Science.gov

Sample records for environmental masking noise

  1. Development of computer program ENMASK for prediction of residual environmental masking-noise spectra, from any three independent environmental parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.-S.; Liebich, R. E.; Chun, K. C.

    2000-03-31

    Residual environmental sound can mask intrusive4 (unwanted) sound. It is a factor that can affect noise impacts and must be considered both in noise-impact studies and in noise-mitigation designs. Models for quantitative prediction of sensation level (audibility) and psychological effects of intrusive noise require an input with 1/3 octave-band spectral resolution of environmental masking noise. However, the majority of published residual environmental masking-noise data are given with either octave-band frequency resolution or only single A-weighted decibel values. A model has been developed that enables estimation of 1/3 octave-band residual environmental masking-noise spectra and relates certain environmental parameters to A-weighted sound level. This model provides a correlation among three environmental conditions: measured residual A-weighted sound-pressure level, proximity to a major roadway, and population density. Cited field-study data were used to compute the most probable 1/3 octave-band sound-pressure spectrum corresponding to any selected one of these three inputs. In turn, such spectra can be used as an input to models for prediction of noise impacts. This paper discusses specific algorithms included in the newly developed computer program ENMASK. In addition, the relative audibility of the environmental masking-noise spectra at different A-weighted sound levels is discussed, which is determined by using the methodology of program ENAUDIBL.

  2. Masking Experiments in Humans and Birds Using Anthropogenic Noises.

    PubMed

    Dooling, Robert J; Blumenrath, Sandra H

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the masking of pure tones by anthropogenic noises in humans and birds. Bird experiments were conducted in the laboratory using operant conditioning and psychophysical procedures but with anthropogenic noises rather than white noise. Humans were tested using equivalent psychophysical procedures in the field with ambient background noise. Results show that for both humans and birds published critical ratios can be used to predict the masking thresholds for pure tones by these complex noises. Thus, the species' critical ratio can be used to estimate the effect of anthropogenic environmental noises on the perception of communication and other biologically relevant sounds. PMID:26610965

  3. Environmental Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumberg, Martin

    Environmental noise may be defined as unwanted sound that is caused by emissions from traffic (roads, air traffic corridors, and railways), industrial sites and recreational infrastructures, which may cause both annoyance and damage to health. Noise in the environment or community seriously affects people, interfering with daily activities at school, work and home and during leisure time.

  4. Does Masking Matter? Shipping Noise and Fish Vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Neenan, Sarah T V; Piper, Rayner; White, Paul R; Kemp, Paul; Leighton, Timothy G; Shaw, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Shipping creates large near-field background noises at levels similar to or higher than fish vocalizations and in the same critical bandwidths. This noise has the potential to "mask" biologically important signals and prevent fish from hearing them; any interference with the detection and recognition of sounds may impact fish survival. The Lombard effect, whereby vocalizations are altered to reduce or exclude masking effects, is an adaptation that has been observed in mammals and birds. Research is needed to establish whether the Lombard effect occurs in fish to gain a better understanding of the implications of noise pollution on fish populations. PMID:26611028

  5. Propagation of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions for environmental noise pollution lie in systematic study of many basic processes such as reflection, scattering, and spreading. Noise propagation processes should be identified in different situations and assessed for their relative importance. (PS)

  6. Impact of mask line edge roughness and statistical noise on next generation mask making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung Gook; Choi, Jin; Lee, Sang Hee; Jeon, Chan Uk

    2012-06-01

    As extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) moves toward high volume manufacturing and pushes to increasingly smaller critical dimensions, achieving the stringent requirements for line edge roughness (LER) is increasingly challenging. For the 22 nm half-pitch node and beyond, the International Roadmap for Semiconductors requires less than 1.6 nm of line width roughness (LWR) on the wafer. The major contributor of this tight LWR is wafer resist LER and mask LER. However, in current ITRS, there is no guideline for mask LER. While significant progress has been made to reduce the resist of the LER on the wafer, it is not yet clear how much the mask LER should be improved for a 22 nm half-pitch node application. Additionally, there are various approaches to obtaining a smaller LER on the mask. It could be improved either by reducing well-known statistical noise or manipulating some process condition or material. Both approaches are effective in improving the LER, however, they shows a different result in mask CD uniformity itself. In this paper, in addition to setting the criteria of the mask LER, we will discuss how tight the mask LER is required to be and what kind of approach is desirable with regards to the LER and CD uniformity. Finally, an analysis of the LER and CD variation provides some insights into the impact of the next generation mask infrastructure.

  7. Spatial release from masking with noise-vocoded speech

    PubMed Central

    Freyman, Richard L.; Balakrishnan, Uma; Helfer, Karen S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated how confusability between target and masking utterances affects the masking release achieved through spatial separation. Important distinguishing characteristics between competing voices were removed by processing speech with six-channel envelope vocoding, which simulates some aspects of listening with a cochlear implant. In the first experiment, vocoded target nonsense sentences were presented against two-talker vocoded maskers in conditions that provide different spatial impressions but not reliable cues that lead to traditional release from masking. Surprisingly, no benefit of spatial separation was found. The absence of spatial release was hypothesized to be the result of the highly positive target-to-masker ratios necessary to understand vocoded speech, which may have been sufficient to reduce confusability. In experiment 2, words excised from the vocoded nonsense sentences were presented against the same vocoded two-talker masker in a four-alternative forced-choice detection paradigm where threshold performance was achieved at negative target-to-masker ratios. Here, the spatial release from masking was more than 20 dB. The results suggest the importance of signal-to-noise ratio in the observation of “informational” masking and indicate that careful attention should be paid to this type of masking as implant processing improves and listeners begin to achieve success in poorer listening environments. PMID:19045654

  8. Noise masking of S-cone increments and decrements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanhong; Richters, David P.; Eskew, Rhea T.

    2014-01-01

    S-cone increment and decrement detection thresholds were measured in the presence of bipolar, dynamic noise masks. Noise chromaticities were the L-, M-, and S-cone directions, as well as L−M, L+M, and achromatic (L+M+S) directions. Noise contrast power was varied to measure threshold Energy versus Noise (EvN) functions. S+ and S− thresholds were similarly, and weakly, raised by achromatic noise. However, S+ thresholds were much more elevated by S, L+M, L–M, L- and M-cone noises than were S− thresholds, even though the noises consisted of two symmetric chromatic polarities of equal contrast power. A linear cone combination model accounts for the overall pattern of masking of a single test polarity well. L and M cones have opposite signs in their effects upon raising S+ and S− thresholds. The results strongly indicate that the psychophysical mechanisms responsible for S+ and S− detection, presumably based on S-ON and S-OFF pathways, are distinct, unipolar mechanisms, and that they have different spatiotemporal sampling characteristics, or contrast gains, or both. PMID:25391300

  9. Noise masking of S-cone increments and decrements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanhong; Richters, David P; Eskew, Rhea T

    2014-01-01

    S-cone increment and decrement detection thresholds were measured in the presence of bipolar, dynamic noise masks. Noise chromaticities were the L-, M-, and S-cone directions, as well as L-M, L+M, and achromatic (L+M+S) directions. Noise contrast power was varied to measure threshold Energy versus Noise (EvN) functions. S+ and S- thresholds were similarly, and weakly, raised by achromatic noise. However, S+ thresholds were much more elevated by S, L+M, L-M, L- and M-cone noises than were S- thresholds, even though the noises consisted of two symmetric chromatic polarities of equal contrast power. A linear cone combination model accounts for the overall pattern of masking of a single test polarity well. L and M cones have opposite signs in their effects upon raising S+ and S- thresholds. The results strongly indicate that the psychophysical mechanisms responsible for S+ and S- detection, presumably based on S-ON and S-OFF pathways, are distinct, unipolar mechanisms, and that they have different spatiotemporal sampling characteristics, or contrast gains, or both. PMID:25391300

  10. Control of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Paul

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the physical properties, sources, physiological effects, and legislation pertaining to noise, especially noise characteristics in the community. Indicates that noise reduction steps can be taken more intelligently after determination of the true noise sources and paths. (CC)

  11. What Do Contrast Threshold Equivalent Noise Studies Actually Measure? Noise vs. Nonlinearity in Different Masking Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Alex S.; Baker, Daniel H.; Hess, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The internal noise present in a linear system can be quantified by the equivalent noise method. By measuring the effect that applying external noise to the system’s input has on its output one can estimate the variance of this internal noise. By applying this simple “linear amplifier” model to the human visual system, one can entirely explain an observer’s detection performance by a combination of the internal noise variance and their efficiency relative to an ideal observer. Studies using this method rely on two crucial factors: firstly that the external noise in their stimuli behaves like the visual system’s internal noise in the dimension of interest, and secondly that the assumptions underlying their model are correct (e.g. linearity). Here we explore the effects of these two factors while applying the equivalent noise method to investigate the contrast sensitivity function (CSF). We compare the results at 0.5 and 6 c/deg from the equivalent noise method against those we would expect based on pedestal masking data collected from the same observers. We find that the loss of sensitivity with increasing spatial frequency results from changes in the saturation constant of the gain control nonlinearity, and that this only masquerades as a change in internal noise under the equivalent noise method. Part of the effect we find can be attributed to the optical transfer function of the eye. The remainder can be explained by either changes in effective input gain, divisive suppression, or a combination of the two. Given these effects the efficiency of our observers approaches the ideal level. We show the importance of considering these factors in equivalent noise studies. PMID:26953796

  12. Hearing Mechanisms and Noise Metrics Related to Auditory Masking in Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Branstetter, Brian K; Bakhtiari, Kimberly L; Trickey, Jennifer S; Finneran, James J

    2016-01-01

    Odontocete cetaceans are acoustic specialists that depend on sound to hunt, forage, navigate, detect predators, and communicate. Auditory masking from natural and anthropogenic sound sources may adversely affect these fitness-related capabilities. The ability to detect a tone in a broad range of natural, anthropogenic, and synthesized noise was tested with bottlenose dolphins using a psychophysical, band-widening procedure. Diverging masking patterns were found for noise bandwidths greater than the width of an auditory filter. Despite different noise types having equal-pressure spectral-density levels (95 dB re 1 μPa(2)/Hz), masked detection threshold differences were as large as 22 dB. Consecutive experiments indicated that noise types with increased levels of amplitude modulation resulted in comodulation masking release due to within-channel and across-channel auditory mechanisms. The degree to which noise types were comodulated (comodulation index) was assessed by calculating the magnitude-squared coherence between the temporal envelope from an auditory filter centered on the signal and temporal envelopes from flanking filters. Statistical models indicate that masked thresholds in a variety of noise types, at a variety of levels, can be explained with metrics related to the comodulation index in addition to the pressure spectral-density level of noise. This study suggests that predicting auditory masking from ocean noise sources depends on both spectral and temporal properties of the noise. PMID:26610950

  13. Vowel perception by noise masked normal-hearing young adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richie, Carolyn; Kewley-Port, Diane; Coughlin, Maureen

    2005-08-01

    This study examined vowel perception by young normal-hearing (YNH) adults, in various listening conditions designed to simulate mild-to-moderate sloping sensorineural hearing loss. YNH listeners were individually age- and gender-matched to young hearing-impaired (YHI) listeners tested in a previous study [Richie et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 2923-2933 (2003)]. YNH listeners were tested in three conditions designed to create equal audibility with the YHI listeners; a low signal level with and without a simulated hearing loss, and a high signal level with a simulated hearing loss. Listeners discriminated changes in synthetic vowel tokens /smcapi e ɛ invv æ/ when F1 or F2 varied in frequency. Comparison of YNH with YHI results failed to reveal significant differences between groups in terms of performance on vowel discrimination, in conditions of similar audibility by using both noise masking to elevate the hearing thresholds of the YNH and applying frequency-specific gain to the YHI listeners. Further, analysis of learning curves suggests that while the YHI listeners completed an average of 46% more test blocks than YNH listeners, the YHI achieved a level of discrimination similar to that of the YNH within the same number of blocks. Apparently, when age and gender are closely matched between young hearing-impaired and normal-hearing adults, performance on vowel tasks may be explained by audibility alone.

  14. Temporal phase mask encrypted optical steganography carried by amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ben; Wang, Zhenxing; Shastri, Bhavin J; Chang, Matthew P; Frost, Nicholas A; Prucnal, Paul R

    2014-01-13

    A temporal phase mask encryption method is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to improve the security of the stealth channel in an optical steganography system. The stealth channel is protected in two levels. In the first level, the data is carried by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise, which cannot be detected in either the time domain or spectral domain. In the second level, even if the eavesdropper suspects the existence of the stealth channel, each data bit is covered by a fast changing phase mask. The phase mask code is always combined with the wide band noise from ASE. Without knowing the right phase mask code to recover the stealth data, the eavesdropper can only receive the noise like signal with randomized phase. PMID:24515055

  15. The masking of beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) vocalizations by icebreaker noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbe, Christine

    1998-11-01

    This thesis examines the masking effect of underwater noise on beluga whale communication. As ocean water is greatly opaque for light but well conducting for sound, marine mammals rely primarily on their hearing for orientation and communication. Man-made underwater noise has the potential of interfering with sounds used by marine mammals. Masking to the point of incomprehensibility can have fatal results-for the individual, but ultimately for the entire species. As part of our understanding of whether marine mammals can cope with human impact on nature, this thesis is the first to study the interference of real ocean noises with complex animal vocalizations. At the Vancouver Aquarium, a beluga whale was trained for acoustic experiments, during which masked hearing thresholds were measured. Focus lay on noise created by icebreaking ships in the Arctic. As experiments with trained animals are time and cost expensive, various techniques were examined for their ability to model the whale's response. These were human hearing tests, visual spectrogram discrimination, matched filtering, spectrogram cross-correlation, critical band cross-correlation, adaptive filtering and various types of artificial neural networks. The most efficient method with respect to similarity to the whale's data and speed, was a backpropagation neural net. Masked hearing thresholds would be of little use if they could not be related to accessible quantities in the wild. An ocean sound propagation model was applied to determine critical distances between a noise source, a calling whale and a listening whale. Colour diagrams, called maskograms, were invented to illustrate zones of masking in the wild. Results are that bubbler system noise with a source level of 194 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m has a maximum radius of masking of 15 km in a 3- dimensional ocean. Propeller noise with a source level of 203 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m has a maximum radius of masking of 22 km. A naturally occurring icecracking event

  16. Masked threshold for noise bands masked by narrower bands of noise: Effects of masker bandwidth and center frequency.

    PubMed

    Taghipour, Armin; Moore, Brian C J; Edler, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines how masked thresholds depend on the masker bandwidth and center frequency when the masker has a smaller bandwidth than the signal. The signal bandwidth was equal to the equivalent rectangular bandwidth of the auditory filter and the masker bandwidth was 0.1, 0.35, or 0.6 times the signal bandwidth. The masker and signal were centered at the same frequency of 257, 697, 1538, 3142, or 6930 Hz. Masked thresholds were estimated using a two-interval two-alternative forced-choice paradigm and a three-down one-up adaptive staircase method. Masked thresholds increased with increasing masker bandwidth and were lowest for medium center frequencies. PMID:27250136

  17. Masking of spondees by interrupted noise in hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Punch, J L

    1978-01-01

    The effects of changing the duty cycle of an interrupted-broad band masker on the spondee thresholds of hearing-impaired subjects were explored. Two diagnostic groups of sensorineural hearing loss, presbycusics and cochlear otosclerotics, were investigated. The interruption rate of the masker was 10/sec, and its duty cycle was varied at 25% intervals. Thresholds also were obtained in continuous noise and in quiet. Results when compared with earlier data from normal listeners revealed that subjects with sensorineural impairment exhibited poorer performance in all instances, including the continuous noise condition, when mean masker levels were adjusted to comparable sound pressure levels. The overall pattern of masking was more similar for the normal and hearing-impaired groups when performance was equated in terms of the mean threshold shift each group experienced in continuous noise. Even under these circumstances, however, hearing-impaired subjects demostrated notably greater residual masking under the 25 and 50% noise-on conditions. A major determinant of speech reception in fluctuating noise backgrounds is the dependence of the pattern of masking upon the difference between an individual's masked threshold in continuous noise and his threshold in quiet, rather than upon the sound pressure level of the masker. PMID:681196

  18. Spectral resolution of monkey primary auditory cortex (A1) revealed with two-noise masking.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Yonatan I; Steinschneider, Mitchell

    2006-09-01

    An important function of the auditory nervous system is to analyze the frequency content of environmental sounds. The neural structures involved in determining psychophysical frequency resolution remain unclear. Using a two-noise masking paradigm, the present study investigates the spectral resolution of neural populations in primary auditory cortex (A1) of awake macaques and the degree to which it matches psychophysical frequency resolution. Neural ensemble responses (auditory evoked potentials, multiunit activity, and current source density) evoked by a pulsed 60-dB SPL pure-tone signal fixed at the best frequency (BF) of the recorded neural populations were examined as a function of the frequency separation (DeltaF) between the tone and two symmetrically flanking continuous 80-dB SPL, 50-Hz-wide bands of noise. DeltaFs ranged from 0 to 50% of the BF, encompassing the range typically examined in psychoacoustic experiments. Responses to the signal were minimal for DeltaF = 0% and progressively increased with DeltaF, reaching a maximum at DeltaF = 50%. Rounded exponential functions, used to model auditory filter shapes in psychoacoustic studies of frequency resolution, provided excellent fits to neural masking functions. Goodness-of-fit was greatest for response components in lamina 4 and lower lamina 3 and least for components recorded in more superficial cortical laminae. Physiological equivalent rectangular bandwidths (ERBs) increased with BF, measuring nearly 15% of the BF. These findings parallel results of psychoacoustic studies in both monkeys and humans, and thus indicate that a representation of perceptual frequency resolution is available at the level of A1. PMID:16738218

  19. Subjective and objective rating of spectrally different pseudorandom noises--implications for speech masking design.

    PubMed

    Hongisto, Valtteri; Oliva, David; Rekola, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Artificial sound masking is increasingly used in open-plan offices to improve speech privacy and to reduce distraction caused by speech sounds. Most of the masking sounds are based on pseudorandom continuous noise filtered to a specific spectrum that should be optimized in respect with speech masking efficiency and comfort. The aim of this study was to increase basic understanding regarding the comfort. The second aim was to determine how well objective rating methods (15 different noise indices) predict the subjective ratings. Twenty-three subjects rated the loudness, disturbance, pleasantness, and six other subjective measures of 11 spectrally different noises in laboratory conditions. Speech was not present during the experiment. All sounds were presented at 42 dB LAeq within 50-10,000 Hz. Unexpectedly, the subjects were most satisfied with sounds having emphasis on low frequencies. A sound having a slope of -7 dB per octave increment resulted in the highest satisfaction. Changes in subjective ratings were reasonably well predicted by five noise indices, while many well-known noise indices frequently used in building design underperformed in this task. The results are expected to benefit in the design of masking sounds and other appliances. PMID:25786947

  20. Feedforward and Feedback Control in Apraxia of Speech: Effects of Noise Masking on Vowel Production

    PubMed Central

    Mailend, Marja-Liisa; Guenther, Frank H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to test two hypotheses about apraxia of speech (AOS) derived from the Directions Into Velocities of Articulators (DIVA) model (Guenther et al., 2006): the feedforward system deficit hypothesis and the feedback system deficit hypothesis. Method The authors used noise masking to minimize auditory feedback during speech. Six speakers with AOS and aphasia, 4 with aphasia without AOS, and 2 groups of speakers without impairment (younger and older adults) participated. Acoustic measures of vowel contrast, variability, and duration were analyzed. Results Younger, but not older, speakers without impairment showed significantly reduced vowel contrast with noise masking. Relative to older controls, the AOS group showed longer vowel durations overall (regardless of masking condition) and a greater reduction in vowel contrast under masking conditions. There were no significant differences in variability. Three of the 6 speakers with AOS demonstrated the group pattern. Speakers with aphasia without AOS did not differ from controls in contrast, duration, or variability. Conclusion The greater reduction in vowel contrast with masking noise for the AOS group is consistent with the feedforward system deficit hypothesis but not with the feedback system deficit hypothesis; however, effects were small and not present in all individual speakers with AOS. Theoretical implications and alternative interpretations of these findings are discussed. PMID:25565143

  1. The perception of rhythm and word boundaries in noise-masked speech.

    PubMed

    Smith, M R; Cutler, A; Butterfield, S; Nimmo-Smith, I

    1989-12-01

    The present experiment tested the suggestion that human listeners may exploit durational information in speech to parse continuous utterances into words. Listeners were presented with six-syllable unpredictable utterances under noise-masking, and were required to judge between alternative word strings as to which best matched the rhythm of the masked utterances. For each utterance there were four alternative strings: (a) an exact rhythmic and word boundary match, (b) a rhythmic mismatch, and (c) two utterances with the same rhythm as the masked utterance, but different word boundary locations. Listeners were clearly able to perceive the rhythm of the masked utterances: The rhythmic mismatch was chosen significantly less often than any other alternative. Within the three rhythmically matched alternatives, the exact match was chosen significantly more often than either word boundary mismatch. Thus, listeners both perceived speech rhythm and used durational cues effectively to locate the position of word boundaries. PMID:2601320

  2. Effects of Masking Noise on Laryngeal Resistance for Breathy, Normal, and Pressed Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grillo, Elizabeth U.; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini; Lee, Timothy D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of masking noise on laryngeal resistance for breathy, normal, and pressed voice in vocally trained women. Method: Eighteen vocally trained women produced breathy, normal, and pressed voice across 7 fundamental frequencies during a repeated CV utterance of /pi/ under normal and…

  3. Feedforward and Feedback Control in Apraxia of Speech: Effects of Noise Masking on Vowel Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Edwin; Mailend, Marja-Liisa; Guenther, Frank H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to test two hypotheses about apraxia of speech (AOS) derived from the Directions Into Velocities of Articulators (DIVA) model (Guenther et al., 2006): the feedforward system deficit hypothesis and the feedback system deficit hypothesis. Method: The authors used noise masking to minimize auditory feedback during…

  4. Assessment of the masking effects of birdsong on the road traffic noise environment.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yiying; Kang, Jian; Wörtche, Heinrich

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to explore how the soundscape quality of traffic noise environments can be improved by the masking effects of birdsong in terms of four soundscape characteristics, i.e., perceived loudness, naturalness, annoyance and pleasantness. Four factors that may influence the masking effects of birdsong (i.e., distance of the receiver from a sound source, loudness of masker, occurrence frequencies of masker, and visibility of sound sources) were examined by listening tests. The results show that the masking effects are more significant in the road traffic noise environments with lower sound levels (e.g., <52.5 dBA), or of distance from traffic (e.g., >19 m). Adding birdsong can indeed increase the naturalness and pleasantness of the traffic noise environment at different distances of the receiver from a road. Naturalness, annoyance, and pleasantness, but not perceived loudness, can be altered by increasing the birdsong loudness (i.e., from 37.5 to 52.5 dBA in this study). The pleasantness of traffic noise environments increases significantly from 2.7 to 6.7, when the occurrence of birdsong over a period of 30 s is increased from 2 to 6 times. The visibility of the sound source also influences the masking effects, but its effect is not as significant as the effects of the three other factors. PMID:27586730

  5. The Effects of Noise Masking and Required Accuracy on Speech Errors, Disfluencies, and Self-Repairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postma, Albert; Kolk, Herman

    1992-01-01

    This study, involving 32 adult speakers of Dutch, strengthens the covert repair hypothesis of disfluency. It found that emphasis on speech accuracy causes lower speech error rates but does not affect disfluency and self-repair rates, noise masking reduces disfluency and self-repair rates but does not affect speech error numbers, and internal…

  6. Environmental Noise: An Undergraduate Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahajan, Sukhbir; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate project of measuring environmental noise. Includes a discussion of current methodologies used in environmental noise assessment and the usefulness of projects which involve the physics profession with local governmental agencies and the community. (SL)

  7. Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

    PubMed

    Thode, Aaron M; Kim, Katherine H; Norman, Robert G; Blackwell, Susanna B; Greene, Charles R

    2016-04-01

    Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1 km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15 dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones. PMID:27106345

  8. Improvement of intelligibility of ideal binary-masked noisy speech by adding background noise.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shuyang; Li, Liang; Wu, Xihong

    2011-04-01

    When a target-speech/masker mixture is processed with the signal-separation technique, ideal binary mask (IBM), intelligibility of target speech is remarkably improved in both normal-hearing listeners and hearing-impaired listeners. Intelligibility of speech can also be improved by filling in speech gaps with un-modulated broadband noise. This study investigated whether intelligibility of target speech in the IBM-treated target-speech/masker mixture can be further improved by adding a broadband-noise background. The results of this study show that following the IBM manipulation, which remarkably released target speech from speech-spectrum noise, foreign-speech, or native-speech masking (experiment 1), adding a broadband-noise background with the signal-to-noise ratio no less than 4 dB significantly improved intelligibility of target speech when the masker was either noise (experiment 2) or speech (experiment 3). The results suggest that since adding the noise background shallows the areas of silence in the time-frequency domain of the IBM-treated target-speech/masker mixture, the abruption of transient changes in the mixture is smoothed and the perceived continuity of target-speech components becomes enhanced, leading to improved target-speech intelligibility. The findings are useful for advancing computational auditory scene analysis, hearing-aid/cochlear-implant designs, and understanding of speech perception under "cocktail-party" conditions. PMID:21476677

  9. Simulated masking of right whale sounds by shipping noise: incorporating a model of the auditory periphery.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Kane A; Mountain, David C

    2014-03-01

    Many species of large, mysticete whales are known to produce low-frequency communication sounds. These low-frequency sounds are susceptible to communication masking by shipping noise, which also tends to be low frequency in nature. The size of these species makes behavioral assessment of auditory capabilities in controlled, captive environments nearly impossible, and field-based playback experiments are expensive and necessarily limited in scope. Hence, it is desirable to produce a masking model for these species that can aid in determining the potential effects of shipping and other anthropogenic noises on these protected animals. The aim of this study was to build a model that combines a sophisticated representation of the auditory periphery with a spectrogram-based decision stage to predict masking levels. The output of this model can then be combined with a habitat-appropriate propagation model to calculate the potential effects of noise on communication range. For this study, the model was tested on three common North Atlantic right whale communication sounds, both to demonstrate the method and to probe how shipping noise affects the detection of sounds with varying spectral and temporal characteristics. PMID:24606298

  10. Masking and scrambling in the auditory thalamus of awake rats by Gaussian and modulated noises.

    PubMed

    Martin, Eugene M; West, Morris F; Bedenbaugh, Purvis H

    2004-10-12

    This paper provides a look at how modulated broad-band noises modulate the thalamic response evoked by brief probe sounds in the awake animal. We demonstrate that noise not only attenuates the response to probe sounds (masking) but also changes the temporal response pattern (scrambling). Two brief probe sounds, a Gaussian noise burst and a brief sinusoidal tone, were presented in silence and in three ongoing noises. The three noises were targeted at activating the auditory system in qualitatively distinct ways. Dynamic ripple noise, containing many random tone-like elements, is targeted at those parts of the auditory system that respond well to tones. International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology noise, comprised of the sum of several simultaneous streams of Schroeder-phase speech, is targeted at those parts of the auditory system that respond well to modulated sounds but lack a well defined response to tones. Gaussian noise is targeted at those parts of the auditory system that respond to acoustic energy regardless of modulation. All noises both attenuated and decreased the precise temporal repeatability of the onset response to probe sounds. In addition, the modulated noises induced context-specific changes in the temporal pattern of the response to probe sounds. Scrambling of the temporal response pattern may be a direct neural correlate of the unfortunate experience of being able to hear, but not understand, speech sounds in noisy environments. PMID:15452349

  11. Reducing environmental noise impacts: A USAREUR noise management program handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feather, Timothy D.; Shekell, Ted K.

    1991-06-01

    Noise pollution is a major environmental problem faced by the U.S. Army in Europe. Noise-related complaints from German citizens can escalate into intense political issues in German communities. This in turn hampers efficient operation of military training and often times threatens the Army's mission. In order to remedy these problems, USAREUR has developed a noise management program. A successful noise management program will limit the impact of unavoidable noise on the populace. This report, a component of the noise management program, is a reference document for noise management planning. It contains guidelines and rules-of-thumb for noise management. This document contains procedures which operation and training level personnel can understand and apply in their day to day noise management planning. Noise mitigation tips are given. Basic technical information that will aid in understanding noise mitigation is provided along with noise management through land use planning. Noise management for specific components of the military community, (airfields, base operations, training areas, and housing and recreation areas) are addressed. The nature of noise generated, means of noise abatement at the source, path, and receiver (both physical and organizational/public relations methods), and a case study example are described.

  12. JAPE 91: Influence of terrain masking of the acoustic propagation of helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naz, P.

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic propagation in the case of a noise source masked by a small element of terrain has been investigated experimentally. These data have been measured during the 'terrain masking' experiment of the NATO JAPE 91 experimental campaign. The main objective of that experiment was to study the acoustic detection of a helicopter masked by a small hill. Microphones have been placed at different locations on the shadow zone of the hill to study the effect of the terrain obstruction on sound propagation. The results presented come from data measured by Atlas Elektronik and by ISL, and have been processed together. The terrain obstruction causes an excess attenuation of the SPL (Sound Pressure Level) for all the frequencies, but this attenuation is more effective for the high frequencies than for the low frequencies. Results typical of diffraction phenomena have been observed; the SPL is minimal at the foot of the hill and is relatively constant beyond it.

  13. Maintaining acoustic communication at a cocktail party: heterospecific masking noise improves signal detection through frequency separation

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, M. E.; Römer, H.; Hartbauer, M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We examined acoustic masking in a chirping katydid species of the Mecopoda elongata complex due to interference with a sympatric Mecopoda species where males produce continuous trills at high amplitudes. Frequency spectra of both calling songs range from 1 to 80 kHz; the chirper species has more energy in a narrow frequency band at 2 kHz and above 40 kHz. Behaviourally, chirper males successfully phase-locked their chirps to playbacks of conspecific chirps under masking conditions at signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of −8 dB. After the 2 kHz band in the chirp had been equalised to the level in the masking trill, the breakdown of phase-locked synchrony occurred at a SNR of +7 dB. The remarkable receiver performance is partially mirrored in the selective response of a first-order auditory interneuron (TN1) to conspecific chirps under these masking conditions. However, the selective response is only maintained for a stimulus including the 2 kHz component, although this frequency band has no influence on the unmasked TN1 response. Remarkably, the addition of masking noise at 65 dB sound pressure level (SPL) to threshold response levels of TN1 for pure tones of 2 kHz enhanced the sensitivity of the response by 10 dB. Thus, the spectral dissimilarity between masker and signal at a rather low frequency appears to be of crucial importance for the ability of the chirping species to communicate under strong masking by the trilling species. We discuss the possible properties underlying the cellular/synaptic mechanisms of the ‘novelty detector’. PMID:24307713

  14. The role of binary mask patterns in automatic speech recognition in background noise

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Arun; Wang, DeLiang

    2013-01-01

    Processing noisy signals using the ideal binary mask improves automatic speech recognition (ASR) performance. This paper presents the first study that investigates the role of binary mask patterns in ASR under various noises, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and vocabulary sizes. Binary masks are computed either by comparing the SNR within a time-frequency unit of a mixture signal with a local criterion (LC), or by comparing the local target energy with the long-term average spectral energy of speech. ASR results show that (1) akin to human speech recognition, binary masking significantly improves ASR performance even when the SNR is as low as −60 dB; (2) the ASR performance profiles are qualitatively similar to those obtained in human intelligibility experiments; (3) the difference between the LC and mixture SNR is more correlated to the recognition accuracy than LC; (4) LC at which the performance peaks is lower than 0 dB, which is the threshold that maximizes the SNR gain of processed signals. This broad agreement with human performance is rather surprising. The results also indicate that maximizing the SNR gain is probably not an appropriate goal for improving either human or machine recognition of noisy speech. PMID:23654411

  15. Dip listening or modulation masking? Call recognition by green treefrogs (Hyla cinerea) in temporally fluctuating noise.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Alejandro; Höbel, Gerlinde; Gordon, Noah M; Bee, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    Despite the importance of perceptually separating signals from background noise, we still know little about how nonhuman animals solve this problem. Dip listening, an ability to catch meaningful 'acoustic glimpses' of a target signal when fluctuating background noise levels momentarily drop, constitutes one possible solution. Amplitude-modulated noises, however, can sometimes impair signal recognition through a process known as modulation masking. We asked whether fluctuating noise simulating a breeding chorus affects the ability of female green treefrogs (Hyla cinerea) to recognize male advertisement calls. Our analysis of recordings of the sounds of green treefrog choruses reveal that their levels fluctuate primarily at rates below 10 Hz. In laboratory phonotaxis tests, we found no evidence for dip listening or modulation masking. Mean signal recognition thresholds in the presence of fluctuating chorus-like noises were never statistically different from those in the presence of a non-fluctuating control. An analysis of statistical effects sizes indicates that masker fluctuation rates, and the presence versus absence of fluctuations, had negligible effects on subject behavior. Together, our results suggest that females listening in natural settings should receive no benefits, nor experience any additional constraints, as a result of level fluctuations in the soundscape of green treefrog choruses. PMID:23069882

  16. Hearing Sensitivity to Shifts of Rippled-Spectrum Sound Signals in Masking Noise

    PubMed Central

    Nechaev, Dmitry I.; Milekhina, Olga N.; Supin, Alexander Ya.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to enlarge knowledge of discrimination of complex sound signals by the auditory system in masking noise. For that, influence of masking noise on detection of shift of rippled spectrum was studied in normal listeners. The signal was a shift of ripple phase within a 0.5-oct wide rippled spectrum centered at 2 kHz. The ripples were frequency-proportional (throughout the band, ripple spacing was a constant proportion of the ripple center frequency). Simultaneous masker was a 0.5-oct noise below-, on-, or above the signal band. Both the low-frequency (center frequency 1 kHz) and on-frequency (the same center frequency as for the signal) maskers increased the thresholds for detecting ripple phase shift. However, the threshold dependence on the masker level was different for these two maskers. For the on-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker/signal ratio: the threshold steeply increased at a ratio of 5 dB, and no shift was detectable at a ratio of 10 dB. For the low-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker level: the threshold increased at a masker level of 80 dB SPL, and no shift was detectable at a masker level of 90 dB (for a signal level of 50 dB) or 100 dB (for a signal level of 80 dB). The high-frequency masker had little effect. The data were successfully simulated using an excitation-pattern model. In this model, the effect of the on-frequency masker appeared to be primarily due to a decrease of ripple depth. The effect of the low-frequency masker appeared due to widening of the auditory filters at high sound levels. PMID:26462066

  17. Hearing Sensitivity to Shifts of Rippled-Spectrum Sound Signals in Masking Noise.

    PubMed

    Nechaev, Dmitry I; Milekhina, Olga N; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to enlarge knowledge of discrimination of complex sound signals by the auditory system in masking noise. For that, influence of masking noise on detection of shift of rippled spectrum was studied in normal listeners. The signal was a shift of ripple phase within a 0.5-oct wide rippled spectrum centered at 2 kHz. The ripples were frequency-proportional (throughout the band, ripple spacing was a constant proportion of the ripple center frequency). Simultaneous masker was a 0.5-oct noise below-, on-, or above the signal band. Both the low-frequency (center frequency 1 kHz) and on-frequency (the same center frequency as for the signal) maskers increased the thresholds for detecting ripple phase shift. However, the threshold dependence on the masker level was different for these two maskers. For the on-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker/signal ratio: the threshold steeply increased at a ratio of 5 dB, and no shift was detectable at a ratio of 10 dB. For the low-frequency masker, the masking effect primarily depended on the masker level: the threshold increased at a masker level of 80 dB SPL, and no shift was detectable at a masker level of 90 dB (for a signal level of 50 dB) or 100 dB (for a signal level of 80 dB). The high-frequency masker had little effect. The data were successfully simulated using an excitation-pattern model. In this model, the effect of the on-frequency masker appeared to be primarily due to a decrease of ripple depth. The effect of the low-frequency masker appeared due to widening of the auditory filters at high sound levels. PMID:26462066

  18. Noise: a forgotten environmental problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kloos, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    Highway traffic noise is a serious problem for communities. The traffic noise can be lessened by source controls. The impact of the noise can be mitigated with barriers built along heavily traveled roads. However, the most promising long-range solution is noise compatible land use planning at the local level. Low cost methods are available to prevent noise problems from ever occuring. The Federal Highway Administration is attempting to encourage local officials to use these methods.

  19. A Mask-Free Passivation Process for Low Noise Nanopore Devices.

    PubMed

    Lim, Min-Cheol; Lee, Min-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Bum; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Kim, Young-Rok

    2015-08-01

    Solid-state nanopores have been studied widely for the label-free analysis of single biomolecules. The translocation of charged biomolecules through a solid-state nanopore is driven by the applied voltage across a thin membrane. The ionic current changes in response to the translocation of DNA through the nanopore. Solid-state nanopores have many advantages over biological nanopores, such as α-hemolysin and MspA, but the high DNA translocation velocity and the inherent noise in solid-state nanopores have hindered its applications to more precise measurements, such as DNA sequencing. This paper reports a simple and reproducible way of passivating the surface of a nanopore device using an insulating layer, photodefinable PDMS (P-PDMS), to reduce noise and enhance the accuracy of the electrical measurements. This new approach does not require a separate photo-mask or sophisticated micro-alignment equipment to pattern the insulating layer. The pit structure on the back side of the support chip serves as a mask, enabling mask-free photolithography, and the insulating layer only on top of the free-standing silicon nitride membrane can be irradiated selectively by UV and removed by subsequent development in toluene. The resulting nanopore device with a small free standing silicon nitride membrane surrounded by a thick insulating layer showed improved noise characteristics. The root-mean-square noise of the ionic current was reduced to 3.8 pA from 90.8 pA by the formation of a micron-thick insulating layer. The overall performance of the nanopores with an insulating layer was improved significantly when tested with the double-stranded DNA (λ-DNA). PMID:26369183

  20. Recovery from prior stimulation: Masking of speech by interrupted noise for younger and older adults with normal hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubno, Judy R.; Horwitz, Amy R.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.

    2003-04-01

    In a previous study [Dubno et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 2897-2907 (2002)], older subjects benefitted less than younger subjects from momentary improvements in signal-to-noise ratio when listening to speech in interrupted maskers. It has been hypothesized that the benefit derived from interrupted maskers may be related to recovery from forward masking, i.e., the recovery of a response to a suprathreshold signal from prior stimulation by a masker. The effect of interrupted maskers on speech recognition may be well suited to test hypotheses regarding recovery from prior stimulation, given that both involve the perception of signals following a masker. Here, younger and older adults with normal but not identical audiograms listened to nonsense syllables at moderate and high levels in a speech-shaped noise that was modulated by a 2-, 10-, 25-, or 50-Hz square wave. An additional low-level noise was always present that was shaped to produce equivalent masked thresholds for all subjects. To assess recovery from forward masking, forward-masked thresholds were measured at 0.5 and 4.0 kHz as a function of the delay between the speech-shaped masker and the signal. Speech recognition in interrupted noise was poorer for older than younger subjects. Small but consistent age-related differences were observed in the decrease in score with interrupted noise relative to the score without interrupted noise. Forward-masked thresholds of older subjects were higher than those of younger subjects, but there were no age-related differences in the amount of forward masking or in simultaneous masking. Negative correlations were observed between speech-recognition scores in interrupted noise and forward-masked thresholds. That is, the benefit derived from momentary improvements in speech audibility in an interrupted noise decreased as forward-masked thresholds increased. Stronger correlations with forward masking were observed for the higher frequency signal, for higher noise

  1. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 2: Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    A randomized sequence of tone bursts was delivered to subjects at short inter-stimulus intervals with the tones originating from one of three spatially and frequency specific channels. The subject's task was to count the tones in one of the three channels at a time, ignoring the other two, and press a button after each tenth tone. In different conditions, tones were given at high and low intensities and with or without a background white noise to mask the tones. The N sub 1 component of the auditory vertex potential was found to be larger in response to attended channel tones in relation to unattended tones. This selective enhancement of N sub 1 was minimal for loud tones presented without noise and increased markedly for the lower tone intensity and in noise added conditions.

  2. How Colored Environmental Noise Affects Population Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenev, Alex; Meerson, Baruch; Shklovskii, Boris

    2008-12-01

    Environmental noise can cause an exponential reduction in the mean time to extinction (MTE) of an isolated population. We study this effect on an example of a stochastic birth-death process with rates modulated by a colored (that is, correlated) Gaussian noise. A path integral formulation yields a transparent way of evaluating the MTE and finding the optimal realization of the environmental noise that determines the most probable path to extinction. The population-size dependence of the MTE changes from exponential in the absence of the environmental noise to a power law for a short-correlated noise and to no dependence for long-correlated noise. We also establish the validity domains of the white-noise limit and adiabatic limit.

  3. Recognition of speech in noise after application of time-frequency masks: Dependence on frequency and threshold parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sinex, Donal G.

    2013-01-01

    Binary time-frequency (TF) masks can be applied to separate speech from noise. Previous studies have shown that with appropriate parameters, ideal TF masks can extract highly intelligible speech even at very low speech-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Two psychophysical experiments provided additional information about the dependence of intelligibility on the frequency resolution and threshold criteria that define the ideal TF mask. Listeners identified AzBio Sentences in noise, before and after application of TF masks. Masks generated with 8 or 16 frequency bands per octave supported nearly-perfect identification. Word recognition accuracy was slightly lower and more variable with 4 bands per octave. When TF masks were generated with a local threshold criterion of 0 dB SNR, the mean speech reception threshold was −9.5 dB SNR, compared to −5.7 dB for unprocessed sentences in noise. Speech reception thresholds decreased by about 1 dB per dB of additional decrease in the local threshold criterion. Information reported here about the dependence of speech intelligibility on frequency and level parameters has relevance for the development of non-ideal TF masks for clinical applications such as speech processing for hearing aids. PMID:23556604

  4. Initial clinical experience of an ultrasonic strain imaging system with novel noise-masking capability.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Freeman, S J; Gee, A H; Housden, R J; Prager, R W; Sinnatamby, R; Treece, G M

    2010-08-01

    Quasistatic strain imaging is a form of elastography that can produce qualitative images of tissue stiffness with only software modifications to conventional ultrasound hardware. Unlike current commercial offerings, the novel strain-imaging system that is the subject of this paper displays regions of signal decorrelation using an overlaid colour mask and can also produce three-dimensional (3D) strain images. In illustrative studies of the breast, testis and thyroid, the colour mask is seen to reduce the potential to misinterpret noise as meaningful stiffness information, and also helps to differentiate cystic and solid lesions. High-quality imaging of the testis in vivo demonstrates that 3D strain imaging is feasible. PMID:20335426

  5. Charting environmental pollution. [by noise measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, E.; Bizo, F.; Karacsonyi, Z.

    1974-01-01

    It is found that areas affected by different noxious agents are within the limits traced for high noise level areas; consequently, it is suggested that high noise pressure levels should be used as the primary indication of environmental pollution. A complex methodology is reported for charting environmental pollution due to physical, chemical and biological noxious agents on the scale of an industrial district.

  6. Speech understanding performance of cochlear implant subjects using time-frequency masking-based noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Obaid ur Rehman; van Dijk, Bas; Moonen, Marc; Wouters, Jan

    2012-05-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) recipients report severe degradation of speech understanding under noisy conditions. Most CI recipients typically can require about 10-25 dB higher signal-to-noise ratio than normal hearing (NH) listeners in order to achieve similar speech understanding performance. In recent years, significant emphasis has been put on binaural algorithms, which not only make use of the head shadow effect, but also have two or more microphone signals at their disposal to generate binaural inputs. Most of the CI recipients today are unilaterally implanted but they can still benefit from the binaural processing utilizing a contralateral microphone. The phase error filtering (PEF) algorithm tries to minimize the phase error variance utilizing a time-frequency mask for noise reduction. Potential improvement in speech intelligibility offered by the algorithm is evaluated with four different kinds of mask functions. The study reveals that the PEF algorithm which uses a contralateral microphone but unilateral presentation provides considerable improvement in intelligibility for both NH and CI subjects. Further, preference rating test suggests that CI subjects can tolerate higher levels of distortions than NH subjects, and therefore, more aggressive noise reduction for CI recipients is possible. PMID:22345522

  7. Effects of environmental noise on sleep.

    PubMed

    Hume, Kenneth I; Brink, Mark; Basner, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings from the past 3 year's research on the effects of environmental noise on sleep and identifies key future research goals. The past 3 years have seen continued interest in both short term effects of noise on sleep (arousals, awakenings), as well as epidemiological studies focusing on long term health impacts of nocturnal noise exposure. This research corroborated findings that noise events induce arousals at relatively low exposure levels, and independent of the noise source (air, road, and rail traffic, neighbors, church bells) and the environment (home, laboratory, hospital). New epidemiological studies support already existing evidence that night-time noise is likely associated with cardiovascular disease and stroke in the elderly. These studies collectively also suggest that nocturnal noise exposure may be more relevant for the genesis of cardiovascular disease than daytime noise exposure. Relative to noise policy, new effect-oriented noise protection concepts, and rating methods based on limiting awakening reactions were introduced. The publications of WHO's ''Night Noise Guidelines for Europe'' and ''Burden of Disease from Environmental Noise'' both stress the importance of nocturnal noise exposure for health and well-being. However, studies demonstrating a causal pathway that directly link noise (at ecological levels) and disturbed sleep with cardiovascular disease and/or other long term health outcomes are still missing. These studies, as well as the quantification of the impact of emerging noise sources (e.g., high speed rail, wind turbines) have been identified as the most relevant issues that should be addressed in the field on the effects of noise on sleep in the near future. PMID:23257581

  8. Environmental noise assessment STS-1 Columbia launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnicki, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    An environmental noise assessement of the initial launch of the Space Transportation System, STS-1 Columbia was conducted. The principal objective of the environmental noise assessment was to measure the noise generated during the initial launch of the space shuttle to ascertain the validity of the levels predicted in the 1979 environmental impact statement. In the 1979 study information obtained for expendable launch vehicles, Titan, Saturn and Atlas was used to predict the noise levels that would be generated by the simultaneous firing of the two solid rocket boosters and the three space shuttle main engines. Fifteen monitoring sites were established in accessable areas located from 4,953 to 23,640 meters from the launch pad. Precision sound level meters were used to capture the peak level during the launch. Data obtained was compared to the predicted levels and were also compared to the identified levels, standards and criteria established by the federal agencies with noise abatement and control responsibilities.

  9. Environmental noise from surface mining operations

    SciTech Connect

    Staiano, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    A sample of five mines were observed as part of a study to determine the magnitude and sources of environmental noise from surface mining operations and to identify noise abatement methods. These mining operations consisted of: a Minnesota iron ore mine, Midwestern and Appalachian coal mines, a Missouri clay pit operation, and a Texas limestone quarry. These operations are typical of Eastern and Midwestern mining activities. This paper highlights the findings of the noise measurement portion of that study.

  10. The effects of noise masking and required accuracy on speech errors, disfluencies, and self-repairs.

    PubMed

    Postma, A; Kolk, H

    1992-06-01

    The covert repair hypothesis views disfluencies as by-products of covert self-repairs applied to internal speech errors. To test this hypothesis we examined effects of noise masking and accuracy emphasis on speech error, disfluency, and self-repair rates. Noise reduced the numbers of disfluencies and self-repairs but did not affect speech error rates significantly. With accuracy emphasis, speech error rates decreased considerably, but disfluency and self-repair rates did not. With respect to these findings, it is argued that subjects monitor errors with less scrutiny under noise and when accuracy of speaking is unimportant. Consequently, covert and overt repair tendencies drop, a fact that is reflected by changes in disfluency and self-repair rates relative to speech error rates. Self-repair occurrence may be additionally reduced under noise because the information available for error detection--that is, the auditory signal--has also decreased. A qualitative analysis of self-repair patterns revealed that phonemic errors were usually repaired immediately after their intrusion. PMID:1608244

  11. Noise reduction for curve-linear structures in real time fluoroscopy applications using directional binary masks

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Martin; Yang, Pengfei; Schafer, Sebastian; Strother, Charles; Mistretta, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recent efforts in the reconstruction of interventional devices from two distinct views require the segmentation of the object in both fluoroscopic images. Noise might decrease the quality of the segmentation and cause artifacts in the reconstruction. The noise level depends on the x-ray dose the patient is exposed to. The proposed algorithm reduces the noise and enhances the separability of curvilinear devices in background subtracted fluoroscopic images to allow a more accurate segmentation. Methods: The algorithm uses a set of binary masks to estimate a line conformity measure that determines the best direction for a directional filter kernel. If the calculated value exceeds a certain threshold, the directional kernel is used to obtain the filtered value. Otherwise, an isotropic filter kernel is used. Results: The evaluation was performed on a set of 36 fluoroscopic images using a vascular head phantom with three different guidewires and nine different x-ray dosages from 6 nGy/pulse to 45 nGy/pulse as well as a clinical data set containing ten images. Compared with wavelet shrinkage and the bilateral filter, the proposed algorithm increased the average contrast to noise ratio by at least 17.8% for the phantom and 68.9% for the clinical images. The accuracy of the device segmentation was improved on average by at least 17.3% and 14.0%, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm was able to significantly reduce the amount of noise in the images and therefore increase the quality of the device segmentations compared to both the bilateral filter and the wavelet thresholding approach for all acquired noise levels using rotating directional filter kernels near line structures and isotropic kernels for the background. The application of the proposed algorithm for the 3D reconstruction of curvilinear devices from two views would allow a more accurate reconstruction of the device. PMID:26233192

  12. A cocktail party model of spatial release from masking by both noise and speech interferers a)

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gary L.; Litovsky, Ruth Y.

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical formula for estimating spatial release from masking (SRM) in a cocktail party environment would be useful as a simpler alternative to computationally intensive algorithms and may enhance understanding of underlying mechanisms. The experiment presented herein was designed to provide a strong test of a model that divides SRM into contributions of asymmetry and angular separation [Bronkhorst (2000). Acustica 86, 117–128] and to examine whether that model can be extended to include speech maskers. Across masker types the contribution to SRM of angular separation of maskers from the target was found to grow at a diminishing rate as angular separation increased within the frontal hemifield, contrary to predictions of the model. Speech maskers differed from noise maskers in the overall magnitude of SRM and in the contribution of angular separation (both greater for speech). These results were used to develop a modified model that achieved good fits to data for noise maskers (ρ = 0.93) and for speech maskers (ρ = 0.94) while using the same functions to describe separation and asymmetry components of SRM for both masker types. These findings suggest that this approach can be used to accurately model SRM for speech maskers in addition to primarily “energetic” noise maskers. PMID:21895087

  13. Practical Ranges of Loudness Levels of Various Types of Environmental Noise, Including Traffic Noise, Aircraft Noise, and Industrial Noise

    PubMed Central

    Salomons, Erik M.; Janssen, Sabine A.

    2011-01-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A-weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels. PMID:21776205

  14. Practical ranges of loudness levels of various types of environmental noise, including traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise.

    PubMed

    Salomons, Erik M; Janssen, Sabine A

    2011-06-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A-weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels. PMID:21776205

  15. Phase effects in masking by harmonic complexes: detection of bands of speech-shaped noise.

    PubMed

    Deroche, Mickael L D; Culling, John F; Chatterjee, Monita

    2014-11-01

    When phase relationships between partials of a complex masker produce highly modulated temporal envelopes on the basilar membrane, listeners may detect speech information from temporal dips in the within-channel masker envelopes. This source of masking release (MR) is however located in regions of unresolved masker partials and it is unclear how much of the speech information in these regions is really needed for intelligibility. Also, other sources of MR such as glimpsing in between resolved masker partials may provide sufficient information from regions that disregard phase relationships. This study simplified the problem of speech recognition to a masked detection task. Target bands of speech-shaped noise were restricted to frequency regions containing either only resolved or only unresolved masker partials, as a function of masker phase relationships (sine or random), masker fundamental frequency (F0) (50, 100, or 200 Hz), and masker spectral profile (flat-spectrum or speech-shaped). Although masker phase effects could be observed in unresolved regions at F0s of 50 and 100 Hz, it was only at 50-Hz F0 that detection thresholds were ever lower in unresolved than in resolved regions, suggesting little role of envelope modulations for harmonic complexes with F0s in the human voice range and at moderate level. PMID:25373972

  16. Cloud and Cloud Shadow Masking Using Multi-Temporal Cloud Masking Algorithm in Tropical Environmental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candra, D. S.; Phinn, S.; Scarth, P.

    2016-06-01

    A cloud masking approach based on multi-temporal satellite images is proposed. The basic idea of this approach is to detect cloud and cloud shadow by using the difference reflectance values between clear pixels and cloud and cloud shadow contaminated pixels. Several bands of satellite image which have big difference values are selected for developing Multi-temporal Cloud Masking (MCM) algorithm. Some experimental analyses are conducted by using Landsat-8 images. Band 3 and band 4 are selected because they can distinguish between cloud and non cloud. Afterwards, band 5 and band 6 are used to distinguish between cloud shadow and clear. The results show that the MCM algorithm can detect cloud and cloud shadow appropriately. Moreover, qualitative and quantitative assessments are conducted using visual inspections and confusion matrix, respectively, to evaluate the reliability of this algorithm. Comparison between this algorithm and QA band are conducted to prove the reliability of the approach. The results show that MCM better than QA band and the accuracy of the results are very high.

  17. Frequency tuning of the dolphin's hearing as revealed by auditory brain-stem response with notch-noise masking.

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Y; Klishin, V O

    1997-12-01

    Notch-noise masking was used to measure frequency tuning in a dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in a simultaneous-masking paradigm in conjunction with auditory brain-stem evoked potential recording. Measurements were made at probe frequencies of 64, 76, 90, and 108 kHz. The data were analyzed by fitting the rounded-exponent model of the auditory filters to the experimental data. The fitting parameter values corresponded to the filter tuning as follows: QER (center frequency divided by equivalent rectangular bandwidths) of 35 to 36.5 and Q10 dB of 18 to 19 at all tested frequencies. PMID:9407671

  18. MaskDensity14: An R package for the density approximant of a univariate based on noise multiplied data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yan-Xia; Fielding, Mark James

    2015-12-01

    Lin (2014) developed a framework of the method of the sample-moment-based density approximant, for estimating the probability density function of microdata based on noise multiplied data. Theoretically, it provides a promising method for data users in generating the synthetic data of the original data without accessing the original data; however, technical issues can cause problems implementing the method. In this paper, we describe a software package called MaskDensity14, written in the R language, that uses a computational approach to solve the technical issues and makes the method of the sample-moment-based density approximant feasible. MaskDensity14 has applications in many areas, such as sharing clinical trial data and survey data without releasing the original data.

  19. Noise. Ag Ed Environmental Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulloch, Rodney W.

    Noise is the subject of the student resource unit to be used with high school vocational agriculture students. The nature of noise as a phenomenon and as a problem is clarified. Sources of noise pollution and the decibel levels they produce are described. Among the effects of noise pollution discussed are hearing loss, annoyance, and accidental…

  20. Environmental noise need not hinder geothermal power development

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, T.R.

    1982-10-01

    Environmental noise issues have hindered some geothermal power developments located near residents by delaying necessary regulatory approvals. However, with full use of demonstrated noise control technology, noise can be reduced to levels acceptable to most quiet rural communities at a distance of about 1000 feet. Thus, it may be feasible to drill closer to residences than is often presumed.

  1. [Health effects of environmental noise exposure].

    PubMed

    Röösli, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In the EU 27 countries about 100 million persons are exposed to road traffic noise above 55 dB (LDEN) according to the European Environment Agency. Exposure to railway noise affects 16 million individuals, aircraft noise 4 million and industry noise 1 million persons. Although the proportion of people reporting to be annoyed by noise exposure is substantial, health effects of noise is rarely an issue in general practitioners' consultations. According to stress models chronic noise exposure results in an increased allostatic load by direct physiological responses as well as psychological stress responses including sleep disturbances. In relation to acute and chronic noise exposure an increase of blood pressure was observed in epidemiological studies. An association between ischemic heart diseases and noise exposure was observed in various studies. However, the data is less consistent for other cardiovascular diseases and for cognitive effects in children. The association between metabolic syndrome and noise has rarely been investigated so far. Recently an association between road traffic noise and diabetes was observed in a Danish cohort study. Given the plausibility for a noise effect, general practitioners should consider noise exposure in patients with increased cardiometabolic risk. PMID:24297857

  2. Reducing environmental noise impacts: A USAREUR noise-management program handbook. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Feather, T.D.; Shekell, T.K.

    1991-06-01

    Noise pollution is a major environmental problem faced by the U.S. Army in Europe. Noise-related complaints from German citizens can escalate into intense political issues in German communities. This in turn hampers efficient operation of military training and often times threatens the Army's mission. In order to remedy these problems, USAREUR has developed a noise management program. A successful noise management program will limit the impact of unavoidable noise on the populace. This report, a component of the noise management program, is a reference document for noise management planning. It contains guidelines and rules-of-thumb for noise management. This document contains procedures which operation and training level personnel can understand and apply in their day to day noise management planning. Noise mitigation tips are given. Basic technical information that will aid in understanding noise mitigation is provided along with noise management through land use planning. Noise management for specific components of the military community, (airfields, base operations, training areas, and housing and recreation areas) are addressed. The nature of noise generated, means of noise abatement at the source, path, and receiver (both physical and organizational/public relations methods), and a case study example are described.

  3. Sentence intelligibility during segmental interruption and masking by speech-modulated noise: Effects of age and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Fogerty, Daniel; Ahlstrom, Jayne B; Bologna, William J; Dubno, Judy R

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated how single-talker modulated noise impacts consonant and vowel cues to sentence intelligibility. Younger normal-hearing, older normal-hearing, and older hearing-impaired listeners completed speech recognition tests. All listeners received spectrally shaped speech matched to their individual audiometric thresholds to ensure sufficient audibility with the exception of a second younger listener group who received spectral shaping that matched the mean audiogram of the hearing-impaired listeners. Results demonstrated minimal declines in intelligibility for older listeners with normal hearing and more evident declines for older hearing-impaired listeners, possibly related to impaired temporal processing. A correlational analysis suggests a common underlying ability to process information during vowels that is predictive of speech-in-modulated noise abilities. Whereas, the ability to use consonant cues appears specific to the particular characteristics of the noise and interruption. Performance declines for older listeners were mostly confined to consonant conditions. Spectral shaping accounted for the primary contributions of audibility. However, comparison with the young spectral controls who received identical spectral shaping suggests that this procedure may reduce wideband temporal modulation cues due to frequency-specific amplification that affected high-frequency consonants more than low-frequency vowels. These spectral changes may impact speech intelligibility in certain modulation masking conditions. PMID:26093436

  4. Sentence intelligibility during segmental interruption and masking by speech-modulated noise: Effects of age and hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Fogerty, Daniel; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Bologna, William J.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how single-talker modulated noise impacts consonant and vowel cues to sentence intelligibility. Younger normal-hearing, older normal-hearing, and older hearing-impaired listeners completed speech recognition tests. All listeners received spectrally shaped speech matched to their individual audiometric thresholds to ensure sufficient audibility with the exception of a second younger listener group who received spectral shaping that matched the mean audiogram of the hearing-impaired listeners. Results demonstrated minimal declines in intelligibility for older listeners with normal hearing and more evident declines for older hearing-impaired listeners, possibly related to impaired temporal processing. A correlational analysis suggests a common underlying ability to process information during vowels that is predictive of speech-in-modulated noise abilities. Whereas, the ability to use consonant cues appears specific to the particular characteristics of the noise and interruption. Performance declines for older listeners were mostly confined to consonant conditions. Spectral shaping accounted for the primary contributions of audibility. However, comparison with the young spectral controls who received identical spectral shaping suggests that this procedure may reduce wideband temporal modulation cues due to frequency-specific amplification that affected high-frequency consonants more than low-frequency vowels. These spectral changes may impact speech intelligibility in certain modulation masking conditions. PMID:26093436

  5. Environmental noise and human prenatal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    To determine whether chronic exposure to relatively loud noise has demonstrable biological effects in humans, a study was conducted on the effect of mother's exposure to airport noise while pregnant, and of social and biological characteristics of the family upon birthweight and gestation length. The sample of births was drawn from a community located adjacent to an international airport in the U.S., where noise levels had been measured previously. Mother's noise exposure was based upon noise levels near her residence in the community while she was pregnant. Data from 115 births were used, these being from mothers whose noise exposure history was most complete throughout the pregnancy. Using multivariate analysis to correct for family characteristics, the partial correlation coefficient for noise exposure and gestation length was negative, large, and significant in girls (r . -0.49, p less than 0.001). In boys the partial correlation coefficient was also negative but was smaller and did not quite reach statistical significance. Partial correlations with birthweight were smaller in both boys and girls and not significant. These results agree best with previous studies that suggest that noise may reduce prenatal growth. The size of the observed effects may be related to a conservative research design biased towards underestimation, as well as to the real effects of noise upon human prenatal growth.

  6. Influence of environmental noise on the weak value amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuannmin; Zhang, Yu-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    Quantum systems are always disturbed by environmental noise. We have investigated the influence of the environmental noise on the amplification in weak measurements. Three typical quantum noise processes are discussed in this article. The maximum expectation values of the observables of the measuring device decrease sharply with the strength of the depolarizing and phase damping channels, while the amplification effect of weak measurement is immune to the amplitude damping noise. To obtain significantly amplified signals, we must ensure that the preselection quantum systems are kept away from the depolarizing and phase damping processes.

  7. Influence of environmental noise on the weak value amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuannmin; Zhang, Yu-Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Quantum systems are always disturbed by environmental noise. We have investigated the influence of the environmental noise on the amplification in weak measurements. Three typical quantum noise processes are discussed in this article. The maximum expectation values of the observables of the measuring device decrease sharply with the strength of the depolarizing and phase damping channels, while the amplification effect of weak measurement is immune to the amplitude damping noise. To obtain significantly amplified signals, we must ensure that the preselection quantum systems are kept away from the depolarizing and phase damping processes.

  8. Tackling the Combined Effects of Reverberation and Masking Noise Using Ideal Channel Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazrati, Oldooz; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, a new signal-processing algorithm is proposed and evaluated for the suppression of the combined effects of reverberation and noise. Method: The proposed algorithm decomposes, on a short-term basis (every 20 ms), the reverberant stimuli into a number of channels and retains only a subset of the channels satisfying a…

  9. An alternative diagnostic test for active Ménière's disease and cochlear hydrops using high-pass noise masked responses: the complex amplitude ratio.

    PubMed

    Don, Manuel; Kwong, Betty; Tanaka, Chiemi

    2007-01-01

    We [Don et al.: Otol Neurotol 2005;26:711-722] previously demonstrated that patients diagnosed with an active case of Ménière's disease could be distinguished from non-Ménière's normal-hearing subjects by a special auditory brainstem response method involving clicks and ipsilateral high-pass masking pink noise. Specifically, auditory brainstem responses to clicks presented alone and clicks with masking noise high-pass filtered at 8, 4, 2, 1 and 0.5 kHz were recorded. It was shown that the level of masking noise sufficient to progressively mask the response to clicks in non-Ménière's normal-hearing subjects was insufficient to appropriately mask the responses in Ménière's disease subjects, resulting in an obvious undermasked component. A relative latency measure of wave V or the undermasked component in the response to clicks with 0.5 kHz high-pass masking noise and wave V in the response to clicks presented alone clearly distinguished these two groups on an individual level, thus making it a valuable clinical tool. However, determining the peak latency of wave V or the undermasked component can be difficult in some cases. In anticipation of this difficulty, we investigated and present in this paper several amplitude measures that may help in the evaluation of these cases. One amplitude measure, the 'complex amplitude ratio', appears to be a good alternative when the latency measure of the undermasked component is difficult to determine. PMID:17664867

  10. Hypotension and environmental noise: a replication study.

    PubMed

    Lercher, Peter; Widmann, Ulrich; Thudium, Jürg

    2014-09-01

    Up to now, traffic noise effect studies focused on hypertension as health outcome. Hypotension has not been considered as a potential health outcome although in experiments some people also responded to noise with decreases of blood pressure. Currently, the characteristics of these persons are not known and whether this down regulation of blood pressure is an experimental artifact, selection, or can also be observed in population studies is unanswered. In a cross-sectional replication study, we randomly sampled participants (age 20-75, N = 807) from circular areas (radius = 500 m) around 31 noise measurement sites from four noise exposure strata (35-44, 45-54, 55-64, >64 Leq, dBA). Repeated blood pressure measurements were available for a smaller sample (N = 570). Standardized information on socio-demographics, housing, life style and health was obtained by door to door visits including anthropometric measurements. Noise and air pollution exposure was assigned by GIS based on both calculation and measurements. Reported hypotension or hypotension medication past year was the main outcome studied. Exposure-effect relationships were modeled with multiple non-linear logistic regression techniques using separate noise estimations for total, highway and rail exposure. Reported hypotension was significantly associated with rail and total noise exposure and strongly modified by weather sensitivity. Reported hypotension medication showed associations of similar size with rail and total noise exposure without effect modification by weather sensitivity. The size of the associations in the smaller sample with BMI as additional covariate was similar. Other important cofactors (sex, age, BMI, health) and moderators (weather sensitivity, adjacent main roads and associated annoyance) need to be considered as indispensible part of the observed relationship. This study confirms a potential new noise effect pathway and discusses potential patho-physiological routes of actions. PMID

  11. Hypotension and Environmental Noise: A Replication Study

    PubMed Central

    Lercher, Peter; Widmann, Ulrich; Thudium, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    Up to now, traffic noise effect studies focused on hypertension as health outcome. Hypotension has not been considered as a potential health outcome although in experiments some people also responded to noise with decreases of blood pressure. Currently, the characteristics of these persons are not known and whether this down regulation of blood pressure is an experimental artifact, selection, or can also be observed in population studies is unanswered. In a cross-sectional replication study, we randomly sampled participants (age 20–75, N = 807) from circular areas (radius = 500 m) around 31 noise measurement sites from four noise exposure strata (35–44, 45–54, 55–64, >64 Leq, dBA). Repeated blood pressure measurements were available for a smaller sample (N = 570). Standardized information on socio-demographics, housing, life style and health was obtained by door to door visits including anthropometric measurements. Noise and air pollution exposure was assigned by GIS based on both calculation and measurements. Reported hypotension or hypotension medication past year was the main outcome studied. Exposure-effect relationships were modeled with multiple non-linear logistic regression techniques using separate noise estimations for total, highway and rail exposure. Reported hypotension was significantly associated with rail and total noise exposure and strongly modified by weather sensitivity. Reported hypotension medication showed associations of similar size with rail and total noise exposure without effect modification by weather sensitivity. The size of the associations in the smaller sample with BMI as additional covariate was similar. Other important cofactors (sex, age, BMI, health) and moderators (weather sensitivity, adjacent main roads and associated annoyance) need to be considered as indispensible part of the observed relationship. This study confirms a potential new noise effect pathway and discusses potential patho-physiological routes of actions

  12. Public policy and environmental noise: modeling exposure or understanding effects.

    PubMed

    Staples, S L

    1997-12-01

    This paper argues that if the federal government is to successfully protect the public from the adverse effects of environmental noise, its policies will need to be informed by a scientific understanding of the psychological and social factors that determine when noise results in annoyance and when noise may affect health as an environmental stressor. The overreliance of federal agencies on mathematical modeling of average group responses to physical noise levels is discussed as oversimplifying and limiting the understanding of noise effects in crucial ways. The development of a more sophisticated information base is related to policy needs, such as the need to make accurate predictions about the annoyance of particular communities, the need to understand relationships between public participation in noise abatement efforts and annoyance, and the need to identify populations that may be susceptible to stress-related health effects. PMID:9431308

  13. Public policy and environmental noise: modeling exposure or understanding effects.

    PubMed Central

    Staples, S L

    1997-01-01

    This paper argues that if the federal government is to successfully protect the public from the adverse effects of environmental noise, its policies will need to be informed by a scientific understanding of the psychological and social factors that determine when noise results in annoyance and when noise may affect health as an environmental stressor. The overreliance of federal agencies on mathematical modeling of average group responses to physical noise levels is discussed as oversimplifying and limiting the understanding of noise effects in crucial ways. The development of a more sophisticated information base is related to policy needs, such as the need to make accurate predictions about the annoyance of particular communities, the need to understand relationships between public participation in noise abatement efforts and annoyance, and the need to identify populations that may be susceptible to stress-related health effects. PMID:9431308

  14. Environmental noise and sleep disturbances: A threat to health?

    PubMed

    Halperin, Demian

    2014-12-01

    Environmental noise, especially that caused by transportation means, is viewed as a significant cause of sleep disturbances. Poor sleep causes endocrine and metabolic measurable perturbations and is associated with a number of cardiometabolic, psychiatric and social negative outcomes both in adults and children. Nocturnal environmental noise also provokes measurable biological changes in the form of a stress response, and clearly affects sleep architecture, as well as subjective sleep quality. These sleep perturbations are similar in their nature to those observed in endogenous sleep disorders. Apart from these measurable effects and the subjective feeling of disturbed sleep, people who struggle with nocturnal environmental noise often also suffer the next day from daytime sleepiness and tiredness, annoyance, mood changes as well as decreased well-being and cognitive performance. But there is also emerging evidence that these short-term effects of environmental noise, particularly when the exposure is nocturnal, may be followed by long-term adverse cardiometabolic outcomes. Nocturnal environmental noise may be the most worrying form of noise pollution in terms of its health consequences because of its synergistic direct and indirect (through sleep disturbances acting as a mediator) influence on biological systems. Duration and quality of sleep should thus be regarded as risk factors or markers significantly influenced by the environment and possibly amenable to modification through both education and counseling as well as through measures of public health. One of the means that should be proposed is avoidance at all costs of sleep disruptions caused by environmental noise. PMID:26483931

  15. Environmental noise and sleep disturbances: A threat to health?

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, Demian

    2014-01-01

    Environmental noise, especially that caused by transportation means, is viewed as a significant cause of sleep disturbances. Poor sleep causes endocrine and metabolic measurable perturbations and is associated with a number of cardiometabolic, psychiatric and social negative outcomes both in adults and children. Nocturnal environmental noise also provokes measurable biological changes in the form of a stress response, and clearly affects sleep architecture, as well as subjective sleep quality. These sleep perturbations are similar in their nature to those observed in endogenous sleep disorders. Apart from these measurable effects and the subjective feeling of disturbed sleep, people who struggle with nocturnal environmental noise often also suffer the next day from daytime sleepiness and tiredness, annoyance, mood changes as well as decreased well-being and cognitive performance. But there is also emerging evidence that these short-term effects of environmental noise, particularly when the exposure is nocturnal, may be followed by long-term adverse cardiometabolic outcomes. Nocturnal environmental noise may be the most worrying form of noise pollution in terms of its health consequences because of its synergistic direct and indirect (through sleep disturbances acting as a mediator) influence on biological systems. Duration and quality of sleep should thus be regarded as risk factors or markers significantly influenced by the environment and possibly amenable to modification through both education and counseling as well as through measures of public health. One of the means that should be proposed is avoidance at all costs of sleep disruptions caused by environmental noise. PMID:26483931

  16. Tackling the combined effects of reverberation and masking noise using ideal channel selection

    PubMed Central

    Hazrati, Oldooz

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A new signal processing algorithm is proposed and evaluated in this study for the suppression of the combined effects of reverberation and noise. Method The proposed algorithm decomposes, on a short-term basis (every 20 ms), the reverberant stimuli into a number of channels and retains only a subset of the channels satisfying a signal-to-reverberant ratio (SRR) criterion. The construction of this criterion assumes access to a priori knowledge of the target (anechoic) signal and the aim of the present study is to assess the full potential of the proposed channel-selection algorithm assuming that this criterion can be estimated accurately. Listening tests were conducted with normal-hearing listeners to assess the performance of the proposed algorithm in highly reverberant conditions (T60 = 1.0 s) which included additive noise at 0 and 5 dB SNR. Results A substantial gain in intelligibility was obtained in both reverberant and combined reverberant and noise conditions. The mean intelligibility scores improved by 44 and 33 percentage points at 0 and 5 dB SNR reverberant+noise conditions. Feature analysis of the consonant confusion matrices revealed that the transmission of voicing information was most negatively affected, followed by manner and place of articulation. Conclusions The proposed algorithm was found to produce substantial gains in intelligibility, and this benefit was attributed to the ability of the proposed SRR criterion to accurately detect voiced/unvoiced boundaries. Detection of those boundaries is postulated to be critical for better perception of voicing information and manner of articulation. PMID:22232411

  17. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise: research in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Elise van

    2011-01-01

    The impact of environmental noise on public health, in The Netherlands, is limited: Less than 1% of the myocardial infarction cases per year are attributable to long-term exposure to road traffic noise. Furthermore, although the Dutch noise policy is not directed to prevent cardiovascular disease due to noise exposure, health does play a role in Dutch noise policy. These are the main conclusions of a systematic review of Dutch observational studies, investigating the possible impact of road traffic and aircraft noise exposure on the cardiovascular system. Since 1970, 14 Dutch studies were published investigating the possible impact of road traffic and aircraft noise exposure on the cardiovascular system. Within these studies a large variety of outcomes were investigated, ranging from blood pressure changes to cardiovascular mortality. The results of the studies were not consistent and only weak associations were found. PMID:21537106

  18. Environmental noise-a challenge for an acoustical engineer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genuit, Klaus

    2003-10-01

    People live in a landscape full of noises which are composed of both natural environmental noises and technically created sounds. Regarding environmental noise, more and more people feel heavily annoyed by noises. Noise is defined as an audible sound which either disturbs the silence or an intentional sound listening or leads to annoyance. Thus, it is clearly defined that the assignment of noise cannot be reduced to simple determining objective parameters such as the A-weighted sound pressure level or the equivalent continuous sound pressure level. The question of whether a sound is judged as noise can only be made after the transformation from the sound event into an auditory event has been accomplished. The evaluation of noise depends on the physical characteristics of the sound event, on the psycho-acoustical features of the human ear, as well as on the psychological aspects of man. For the acoustical design of environmental noise and in order to create a better soundscape the acoustical engineer has to consider these aspects. That means a specific challenge for the sound engineering.

  19. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise: research in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Gösta; Eriksson, Charlotta

    2011-01-01

    In Sweden, as in many other European countries, traffic noise is an important environmental health issue. At present, almost two million people are exposed to average noise levels exceeding the outdoor national guideline value (55 dB(A)). Despite efforts to reduce the noise burden, noise-related health effects, such as annoyance and sleep disturbances, are increasing. The scientific interest regarding more serious health effects related to the cardiovascular system is growing, and several experimental and epidemiological studies have been performed or are ongoing. Most of the studies on cardiovascular outcomes have been related to noise from road or aircraft traffic. Few studies have included railway noise. The outcomes under study include morning saliva cortisol, treatment for hypertension, self-reported hypertension, and myocardial infarction. The Swedish studies on road traffic noise support the hypothesis of an association between long-term noise exposure and cardiovascular disease. However, the magnitude of effect varies between the studies and has been shown to depend on factors such as sex, number of years at residence, and noise annoyance. Two national studies have been performed on the cardiovascular effects of aircraft noise exposure. The first one, a cross-sectional study assessing self-reported hypertension, has shown a 30% risk increase per 5 dB(A) noise increase. The second one, which to our knowledge is the first longitudinal study assessing the cumulative incidence of hypertension, found a relative risk (RR) of 1.10 (95% CI 1.01 - 1.19) per 5 dB(A) noise increase. No associations have been found between railway noise and cardiovascular diseases. The findings regarding noise-related health effects and their economic consequences should be taken into account in future noise abatement policies and community planning. PMID:21537104

  20. The 'shell effect': music from environmental noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diodati, Paolo

    2005-02-01

    The 'shell effect' can be used to play music with a pleasant and characteristic timbre. If you place a sensitive microphone at the rim of pipes of suitable length and diameter to obtain resonance frequencies, ambient noise will produce musical notes. The corresponding optical effect, i.e. extracting visible light from ambient radiation considered dark by the human eye, is also discussed.

  1. A new feature detection mechanism and its application in secured ECG transmission with noise masking.

    PubMed

    Sufi, Fahim; Khalil, Ibrahim

    2009-04-01

    With cardiovascular disease as the number one killer of modern era, Electrocardiogram (ECG) is collected, stored and transmitted in greater frequency than ever before. However, in reality, ECG is rarely transmitted and stored in a secured manner. Recent research shows that eavesdropper can reveal the identity and cardiovascular condition from an intercepted ECG. Therefore, ECG data must be anonymized before transmission over the network and also stored as such in medical repositories. To achieve this, first of all, this paper presents a new ECG feature detection mechanism, which was compared against existing cross correlation (CC) based template matching algorithms. Two types of CC methods were used for comparison. Compared to the CC based approaches, which had 40% and 53% misclassification rates, the proposed detection algorithm did not perform any single misclassification. Secondly, a new ECG obfuscation method was designed and implemented on 15 subjects using added noises corresponding to each of the ECG features. This obfuscated ECG can be freely distributed over the internet without the necessity of encryption, since the original features needed to identify personal information of the patient remain concealed. Only authorized personnel possessing a secret key will be able to reconstruct the original ECG from the obfuscated ECG. Distribution of the would appear as regular ECG without encryption. Therefore, traditional decryption techniques including powerful brute force attack are useless against this obfuscation. PMID:19397097

  2. Active Shielding and Control of Environmental Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, S. V.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the research project supported by NASA under grant # NAG-1-01064, we have studied the mathematical aspects of the problem of active control of sound, i.e., time-harmonic acoustic disturbances. The foundations of the methodology are described in our paper [1]. Unlike. many other existing techniques, the approach of [1] provides for the exact volumetric cancellation of the unwanted noise on a given predetermined region airspace, while leaving unaltered those components of the total acoustic field that are deemed as friendly. The key finding of the work is that for eliminating the unwanted component of the acoustic field in a given area, one needs to know relatively little; in particular, neither the locations nor structure nor strength of the exterior noise sources need to be known. Likewise, there is no need to know the volumetric properties of the supporting medium across which the acoustic signals propagate, except, maybe, in a narrow area of space near the perimeter of the protected region. The controls are built based solely on the measurements performed on the perimeter of the domain to be shielded; moreover, the controls themselves (i.e., additional sources) are concentrated also only on or near this perimeter. Perhaps as important, the measured quantities can refer to the total acoustic field rather than to its unwanted component only, and the methodology can automatically distinguish between the two. In [1], we have constructed the general solution for controls. The apparatus used for deriving this general solution is closely connected to the concepts of generalized potentials and boundary projections of Calderon's type. For a given total wave field, the application of a Calderon's projection allows one to definitively tell between its incoming and outgoing components with respect to a particular domain of interest, which may have arbitrary shape. Then, the controls are designed so that they suppress the incoming component for the domain

  3. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise: research in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Stansfeld, Stephen; Crombie, Rosanna

    2011-01-01

    Although the auditory effects of noise on humans have been established, the non-auditory effects are not so well established. The emerging links between noise and cardiovascular disease (CVD) have potentially important implications on public health and policy. In the United Kingdom (UK), noise from transport is a problem, where more than half of the population is exposed to more than the recommended maximum day-time noise level and just under three-quarters of the population live in areas where the recommended night-time noise level is exceeded. This review focuses on findings from studies conducted in the UK that examined environmental noise and cardiovascular disease. There were statistically no significant associations between road traffic noise and incident ischemic heart disease in the Caerphilly and Speedwell studies, but there was a suggestion of effects when modifying factors such as length of residence, room orientation, and window opening were taken into account. In a sample stratified by pre-existing disease a strongly increased odds of incident ischemic heart disease for the highest annoyance category was found compared to the lowest among men without pre-existing disease (OR = 2.45, 95%1.13 - 5.31), which was not found in men with pre-existing disease. In the Hypertension and exposure to noise near airports (HYENA) study, night time aircraft noise exposure (L night ) was associated with an increased risk of hypertension, in fully adjusted analyses. A 10-dB increase in aircraft noise exposure was associated with an odds ratio of 1.14 (95%CI, 1.01 - 1.29). Aircraft noise was not consistently related to raised systolic blood pressure in children in the road traffic and aircraft noise exposure and children's cognition and health (RANCH) study. There is some evidence of an association among environmental noise exposure and hypertension and ischemic heart disease in the UK studies; further studies are required to explore gender differences, the effects of

  4. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise: research in Austria.

    PubMed

    Lercher, Peter; Botteldooren, Dick; Widmann, Ulrich; Uhrner, Ulrich; Kammeringer, Ewald

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of noise rank second in terms of disability-adjusted life year (DALYs) after annoyance. Although research during the past decade has consolidated the available data base, the most recent meta-analysis still shows wide confidence intervals - indicating imprecise information for public health risk assessment. The alpine area of Tyrol in the Austrian part of the Alps has experienced a massive increase in car and heavy goods traffic (road and rail) during the last 35 years. Over the past 25 years small-, middle-, and large-sized epidemiological health surveys have been conducted - mostly within the framework of environmental health impact assessments. By design, these studies have emphasized a contextually driven environmental stress perspective, where the adverse health effects on account of noise are studied in a broader framework of environmental health, susceptibility, and coping. Furthermore, innovative exposure assessment strategies have been implemented. This article reviews the existing knowledge from these studies over time, and presents the exposure-response curves, with and without interaction assessment, based on standardized re-analyses and discusses it in the light of past and current cardiovascular noise effects research. The findings support relevant moderation by age, gender, and family history in nearly all studies and suggest a strong need for consideration of non-linearity in the exposure-response analyses. On the other hand, air pollution has not played a relevant role as a moderator in the noise-hypertension or the noise-angina pectoris relationship. Finally, different noise modeling procedures can introduce variations in the exposure response curves, with substantive consequences for public health risk assessment of noise exposure. PMID:21537108

  5. Environmental Pollution: Noise Pollution - Sonic Boom. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Documentation Center, Alexandria, VA.

    The unclassified, annotated bibliography is Volume I of a two-volume set on Noise Pollution - Sonic Boom in a series of scheduled bibliographies on Environmental Pollution. Volume II is Confidential. Corporate author-monitoring agency, subject, title, contract, and report number indexes are included. (Author/JR)

  6. Assessing the environmental impacts of aircraft noise and emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahashabde, Anuja; Wolfe, Philip; Ashok, Akshay; Dorbian, Christopher; He, Qinxian; Fan, Alice; Lukachko, Stephen; Mozdzanowska, Aleksandra; Wollersheim, Christoph; Barrett, Steven R. H.; Locke, Maryalice; Waitz, Ian A.

    2011-01-01

    With the projected growth in demand for commercial aviation, many anticipate increased environmental impacts associated with noise, air quality, and climate change. Therefore, decision-makers and stakeholders are seeking policies, technologies, and operational procedures that balance environmental and economic interests. The main objective of this paper is to address shortcomings in current decision-making practices for aviation environmental policies. We review knowledge of the noise, air quality, and climate impacts of aviation, and demonstrate how including environmental impact assessment and quantifying uncertainties can enable a more comprehensive evaluation of aviation environmental policies. A comparison is presented between the cost-effectiveness analysis currently used for aviation environmental policy decision-making and an illustrative cost-benefit analysis. We focus on assessing a subset of the engine NO X emissions certification stringency options considered at the eighth meeting of the International Civil Aviation Organization’s Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection. The FAA Aviation environmental Portfolio Management Tool (APMT) is employed to conduct the policy assessments. We show that different conclusions may be drawn about the same policy options depending on whether benefits and interdependencies are estimated in terms of health and welfare impacts versus changes in NO X emissions inventories as is the typical practice. We also show that these conclusions are sensitive to a variety of modeling uncertainties. While our more comprehensive analysis makes the best policy option less clear, it represents a more accurate characterization of the scientific and economic uncertainties underlying impacts and the policy choices.

  7. Averaging underwater noise levels for environmental assessment of shipping.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Nathan D; Blondel, Philippe; Dakin, D Tom; Dorocicz, John

    2012-10-01

    Rising underwater noise levels from shipping have raised concerns regarding chronic impacts to marine fauna. However, there is a lack of consensus over how to average local shipping noise levels for environmental impact assessment. This paper addresses this issue using 110 days of continuous data recorded in the Strait of Georgia, Canada. Probability densities of ~10(7) 1-s samples in selected 1/3 octave bands were approximately stationary across one-month subsamples. Median and mode levels varied with averaging time. Mean sound pressure levels averaged in linear space, though susceptible to strong bias from outliers, are most relevant to cumulative impact assessment metrics. PMID:23039575

  8. Masking of short stimuli by noises with spiked spectra: II. Time summation and frequency selectivity of hearing in a narrow frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimskaya-Korsakova, L. K.; Lalayants, M. R.; Supin, A. Ya.; Tavartkiladze, G. A.

    2011-03-01

    The thresholds of masking of short high-frequency pulses with either different durations (1.25-25 ms) and similar central frequency or different central frequencies (3.6-4.4 kHz) but similar durations were measured to reveal manifestations of the properties of peripheral encoding in auditory perception. Noises with a spiked amplitude spectrum structure were used as maskers. The central frequency and the frequency band of a masker were 4 and 1 kHz, respectively. The central frequencies of a stimulus and a masker being equal, the noise the central frequency of which coincided with the frequency corresponding to a dip of an indented spectrum was called an off(rip)-frequency masker. Owing to the off(rip)-masker, stimuli-induced masking thresholds were formed taking into account excitation in a narrow region of a basila membrane and auditory nerve fibers with characteristic frequencies from a narrow range. High-frequency pulses with an envelope in the form of the Gaussian function and sinusoidal filling were used as stimuli. At masker levels of 30 dB above the auditory threshold, frequencies of off(rip)-masker spectra spikes of 500-2000 Hz, and a central stimulus frequency of 4 kHz, the thresholds of tonal stimuli (25 ms in duration) masking in two out of three probationers were higher than the thresholds of masking of compact stimuli (1.25 ms in duration). In the third probationer, on the contrary, the thresholds of tonal stimuli masking were lower than the thresholds of compact stimuli masking. At masker levels of 50 dB, individual threshold differences disappeared. The obtained results were interpreted in the context of implementation of different methods of auditory encoding of the intensity. The methods were based on either the average frequency of auditory nerve pulsations or the number of fibers participating in the response. The interpretation was also carried out in the context of revealing manifestations of nonlinear properties of basila membrane displacements

  9. Poor environmental tracking can make extinction risk insensitive to the colour of environmental noise.

    PubMed

    van de Pol, Martijn; Vindenes, Yngvild; Sæther, Bernt-Erik; Engen, Steinar; Ens, Bruno J; Oosterbeek, Kees; Tinbergen, Joost M

    2011-12-22

    The relative importance of environmental colour for extinction risk compared with other aspects of environmental noise (mean and interannual variability) is poorly understood. Such knowledge is currently relevant, as climate change can cause the mean, variability and temporal autocorrelation of environmental variables to change. Here, we predict that the extinction risk of a shorebird population increases with the colour of a key environmental variable: winter temperature. However, the effect is weak compared with the impact of changes in the mean and interannual variability of temperature. Extinction risk was largely insensitive to noise colour, because demographic rates are poor in tracking the colour of the environment. We show that three mechanisms-which probably act in many species-can cause poor environmental tracking: (i) demographic rates that depend nonlinearly on environmental variables filter the noise colour, (ii) demographic rates typically depend on several environmental signals that do not change colour synchronously, and (iii) demographic stochasticity whitens the colour of demographic rates at low population size. We argue that the common practice of assuming perfect environmental tracking may result in overemphasizing the importance of noise colour for extinction risk. Consequently, ignoring environmental autocorrelation in population viability analysis could be less problematic than generally thought. PMID:21561978

  10. Potential Application of Environmental Noise Recordings in Geoarchaeological Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Luzio, E.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental noise recordings are commonly applied in seismic microzonation studies. By calculating the H/V spectral ratio, the fundamental frequency of soft terrains overlying a rigid bedrock can be determined (Nakamura (1989). In such a simple two-layer system, equation f = n Vs/4H (1) links the resonance frequency "f" to the thickness "H" and shear waves velocity "Vs "of the resonating layer. In recent years, this methodology has been applied generally to obtain information on the seismostratigraphy of an investigated site in different environmental context. In this work, its potential application in the characterization of archaeological features hosted in shallow geological levels is discussed. Field cases are identified in the Appia Antica archaeological site which is placed in central Italy. Here, acknowledged targets correspond to: i) empty tanks carved by the Romans into Cretaceous limestone in the IV-III cen. BC and ii): the basaltic stone paving of the ancient road track which is locally buried beneath colluvial deposits. Narrowly-spaced recordings of environmental noise were carried using a portable digital seismograph equipped with three electrodynamic orthogonal sensors (velocimeters) responding in the band 0.1 ÷1024 Hz and adopting a sampling frequency of 256 Hz.. Results are discussed in terms of absolute H/V values and related distribution maps in the very high-frequency interval of 10-40Hz. In the tanks hosting area, interpolation of H/V maximum values around 13Hz matches caves location and alignment, which is also evidenced by clear inversions (H/V<1) at lower frequencies (10-1Hz). Correlation between H/V peaks and the top surface of the buried stone paving along the prosecution of the road track is even more straightforward. Finally, the depth variations of the tank roofs and the basaltic paving were reconstructed combining in equation (1) results of noise recordings with borehole data and geophysical surveys (SASW analysis).

  11. Chicago Transit Authority train passenger environmental noise study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDuffee, Matt R.; Karner, Chris

    2003-04-01

    The Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) train system is referred to as the ``L'' because most of the track throughout the city is elevated. Passengers riding aboard the ``L'' are often subjected to high levels of noise due to the aging metal girder system that the tracks are perched on, as well as some train cars that are in disrepair. The environmental acoustics class of nine students at Columbia College Chicago decided to quantify exactly how much noise an ``L'' passenger is subjected to. Using a Quest 2900 integrating sound level meter the class split up and took Leq measurements on all of the seven train lines. Each line was tested in both directions of travel twice, with the meter taking samples every 3 s, which added up to a total of approximately 65 000 samples. The data were then averaged and synthesized into a graph using ESRI ArcView software. The graph is actually a map of the CTA ``L'' system that is color coded according to the Leq level that the passengers are subjected to between each station. It was interesting to see the difference in noise levels according to the type of track construction.

  12. Masking by Gratings Predicted by an Image Sequence Discriminating Model: Testing Models for Perceptual Discrimination Using Repeatable Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Adding noise to stimuli to be discriminated allows estimation of observer classification functions based on the correlation between observer responses and relevant features of the noisy stimuli. Examples will be presented of stimulus features that are found in auditory tone detection and visual vernier acuity. using the standard signal detection model (Thurstone scaling), we derive formulas to estimate the proportion of the observers decision variable variance that is controlled by the added noise. one is based on the probability of agreement of the observer with him/herself on trials with the same noise sample. Another is based on the relative performance of the observer and the model. When these do not agree, the model can be rejected. A second derivation gives the probability of agreement of observer and model when the observer follows the model except for internal noise. Agreement significantly less than this amount allows rejection of the model.

  13. Nature-Inspired Airfoils for Environmental Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Suyeong; Kyung, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Recently, study on the insects' flapping flight became one of the challenging research subjects in the field of environmental engineering and aeronautics because of its potential applicability to intelligent micro-robots capable of autonomous flight and the next generation aerial-vehicles. In order to uncover its curious unsteady characteristics, many researchers have conducted experimental and computational studies on the unsteady aerodynamics of insects' flapping flight. In the present work, the unsteady flow physics around insect wings are conducted by utilizing numerical and computational simulation. The e-AIRS [6] (e-Science Aerospace Integrated Research System) gives a balanced service between computational and experimental aerodynamics, along with integrated research process of these two research activities. This paper presents the wing motions and their aerodynamics with a two dimensional approach to reduce environmental noise during the airflight. Also this paper shows an optimal phase angle, where the thrust is maximized at the position of minimized drag, which occurs when noise is minimized. Aside from the two-dimensional approach, stroke angles and phase angles of the airfoils are set as parameters, to determine which motion yields the best aerodynamic characteristics.

  14. Physiological functioning of the ear and masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physiological functions of the ear and the role masking plays in speech communication are examined. Topics under investigation include sound analysis of the ear, the aural reflex, and various types of noise masking.

  15. Quantum correlations of identical particles subject to classical environmental noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggi, Andrea; Buscemi, Fabrizio; Bordone, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we propose a measure for the quantum discord of indistinguishable particles, based on the definition of entanglement of particles given in Wiseman and Vaccaro (Phys Rev Lett 91:097902, 2003. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.91.097902). This discord of particles is then used to evaluate the quantum correlations in a system of two identical bosons (fermions), where the particles perform a quantum random walk described by the Hubbard Hamiltonian in a 1D lattice. The dynamics of the particles is either unperturbed or subject to a classical environmental noise—such as random telegraph, pink or brown noise. The observed results are consistent with those for the entanglement of particles, and we observe that on-site interaction between particles have an important protective effect on correlations against the decoherence of the system.

  16. Noise Pollution, AMA Congress on Environmental Health (6th, Chicago, Illinois, April 28-29, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL.

    Contained are 15 papers presented at the sixth annual AMA Congress on Environmental Health. Three papers are concerned with noise induced hearing loss as it relates to pathological effects, the role of physicians in workmen's compensation cases, and exposure to steady-state noise. Five papers deal with noise control as it relates to medical…

  17. [Summary of ongoing activities on environmental noise and health at the WHO regional office for Europe].

    PubMed

    Héroux, M E; Braubach, M; Dramac, D; Korol, N; Paunovic, E; Zastenskaya, I

    2014-01-01

    The environmental noise is an important public health issue, according to recent assessment of the burden of diseases among environmental health risk factors in order of importance the environmental noise occupies the second place after air pollution. The World Health Organization (WHO) for the first time published its public health recommendations for the environmental noise in 1999 in the "WHO Guidelines for Community Noise (1999)". These recommendations found their development in WHO Night Noise Guidelines for Europe" (2009). From then onward there have been published new important data on the impact of the environmental noise on the health, that stipulated the revision of existing guidelines. Furthermore, both in the European Union (EU) Directive 2002/49/ EC and the Parma Declaration from 2010 there was pointed out the importance of renewal environmental noise recommendations. Responding to appearing interrogation, WHO Regional Office for Europe has recently initiated the process of the elaboration of new guiding principles known as "WHO Environmental Noise Guidelines for the European Region". The Guidelines will include a systematic review of most critical or important health consequences and also concentrate on health benefits of measures for the reducing noise levels. The Guidelines will consider noise coming from various noise sources such as aircraft, railroad, personal electronic devices and wind turbines. The Guidelines will also consider the particularity of such accommodations as residences, hospitals, and educational facilities. The work in the mentioned spheres is ongoing and the revised Guidelines are expected to be published in mid-2015. The Guidelines will provide up-to-date information on the health risks related to the environmental noise and evidence-based recommendations in order to support for WHO Member States in their efforts to prevent of the excessive noise and the struggle with their negative impact. PMID:25831923

  18. The control and optimization of environmental noise emissions from combustion turbine plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, G.F. Jr.; Hessler, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The methodology for performing an environmental noise assessment or impact study is reviewed to provide an overall framework for the importance of comprehensive noise control design for planned or existing combustion turbine facilities. Since ambient or background noise levels in residential communities usually drive the acoustical design goal for plant noise emissions, typical levels that can be expected are categorized. Noise emission criteria are discussed with regard to both satisfying mandated and responsible neighbor levels. Quantitative guidelines for designing plants to responsible neighbor levels are also examined. The principal equipment noise emissions sources are rank ordered for typical plants in the 25 to 100 MW size range. The basic acoustical engineering principles for predicting and modeling environmental noise emissions from complex arrangements of equipment are explained and illustrated. These principles are used to show that thoughtful siting or arrangement of equipment can often reduce, or at least minimize, the cost and performance penalties of noise mitigation measures.

  19. Inter-noise 89 - Engineering for environmental noise control; Proceedings of the International Conference on Noise Control Engineering, Newport Beach, CA, Dec. 4-6, 1989. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maling, George C., Jr.

    Recent advances in noise analysis and control theory and technology are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include noise generation; sound-wave propagation; noise control by external treatments; vibration and shock generation, transmission, isolation, and reduction; multiple sources and paths of environmental noise; noise perception and the physiological and psychological effects of noise; instrumentation, signal processing, and analysis techniques; and noise standards and legal aspects. Diagrams, drawings, graphs, photographs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  20. Noise impact on wildlife: An environmental impact assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, A.

    1977-01-01

    Various biological effects of noise on animals are discussed and a systematic approach for an impact assessment is developed. Further research is suggested to fully quantify noise impact on the species and its ecosystem.

  1. Construction and application of a questionnaire for the social scientific investigation of environmental noise effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guski, R.; Wichmann, U.; Rohrmann, B.; Finke, H. O.

    1980-01-01

    A social psychological questionnair has been developed to study the effects of environmental noise and was applied to 636 people living in 19 different areas of Hamburg. The theoretical foundations and the statistical means employed in its development are described. Four main reactions to noise are isolated statistically, and it is determined that these are moderated by several intervening variables, chief of which are coping capacity for noise, the perceived dangerousness of the noise souce, other daily loads and the individual's liability.

  2. A Comprehensive Approach to Management of Workplace and Environmental Noise at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.

    1995-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is home to more than 100 experimental research testing facilities and laboratories, including large wind tunnels and engine test cells, which in combination create a varied and complex noise environment. Much of the equipment was manufactured prior to the enactment of legislation limiting product noise emissions or occupational noise exposure. Routine facility maintenance and associated construction also contributes to a noise exposure management responsibility which is equal in magnitude and scope to that of several small industrial companies. The Noise Program, centrally managed within the Office of Environmental Programs at LRC, maintains overall responsibility for hearing conservation, community noise control, and acoustical and noise control engineering. Centralized management of the LRC Noise Program facilitates the timely development and implementation of engineered noise control solutions for problems identified via either the Hearing Conservation of Community Noise Program. The key element of the Lewis Research Center Noise Program, Acoustical and Noise Control Engineering Services, is focused on developing solutions that permanently reduce employee and community noise exposure and maximize research productivity by reducing or eliminating administrative and operational controls and by improving the safety and comfort of the work environment. The Hearing Conservation Program provides noise exposure assessment, medical monitoring, and training for civil servant and contractor employees. The Community Noise Program aims to maintain the support of LRC's neighboring communities while enabling necessary research operations to accomplish their programmatic goals. Noise control engineering capability resides within the Noise Program. The noise control engineering, based on specific exposure limits, is a fundamental consideration throughout the design phase of new test facilities, labs, and office buildings. In summary, the Noise Program

  3. Annoyance from Road Traffic, Trains, Airplanes and from Total Environmental Noise Levels.

    PubMed

    Ragettli, Martina S; Goudreau, Sophie; Plante, Céline; Perron, Stéphane; Fournier, Michel; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of studies assessing the exposure-response relationship between transportation noise and annoyance in North America. Our aims were to investigate the prevalence of noise annoyance induced by road traffic, trains and airplanes in relation to distance to transportation noise sources, and to total environmental noise levels in Montreal, Canada; annoyance was assessed as noise-induced disturbance. A telephone-based survey among 4336 persons aged >18 years was conducted. Exposure to total environmental noise (A-weighted outdoor noise levels-LAeq24h and day-evening-night equivalent noise levels-Lden) for each study participant was determined using a statistical noise model (land use regression-LUR) that is based on actual outdoor noise measurements. The proportion of the population annoyed by road traffic, airplane and train noise was 20.1%, 13.0% and 6.1%, respectively. As the distance to major roads, railways and the Montreal International Airport increased, the percentage of people disturbed and highly disturbed due to the corresponding traffic noise significantly decreased. When applying the statistical noise model we found a relationship between noise levels and disturbance from road traffic and total environmental noise, with Prevalence Proportion Ratios (PPR) for highly disturbed people of 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07-1.13) and 1.04 (1.02-1.06) per 1 dB(A) Lden, respectively. Our study provides the first comprehensive information on the relationship between transportation noise levels and disturbance in a Canadian city. LUR models are still in development and further studies on transportation noise induced annoyance are consequently needed, especially for sources other than road traffic. PMID:26729143

  4. Annoyance from Road Traffic, Trains, Airplanes and from Total Environmental Noise Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ragettli, Martina S.; Goudreau, Sophie; Plante, Céline; Perron, Stéphane; Fournier, Michel; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of studies assessing the exposure-response relationship between transportation noise and annoyance in North America. Our aims were to investigate the prevalence of noise annoyance induced by road traffic, trains and airplanes in relation to distance to transportation noise sources, and to total environmental noise levels in Montreal, Canada; annoyance was assessed as noise-induced disturbance. A telephone-based survey among 4336 persons aged >18 years was conducted. Exposure to total environmental noise (A-weighted outdoor noise levels—LAeq24h and day-evening-night equivalent noise levels—Lden) for each study participant was determined using a statistical noise model (land use regression—LUR) that is based on actual outdoor noise measurements. The proportion of the population annoyed by road traffic, airplane and train noise was 20.1%, 13.0% and 6.1%, respectively. As the distance to major roads, railways and the Montreal International Airport increased, the percentage of people disturbed and highly disturbed due to the corresponding traffic noise significantly decreased. When applying the statistical noise model we found a relationship between noise levels and disturbance from road traffic and total environmental noise, with Prevalence Proportion Ratios (PPR) for highly disturbed people of 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07–1.13) and 1.04 (1.02–1.06) per 1 dB(A) Lden, respectively. Our study provides the first comprehensive information on the relationship between transportation noise levels and disturbance in a Canadian city. LUR models are still in development and further studies on transportation noise induced annoyance are consequently needed, especially for sources other than road traffic. PMID:26729143

  5. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise: research in Germany.

    PubMed

    Maschke, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Research on systematic noise effects started in Germany back in the fifties with basic experimental studies on humans. As a result, noise was classified as a non-specific stressor, which could cause an ergotropic activation of the complete organism. In the light of this background research a hypothesis was proposed that long-term noise exposure could have an adverse effect on health. This hypothesis was further supported by animal studies. Since the sixties, the adverse effects of chronic road traffic noise exposure were further examined in humans with the help of epidemiological studies. More epidemiological aircraft noise studies followed in the 1970s and thereafter. The sample size was increased, relevant confounding factors were taken into account, and the exposure and health outcomes were investigated objectively and with higher quality measures. To date, more than 20 German epidemiological traffic noise studies have focused on noise-induced health effects, mainly on the cardiovascular system. In particular, the newer German noise studies demonstrate a clear association between residential exposure to traffic noise (particularly night noise) and cardiovascular outcomes. Nevertheless, additional research is needed, particularly on vulnerable groups and multiple noise exposures. The epidemiological findings have still not been fully considered in German regulations, particularly for aircraft noise. The findings, however, were taken into account in national recommendations. The Federal Environment Agency recommends noise rating levels of 65 dB(A) for the day and 55 dB(A) for the night, as a short-term goal. In the medium term, noise rating levels of 60 / 50 (day, night) should be reached and noise rating levels of 55 / 45 in the long run. PMID:21537103

  6. Environmental Noise Pollution in the United States: Developing an Effective Public Health Response

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Monica S.; Swinburn, Tracy K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tens of millions of Americans suffer from a range of adverse health outcomes due to noise exposure, including heart disease and hearing loss. Reducing environmental noise pollution is achievable and consistent with national prevention goals, yet there is no national plan to reduce environmental noise pollution. Objectives: We aimed to describe some of the most serious health effects associated with noise, summarize exposures from several highly prevalent noise sources based on published estimates as well as extrapolations made using these estimates, and lay out proven mechanisms and strategies to reduce noise by incorporating scientific insight and technological innovations into existing public health infrastructure. Discussion: We estimated that 104 million individuals had annual LEQ(24) levels > 70 dBA (equivalent to a continuous average exposure level of >70 dBA over 24 hr) in 2013 and were at risk of noise-induced hearing loss. Tens of millions more may be at risk of heart disease, and other noise-related health effects. Direct regulation, altering the informational environment, and altering the built environment are the least costly, most logistically feasible, and most effective noise reduction interventions. Conclusion: Significant public health benefit can be achieved by integrating interventions that reduce environmental noise levels and exposures into the federal public health agenda. Citation: Hammer MS, Swinburn TK, Neitzel RL. 2014. Environmental noise pollution in the United States: developing an effective public health response. Environ Health Perspect 122:115–119; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307272 PMID:24311120

  7. A program to support the full utilization of data from existing social surveys of environmental noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is presented of a three-part project (partially supported by NASA), which promotes greater utilization of social survey data for gaining new information about human response to environmental noise. The goal is accomplished by (1) publishing a catalog of existing social surveys on environmental noise, (2) establishing a data archive for noise survey data sets, and (3) reanalyzing selected surveys to address substantial and methodological issues. A finding about annoyance scales illustrates the use of a comparative analysis.

  8. Manatee (Trichechus manatus) vocalization usage in relation to environmental noise levels.

    PubMed

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L; Tyack, Peter L

    2009-03-01

    Noise can interfere with acoustic communication by masking signals that contain biologically important information. Communication theory recognizes several ways a sender can modify its acoustic signal to compensate for noise, including increasing the source level of a signal, its repetition, its duration, shifting frequency outside that of the noise band, or shifting the timing of signal emission outside of noise periods. The extent to which animals would be expected to use these compensation mechanisms depends on the benefit of successful communication, risk of failure, and the cost of compensation. Here we study whether a coastal marine mammal, the manatee, can modify vocalizations as a function of behavioral context and ambient noise level. To investigate whether and how manatees modify their vocalizations, natural vocalization usage and structure were examined in terms of vocalization rate, duration, frequency, and source level. Vocalizations were classified into two call types, chirps and squeaks, which were analyzed independently. In conditions of elevated noise levels, call rates decreased during feeding and social behaviors, and the duration of each call type was differently influenced by the presence of calves. These results suggest that ambient noise levels do have a detectable effect on manatee communication and that manatees modify their vocalizations as a function of noise in specific behavioral contexts. PMID:19275337

  9. Opportunities for Environmental Noise Mapping in Saudi Arabia: A Case of Traffic Noise Annoyance in an Urban Area in Jeddah City.

    PubMed

    Zytoon, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    As the traffic and other environmental noise generating activities are growing in The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), adverse health and other impacts are expected to develop. The management of such problem involves many actions, of which noise mapping has been proven to be a helpful approach. The objective of the current study was to test the adequacy of the available data in KSA municipalities for generating urban noise maps and to verify the applicability of available environmental noise mapping and noise annoyance models for KSA. Therefore, noise maps were produced for Al-Fayha District in Jeddah City, KSA using commercially available noise mapping software and applying the French national computation method "NMPB" for traffic noise. Most of the data required for traffic noise prediction and annoyance analysis were available, either in the Municipality GIS department or in other governmental authorities. The predicted noise levels during the three time periods, i.e., daytime, evening, and nighttime, were found higher than the maximum recommended levels established in KSA environmental noise standards. Annoyance analysis revealed that high percentages of the District inhabitants were highly annoyed, depending on the type of planning zone and period of interest. These results reflect the urgent need to consider environmental noise reduction in KSA national plans. The accuracy of the predicted noise levels and the availability of most of the necessary data should encourage further studies on the use of noise mapping as part of noise reduction plans. PMID:27187438

  10. Opportunities for Environmental Noise Mapping in Saudi Arabia: A Case of Traffic Noise Annoyance in an Urban Area in Jeddah City

    PubMed Central

    Zytoon, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    As the traffic and other environmental noise generating activities are growing in The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), adverse health and other impacts are expected to develop. The management of such problem involves many actions, of which noise mapping has been proven to be a helpful approach. The objective of the current study was to test the adequacy of the available data in KSA municipalities for generating urban noise maps and to verify the applicability of available environmental noise mapping and noise annoyance models for KSA. Therefore, noise maps were produced for Al-Fayha District in Jeddah City, KSA using commercially available noise mapping software and applying the French national computation method “NMPB” for traffic noise. Most of the data required for traffic noise prediction and annoyance analysis were available, either in the Municipality GIS department or in other governmental authorities. The predicted noise levels during the three time periods, i.e., daytime, evening, and nighttime, were found higher than the maximum recommended levels established in KSA environmental noise standards. Annoyance analysis revealed that high percentages of the District inhabitants were highly annoyed, depending on the type of planning zone and period of interest. These results reflect the urgent need to consider environmental noise reduction in KSA national plans. The accuracy of the predicted noise levels and the availability of most of the necessary data should encourage further studies on the use of noise mapping as part of noise reduction plans. PMID:27187438

  11. Mapping noise pollution from road traffic for regional environmental planning

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, D.J.; France, J.

    1982-03-01

    Attempts were made to assess and map noise pollution from traffic for 1 km grid squares throughout South Yorkshire. The method adopted involved estimating traffic noise at source for all major road sections and modeling the attenuation of noise with distance by use of a variety of relationships developed by road traffic engineers. Results of the analysis were plotted by computer. This paper outlines the methods used in the analysis, presents the data and discusses the results. It is concluded that the method provides a realistic picture of noise pollution in South Yorkshire, and might be used more widely as an instrument of regional survey.

  12. Environmental noise alters gastric myoelectrical activity: Effect of age

    PubMed Central

    Castle, James S; Xing, Jin-Hong; Warner, Mark R; Korsten, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of age and acoustic stress on gastric myoelectrical activity (GMA) and autonomic nervous system function. METHODS: Twenty-one male subjects (age range 22-71 years, mean 44 years) were recruited and exposed, in random order, to three auditory stimuli (Hospital noise, conversation babble and traffic noise) after a 20-min baseline. All periods lasted 20 min and were interspersed with a 10 min of recovery. GMA was obtained using a Synectics Microdigitrapper. Autonomic nerve function was assessed by monitoring blood pressure and heart rate using an automatic recording device. RESULTS: Dominant power tended to decrease with increase of age (P < 0.05). The overall percentage of three cycle per minute (CPM) activity decreased during exposure to hospital noise (12.0%, P < 0.05), traffic noise (13.9%, P < 0.05), and conversation babble (7.1%). The subjects in the younger group (< 50 years) showed a consistent reduction in the percentage of 3 CPM activity during hospital noise (22.9%, P < 0.05), traffic noise (19.0%, P < 0.05), and conversation babble (15.5%). These observations were accompanied by a significant increase in bradygastria: hospital noise (P < 0.05) and traffic noise (P < 0.05). In contrast, the subjects over 50 years of age did not exhibit a significant decrease in 3 CPM activity. Regardless of age, noise did not alter blood pressure or heart rate. CONCLUSION: GMA changes with age. Loud noise can alter GMA, especially in younger individuals. Our data indicate that even short-term exposure to noise may alter the contractility of the stomach. PMID:17230609

  13. Cancellation of simulated environmental noise as a tool for measuring vocal performance during noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Ternström, Sten; Södersten, Maria; Bohman, Mikael

    2002-06-01

    It can be difficult for the voice clinician to observe or measure how a patient uses his voice in a noisy environment. We consider here a novel method for obtaining this information in the laboratory. Worksite noise and filtered white noise were reproduced over high-fidelity loudspeakers. In this noise, 11 subjects read an instructional text of 1.5 to 2 minutes duration, as if addressing a group of people. Using channel estimation techniques, the site noise was suppressed from the recording, and the voice signal alone was recovered. The attainable noise rejection is limited only by the precision of the experimental setup, which includes the need for the subject to remain still so as not to perturb the estimated acoustic channel. This feasibility study, with 7 female and 4 male subjects, showed that small displacements of the speaker's body, even breathing, impose a practical limit on the attainable noise rejection. The noise rejection was typically 30 dB and maximally 40 dB down over the entire voice spectrum. Recordings thus processed were clean enough to permit voice analysis with the long-time average spectrum and the computerized phonetogram. The effects of site noise on voice sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, long-term average spectrum centroid, phonetogram area, and phonation time were much as expected, but with some interesting differences between females and males. PMID:12150372

  14. Noise

    MedlinePlus

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  15. Exploring the Relationship between Noise Sensitivity, Annoyance and Health-Related Quality of Life in a Sample of Adults Exposed to Environmental Noise

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Daniel; Welch, David; Dirks, Kim N.; Mathews, Renata

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between environmental noise and health is poorly understood but of fundamental importance to public health. This study estimated the relationship between noise sensitivity, noise annoyance and health-related quality of life in a sample of adults residing close to the Auckland International Airport, New Zealand. A small sample (n = 105) completed surveys measuring noise sensitivity, noise annoyance, and quality of life. Noise sensitivity was associated with health-related quality of life; annoyance and sleep disturbance mediated the effects of noise sensitivity on health. PMID:21139850

  16. A catalog of social surveys of residents' reactions to environmental noise, 1943 - 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Two hundred social surveys of people's responses to environmental noise in residential areas are briefly described. The surveys are indexed by country, noise source and date of survey. The publications and reports about each survey are listed in a bibliography. Recent English translations of 14 publications are listed separately. Nineteen surveys are listed which are available for secondary analysis from a data archive.

  17. An Updated Catalog of 521 Social Surveys of Residents' Reactions to Environmental Noise (1943-2000)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, James M.; Shepherd, Kevin P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes all social surveys of residents' reactions to environmental noise in residential areas that have been located in English language publications from 1943 to December of 2000. A total of 521 surveys are described. The surveys are indexed by country, noise source, and date of survey. The publications and reports from each survey are listed in a bibliography.

  18. Sleep Disturbance from Road Traffic, Railways, Airplanes and from Total Environmental Noise Levels in Montreal

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Stéphane; Plante, Céline; Ragettli, Martina S.; Kaiser, David J.; Goudreau, Sophie; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The objective of our study was to measure the impact of transportation-related noise and total environmental noise on sleep disturbance for the residents of Montreal, Canada. A telephone-based survey on noise-related sleep disturbance among 4336 persons aged 18 years and over was conducted. LNight for each study participant was estimated using a land use regression (LUR) model. Distance of the respondent’s residence to the nearest transportation noise source was also used as an indicator of noise exposure. The proportion of the population whose sleep was disturbed by outdoor environmental noise in the past 4 weeks was 12.4%. The proportion of those affected by road traffic, airplane and railway noise was 4.2%, 1.5% and 1.1%, respectively. We observed an increased prevalence in sleep disturbance for those exposed to both rail and road noise when compared for those exposed to road only. We did not observe an increased prevalence in sleep disturbance for those that were both exposed to road and planes when compared to those exposed to road or planes only. We developed regression models to assess the marginal proportion of sleep disturbance as a function of estimated LNight and distance to transportation noise sources. In our models, sleep disturbance increased with proximity to transportation noise sources (railway, airplane and road traffic) and with increasing LNight values. Our study provides a quantitative estimate of the association between total environmental noise levels estimated using an LUR model and sleep disturbance from transportation noise. PMID:27529260

  19. Sleep Disturbance from Road Traffic, Railways, Airplanes and from Total Environmental Noise Levels in Montreal.

    PubMed

    Perron, Stéphane; Plante, Céline; Ragettli, Martina S; Kaiser, David J; Goudreau, Sophie; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The objective of our study was to measure the impact of transportation-related noise and total environmental noise on sleep disturbance for the residents of Montreal, Canada. A telephone-based survey on noise-related sleep disturbance among 4336 persons aged 18 years and over was conducted. LNight for each study participant was estimated using a land use regression (LUR) model. Distance of the respondent's residence to the nearest transportation noise source was also used as an indicator of noise exposure. The proportion of the population whose sleep was disturbed by outdoor environmental noise in the past 4 weeks was 12.4%. The proportion of those affected by road traffic, airplane and railway noise was 4.2%, 1.5% and 1.1%, respectively. We observed an increased prevalence in sleep disturbance for those exposed to both rail and road noise when compared for those exposed to road only. We did not observe an increased prevalence in sleep disturbance for those that were both exposed to road and planes when compared to those exposed to road or planes only. We developed regression models to assess the marginal proportion of sleep disturbance as a function of estimated LNight and distance to transportation noise sources. In our models, sleep disturbance increased with proximity to transportation noise sources (railway, airplane and road traffic) and with increasing LNight values. Our study provides a quantitative estimate of the association between total environmental noise levels estimated using an LUR model and sleep disturbance from transportation noise. PMID:27529260

  20. Detecting Drawdowns Masked by Environmental Stresses with Water-Level Models

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, CA; Halford, KJ; Fenelon, JM

    2013-01-01

    Detecting and quantifying small drawdown at observation wells distant from the pumping well greatly expands the characterized aquifer volume. However, this detection is often obscured by water level fluctuations such as barometric and tidal effects. A reliable analytical approach for distinguishing drawdown from nonpumping water-level fluctuations is presented and tested here. Drawdown is distinguished by analytically simulating all pumping and nonpumping water-level stresses simultaneously during the period of record. Pumping signals are generated with Theis models, where the pumping schedule is translated into water-level change with the Theis solution. This approach closely matched drawdowns simulated with a complex three-dimensional, hypothetical model and reasonably estimated drawdowns from an aquifer test conducted in a complex hydrogeologic system. Pumping-induced changes generated with a numerical model and analytical Theis model agreed (RMS as low as 0.007 m) in cases where pumping signals traveled more than 1 km across confining units and fault structures. Maximum drawdowns of about 0.05 m were analytically estimated from field investigations where environmental fluctuations approached 0.2 m during the analysis period. PMID:23469925

  1. Detecting drawdowns masked by environmental stresses with water-level models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C.A.; Halford, K.J.; Fenelon, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Detecting and quantifying small drawdown at observation wells distant from the pumping well greatly expands the characterized aquifer volume. However, this detection is often obscured by water level fluctuations such as barometric and tidal effects. A reliable analytical approach for distinguishing drawdown from nonpumping water-level fluctuations is presented and tested here. Drawdown is distinguished by analytically simulating all pumping and nonpumping water-level stresses simultaneously during the period of record. Pumping signals are generated with Theis models, where the pumping schedule is translated into water-level change with the Theis solution. This approach closely matched drawdowns simulated with a complex three-dimensional, hypothetical model and reasonably estimated drawdowns from an aquifer test conducted in a complex hydrogeologic system. Pumping-induced changes generated with a numerical model and analytical Theis model agreed (RMS as low as 0.007 m) in cases where pumping signals traveled more than 1 km across confining units and fault structures. Maximum drawdowns of about 0.05 m were analytically estimated from field investigations where environmental fluctuations approached 0.2 m during the analysis period.

  2. Error Sensitivity to Environmental Noise in Quantum Circuits for Chemical State Preparation.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Nicolas P D; Smelyanskiy, Mikhail; McClean, Jarrod R; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-07-12

    Calculating molecular energies is likely to be one of the first useful applications to achieve quantum supremacy, performing faster on a quantum than a classical computer. However, if future quantum devices are to produce accurate calculations, errors due to environmental noise and algorithmic approximations need to be characterized and reduced. In this study, we use the high performance qHiPSTER software to investigate the effects of environmental noise on the preparation of quantum chemistry states. We simulated 18 16-qubit quantum circuits under environmental noise, each corresponding to a unitary coupled cluster state preparation of a different molecule or molecular configuration. Additionally, we analyze the nature of simple gate errors in noise-free circuits of up to 40 qubits. We find that, in most cases, the Jordan-Wigner (JW) encoding produces smaller errors under a noisy environment as compared to the Bravyi-Kitaev (BK) encoding. For the JW encoding, pure dephasing noise is shown to produce substantially smaller errors than pure relaxation noise of the same magnitude. We report error trends in both molecular energy and electron particle number within a unitary coupled cluster state preparation scheme, against changes in nuclear charge, bond length, number of electrons, noise types, and noise magnitude. These trends may prove to be useful in making algorithmic and hardware-related choices for quantum simulation of molecular energies. PMID:27254482

  3. Considering the influence of artificial environmental noise to study cough time-frequency features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hirtum, A.; Berckmans, D.

    2003-09-01

    In general the study of the cough mechanism and sound in both animal and human is performed by eliciting coughing in a reproducible way by nebulization of an irritating substance. Due to ventilation the controlled evaporation-protocol causes artificial noises from a mechanical origin. The resulting environmental low-frequency noises complicate cough time-frequency features. In order to optimize the study of the cough-sound the research described in this paper attempts on the one hand to characterize and model the environmental noises and on the other hand to evaluate the influence of the noise on the time-frequency representation for the intended cough sounds by comparing different de-noising approaches. Free field acoustic sound is continuously registered during 30 min citric acid cough-challenges on individual Belgian Landrace piglets and during respiratory infection experiments, with a duration of about 10 days, where room-ventilation was present.

  4. Involuntary and Persistent Environmental Noise Influences Health and Hearing in Beirut, Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Fooladi, Marjaneh M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study was conducted to assess the effects of involuntary and persistent noise exposure on health and hearing among Lebanese adults in Beirut, Lebanon, where people are exposed to noise from construction sites, power generators, honking cars, and motorcycles. Methods. Using a descriptive and exploratory design with mixed methods, participants were surveyed, interviewed, and tested for hearing while street noise levels were measured near their residents and work places. Results. Self-reports of 83 Lebanese adult, who lived and worked in Beirut, helped identify common patterns in experiences such as irritability, anger, headaches, and sleep disturbances due to noise annoyance. Of those tested, 30% suffered from high-frequency hearing impairment. Our results showed that environmental sound dB had increased by 12% and sound intensity by 400% above the maximum standard level when compared to the WHO report of 1999. Conclusion. Environmental noise contributes to premature hearing loss and potentiates systemic diseases among Lebanese. PMID:22013454

  5. Environmental Effects on Affect: Density, Noise and Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bharucha-Reid, Rodabe; Kivak, H. Asuman

    1982-01-01

    Research findings are reported of a study (N=88 undergraduate males) of molar crowding in urban centers which involved the simultaneous variation of social density, spatial density, noise, and personality as they effect room affect (physical and psychological). Several main effects proved significant. (Author/DC)

  6. Active Self-Testing Noise Measurement Sensors for Large-Scale Environmental Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Federico; Cuong, Nguyen The; Reinoso, Felipe; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone's frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor's hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50) effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10. PMID:24351634

  7. The effects of environmental and classroom noise on the academic attainments of primary school children.

    PubMed

    Shield, Bridget M; Dockrell, Julie E

    2008-01-01

    While at school children are exposed to various types of noise including external, environmental noise and noise generated within the classroom. Previous research has shown that noise has detrimental effects upon children's performance at school, including reduced memory, motivation, and reading ability. In England and Wales, children's academic performance is assessed using standardized tests of literacy, mathematics, and science. A study has been conducted to examine the impact, if any, of chronic exposure to external and internal noise on the test results of children aged 7 and 11 in London (UK) primary schools. External noise was found to have a significant negative impact upon performance, the effect being greater for the older children. The analysis suggested that children are particularly affected by the noise of individual external events. Test scores were also affected by internal classroom noise, background levels being significantly related to test results. Negative relationships between performance and noise levels were maintained when the data were corrected for socio-economic factors relating to social deprivation, language, and special educational needs. Linear regression analysis has been used to estimate the maximum levels of external and internal noise which allow the schools surveyed to achieve required standards of literacy and numeracy. PMID:18177145

  8. Noise sensitivity: Symptoms, health status, illness behavior and co-occurring environmental sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Baliatsas, Christos; van Kamp, Irene; Swart, Wim; Hooiveld, Mariëtte; Yzermans, Joris

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence on the symptomatic profile, health status and illness behavior of people with subjective sensitivity to noise is still scarce. Also, it is unknown to what extent noise sensitivity co-occurs with other environmental sensitivities such as multi-chemical sensitivity and sensitivity to electromagnetic fields (EMF). A cross-sectional study performed in the Netherlands, combining self-administered questionnaires and electronic medical records of non-specific symptoms (NSS) registered by general practitioners (GP) allowed us to explore this further. The study sample consisted of 5806 participants, drawn from 21 general practices. Among participants, 722 (12.5%) responded "absolutely agree" to the statement "I am sensitive to noise", comprising the high noise-sensitive (HNS) group. Compared to the rest of the sample, people in the HNS group reported significantly higher scores on number and duration of self-reported NSS, increased psychological distress, decreased sleep quality and general health, more negative symptom perceptions and higher prevalence of healthcare contacts, GP-registered NSS and prescriptions for antidepressants and benzodiazepines. These results remained robust after adjustment for demographic, residential and lifestyle characteristics, objectively measured nocturnal noise exposure from road-traffic and GP-registered morbidity. Co-occurrence rates with other environmental sensitivities varied between 9% and 50%. Individuals with self-declared sensitivity to noise are characterized by high prevalence of multiple NSS, poorer health status and increased illness behavior independently of noise exposure levels. Findings support the notion that different types of environmental sensitivities partly overlap. PMID:27232297

  9. Acoustical model and theory for predicting effects of environmental noise on people.

    PubMed

    Kryter, Karl D

    2009-06-01

    The Schultz [(1978). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 64, 377-405]; Fidell et al. [(1991). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 89, 221-233] and Finegold et al. [(1994). Noise Control Eng. 42, 25-30] curves present misleading research information regarding DENL/DENL levels of environmental noises from transportation vehicles and the impact of annoyance and associated adverse effects on people living in residential areas. The reasons are shown to be jointly due to (a) interpretations of early research data, (b) plotting of annoyance data for noise exposure from different types of transportation vehicles on a single set of coordinates, and (c) the assumption that the effective, as heard, levels of noise from different sources are proportional to day, night level (DNL)/day, evening night level (DENL) levels measured at a common-point outdoors. The subtraction of on-site attenuations from the measured outdoor levels of environmental noises used in the calculation of DNL/DENL provides new metrics, labeled EDNL/EDENL, for the calculation of the effective exposure levels of noises perceived as equaling annoying. Predictions of judged annoyance in residential areas from the noises of transportation vehicles are made with predicted errors of <1 dB EDNL/EDENL, compared to errors ranging from approximately 6 to approximately 14 dB by DNL/DENL. A joint neurological, physiological, and psychological theory, and an effective acoustical model for the prediction of public annoyance and related effects from exposures to environment noises are presented. PMID:19507953

  10. Environmental noise levels affect the activity budget of the Florida manatee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L.; Donaghay, Percy L.; Miller, James H.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2005-09-01

    Manatees inhabit coastal bays, lagoons, and estuaries because they are dependent on the aquatic vegetation that grows in shallow waters. Food requirements force manatees to occupy the same areas in which human activities are the greatest. Noise produced from human activities has the potential to affect these animals by eliciting responses ranging from mild behavioral changes to extreme aversion. This study quantifies the behavioral responses of manatees to both changing levels of ambient noise and transient noise sources. Results indicate that elevated environmental noise levels do affect the overall activity budget of this species. The proportion of time manatees spend feeding, milling, and traveling in critical habitats changed as a function of noise level. More time was spent in the directed, goal-oriented behaviors of feeding and traveling, while less time was spent milling when noise levels were highest. The animals also responded to the transient noise of approaching vessels with changes in behavioral state and movements out of the geographical area. This suggests that manatees detect and respond to changes in environmental noise levels. Whether these changes legally constitute harassment and produce biologically significant effects need to be addressed with hypothesis-driven experiments and long-term monitoring. [For Animal Bioacoustics Best Student Paper Award.

  11. Experiences on Science, Technology and Society (ScTS) in teaching environmental noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulin, Pablo Roberto Lizana; Redondo, Jose de Jesus Negrete; Rizo, Elena Romero

    2002-11-01

    The ScTS (Science, Technology and Society) is a new work field for a critical and interdisciplinary way to evaluate the social dimension of science and technology with regard to the social and environmental effects, in this case of environmental noise contamination. This new way to see science promotes reflection and modification of personal and professional values. Teams were organized to research the environmental noise impact on society and the human being. Then discussions were carried out in order to prepare classroom presentations. After the presentations and proposals, further discussion and conclusions about the problem were made, getting the students involved in the possible solutions. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  12. The amplification of environmental noise in population models: causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Greenman, J V; Benton, T G

    2003-02-01

    Environmental variability is a ubiquitous feature of every organism's habitat. However, the interaction between density dependence and those density-independent factors that are manifested as environmental noise is poorly understood. We are interested in the conditions under which noise interacts with the density dependence to cause amplification of that noise when filtered by the system. For a broad family of structured population models, we show that amplification occurs near the threshold from stable to unstable dynamics by deriving an analytic formula for the amplification under weak noise. We confirm that the effect of noise is to sustain oscillations that would otherwise decay, and we show that it is the amplitude and not the phase that is affected. This is a feature noted in several recent studies. We study this phenomenon in detail for the lurchin and LPA models of population dynamics. We find that the degree of amplification is sensitive to both the noise input and life-history stage through which it acts, that the results hold for surprisingly high levels of noise, and that stochastic chaos (as measured by local Lyapunov exponents) is a concomitant feature of amplification. Further, it is shown that the temporal autocorrelation, or "color," of the noise has a major impact on the system response. We discuss the conditions under which color increases population variance and hence the risk of extinction, and we show that periodicity is sharpened when the color of the noise and dynamics coincide. Otherwise, there is interference, which shows how difficult it is in practice to separate the effects of nonlinearity and noise in short time series. The sensitivity of the population dynamics to noise when close to a bifurcation has wide-ranging consequences for the evolution and ecology of population dynamics. PMID:12675369

  13. A vision of the environmental and occupational noise pollution in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Foo Keng

    2014-01-01

    Environmental noise remains a complex and fragmented interplay between industrialization, population growth, technological developments, and the living environment. Next to the circulatory diseases and cancer, noise pollution has been cited as the third epidemic cause of psychological and physiological disorders internationally. A reliable and firm relationship between the cumulative health implications with the traffic annoyance and occupational noise has been established. This agenda has called for an integrated, coordinated, and participatory approach to the reliable protection of noise interference. Despite several fragmented policies, legislation and global efforts have been addressed; the noise pollution complaints have been traditionally neglected in developing countries, especially in Malaysia. This paper was undertaken to postulate an initial platform to address the dynamic pressures, gigantic challenges, and tremendous impacts of noise pollution scenario in Malaysia. The emphasis is speculated on the traffic interference and assessment of industrial and occupational noise. The fundamental importance of noise monitoring and modeling is proposed. Additionally, the confronting conservation program and control measure for noise pollution control are laconically elucidated. PMID:25387540

  14. An updated catalog of 318 social surveys of residents' reactions to environmental noise (1943-1989)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, James M.

    1991-01-01

    All social surveys of residents' reactions to environmental noise in residential areas which were described in English language publications from 1943 to 1989 are identified. A total of 318 surveys are described. The surveys are indexed by country, noise source, and data of survey. The publications and reports from each survey are listed in a bibliography. Twenty-four surveys are listed which are available for secondary analysis from a data archive.

  15. Immersive virtual reality and environmental noise assessment: An innovative audio–visual approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ruotolo, Francesco; Maffei, Luigi; Di Gabriele, Maria; Iachini, Tina; Masullo, Massimiliano; Ruggiero, Gennaro; Senese, Vincenzo Paolo

    2013-07-15

    Several international studies have shown that traffic noise has a negative impact on people's health and that people's annoyance does not depend only on noise energetic levels, but rather on multi-perceptual factors. The combination of virtual reality technology and audio rendering techniques allow us to experiment a new approach for environmental noise assessment that can help to investigate in advance the potential negative effects of noise associated with a specific project and that in turn can help designers to make educated decisions. In the present study, the audio–visual impact of a new motorway project on people has been assessed by means of immersive virtual reality technology. In particular, participants were exposed to 3D reconstructions of an actual landscape without the projected motorway (ante operam condition), and of the same landscape with the projected motorway (post operam condition). Furthermore, individuals' reactions to noise were assessed by means of objective cognitive measures (short term verbal memory and executive functions) and subjective evaluations (noise and visual annoyance). Overall, the results showed that the introduction of a projected motorway in the environment can have immediate detrimental effects of people's well-being depending on the distance from the noise source. In particular, noise due to the new infrastructure seems to exert a negative influence on short term verbal memory and to increase both visual and noise annoyance. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. -- Highlights: ► Impact of traffic noise on people's well-being depends on multi-perceptual factors. ► A multisensory virtual reality technology is used to simulate a projected motorway. ► Effects on short-term memory and auditory and visual subjective annoyance were found. ► The closer the distance from the motorway the stronger was the effect. ► Multisensory virtual reality methodologies can be used to study

  16. Spatial variation in environmental noise and air pollution in New York City.

    PubMed

    Kheirbek, Iyad; Ito, Kazuhiko; Neitzel, Richard; Kim, Jung; Johnson, Sarah; Ross, Zev; Eisl, Holger; Matte, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Exposure to environmental noise from traffic is common in urban areas and has been linked to increased risks of adverse health effects including cardiovascular disease. Because traffic sources also produce air pollutants that increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity, associations between traffic exposures and health outcomes may involve confounding and/or synergisms between air pollution and noise. While prior studies have characterized intraurban spatial variation in air pollution in New York City (NYC), limited data exists on the levels and spatial variation in noise levels. We measured 1-week equivalent continuous sound pressure levels (Leq) at 56 sites during the fall of 2012 across NYC locations with varying traffic intensity and building density that are routinely monitored for combustion-related air pollutants. We evaluated correlations among several noise metrics used to characterize noise exposures, including Leq during different time periods (night, day, weekday, weekend), Ldn (day-night noise), and measures of intermittent noise defined as the ratio of peak levels to median and background levels. We also examined correlations between sound pressure levels and co-located simultaneous measures of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), and black carbon (BC) as well as estimates of traffic and building density around the monitoring sites. Noise levels varied widely across the 56 monitoring sites; 1-week Leq varied by 21.6 dBA (range 59.1-80.7 dBA) with the highest levels observed during the weekday, daytime hours. Indices of average noise were well correlated with each other (r > 0.83), while indices of intermittent noise were not well correlated with average noise levels (r < 0.41). One-week Leq correlated well with NO, NO2, and EC levels (r = 0.61 to 0.68) and less so with PM2.5 levels (r = 0.45). We observed associations between 1-week noise levels and traffic intensity within 100 m of the monitoring sites (r = 0

  17. Estimation of environmental noise impacts within architectural spaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y. S.; Liebich, R. E.; Chun, K. C.

    2002-05-03

    Public Law 91-596, ''Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970,'' Dec. 29, 1970, stimulated interest in modeling the impacts of interior noise on employees, as well as the intelligibility of interior public-address and other speech intra-communication systems. The classical literature on this topic has primarily featured a statistical uniform diffuse-field model. This was pioneered by Leo L. Beranek in the 1950s, based on energy-density formulations at the former Bell Telephone (AT&T) Laboratories in the years from 1930 to 1950. This paper compares the classical prediction approach to the most recent statistical methods. Such models were developed in the late 1970s and included innovations such as consideration of irregularly shaped (e.g., L-shaped) interior room spaces and coupled spaces.

  18. Estimation of environmental noise impacts within architectural spaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y. S.; Liebich, R. E.; Chun, K. C.

    2002-05-03

    Public Law 91-596, ''Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970,'' Dec. 29, 1970, stimulated interest in modeling the impacts of interior noise on employees, as well as the intelligibility of interior public-address and other speech intra-communication systems. The classical literature on this topic has primarily featured a statistical uniform diffuse-field model. This was pioneered by Leo L. Beranek in the 1950s, based on energy-density formulations at the former Bell Telephone (AT and T) Laboratories in the years from 1930 to 1950. This paper compares the classical prediction approach to the most recent statistical methods. Such models were developed in the late 1970s and included innovations such as consideration of irregularly shaped (e.g., L-shaped) interior room spaces and coupled spaces.

  19. Aircraft Noise Perception Study in Brazil: A Perspective on Airport Sustainable Growth and Environmental Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deArantesGomesEller, Rogerio; Urbina, Ligia Maria Soto; Porto, Protogenes Pires

    2003-01-01

    Aircraft noise perception is related to several variables that are tangible and objective, such as the number of operations, flight schedules. Other variables, instead, are more subjective, such as preferences. However, although their elusiveness, they contribute to determine the individuals' perception of this type of externality. Despite the fact that the complaints related to aeronautical noise have been registered since the decade of 50, it has been observed that the perception of noise seems to have grown, especially since the 80's. It has been argued that this change in noise perception has its roots on the accelerated expansion of air traffic. But, it is necessary to point out the important role played on modeling preferences, by the growing environmental conscience and the higher welfare and quality of life standards and expectations. In that context, the main objective of this paper is to study the aeronautical noise perception in the neighborhoods of the Aeroporto Internacional de Sao Paulo - AISP (the biggest airport of South America). Specifically, it analyzes the relationship between aircraft noise perception and social class, which is expected to be positive. Since noise perception is an intangible variable, this study chose as a proxy the value losses of residential properties, caused by aeronautical noise. The variable social class has been measured utilizing average per capita income of the population who live nearby the airport. The comparison of both, the lowest and the highest social class suggests that the relationship between social class and noise perception is positive in the AISP region. Moreover, it was observed that all social classes are very susceptible to aircraft noise annoyance. In fact, the magnitude of the noise perception proxy for both social classes -the residential value losses- was found to be comparable to levels encountered in developed countries.

  20. Benefits and disadvantages of self-regulation of environmental noise from military training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luz, George A.

    2002-05-01

    In a 1981 Executive decision, the Administration's Office of Management and Budget (OMB) told the Environmental Protection Agency to end funding of the Office of Noise Abatement and Control (ONAC). This decision, coupled with a specific exemption for military equipment contained in the Noise Control Act of 1972, ensured that the military departments would be self-regulating in regard to noise. This self-regulation for noise stands in contrast to the external regulation of other pollutants, such as air and water emissions. Two possible disadvantages of self-regulation are (1) reduced funding for noise management compared with funding for externally regulated pollutants, and (2) lack of an independent and external set of standards for determining acceptable limits on community noise exposure. Three possible benefits are (1) avoiding the costs of mitigating trivial violations of external standards, (2) maintaining a long-standing policy of preventing noise problems through land use planning, and (3) enabling negotiated solutions between installations and their neighboring communities. The paper ends with an examination of a negotiated solution for a community subjected to noise from the detonation of obsolete ammunition.

  1. Influence of auditory fatigue on masked speech intelligibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Martens, W. L.; Johnston, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    Intelligibility of PB word lists embedded in simultaneous masking noise was evaluated before and after fatiguing-noise exposure, which was determined by observing the number of words correctly repeated during a shadowing task. Both the speech signal and the masking noise were filtered to a 2825-3185-Hz band. Masking-noise leves were varied from 0- to 90-dB SL. Fatigue was produced by a 1500-3000-Hz octave band of noise at 115 dB (re 20 micron-Pa) presented continuously for 5 min. The results of three experiments indicated that speed intelligibility was reduced when the speech was presented against a background of silence but that the fatiguing-noise exposure had no effect on intelligibility when the speech was made more intense and embedded in masking noise of 40-90-dB SL. These observations are interpreted by considering the recruitment produced by fatigue and masking noise.

  2. From environmental noise abatement to soundscape creation through strategic noise mapping in medium urban agglomerations in South Europe.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; Remy, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    In the framework of the European Directive 2002-49-EU, the medium sized cities of Volos and Larissa in central Greece recently completed (2012) their strategic noise maps and relevant action plans that define the main strategies to reduce noise exposure of residents and introduce and preserve "quite zones". For the first time in this framework, it has been decided to introduce, as well, a general study for five specific urban districts covering not only the measurement and modeling of environmental noise levels but also qualitative surveys on the sound perception by the residents and several analyses of the urban and architectural tissue. The districts (respectively four in Volos and one in Larissa with the two of them in the center of both agglomerations) were chosen as representatives of urban situations due to their proximity to transportation infrastructures (main road network, industrial harbor facilities and both regional and intercity train network) and also because they represent different urban typologies (residential district, downtown area with or without shops, more or less densely populated neighborhood, etc.…). Sociological surveys on sound and noise perception have been implemented on some 15% of the residents per district using opened questionnaires. Soundscape analysis was also conducted through qualitative criteria. A cross-analysis of these data explains in detail the physical reasons for the existence of sound qualities that contribute to the identity of each distinct neighborhood. This paper, in a strategic plan level, has introduced valuable recommendations in order not only to preserve the sound quality on the existing sites but also to authorize developers and decision makers (mayors, architects, town planners) to evolve them positively over time. PMID:23992742

  3. Explaining "Noise" as Environmental Variations in Population Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, Timothy R.; Loge, Frank J.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2007-03-01

    The impacts of human activities on our own and other populations on the plant are making news at an alarming pace. Global warming, ocean and freshwater contamination and acidification, deforestation, habitat destruction and incursion, and in general a burgeoning human population are associated with a complete spectrum of changes to the dynamics of populations. Effects on songbirds, insects, coral reefs, ocean mammals, anadromous fishes, just to name a few, and humans, have been linked to human industry and population growth. The linkage, however, remains often ghostly and often tenuous at best, because of the difficulty in quantitatively combining ecological processes with environmental fate and transport processes. Establishing quantitative tools, that is, models, for the combined dynamics of populations and environmental chemical/thermal things is needed. This truly interdisciplinary challenge is briefly reviewed, and two approaches to integrating chemical and biological intermingling are addressed in the context of salmon populations in the Pacific Northwest.

  4. Determination and Applications of Environmental Costs at Different Sized Airports: Aircraft Noise and Engine Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Cherie; Lierens, Abigail

    2003-01-01

    With the increasing trend of charging for externalities and the aim of encouraging the sustainable development of the air transport industry, there is a need to evaluate the social costs of these undesirable side effects, mainly aircraft noise and engine emissions, for different airports. The aircraft noise and engine emissions social costs are calculated in monetary terms for five different airports, ranging from hub airports to small regional airports. The number of residences within different levels of airport noise contours and the aircraft noise classifications are the main determinants for accessing aircraft noise social costs. Whist, based on the damages of different engine pollutants on the human health, vegetation, materials, aquatic ecosystem and climate, the aircraft engine emissions social costs vary from engine types to aircraft categories. The results indicate that the relationship appears to be curvilinear between environmental costs and the traffic volume of an airport. The results and methodology of environmental cost calculation could input for to the proposed European wide harmonized noise charges as well as the social cost benefit analysis of airports.

  5. Environmental integration of measures to reduce railway noise in the Brussels Capital Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Doninck, N.; Schillemans, L.

    2003-10-01

    The Brussels Capital Region is a densely populated area with a surface area of 63 square miles and a total of 40 miles of railway lines. Earlier studies have already registered a large number of problems regarding railway noise. Moreover, the transport policy of the federal government aims to increase train travel and plans an expansion of the railway network. In order to be able to control railway noise, the Brussels authority needs an instrument that provides technical and practical information concerning: minimizing the noise produced by railways (both existing and new); the environmental integration of noise abatement measures. This paper discusses the objectives of the study, the methodology that was applied, and the main conclusions reached.

  6. Sensitivity of coded mask telescopes.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2008-05-20

    Simple formulas are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask x-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but these are strictly applicable only if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask, or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given that allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimization of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels. PMID:18493279

  7. Clay Mask Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Masks can represent so many things, such as emotions (happy, sad, fearful) and power. The familiar "comedy and tragedy" masks, derived from ancient Greek theater, are just one example from mask history. Death masks from the ancient Egyptians influenced the ancient Romans into creating similar masks for their departed. Masks can represent many…

  8. Communication masking in marine mammals: A review and research strategy.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Christine; Reichmuth, Colleen; Cunningham, Kane; Lucke, Klaus; Dooling, Robert

    2016-02-15

    Underwater noise, whether of natural or anthropogenic origin, has the ability to interfere with the way in which marine mammals receive acoustic signals (i.e., for communication, social interaction, foraging, navigation, etc.). This phenomenon, termed auditory masking, has been well studied in humans and terrestrial vertebrates (in particular birds), but less so in marine mammals. Anthropogenic underwater noise seems to be increasing in parts of the world's oceans and concerns about associated bioacoustic effects, including masking, are growing. In this article, we review our understanding of masking in marine mammals, summarise data on marine mammal hearing as they relate to masking (including audiograms, critical ratios, critical bandwidths, and auditory integration times), discuss masking release processes of receivers (including comodulation masking release and spatial release from masking) and anti-masking strategies of signalers (e.g. Lombard effect), and set a research framework for improved assessment of potential masking in marine mammals. PMID:26707982

  9. Graduate Student Learning Styles and the Environmental Factor of Noise: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Jagt, Johan W.; Anzelmo-Skelton, Nicki; Madison, Marion; Gum, Louann

    This study investigated the relationships among environmental noise (i.e., location, type, and constancy) and graduate student preferred learning styles (visual-overhead transparencies, auditory-lecture, kinesthetic-activity), gender, and age differences. The participants were 43 graduate students, who were currently teachers with experience…

  10. Combined acoustical and visual performance of noise barriers in mitigating the environmental impact of motorways.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Like; Kang, Jian

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the overall performance of noise barriers in mitigating environmental impact of motorways, taking into consideration their effects on reducing noise and visual intrusions of moving traffic, but also potentially inducing visual impact themselves. A laboratory experiment was carried out, using computer-visualised video scenes and motorway traffic noise recordings to present experimental scenarios covering two traffic levels, two distances of receiver to road, two types of background landscape, and five barrier conditions including motorway only, motorway with tree belt, motorways with 3 m timber barrier, 5m timber barrier, and 5m transparent barrier. Responses from 30 participants of university students were gathered and perceived barrier performance analysed. The results show that noise barriers were always beneficial in mitigating environmental impact of motorways, or made no significant changes in environmental quality when the impact of motorways was low. Overall, barriers only offered similar mitigation effect as compared to tree belt, but showed some potential to be more advantageous when traffic level went high. 5m timber barrier tended to perform better than the 3m one at the distance of 300 m but not at 100 m possibly due to its negative visual effect when getting closer. The transparent barrier did not perform much differently from the timber barriers but tended to be the least effective in most scenarios. Some low positive correlations were found between aesthetic preference for barriers and environmental impact reduction by the barriers. PMID:26584069

  11. Advances in the development of common noise assessment methods in Europe: The CNOSSOS-EU framework for strategic environmental noise mapping.

    PubMed

    Kephalopoulos, Stylianos; Paviotti, Marco; Anfosso-Lédée, Fabienne; Van Maercke, Dirk; Shilton, Simon; Jones, Nigel

    2014-06-01

    The Environmental Noise Directive (2002/49/EC) requires EU Member States to determine the exposure to environmental noise through strategic noise mapping and to elaborate action plans in order to reduce noise pollution, where necessary. A common framework for noise assessment methods (CNOSSOS-EU) has been developed by the European Commission in co-operation with the EU Member States to be applied for strategic noise mapping as required by the Environment Noise Directive (2002/49/EC). CNOSSOS-EU represents a harmonised and coherent approach to assess noise levels from the main sources of noise (road traffic, railway traffic, aircraft and industrial) across Europe. This paper outlines the process behind the development of CNOSSOS-EU and the parts of the CNOSSOS-EU core methodological framework which were developed during phase A of the CNOSSOS-EU process (2010-2012), whilst focusing on the main scientific and technical issues that were addressed, and the implementation challenges that are being faced before it can become fully operational in the EU MS. PMID:24582156

  12. Impact of colored environmental noise on the extinction of a long-lived stochastic population: Role of the Allee effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Eitan Y.; Meerson, Baruch

    2013-03-01

    We study the combined impact of a colored environmental noise and demographic noise on the extinction risk of a long-lived and well-mixed isolated stochastic population which exhibits the Allee effect. The environmental noise modulates the population birth and death rates. Assuming that the Allee effect is strong, and the environmental noise is positively correlated and Gaussian, we derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the joint probability distribution of the population sizes and environmental fluctuations. In the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation this equation reduces to an effective two-dimensional Hamiltonian mechanics, where the most likely path to extinction and the most likely environmental fluctuation are encoded in an instanton-like trajectory in the phase space. The mean time to extinction τ is related to the mechanical action along this trajectory. We obtain new analytic results for short-correlated, long-correlated and relatively weak environmental noise. The population-size dependence of τ changes from exponential for weak environmental noise to no dependence for strong noise, implying a greatly increased extinction risk. The theory is readily extendable to population switches between different metastable states, and to stochastic population explosion, due to a combined action of demographic and environmental noise.

  13. Strategic noise map of a major road carried out with two environmental prediction software packages.

    PubMed

    Arana, M; San Martin, R; San Martin, M L; Aramendía, E

    2010-04-01

    The main objective of this study is to analyze the differences found in the results of noise mapping using two of the most popular software techniques for the prediction of environmental noise. The location selected to conduct the comparative study is an area encompassed by the ring road that surrounds the city of Pamplona and on a grid, with a total of 6 x 10(5) points, approximately. In fact, and as the Environmental Noise Directive points out, it is a major road designated by a Member State (Spain). Configuration of the calculation parameters (discretization of the sources, ground absorption, reflection order, etc.) was as equivalent as possible as far as programs allow. In spite of that, a great number of differences appear in the findings. Although in 95.5% of the points the difference in the noise level calculated from the two programs was less than 3 dB, this general statistic result concealed some great differences. These are due to the various algorithms that programs implement to evaluate noise levels. Most differences pertain to highly screened receivers or remote ones. In the former, the algorithm of visibility is the main cause of such differences. In the latter, differences are mainly brought about by a different implementation of the propagation under homogeneous and favorable atmospheric conditions from both software systems. PMID:19301137

  14. Influence of short-term sampling parameters on the uncertainty of the Lden environmental noise indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateus, M.; Dias Carrilho, J.; Gameiro da Silva, M.

    2015-02-01

    The present study deals with the influence of the sampling parameters on the uncertainty of noise equivalent level in environmental noise measurements. The study has been carried out through the test of different sampling strategies doing resampling trials over continuous monitoring noise files obtained previously in an urban location in the city of Coimbra, in Portugal. On short term measurements, not only the duration of the sampling episodes but also its number have influence on the uncertainty of the result. This influence is higher for the time periods where sound levels suffer a greater variation, such as during the night period. In this period, in case both parameters (duration and number of sampling episodes) are not carefully selected, the uncertainty level can reach too high values contributing to a loss of precision of the measurements. With the obtained data it was investigated the sampling parameters influence on the long term noise indicator uncertainty, calculated according the Draft 1st CD ISO 1996-2:2012 proposed method. It has been verified that this method allows the possibility of defining a general methodology which enables the setting of the parameters once the precision level is fixed. For the three reference periods defined for environmental noise (day, evening and night), it was possible to derive a two variable power law representing the uncertainty of the determined values as a function of the two sampling parameters: duration of sampling episode and number of episodes.

  15. Smoke Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Smoke inhalation injury from the noxious products of fire combustion accounts for as much as 80 percent of fire-related deaths in the United States. Many of these deaths are preventable. Smoke Mask, Inc. (SMI), of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, is working to decrease these casualties with its line of life safety devices. The SMI personal escape hood and the Guardian Filtration System provide respiratory protection that enables people to escape from hazardous and unsafe conditions. The breathing filter technology utilized in the products is specifically designed to supply breathable air for 20 minutes. In emergencies, 20 minutes can mean the difference between life and death.

  16. Consideration of environmental noise effects in transportation planning by governmental entities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    Environmental concerns are reviewed with respect to major transportation systems: the interstate highway system and commercial air transportation. The type of planning that was done for interstate highway systems is described, and the shift in social value emphasis that has become apparent since the interstate system was authorized is considered. Other topics discussed include the constitutional framework for the allocation of governmental power with respect to transportation systems planning, governmental assessment of the aircraft noise problem, and evaluating the social benefit of noise abatement.

  17. Evaluation of mobile smartphones app as a screening tool for environmental noise monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, Titus S; Folorunsho, David O; Dahilo, Enoch A; Gbujie, Ibeneche O; Nwegbu, Maxwell M; Nwaorgu, Onyekwere G

    2016-01-01

    Noise is a global occupational and environmental health hazard with considerable social and physiological impact and, therefore, there is a need for regular measurements to boost monitoring and regulations of environmental noise levels in our communities. This necessitates a readily available, inexpensive, and easy to use noise measuring device. We aimed to test the sensitivity and validity of mobile "smart" phones for this purpose. This was a comparative analysis of a cross sectional study done between January 2014 and February 2015. Noise levels were measured simultaneously at different locations within Abuja Nigeria at day and night hours in real time environments. A sound level meter (SLM) (Extech407730 Digital Soundmeter, serial no.: 2310135, calibration no: 91037) and three smartphones (Samsung Galaxy note3, Nokia S, and Techno Phantom Z running on Android "Apps" Androidboy1) were used. Statistical calculations were done with Pearson correlation, T-test and Consistency within American National Standards Institute acceptable standard errors. Noise level readings for both daytime and night with the SLM and the mobile phones showed equivalent values. All noise level meters measured were <100dB. The daytime readings were nearly identical in six locations and the maximum difference in values between the SLM and Smartphone instruments was 3db, noted in two locations. Readings in dBA showed strong correlation (r = 0.9) within acceptable error limits for Type 2 SLM devices and no significant difference in the values (p = 0.12 & 0.58) for both day and night. Sensitivity of the instrument yielded 92.9%. The androidboy1 "app" performance in this study showed a good correlation and comparative high sensitivity to the Standard SLM (type 2 SLM device). However there is the need for further studies. PMID:26418486

  18. Subjective soundscapes qualitative research in the experience and evaluation of environmental noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, Uwe

    2001-05-01

    If the subjective experience and evaluation of environmental noise shall be considered and integrated into the current soundscape research, the use of qualitative research methods used in sociology and psychology will become necessary. A triangulation of research methods for measuring objective noise and for the subjective evaluation of noises and sounds on the background of subjective meanings of health and healthy living will be a fruitful way to a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon of soundscapes in the context of health and quality of life. In this contribution, a selection of qualitative research methods will be presented that allows for analyzing subjective experiences with environmental noise. Interviews focusing on narratives of episodes and situations (e.g., the episodic interview, Flick, 2002) will be outlined. Issues of how to assess the quality of qualitative research and its results will be addressed and finally the benefits and limits of the triangulation of different methods (e.g., interviews and focus groups or interviews and physical measures) will be discussed. Research experiences from the author's recent studies on health concepts of health professionals will be used for illustration.

  19. Assessment of an action against environmental noise: Acoustic durability of a pavement surface with crumb rubber.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, V F; Luong, J; Bueno, M; Terán, F; Paje, S E

    2016-01-15

    Environmental noise is a worldwide problem that has an adverse effect in the quality of life of urban population. Some work has shown that there is a correlation between environmental noise and health issues as sleep disturbance or annoyance. This study presents the time evolution of a test track fabricated with an asphalt mixture with 20% of crumb rubber by weight of bitumen, added by the wet process. A complete surface characterization has been performed by determining tire/pavement sound levels, road texture profiles, in-situ dynamic stiffness and sound absorption of compacted and extracted sample cores. Two measurement campaigns were performed: just after mixture laying and after 3 years in service. This study confirms that the use of crumb rubber as a modifier of bituminous binders (CRMB) can improve the pavement characteristics: gap-graded mixtures with crumb rubber can be used in the action plans as urban rehabilitation measure to fight noise pollution. However, this noise reduction seems to decrease with age at a rate of approximately 0.15 dB(A) per year. PMID:26519582

  20. Environmental issues: Energy, water, noise, waste, and natural resources. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Car scrappage rates and their effects on fleet fuel efficiency in the United States between 1966 and 1992 are described. Transportation energy consumption and energy intensity from 1972 to 1992 are reviewed. Pavement damage caused by buses fueled by compressed natural gas is assessed, and the market for electric vehicles is reexamined. Another paper reports on studies to evaluate the costs and benefits associated with technologies for reducing vehicle emissions. Among the papers on environmental concerns, one suggests techniques for accelerating the remediation of a hazardous waste site, and another explores the integration of the environmental review process and the new planning process known as major metropolitan transportation investment studies. Four papers tracked vehicles, airport noise generated by transportation: issues include noise generated by highspeed tracked vehicles, airport noise contours, the perceptions of helicopter noise in rural communities, and vibration-attenuating rail fasteners. The papers that address waste management discuss Superfund site cleanup efforts, control of groundwater contamination plumes during highway construction, large-scale groundwater remediation of a contaminated storm water runoff construction pond, and gas sampling and analysis of petroleum-contaminated soils. The final two papers describe wetland function and value assessment using computer-aided drafting and design and geographic information system techniques, and the mitigation of adverse impacts on natural resources and fragmentation of vertebrate habitats.

  1. On the ability of consumer electronics microphones for environmental noise monitoring.

    PubMed

    Van Renterghem, Timothy; Thomas, Pieter; Dominguez, Frederico; Dauwe, Samuel; Touhafi, Abdellah; Dhoedt, Bart; Botteldooren, Dick

    2011-03-01

    The massive production of microphones for consumer electronics, and the shift from dedicated processing hardware to PC-based systems, opens the way to build affordable, extensive noise measurement networks. Applications include e.g. noise limit and urban soundscape monitoring, and validation of calculated noise maps. Microphones are the critical components of such a network. Therefore, in a first step, some basic characteristics of 8 microphones, distributed over a wide range of price classes, were measured in a standardized way in an anechoic chamber. In a next step, a thorough evaluation was made of the ability of these microphones to be used for environmental noise monitoring. This was done during a continuous, half-year lasting outdoor experiment, characterized by a wide variety of meteorological conditions. While some microphones failed during the course of this test, it was shown that it is possible to identify cheap microphones that highly correlate to the reference microphone during the full test period. When the deviations are expressed in total A-weighted (road traffic) noise levels, values of less than 1 dBA are obtained, in excess to the deviation amongst reference microphones themselves. PMID:21157618

  2. A preliminary assessment of environmental noise from large Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) based on experiences from Swedish prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljunggren, S.

    1984-10-01

    Noise at Swedish 3 and 2 MW wind energy converters was measured. It is shown that the noise levels are close to those measured at similar units in the United States, and that the radiation is uniform in the vertical and horizontal plane. A comparatively large distance (800 to 2500 m) is needed between the prototypes and residential locations if the same basis for forming a judgement is used as for industrial noise. With suitable measures (sound insulation of machinery housing, increased cut-in wind speed, variable rotational speed of turbine) the distance for an upwind unit is reduced to 300 to 500 m, provided the masking effect of natural wind sound is taken into account.

  3. Experimental Protection of Two-Qubit Quantum Gates against Environmental Noise by Dynamical Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingfu; Suter, Dieter

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid systems consisting of different types of qubits are promising for building quantum computers if they combine useful properties of their constituent qubits. However, they also pose additional challenges if one type of qubits is more susceptible to environmental noise than the others. Dynamical decoupling can help to protect such systems by reducing the decoherence due to the environmental noise, but the protection must be designed such that it does not interfere with the control fields driving the logical operations. Here, we test such a protection scheme on a quantum register consisting of the electronic and nuclear spins of a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. The results show that processing is compatible with protection: The dephasing time was extended almost to the limit given by the longitudinal relaxation time of the electron spin.

  4. Influence of urban shapes on environmental noise: a case study in Aracaju-Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Italo C Montalvão; Bertoli, Stelamaris R; Zannin, Paulo H T

    2011-12-15

    This paper discusses the results of a study about the influence of urban shapes on environmental noise in the city of Aracaju (Brazil). The study, which involved in situ measurements and acoustic simulations using SoundPLAN software, began with an analysis of the current acoustic scenario, followed by the creation and simulation of hypothetical scenarios in as yet unoccupied sectors of the region under study. The acoustic modeling and simulations were based on measurements of equivalent-continuous sound pressure level, LAeq, and vehicle flow data, and on the region's geometrics. The results reveal that the physical characteristics of the urban shape, such as construction density, the existence of open spaces, and the shape and physical position of buildings exert a significant influence on environmental noise. PMID:22078329

  5. Influence of auditory fatigue on masked pure-tone thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Tubbs, R. L.; Johnston, P. A.; Johnston, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of four related experiments involving conditions of 3-kHz low-intensity masking, a replication of experiment I with slight variations, 3-kHz high-intensity masking, and 6-kHz low-intensity masking. The frequencies of the tones which the observers detected were 3 and 6 kHz. The observed change in masked-tone threshold as a function of fatigue is discussed. It is found that masked-tone-detection thresholds remain essentially unchanged following fatigue if the masking-noise intensity is sufficiently great.

  6. Neutral dynamics with environmental noise: Age-size statistics and species lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, David; Suweis, Samir; Formentin, Marco; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2015-08-01

    Neutral dynamics, where taxa are assumed to be demographically equivalent and their abundance is governed solely by the stochasticity of the underlying birth-death process, has proved itself as an important minimal model that accounts for many empirical datasets in genetics and ecology. However, the restriction of the model to demographic [O (√{N }) ] noise yields relatively slow dynamics that appears to be in conflict with both short-term and long-term characteristics of the observed systems. Here we analyze two of these problems—age-size relationships and species extinction time—in the framework of a neutral theory with both demographic and environmental stochasticity. It turns out that environmentally induced variations of the demographic rates control the long-term dynamics and modify dramatically the predictions of the neutral theory with demographic noise only, yielding much better agreement with empirical data. We consider two prototypes of "zero mean" environmental noise, one which is balanced with regard to the arithmetic abundance, another balanced in the logarithmic (fitness) space, study their species lifetime statistics, and discuss their relevance to realistic models of community dynamics.

  7. Neutral dynamics with environmental noise: Age-size statistics and species lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Kessler, David; Suweis, Samir; Formentin, Marco; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2015-08-01

    Neutral dynamics, where taxa are assumed to be demographically equivalent and their abundance is governed solely by the stochasticity of the underlying birth-death process, has proved itself as an important minimal model that accounts for many empirical datasets in genetics and ecology. However, the restriction of the model to demographic [O√N)] noise yields relatively slow dynamics that appears to be in conflict with both short-term and long-term characteristics of the observed systems. Here we analyze two of these problems--age-size relationships and species extinction time--in the framework of a neutral theory with both demographic and environmental stochasticity. It turns out that environmentally induced variations of the demographic rates control the long-term dynamics and modify dramatically the predictions of the neutral theory with demographic noise only, yielding much better agreement with empirical data. We consider two prototypes of "zero mean" environmental noise, one which is balanced with regard to the arithmetic abundance, another balanced in the logarithmic (fitness) space, study their species lifetime statistics, and discuss their relevance to realistic models of community dynamics. PMID:26382447

  8. Mask process simulation for mask quality improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Nobuyasu; Goto, So; Tsunoda, Dai; Shin, So-Eun; Lee, Sukho; Shon, Jungwook; Park, Jisoong

    2015-10-01

    Demand for mask process correction (MPC) is growing facing the 14nm era. We have developed model based MPC and can generate mask contours by using this mask process model. This mask process model consists of EB (development) and etch, which employs a threshold (level set) model and a variable bias model respectively. The model calibration tool accepts both CD measurement results and SEM images. The simulation can generate mask image (contour), runs with distributed computing resources, and has scalable performance. The contour simulation shows the accuracy of the MPC correction visually and provides comprehensive information about hot spots in mask fabrication. Additionally, it is possible to improve lithography simulation quality by providing a simulated mask contour. In this paper, accuracy and computational performance of mask process simulation are shown. The focus is on the difference between the calibration methods using CDs or images.

  9. New Measures of Masked Text Recognition in Relation to Speech-in-Noise Perception and Their Associations with Age and Cognitive Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besser, Jana; Zekveld, Adriana A.; Kramer, Sophia E.; Ronnberg, Jerker; Festen, Joost M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this research, the authors aimed to increase the analogy between Text Reception Threshold (TRT; Zekveld, George, Kramer, Goverts, & Houtgast, 2007) and Speech Reception Threshold (SRT; Plomp & Mimpen, 1979) and to examine the TRT's value in estimating cognitive abilities that are important for speech comprehension in noise. Method: The…

  10. Advancing Environmental Noise Pollution Analysis in Urban Areas by Considering the Variation of Population Exposure in Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, S.; Gomes, N.

    2013-05-01

    Ambient noise is a subtle form of pollution in large urban areas, degrading human health and well-being. In Europe, directives require that urban environmental noise be measured and mapped for the main periods of the daily cycle. Subsequent analyses of human exposure to noise in those periods is usually conducted using resident (i.e., nighttime) population from the census and assuming constant densities within the enumeration units. However, population distribution and densities vary considerably from night to day in metropolitan areas, and disregard for that process results in gross misestimation of exposure to ambient noise in the daytime period. This study considers the spatio-temporal variation of population distribution in assessing exposure to ambient noise in a major urban area, the city of Lisbon, Portugal. Detailed and compatible day- and nighttime population distribution maps were used, developed by means of "intelligent dasymetric mapping". After categorizing noise levels in existing maps in each period, classified according to current legislation, human exposure to ambient noise was assessed with temporally matching population surfaces. Population exposure to noise in 2000 and 2009 was compared and further analyzed in regards to main source of noise, i.e. road traffic vs. aircraft.. Results show that human exposure to noise shifts substantially in time and space, with a significant increase in exposed population from the nighttime to daytime period, especially in the higher noise levels. This is due to the combined effects of the daily variation of noise patterns and population distribution.

  11. Acoustical, sensory, and psychological research data and procedures for their use in predicting effects of environmental noises.

    PubMed

    Kryter, Karl D

    2007-11-01

    A demonstration field-research study reveals that aircraft noise measured at two one-story houses is approximately 9 dB less attenuated from measured outdoor levels than is street traffic noise, and, found in other studies, approximately 14 dB less than railway noise. Comparable differences are found between these noises from the application of basic acoustical formulas for quantifying attenuations that occur on site of one- and two-story houses. Reasonably consistent with those findings are results from attitude surveys showing that daily exposure levels of aircraft must be approximately 8 dB less than levels of street traffic noise, and approximately 13 dB less than levels of railway noise to be perceived as an equal cause of annoyance and related adverse effects. However, USA government guidelines recommend that equal exposure levels of noise measured outdoors from vehicles of transportation should be considered as being equally annoying. Changes in present USA noise-measurement procedures and noise-control guidelines are proposed that provide more accurate predictions of annoyance, related adverse effects, and criteria for setting "tolerable" limits of noise exposure in residential areas. Key acoustical and psycho-acoustical principles and data pertaining to predicting correlations between dosages of environmental noises and its effects on people and land noise zoning in residential communities are examined. PMID:18189552

  12. Environmental noise and sleep disturbance: research in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe and Newly Independent States.

    PubMed

    Ristovska, Gordana; Lekaviciute, Jurgita

    2013-01-01

    Countries from South-East Europe (SEE), Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and Newly Independent States (NIS) are in the process of harmonization with European environmental noise legislation. However, research work on noise and health was performed in some countries independently of harmonization process of adoption and implementation of legislation for environmental noise. Aim of this review is to summarize available evidence for noise induced sleep disturbance in population of CEE, SEE and NIS countries and to give directions for further research work in this field. After a systematic search through accessible electronic databases, conference proceedings, PhD thesis, national reports and scientific journals in English and non-English language, we decided to include six papers and one PhD thesis in this review: One paper from former Yugoslavia, one paper from Slovakia, one paper from Lithuania, two papers from Serbia and one paper, as also one PhD thesis from The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Noise exposure assessment focused on road traffic noise was mainly performed with objective noise measurements, but also with noise mapping in case of Lithuanian study. Sleep disturbance was assessed with the questionnaire based surveys and was assumed from dose-effect relationship between night-time noise indicator (Lnight ) for road traffic noise and sleep disturbance (for Lithuanian study). Although research evidence on noise and sleep disturbance show to be sufficient for establishing dose response curves for sleep disturbance in countries where studies were performed, further research is needed with particular attention to vulnerable groups, other noise sources, development of laboratory research work and common methodology in assessment of burden of diseases from environmental noise. PMID:23412575

  13. Psychometric functions for informational masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Kistler, Doris J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2003-12-01

    The term informational masking has traditionally been used to refer to elevations in signal threshold resulting from masker uncertainty. In the present study, the method of constant stimuli was used to obtain complete psychometric functions (PFs) from 44 normal-hearing listeners in conditions known to produce varying amounts of informational masking. The listener's task was to detect a pure-tone signal in the presence of a broadband noise masker (low masker uncertainty) and in the presence of multitone maskers with frequencies and amplitudes that varied at random from one presentation to the next (high masker uncertainty). Relative to the broadband noise condition, significant reductions were observed in both the slope and the upper asymptote of the PF for multitone maskers producing large amounts of informational masking. Slope was affected more for some listeners and conditions while asymptote was affected more for others; consequently, neither parameter alone was highly predictive of individual thresholds or the amount of informational masking. Mean slopes and asymptotes varied nonmonotonically with the number of masker components in a manner similar to mean thresholds, particularly when the estimated effect of energetic masking on thresholds was subtracted out. As in past studies, the threshold data were well described by a model in which trial-by-trial judgments are based on a weighted sum of levels in dB at the output of independent auditory filters. The psychometric data, however, complicated the model's interpretation in two ways: First, they suggested that, depending on the listener and condition, the weights can either reflect a fixed influence of masker components on each trial or the effect of occasionally mistaking a masker component for the signal from trial to trial. Second, they indicated that in either case the variance of the underlying decision variable as estimated from PF slope is not by itself great enough to account for the observed changes

  14. Assessment of noise impact on the urban environment: a study on noise-prediction models. Environmental health series

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, J.

    1986-01-01

    The report identifies, compares, and evaluates the major methods developed in Europe and North America to predict noise levels resulting from urban-development projects. Hopefully, it will guide countries that have not yet developed their own noise-prediction models to choose the model most appropriate for their particular situation. It covers prediction methods for road traffic noise and railroad traffic noise in Austria, Czecheslovakia, France, both Germany's Hungary, Netherlands, Scandinavia, Switzerland, U.K. and USA, as well as the Commission of the European Communities, and a comparison of methods. It also covers prediction methods for industrial noise from Austria, both Germany's Netherlands, Scandinavia, and U.K., and discusses calculation methods for aircraft noise around airports.

  15. Environmental noise reduction configuration: Effects on preferences, satisfaction, and speech understanding.

    PubMed

    Zakis, Justin A; Hau, Jutta; Blamey, Peter J

    2009-12-01

    The effects of four configurations of an environmental noise reduction (ENR) algorithm on preferences, speech understanding, and satisfaction were investigated. The gain reduction at 0 dB modulation depth was either 10 dB in all channels (ENR StrongFlat) or shaped from 2-10 dB across channels according to a speech importance function (ENR MildSII). This gain reduction was either invariant (ENR Constant) or varied with (ENR Variable) the noise level. Ten hearing-impaired participants blindly compared pairs of configurations in real-world situations and recorded their preferences. Sentence reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured in quiet and noise, and satisfaction was rated with speech in noise. Half of the participants preferred ENR MildSII and half preferred ENR StrongFlat. All preferred ENR Variable to ENR Constant. Overall, the preferred ENR configuration was preferred to ENR off in 90% of responses. No statistically significant effect on SRTs was found, but a clinically significant effect of up to 2 dB could not be ruled out from the available data. ENR significantly improved satisfaction for listening comfort, ease of speech understanding, and sound quality. PMID:20017682

  16. Do outdoor environmental noise and atmospheric NO2 levels spatially overlap in urban areas?

    PubMed

    Tenailleau, Quentin M; Bernard, Nadine; Pujol, Sophie; Parmentier, Anne-Laure; Boilleaut, Mathieu; Houot, Hélène; Joly, Daniel; Mauny, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    The urban environment holds numerous emission sources for air and noise pollution, creating optimum conditions for environmental multi-exposure situations. Evaluation of the joint-exposure levels is the main obstacle for multi-exposure studies and one of the biggest challenges of the next decade. The present study aims to describe the noise/NO2 multi-exposure situations in the urban environment by exploring the possible discordant and concordant situations of both exposures. Fine-scale diffusion models were developed in the European medium-sized city of Besançon (France), and a classification method was used to evaluate the multi-exposure situations in the façade perimeter of 10,825 buildings. Although correlated (Pearson's r = 0.64, p < 0.01), urban spatial distributions of the noise and NO2 around buildings do not overlap, and 30% of the buildings were considered to be discordant in terms of the noise and NO2 exposure levels. This discrepancy is spatially structured and associated with variables describing the building's environment. Our results support the presence of several co-existing, multi-exposure situations across the city impacted by both the urban morphology and the emission and diffusion/propagation phases of each pollutant. Identifying the mechanisms of discrepancy and convergence of multi-exposure situations could help improve the health risk assessment and public health. PMID:27155094

  17. Loud speech in realistic environmental noise: phonetogram data, perceptual voice quality, subjective ratings, and gender differences in healthy speakers.

    PubMed

    Södersten, Maria; Ternström, Sten; Bohman, Mikael

    2005-03-01

    A new method for cancelling background noise from running speech was used to study voice production during realistic environmental noise exposure. Normal subjects, 12 women and 11 men, read a text in five conditions: quiet, soft continuous noise (75 dBA to 70 dBA), day-care babble (74 dBA), disco (87 dBA), and loud continuous noise (78 dBA to 85 dBA). The noise was presented over loudspeakers and then removed from the recordings in an off-line processing operation. The voice signals were analyzed acoustically with an automatic phonetograph and perceptually by four expert listeners. Subjective data were collected after each vocal loading task. The perceptual parameters press, instability, and roughness increased significantly as an effect of speaking loudly over noise, whereas vocal fry decreased. Having to make oneself heard over noise resulted in higher SPL and F0, as expected, and in higher phonation time. The total reading time was slightly longer in continuous noise than in intermittent noise. The women had 4 dB lower voice SPL overall and increased their phonation time more in noise than did the men. Subjectively, women reported less success making themselves heard and higher effort. The results support the contention that female voices are more vulnerable to vocal loading in background noise. PMID:15766848

  18. [The role of the Federal Agency for Environmental Protection in the field of noise control].

    PubMed

    Verdan, G

    1982-05-01

    The public efforts in noise abatement are shared among federal, cantonal, and local authorities. Since the acceptance of a new article in the Federal Constitution concerning the protection of the environment, the federal authorities have primarily the task to prepare and issue regulations, whilst the cantonal and local authorities have to enforce them. The Federal Office for Environmental Protection has to coordinate the activities at the federal level. The main present tasks are the preparation of new regulations, to act as an advisory board for other authorities, to analyse and evaluate the noise impact of installations and facilities, to inform the public, and to prepare the future education and training of the executive officials. PMID:7113469

  19. Spectroscopy of cross-correlations of environmental noises with two qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cywinski, Lukasz; Szankowski, Piotr; Trippenbach, Marek

    A single qubit driven by an appropriate sequence of control pulses can serve as a spectrometer of local noise affecting its energy splitting. We show that by driving and observing two spatially separated qubits, it is possible to reconstruct the spectrum of cross-correlations of noises acting at various locations. When the qubits are driven by the same sequence of pulses, real part of cross-correlation spectrum can be reconstructed, while applying two distinct sequence to the two qubits allows for reconstruction of imaginary part of this spectrum. The latter quantity contains information on either causal correlations between environmental dynamics at distinct locations, or on the occurrence of propagation of noisy signals through the environment. While entanglement between the qubits is not necessary, its presence enhances the signal from which the spectroscopic information is reconstructed. This work is supported by funds of Polish National Science Center (NCN) under decision no. DEC- 2012/07/B/ST3/03616.

  20. Unconventional Impacts from Unconventional Hydropower Devices: The Environmental Effects of Noise, Electromagnetic Fields, and other Stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevelhimer, M.; Cada, G. F.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional dam-based hydropower production produces a variety of environmental stressors that have been debated and confronted for decades. In-current hydrokinetic devices present some of the same or analogous stressors (e.g., changes in sediment transport and deposition, interference with animal movements and migrations, and strike by rotor blades) and some potentially new stressors (e.g., noise during operation, emission of electromagnetic fields [EMF], and toxicity of paints, lubricants, and antifouling coatings). The types of hydrokinetic devices being proposed and tested are varied, as are the locations where they could be deployed, i.e., coastal, estuarine, and big rivers. Differences in hydrology, device type, and the affected aquatic community (marine, estuarine, and riverine) will likely result in a different suite of environmental concerns for each project. Studies are underway at the U.S. Department of Energy's national laboratories to characterize the level of exposure to these stressors and to measure environmental response where possible. In this presentation we present results of studies on EMF, noise, and benthic habitat alteration relevant to hydrokinetic device operation in large rivers. In laboratory studies we tested the behavioral response of a variety of fish and invertebrate organisms to exposure to DC and AC EMF. Our findings suggest that lake sturgeon may be susceptible to EMF like that emitted from underwater cables, but most other species tested are not. Based on recordings of various underwater noise sources, we will show how the spectral density of noises created by hydrokinetic devices compares to that from other anthropogenic sources and natural sources. We will also report the results of hydroacoustic surveys that show how sediments are redistributed behind pilings like those that could be used for mounting hydrokinetic devices. The potential effects of these stressors will be discussed in the context of possible fish population

  1. Masks and Other Disguises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploghoft, Debra

    Instructions for making simple masks are provided in this guide for teachers of elementary children. Directions with illustrations are given for constructing masks from paper plates, construction paper, plastic milk jugs, and papier-mache. Ideas include a clown mask, a flower mask, a top hat, a paper crown, and "Groucho" glasses. Types of masks…

  2. Informational masking and musical training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxenham, Andrew J.; Fligor, Brian J.; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald

    2003-09-01

    The relationship between musical training and informational masking was studied for 24 young adult listeners with normal hearing. The listeners were divided into two groups based on musical training. In one group, the listeners had little or no musical training; the other group was comprised of highly trained, currently active musicians. The hypothesis was that musicians may be less susceptible to informational masking, which is thought to reflect central, rather than peripheral, limitations on the processing of sound. Masked thresholds were measured in two conditions, similar to those used by Kidd et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 3475-3480 (1994)]. In both conditions the signal was comprised of a series of repeated tone bursts at 1 kHz. The masker was comprised of a series of multitone bursts, gated with the signal. In one condition the frequencies of the masker were selected randomly for each burst; in the other condition the masker frequencies were selected randomly for the first burst of each interval and then remained constant throughout the interval. The difference in thresholds between the two conditions was taken as a measure of informational masking. Frequency selectivity, using the notched-noise method, was also estimated in the two groups. The results showed no difference in frequency selectivity between the two groups, but showed a large and significant difference in the amount of informational masking between musically trained and untrained listeners. This informational masking task, which requires no knowledge specific to musical training (such as note or interval names) and is generally not susceptible to systematic short- or medium-term training effects, may provide a basis for further studies of analytic listening abilities in different populations.

  3. Effects of environmental noise on cognitive (dys)functions in schizophrenia: A pilot within-subjects experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Bernice; Peters, Emmanuelle; Ettinger, Ulrich; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Kumari, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment, particularly in attention, memory and executive function domains, is commonly present and associated with poor functional outcomes in schizophrenia. In healthy adults, environmental noise adversely affects many cognitive domains, including those known to be compromised in schizophrenia. This pilot study examined whether environmental noise causes further cognitive deterioration in a small sample of people with schizophrenia. Eighteen outpatients with schizophrenia on stable doses of antipsychotics and 18 age and sex-matched healthy participants were assessed on a comprehensive cognitive battery including measures of psychomotor speed, attention, executive functioning, working memory, and verbal learning and memory under three different conditions [quiet: ~ 30 dB(A); urban noise: building site noise, 68–78 dB(A); and social noise: background babble and footsteps from a crowded hall without any discernible words, 68–78 dB(A)], 7–14 days apart, with counter-balanced presentation of noise conditions across participants of both groups. The results showed widespread cognitive impairment in patients under all conditions, and noise-induced impairments of equal magnitude on specific cognitive functions in both groups. Both patient and healthy participant groups showed significant disruption of delayed verbal recall and recognition by urban and social noise, and of working memory by social noise, relative to the quiet condition. Performance under urban and social noise did not differ significantly from each other for any cognitive measure in either group. We conclude that noise has adverse effects on the verbal and working memory domains in schizophrenia patients and healthy participants. This may be particularly problematic for patients as it worsens their pre-existing cognitive deficits. PMID:27017491

  4. Effects of environmental noise on cognitive (dys)functions in schizophrenia: A pilot within-subjects experimental study.

    PubMed

    Wright, Bernice; Peters, Emmanuelle; Ettinger, Ulrich; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Kumari, Veena

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive impairment, particularly in attention, memory and executive function domains, is commonly present and associated with poor functional outcomes in schizophrenia. In healthy adults, environmental noise adversely affects many cognitive domains, including those known to be compromised in schizophrenia. This pilot study examined whether environmental noise causes further cognitive deterioration in a small sample of people with schizophrenia. Eighteen outpatients with schizophrenia on stable doses of antipsychotics and 18 age and sex-matched healthy participants were assessed on a comprehensive cognitive battery including measures of psychomotor speed, attention, executive functioning, working memory, and verbal learning and memory under three different conditions [quiet: ~30dB(A); urban noise: building site noise, 68-78dB(A); and social noise: background babble and footsteps from a crowded hall without any discernible words, 68-78dB(A)], 7-14days apart, with counter-balanced presentation of noise conditions across participants of both groups. The results showed widespread cognitive impairment in patients under all conditions, and noise-induced impairments of equal magnitude on specific cognitive functions in both groups. Both patient and healthy participant groups showed significant disruption of delayed verbal recall and recognition by urban and social noise, and of working memory by social noise, relative to the quiet condition. Performance under urban and social noise did not differ significantly from each other for any cognitive measure in either group. We conclude that noise has adverse effects on the verbal and working memory domains in schizophrenia patients and healthy participants. This may be particularly problematic for patients as it worsens their pre-existing cognitive deficits. PMID:27017491

  5. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. I - Effects of stimulus delivery rate. II - Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of varying the rate of delivery of dichotic tone pip stimuli on selective attention measured by evoked-potential amplitudes and signal detectability scores were studied. The subjects attended to one channel (ear) of tones, ignored the other, and pressed a button whenever occasional targets - tones of a slightly higher pitch were detected in the attended ear. Under separate conditions, randomized interstimulus intervals were short, medium, and long. Another study compared the effects of attention on the N1 component of the auditory evoked potential for tone pips presented alone and when white noise was added to make the tones barely above detectability threshold in a three-channel listening task. Major conclusions are that (1) N1 is enlarged to stimuli in an attended channel only in the short interstimulus interval condition (averaging 350 msec), (2) N1 and P3 are related to different modes of selective attention, and (3) attention selectivity in multichannel listening task is greater when tones are faint and/or difficult to detect.

  6. Shuttle mask floorplanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Tian, Ruiqi; Wong, Martin D.; Reich, Alfred J.

    2003-12-01

    A shuttle mask has different chips on the same mask. The chips are not electrically connected. Alliance and foundry customers can utilize shuttle masks to share the rising cost of mask and wafer manufacturing. This paper studies the shuttle mask floorplan problem, which is formulated as a rectangle-packing problem with constraints of final die sawing strategy and die-to-die mask inspection. For our formulation, we offer a "merging" method that reduces the problem to an unconstrained slicing floorplan problem. Excellent results are obtained from the experiment with real industry data. We also study a "general" method and discuss the reason why it does not work very well.

  7. Does environmental confounding mask pleiotropic effects of a multiple sclerosis susceptibility variant on vitamin D in psychosis?

    PubMed Central

    Iyegbe, Conrad O; Acharya, Anita; Lally, John; Gardner-Sood, Poonam; Smith, Louise S; Smith, Shubulade; Murray, Robin; Howes, Oliver; Gaughran, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Background: This work addresses the existing and emerging evidence of overlap within the environmental and genetic profiles of multiple sclerosis (MS) and schizophrenia. Aims: To investigate whether a genetic risk factor for MS (rs703842), whose variation is indicative of vitamin D status in the disorder, could also be a determinant of vitamin D status in chronic psychosis patients. Methods: A cohort of 224 chronic psychosis cases was phenotyped and biologically profiled. The relationship between rs703842 and physiological vitamin D status in the blood plasma was assessed by logistic regression. Deficiency was defined as a blood plasma concentration below 10 ng/µl. Potential environmental confounders of the vitamin D status were considered as part of the analysis. Results: We report suggestive evidence of an association with vitamin D status in established psychosis (ßstandardized=0.51, P=0.04). The logistic model fit significantly benefited from controlling for body mass index, depression and ethnicity (χ2=91.7; 2 degrees of freedom (df); P=1.2×1020). Conclusions: The results suggest that, in addition to lifestyle changes that accompany the onset of illness, vitamin D dysregulation in psychosis has a genetic component that links into MS. Further, comprehensive studies are needed to evaluate this prospect. PMID:27336042

  8. How Might People Near National Roads Be Affected by Traffic Noise as Electric Vehicles Increase in Number? A Laboratory Study of Subjective Evaluations of Environmental Noise

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ian; Kennedy, John; Martin, Susanna; Rice, Henry

    2016-01-01

    We face a likely shift to electric vehicles (EVs) but the environmental and human consequences of this are not yet well understood. Simulated auditory traffic scenes were synthesized from recordings of real conventional and EVs. These sounded similar to what might be heard by a person near a major national road. Versions of the simulation had 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% EVs. Participants heard the auditory scenes in random order, rating each on five perceptual dimensions such as pleasant–unpleasant and relaxing–stressful. Ratings of traffic noise were, overall, towards the negative end of these scales, but improved significantly when there were high proportions of EVs in the traffic mix, particularly when there were 80% or 100% EVs. This suggests a shift towards a high proportion of EVs is likely to improve the subjective experiences of people exposed to traffic noise from major roads. The effects were not a simple result of EVs being quieter: ratings of bandpass-filtered versions of the recordings suggested that people’s perceptions of traffic noise were specifically influenced by energy in the 500–2000 Hz band. Engineering countermeasures to reduce noise in this band might be effective for improving the subjective experience of people living or working near major roads, even for conventional vehicles; energy in the 0–100 Hz band was particularly associated with people identifying sound as ‘quiet’ and, again, this might feed into engineering to reduce the impact of traffic noise on people. PMID:26938865

  9. How Might People Near National Roads Be Affected by Traffic Noise as Electric Vehicles Increase in Number? A Laboratory Study of Subjective Evaluations of Environmental Noise.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ian; Kennedy, John; Martin, Susanna; Rice, Henry

    2016-01-01

    We face a likely shift to electric vehicles (EVs) but the environmental and human consequences of this are not yet well understood. Simulated auditory traffic scenes were synthesized from recordings of real conventional and EVs. These sounded similar to what might be heard by a person near a major national road. Versions of the simulation had 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% EVs. Participants heard the auditory scenes in random order, rating each on five perceptual dimensions such as pleasant-unpleasant and relaxing-stressful. Ratings of traffic noise were, overall, towards the negative end of these scales, but improved significantly when there were high proportions of EVs in the traffic mix, particularly when there were 80% or 100% EVs. This suggests a shift towards a high proportion of EVs is likely to improve the subjective experiences of people exposed to traffic noise from major roads. The effects were not a simple result of EVs being quieter: ratings of bandpass-filtered versions of the recordings suggested that people's perceptions of traffic noise were specifically influenced by energy in the 500-2000 Hz band. Engineering countermeasures to reduce noise in this band might be effective for improving the subjective experience of people living or working near major roads, even for conventional vehicles; energy in the 0-100 Hz band was particularly associated with people identifying sound as 'quiet' and, again, this might feed into engineering to reduce the impact of traffic noise on people. PMID:26938865

  10. Speech recognition index of workers with tinnitus exposed to environmental or occupational noise: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Tinnitus is considered the third worst symptom affecting humans. The aim of this article is to assess complaints by workers with tinnitus exposed to environmental and occupational noise. Methodology 495 workers went through an epidemiological survey at the Audiology Department of the Center for Studies on Workers’ Health and Human Ecology, from 2003 to 2007. The workers underwent tonal and vocal audiometry, preceded by a clinical and occupational history questionnaire. Two-factor ANOVA and Tukey were the statistical tests used. All the analysis set statistical significance at α=5%. Findings There was a higher prevalence of occupational tinnitus (73.7%), a predominance of female domestic workers (65.4%) in cases of environmental exposure, and predominance of male construction workers (71.5%) for occupational exposure. There was a significant difference in workers with hearing loss, who showed a mean speech recognition index (SRI) of 85%, as compared to healthy workers with a mean SRI greater than 93.5%. Signs and symptoms, speech perception, and interference in sound localization with the type of noise exposure (environmental versus occupational) comparisons found no significant differences. Conclusion Studied group’s high prevalence of tinnitus, major difficulties in speech recognition with hearing loss and the presence of individuals with normal hearing with both types of exposure justify the importance of measures in health promotion, prevention, and hearing surveillance. The findings highlight the importance of valuing the patients’ own perception as the first indication of tinnitus and hearing loss in order to help develop appropriate public policies within the Unified National Health System (SUS). PMID:23259813

  11. The Binaural Masking-Level Difference of Mandarin Tone Detection and the Binaural Intelligibility-Level Difference of Mandarin Tone Recognition in the Presence of Speech-Spectrum Noise

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Cheng-Yu; Li, Pei-Chun; Chiang, Yuan-Chuan; Young, Shuenn-Tsong; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2015-01-01

    Binaural hearing involves using information relating to the differences between the signals that arrive at the two ears, and it can make it easier to detect and recognize signals in a noisy environment. This phenomenon of binaural hearing is quantified in laboratory studies as the binaural masking-level difference (BMLD). Mandarin is one of the most commonly used languages, but there are no publication values of BMLD or BILD based on Mandarin tones. Therefore, this study investigated the BMLD and BILD of Mandarin tones. The BMLDs of Mandarin tone detection were measured based on the detection threshold differences for the four tones of the voiced vowels /i/ (i.e., /i1/, /i2/, /i3/, and /i4/) and /u/ (i.e., /u1/, /u2/, /u3/, and /u4/) in the presence of speech-spectrum noise when presented interaurally in phase (S0N0) and interaurally in antiphase (SπN0). The BILDs of Mandarin tone recognition in speech-spectrum noise were determined as the differences in the target-to-masker ratio (TMR) required for 50% correct tone recognitions between the S0N0 and SπN0 conditions. The detection thresholds for the four tones of /i/ and /u/ differed significantly (p<0.001) between the S0N0 and SπN0 conditions. The average detection thresholds of Mandarin tones were all lower in the SπN0 condition than in the S0N0 condition, and the BMLDs ranged from 7.3 to 11.5 dB. The TMR for 50% correct Mandarin tone recognitions differed significantly (p<0.001) between the S0N0 and SπN0 conditions, at –13.4 and –18.0 dB, respectively, with a mean BILD of 4.6 dB. The study showed that the thresholds of Mandarin tone detection and recognition in the presence of speech-spectrum noise are improved when phase inversion is applied to the target speech. The average BILDs of Mandarin tones are smaller than the average BMLDs of Mandarin tones. PMID:25835987

  12. Environmental noise and cardiovascular disease in adults: research in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe and Newly Independent States.

    PubMed

    Argalášová-Sobotová, L'ubica; Lekaviciute, Jurgita; Jeram, Sonja; Sevcíková, L'udmila; Jurkovicová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    The adverse effects of noise on health have been intensely explored in the past 50 years. However, the scope of research conducted in the Central and Eastern Europe, South-East Europe, and Newly Independent States is not well-known. The aim of this review was to present studies on cardiovascular effects of environmental noise in adults published since 1965 and to point out the most important issues that need to be addressed in the future. More than 100 papers on noise and health and about 20 papers on cardiovascular effects of environmental noise in adults were identified by literature search. The authors reviewed scientific international and local journals, conference proceedings, and local reports published in national languages. The major endpoints were high blood pressure, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction. The target populations were adults. Experimental and exposure-assessment studies, field, empirical studies, social surveys, and epidemiological studies are presented. The major sources of environmental noise were road and air traffic. The results were presented in tables and the most relevant articles were briefly discussed. The importance of this review is that it refers to some countries that no longer exist in the same political and governmental systems. The strength of this paper is that it includes publications that were not evaluated in earlier systematic reviews. Strategies for future noise-related research on national and global level are proposed. PMID:23412577

  13. Airport environmental noise mapping and land use management as an environmental protection action policy tool. The case of the Larnaka International Airport (Cyprus).

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2012-05-01

    The evidence from epidemiological studies on the association between exposure to traffic and aircraft noise and hypertension and ischemic heart disease has increased during the recent years. Both road traffic and aircraft noise increase the risk of high blood pressure. Environmental noise mapping, as per the 2002/49/EC Directive, is an obligation of all European Union (EU) member states. In the framework of the present article a complete Strategic Noise Mapping research and Action Noise Plans assessment and evaluation are presented and aim to access land use management as an effective tool for protection from aircraft noise. The case of the Larnaka International Airport in Cyprus, a typical Mediterranean airport, (considered as a "large airport" according to the above EU Directive and the recent Cyprus Legislation Law No. 224(Ι)/2004), is presented. In this paper a review of both assessment and action implementation procedures focusing on the dominant--in the area--aircraft traffic noise is presented, with emphasis to (a) a full calculation of Strategic Noise Map (SNM) scenarios of actual and future airport operation using the ECAC.CEAC Doc 29 methodology for both EU common indicators L(den) and L(night) in scales of 5 dB, (b) a full evaluation of results with emphasis to the Larnaka greater area land uses and the exposure of inhabitants in residences in various levels of environmental noise, and (c) a full evaluation of Noise Action Plans (NAP) introducing especially a new land use management scheme for the future Larnaka Town Land Use Plan. PMID:22425171

  14. Keeping African Masks Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Art is a good place to learn about our multicultural planet, and African masks are prized throughout the world as powerfully expressive artistic images. Unfortunately, multicultural education, especially for young children, can perpetuate stereotypes. Masks taken out of context lose their meaning and the term "African masks" suggests that there is…

  15. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Climate, Ambient Air Quality, and Noise (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Hamilton, C.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 withdrawing its Notice of Intent of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate and air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui, and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of hydrogen sulfide. the scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  16. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M.; Hamilton, C.B.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  17. Environmental seismology: What can we learn on earth surface processes with ambient noise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larose, Eric; Carrière, Simon; Voisin, Christophe; Bottelin, Pierre; Baillet, Laurent; Guéguen, Philippe; Walter, Fabian; Jongmans, Denis; Guillier, Bertrand; Garambois, Stéphane; Gimbert, Florent; Massey, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Environmental seismology consists in studying the mechanical vibrations that originate from, or that have been affected by external causes, that is to say causes outside the solid Earth. This includes for instance the coupling between the solid Earth and the cryosphere, or the hydrosphere, the anthroposphere and the specific sources of vibration developing there. Environmental seismology also addresses the modifications of the wave propagation due to environmental forcing such as temperature and hydrology. Recent developments in data processing, together with increasing computational power and sensor concentration have led to original observations that allow for the development of this new field of seismology. In this article, we will particularly review how we can track and interpret tiny changes in the subsurface of the Earth related to external changes from modifications of the seismic wave propagation, with application to geomechanics, hydrology, and natural hazard. We will particularly demonstrate that, using ambient noise, we can track 1) thermal variations in the subsoil, in buildings or in rock columns; 2) the temporal and spatial evolution of a water table; 3) the evolution of the rigidity of the soil constituting a landslide, and especially the drop of rigidity preceding a failure event.

  18. Environmentally Responsible Aviation: Propulsion Research to Enable Fuel Burn, Noise and Emissions Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zante, Dale; Suder, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program is maturing technologies to enable simultaneous reduction of fuel burn, noise and emissions from an aircraft engine system. Three engine related Integrated Technology Demonstrations (ITDs) have been completed at Glenn Research Center in collaboration with Pratt Whitney, General Electric and the Federal Aviation Administration. The engine technologies being matured are: a low NOx, fuel flexible combustor in partnership with Pratt Whitney; an ultra-high bypass, ducted propulsor system in partnership with Pratt Whitney and FAA; and high pressure ratio, front-stage core compressor technology in partnership with General Electric. The technical rationale, test configurations and overall results from the test series in each ITD are described. ERA is using system analysis to project the benefits of the ITD technologies on potential aircraft systems in the 2025 timeframe. Data from the ITD experiments were used to guide the system analysis assumptions. Results from the current assessments for fuel burn, noise and oxides of nitrogen emissions are presented.

  19. Environmentally Responsible Aviation: Propulsion Research to Enable Fuel Burn, Noise and Emissions Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zante, Dale E.; Suder, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program is maturing technologies to enable simultaneous reduction of fuel burn, noise and emissions from an aircraft engine system. Three engine related Integrated Technology Demonstrations (ITDs) have been completed at Glenn Research Center in collaboration with Pratt Whitney, General Electric and the Federal Aviation Administration. The engine technologies being matured are a low NOx, fuel flexible combustor in partnership with Pratt Whitney, an ultra-high bypass, ducted propulsor system in partnership with Pratt Whitney FAA and high pressure ratio, front-stage core compressor technology in partnership with General Electric. The technical rationale, test configurations and overall results from the test series in each ITD are described. ERA is using system analysis to project the benefits of the ITD technologies on potential aircraft systems in the 2025 timeframe. Data from the ITD experiments were used to guide the system analysis assumptions. Results from the current assessments for fuel burn, noise and oxides of nitrogen emissions are presented.

  20. Application of Portable Digital Music Player for the Long-time Monitoring of Environmental Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukagawa, Yuji; Goto, Yuichi; Noro, Yuichi; Takeo, Takashi; Kuno, Kazuhiro

    In this paper, use of portable music players with recording function to measure the environmental noise for long hours is proposed, and the method of specific operation and measurement accuracy are discussed. Specifically, players are used to record the sound, and the recorded sound is analyzed on personal computer to calculate the noise evaluation function, such as A-weighted sound pressure level or equivalent continuous level. To check the accuracy, continuous recording for 24 hours at 20 sites, targeting at the sounds received in general residence, was carried out and equivalent continuous levels over a fixed period of ten minutes were calculated. As a result, difference to the measured value by the sound level meter turned out to be less than 0.5 dB (0.26 dB with rms) when built-in microphone of sound level meter was used to record (the AC output). For this reason, when used in combination with sound level meter, back-up usage with actual sound recording is expected. Also, difference to the measured value by the sound level meter was less than 2.0 dB (1.24 dB with rms), and it is considered fully usable when portable players are used alone for such as preliminary survey.

  1. Mask degradation monitoring with aerial mask inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Wen-Jui; Fu, Yung-Ying; Lu, Shih-Ping; Jiang, Ming-Sian; Lin, Jeffrey; Wu, Clare; Lifschitz, Sivan; Tam, Aviram

    2013-06-01

    As design rule continues to shrink, microlithography is becoming more challenging and the photomasks need to comply with high scanner laser energy, low CDU, and ever more aggressive RETs. This give rise to numerous challenges in the semiconductor wafer fabrication plants. Some of these challenges being contamination (mainly haze and particles), mask pattern degradation (MoSi oxidation, chrome migration, etc.) and pellicle degradation. Fabs are constantly working to establish an efficient methodology to manage these challenges mainly using mask inspection, wafer inspection, SEM review and CD SEMs. Aerial technology offers a unique opportunity to address the above mask related challenges using one tool. The Applied Materials Aera3TM system has the inherent ability to inspect for defects (haze, particles, etc.), and track mask degradation (e.g. CDU). This paper focuses on haze monitoring, which is still a significant challenge in semiconductor manufacturing, and mask degradation effects that are starting to emerge as the next challenge for high volume semiconductor manufacturers. The paper describes Aerial inspector (Aera3) early haze methodology and mask degradation tracking related to high volume manufacturing. These will be demonstrated on memory products. At the end of the paper we take a brief look on subsequent work currently conducted on the more general issue of photo mask degradation monitoring by means of an Aerial inspector.

  2. Intelligibility of reverberant noisy speech with ideal binary masking.

    PubMed

    Roman, Nicoleta; Woodruff, John

    2011-10-01

    For a mixture of target speech and noise in anechoic conditions, the ideal binary mask is defined as follows: It selects the time-frequency units where target energy exceeds noise energy by a certain local threshold and cancels the other units. In this study, the definition of the ideal binary mask is extended to reverberant conditions. Given the division between early and late reflections in terms of speech intelligibility, three ideal binary masks can be defined: an ideal binary mask that uses the direct path of the target as the desired signal, an ideal binary mask that uses the direct path and early reflections of the target as the desired signal, and an ideal binary mask that uses the reverberant target as the desired signal. The effects of these ideal binary mask definitions on speech intelligibility are compared across two types of interference: speech shaped noise and concurrent female speech. As suggested by psychoacoustical studies, the ideal binary mask based on the direct path and early reflections of target speech outperforms the other masks as reverberation time increases and produces substantial reductions in terms of speech reception threshold for normal hearing listeners. PMID:21973369

  3. The Sensitivity of Coded Mask Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2008-01-01

    Simple formulae are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask X-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but t,hese are strictly only applicable if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given which allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimisation of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels.

  4. Computer models for masked hearing experiments with beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Erbe, C; King, A R; Yedlin, M; Farmer, D M

    1999-05-01

    Environmental assessments of manmade noise and its effects on marine mammals need to address the question of how noise interferes with animal vocalizations. Seeking the answer with animal experiments is very time consuming, costly, and often infeasible. This article examines the possibility of estimating results with software models. A matched filter, spectrogram cross-correlation, critical band cross-correlation, and a back-propagation neural network detected a beluga vocalization in three types of ocean noise. Performance was compared to masked hearing experiments with a beluga whale [C. Erbe and D. M. Farmer, Deep-Sea Res. II 45, 1373-1388 (1998)]. The artificial neural network simulated the animal data most closely and raised confidence in its ability to predict the interference of a variety of noise source with a variety of vocalizations. PMID:10335646

  5. 2013 mask industry survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive survey was sent to merchant and captive mask shops to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. 2013 marks the 12th consecutive year for this process. Historical topics including general mask profile, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, maintenance, and returns were included and new topics were added. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. While each year's survey includes minor updates based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics, the bulk of the survey and reporting structure have remained relatively constant. A series of improvements is being phased in beginning in 2013 to add value to a wider audience, while at the same time retaining the historical content required for trend analyses of the traditional metrics. Additions in 2013 include topics such as top challenges, future concerns, and additional details in key aspects of mask masking, such as the number of masks per mask set per ground rule, minimum mask resolution shipped, and yield by ground rule. These expansions beyond the historical topics are aimed at identifying common issues, gaps, and needs. They will also provide a better understanding of real-life mask requirements and capabilities for comparison to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).

  6. Mask industry assessment: 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert V.; Hector, Scott D.

    2004-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was created with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of mask technologists from semiconductor manufacturers, merchant mask suppliers, and makers of equipment for mask fabrication. This year's assessment is the third in the current series of annual reports and is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the mask industry. This report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results may be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey builds upon the 2003 survey to provide an ongoing database using the same questions as a baseline with only a few minor changes or additions. Questions are grouped into categories: general business profile information, data processing, yields and yield loss mechanisms, delivery times, returns and services. Within each category are a many questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. This assessment includes inputs from ten major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers whose revenue represents approximately 85% of the global mask market.

  7. Aerial imaging study of the mask-induced line-width roughness of EUV lithography masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojdyla, Antoine; Donoghue, Alexander; Benk, Markus P.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2016-03-01

    EUV lithography uses reflective photomasks to print features on a wafer through the formation of an aerial image. The aerial image is influenced by the mask's substrate and pattern roughness and by photon shot noise, which collectively affect the line-width on wafer prints, with an impact on local critical dimension uniformity (LCDU). We have used SHARP, an actinic mask-imaging microscope, to study line-width roughness (LWR) in aerial images at sub-nanometer resolution. We studied the impact of photon density and the illumination partial coherence on recorded images, and found that at low coherence settings, the line-width roughness is dominated by photon noise, while at high coherence setting, the effect of speckle becomes more prominent, dominating photon noise for exposure levels of 4 photons/nm2 at threshold on the mask size.

  8. A general procedure to generate models for urban environmental-noise pollution using feature selection and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Torija, Antonio J; Ruiz, Diego P

    2015-02-01

    The prediction of environmental noise in urban environments requires the solution of a complex and non-linear problem, since there are complex relationships among the multitude of variables involved in the characterization and modelling of environmental noise and environmental-noise magnitudes. Moreover, the inclusion of the great spatial heterogeneity characteristic of urban environments seems to be essential in order to achieve an accurate environmental-noise prediction in cities. This problem is addressed in this paper, where a procedure based on feature-selection techniques and machine-learning regression methods is proposed and applied to this environmental problem. Three machine-learning regression methods, which are considered very robust in solving non-linear problems, are used to estimate the energy-equivalent sound-pressure level descriptor (LAeq). These three methods are: (i) multilayer perceptron (MLP), (ii) sequential minimal optimisation (SMO), and (iii) Gaussian processes for regression (GPR). In addition, because of the high number of input variables involved in environmental-noise modelling and estimation in urban environments, which make LAeq prediction models quite complex and costly in terms of time and resources for application to real situations, three different techniques are used to approach feature selection or data reduction. The feature-selection techniques used are: (i) correlation-based feature-subset selection (CFS), (ii) wrapper for feature-subset selection (WFS), and the data reduction technique is principal-component analysis (PCA). The subsequent analysis leads to a proposal of different schemes, depending on the needs regarding data collection and accuracy. The use of WFS as the feature-selection technique with the implementation of SMO or GPR as regression algorithm provides the best LAeq estimation (R(2)=0.94 and mean absolute error (MAE)=1.14-1.16 dB(A)). PMID:25461071

  9. Methods and Tools for Monitoring and Prediction of the Large-Scale Environmental Impact of Railway Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ELBERS, F. B. J.

    2000-03-01

    Due to environmental impact regulations there is a demand for methods and tools to determine noise reception levels near railway lines. Currently, a wide variety of methods and tools is available. Fast computers now enable us to develop powerful tools that combine simplified prediction methods with GIS systems. These new systems allow the study of noise reception levels and environmental impact on a large-scale (complete network, national or international), while more detailed and labour-intensive methods and tools are used when demanded by law. This paper presents a brief overview of the noise prediction methods and tools used in the Netherlands. The focus is on the advantages and restrictions of the different methods. Finally, the paper gives an overview of the actual advantages and restrictions of the recently extended Gerano method Gerano98 (Geographic Railway Noise). Gerano was originally based on the “basic Dutch calculation rules for railway noise”. Gerano98 was extended using simplified prediction schemes for the most relevant parts of the “detailed Dutch calculation rules for railway noise”. This most recent calculation method, combined with geographic input features, provides the possibility of determining noise impact and the noise measures to be taken on both the medium and large scale. Examples of the application of the methods and tools to specific (medium- and large-scale) projects are provided. The medium-scale project presents the results of a selection of the prefered line between Amsterdam and Zwolle. The large-scale project (the complete Dutch railway network) shows the results of the comparison of noise measures at source with noise barriers or housing insulation. For both projects the applicability and the usefulness of the methods in these situations is discussed. In conclusion four developments of the Gerano concept are described which have recently been finished or will be so in the near future.

  10. The effect of complementary music therapy on the patient's postoperative state anxiety, pain control, and environmental noise satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Comeaux, Tressa; Comeaux, Tressa

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative pain is difficult to manage with analgesia alone. Complementary interventions such as music therapy provide a level of distraction, thus promoting comfort. In this study, decreased pain and environmental noise were demonstrated, without diminishing state anxiety, in a group of postoperative patients. PMID:24358573

  11. 77 FR 18297 - Air Traffic Noise, Fuel Burn, and Emissions Modeling Using the Aviation Environmental Design Tool...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Noise, Fuel Burn, and Emissions Modeling Using the Aviation... methodology for performing air quality analysis modeling for aviation sources.'' Section 2.4d states that... using the most recent EDMS model available at the start of the environmental analysis process.'' ]...

  12. An Effective, Economical Method of Reducing Environmental Noise in the Vivarium

    PubMed Central

    Young, Maggie T; French, Alan L; Clymer, Jeffrey W

    2011-01-01

    High levels of ambient noise can have detrimental effects on laboratory animal wellbeing and may affect experimental results. In addition, excessive noise can reduce technician comfort and performance. This study was performed to determine whether inexpensive, passive acoustic noise abatement measures could meaningfully reduce noise levels. Sound level measurements for various activities were obtained in the incoming processing room for pigs before and after installing gypsum acoustic paneling, covering metal-to-metal contact points with strips of adhesive-backed rubber, and replacing hard plastic wheels on transport carts with neoprene wheels. The modifications reduced the overall average noise level by 8.1 dB. Average noise levels for each activity were all less than 85 dB after the modifications. Average noise levels can be reduced effectively and economically with passive abatement methods. Intermittent spikes in noise are more difficult to control and may require attention to the individual activity. PMID:21838981

  13. An effective, economical method of reducing environmental noise in the vivarium.

    PubMed

    Young, Maggie T; French, Alan L; Clymer, Jeffrey W

    2011-07-01

    High levels of ambient noise can have detrimental effects on laboratory animal wellbeing and may affect experimental results. In addition, excessive noise can reduce technician comfort and performance. This study was performed to determine whether inexpensive, passive acoustic noise abatement measures could meaningfully reduce noise levels. Sound level measurements for various activities were obtained in the incoming processing room for pigs before and after installing gypsum acoustic paneling, covering metal-to-metal contact points with strips of adhesive-backed rubber, and replacing hard plastic wheels on transport carts with neoprene wheels. The modifications reduced the overall average noise level by 8.1 dB. Average noise levels for each activity were all less than 85 dB after the modifications. Average noise levels can be reduced effectively and economically with passive abatement methods. Intermittent spikes in noise are more difficult to control and may require attention to the individual activity. PMID:21838981

  14. High quality mask storage in an advanced Logic-Fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähnert, Carmen; Fritsche, Silvio

    2012-02-01

    High efficient mask logistics as well as safe and high quality mask storage are essential requirements within an advanced lithography area of a modern logic waferfab. Fast operational availability of the required masks at the exposure tool with excellent mask condition requires a safe mask handling, safeguarding of high mask quality over the whole mask usage time without any quality degradation and an intelligent mask logistics. One big challenge is the prevention of haze on high advanced phase shift masks used in a high volume production line for some thousands of 248nm or 193nm exposures. In 2008 Infineon Dresden qualified a customer specific developed semi-bare mask storage system from DMSDynamic Micro Systems in combination with a high advanced mask handling and an interconnected complex logistic system. This high-capacity mask storage system DMS M1900.22 for more than 3000 masks with fully automated mask and box handling as well as full-blown XCDA purge has been developed and adapted to the Infineon Lithotoollandscape using Nikon and SMIF reticle cases. Advanced features for ESD safety and mask security, mask tracking via RFID and interactions with the exposure tools were developed and implemented. The stocker is remote controlled by the iCADA-RSM system, ordering of the requested mask directly from the affected exposure tool allows fast access. This paper discusses the advantages and challenges for this approach as well as the practical experience gained during the implementation of the new system which improves the fab performance with respect to mask quality, security and throughput. Especially the realization of an extremely low and stable humidity level in addition with a well controlled air flow at each mask surface, preventing masks from haze degradation and particle contamination, turns out to be a notable technical achievement. The longterm stability of haze critical masks has been improved significantly. Relevant environmental parameters like

  15. Speech communications in noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of speech, the methods of speech masking measurement, and the effects of noise on speech communication are investigated. Topics include the speech signal and intelligibility, the effects of noise on intelligibility, the articulation index, and various devices for evaluating speech systems.

  16. Mask industry assessment: 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2003-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask technology and mask supply issues of cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was initiated in 2002 with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition.1 This paper presents the results of the second annual survey which is an enhanced version of the inaugural survey building upon its strengths and improving the weak points. The original survey was designed with the input of member company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. The assessment is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the critical mask industry. An objective is to create a valuable reference to identify strengths and opportunities and to guide investments on critical-path issues. As subsequent years are added, historical profiles can also be created. This assessment includes inputs from ten major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers representing approximately 80% of the global mask market (using revenue as the measure) and making this the most comprehensive mask industry survey ever. The participating companies are: Compugraphics, Dai Nippon Printing, Dupont Photomask, Hoya, IBM, Infineon, Intel, Taiwan Mask Company, Toppan, and TSMC. Questions are grouped into five categories: General Business Profile Information; Data Processing; Yields and Yield loss Mechanisms; Delivery Time; and Returns and Services. Within each category are a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry.

  17. Little effect of natural noise on high-frequency hearing in frogs, Odorrana tormota.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Yang, Han; Hu, Guang-Lei; Li, Shan; Xu, Zhi-Min; Qi, Zhi; Shen, Jun-Xian

    2015-10-01

    Ambient noise influences acoustic communication in animals. The concave-eared frogs (Odorrana tormota) produce high-frequency sound signals to avoid potential masking from noise. However, whether environmental noise has effect on the high-frequency hearing of frogs is largely unclear. By measuring the auditory evoked near-field potentials (AENFPs) from the torus semicircularis of the midbrain at frequencies 1-23 kHz in the presence of three noise levels, we found no significant difference in the peak-to-peak amplitude, threshold and latency of AENFP between low-level (35 dB SPL) background noise and mid-level (65 dB SPL) broadcast natural noise. For a natural noise level of 85 dB SPL, AENFP amplitude decreased and threshold and latency increased at frequencies 3-13 kHz. Spike counts evoked by stimuli at the best excitatory frequency under 85 dB SPL natural noise exposure were lower in 7-kHz CF neurons than in exposures to 35 and 65 dB SPL noise. However spike counts were similar for 14- and 20-kHz CF neurons at the three exposure levels. These findings indicate that environmental noise does not mask the responses of high-frequency tuned auditory neurons, and suggest that the acoustic communication system of O. tormota is efficiently adapted to noisy habitats. PMID:26260392

  18. Informational masking of speech in dyslexic children.

    PubMed

    Calcus, Axelle; Colin, Cécile; Deltenre, Paul; Kolinsky, Régine

    2015-06-01

    Studies evaluating speech perception in noise have reported inconsistent results regarding a potential deficit in dyslexic children. So far, most of them investigated energetic masking. The present study evaluated situations inducing mostly informational masking, which reflects cognitive interference induced by the masker. Dyslexic children were asked to identify a female target syllable presented in quiet, babble, unmodulated, and modulated speech-shaped noise. Whereas their performance was comparable to normal-reading children in quiet, it dropped significantly in all noisy conditions compared to age-, but not reading level-matched controls. Interestingly, noise affected similarly the reception of voicing, place, and manner of articulation in dyslexic and normal-reading children. PMID:26093461

  19. Object Substitution Masking: When Does Mask Preview Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Stephen Wee Hun; Chua, Fook K.

    2008-01-01

    When a target is enclosed by a 4-dot mask that persists after the target disappears, target identification is worse than it is when the mask terminates with the target. This masking effect is attributed to object substitution masking (OSM). Previewing the mask, however, attenuates OSM. This study investigated specific conditions under which mask…

  20. Investigation of EUV haze defect: molecular behaviors of mask cleaning chemicals on EUV mask surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaehyuck; Novak, Steve; Kandel, Yudhishthir; Denbeaux, Greg; Lee, Han-shin; Ma, Andy; Goodwin, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Photo-induced defects (or haze defects) on 193nm optic masks (haze defects) have been a serious problem not only to reticle engineers working for mask manufacturing and handling but also to photo-lithography engineers. The most widely accepted explanation of the root causes of haze defects is the cleaning chemical residues remaining on the mask surface and unavoidable outgassed molecules that outgas from pellicle materials when exposed to 193nm radiation. These have been significant challenges for reticle cleaning engineers who need to use cleaning chemicals whose residues do not lead to progressive defect formation on the mask and to find improved materials to minimize pellicle outgassing. It is assumed that contamination generation on EUV masks would have a higher probability than on optic masks, primarily since EUV masks are not protected by a pellicle and amorphous carbon films can accumulate during exposure to EUV light. While there is potential to mitigate the generation of carbon contamination by improving the exposure tool environment and removing carbon films using in-situ atomic hydrogen cleaning, it is not yet clear whether the reaction of mask cleaning chemicals to EUV radiation will lead to creation of progressive defects on EUV mask surfaces. With the work to being done it has been observed that carbon contamination on EUV masks dominates any effects of solvent chemicals under normal environmental or exposure conditions (from atmospheric pressure up to a vacuum level of 10-6 Torr) during EUV exposure. However, it is still unknown whether residual cleaning chemicals will provide a nucleus for progressive defect formation during exposure. This lack of understanding needs to be addressed by the industry as EUV masks are expected to undergo more frequent cleaning cycles. In this work, we will report on an investigation of the molecular behavior of cleaning chemicals on EUV mask surfaces during EUV exposure. Movement (e.g., migration or aggregation) of

  1. Protecting a quantum state from environmental noise by an incompatible finite-time measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Brasil, Carlos Alexandre; Castro, L. A. de; Napolitano, R. d. J.

    2011-08-15

    We show that measurements of finite duration performed on an open two-state system can protect the initial state from a phase-noisy environment, provided the measured observable does not commute with the perturbing interaction. When the measured observable commutes with the environmental interaction, the finite-duration measurement accelerates the rate of decoherence induced by the phase noise. For the description of the measurement of an observable that is incompatible with the interaction between system and environment, we have found an approximate analytical expression, valid at zero temperature and weak coupling with the measuring device. We have tested the validity of the analytical predictions against an exact numerical approach, based on the superoperator-splitting method, that confirms the protection of the initial state of the system. When the coupling between the system and the measuring apparatus increases beyond the range of validity of the analytical approximation, the initial state is still protected by the finite-time measurement, according with the exact numerical calculations.

  2. Mask industry assessment: 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Hector, Scott

    2005-11-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was created with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of mask technologists from semiconductor manufacturers, merchant mask suppliers, and makers of equipment for mask fabrication. This year's assessment is the fourth in the current series of annual reports and is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the mask industry. This report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results may be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey contains all of the 2004 survey questions to provide an ongoing database. Additional questions were added to the survey covering operating cost factors and equipment utilization. Questions are grouped into categories: general business profile information, data processing, yields and yield loss mechanisms, delivery times, returns and services, operating cost factors and equipment utilization. Within each category are a many questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. This assessment includes inputs from eight major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers whose revenue represents approximately 85% of the global mask market. This participation rate is reduced by one captive from 2004. Note: Toppan, DuPont Photomasks Inc and AMTC (new) were consolidated into one input therefore the 2004 and 2005 surveys are basically equivalent.

  3. Noise-induced hearing loss in children: A ‘less than silent’ environmental danger

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert V

    2008-01-01

    A review of the problems of noise-induced hearing loss in children, especially related to recreational music and the use of personal entertainment devices. The pathophysiology of noise-induced hearing loss and its associated problems (eg, tinnitus) are discussed. The evidence for an increase in noise-induced hearing loss in children and young people is reviewed. Some practical advice (for clinicians, caregivers and children) on hearing loss prevention is provided. PMID:19412364

  4. Mask and pattern characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Routh, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of the mask and pattern facility to include information on equipment accuracy, limitations, and pattern making capabilities is discussed. An insight is provided into potential areas of pattern applications, the sequence of mask making, as well as possible inputs and outputs available to the user.

  5. Mini Metal Masks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project used with kindergarten and first-grade students that focused on traditional African masks as part of a unit on the culture of West Africa. Discusses how the students created their clay masks. Includes lists of learning objectives and art materials. (CMK)

  6. Lightweight Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, W. E. I.; Baucom, R. M.; Evans, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Lightweight face mask originally developed to protect epileptic patients during seizures could have many other medical and nonmedical applications such as muscular distrophy patients, football linesmen and riot-control police. Masks are extremely lightweight, the lightest of the configurations weighing only 136 grams.

  7. Enhancement in Informational Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Xiang; Richards, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to detect a tone added to a random masker improves when a preview of the masker is provided. In 2 experiments, the authors explored the role that perceptual organization plays in this release from masking. Method: Detection thresholds were measured in informational masking studies. The maskers were drawn at random prior to…

  8. Mask industry assessment: 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Marmillion, Patricia

    2006-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the fifth in the current series of annual reports. With continued industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 survey. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns and Services, Operating Cost Factors, and Equipment Utilization. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  9. Mask industry assessment: 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Yun, Henry

    2009-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the eighth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 through 2008 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This in combination with the past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  10. Mask industry assessment: 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Yun, Henry

    2008-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the seventh in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 through 2007 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  11. Mask Industry Assessment: 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Marmillion, Patricia; Hughes, Greg

    2007-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the sixth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 and 2006 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns and Services, Operating Cost Factors, and Equipment Utilization. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  12. Mask industry assessment: 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2002-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask technology and mask supply issues of cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was created with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of member company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This assessment can be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of our critical mask industry. It should serve as a valuable reference to identify strengths and opportunities and to guide investments on critical-path issues. Questions are grouped into five categories: General Business Profile Information; Data Processing; Yields and Yield loss Mechanisms; Delivery Time; and Returns and Services. Within each category are a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  13. Perspectives on noise in the menu of environmental issues, and the role of technical solutions relative to policy approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burleson, Carl

    2005-09-01

    Over the last thirty years, the number of people affected by aircraft noise has decreased while air travel has grown dramatically. Despite this success, environmental issues, both noise and emissions, may become the key constraint on future air transportation expansion. As part of the Next Generation Air Transportation System Plan, the goal is for environmental protection that allows for sustained aviation growth. This includes reductions, in absolute terms, of community noise and local air quality emissions from aviation that significantly impact human health and welfare. Achieving these goals will require a multi-pronged approach that combines source reduction technology, operational abatement procedures, intelligent land use planning, and airport and aircraft operating restrictions. Given the interdependencies of impacts, there is a need to move from stand-alone models to an integrated tool set that allows understanding of the interactions between noise, air quality, economic costs and benefits. Such models would enable more effective evaluation of proposed air transportation system changes and allow communities and decision-makers better information to reach decisions on the proposed changes. FAA has initiated a multi-year, multi-million dollar effort to develop these models and improved capabilities and decision-making that will aid in tackling the enviornnmental challenges of aviation growth.

  14. A model of selective masking in chromatic detection.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Timothy G; Swanson, Emily A; McCarthy, Comfrey L; Eskew, Rhea T

    2016-07-01

    Narrowly tuned, selective noise masking of chromatic detection has been taken as evidence for the existence of a large number of color mechanisms (i.e., higher order color mechanisms). Here we replicate earlier observations of selective masking of tests in the (L,M) plane of cone space when the noise is placed near the corners of the detection contour. We used unipolar Gaussian blob tests with three different noise color directions, and we show that there are substantial asymmetries in the detection contours-asymmetries that would have been missed with bipolar tests such as Gabor patches. We develop a new chromatic detection model, which is based on probability summation of linear cone combinations, and incorporates a linear contrast energy versus noise power relationship that predicts how the sensitivity of these mechanisms changes with noise contrast and chromaticity. With only six unipolar color mechanisms (the same number as the cardinal model), the new model accounts for the threshold contours across the different noise conditions, including the asymmetries and the selective effects of the noises. The key for producing selective noise masking in the (L,M) plane is having more than two mechanisms with opposed L- and M-cone inputs, in which case selective masking can be produced without large numbers of color mechanisms. PMID:27442723

  15. Effects of noise on fishes: What we can learn from humans and birds

    PubMed Central

    Dooling, Robert J.; Leek, Marjorie R.; Popper, Arthur N.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the masking of pure tones in humans and birds by man-made noises and show that similar ideas can be applied when considering the potential effects of noise on fishes, as well as other aquatic vertebrates. Results from many studies on humans and birds, both in the field and in the laboratory, show that published critical ratios can be used to predict the masked thresholds for pure tones when maskers consist of complex man-made and natural noises. We argue from these data that a single, simple measure, the species critical ratio, can be used to estimate the effect of man-made environmental noises on the perception of communication and other biologically relevant sounds. We also reason that if this principle holds for species as diverse as humans and birds, it probably also applies for all other vertebrates, including fishes. PMID:24919543

  16. Effects of noise on fishes: what we can learn from humans and birds.

    PubMed

    Dooling, Robert J; Leek, Marjorie R; Popper, Arthur N

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the masking of pure tones in humans and birds by manmade noises and show that similar ideas can be applied when considering the potential effects of noise on fishes, as well as other aquatic vertebrates. Results from many studies on humans and birds, both in the field and in the laboratory, show that published critical ratios can be used to predict the masked thresholds for pure tones when maskers consist of complex manmade and natural noises. We argue from these data that a single, simple measure, the species critical ratio, can be used to estimate the effect of manmade environmental noises on the perception of communication and other biologically relevant sounds. We also reason that if this principle holds for species as diverse as humans and birds, it probably also applies for all other vertebrates, including fishes. PMID:24919543

  17. 2012 Mask Industry Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Litt, Lloyd C.

    2012-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to semiconductor industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. 2012 marks the 11th consecutive year for the mask industry survey. This year's survey and reporting structure are similar to those of the previous years with minor modifications based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics. Categories include general mask information, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, and maintenance and returns. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. Results, initial observations, and key comparisons between the 2011 and 2012 survey responses are shown here, including multiple indications of a shift towards the manufacturing of higher end photomasks.

  18. Simulating aperture masking at the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stürmer, Julian; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Preliminary investigations for an Aperture Masking Experiment at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) and its application to stellar surface imaging are presented. An algorithm is implemented which generates non redundant aperture masks for the LBT. These masks are adapted to the special geometrical conditions at the LBT. At the same time, they are optimized to provide a uniform UV-coverage. It is also possible to favor certain baselines to adapt the UV-coverage to observational requirements. The optimization is done by selecting appropriate masks among a large number (order 109) of randomized realizations of non-redundant (NR) masks. Using results of numerical simulations of the surface of red supergiants, interferometric data is generated as it would be available with these masks at the LBT while observing Betelgeuse. An image reconstruction algorithm is used to reconstruct images from Squared Visibility and Closure Phase data. It is shown that a number of about 15 holes per mask is sufficient to retrieve detailed images. Additionally, noise is added to the data in order to simulate the influence of measurement errors e.g. photon noise. Both the position and the shape of surface structures are hardly influenced by this noise. However, the flux of these details changes significantly.

  19. Self-masking: Listening during vocalization. Normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Borg, Erik; Bergkvist, Christina; Gustafsson, Dan

    2009-06-01

    What underlying mechanisms are involved in the ability to talk and listen simultaneously and what role does self-masking play under conditions of hearing impairment? The purpose of the present series of studies is to describe a technique for assessment of masked thresholds during vocalization, to describe normative data for males and females, and to focus on hearing impairment. The masking effect of vocalized [a:] on narrow-band noise pulses (250-8000 Hz) was studied using the maximum vocalization method. An amplitude-modulated series of sound pulses, which sounded like a steam engine, was masked until the criterion of halving the perceived pulse rate was reached. For masking of continuous reading, a just-follow-conversation criterion was applied. Intra-session test-retest reproducibility and inter-session variability were calculated. The results showed that female voices were more efficient in masking high frequency noise bursts than male voices and more efficient in masking both a male and a female test reading. The male had to vocalize 4 dBA louder than the female to produce the same masking effect on the test reading. It is concluded that the method is relatively simple to apply and has small intra-session and fair inter-session variability. Interesting gender differences were observed. PMID:19507970

  20. Progress of Aircraft System Noise Assessment with Uncertainty Quantification for the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burley, Casey L.; Guo, Yueping

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft system noise predictions have been performed for NASA modeled hybrid wing body aircraft advanced concepts with 2025 entry-into-service technology assumptions. The system noise predictions developed over a period from 2009 to 2016 as a result of improved modeling of the aircraft concepts, design changes, technology development, flight path modeling, and the use of extensive integrated system level experimental data. In addition, the system noise prediction models and process have been improved in many ways. An additional process is developed here for quantifying the uncertainty with a 95% confidence level. This uncertainty applies only to the aircraft system noise prediction process. For three points in time during this period, the vehicle designs, technologies, and noise prediction process are documented. For each of the three predictions, and with the information available at each of those points in time, the uncertainty is quantified using the direct Monte Carlo method with 10,000 simulations. For the prediction of cumulative noise of an advanced aircraft at the conceptual level of design, the total uncertainty band has been reduced from 12.2 to 9.6 EPNL dB. A value of 3.6 EPNL dB is proposed as the lower limit of uncertainty possible for the cumulative system noise prediction of an advanced aircraft concept.

  1. Masked Photocathode for Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-01-21

    In this research note, we propose a scheme to insert a photocathode inside a photoinjector for generating high brightness electron beam. Instead of mounting the photocathode onto the electrode, a masked electrode with small hole is used to shield the photocathode from the accelerating vacuum chamber. Using such a masked photocathode will make the replacement of photocathode material very simple by rotating the photocathode behind the mask into the hole. This will significantly increase the usage lifetime of a photocathode. Furthermore, this also helps reduce the dark current or secondary electron emission from the photocathode. The hole on the mask also provides a transverse cut-off to the Gaussian laser profile which can be beneficial from the beam dynamics point of view.

  2. Protective Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Mask to protect the physically impaired from injuries to the face and head has been developed by Langley Research Center. It is made of composite materials, usually graphite or boron fibers woven into a matrix. Weighs less than three ounces.

  3. EUVL Mask Blank Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Mirkarimi, P; Stearns, D G; Sweeney, D; Chapman, H N; Clift, M; Hector, S; Yi, M

    2002-05-22

    EUV mask blanks are fabricated by depositing a reflective Mo/Si multilayer film onto super-polished substrates. Small defects in this thin film coating can significantly alter the reflected field and introduce defects in the printed image. Ideally one would want to produce defect-free mask blanks; however, this may be very difficult to achieve in practice. One practical way to increase the yield of mask blanks is to effectively repair multilayer defects, and to this effect they present two complementary defect repair strategies for use on multilayer-coated EUVL mask blanks. A defect is any area on the mask which causes unwanted variations in EUV dose in the aerial image obtained in a printing tool, and defect repair is correspondingly defined as any strategy that renders a defect unprintable during exposure. The term defect mitigation can be adopted to describe any strategy which renders a critical defect non-critical when printed, and in this regard a non-critical defect is one that does not adversely affect device function. Defects in the patterned absorber layer consist of regions where metal, typically chrome, is unintentionally added or removed from the pattern leading to errors in the reflected field. There currently exists a mature technology based on ion beam milling and ion beam assisted deposition for repairing defects in the absorber layer of transmission lithography masks, and it is reasonable to expect that this technology will be extended to the repair of absorber defects in EUVL masks. However, techniques designed for the repair of absorber layers can not be directly applied to the repair of defects in the mask blank, and in particular the multilayer film. In this paper they present for the first time a new technique for the repair of amplitude defects as well as recent results on the repair of phase defects.

  4. New mask technology challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2001-09-01

    Mask technology development has accelerated dramatically in recent years from the glacial pace of the last three decades to the rapid and sometimes simultaneous introductions of new wavelengths and mask-based resolution enhancement techniques. The nature of the semiconductor business has also become one driven by time-to-market as an overwhelming factor in capturing market share and profit. These are among the factors that have created enormous stress on the mask industry to produce masks with enhanced capabilities, such as phase-shifting attenuators, sub-resolution assist bars, and optical proximity correction (OPC) features, while maintaining or reducing cost and cycle time. The mask can no longer be considered a commodity item that is purchased form the lowest-cost supplier. Instead, it must now be promoted as an integral part of the technical and business case for a total lithographic solution. Improving partnership between designer, mask-maker, and wafer lithographer will be the harbinger of success in finding a profitable balance of capability, cost, and cycle time. Likewise for equipment infrastructure development, stronger partnership on the international level is necessary to control development cost and mitigate schedule and technical risks.

  5. Mask Industry Assessment: 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Chan, David Y.

    2010-09-01

    A survey created supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the ninth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was basically the same as the 2005 through 2009 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  6. Mask Industry Assessment: 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. David

    2011-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the tenth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report has been used as one of the baselines to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It continues to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was essentially the same as the 2005 through 2010 surveys. Questions are grouped into following categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  7. Diagnostic System Based on the Human AUDITORY-BRAIN Model for Measuring Environmental NOISE—AN Application to Railway Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAKAI, H.; HOTEHAMA, T.; ANDO, Y.; PRODI, N.; POMPOLI, R.

    2002-02-01

    Measurements of railway noise were conducted by use of a diagnostic system of regional environmental noise. The system is based on the model of the human auditory-brain system. The model consists of the interplay of autocorrelators and an interaural crosscorrelator acting on the pressure signals arriving at the ear entrances, and takes into account the specialization of left and right human cerebral hemispheres. Different kinds of railway noise were measured through binaural microphones of a dummy head. To characterize the railway noise, physical factors, extracted from the autocorrelation functions (ACF) and interaural crosscorrelation function (IACF) of binaural signals, were used. The factors extracted from ACF were (1) energy represented at the origin of the delay, Φ (0), (2) effective duration of the envelope of the normalized ACF, τe, (3) the delay time of the first peak, τ1, and (4) its amplitude,ø1 . The factors extracted from IACF were (5) IACC, (6) interaural delay time at which the IACC is defined, τIACC, and (7) width of the IACF at the τIACC,WIACC . The factor Φ (0) can be represented as a geometrical mean of energies at both ears as listening level, LL.

  8. Noise Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  9. Masks: The Artist in Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Whether masks are made from cardboard, papier-mache, metal, wood, leather, fabric, clay or any combination of these materials, they bring out the artist in people. Young children like to wear masks when they play to pretend they were another person or animal. Masks let them fantasize and be creative. The author's students made masks representing…

  10. The subjective importance of noise spectral content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Donald; Phillips, Jonathan; Denman, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents secondary Standard Quality Scale (SQS2) rankings in overall quality JNDs for a subjective analysis of the 3 axes of noise, amplitude, spectral content, and noise type, based on the ISO 20462 softcopy ruler protocol. For the initial pilot study, a Python noise simulation model was created to generate the matrix of noise masks for the softcopy ruler base images with different levels of noise, different low pass filter noise bandwidths and different band pass filter center frequencies, and 3 different types of noise: luma only, chroma only, and luma and chroma combined. Based on the lessons learned, the full subjective experiment, involving 27 observers from Google, NVIDIA and STMicroelectronics was modified to incorporate a wider set of base image scenes, and the removal of band pass filtered noise masks to ease observer fatigue. Good correlation was observed with the Aptina subjective noise study. The absence of tone mapping in the noise simulation model visibly reduced the contrast at high levels of noise, due to the clipping of the high levels of noise near black and white. Under the 34-inch viewing distance, no significant difference was found between the luma only noise masks and the combined luma and chroma noise masks. This was not the intuitive expectation. Two of the base images with large uniform areas, `restaurant' and `no parking', were found to be consistently more sensitive to noise than the texture rich scenes. Two key conclusions are (1) there are fundamentally different sensitivities to noise on a flat patch versus noise in real images and (2) magnification of an image accentuates visual noise in a way that is non-representative of typical noise reduction algorithms generating the same output frequency. Analysis of our experimental noise masks applied to a synthetic Macbeth ColorChecker Chart confirmed the color-dependent nature of the visibility of luma and chroma noise.

  11. Overview of Mask Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Bryan J.; Jindal, Vibhu; Lin, C. C.; Harris-Jones, Jenah; Kwon, Hyuk Joo; Ma, Hsing-Chien; Goldstein, Michael; Chan, Yau-Wai; Goodwin, Frank

    2011-11-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is the successor to optical lithography and will enable advanced patterning in semiconductor manufacturing processes down to the 8 nm half pitch technology node and beyond. However, before EUV can successfully be inserted into high volume manufacturing a few challenges must be overcome. Central among these remaining challenges is the requirement to produce "defect free" EUV masks. Mask blank defects have been one of the top challenges in the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. To determine defect sources and devise mitigation solutions, detailed characterization of defects is critical. However, small defects pose challenges in metrology scale-up. SEMATECH has a comprehensive metrology strategy to address any defect larger than a 20 nm core size to obtain solutions for defect-free EUV mask blanks. SEMATECH's Mask Blank Development Center has been working since 2003 to develop the technology to support defect free EUV mask blanks. Since 2003, EUV mask blank defects have been reduced from 10000 of size greater than 100 nm to about a few tens at size 70 nm. Unfortunately, today's state of the art defect levels are still about 10 to 100 times higher than needed. Closing this gap requires progress in the various processes associated with glass substrate creation and multilayer deposition. That process development improvement in turn relies upon the availability of metrology equipment that can resolve and chemically characterize defects as small as 30 nm. The current defect reduction efforts at SEMATECH have intensively included a focus on inspection and characterization. The facility boasts nearly 100M of metrology hardware, including an FEI Titan TEM, Lasertec M1350 and M7360 tools, an actinic inspection tool, AFM, SPM, and scanning auger capabilities. The newly established Auger tool at SEMATECH can run a standard 6-inch mask blank and is already providing important information on sub-100 nm defects on EUV

  12. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  13. Orion Emergency Mask Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George C.; Graf, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Emergency mask approach on Orion poses a challenge to the traditional Shuttle or Station approaches. Currently, in the case of a fire or toxic spill event, the crew utilizes open loop oxygen masks that provide the crew with oxygen to breath, but also dumps the exhaled oxygen into the cabin. For Orion, with a small cabin volume, the extra oxygen will exceed the flammability limit within a short period of time, unless a nitrogen purge is also provided. Another approach to a fire or toxic spill event is the use of a filtering emergency masks. These masks utilize some form of chemical beds to scrub the air clean of toxic providing the crew safe breathing air for a period without elevating the oxygen level in the cabin. Using the masks and a form of smoke-eater filter, it may be possible to clean the cabin completely or to a level for safe transition to a space suit to perform a cabin purge. Issues with filters in the past have been the reaction temperature and high breathing resistance. Development in a new form of chemical filters has shown promise to make the filtering approach feasible.

  14. Orion Emergency Mask Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George C.; Graf, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Emergency mask approach on Orion poses a challenge to the traditional Shuttle or Station approaches. Currently, in the case of a fire or toxic spill event, the crew utilizes open loop oxygen masks that provide the crew with oxygen to breath, but also dumps the exhaled oxygen into the cabin. For Orion, with a small cabin volume, the extra oxygen will exceed the flammability limit within a short period of time, unless a nitrogen purge is also provided. Another approach to a fire or toxic spill event is the use of a filtering emergency masks. These masks utilize some form of chemical beds to scrub the air clean of toxic providing the crew safe breathing air for a period without elevating the oxygen level in the cabin. Using the masks and a form of smoke-eater filter, it may be possible to clean the cabin completely or to a level for safe transition to a space suit to perform a cabin purge. Issues with filters in the past have been the reaction time, breakthroughs, and high breathing resistance. Development in a new form of chemical filters has shown promise to make the filtering approach feasible.

  15. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment, Phase II, Post-Secondary Education Profile: Noise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    Noise-related training programs were reviewed in nine degree-granting institutions in seven states. These programs represent a sample, only, of the various programs available nationwide. The enrollment profile and average number of graduates by degree level for the past three years are given, as well as the apparent enrollment trends by degree…

  16. Development of computer program ENAUDIBL for computation of the sensation levels of multiple, complex, intrusive sounds in the presence of residual environmental masking noise

    SciTech Connect

    Liebich, R. E.; Chang, Y.-S.; Chun, K. C.

    2000-03-31

    The relative audibility of multiple sounds occurs in separate, independent channels (frequency bands) termed critical bands or equivalent rectangular (filter-response) bandwidths (ERBs) of frequency. The true nature of human hearing is a function of a complex combination of subjective factors, both auditory and nonauditory. Assessment of the probability of individual annoyance, community-complaint reaction levels, speech intelligibility, and the most cost-effective mitigation actions requires sensation-level data; these data are one of the most important auditory factors. However, sensation levels cannot be calculated by using single-number, A-weighted sound level values. This paper describes specific steps to compute sensation levels. A unique, newly developed procedure is used, which simplifies and improves the accuracy of such computations by the use of maximum sensation levels that occur, for each intrusive-sound spectrum, within each ERB. The newly developed program ENAUDIBL makes use of ERB sensation-level values generated with some computational subroutines developed for the formerly documented program SPECTRAN.

  17. EFFECT OF MASKED REGIONS ON WEAK-LENSING STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamana, Takashi

    2013-09-10

    Sky masking is unavoidable in wide-field weak-lensing observations. We study how masks affect the measurement of statistics of matter distribution probed by weak gravitational lensing. We first use 1000 cosmological ray-tracing simulations to examine in detail the impact of masked regions on the weak-lensing Minkowski Functionals (MFs). We consider actual sky masks used for a Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging survey. The masks increase the variance of the convergence field and the expected values of the MFs are biased. The bias then compromises the non-Gaussian signals induced by the gravitational growth of structure. We then explore how masks affect cosmological parameter estimation. We calculate the cumulative signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for masked maps to study the information content of lensing MFs. We show that the degradation of S/N for masked maps is mainly determined by the effective survey area. We also perform simple {chi}{sup 2} analysis to show the impact of lensing MF bias due to masked regions. Finally, we compare ray-tracing simulations with data from a Subaru 2 deg{sup 2} survey in order to address if the observed lensing MFs are consistent with those of the standard cosmology. The resulting {chi}{sup 2}/n{sub dof} = 29.6/30 for three combined MFs, obtained with the mask effects taken into account, suggests that the observational data are indeed consistent with the standard {Lambda}CDM model. We conclude that the lensing MFs are a powerful probe of cosmology only if mask effects are correctly taken into account.

  18. Effect of Masked Regions on Weak-lensing Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamana, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Sky masking is unavoidable in wide-field weak-lensing observations. We study how masks affect the measurement of statistics of matter distribution probed by weak gravitational lensing. We first use 1000 cosmological ray-tracing simulations to examine in detail the impact of masked regions on the weak-lensing Minkowski Functionals (MFs). We consider actual sky masks used for a Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging survey. The masks increase the variance of the convergence field and the expected values of the MFs are biased. The bias then compromises the non-Gaussian signals induced by the gravitational growth of structure. We then explore how masks affect cosmological parameter estimation. We calculate the cumulative signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for masked maps to study the information content of lensing MFs. We show that the degradation of S/N for masked maps is mainly determined by the effective survey area. We also perform simple χ2 analysis to show the impact of lensing MF bias due to masked regions. Finally, we compare ray-tracing simulations with data from a Subaru 2 deg2 survey in order to address if the observed lensing MFs are consistent with those of the standard cosmology. The resulting χ2/n dof = 29.6/30 for three combined MFs, obtained with the mask effects taken into account, suggests that the observational data are indeed consistent with the standard ΛCDM model. We conclude that the lensing MFs are a powerful probe of cosmology only if mask effects are correctly taken into account.

  19. Environmental noise characteristics of the MOD5-B (3.2 MW) wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1989-01-01

    Both narrow band and broad band acoustic data were obtained for the MOD5-B wind turbine for a range of wind speeds from 5.8 to 14.3 m/s; for a range of power outputs from 300 to 3100 kW; and for various azimuth angles and distances. Comparisons are made with those of other large machines and with predictions by available methods. The highest levels occur at the lower frequencies and generally decrease as the frequency increases. Low frequency rotational noise components were more intense than expected for an upwind machine and are believed to result from localized wind gradients across the rotor disk due to upwind terrain features. Predicted broad band spectra follow the general trends of the data but tend to underestimate the levels in the frequency range where the turbulent boundary layer-trailing edge interaction noise is expected to be significant.

  20. Fdtd Calculation of Linear Acoustic Phenomena and Its Application to Architectural Acoustics and Environmental Noise Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, S.

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is widely used as an effective and powerful tool for analyzing acoustic problems. In architectural acoustics, impulse response is the most important quantity and therefore the FDTD method, by which the physical quantities are obtained in time domain, is more advantageous than other wave-based analysis methods, by many of which the calculation is performed in frequency domain. This paper reports application of the FDTD method to room acoustics and outdoor noise assessment.

  1. Effect of broadband-noise masking on the behavioral response of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) to 1-s duration 6-7 kHz sonar up-sweeps.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Steen, Nele; de Jong, Christ; Wensveen, Paul J; Verboom, Willem C

    2011-04-01

    Naval sonar systems produce signals which may affect the behavior of harbor porpoises, though their effect may be reduced by ambient noise. To show how natural ambient noise influences the effect of sonar sweeps on porpoises, a porpoise in a pool was exposed to 1-s duration up-sweeps, similar in frequency range (6-7 kHz) to those of existing naval sonar systems. The sweep signals had randomly generated sweep intervals of 3-7 s (duty cycle: 19%). Behavioral parameters during exposure to signals were compared to those during baseline periods. The sessions were conducted under five background noise conditions: the local normal ambient noise and four conditions mimicking the spectra for wind-generated noise at Sea States 2-8. In all conditions, the sweeps caused the porpoise to swim further away from the transducer, surface more often, swim faster, and breathe more forcefully than during the baseline periods. However, the higher the background noise level, the smaller the effects of the sweeps on the surfacing behavior of the porpoise. Therefore, the effects of naval sonar systems on harbor porpoises are determined not only by the received level of the signals and the hearing sensitivity of the animals but also by the background noise. PMID:21476686

  2. Discrimination of environmental background noise in presence of speech using sample-pairs statistics based features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhanwar, D.; Sharma, Kamlesh K.; Modani, S. G.

    2015-09-01

    A methodology to discriminate the different classes of background noise using new features based on samples of the signal is presented here. Two consecutive samples of different amplitude of the discretetime signals are termed as sample-pair and 14 types of sample-pairs are considered here as fundamental features. Results of simulation work proves that count of some of such type of sample-pairs as well as count of few combinations of two, three and four such sample-pairs are useful to detect and discriminate the different acoustic noise mixed with speech signals. On the basis of simulation results, the performance of proposed features have proved better than other spectral features like Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC), Spectral Centroid, Spectral Flux and Spectral Roll-off regarding discrimination capabilities, simplicity of extraction process and lesser dependency over speech utterances mixed with noise. These sample-pairs based features having advantage of not requiring frame-decomposition and silence period removal. Their discrimination capabilities are shown by Fisher's F-ratio as performance index. The multiclass Support Vector Machine (SVM) is used as a classifier.

  3. Masking Release in Children and Adults With Hearing Loss When Using Amplification

    PubMed Central

    McCreery, Ryan; Kopun, Judy; Lewis, Dawna; Alexander, Joshua; Stelmachowicz, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared masking release for adults and children with normal hearing and hearing loss. For the participants with hearing loss, masking release using simulated hearing aid amplification with 2 different compression speeds (slow, fast) was compared. Method Sentence recognition in unmodulated noise was compared with recognition in modulated noise (masking release). Recognition was measured for participants with hearing loss using individualized amplification via the hearing-aid simulator. Results Adults with hearing loss showed greater masking release than the children with hearing loss. Average masking release was small (1 dB) and did not depend on hearing status. Masking release was comparable for slow and fast compression. Conclusions The use of amplification in this study contrasts with previous studies that did not use amplification. The results suggest that when differences in audibility are reduced, participants with hearing loss may be able to take advantage of dips in the noise levels, similar to participants with normal hearing. Although children required a more favorable signal-to-noise ratio than adults for both unmodulated and modulated noise, masking release was not statistically different. However, the ability to detect a difference may have been limited by the small amount of masking release observed. PMID:26540194

  4. Characterizing large river sounds: Providing context for understanding the environmental effects of noise produced by hydrokinetic turbines.

    PubMed

    Bevelhimer, Mark S; Deng, Z Daniel; Scherelis, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Underwater noise associated with the installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in rivers and tidal zones presents a potential environmental concern for fish and marine mammals. Comparing the spectral quality of sounds emitted by hydrokinetic turbines to natural and other anthropogenic sound sources is an initial step at understanding potential environmental impacts. Underwater recordings were obtained from passing vessels and natural underwater sound sources in static and flowing waters. Static water measurements were taken in a lake with minimal background noise. Flowing water measurements were taken at a previously proposed deployment site for hydrokinetic turbines on the Mississippi River, where sounds created by flowing water are part of all measurements, both natural ambient and anthropogenic sources. Vessel sizes ranged from a small fishing boat with 60 hp outboard motor to an 18-unit barge train being pushed upstream by tugboat. As expected, large vessels with large engines created the highest sound levels, which were, on average, 40 dB greater than the sound created by an operating hydrokinetic turbine. A comparison of sound levels from the same sources at different distances using both spherical and cylindrical sound attenuation functions suggests that spherical model results more closely approximate observed sound attenuation. PMID:26827007

  5. Effects of ship noise on the detectability of communication signals in the Lusitanian toadfish.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Raquel O; Amorim, M Clara P; Ladich, Friedrich

    2007-06-01

    Underwater noise pollution is an increasing environmental problem which might affect communication, behaviour, fitness and consequently species' survival. The most common anthropogenic noises in aquatic habitats derive from shipping. In the present study we investigated the implications of noise pollution from a ship on the sound detectability, namely of conspecific vocalizations in the Lusitanian toadfish, Halobatrachus didactylus. Ambient and ferry-boat noises were recorded in the Tagus River estuary (Portugal), as well as toadfish sounds, and their sound pressure levels determined. Hearing sensitivities were measured under quiet lab conditions and in the presence of these masking noises at levels encountered in the field, using the auditory evoked potentials (AEP) recording technique. The Lusitanian toadfish is a hearing generalist, with best hearing sensitivity at low frequencies between 50 and 200 Hz (below 100 dB re. 1 microPa). Under ambient noise conditions, hearing was only slightly masked at lower frequencies. In the presence of ship noise, auditory thresholds increased considerably, by up to 36 dB, at most frequencies tested. This is mainly because the main energies of ferry-boat noise were within the most sensitive hearing range of this species. Comparisons between masked audiograms and sound spectra of the toadfish's mating and agonistic vocalizations revealed that ship noise decreased the ability to detect conspecific acoustic signals. This study provides the first evidence that fishes' auditory sensitivity can be impaired by ship noise and that acoustic communication, which is essential during agonistic encounters and mate attraction, might be restricted in coastal environments altered by human activity. PMID:17562883

  6. Masked mycotoxins: A review

    PubMed Central

    Berthiller, Franz; Crews, Colin; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Saeger, Sarah De; Haesaert, Geert; Karlovsky, Petr; Oswald, Isabelle P; Seefelder, Walburga; Speijers, Gerrit; Stroka, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on plant metabolites of mycotoxins, also called masked mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites, toxic to human and animals. Toxigenic fungi often grow on edible plants, thus contaminating food and feed. Plants, as living organisms, can alter the chemical structure of mycotoxins as part of their defence against xenobiotics. The extractable conjugated or non-extractable bound mycotoxins formed remain present in the plant tissue but are currently neither routinely screened for in food nor regulated by legislation, thus they may be considered masked. Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, fusaric acid) are prone to metabolisation or binding by plants, but transformation of other mycotoxins by plants (ochratoxin A, patulin, destruxins) has also been described. Toxicological data are scarce, but several studies highlight the potential threat to consumer safety from these substances. In particular, the possible hydrolysis of masked mycotoxins back to their toxic parents during mammalian digestion raises concerns. Dedicated chapters of this article address plant metabolism as well as the occurrence of masked mycotoxins in food, analytical aspects for their determination, toxicology and their impact on stakeholders. PMID:23047235

  7. Apodized Phase Mask Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Among the optical instruments proposed to detect and characterize exoplanets, phase masks coronagraphs offer very small inner working angles. Designed for off-axis telescopes, their performance is greatly reduced when used with centrally obstructed apertures such as those of the Palomar telescope, the very large telescope, or the James Webb space telescope. However, a clear circular aperture is not the only pupil shape for which a phase mask coronagraph can work properly. In fact, for a given centrally obstructed aperture, we show that it is possible to compute optimal apodizers that help achieve stellar extinction levels similar to those obtained in the ideal case of an off-axis telescope. Trade-offs exist between these levels, the transmission of the apodizer, and the area covered by the Lyot stop. We detail the Fourier optics formalism that makes these optimizations possible, as well as a few examples of shaped pupils. Some are designed for a four-quadrants phase mask, and some others for a vortex phase mask. We also offer a comparison with a coronagraph solely composed of a shaped pupil.

  8. Competing for Consciousness: Prolonged Mask Exposure Reduces Object Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhew, Stephanie C.; Visser, Troy A. W.; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    In object substitution masking (OSM) a sparse, temporally trailing 4-dot mask impairs target identification, even though it has different contours from, and does not spatially overlap with the target. Here, we demonstrate a previously unknown characteristic of OSM: Observers show reduced masking at prolonged (e.g., 640 ms) relative to intermediate…

  9. To enhance imaging performance of hybrid imaging systems by using two asymmetrical phase masks.

    PubMed

    Le, Van Nhu; Chen, Shouqian; Fan, Zhigang; Pham, Nghia Minh

    2016-02-10

    We propose the use of two asymmetrical phase masks combined with the subtracted imaging method to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio in wavefront coding systems. This subtracted imaging technique is similar to the variable pinhole diameter in confocal microscopy. Two different phase modulations of same phase masks are employed to promote the magnitude of the optical transfer function (OTF). The ratio factor is used to control the phase variation between two phase masks. The noise of decoded images is suppressed owing to the higher magnitude of the OTF than the wavefront coding systems with a phase mask. A tangent phase mask as an example is used to demonstrate our concept. Simulated results show that the performance promotion controls noise amplification of decoded images while maintaining a depth-of-field extension. PMID:26906377

  10. Mask Blank Defect Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M A; Sommargren, G E

    2000-02-04

    Mask blanks are the substrates that hold the master patterns for integrated circuits. Integrated circuits are semiconductor devices, such as microprocessors (mPs), dynamic random access memory (DRAMs), and application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) that are central to the computer, communication, and electronics industries. These devices are fabricated using a set of master patterns that are sequentially imaged onto light-sensitive coated silicon wafers and processed to form thin layers of insulating and conductive materials on top of the wafer. These materials form electrical paths and transistors that control the flow of electricity through the device. For the past forty years the semiconductor industry has made phenomenal improvements in device functionality, compactness, speed, power, and cost. This progress is principally due to the exponential decrease in the minimum feature size of integrated circuits, which has been reduced by a factor of {radical}2 every three years. Since 1992 the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) has coordinated the efforts of producing a technology roadmap for semiconductors. In the latest document, ''The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors: 1999'', future technology nodes (minimum feature sizes) and targeted dates were specified and are summarized in Table 1. Lithography is the imaging technology for producing a de-magnified image of the mask on the wafer. A typical de-magnification factor is 4. Mask blank defects as small as one-eighth the equivalent minimum feature size are printable and may cause device failure. Defects might be the result of the surface preparation, such as polishing, or contamination due to handling or the environment. Table 2 shows the maximum tolerable defect sizes on the mask blank for each technology node. This downward trend puts a tremendous burden on mask fabrication, particularly in the area of defect detection and reduction. A new infrastructure for mask inspection will be

  11. [Intubating laryngeal mask].

    PubMed

    Langenstein, H; Möller, F

    1998-01-01

    To improve the success of blind intubation through a laryngeal mask, Dr. A.I.J. Brain constructed the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA), marketed under the name Fastrach. The new construction allows blind intubation with highly flexible endotracheal tubes up to 8 mm ID with cuff (straight Woodbridge type), securing the airway around the intubation process and maintaining most of the characteristics of a standard laryngeal mask airway (SLMA), including contraindications. An additional contraindication is the existence of a Zenker diverticle. Up to now, eight working groups reported a success rate of blind intubation through the ILMA of more than 90% in about 1,200 patients, with a success rate of blind intubation of more than 50% for the first intubation attempt. Ten percent of the patients were difficult to intubate with the same success rate for blind intubation as in normal patients. Reduced mouth opening does not seem to hinder the use of the ILMA in spite of its increased outer diameter of 2 cm, as long as it is possible to enlarge the mouth opening to > 2 cm during anaesthesia. The new ILMA more than doubles the success of blind intubation compared to an SLMA, irrespective of a large variety of intubation difficulties. Correct judgement of endotracheal tube position is mandatory. The ILMA has the potential to be used in patients who are difficult to intubate and to substitute the SLMA in "cannot ventilate--cannot intubate" situations. The future will show if the ILMA also will improve emergency airway management by inexperienced personnel, including intubation, as has been shown for the standard laryngeal mask airway in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for ventilation only. PMID:9611362

  12. Masked multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Winiecki, A.L.; Kroop, D.C.; McGee, M.K.; Lenkszus, F.R.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

  13. Masked multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Winiecki, Alan L.; Kroop, David C.; McGee, Marilyn K.; Lenkszus, Frank R.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

  14. Masking Release in Children and Adults with Hearing Loss When Using Amplification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Marc; McCreery, Ryan; Kopun, Judy; Lewis, Dawna; Alexander, Joshua; Stelmachowicz, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared masking release for adults and children with normal hearing and hearing loss. For the participants with hearing loss, masking release using simulated hearing aid amplification with 2 different compression speeds (slow, fast) was compared. Method: Sentence recognition in unmodulated noise was compared with recognition…

  15. Wavelength dependent mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen; Butt, Shahid; Burnham, Jay; Faure, Tom; Hibbs, Michael; Rankin, Jed; Thibault, David; Watts, Andrew

    2005-05-01

    For years there has been a mismatch between the photomask inspection wavelength and the usage conditions. While the non-actinic inspection has been a source for concern, there has been essentially no evidence that a defect "escaped" the mask production process due to the inspection mismatch. This paper will describe the discovery of one such defect, as well as the diagnostic and inspection techniques used to identify the location, analyze the composition, and determine the source of the printed wafer defect. Conventional mask inspection techniques revealed no defects, however an actinic Aerial Image Metrology System (AIMS) revealed a 1.5 mm region on the mask with up to 59% transmission reduction at 193 nm. Further diagnostics demonstrated a strong wavelength dependence which accounted for the near invisibility of the defect at I line (365 nm) or even DUV (248 nm) wavelengths, which had 0% and 5% respective transmission reductions. Using some creative imaging techniques via AIMS tool and modeling, the defect was deduced to have a three dimensional Gaussian absorption character, with total width approximately 1.5 mm. Several non-destructive diagnostic techniques were developed to determine the composition and location of the defect within the substrate. These results will be described in addition to identifying methods for ensuring product quality in the absence of actinic inspection.

  16. Mask strategy at International SEMATECH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2002-08-01

    International SEMATECH (ISMT) is a consortium consisting of 13 leading semiconductor manufacturers from around the globe. Its objective is to develop the infrastructure necessary for its member companies to realize the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) through efficiencies of shared development resources and knowledge. The largest area of effort is lithography, recognized as a crucial enabler for microelectronics technology progress. Within the Lithography Division, most of the efforts center on mask-related issues. The development strategy at International SEMATCH will be presented and the interlock of lithography projects clarified. Because of the limited size of the mask production equipment market, the business case is weak for aggressive investment commensurate with the pace of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. With masks becoming the overwhelming component of lithography cost, new ways of reducing or eliminating mask costs are being explored. Will mask technology survive without a strong business case? Will the mask industry limit the growth of the semiconductor industry? Are advanced masks worth their escalating cost? An analysis of mask cost from the perspective of mask value imparted to the user is presented with examples and generic formulas for the reader to apply independently. A key part to the success for both International SEMATECH and the industry globally will be partnerships on both the local level between mask-maker and mask-user, and the macro level where global collaborations will be necessary to resolve technology development cost challenges.

  17. Analysis of environmental contaminates in hair using an ion trap mass spectrometer with a filtered noise field waveboard

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A.; Hulsey, S.S.; Frantz, C.E.; Andresen, B.D.

    1994-12-31

    A variety of methods have been established using mass spectrometry (MS) for the analysis of chemicals in hair. Much of this past work has been focused on the detection of drugs of abuse. Human hair has been analyzed either directly by probe distillation (DIP) with some preliminary clean-up using HPLC or solid phase extraction (SPE). However, established drug analysis methods do not apply for the detection of some environmental contaminates. In this study, the authors selected 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and malathion as the target compounds. In addition two types of hair samples were analyzed: (1) human hair fortified with either TNT or malathion and (2) hair from mice who ingested the same analytes. The analytical method was DIP-EI-MS/MS with an ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with a filtered noise field wave board.

  18. Masking Release for Igbo and English.

    PubMed

    Ebem, Deborah U; Desloge, Joseph G; Reed, Charlotte M; Braida, Louis D; Uguru, Joy O

    2013-09-01

    In this research, we explored the effect of noise interruption rate on speech intelligibility. Specifically, we used the Hearing In Noise Test (HINT) procedure with the original HINT stimuli (English) and Igbo stimuli to assess speech reception ability in interrupted noise. For a given noise level, the HINT test provides an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) required for 50%-correct speech intelligibility. The SNR for 50%-correct intelligibility changes depending upon the interruption rate of the noise. This phenomenon (called Masking Release) has been studied extensively in English but not for Igbo - which is an African tonal language spoken predominantly in South Eastern Nigeria. This experiment explored and compared the phenomenon of Masking Release for (i) native English speakers listening to English, (ii) native Igbo speakers listening to English, and (iii) native Igbo speakers listening to Igbo. Since Igbo is a tonal language and English is a non-tonal language, this allowed us to compare Masking Release patterns on native speakers of tonal and non-tonal languages. Our results for native English speakers listening to English HINT show that the SNR and the masking release are orderly and consistent with other English HINT data for English speakers. Our result for Igbo speakers listening to English HINT sentences show that there is greater variability in results across the different Igbo listeners than across the English listeners. This result likely reflects different levels of ability in the English language across the Igbo listeners. The masking release values in dB are less than for English listeners. Our results for Igbo speakers listening to Igbo show that in general, the SNRs for Igbo sentences are lower than for English/English and Igbo/English. This means that the Igbo listeners could understand 50% of the Igbo sentences at SNRs less than those required for English sentences by either native or non-native listeners. This result can be

  19. Mask industry assessment trend analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Hector, Scott; Marmillion, Pat; Lercel, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. In 2002, a survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of mask technologists from semiconductor manufacturers, merchant mask suppliers, and makers of mask equipment. The 2005 survey was the fourth in the current series of annual surveys. The survey data can be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the mask industry. The results may be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. Questions are grouped into categories: general business profile information, data processing, yields and yield loss mechanisms, delivery times, returns and services, operating cost factors, and equipment utilization. Because the questions covering operating cost factors and equipment utilization were just added to the survey, no trend analysis is possible. Within each category are many questions that together create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. The assessment participation has changed from year to year. The 2005 survey, for example, includes inputs from eight major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers whose revenue represents approximately 85% of the global mask market.

  20. Characterizing large river sounds: Providing context for understanding the environmental effects of noise produced by hydrokinetic turbines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Scherelis, Constantin C.

    2016-01-06

    Underwaternoise associated with the installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in rivers and tidal zones presents a potential environmental concern for fish and marine mammals. Comparing the spectral quality of sounds emitted by hydrokinetic turbines to natural and other anthropogenic sound sources is an initial step at understanding potential environmental impacts. Underwater recordings were obtained from passing vessels and natural underwater sound sources in static and flowing waters. Static water measurements were taken in a lake with minimal background noise. Flowing water measurements were taken at a previously proposed deployment site for hydrokinetic turbines on the Mississippi River, where soundsmore » created by flowing water are part of all measurements, both natural ambient and anthropogenic sources. Vessel sizes ranged from a small fishing boat with 60 hp outboard motor to an 18-unit barge train being pushed upstream by tugboat. As expected, large vessels with large engines created the highest sound levels, which were, on average, 40 dB greater than the sound created by an operating hydrokinetic turbine. As a result, a comparison of sound levels from the same sources at different distances using both spherical and cylindrical sound attenuation functions suggests that spherical model results more closely approximate observed sound attenuation.« less

  1. Masks of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Edward

    2011-11-01

    Preface; Introducing the masks; Part I. Worlds in the Making: 1. The magic Universe; 2. The mythic Universe; 3. The geometric Universe; 4. The medieval Universe; 5. The infinite Universe; 6. The mechanistic Universe; Part II. The Heart Divine: 7. Dance of the atoms and waves; 8. Fabric of space and time; 9. Nearer to the heart's desire; 10. The cosmic tide; 11. Do dreams ever come true?; Part III. The Cloud of Unknowing: 12. The witch universe; 13. The spear of Archytas; 14. All that is made; 15. The cloud of unknowing; 16. Learned ignorance.

  2. Mask fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2000-01-01

    A method for fabricating masks and reticles useful for projection lithography systems. An absorber layer is conventionally patterned using a pattern and etch process. Following the step of patterning, the entire surface of the remaining top patterning photoresist layer as well as that portion of an underlying protective photoresist layer where absorber material has been etched away is exposed to UV radiation. The UV-exposed regions of the protective photoresist layer and the top patterning photoresist layer are then removed by solution development, thereby eliminating the need for an oxygen plasma etch and strip and chances for damaging the surface of the substrate or coatings.

  3. Noise affects the shape of female preference functions for acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Ronacher, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The shape of female mate preference functions influences the speed and direction of sexual signal evolution. However, the expression of female preferences is modulated by interactions between environmental conditions and the female's sensory processing system. Noise is an especially relevant environmental condition because it interferes directly with the neural processing of signals. Although noise is therefore likely a significant force in the evolution of communication systems, little is known about its effects on preference function shape. In the grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus, female preferences for male calling song characteristics are likely to be affected by noise because its auditory system is sensitive to fine temporal details of songs. We measured female preference functions for variation in male song characteristics in several levels of masking noise and found strong effects of noise on preference function shape. The overall responsiveness to signals in noise generally decreased. Preference strength increased for some signal characteristics and decreased for others, largely corresponding to expectations based on neurophysiological studies of acoustic signal processing. These results suggest that different signal characteristics will be favored under different noise conditions, and thus that signal evolution may proceed differently depending on the extent and temporal patterning of environmental noise. PMID:25546134

  4. A computational investigation of feedforward and feedback processing in metacontrast backward masking

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, David N.

    2015-01-01

    In human perception studies, visual backward masking has been used to understand the temporal dynamics of subliminal vs. conscious perception. When a brief target stimulus is followed by a masking stimulus after a short interval of <100 ms, performance on the target is impaired when the target and mask are in close spatial proximity. While the psychophysical properties of backward masking have been studied extensively, there is still debate on the underlying cortical dynamics. One prevailing theory suggests that the impairment of target performance due to the mask is the result of lateral inhibition between the target and mask in feedforward processing. Another prevailing theory suggests that this impairment is due to the interruption of feedback processing of the target by the mask. This computational study demonstrates that both aspects of these theories may be correct. Using a biophysical model of V1 and V2, visual processing was modeled as interacting neocortical attractors, which must propagate up the visual stream. If an activating target attractor in V1 is quiesced enough with lateral inhibition from a mask, or not reinforced by recurrent feedback, it is more likely to burn out before becoming fully active and progressing through V2 and beyond. Results are presented which simulate metacontrast backward masking with an increasing stimulus interval and with the presence and absence of feedback activity. This showed that recurrent feedback diminishes backward masking effects and can make conscious perception more likely. One model configuration presented a metacontrast noise mask in the same hypercolumns as the target, and produced type-A masking. A second model configuration presented a target line with two parallel adjacent masking lines, and produced type-B masking. Future work should examine how the model extends to more complex spatial mask configurations. PMID:25759672

  5. Masking Property Based Residual Acoustic Echo Cancellation for Hands-Free Communication in Automobile Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yoonjae; Jeong, Seokyeong; Ko, Hanseok

    A residual acoustic echo cancellation method that employs the masking property is proposed to enhance the speech quality of hands-free communication devices in an automobile environment. The conventional masking property is employed for speech enhancement using the masking threshold of the desired clean speech signal. In this Letter, either the near-end speech or residual noise is selected as the desired signal according to the double-talk detector. Then, the residual echo signal is masked by the desired signal (masker). Experiments confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method by deriving the echo return loss enhancement and by examining speech waveforms and spectrograms.

  6. Intelligibility Assessment of Ideal Binary-Masked Noisy Speech with Acceptance of Room Acoustic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimír, Sedlak; Daniela, Durackova; Roman, Zalusky; Tomas, Kovacik

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the intelligibility of ideal binary-masked noisy signal is evaluated for different signal to noise ratio (SNR), mask error, masker types, distance between source and receiver, reverberation time and local criteria for forming the binary mask. The ideal binary mask is computed from time-frequency decompositions of target and masker signals by thresholding the local SNR within time-frequency units. The intelligibility of separated signal is measured using different objective measures computed in frequency and perceptual domain. The present study replicates and extends the findings which were already presented but mainly shows impact of room acoustic on the intelligibility performance of IBM technique.

  7. Perceptually-weighted evaluation criteria for segmentation masks in video sequences.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Paulo; Marichal, Xavier

    2004-08-01

    In order to complement subjective evaluation of the quality of segmentation masks, this paper introduces a procedure for automatically assessing this quality. Algorithmically computed figures of merit are proposed. Assuming the existence of a perfect reference mask (ground truth), generated manually or with a reliable procedure over a test set, these figures of merit take into account visually desirable properties of a segmentation mask in order to provide the user with metrics that best quantify the spatial and temporal accuracy of the segmentation masks. For the sake of easy interpretation, results are presented on a peaked signal-to-noise ratio-like logarithmic scale. PMID:15326851

  8. Proceedings of noise-con 91

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.A.; Prasad, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    This volume covers the following topics related to noise control: control of mine ventilation fans; physical phenomena; gas turbine exhaust system silencing; computer models for estimating electric utility environmental noise; noise from rotary coal car unloading; noise analysis.

  9. Getting the cocktail party started: masking effects in speech perception

    PubMed Central

    Evans, S; McGettigan, C; Agnew, ZK; Rosen, S; Scott, SK

    2016-01-01

    Spoken conversations typically take place in noisy environments and different kinds of masking sounds place differing demands on cognitive resources. Previous studies, examining the modulation of neural activity associated with the properties of competing sounds, have shown that additional speech streams engage the superior temporal gyrus. However, the absence of a condition in which target speech was heard without additional masking made it difficult to identify brain networks specific to masking and to ascertain the extent to which competing speech was processed equivalently to target speech. In this study, we scanned young healthy adults with continuous functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), whilst they listened to stories masked by sounds that differed in their similarity to speech. We show that auditory attention and control networks are activated during attentive listening to masked speech in the absence of an overt behavioural task. We demonstrate that competing speech is processed predominantly in the left hemisphere within the same pathway as target speech but is not treated equivalently within that stream, and that individuals who perform better in speech in noise tasks activate the left mid-posterior superior temporal gyrus more. Finally, we identify neural responses associated with the onset of sounds in the auditory environment, activity was found within right lateralised frontal regions consistent with a phasic alerting response. Taken together, these results provide a comprehensive account of the neural processes involved in listening in noise. PMID:26696297

  10. Shanghai alleviates noise pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Runling

    1983-07-14

    ''Environmental noise is now under control in Shanghai, the level of environmental noise is basically holding steady, and in some areas industrial and traffic noise has decreased.'' These were the conclusions of research by Hong Zonghui (3163 1350 6540) and Wang Shixian (3769 6164 6343) of Tongji University's Acoustics Laboratory, as put forward at a recent public academic lecture at Tongji University. In order to eliminate noise from the environment, Tongji University in the early 1970's began conducting investigations and research on noise pollution and its control together with concerned units in this city. After tests in a network of 2,117 points throughout the city, they determined that the most common form of noise pollution is traffic, which accounts for 50 percent of all noise. Since 1979, this city has adopted successive measures in the area of traffic control in order to eliminate the source of noise. Traffic noise has now dropped about 3 decibels in the city. This research report also pointed out that according to the results of regional environmental noise tests, this city does not meet the noise pollution standards set by the state. Tugboats on the Suzhou He blow their whistles late at night, and the noise at riverside homes can reach 82 decibels; the Fangua Lane residential district is close to a railroad where engine noise can reach 89 decibels and affect the residents' health. In addition, rather serious noise pollution is produced by more than 300 handicraft, light industry, textile, and electrical machinery plants.

  11. A Masked Photocathode in Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-12-14

    In this paper, we propose a masked photocathode inside the photoinjector for generating high brightness election beam. Instead of mounting the photocathode onto an electrode, an electrode with small hole is used as a mask to shield the photocathode from the accelerating vacuum chamber. Using such a masked photocathode will make the replacement of photocathode material easy by rotating the photocathode behind the electrode into the hole. Furthermore, this helps reduce the dark current or secondary electron emission from the photocathode material. The masked photocathode also provides transverse cut-off to a Gaussian laser beam that reduces electron beam emittance growth from nonlinear space-charge effects.

  12. Current status of NGL masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, David M.

    2000-07-01

    The manufacture of Next Generation Lithography reticles presents many challenges. Extremely small critical dimension and image placement error budgets; novel substrates including membranes and multi-layer reflective coatings; and inspection, detection and repair of subresolution defects will force revolutionary change in the infrastructure of mask technology. This paper surveys current NGL mask designs, structures, materials and manufacturing capabilities. Results from mask fabrication, physical modeling, error budget analysis and extensive experience in building X-Ray membrane masks are presented to develop process learning plans to meet future product specifications.

  13. Optical inspection of NGL masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettibone, Donald W.; Stokowski, Stanley E.

    2004-12-01

    For the last five years KLA-Tencor and our joint venture partners have pursued a research program studying the ability of optical inspection tools to meet the inspection needs of possible NGL lithographies. The NGL technologies that we have studied include SCALPEL, PREVAIL, EUV lithography, and Step and Flash Imprint Lithography. We will discuss the sensitivity of the inspection tools and mask design factors that affect tool sensitivity. Most of the work has been directed towards EUV mask inspection and how to optimize the mask to facilitate inspection. Our partners have succeeded in making high contrast EUV masks ranging in contrast from 70% to 98%. Die to die and die to database inspection of EUV masks have been achieved with a sensitivity that is comparable to what can be achieved with conventional photomasks, approximately 80nm defect sensitivity. We have inspected SCALPEL masks successfully. We have found a limitation of optical inspection when applied to PREVAIL stencil masks. We have run inspections on SFIL masks in die to die, reflected light, in an effort to provide feedback to improve the masks. We have used a UV inspection system to inspect both unpatterned EUV substrates (no coatings) and blanks (with EUV multilayer coatings). These inspection results have proven useful in driving down the substrate and blank defect levels.

  14. Masking of low-frequency signals by high-frequency, high-level narrow bands of noisea

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Harisadhan; Roup, Christina M.; Feth, Lawrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Low-frequency masking by intense high-frequency noise bands, referred to as remote masking (RM), was the first evidence to challenge energy-detection models of signal detection. Its underlying mechanisms remain unknown. RM was measured in five normal-hearing young-adults at 250, 350, 500, and 700 Hz using equal-power, spectrally matched random-phase noise (RPN) and low-noise noise (LNN) narrowband maskers. RM was also measured using equal-power, two-tone complex (TC2) and eight-tone complex (TC8). Maskers were centered at 3000 Hz with one or two equivalent rectangular bandwidths (ERBs). Masker levels varied from 80 to 95 dB sound pressure level in 5 dB steps. LNN produced negligible masking for all conditions. An increase in bandwidth in RPN yielded greater masking over a wider frequency region. Masking for TC2 was limited to 350 and 700 Hz for one ERB but shifted to only 700 Hz for two ERBs. A spread of masking to 500 and 700 Hz was observed for TC8 when the bandwidth was increased from one to two ERBs. Results suggest that high-frequency noise bands at high levels could generate significant low-frequency masking. It is possible that listeners experience significant RM due to the amplification of various competing noises that might have significant implications for speech perception in noise. PMID:21361445

  15. Local masking in natural images: a database and analysis.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Mushfiqul; Vilankar, Kedarnath P; Field, David J; Chandler, Damon M

    2014-01-01

    Studies of visual masking have provided a wide range of important insights into the processes involved in visual coding. However, very few of these studies have employed natural scenes as masks. Little is known on how the particular features found in natural scenes affect visual detection thresholds and how the results obtained using unnatural masks relate to the results obtained using natural masks. To address this issue, this paper describes a psychophysical study designed to obtain local contrast detection thresholds for a database of natural images. Via a three-alternative forced-choice experiment, we measured thresholds for detecting 3.7 cycles/° vertically oriented log-Gabor noise targets placed within an 85 × 85-pixels patch (1.9° patch) drawn from 30 natural images from the CSIQ image database (Larson & Chandler, Journal of Electronic Imaging, 2010). Thus, for each image, we obtained a masking map in which each entry in the map denotes the root mean squared contrast threshold for detecting the log-Gabor noise target at the corresponding spatial location in the image. From qualitative observations we found that detection thresholds were affected by several patch properties such as visual complexity, fineness of textures, sharpness, and overall luminance. Our quantitative analysis shows that except for the sharpness measure (correlation coefficient of 0.7), the other tested low-level mask features showed a weak correlation (correlation coefficients less than or equal to 0.52) with the detection thresholds. Furthermore, we evaluated the performance of a computational contrast gain control model that performed fairly well with an average correlation coefficient of 0.79 in predicting the local contrast detection thresholds. We also describe specific choices of parameters for the gain control model. The objective of this database is to provide researchers with a large ground-truth dataset in order to further investigate the properties of the human visual

  16. Categorical scaling of partial loudness in a condition of masking release.

    PubMed

    Verhey, Jesko L; Heeren, Wiebke

    2015-08-01

    Categorical loudness scaling was used to measure suprathreshold release from masking. The signal was a 986-Hz sinusoid that was embedded in a bandpass-filtered masking noise. This noise was either unmodulated or was amplitude modulated with a square-wave modulator. The unmodulated noise had either the same level as the modulated noise or had a level that was reduced by the difference in thresholds for the 986-Hz signal obtained with the modulated and unmodulated noise masker presented at the same level (i.e., the masking release). A comparison with loudness matching data of the same set of subjects showed that the data obtained with loudness scaling capture main aspects of the change in suprathreshold perception of the sinusoid when the masker was modulated. The scaling data for the signal masked by the unmodulated noise with the reduced masker level were similar to that for the signal embedded in the modulated noise. This similarity supports the hypothesis that the mechanism eliciting the masking release is effectively reducing the masker level. PMID:26328706

  17. The implementation of Mask-Ed: reflections of academic participants.

    PubMed

    Reid-Searl, Kerry; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Cooper, Simon; Happell, Brenda

    2014-09-01

    This paper profiles the findings from a study that explored the perspectives and experiences of nurse educators who implemented a novel simulation approach termed Mask-Ed. The technique involves the educator wearing a silicone mask and or body parts and transforming into a character. The premise of this approach is that the masked educator has domain specific knowledge related to the simulation scenario and can transmit this to learners in a way that is engaging, realistic, spontaneous and humanistic. Nurse educators charged with the responsibility of implementing Mask-Ed in three universities were invited to participate in the study by attending an introductory workshop, implementing the technique and then journaling their experiences, insights and perspectives over a 12 month period. The journal entries were then thematically analysed. Key themes were categorised under the headings of Preparation, Implementation and Impact; Reflexivity and Responsiveness; Student Engagement and Ownership; and Teaching and Learning. Mask-Ed is a simulation approach which allows students to interact with the 'characters' in humanistic ways that promote person-centred care and therapeutic communication. This simulation approach holds previously untapped potential for a range of learning experiences, however, to be effective, adequate resourcing, training, preparation and practice is required. PMID:24906681

  18. What Is Being Masked in Object Substitution Masking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Cole, Geoff; Skarratt, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Object substitution masking (OSM) is said to occur when a perceptual object is hypothesized that is mismatched by subsequent sensory evidence, leading to a new hypothesized object being substituted for the first. For example, when a brief target is accompanied by a longer lasting display of nonoverlapping mask elements, reporting of target…

  19. SEMATECH EUVL mask program status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Henry; Goodwin, Frank; Huh, Sungmin; Orvek, Kevin; Cha, Brian; Rastegar, Abbas; Kearney, Patrick

    2009-04-01

    As we approach the 22nm half-pitch (hp) technology node, the industry is rapidly running out of patterning options. Of the several lithography techniques highlighted in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), the leading contender for the 22nm hp insertion is extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). Despite recent advances with EUV resist and improvements in source power, achieving defect free EUV mask blank and enabling the EUV mask infrastructure still remain critical issues. To meet the desired EUV high volume manufacturing (HVM) insertion target date of 2013, these obstacles must be resolved on a timely bases. Many of the EUV mask related challenges remain in the pre-competitive stage and a collaborative industry based consortia, such as SEMATECH can play an important role to enable the EUVL landscape. SEMATECH based in Albany, NY is an international consortium representing several of the largest manufacturers in the semiconductor market. Full members include Intel, Samsung, AMD, IBM, Panasonic, HP, TI, UMC, CNSE (College of Nanoscience and Engineering), and Fuller Road Management. Within the SEMATECH lithography division a major thrust is centered on enabling the EUVL ecosystem from mask development, EUV resist development and addressing EUV manufacturability concerns. An important area of focus for the SEMATECH mask program has been the Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC). At the MBDC key issues in EUV blank development such as defect reduction and inspection capabilities are actively pursued together with research partners, key suppliers and member companies. In addition the mask program continues a successful track record of working with the mask community to manage and fund critical mask tools programs. This paper will highlight recent status of mask projects and longer term strategic direction at the MBDC. It is important that mask technology be ready to support pilot line development HVM by 2013. In several areas progress has been

  20. Masked Proportional Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David

    2004-01-01

    Masked proportional routing is an improved procedure for choosing links between adjacent nodes of a network for the purpose of transporting an entity from a source node ("A") to a destination node ("B"). The entity could be, for example, a physical object to be shipped, in which case the nodes would represent waypoints and the links would represent roads or other paths between waypoints. For another example, the entity could be a message or packet of data to be transmitted from A to B, in which case the nodes could be computer-controlled switching stations and the links could be communication channels between the stations. In yet another example, an entity could represent a workpiece while links and nodes could represent, respectively, manufacturing processes and stages in the progress of the workpiece towards a finished product. More generally, the nodes could represent states of an entity and the links could represent allowed transitions of the entity. The purpose of masked proportional routing and of related prior routing procedures is to schedule transitions of entities from their initial states ("A") to their final states ("B") in such a manner as to minimize a cost or to attain some other measure of optimality or efficiency. Masked proportional routing follows a distributed (in the sense of decentralized) approach to probabilistically or deterministically choosing the links. It was developed to satisfy a need for a routing procedure that 1. Does not always choose the same link(s), even for two instances characterized by identical estimated values of associated cost functions; 2. Enables a graceful transition from one set of links to another set of links as the circumstances of operation of the network change over time; 3. Is preferably amenable to separate optimization of different portions of the network; 4. Is preferably usable in a network in which some of the routing decisions are made by one or more other procedure(s); 5. Preferably does not cause an

  1. Musicians and non-musicians are equally adept at perceiving masked speech

    PubMed Central

    Boebinger, Dana; Evans, Samuel; Scott, Sophie K.; Rosen, Stuart; Lima, César F.; Manly, Tom

    2015-01-01

    There is much interest in the idea that musicians perform better than non-musicians in understanding speech in background noise. Research in this area has often used energetic maskers, which have their effects primarily at the auditory periphery. However, masking interference can also occur at more central auditory levels, known as informational masking. This experiment extends existing research by using multiple maskers that vary in their informational content and similarity to speech, in order to examine differences in perception of masked speech between trained musicians (n = 25) and non-musicians (n = 25). Although musicians outperformed non-musicians on a measure of frequency discrimination, they showed no advantage in perceiving masked speech. Further analysis revealed that nonverbal IQ, rather than musicianship, significantly predicted speech reception thresholds in noise. The results strongly suggest that the contribution of general cognitive abilities needs to be taken into account in any investigations of individual variability for perceiving speech in noise. PMID:25618067

  2. Study on Macroscopic Relation between Environmental Noise and Road Traffic Flow in Urban Areas Based on Grid Square Data Using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuda, Kenji; Noro, Yuichi; Yoshihisa, Koichi; Kuno, Kazuhiro

    We have proposed a simple model to predict environmental noise in urban areas. In the model, the sound power level per unit area is estimated from the local traffic volume and the law of the conservation of energy is applied to derive the average value of LAeq in an area. In order to examine the actual relation between environmental noise and road traffic networks and verify the proposed model, field data on environmental noise and the distance traveled by vehicles in Nagoya City were analyzed statistically. The field data were converted into the grid square data by using GIS in 12 areas of the city. It has been found that a strong relation between LAeq and the distance traveled by vehicles is observed for each area. When the exceptional larger values of noise data are excluded and the observation time of LAeq becomes sufficiently large, the coefficients of determination exceed 0.8. The strong relation between them found to be consistent with that derived from the proposed simple model.

  3. Oncologic image compression using both wavelet and masking techniques.

    PubMed

    Yin, F F; Gao, Q

    1997-12-01

    A new algorithm has been developed to compress oncologic images using both wavelet transform and field masking methods. A compactly supported wavelet transform is used to decompose the original image into high- and low-frequency subband images. The region-of-interest (ROI) inside an image, such as an irradiated field in an electronic portal image, is identified using an image segmentation technique and is then used to generate a mask. The wavelet transform coefficients outside the mask region are then ignored so that these coefficients can be efficiently coded to minimize the image redundancy. In this study, an adaptive uniform scalar quantization method and Huffman coding with a fixed code book are employed in subsequent compression procedures. Three types of typical oncologic images are tested for compression using this new algorithm: CT, MRI, and electronic portal images with 256 x 256 matrix size and 8-bit gray levels. Peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) is used to evaluate the quality of reconstructed image. Effects of masking and image quality on compression ratio are illustrated. Compression ratios obtained using wavelet transform with and without masking for the same PSNR are compared for all types of images. The addition of masking shows an increase of compression ratio by a factor of greater than 1.5. The effect of masking on the compression ratio depends on image type and anatomical site. A compression ratio of greater than 5 can be achieved for a lossless compression of various oncologic images with respect to the region inside the mask. Examples of reconstructed images with compression ratio greater than 50 are shown. PMID:9434988

  4. Combining Simultaneous with Temporal Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermens, Frouke; Herzog, Michael H.; Francis, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous and temporal masking are two frequently used techniques in psychology and vision science. Although there are many studies and theories related to each masking technique, there are no systematic investigations of their mutual relationship, even though both techniques are often applied together. Here, the authors show that temporal…

  5. Masked Repetition Priming Using Magnetoencephalography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Philip J.; Fiorentino, Robert; Poeppel, David

    2008-01-01

    Masked priming is used in psycholinguistic studies to assess questions about lexical access and representation. We present two masked priming experiments using MEG. If the MEG signal elicited by words reflects specific aspects of lexical retrieval, then one expects to identify specific neural correlates of retrieval that are sensitive to priming.…

  6. Mask industry assessment trend analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Marmillion, Patricia; Hughes, Greg

    2008-04-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. This year's survey data were presented in detail at BACUS and the detailed trend analysis presented at EMLC. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the sixth in the current series of annual reports. With continued industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 and 2006 surveys. Questions are grouped into eight categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss, Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns and Services, Operating Cost Factors, and Equipment Utilization. Within each category is a multitude of questions that creates a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. Note: the questions covering operating cost factors and equipment utilization were added to the survey only in 2005; therefore, meaningful trend analysis is not available.

  7. Mask industry assessment trend analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Yun, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. This year's survey data were presented in detail at BACUS and the detailed trend analysis presented at EMLC. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the seventh in the current series of annual reports. With continued industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the surveys in 2005 through 2007. Questions are grouped into seven categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss, Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. (Examples are given below). Within each category is a multitude of questions that creates a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  8. Advanced Mask Aligner Lithography (AMALITH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna

    2015-03-01

    Mask aligner lithography is very attractive for less-critical lithography layers and is widely used for LED, display, CMOS image sensor, micro-fluidics and MEMS manufacturing. Mask aligner lithography is also a preferred choice the semiconductor back-end for 3D-IC, TSV interconnects, advanced packaging (AdP) and wafer-level-packaging (WLP). Mask aligner lithography is a mature technique based on shadow printing and has not much changed since the 1980s. In shadow printing lithography a geometric pattern is transferred by free-space propagation from a photomask to a photosensitive layer on a wafer. The inherent simplicity of the pattern transfer offers ease of operation, low maintenance, moderate capital expenditure, high wafers-per-hour (WPH) throughput, and attractive cost-of-ownership (COO). Advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) comprises different measures to improve shadow printing lithography beyond current limits. The key enabling technology for AMALITH is a novel light integrator systems, referred to as MO Exposure Optics® (MOEO). MOEO allows to fully control and shape the properties of the illumination light in a mask aligner. Full control is the base for accurate simulation and optimization of the shadow printing process (computational lithography). Now photolithography enhancement techniques like customized illumination, optical proximity correction (OPC), phase masks (AAPSM), half-tone lithography and Talbot lithography could be used in mask aligner lithography. We summarize the recent progress in advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) and discuss possible measures to further improve shadow printing lithography.

  9. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  10. Brontides: natural explosive noises.

    PubMed

    Gold, T; Soter, S

    1979-04-27

    Episodes of explosive noises of natural origin, or brontides, have been well documented, often in association with seismic activity and in a few cases as precursors to major earthquakes. Ground-to-air acoustic transmission from shallow earthquakes can account for many of these episodes, but not for all, and other causes, such as the sudden eruption of gas from high-pressure sources in the ground may at times have been responsible. Confusion with distant thunder or artillery at times of anomalous sound propagation complicates the analysis, and more recently the greatly increased frequency of artificial explosive noises and sonic booms has tended to mask the recognition of natural brontides. PMID:17757998

  11. Effective EUVL mask cleaning technology solutions for mask manufacturing and in-fab mask maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Uwe; Dress, Peter; Waehler, Tobias; Singh, Sherjang; Jonckheere, Rik; Baudemprez, Bart

    2011-03-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is considered the leading lithography technology choice for semiconductor devices at 16nm HP node and beyond. However, before EUV Lithography can enter into High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) of advanced semiconductor devices, the ability to guarantee mask integrity at point-of-exposure must be established. Highly efficient, damage free mask cleaning plays a critical role during the mask manufacturing cycle and throughout the life of the mask, where the absence of a pellicle to protect the EUV mask increases the risk of contamination during storage, handling and use. In this paper, we will present effective EUVL mask cleaning technology solutions for mask manufacturing and in-fab mask maintenance, which employs an intelligent, holistic approach to maximize Mean Time Between Cleans (MBTC) and extend the useful life span of the reticle. The data presented will demonstrate the protection of the capping and absorber layers, preservation of pattern integrity as well as optical and mechanical properties to avoid unpredictable CD-linewidth and overlay shifts. Experiments were performed on EUV blanks and pattern masks using various process conditions. Conditions showing high particle removal efficiency (PRE) and minimum surface layer impact were then selected for durability studies. Surface layer impact was evaluated over multiple cleaning cycles by means of UV reflectivity metrology XPS analysis and wafer prints. Experimental results were compared to computational models. Mask life time predictions where made using the same computational models. The paper will provide a generic overview of the cleaning sequence which yielded best results, but will also provide recommendations for an efficient in-fab mask maintenance scheme, addressing handling, storage, cleaning and inspection.

  12. BAYESIAN INSIGHTS ON DISCLOSURE LIMITATION: MASK OR IMPUTE?

    SciTech Connect

    S. KELLER-MCNULTY; G. DUNCAN

    2000-10-01

    Statistical agencies seek to disseminate useful data while keeping low the risk of statistical confidentiality disclosure. Recognizing that reidentification of data is generally inadequate to protect its confidentiality against attack by a data snooper, agencies restrict the data they release for general use. Typically, these restricted data procedures have involved transformation or masking of the original, collected data through such devices as adding noise, topcoding, data swapping, and recoding. Recently, proposals have been put forth for the release of synthetic data, simulated from models constructed from the original data. This paper gives a framework for the comparison of masking and synthetic data as two approaches to disclosure limitation. Particular attention is paid to data utility and disclosure risk. Examples of instantiation of masking and of synthetic data construction are provided to illustrate the concepts. Particular attention is paid to data swapping. Insights drawn from the Bayesian paxadigm are provided.

  13. An Examination of Speech Recognition in a Modulated Background and of Forward Masking in Younger and Older Listeners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Rene H.; Bacon, Sid P.; Williams, Erica J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare speech intelligibility in the presence of a 10-Hz square-wave noise masker in younger and older listeners and to relate performance to recovery from forward masking. Method: The signal-to-noise ratio required to achieve 50% sentence identification in the presence of a 10-Hz square-wave noise masker was obtained for each of the…

  14. Bringing mask repair to the next level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinger, K.; Wolff, K.; Steigerwald, H.; Auth, N.; Spies, P.; Oster, J.; Schneider, H.; Budach, M.; Hofmann, T.; Waiblinger, M.

    2014-10-01

    Mask repair is an essential step in the mask manufacturing process as the extension of 193nm technology and the insertion of EUV are drivers for mask complexity and cost. The ability to repair all types of defects on all mask blank materials is crucial for the economic success of a mask shop operation. In the future mask repair is facing several challenges. The mask minimum features sizes are shrinking and require a higher resolution repair tool. At the same time mask blanks with different new mask materials are introduced to optimize optical performance and long term durability. For EUV masks new classes of defects like multilayer and phase defects are entering the stage. In order to achieve a high yield, mask repair has to cover etch and deposition capabilities and must not damage the mask. These challenges require sophisticated technologies to bring mask repair to the next level. For high end masks ion-beam based and e-based repair technologies are the obvious choice when it comes to the repair of small features. Both technologies have their pro and cons. The scope of this paper is to review and compare the performance of ion-beam based mask repair to e-beam based mask repair. We will analyze the limits of both technologies theoretically and experimentally and show mask repair related performance data. Based on this data, we will give an outlook to future mask repair tools.

  15. Masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G; Goldsmith, J; Kearney, P A; Larson, C; Moore, C E; Prisbrey, S; Tong, W; Vernon, S P; Weber, F; Yan, P-Y

    1998-09-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the technology specific requirements on the mask are a direct consequence of the utilization of radiation in the spectral region between 10 and 15 nm. At these wavelengths, all condensed materials are highly absorbing and efficient radiation transport mandates the use of all-reflective optical systems. Reflectivity is achieved with resonant, wavelength-matched multilayer (ML) coatings on all of the optical surfaces - including the mask. The EUV mask has a unique architecture - it consists of a substrate with a highly reflective ML coating (the mask blank) that is subsequently over-coated with a patterned absorber layer (the mask). Particulate contamination on the EUVL mask surface, errors in absorber definition and defects in the ML coating all have the potential to print in the lithographic process. While highly developed technologies exist for repair of the absorber layer, no viable strategy for the repair of ML coating defects has been identified. In this paper the state-of-the-art in ML deposition technology, optical inspection of EUVL mask blank defects and candidate absorber patterning approaches are reviewed.

  16. Thresholds for a tone masked by constant, remote-frequency maskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Lynne A.; Leibold, Lori J.

    2005-09-01

    In an experiment examining informational masking in infants, Leibold (2004) reported that infants and adults exhibited masking of a tone by two tones of constant, remote frequencies. Neither informational nor energetic masking would be expected for adults under these conditions. In the present experiment, adults' detection of a tone masked by two constant frequency tones or two narrow bands of noise were compared. Fifteen young adults participated. The target tone was 1000-Hz, 300-ms duration with 16-ms rise/fall. Unmasked and two masked thresholds were estimated. The maskers were either tones of 581 and 2920 Hz or 50-Hz-wide noise bands centered at 556 and 2895 Hz. The duration of the maskers was 300 ms with 16-ms rise/fall. A one-interval adaptive procedure was used to estimate thresholds. The maskers repeated at 600-ms intervals. The target tone was presented simultaneously with the maskers on signal trials. Listeners received feedback whenever they correctly detected the target. About 75% of listeners demonstrated masking in both conditions, but the threshold in the two-noise condition was generally higher than in the two-tone condition. Thus, introducing a timbre difference between the target and masker did not reduce the amount of masking.

  17. Tuning the cognitive environment: Sound masking with 'natural' sounds in open-plan offices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLoach, Alana

    With the gain in popularity of open-plan office design and the engineering efforts to achieve acoustical comfort for building occupants, a majority of workers still report dissatisfaction in their workplace environment. Office acoustics influence organizational effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction through meeting appropriate requirements for speech privacy and ambient sound levels. Implementing a sound masking system is one tried-and-true method of achieving privacy goals. Although each sound masking system is tuned for its specific environment, the signal -- random steady state electronic noise, has remained the same for decades. This research work explores how `natural' sounds may be used as an alternative to this standard masking signal employed so ubiquitously in sound masking systems in the contemporary office environment. As an unobtrusive background sound, possessing the appropriate spectral characteristics, this proposed use of `natural' sounds for masking challenges the convention that masking sounds should be as meaningless as possible. Through the pilot study presented in this work, we hypothesize that `natural' sounds as sound maskers will be as effective at masking distracting background noise as the conventional masking sound, will enhance cognitive functioning, and increase participant (worker) satisfaction.

  18. Hg-Mask Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, P.; Veiga, C. H.; Vieira Martins, R.; Assus, P.; Colas, F.

    In order to optimize the occulting process of a Lyot coronagraph and to provide a high dynamic range imaging, a new kind of occulting disk has been developed at the National Observatory of Rio de Janeiro. A mercury (Hg) drop glued onto an optical window by molecular cohesion and compressed by a pellicle film is used as the occulting disk. The minimum of the superficial tension potential function provides an optical precision (lambda/100) of the toric free surface of the mercury. This process provides a size control for the adaptation to the seeing conditions and to the apparent diameter of a resolved object, and in the case of adaptive optics, to the Airy diameter fraction needed. The occultation is a three dimensional process near the focal plane on the toric free surface that provides an apodization of the occultation. The Hg-Mask coronagraph has been projected for astrometric observations of faint satellites near to Jovian planets and works since 2000 at the 1.6 m telescope of the Pico dos Dias Observatory (OPD - Brazil).

  19. Noise and Speech Interference: Proceedings of Minisymposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, W. T. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Several papers are presented which deal with the psychophysical effects of interference with speech and listening activities by different forms of noise masking and filtering. Special attention was given to the annoyance such interruptions cause, particularly that due to aircraft flyover noises. Activities such as telephone listening and television watching were studied. A number of experimental investigations are described and the results are analyzed.

  20. [Masking in bone-conduction testing--proposal of ABC method].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Y

    1992-11-01

    A new strategic masking technique, namely the ABC method, has been developed. In performing this method of measuring thresholds of bone-conduction, the vibrator is placed at the forehead with both ears occluded by air-conduction earphones. One of the earphones is for masking noise and the other is a dummy which balances out the occlusive effect of the test ear against the nontest ear. The ABC method is based on the ABC rule that, in bone-conduction testing, the effective masking noise level necessary to block out the nontest ear can be calculated by a simple equation: right AC (A) + left AC (B)--unmasked BCu (C) under the assumption that the BCu belongs to the nontest ear. In some cases of hearing loss, the above noise level might produce overmasking, then an additive safety noise level, BCu + Interaural Attenuation, is employed. This method offers testers step by step directions which consist of indications of the noise level and a criterion for determining whether the measured bone-conduction is free from cross hearing and overmasking for the given configuration of air-conduction of both ears, BCu, and the masking noise level. Compared to the well known Plato method, in which measurements of thresholds are repeated at several masking noise levels in order to find a single bone-conduction threshold, the ABC method can essentially find the threshold at only one masking noise level. Therefore the ABC method makes it possible to save a great deal of time in performing bone conduction testing. PMID:1464791

  1. Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography - Reflective Mask Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, C.C.; Kearney, P.A.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; Bowers, J.M.; Cerjan, C.; Warrick, A.L.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Fought, E.; Moore, C.; Larson, C.; Baker, S.; Burkhart, S.C.; Hector, S.D.

    2000-05-09

    EUVL mask blanks consist of a distributed Bragg reflector made of 6.7nm-pitch bi-layers of MO and Si deposited upon a precision Si or glass substrate. The layer deposition process has been optimized for low defects, by application of a vendor-supplied but highly modified ion-beam sputter deposition system. This system is fully automated using SMIF technology to obtain the lowest possible environmental- and handling-added defect levels. Originally designed to coat 150mm substrates, it was upgraded in July, 1999 to 200 mm and has coated runs of over 50 substrates at a time with median added defects >100nm below 0.05/cm{sup 2}. These improvements have resulted from a number of ion-beam sputter deposition system modifications, upgrades, and operational changes, which will be discussed. Success in defect reduction is highly dependent upon defect detection, characterization, and cross-platform positional registration. We have made significant progress in adapting and extending commercial tools to this purpose, and have identified the surface scanner detection limits for different defect classes, and the signatures of false counts and non-printable scattering anomalies on the mask blank. We will present key results and how they have helped reduce added defects. The physics of defect reduction and mitigation is being investigated by a program on multilayer growth over deliberately placed perturbations (defects) of varying size. This program includes modeling of multilayer growth and modeling of defect printability. We developed a technique for depositing uniformly sized gold spheres on EUVL substrates, and have studied the suppression of the perturbations during multilayer growth under varying conditions. This work is key to determining the lower limit of critical defect size for EUV Lithography. We present key aspects of this work. We will summarize progress in all aspects of EUVL mask blank development, and present detailed results on defect reduction and mask blank

  2. Mask materials for powder blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensink, Henk; Jansen, Henri V.; Berenschot, J. W.; Elwenspoek, Miko C.

    2000-06-01

    Powder blasting, or abrasive jet machining (AJM), is a technique in which a particle jet is directed towards a target for mechanical material removal. It is a fast, cheap and accurate directional etch technique for brittle materials such as glass, silicon and ceramics. The particle jet (which expands to about 1 cm in diameter) can be optimized for etching, while the mask defines the small and complex structures. The quality of the mask influences the performance of powder blasting. In this study we tested and compared several mask types and added a new one: electroplated copper. The latter combines a highly resistant mask material for powder blasting with the high-resolution capabilities of lithography, which makes it possible to obtain an accurate pattern transfer and small feature sizes (<50 µm).

  3. Mask technology for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujak, M.; Burkhart, Scott C.; Cerjan, Charles J.; Kearney, Patrick A.; Moore, Craig E.; Prisbrey, Shon T.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Tong, William M.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Walton, Christopher C.; Warrick, Abbie L.; Weber, Frank J.; Wedowski, Marco; Wilhelmsen, Karl C.; Bokor, Jeffrey; Jeong, Sungho; Cardinale, Gregory F.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.; Stivers, Alan R.; Tejnil, Edita; Yan, Pei-yang; Hector, Scott D.; Nguyen, Khanh B.

    1999-04-01

    Extreme UV Lithography (EUVL) is one of the leading candidates for the next generation lithography, which will decrease critical feature size to below 100 nm within 5 years. EUVL uses 10-14 nm light as envisioned by the EUV Limited Liability Company, a consortium formed by Intel and supported by Motorola and AMD to perform R and D work at three national laboratories. Much work has already taken place, with the first prototypical cameras operational at 13.4 nm using low energy laser plasma EUV light sources to investigate issues including the source, camera, electro- mechanical and system issues, photoresists, and of course the masks. EUV lithograph masks are fundamentally different than conventional photolithographic masks as they are reflective instead of transmissive. EUV light at 13.4 nm is rapidly absorbed by most materials, thus all light transmission within the EUVL system from source to silicon wafer, including EUV reflected from the mask, is performed by multilayer mirrors in vacuum.

  4. Across-frequency envelope correlation discrimination and masked signal detection

    PubMed Central

    Grose, John H.; Buss, Emily; Porter, Heather L.; Hall, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the dependence of comodulation masking release (CMR) and monaural envelope correlation perception (MECP) on the degree of envelope correlation for the same narrowband noise stimuli. Envelope correlation across noise bands was systematically varied by mixing independent bands with a base set of comodulated bands. The magnitude of CMR fell monotonically with reductions in envelope correlation, and CMR varied over a range of envelope correlations that were not discriminable from each other in the MECP paradigm. For complexes of 100-Hz-wide noise bands, discrimination thresholds in the MECP task were similar whether the standard was a comodulated set of noise bands or a completely independent set of noise bands. This was not the case for 25-Hz-wide noise bands. Although the data demonstrate that CMR and MECP exhibit different dependencies on the degree of envelope correlation, some commonality across the two phenomena was observed. Specifically, for 25-Hz-wide bands of noise, there was a robust relationship between individual listeners' sensitivity to decorrelation from an otherwise comodulated set of noise bands and the magnitude of CMR measured for those same comodulated noise bands. PMID:23927119

  5. Cosmic Masks Still Dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, David L.; Puerari, Ivânio; Frogel, Jay A.; Eskridge, Paul B.; Stockton, Alan; Fuchs, Burkhard

    The Hubble classification scheme of galaxies is based on their optical appearance or `masks'. As one goes from early to late type spirals, both barred and unbarred, the optical appearance will be dominated more and more by the young Population I, i.e., blue stars and dust. Atlases reveal the rich variety of responses of the Population I component of gas and dust (the mask) to the underlying, older, stellar population. However, the gaseous Population I component, may only constitute 5 percent of the dynamical mass of the galaxy. Masks of negligible mass may conceal the human face - and that of galaxy. In the near-infrared, the morphology of older star-dominated disk indicates a simple classification scheme: the dominant Fourier m-mode in the dust penetrated regime, and the associated pitch angle. A ubiquity of low m=1 and m=2 modes is confirmed. On the basis of deprojected H (1.65 μm) and K' (2.1μm) images, we propose that the evolved stellar disks may be grouped into three principal dust penetrated archetypes: those with tightly wound stellar arms characterised by pitch angles at K' of ~ 10^° (the α class), an intermediate group with pitch angles of ~ 25^° (the β class) and thirdly, those with open spirals demarcated by pitch angles at K' of ~ 40^° (the γ bin). Flat or falling rotation curves give rise to the tightly wound α class; rising rotation curves are associated with the open γ class. The observed dust penetrated classes are inextricably related to the rate of shear in the stellar disk, as determined by A/ω. Here A is the first Oort constant andω denotes the angular velocity. There is no correlation between our dust penetrated classes and optical Hubble binning; the Hubble tuning fork does not constrain the morphology of the old stellar Population II disks. NGC 3223 and NGC 7083 (both SbI-II and almost the same absolute blue magnitude) have identical Hubble types and identical luminosity classes; the dust penetrated disk of NGC 3223 has tightly

  6. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa

  7. Passive acoustic detection and localization of whales: effects of shipping noise in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park.

    PubMed

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Gervaise, Cédric

    2008-06-01

    The performance of large-aperture hydrophone arrays to detect and localize blue and fin whales' 15-85 Hz signature vocalizations under ocean noise conditions was assessed through simulations from a normal mode propagation model combined to noise statistics from 15 960 h of recordings in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park. The probability density functions of 2482 summer noise level estimates in the call bands were used to attach a probability of detection/masking to the simulated call levels as a function of whale depth and range for typical environmental conditions. Results indicate that call detection was modulated by the calling depth relative to the sound channel axis and by modal constructive and destructive interferences with range. Masking of loud infrasounds could reach 40% at 30 km for a receiver at the optimal depth. The 30 dB weaker blue whale D-call were subject to severe masking. Mapping the percentages of detection and localization allowed assessing the performance of a six-hydrophone array under mean- and low-noise conditions. This approach is helpful for optimizing hydrophone configuration in implementing passive acoustic monitoring arrays and building their detection function for whale density assessment, as an alternative to or in combination with the traditional undersampling visual methods. PMID:18537362

  8. Coherent diffractive imaging using randomly coded masks

    SciTech Connect

    Seaberg, Matthew H.; D'Aspremont, Alexandre; Turner, Joshua J.

    2015-12-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an extension to coherent diffractive imaging that encodes additional information through the use of a series of randomly coded masks, removing the need for typical object-domain constraints while guaranteeing a unique solution to the phase retrieval problem. Phase retrieval is performed using a numerical convex relaxation routine known as “PhaseCut,” an iterative algorithm known for its stability and for its ability to find the global solution, which can be found efficiently and which is robust to noise. The experiment is performed using a laser diode at 532.2 nm, enabling rapid prototyping for future X-ray synchrotron and even free electron laser experiments.

  9. The effect of overlap-masking on binaural reverberant word intelligibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libbey, Brad; Rogers, Peter H.

    2004-11-01

    Reverberation interferes with the ability to understand speech in rooms. Overlap-masking explains this degradation by assuming reverberant phonemes endure in time and mask subsequent reverberant phonemes. Most listeners benefit from binaural listening when reverberation exists, indicating that the listener's binaural system processes the two channels to reduce the reverberation. This paper investigates the hypothesis that the binaural word intelligibility advantage found in reverberation is a result of binaural overlap-masking release with the reverberation acting as masking noise. The tests utilize phonetically balanced word lists (ANSI-S3.2 1989), that are presented diotically and binaurally with recorded reverberation and reverberation-like noise. A small room, 62 m3, reverberates the words. These are recorded using two microphones without additional noise sources. The reverberation-like noise is a modified form of these recordings and has a similar spectral content. It does not contain binaural localization cues due to a phase randomization procedure. Listening to the reverberant words binaurally improves the intelligibility by 6.0% over diotic listening. The binaural intelligibility advantage for reverberation-like noise is only 2.6%. This indicates that binaural overlap-masking release is insufficient to explain the entire binaural word intelligibility advantage in reverberation. .

  10. Visual Masking During Pursuit Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles W.

    1976-01-01

    Visual masking occurs when one stimulus interferes with the perception of another stimulus. Investigates which matters more for visual masking--that the target and masking stimuli are flashed on the same part of the retina, or, that the target and mask appear in the same place. (Author/RK)

  11. Environmental ground borne noise and vibration protection of sensitive cultural receptors along the Athens Metro Extension to Piraeus.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2012-11-15

    Attiko Metro S.A., the state company ensuring the development of the Athens Metro network, has recently initiated a new extension of 7.6 km, has planned for line 3 of Athens Metro from Haidari to Piraeus "Dimotikon Theatre" towards "University of Piraeus" (forestation), connecting the major Piraeus Port with "Eleftherios Venizelos" International Airport. The Piraeus extension consists of a Tunnel Boring Machine, 2 tracks and, tunnel sections, as well as 6 stations and a forestation (New Austrian Tunnelling Method) at the end of the alignment. In order to avoid the degradation of the urban acoustic environment from ground borne noise and vibration during metro operation, the assessment of the required track types and possible noise mitigation measures was executed, and for each section and each sensitive building, the ground borne noise and vibration levels will be numerically predicted. The calculated levels were then compared with ground borne noise and vibration level criteria. The necessary mitigation measures were defined in order to guarantee, in each location along the extension, the allowable ground borne Noise and Vibration max. levels inside nearby sensitive buildings taking into account alternative Transfer Functions for ground borne noise diffusion inside the buildings. Ground borne noise levels were proven to be higher than the criterion where special track work is present and also in the case of the sensitive receptor: "Dimotikon Theatre". In order to reduce the ground borne noise levels to allowable values in these sections, the installation of tracks and special track work on a floating slab was assessed and recommended. PMID:23079685

  12. Environmental impact of electric motorcycles: Evidence from traffic noise assessment by a building-based data mining technique.

    PubMed

    Sheng, N; Zhou, X; Zhou, Y

    2016-06-01

    This study provided new evidence on the potential adoption of electric motorcycle (EM) as a cleaner alternative to gasoline-powered motorcycle. The effects of EM on human exposure to traffic noise were assessed in different urban areas with different traffic scenarios. The assessment was carried out by a developed building-based model system that took into account the contribution of motorcycle traffic. The results indicated that the EM could be an appealing solution to reduce the risk of human exposure to excessive high traffic noise in a motorcycle city. Particularly, in a historical urban area in which the total traffic volume was lower and motorcycle traffic was dominant, the proportion of noise levels meeting the standard of 70 dB(A) increased significantly from 12.2% to 41.9% when 100% of gasoline motorcycles in the real traffic scenario were replaced by EMs. On the other hand, in a modern urban area in which the total traffic volume was higher and traffic noise levels at majority of sites were higher than 75 dB(A), the proportion of noise levels above 75 dB(A) decreased significantly from 82.6% to 59.9%. Nevertheless, the effect of EM on improving the traffic noise compliance rate in the modern urban area was not significant and other policies or measures need to be sought. PMID:26950621

  13. Unmasking the effects of masking on performance: The potential of multiple-voice masking in the office environment.

    PubMed

    Keus van de Poll, Marijke; Carlsson, Johannes; Marsh, John E; Ljung, Robert; Odelius, Johan; Schlittmeier, Sabine J; Sundin, Gunilla; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2015-08-01

    Broadband noise is often used as a masking sound to combat the negative consequences of background speech on performance in open-plan offices. As office workers generally dislike broadband noise, it is important to find alternatives that are more appreciated while being at least not less effective. The purpose of experiment 1 was to compare broadband noise with two alternatives-multiple voices and water waves-in the context of a serial short-term memory task. A single voice impaired memory in comparison with silence, but when the single voice was masked with multiple voices, performance was on level with silence. Experiment 2 explored the benefits of multiple-voice masking in more detail (by comparing one voice, three voices, five voices, and seven voices) in the context of word processed writing (arguably a more office-relevant task). Performance (i.e., writing fluency) increased linearly from worst performance in the one-voice condition to best performance in the seven-voice condition. Psychological mechanisms underpinning these effects are discussed. PMID:26328697

  14. Hidden data transmission using time delay for separating useful signals from masking oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kal'Yanov, Er. V.

    2009-03-01

    A new method of hidden data transmission based on the use of time delay for the separation of useful signals from masking noise-like (chaotic or stochastic) oscillations is described. Mathematical models involving a source of chaotic oscillations have been studied using numerical methods. The transmission of a masked non-encoded signal and the pulsed data transmission using 0/1 bit code are considered.

  15. Generating mask inspection rules for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen; Broadbent, Bill; Dayal, Aditya; Gallagher, Emily; Hsiang, ChingYun; Redding, Vincent

    2005-11-01

    Semiconductor product designs are necessarily constrained by both the wafer and mask lithographic capabilities. When mask image sizes approach the exposure wavelength, optical and resist effects distort the printed images. Applying optical proximity correction (OPC) to design features on the mask compensates for diffraction effects. However, aggressive OPC introduces even smaller minimum features, adds notches and bulges, introduces sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs) and generally creates a more challenging mask design with respect to data handling, printing and inspection. Mask defect inspection is a critical part of the mask process, ensuring that the mask pattern matches the intended design. However, the inspection itself imposes constraints on mask patterns that can be inspected with high defect sensitivity but low nuisance defect counts. These additional restrictions are undesirable since they can reduce the effectiveness of the OPC. IBM and KLA-Tencor have developed a test mask methodology to investigate the inspectability limits of the 576 and 516 mask inspection systems. The test mask design contains a variety of rules or features that currently impose inspectability limits on the inspection tools, in a range of sizes. The design also incorporates many features essential for obtaining valid results, such as a user-friendly layout, multiple pattern orientations, and background patterns. The mask was built and inspected in IBM Burlington's mask house. Preliminary inspection results will be presented; they underscore the importance of understanding both the inspection tool and the mask process when restricting mask design rules.

  16. Mask effects on cosmological studies with weak-lensing peak statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiangkun; Pan, Chuzhong; Fan, Zuhui; Wang, Qiao

    2014-03-20

    With numerical simulations, we analyze in detail how the bad data removal, i.e., the mask effect, can influence the peak statistics of the weak-lensing convergence field reconstructed from the shear measurement of background galaxies. It is found that high peak fractions are systematically enhanced because of the presence of masks; the larger the masked area is, the higher the enhancement is. In the case where the total masked area is about 13% of the survey area, the fraction of peaks with signal-to-noise ratio ν ≥ 3 is ∼11% of the total number of peaks, compared with ∼7% of the mask-free case in our considered cosmological model. This can have significant effects on cosmological studies with weak-lensing convergence peak statistics, inducing a large bias in the parameter constraints if the effects are not taken into account properly. Even for a survey area of 9 deg{sup 2}, the bias in (Ω {sub m}, σ{sub 8}) is already intolerably large and close to 3σ. It is noted that most of the affected peaks are close to the masked regions. Therefore, excluding peaks in those regions in the peak statistics can reduce the bias effect but at the expense of losing usable survey areas. Further investigations find that the enhancement of the number of high peaks around the masked regions can be largely attributed to the smaller number of galaxies usable in the weak-lensing convergence reconstruction, leading to higher noise than that of the areas away from the masks. We thus develop a model in which we exclude only those very large masks with radius larger than 3' but keep all the other masked regions in peak counting statistics. For the remaining part, we treat the areas close to and away from the masked regions separately with different noise levels. It is shown that this two-noise-level model can account for the mask effect on peak statistics very well, and the bias in cosmological parameters is significantly reduced if this model is applied in the parameter fitting.

  17. Rewritable photochromic focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Bertarelli, Chiara; Bianco, Andrea; Bortoletto, Fabio; Conconi, Paolo; Crimi, Giuseppe; Gallazzi, Maria C.; Giro, Enrico; Lucotti, Andrea; Pernechele, Claudio; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2003-02-01

    The application of organic photochromic materials in astronomy is opening new possibilities which we are investigating in order to design innovative devices for future instrumentation. The photochromic property of transparent/opaque transition (although in a limited wavelength range) and the changes in intrinsic refractive index have led our studies to application in astronomic spectrographs, both as focal plane mask (for MOS application) and as dispersive elements (volume phase holographic gratings, VPHG), respectively. In both cases the possibility to write and erase devices with suitable irradiation has revealed a new perspective for non-disposable and fully customizable items for spectroscopy. Pursuing this goal we have synthesized a series of novel photochromic materials belonging to the diarylethenes. They fulfill the requirements of thermal stability and fatigue resistance necessary to build functional devices. Prototypes of high contrast focal plane mask working in the H-alpha spectral region have been manufactured and characterized both in laboratory and with the AFOSC camera at Asiago telescope (1.8 m). A custom writing robot (ARATRO) which, taking imaging frames and with the aid of interactive mask design software and ad hoc control electronics, is able to write MOS masks, has been constructed. The design of the MOS masks allow the fitting in the AFOSC slit wheel. The overall set-up is ready for the sky tests.

  18. Noise Abatement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

  19. Coatings on reflective mask substrates

    DOEpatents

    Tong, William Man-Wai; Taylor, John S.; Hector, Scott D.; Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; Stivers, Alan R.; Kofron, Patrick G.; Thompson, Matthew A.

    2002-01-01

    A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

  20. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  1. The attentional blink is not affected by backward masking of T2, T2-mask SOA, or level of T2 impoverishment.

    PubMed

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M; Lagroix, Hayley E P; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    Identification of the second of two targets (T2) is impaired when presented shortly after the first (T1). This attentional blink (AB) is thought to arise from a delay in T2 processing during which T2 is vulnerable to masking. Conventional studies have measured T2 accuracy which is constrained by the 100% ceiling. We avoided this problem by using a dynamic threshold-tracking procedure that is inherently free from ceiling constraints. In two experiments we examined how AB magnitude is affected by three masking-related factors: (a) presence/absence of T2 mask, (b) T2-mask stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), and (c) level of T2 impoverishment (signal-to-noise ratio [SNR]). In Experiment 1, overall accuracy decreased with T2-mask SOA. The magnitude of the AB, however, was invariant with SOA and with mask presence/absence. Experiment 2 further showed that the AB was invariant with T2 SNR. The relationship among mask presence/absence, SOA, and T2 SNR and the AB is encompassed in a qualitative model. PMID:22060143

  2. Self-masking subtraction tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, D.P.; Yester, M.V.; Barnes, G.T.; Lakshminarayanan, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    The authors tested the image quality and dose savings of self-masking subtraction tomosynthesis (SST), which combines digital tomosynthesis with subtraction of a blurred self-mask. High-quality images of the inner ear of a head phantom were obtained at moderate dose savings. Although they were taken with linear motion, they did not exhibit the streaking due to off-fulcrum objects that is characteristic of conventional linear tomography. SST could reduce patient dose by a factor of at least 12 in examinations of the inner ear, and the mechanical aspects can be implemented with moderate modifications of existing instrumentation.

  3. The effects of noise on man

    SciTech Connect

    Kryter, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    As a reference source of research concerning effects of noise on people, this book reports and analyzes procedures used in regulation and control of noise. Quantitative relations are formed between physical measures of environmental noise and the reactions of people and communities to noise. The author reviews scientific and engineering research published from 1970 to the present. The Effects of Noise on Man, Second Edition discusses: adverse effects of noise and noise-induced hearing loss on speech communications; damage to hearing from ''everyday'' noise; damage to hearing from industrial noise and gunfire; work performance in noise; effects of noise on non-auditory systems of the body and sleep; aircraft and street traffic noise and its effects on health, annoyance, and house depreciation; physical measurements used for the assessment and control of environmental noise; federal standards and guidelines for community noise and proposed modification based on recent research findings.

  4. Threshold of the precedence effect in noise

    PubMed Central

    Freyman, Richard L.; Griffin, Amanda M.; Zurek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Three effects that show a temporal asymmetry in the influence of interaural cues were studied through the addition of masking noise: (1) The transient precedence effect—the perceptual dominance of a leading transient over a similar lagging transient; (2) the ongoing precedence effect—lead dominance with lead and lag components that extend in time; and (3) the onset capture effect—determination by an onset transient of the lateral position of an otherwise ambiguous extended trailing sound. These three effects were evoked with noise-burst stimuli and were compared in the presence of masking noise. Using a diotic noise masker, detection thresholds for stimuli with lead/lag interaural delays of 0/500 μs were compared to those with 500/0 μs delays. None of the three effects showed a masking difference between those conditions, suggesting that none of the effects is operative at masked threshold. A task requiring the discrimination between stimuli with 500/0 and 0/500 μs interaural delays was used to determine the threshold for each effect in noise. The results showed similar thresholds in noise (10–13 dB SL) for the transient and ongoing precedence effects, but a much higher threshold (33 dB SL) for onset capture of an ambiguous trailing sound. PMID:24815272

  5. The effect of masking noise on rippled-spectrum resolution.

    PubMed

    Supin, A Y; Popov, V V; Milekhina, O N; Tarakanov, M B

    2001-01-01

    Ripple-density resolution in a rippled sound spectrum (probe band) under the effect of another band (masker) was studied in normal listeners. The resolvable ripple density in the probe band was measured using a phase-reversal test. The principle of the test was to find the highest ripple density at which an interchange of mutual peak and valley position (the ripple phase reversal) was detectable. Probe bands were 0.5 octave (oct) wide with center frequencies of 1, 2, and 4 kHz. When a masker band was below the probe one (a low-frequency masker), it markedly reduced the ripple-density resolution. The effect of the low-frequency masker enhanced (ripple-density resolution decreased) with decreasing the stop-band (frequency spacing) between the probe and masker bands. The strongest masker effect was observed at zero spacing between the probe and masker bands. However, when the probe band overlapped the masker one so that no masker power was below the probe band, the masker effect diminished (ripple-density resolution partially released). Increase of the masker bandwidth above 0.5 oct by shifting its lower boundary downwards did not enhance the masker effect. Masker bands above the probe one (high-frequency maskers) did not influence the ripple-density resolution. PMID:11124463

  6. Rotorcraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of a realistic plan for NASA and the U.S. helicopter industry to develop a design-for-noise methodology, including plans for the identification and development of promising noise reduction technology was discussed. Topics included: noise reduction techniques, scaling laws, empirical noise prediction, psychoacoustics, and methods of developing and validing noise prediction methods.

  7. Multiple-mask chemical etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, D. L.

    1969-01-01

    Multiple masking techniques use lateral etching to reduce the total area of the high etch-rate oxide exposed to the chemical etchant. One method uses a short-term etch to remove the top layer from the silicon oxide surface, another acts before the top layer is grown.

  8. Ambient Noise in an Urbanized Tidal Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Christopher

    levels that shows good agreement with 85% of the temporal data. Bed stresses associated with currents can produce propagating ambient noise by mobilizing sediments. The strength of the tidal currents in northern Admiralty Inlet produces bed stresses in excess of 20 Pa. Significant increases in noise levels at frequencies from 4-30 kHz, with more modest increases noted from 1-4 kHz, are attributed to mobilized sediments. Sediment-generated noise during strong currents masks background noise from other sources, including vessel traffic. Inversions of the acoustic spectra for equivalent grain sizes are consistent with qualitative observations of the seabed composition. Bed stress calculations using log layer, Reynolds stress, and inertial dissipation techniques generally agree well and are used to estimate the shear stresses at which noise levels increase for different grain sizes. Ambient noise levels in one-third octave bands with center frequencies from 1 kHz to 25 kHz are dominated by sediment-generated noise and can be accurately predicted using the near-bed current velocity above a critical threshold. When turbulence is advected over a pressure sensitive transducer, the turbulent pressure fluctuations can be measured as noise, though these pressure fluctuations are not propagating sound and should not be interpreted as ambient noise. Based on measurements in both Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound and the Chacao Channel, Chile, two models are developed for flow-noise. The first model combined measurements of mean current velocities and turbulence and agrees well with data from both sites. The second model uses scaling arguments to model the flow-noise based solely on the mean current velocity. This model agrees well with the data from the Chacao Channel but performs poorly in Admiralty Inlet, a difference attributed to differences turbulence production mechanisms. At both sites, the spectral slope of flow noise follows a f-3.2 dependence, suggesting partial cancellation of

  9. Northern elephant seal field bioacoustics and aerial auditory masked hearing thresholds in three pinnipeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southall, Brandon Lee

    This dissertation comprises four interrelated studies on acoustic communication (including both signal production and signal reception) in pinnipeds, primarily northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris). Field measurements of vocalization parameters were obtained in elephant seal breeding rookeries. Additionally, auditory masking experiments were conducted with individuals representing three pinniped species, including a northern elephant seal. This study quantified how aerial noise masks aerial hearing and provided preliminary data on auditory frequency filtering. All of these studies were conducted in air for a variety of practical and theoretical reasons. Some governmental, media, and research organizations have recently become concerned with the impacts of underwater anthropogenic noise on aquatic animals. However, little consideration has been given to the dual pressures imposed by aerial and underwater noise on amphibious marine mammals such as the pinnipeds. This dissertation sought to provide some basic data bearing on this matter by investigating aerial signals and aerial masked hearing. Data were obtained on aerial vocalization source levels, signal directivity patterns, natural aerial ambient noise, signal propagation properties, multi-modal aspects of signaling, motivation-specific signal variability, aerial critical masking ratios, and auditory filter bandwidths. The results indicate that different signal components may be more readily detectable in variable noise conditions, frequency resolution likely affects detection ranges, developmental and motivational factors affect signal parameters, and that some pinnipeds apparently detect signals over masking noise relatively well both in air and water. Using the northern elephant seal as a representative model, a model for quantifying constraints on vocal communication was developed to provide first-order predictions about detection ranges for signals in variable noise conditions.

  10. "The Mask Who Wasn't There": Visual Masking Effect with the Perceptual Absence of the Mask

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Amandine Eve; Riou, Benoit; Muller, Dominique; Dabic, Stéphanie; Versace, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Does a visual mask need to be perceptually present to disrupt processing? In the present research, we proposed to explore the link between perceptual and memory mechanisms by demonstrating that a typical sensory phenomenon (visual masking) can be replicated at a memory level. Experiment 1 highlighted an interference effect of a visual mask on the…

  11. Auditory masking in three pinnipeds: aerial critical ratios and direct critical bandwidth measurements.

    PubMed

    Southall, Brandon L; Schusterman, Ronald J; Kastak, David

    2003-09-01

    This study expands the limited understanding of pinniped aerial auditory masking and includes measurements at some of the relatively low frequencies predominant in many pinniped vocalizations. Behavioral techniques were used to obtain aerial critical ratios (CRs) within a hemianechoic chamber for a northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). Simultaneous, octave-band noise maskers centered at seven test frequencies (0.2-8.0 kHz) were used to determine aerial CRs. Narrower and variable bandwidth masking noise was also used in order to obtain direct critical bandwidths (CBWs). The aerial CRs are very similar in magnitude and in frequency-specific differences (increasing gradually with test frequency) to underwater CRs for these subjects, demonstrating that pinniped cochlear processes are similar both in air and water. While, like most mammals, these pinniped subjects apparently lack specialization for enhanced detection of specific frequencies over masking noise, they consistently detect signals across a wide range of frequencies at relatively low signal-to-noise ratios. Direct CBWs are 3.2 to 14.2 times wider than estimated based on aerial CRs. The combined masking data are significant in terms of assessing aerial anthropogenic noise impacts, effective aerial communicative ranges, and amphibious aspects of pinniped cochlear mechanics. PMID:14514219

  12. Auditory masking in three pinnipeds: Aerial critical ratios and direct critical bandwidth measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southall, Brandon L.; Schusterman, Ronald J.; Kastak, David

    2003-09-01

    This study expands the limited understanding of pinniped aerial auditory masking and includes measurements at some of the relatively low frequencies predominant in many pinniped vocalizations. Behavioral techniques were used to obtain aerial critical ratios (CRs) within a hemianechoic chamber for a northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). Simultaneous, octave-band noise maskers centered at seven test frequencies (0.2-8.0 kHz) were used to determine aerial CRs. Narrower and variable bandwidth masking noise was also used in order to obtain direct critical bandwidths (CBWs). The aerial CRs are very similar in magnitude and in frequency-specific differences (increasing gradually with test frequency) to underwater CRs for these subjects, demonstrating that pinniped cochlear processes are similar both in air and water. While, like most mammals, these pinniped subjects apparently lack specialization for enhanced detection of specific frequencies over masking noise, they consistently detect signals across a wide range of frequencies at relatively low signal-to-noise ratios. Direct CBWs are 3.2 to 14.2 times wider than estimated based on aerial CRs. The combined masking data are significant in terms of assessing aerial anthropogenic noise impacts, effective aerial communicative ranges, and amphibious aspects of pinniped cochlear mechanics.

  13. How to boost soundscapes with tax breaks-On the application of Henry George's environmental economics to noise annoyance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehner, Cay

    2001-05-01

    The improvement of the characteristic soundscape in a given metropolitan area depends largely on a varied number of parameters not the least of which are economic. The way to sustain a large city not only economically responsible behavior patterns and activities are required, but ecologically viable ones as well. And, not coincidentally, if both patterns come into balance, a reduction of noise annoyance ensues. The cohesive set of measures that would provide the framework to ensure that the necessary economic activity is not antagonistic to (acoustic) ecology is provided by the US economist Henry George who advocated a comprehensive tax on land and all natural resources to replace eventually the bulk of all taxes checking production. New data will be provided in this paper to show the results of the application of a Georgist approach of eco-taxation to the improvement of sound quality and the reduction of noise annoyance.

  14. Noise Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... here: EPA Home Air and Radiation Noise Pollution Noise Pollution This page has moved. You should be ... epa.gov/clean-air-act-overview/title-iv-noise-pollution Local Navigation Air & Radiation Home Basic Information ...

  15. Very loud speech over simulated environmental noise tends to have a spectral peak in the F1 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ternstrom, Sten; Bohman, Mikael; Sodersten, Maria

    2003-04-01

    In some professions, workplace noise appears to be a hazard to the voice, if not to hearing. Several studies have shown that teachers and sports instructors, for example, are more prone to voice problems than average, prompting research on loud voice. Since on-location recordings are in many ways impractical, the running speech of 23 untrained speaker subjects (12 female, 11 male) was instead recorded in several types of loud noise that was presented over high-quality loudspeakers. Using adaptive cancellation techniques, the noise was then removed from the recordings, thus exposing the strained voices for analysis. The experiment produced a large body of data, only one aspect of which is reported here. In most subjects, the vowel spectrum as a function of voice SPL showed the expected behavior for low to moderate efforts, but developed a very pronounced peak in the F1 region at the highest efforts. This peak can be ascribed to the concerted action of several acoustic mechanisms, including source waveform asymmetry, F1 approximating one of the lower partials, and increased formant Q values due to a longer closed phase. [Work supported by the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research, Contract No. 2001-0341.

  16. Rotorcraft Noise Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Michael J.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    The Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM) is an aircraft noise impact modeling computer program being developed for NASA-Langley Research Center which calculates sound levels at receiver positions either on a uniform grid or at specific defined locations. The basic computational model calculates a variety of metria. Acoustic properties of the noise source are defined by two sets of sound pressure hemispheres, each hemisphere being centered on a noise source of the aircraft. One set of sound hemispheres provides the broadband data in the form of one-third octave band sound levels. The other set of sound hemispheres provides narrowband data in the form of pure-tone sound pressure levels and phase. Noise contours on the ground are output graphically or in tabular format, and are suitable for inclusion in Environmental Impact Statements or Environmental Assessments.

  17. Method for mask repair using defect compensation

    DOEpatents

    Sweeney, Donald W.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2001-01-01

    A method for repair of amplitude and/or phase defects in lithographic masks. The method involves modifying or altering a portion of the absorber pattern on the surface of the mask blank proximate to the mask defect to compensate for the local disturbance (amplitude or phase) of the optical field due to the defect.

  18. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  3. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... operating in the frequency bands governed under this part. Applicable Emission Masks Frequency band(MHz) Mask for equipment with Audio low passfilter Mask for equipment without audio low pass filter Below 25... the output power (P in watts) of the transmitter as follows: (1) On any frequency removed from...

  4. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... operating under this part. Applicable Emission Masks Frequency band (MHz) Mask for equipmentwith audio low pass filter Mask for equipmentwithout audio low pass filter Below 25 1 A or B A or C 25-50 B C 72-76 B... watts) of the transmitter as follows: (1) On any frequency removed from the assigned frequency by...

  5. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... operating in the frequency bands governed under this part. Applicable Emission Masks Frequency band(MHz) Mask for equipment with Audio low passfilter Mask for equipment without audio low pass filter Below 25... the output power (P in watts) of the transmitter as follows: (1) On any frequency removed from...

  6. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... operating under this part. Applicable Emission Masks Frequency band (MHz) Mask for equipmentwith audio low pass filter Mask for equipmentwithout audio low pass filter Below 25 1 A or B A or C 25-50 B C 72-76 B... watts) of the transmitter as follows: (1) On any frequency removed from the assigned frequency by...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  12. Masks: Escape to/from Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavett, Hyman

    1981-01-01

    Explains the significance of masks in ethnographic and cultural research and suggests 24 activities intended for use by social studies classroom teachers as they teach about masks. Activities include projecting slides onto students' bodies and faces, directing students to create masks from old clothing and rags, cutting faces from magazines, and…

  13. Mask qualification strategies in a wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaehnert, Carmen; Kunowski, Angela

    2007-02-01

    Having consistent high quality photo masks is one of the key factors in lithography in the wafer fab. Combined with stable exposure- and resist processes, it ensures yield increases in production and fast learning cycles for technology development and design evaluation. Preventive controlling of incoming masks and quality monitoring while using the mask in production is essential for the fab to avoid yield loss or technical problems caused by mask issues, which eventually result in delivery problems to the customer. In this paper an overview of the procedures used for mask qualification and production release, for both logic and DRAM, at Infineon Dresden is presented. Incoming qualification procedures, such as specification checks, incoming inspection, and inline litho process window evaluation, are described here. Pinching and electrical tests, including compatibility tests for mask copies for high volume products on optimized litho processes, are also explained. To avoid mask degradation over lifetime, re-inspection checks are done for re-qualification while using the mask in production. The necessity of mask incoming inspection and re-qualification, due to the repeater printing from either the processing defects of the original mask or degrading defects of being used in the fab (i.e. haze, ESD, and moving particles, etc.), is demonstrated. The need and impact of tight mask specifications, such as CD uniformity signatures and corresponding electrical results, are shown with examples of mask-wafer CD correlation.

  14. Object Substitution Masking Induced by Illusory Masks: Evidence for Higher Object-Level Locus of Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Nobuyuki; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    A briefly presented target can be rendered invisible by a lingering sparse mask that does not even touch it. This form of visual backward masking, called object substitution masking, is thought to occur at the object level of processing. However, it remains unclear whether object-level interference alone produces substitution masking because…

  15. Performance of GFIS mask repair system for various mask materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Fumio; Kozakai, Tomokazu; Matsuda, Osamu; Yasaka, Anto; Yoshikawa, Shingo; Kanno, Koichi; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Naoya

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a new focused ion beam (FIB) technology using a gas field ion source (GFIS) for mask repair. Meanwhile, since current high-end photomasks do not have high durability in exposure nor cleaning, some new photomask materials are proposed. In 2012, we reported that our GFIS system had repaired a representative new material "A6L2". It is currently expected to extend the application range of GFIS technology for various new materials and various defect shapes. In this study, we repaired a single bridge, a triple bridge and a missing hole on a phase shift mask (PSM) of "A6L2", and also repaired single bridges on a binary mask of molybdenum silicide (MoSi) material "W4G" and a PSM of high transmittance material "SDC1". The etching selectivity between those new materials and quartz were over 4:1. There were no significant differences of pattern shapes on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images between repair and non-repair regions. All the critical dimensions (CD) at repair regions were less than +/-3% of those at normal ones on an aerial image metrology system (AIMS). Those results demonstrated that GFIS technology is a reliable solution of repairing new material photomasks that are candidates for 1X nm generation.

  16. Noise and public health.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, D M; Roettger, R W

    1976-01-01

    Environmental noise has increased to the point that it affects large numbers of people. The most consistently demonstrated health effect of exposure to noise is hearing impairment. Other effects, such as stress reaction, irritability, fatigue and disturbances to physiologic function have been seen in laboratory research but are highly individualized and restricted to such specific populations as industrial workers. Rising background sound levels in communities due to increased traffic flow, industralization, work saving machinery, and other noise sources have caused community noise levels to become dangerously high. This factor is complicated by exposure to high sound level recreational activities with greater frequency and for longer periods. Recognizing the existence of the problem, governmental agencies have begun to identify the scope of the problem, to designate standards and regulations controlling noise sources, and to regulate allowable noise exposure for workers. PMID:10297834

  17. How anthropogenic noise affects foraging.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinhong; Siemers, Björn M; Koselj, Klemen

    2015-09-01

    The influence of human activity on the biosphere is increasing. While direct damage (e.g. habitat destruction) is relatively well understood, many activities affect wildlife in less apparent ways. Here, we investigate how anthropogenic noise impairs foraging, which has direct consequences for animal survival and reproductive success. Noise can disturb foraging via several mechanisms that may operate simultaneously, and thus, their effects could not be disentangled hitherto. We developed a diagnostic framework that can be applied to identify the potential mechanisms of disturbance in any species capable of detecting the noise. We tested this framework using Daubenton's bats, which find prey by echolocation. We found that traffic noise reduced foraging efficiency in most bats. Unexpectedly, this effect was present even if the playback noise did not overlap in frequency with the prey echoes. Neither overlapping noise nor nonoverlapping noise influenced the search effort required for a successful prey capture. Hence, noise did not mask prey echoes or reduce the attention of bats. Instead, noise acted as an aversive stimulus that caused avoidance response, thereby reducing foraging efficiency. We conclude that conservation policies may seriously underestimate numbers of species affected and the multilevel effects on animal fitness, if the mechanisms of disturbance are not considered. PMID:26046451

  18. Spatial release from masking in a free-field source identification task by gray treefrogs

    PubMed Central

    Nityananda, Vivek; Bee, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Humans and other animals often communicate acoustically in noisy social groups, in which the background noise generated by other individuals can mask signals of interest. When listening to speech in the presence of speech-like noise, humans experience a release from auditory masking when target and masker are spatially separated. We investigated spatial release from masking (SRM) in a free-field call recognition task in Cope’s gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis). In this species, reproduction requires that females successfully detect, recognize, and localize a conspecific male in the noisy social environment of a breeding chorus. Using no-choice phonotaxis assays, we measured females’ signal recognition thresholds in response to a target signal (an advertisement call) in the presence and absence of chorus-shaped noise. Females experienced about 3 dB of masking release, compared with a co-localized condition, when the masker was displaced 90° in azimuth from the target. The magnitude of masking release was independent of the spectral composition of the target (carriers of 1.3 kHz, 2.6 kHz, or both). Our results indicate that frogs experience a modest degree of spatial unmasking when performing a call recognition task in the free-field, and suggest that variation in signal spectral content has small effects on both source identification and spatial unmasking. We discuss these results in the context of spatial unmasking in vertebrates and call recognition in frogs. PMID:22240459

  19. Mask blank defect printability comparison using optical and SEM mask and wafer inspection and bright field actinic mask imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangat, Pawitter; Verduijn, Erik; Wood, Obert R.; Benk, Markus P.; Wojdyla, Antoine; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2015-07-01

    Despite significant enhancements in defect detection using optical and e-beam methodology, the smaller length scales and increasing challenges of future technology nodes motivate ongoing research into the need and associated cost of actinic inspection for EUV masks. This paper reports an extensive study of two EUV patterned masks, wherein the mask blank defectivity was characterized using optical (mask and wafer) methods and bright-field mask imaging (using the SHARP actinic microscope) of previously identified blank defects. We find that the bright field actinic imaging tool microscope captures and images many defects that are not seen by the automated optical inspection of patterned masks and printed wafers. In addition, actinic review reveals the impact of multilayer damage and depicts the printability profile which can be used as an added metric to define the patterned mask repair and defect compensation strategies.

  20. Noise Mapping and Annoyance.

    PubMed

    Knauss, D.

    2002-01-01

    The EC has published a Green Paper on noise policy in the EU and has issued a directive on the assessment and reduction of environmental noise. This directive will make noise mapping mandatory for cities with at least 250.000 inhabitants. Due to the development in computer technology it is possible to calculate noise maps for large urban areas using the available data on buildings, ground profile, road and rail traffic. Examples for noise mapping are Birmingham (GB), Linz (A) and various German cities. Based on noise maps and empirical data on the correlation between annoyance and noise levels annoyance maps for different sources (rail, road, aircraft) can be calculated. Under the assumption that the annoyance for the different sources are only weakly correlated, a combined annoyance map can be calculated. In a second step using the distribution of the population the actual number of annoyed people can be evaluated. This analysis can be used, for example, to identify noise hot spots and to assess the impact of major traffic projects - roads, airports- on the noise situation as well as the impact on the population. Furthermore, the combined annoyance maps can be used to investigate on health effects and to check whether or not empirical correlations between annoyance and noise levels are sufficiently correct. PMID:12678944

  1. Urban Noise Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäcker-Cüppers, Michael

    Noise belongs to the severest environmental impairments in towns, with road traffic being the most annoying noise source. The reduction of these impairments and the precaution against new noise impacts is an important task of the communities. However, many of the potential abatement measures are not in the responsibility of the communities. In most European countries, noise emission regulations for road and rail vehicles and outdoor machinery are nowadays enforced by the European Union. Noise reception limits are generally enforced by national laws. Therefore, efficient noise abatement in towns has to be coordinated with the regional, national and supranational, i.e. European noise policy. The most important fields of action for the urban noise abatement are the roads, railways and airports with heavy traffic. For the avoidance of health risks due to noise here short-term reductions are needed, which can generally be achieved only by a combination of measures for which different stakeholders are responsible. This underlines the importance of integrated and coordinated noise abatement concepts.

  2. Offshore Wind Turbines - Estimated Noise from Offshore Wind Turbine, Monhegan Island, Maine: Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Energy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, Pamela M.; Jones, Anthony M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-11-23

    Deep C Wind, a consortium headed by the University of Maine will test the first U.S. offshore wind platforms in 2012. In advance of final siting and permitting of the test turbines off Monhegan Island, residents of the island off Maine require reassurance that the noise levels from the test turbines will not disturb them. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, at the request of the University of Maine, and with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program, modeled the acoustic output of the planned test turbines.

  3. Cross-modal Informational Masking of Lipreading by Babble.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Joel; Spehar, Brent; Tye-Murray, Nancy; Van Engen, Kristin; Hale, Sandra; Sommers, Mitchell S

    2016-01-01

    Whereas the energetic and informational masking effects of unintelligible babble on auditory speech recognition are well established, the present study is the first to investigate its effects on visual speech recognition. Young and older adults performed two lipreading tasks while simultaneously experiencing either quiet, speech-shaped noise, or 6-talker background babble. Both words at the end of uninformative carrier sentences and key words in everyday sentences were harder to lipread in the presence of babble than in the presence of speech-shaped noise or quiet. Contrary to the inhibitory deficit hypothesis of cognitive aging, babble had equivalent effects on young and older adults. In a follow-up experiment, neither the babble nor the speech-shaped noise stimuli interfered with performance of a face-processing task, indicating that babble selectively interferes with visual speech recognition and not with visual perception tasks per se. The present results demonstrate that babble can produce cross-modal informational masking and suggest a breakdown in audiovisual scene analysis, either because of obligatory monitoring of even uninformative speech sounds or because of obligatory efforts to integrate speech sounds even with uncorrelated mouth movements. PMID:26474981

  4. Aperture masking behind AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Michael J.

    2012-07-01

    Sparse Aperture-Mask Interferometry (SAM or NRM) behind Adaptive Optics (AO) has now come of age, with more than a dozen astronomy papers published from several 5-10m class telescopes around the world. I will describe the reasons behind its success in achieving relatively high contrasts ( 1000:1 at lambda/ D) and repeatable binary astronomy at the diffraction limit, even when used behind laser-guide star adaptive optics. Placed within the context of AO calibration, the information in an image can be split into pupil-plane phase, Fourier amplitude and closure-phase. It is the closure-phase observable, or its generalisation to Kernel phase, that is immune to pupil-plane phase errors at first and second-order and has been the reason for the technique's success. I will outline the limitations of the technique and the prospects for aperture-masking and related techniques in the future.

  5. Improving vision by pupil masking.

    PubMed

    Bonaque-González, Sergio; Ríos-Rodríguez, Susana; López-Gil, Norberto

    2016-07-01

    We propose an alternative solution to improve visual quality by spatially modulating the amplitude of light passing into the eye (related to the eye's transmittance), in contrast to traditional correction of the wavefront phase (related to the local refractive power). Numerical simulations show that masking the aberrated areas at the pupil plane should enhance visual function, especially in highly aberrated eyes. This correction could be implemented in practice using customized contact or intraocular lenses. PMID:27446688

  6. Improving vision by pupil masking

    PubMed Central

    Bonaque-González, Sergio; Ríos-Rodríguez, Susana; López-Gil, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    We propose an alternative solution to improve visual quality by spatially modulating the amplitude of light passing into the eye (related to the eye's transmittance), in contrast to traditional correction of the wavefront phase (related to the local refractive power). Numerical simulations show that masking the aberrated areas at the pupil plane should enhance visual function, especially in highly aberrated eyes. This correction could be implemented in practice using customized contact or intraocular lenses. PMID:27446688

  7. Noise prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methods for noise abatement are discussed. Noise nuisance, types of noise (continuous, fluctuating, intermittent, pulsed), and types of noise abatement (absorption, vibration damping, isolation) are defined. Rockwool panels, industrial ceiling panels, baffles, acoustic foam panels, vibration dampers, acoustic mats, sandwich panels, isolating cabins and walls, ear protectors, and curtains are presented.

  8. Mask pattern generator employing EPL technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Yamabe, Masaki; Wakamiya, Wataru; Endo, Nobuhiro

    2003-08-01

    Mask cost is one of crucial issues in device fabrication, especially in SoC (System on a Chip) with small-volume production. The cost mainly depends on productivity of mask manufacturing tools such as mask writers and defect inspection tools. EPL (Electron Projection Lithography) has been developing as a high-throughput electron beam exposure technology that will succeed optical lithography. The application of EPL technology to mask writing will result in high productivity and contribute to decrease the mask cost. The concept of a mask pattern generator employing EPL technology is proposed in this paper. It is very similar to EPL technology used for pattern printing on a wafer. The mask patterns on the glass substrate are exposed by projecting the basic circuit patterns formed on the mother EPL mask. One example of the mother EPL mask is a stencil type made with 200-mm Si wafer. The basic circuit patterns are IP patterns and logical primitive patterns such as cell libraries (AND, OR, Inverter, Flip-Flop and etc.) to express the SoC device patterns. Since the SoC patterns are exposed with its collective units such as IP and logical primitive patterns by using this method, the high throughput will be expected comparing with conventional mask E-beam writers. In this paper, the mask pattern generator with the EPL technology is proposed. The concept, its advantages and issues to be solved are discussed.

  9. Process capability of etched multilayer EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Kosuke; Iida nee Sakurai, Noriko; Kamo, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Hayashi, Naoya

    2015-10-01

    With shrinking pattern size at 0.33NA EUV lithography systems, mask 3D effects are expected to become stronger, such as horizontal/vertical shadowing, best focus shifts through pitch and pattern shift through focus. Etched multilayer EUV mask structures have been proposed in order to reduce mask 3D effects. It is estimated that etched multilayer type mask is also effective in reducing mask 3D effects at 0.33NA with lithographic simulation, and it is experimentally demonstrated with NXE3300 EUV Lithography system. We obtained cross-sectional TEM image of etched multilayer EUV mask pattern. It is observed that patterned multilayer width differs from pattern physical width. This means that effective reflecting width of etched multilayer pattern is smaller than pattern width measured by CD-SEM. In this work, we evaluate mask durability against both chemical and physical cleaning process to check the feasibility of etched multilayer EUV mask patterning against mask cleaning for 0.33NA EUV extension. As a result, effective width can be controlled by suitable cleaning chemicals because sidewall film works as a passivation film. And line and space pattern collapse is not detected by DUV mask pattern inspection tool after mask physical cleaning that includes both megasonic and binary spray steps with sufficient particle removal efficiency.

  10. Position and rotation-invariant pattern recognition system by binary rings masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solorza, S.; Álvarez-Borrego, J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, algorithms invariant to position, rotation, noise and non-homogeneous illumination are presented. Here, several manners are studied to generate binary rings mask filters and the corresponding signatures associated to each image. Also, in this work it is shown that digital systems, which are based on the ?-law non-linear correlation, are ?-invariant for ?. The methodologies are tested using greyscale fossil diatoms digital images (real images), and considering the great similarity between those images the results obtained are excellent. The box plot statistical analysis and the computational cost times yield that the Bessel rings masks are the best option when the images contain a homogeneous illumination and the Fourier masks digital system is the right selection when the non-homogeneous illumination and noise is presented in the images.

  11. Cortical correlate of pattern backward masking.

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, G; Vogels, R; Orban, G A

    1995-01-01

    The perception of a briefly presented shape is strongly impaired when it is followed by another pattern, a phenomenon called backward masking. We found that the vast majority of a sample of shape-selective neurons in the macaque inferior temporal cortex respond selectively to backward-masked shapes, although these shapes could not be discriminated by human and monkey subjects. However, this selective response was brief, since it was either interrupted by the mask or overridden by a response to the mask itself. We show that reliable discrimination of briefly presented shapes by single neurons depends on the temporal integration of the response. Presentation of the mask, however, reduces the number of spikes available for integration, explaining backward masking. These results also provide direct neurophysiological evidence for the "interruption theory" of backward masking. PMID:7777553

  12. History and future of mask making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Ken L.

    1996-12-01

    The history of the mask industry has three main periods, which I call the Classical Period, the Dark Ages, and the Renaissance, by analogy with those periods in the history of Western Europe. During the Classical Period, people developed 1X masks and the technology to make them. In the Dark Ages, people exploited the equipment developed during the Classical Period to make 5X reduction reticle, ending the nobility of mask making. In today's Renaissance of mask making, a proliferation of mask types is requiring a rebirth of innovation and creativity. The Renaissance resembles the Classical Period: masks are once again strategic, and technological capability is once again the driver. Meanwhile, the mask industry is carrying forward the productivity and efficiency gains it achieved during the Dark Ages. We must create a new business and economic model to support these changes in the characteristics of the marketplace.

  13. 42 CFR 84.110 - Gas masks; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... as follows: (1) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas mask. A gas mask which consists of a full facepiece.... (2) Chin-style gas mask. A gas mask which consists of a full facepiece, a canister which is usually attached to the facepiece, and associated connections. (3) Escape gas mask. A gas mask designed for...

  14. Image discrimination models predict detection in fixed but not random noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Beard, B. L.; Watson, A. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    By means of a two-interval forced-choice procedure, contrast detection thresholds for an aircraft positioned on a simulated airport runway scene were measured with fixed and random white-noise masks. The term fixed noise refers to a constant, or unchanging, noise pattern for each stimulus presentation. The random noise was either the same or different in the two intervals. Contrary to simple image discrimination model predictions, the same random noise condition produced greater masking than the fixed noise. This suggests that observers seem unable to hold a new noisy image for comparison. Also, performance appeared limited by internal process variability rather than by external noise variability, since similar masking was obtained for both random noise types.

  15. Fabrication and commercialization of scalpel masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novembre, Anthony E.; Peabody, Milton L., Jr.; Blakey, Myrtle I.; Farrow, Reginald C.; Kasica, Richard J.; Liddle, James A.; Saunders, Thomas E.; Tennant, Donald M.

    1998-09-01

    SCALPEL masks have been fabricated for use in the Proof-of- Lithography system and to demonstrate the feasibility of having them produced by a commercial blank manufacturer and optical mask shops. Masks blanks are formed from 100 mm diameter silicon wafers. A 100-150 nm thick SiNx layer is LPCVD deposited onto the wafers followed by magnetron sputter deposition of a thin Cr/W metal layer which is used as the scatterer layer for the mask>the mask is supported by an underlying network of struts which are arranged to be compatible with the step and scan writing strategy of the exposure tool and to provide robustness to the mask. Crystallographic wet etching of the silicon wafer forms membranes and struts. To date over 300 mask blanks have been formed and yield data as a function of the thickness of the silicon nitride membrane has been quantified. Recent developments in the mask blank formation process include the production of blanks by MCNC who serve as a commercial source of SCALPEL mask blanks. They have successfully delivered 36 blanks that exhibit equivalent properties to those produced at Lucent. Mask patterning has been performed at the commercial optical mask shops of PHOTRONICS and DUPONT. In this investigation a MEBES exposure system has been used to write patterns. The resist used is ZEP-520 and development and pattern transfer processes are performed in the STEAG-Hammatech spray/spin processing tool. Metrology is performed using a KMS 310 RT optical microscope. Pattern placement accuracy is measured on the LMS 2020 system without modification. The masks are inspected for defects using the optical based KLA 300 series inspection system in a die to die mode and in transmission. Results to date suggest feasibility of producing SCALPEL masks by a commercial blank supplier and by merchant optical mask shops.

  16. Comodulation Masking Release (CMR) in Children and the Influence of Reading Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zettler, Cynthia M.; Sevcik, Rose A.; Morris, Robin D.; Clarkson, Marsha G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Research suggests that children with reading disabilities (RD) have difficulty processing temporal and spectral components of sounds. Comodulation masking release (CMR) measures a listener's ability to use temporal and spectral information in noise to identify a signal. The purpose of this study was to determine whether children with RD…

  17. Development of Spatial Release from Masking in Mandarin-Speaking Children with Normal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuen, Kevin C. P.; Yuan, Meng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the development of spatial release from masking in children using closed-set Mandarin disyllabic words and monosyllabic words carrying lexical tones as test stimuli and speech spectrum-weighted noise as a masker. Method: Twenty-six children ages 4-9 years and 12 adults, all with normal hearing, participated in…

  18. Image Denoising With Edge-Preserving and Segmentation Based on Mask NHA.

    PubMed

    Hosotani, Fumitaka; Inuzuka, Yuya; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hirobayashi, Shigeki; Misawa, Tadanobu

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a zero-mean white Gaussian noise removal method using a high-resolution frequency analysis. It is difficult to separate an original image component from a noise component when using discrete Fourier transform or discrete cosine transform for analysis because sidelobes occur in the results. The 2D non-harmonic analysis (2D NHA) is a high-resolution frequency analysis technique that improves noise removal accuracy because of its sidelobe reduction feature. However, spectra generated by NHA are distorted, because of which the signal of the image is non-stationary. In this paper, we analyze each region with a homogeneous texture in the noisy image. Non-uniform regions that occur due to segmentation are analyzed by an extended 2D NHA method called Mask NHA. We conducted an experiment using a simulation image, and found that Mask NHA denoising attains a higher peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) value than the state-of-the-art methods if a suitable segmentation result can be obtained from the input image, even though parameter optimization was incomplete. This experimental result exhibits the upper limit on the value of PSNR in our Mask NHA denoising method. The performance of Mask NHA denoising is expected to approach the limit of PSNR by improving the segmentation method. PMID:26513792

  19. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  20. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  1. Comparative Study of Manufacturing Techniques for Coronagraphic Binary Pupil Masks: Masks on Substrates and Free-Standing Masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, Keigo; Haze, Kanae; Kotani, Takayuki; Abe, Lyu

    2012-12-01

    We present a comparative study of the manufacture of binary pupil masks for coronagraphic observations of exoplanets. A checkerboard mask design, a type of binary pupil mask design, was adopted, and identical patterns of the same size were used for all masks in order that we could compare the differences resulting from the different manufacturing methods. The masks on substrates had aluminum checkerboard patterns with thicknesses of 0.1/0.2/0.4/0.8/1.6μm, constructed on substrates of BK7 glass, silicon, and germanium using photolithography and chemical processes. Free-standing masks made of copper and nickel with thicknesses of 2/5/10/20μm were also realized using photolithography and chemical processes, which included careful release from the substrate used as an intermediate step in the manufacture. Coronagraphic experiments using a visible laser were carried out for all masks on BK7 glass substrate and the free-standing masks. The average contrasts were 8.4 × 10-8, 1.2 × 10-7, and 1.2 × 10-7 for the masks on BK7 substrates, the free-standing copper masks, and the free-standing nickel masks, respectively. No significant correlation was concluded between the contrast and the mask properties. The high-contrast masks have the potential to cover the needs of coronagraphs for both ground-based and space-borne telescopes over a wide wavelength range. Especially, their application to the infrared space telescope, SPICA, is appropriate.

  2. Advanced Jet Noise Exhaust Concepts in NASA's N+2 Supersonics Validation Study and the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project's Upcoming Hybrid Wing Body Acoustics Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Doty, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic and flow-field experiments were conducted on exhaust concepts for the next generation supersonic, commercial aircraft. The concepts were developed by Lockheed Martin (LM), Rolls-Royce Liberty Works (RRLW), and General Electric Global Research (GEGR) as part of an N+2 (next generation forward) aircraft system study initiated by the Supersonics Project in NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The experiments were conducted in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The exhaust concepts presented here utilized lobed-mixers and ejectors. A powered third-stream was implemented to improve ejector acoustic performance. One concept was found to produce stagnant flow within the ejector and the other produced discrete-frequency tones (due to flow separations within the model) that degraded the acoustic performance of the exhaust concept. NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project has been investigating a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft as a possible configuration for meeting N+2 system level goals for noise, emissions, and fuel burn. A recently completed NRA led by Boeing Research and Technology resulted in a full-scale aircraft design and wind tunnel model. This model will be tested acoustically in NASA Langley's 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and will include dual jet engine simulators and broadband engine noise simulators as part of the test campaign. The objectives of the test are to characterize the system level noise, quantify the effects of shielding, and generate a valuable database for prediction method development. Further details of the test and various component preparations are described.

  3. Particle Contamination Control Technology in Electron Beam Mask Writing System for Next-Generation Mask Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akeno, Kiminobu; Ogasawara, Munehiro; Ooki, Kenji; Tojo, Toru; Hirano, Ryoichi; Yoshitake, Shusuke; Toriumi, Masaki; Sekine, Akihiko; Takigawa, Tadahiko; Shinoda, Toshiki; Noguchi, Shigeru

    2002-09-01

    An in-situ measurement system for particles in an electron beam (EB) writer is developed to improve mask yield management. The system has satisfied the required installation specifications for a mask blank inspection system for the EB writer, and the results of an experiment using the system prove that particles added from the mask handling system in our EB writer satisfy the total particle count specification (<1.25 counts/cycle for 6 inch mask). The investigation of particle increase after repeated mask movement has been carried out in each segmented mask handling route. It has been clarified that the segmentation test using this system is helpful for investigation of the origin of particle production on a mask. Effective application of information such as particle position and size obtained by this system will be very useful for improving mask yield management in the mask fabrication process in terms of pattern inspection and repair system.

  4. High performance mask fabrication process for the next-generation mask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagawa, Keisuke; Ugajin, Kunihiro; Suenaga, Machiko; Kobayashi, Yoshihito; Motokawa, Takeharu; Hagihara, Kazuki; Saito, Masato; Itoh, Masamitsu

    2014-07-01

    ArF immersion lithography combined with double patterning has been used for fabricating below half pitch 40nm devices. However, when pattern size shrinks below 20nm, we must use new technology like quadruple patterning process or next generation lithography (NGL) solutions. Moreover, with change in lithography tool, next generation mask production will be needed. According to ITRS 2013, fabrication of finer patterns less than 15nm will be required on mask plate in NGL mask production 5 years later [1]. In order to fabricate finer patterns on mask, higher resolution EB mask writer and high performance fabrication process will be required. In a previous study, we investigated a potential of mask fabrication process for finer patterning and achieved 17nm dense line pattern on mask plate by using VSB (Variable Shaped Beam) type EB mask writer and chemically amplified resist [2][3]. After a further investigation, we constructed higher performance mask process by using new EB mask writer EBM9000. EBM9000 is the equipment supporting hp16nm generation's photomask production and has high accuracy and high throughput. As a result, we achieved 15.5nm pattern on mask with high productivity. Moreover, from evaluation of isolated pattern, we proved that current mask process has the capability for sub-10nm pattern. These results show that the performance of current mask fabrication process have the potential to fabricate the next-generation mask.

  5. Relations between environmental noise and electronic coupling for optimal exciton transfer in one- and two-dimensional homogeneous and inhomogeneous quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Forgy, Charles C.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2014-12-14

    Recent studies have indicated that environmental noise may increase energy-transfer efficiency in quantum systems. For homogeneous networks of chromophores previous studies have primarily considered excitonic transport in one-dimensional (linear) networks. In our study, we expand previous research to a two-dimensional fully coupled topology of chromophore molecules. We demonstrate that not only does an optimal dephasing rate exist in both one- and two-dimensional networks but also that it increases in magnitude with increasing coupling strength between chromophores. Optimal transport occurs when the noise quenches the entanglement between local modes that prevent the exciton from moving efficiently to the target site. We find that these results are insensitive to minor site defects such as those found in realistic systems. We contrast these findings to systems with a high degree of inhomogeneity, in which the optimal dephasing rate is largely set by the system topology and does not vary significantly with respect to coupling strength. Our findings have potential applications to systems such as quantum dot arrays and carbon nanotube structures.

  6. Noise issues in Kanagawa Prefecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoshima, Shigenori; Tamura, Akihiro

    2001-05-01

    In Kanagawa Prefecture, bordering Tokyo Metropolis and the third most densely populated prefecture in Japan, various noises have caused serious problems in terms of living environment preservation and human health protection. This paper describes present states of noise issues in Kanagawa. Road traffic noise, remaining one of serious pollution issues, was monitored at a total 217 sites along trunk roads in Kanagawa from fiscal year 2000 to 2002. The percentage of the sites that achieve environmental quality standards for road traffic noise was approximately 20%. Noise caused by Tokaido Shinkansen trains, of which the total daily number is 287, also has negative impacts on inhabitants along the railway. As a result of the noise measurement from fiscal year 1994 to 2002, about 80% of the measurement sites exceeded environmental quality standards for Shinkansen railway noise during the years. In the areas surrounding the Atsugi Base, noise generated by training flights damagingly affects inhabitants' daily life. The number of complaints due to the noise was largest among noise issues. Moreover, neighborhood noises, noises emitted during the nighttime operation of bars, restaurants and shops, and noises produced by work in out-of-door yards have recently provoked social issues.

  7. Error mitigation in the control of quantum spin systems subject to environmental noise: A quaternion-based path-integral formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipolito, Rafael; Goldbart, Paul

    2015-03-01

    We address the task of controlling a quantum system, i.e., giving it a predetermined unitary evolution via control fields that are subject to limitations. This task is complicated by the challenge of truly isolating a quantum system from environmental effects; hence, the need to mitigate the impact of noise. We consider the case of a spin system coupled to an environment that is not necessarily in equilibrium. We develop a path-integral formulation based on an action that features degrees of freedom expressed in terms of quaternions and effective interactions determined by correlators that characterize the environment. We compare this quaternion-based description with more conventional approaches, and show that quaternions yield distinct, not solely æsthetic, advantages. For example, the quaternion formulation does not suffer from the phenomenon of `gimbal lockrlap', a phenomenon that can create difficulties for numerical schemes.

  8. A model of visual backward masking.

    PubMed

    Bugmann, Guido; Taylor, John G

    2005-01-01

    When two successive stimuli are presented within 0-200 ms intervals, the recognition of the first stimulus (the target) can be impaired by the second (the mask). This backward masking phenomenon has a form called metacontrast masking where the target and the mask are in close spatial proximity but not overlapping. In that case, the masking effect is strongest for interval of 60-100 ms. To understand this behaviour, activity propagation in a feedforward network of leaky integrate and fire neurons is investigated. It is found that, if neurons have a selectivity similar to that of V1 simple cells, activity decays layer after layer and ceases to propagate. To combat this, a local amplification mechanism is included in the model, using excitatory lateral connections, which turn out to support prolonged self-sustained activity. Masking is assumed to arise from local competition between representations recruited by the target and the mask. This tends to interrupt sustained firing, while prolonged retinal input tends to re-initiate it. Thus, masking causes a maximal reduction of the duration of the cortical response to the target towards the end of the retinal response. This duration exhibits the typical U-shape of the masking curve. In this model, masking does not alter the propagation of the onset of the response to the target, thus preserving response reaction times and enabling unconscious priming phenomena. PMID:15649600

  9. EUVL mask repair: expanding options with nanomachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Emily; McIntyre, Gregory; Lawliss, Mark; Robinson, Tod; Bozak, Ronald; White, Roy; LeClaire, Jeff

    2012-11-01

    Mask defectivity is often cited as a barrier to EUVL manufacturing, falling just behind low source power. Mask defectivity is a combination of intrinsic blank defects, defects introduced during the mask fabrication and defects introduced during the use of the mask in the EUV exposure tool. This paper works towards minimizing the printing impact of blank defects so that the final EUVL mask can achieve a lower defectivity. Multilayer defects can be created by a step or scratch as shallow as 1nm in the substrate. These small defects create coherent disruptions in the multilayer that can generate significant variations in mask reflectivity and induce clearly-defined, printable defects. If the optical properties of the defect can be well understood, nanomachining repair processes can be deployed to fix these defects. The purpose of this work is to develop new nanomachining repair processes and approaches that can repair complex EUVL mask defects by targeted removal of the EUVL mask materials. The first phase of this work uses nanomachining to create artificial phase defects of different types and sizes for both printability evaluation and benchmarking with simulation. Experimental results validate the concept, showing a reasonable match between imaging with the LBNL Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) and simulation of the mask topography measured by AFM. Once the printability of various nanomachined structures is understood, the second phase of the work aims to optimize the process to repair real EUVL mask defects with surrounding absorber patterns.

  10. Mask data volume: explosion or damp squib?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Chris; Goad, Scott; Buck, Peter; Gladhill, Richard; Cinque, Russell

    2005-11-01

    Mask data file sizes are increasing as we move from technology generation to generation. The historical 30% linear shrink every 2-3 years that has been called Moore's Law, has driven a doubling of the transistor budget and hence feature count. The transition from steppers to step-and-scan tools has increased the area of the mask that needs to be patterned. At the 130nm node and below, Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) has become prevalent, and the edge fragmentation required to implement OPC leads to an increase in the number of polygons required to define the layout. Furthermore, Resolution Enhancement Techniques (RETs) such as Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs) or tri-tone Phase Shift Masks (PSM) require additional features to be defined on the mask which do not resolve on the wafer, further increasing masks volumes. In this paper we review historical data on mask file sizes for microprocessor designs. We consider the consequences of this increase in file size on Mask Data Prep (MDP) activities, both within the Integrated Device Manufacturer (IDM) and Mask Shop, namely: computer resources, storage and networks (for file transfer). The impact of larger file sizes on mask writing times is also reviewed. Finally we consider, based on the trends that have been observed over the last 5 technology nodes, what will be required to maintain reasonable MDP and mask manufacturing cycle times.

  11. Electrostatic chucking and EUVL mask flatness analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataraju, M.; Mikkelson, A.; Sohn, J.; Engelstad, R. L.; Lovell, E. G.

    2005-11-01

    Successful implementation of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) depends on advancements in many areas, including the quality of the mask and chuck system to control image placement (IP) errors. One source of IP error is the height variations of the patterned mask surface (i.e., its nonflatness). The SEMI EUVL mask and chucking standards (SEMI P37 and SEMI P40) describe stringent requirements for the nonflatness of the mask frontside and backside, and the chucking surfaces. Understanding and characterizing the clamping ability of the electrostatic chuck and the effect on the mask flatness is therefore critical in order to meet these requirements. Legendre polynomials have been identified as an effective and efficient means of representing EUVL mask surface shapes. Finite element (FE) models have been developed to utilize the Legendre coefficients (obtained from measured mask and chuck data) as input data to define the surfaces of the mask and the chuck. The FE models are then used to determine the clamping response of the mask and the resulting flatness of the pattern surface. The sum of the mask thickness nonuniformity and the chuck surface shape has a dominant effect on the flatness of the patterned surface after chucking. The focus of the present research is a comprehensive analysis of the flatness and interaction between the nonflat chuck and the mask. Experiments will be conducted using several sample masks chucked by a slab type electrostatic chuck. Results from the study will support and facilitate the timely development of EUVL mask/chuck systems which meet required specifications.

  12. Intelligibility of whispered speech in stationary and modulated noise maskers

    PubMed Central

    Freyman, Richard L.; Griffin, Amanda M.; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the role of natural periodic temporal fine structure in helping listeners take advantage of temporal valleys in amplitude-modulated masking noise when listening to speech. Young normal-hearing participants listened to natural, whispered, and/or vocoded nonsense sentences in a variety of masking conditions. Whispering alters normal waveform temporal fine structure dramatically but, unlike vocoding, does not degrade spectral details created by vocal tract resonances. The improvement in intelligibility, or masking release, due to introducing 16-Hz square-wave amplitude modulations in an otherwise steady speech-spectrum noise was reduced substantially with vocoded sentences relative to natural speech, but was not reduced for whispered sentences. In contrast to natural speech, masking release for whispered sentences was observed even at positive signal-to-noise ratios. Whispered speech has a different short-term amplitude distribution relative to natural speech, and this appeared to explain the robust masking release for whispered speech at high signal-to-noise ratios. Recognition of whispered speech was not disproportionately affected by unpredictable modulations created by a speech-envelope modulated noise masker. Overall, the presence or absence of periodic temporal fine structure did not have a major influence on the degree of benefit obtained from imposing temporal fluctuations on a noise masker. PMID:23039445

  13. Velocity and structural model of the Lower Tagus Basin according to the study of environmental seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes Torres, Ricardo Jorge; Furtado, José Augusto; Gonçalves Silva, Hugo; Borges, José Fernando; Caldeira, Bento; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Carvalho, João

    2013-04-01

    Along his history the Lower Tagus Valley (LTV) region was shaken by several earthquakes, some of them produced in large ruptures of offshore structures located southwest of the Portuguese coastline. Among these is the Lisbon earthquake of 1 November 1755 (M~8.5-8.7), and other moderates earthquakes that were produced by local sources such as the 1344 (M6.0), 1531 (M7.1) and 1909 (M6.0) earthquakes. Previous simulations [1] have shown high velocity amplification in the region. The model used in the simulations was updated from low to high resolution using all the new available geophysical and geotechnical data on the area (seismic reflection, aeromagnetic, gravimetric, deep wells and geological outcrops) [2]. To confirm this model in the areas where it was derived by potential field methods we use broadband ambient noise measurements collected in about 200 points along seven profiles on the LTV basin, six perpendicular and one parallel to the basin axis. We applied the horizontal to vertical (H/V) spectral ratio method [3] to the seismic noise profiles in order to estimate the distribution of amplification in the basin. The H/V curves obtained reveals the existence of two low frequency peaks centered on 0.2 and 1 Hz [4]. These peaks are strongly related with the thickness of Cenozoic and alluvial sediments. The velocity model obtained by inversion of the H/V curves is in good agreement with borehole data, and results obtained using seismic reflection and gravimetric methods. However, aeromagnetic data overestimates the depth of the base of Cenozoic in the areas where it overlies directly the paleozoic basement, which we attribute either to the existence of Mesozoic units or higher magnetic susceptibilities than expected for the Paleozoic. References: [1] Bezzeghoud, M., Borges, J.F., M., Caldeira (2011). Ground motion simulations of the SW Iberia margin: rupture directivity and earth structure effects. Natural Hazards, pages 1-17. doi:10.1007/s11069-011-9925-2 [2

  14. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The presentation highlights jet-noise research conducted in the Subsonic Fixed Wing, Supersonics, and Environmentally Responsible Aviation Projects in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program at NASA. The research efforts discussed include NASA's updated Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP2), acoustic-analogy-based prediction tools, jet-surface-interaction studies, plasma-actuator investigations, N+2 Supersonics Validation studies, rectangular-jet experiments, twin-jet experiments, and Hybrid Wind Body (HWB) activities.

  15. Mask blank particle inspection in vacuum environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Akihiko; Nagahama, Hiroyuki; Tojo, Toru; Akeno, Kiminobu; Hirano, Ryoichi

    2002-10-01

    The mask blank surface inspection system for the electron beam mask writing system (EB mask writer) has developed. This system, that has the small vacuum chamber attachable to EB mask writer, inspects a mask blank that is just before EB writing in vacuum environments. It can inspect whole area of the 230mm mask at 0.3micrometer sensitivity. It also can perform fast inspection by applying the original scanning algorithm for the laser beam. It has the wide detective range from 0.3 to 2.0 micrometers of particle size. It can distinguish sizes of particles in that range. The auto focus function is most important factor for maintaining the sensitivity.

  16. Polarization masks: concept and initial assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2002-07-01

    Polarization from photomasks can be used as a new lever to improve lithographic performance in both binary and phase-shifting masks (PSMs). While PSMs manipulate the phase of light to control the temporal addition of electric field vectors, polarization masks manipulate the vector direction of electric field vectors to control the spatial addition of electric field components. This paper explores the theoretical possibilities of polarization masks, showing that it is possible to use bar structures within openings on the mask itself to polarize incident radiation. Rigorous electromagnetic scattering simulations using TEMPEST and imaging with SPLAT are used to give an initial assessment on the functionality of polarization masks, discussing the polarization quality and throughputs achieved with the masks. Openings between 1/8 and 1/3 of a wavelength provide both a low polarization ratio and good transmission. A final overall throughput of 33% - 40% is achievable, corresponding to a dose hit of 2.5x - 3x.

  17. Polyurethane Masks Large Areas in Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Polyurethane foam provides effective mask in electroplating of copper or nickel. Thin layer of Turco maskant painted on area to be masked: Layer ensures polyurethane foam removed easily after served its purpose. Component A, isocyanate, and component B, polyol, mixed together and brushed or sprayed on mask area. Mixture reacts, yielding polyurethane foam. Foam prevents deposition of nickel or copper on covered area. New method saves time, increases productivity and uses less material than older procedures.

  18. Distinct neural systems recruited when speech production is modulated by different masking sounds.

    PubMed

    Meekings, Sophie; Evans, Samuel; Lavan, Nadine; Boebinger, Dana; Krieger-Redwood, Katya; Cooke, Martin; Scott, Sophie K

    2016-07-01

    When talkers speak in masking sounds, their speech undergoes a variety of acoustic and phonetic changes. These changes are known collectively as the Lombard effect. Most behavioural research and neuroimaging research in this area has concentrated on the effect of energetic maskers such as white noise on Lombard speech. Previous fMRI studies have argued that neural responses to speaking in noise are driven by the quality of auditory feedback-that is, the audibility of the speaker's voice over the masker. However, we also frequently produce speech in the presence of informational maskers such as another talker. Here, speakers read sentences over a range of maskers varying in their informational and energetic content: speech, rotated speech, speech modulated noise, and white noise. Subjects also spoke in quiet and listened to the maskers without speaking. When subjects spoke in masking sounds, their vocal intensity increased in line with the energetic content of the masker. However, the opposite pattern was found neurally. In the superior temporal gyrus, activation was most strongly associated with increases in informational, rather than energetic, masking. This suggests that the neural activations associated with speaking in noise are more complex than a simple feedback response. PMID:27475128

  19. Informational masking of speech produced by speech-like sounds without linguistic content.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Li, Huahui; Li, Liang; Wu, Xihong; Moore, Brian C J

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated whether speech-like maskers without linguistic content produce informational masking of speech. The target stimuli were nonsense Chinese Mandarin sentences. In experiment I, the masker contained harmonics the fundamental frequency (F0) of which was sinusoidally modulated and the mean F0 of which was varied. The magnitude of informational masking was evaluated by measuring the change in intelligibility (releasing effect) produced by inducing a perceived spatial separation of the target speech and masker via the precedence effect. The releasing effect was small and was only clear when the target and masker had the same mean F0, suggesting that informational masking was small. Performance with the harmonic maskers was better than with a steady speech-shaped noise (SSN) masker. In experiments II and III, the maskers were speech-like synthesized signals, alternating between segments with harmonic structure and segments composed of SSN. Performance was much worse than for experiment I, and worse than when an SSN masker was used, suggesting that substantial informational masking occurred. The similarity of the F0 contours of the target and masker had little effect. The informational masking effect was not influenced by whether or not the noise-like segments of the masker were synchronous with the unvoiced segments of the target speech. PMID:22501069

  20. Masking the Auditory Evoked Potential in TMS-EEG: A Comparison of Various Methods.

    PubMed

    ter Braack, Esther M; de Vos, Cecile C; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2015-05-01

    There is growing interest in combining transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with electroencephalography (EEG). Because TMS pulses are accompanied by a clicking sound, it is very likely that part of the response in the EEG consists of an auditory evoked potential (AEP). Different methods have been applied to mask the sound of TMS. However, it is unclear which masking method is most effective in reducing the AEP. In this study we explore the presumed contribution of the AEP to the response and evaluate different ways to mask the TMS clicking sound. Twelve healthy subjects and one completely deaf subject participated in this study. Eight different masking conditions were evaluated in nine hearing subjects. The amplitude of the N100-P180 complex was compared between the different masking conditions. We were not able to completely suppress the N100-P180 when the coil was placed on top of the head. Using an earmuff or exposing the subjects to white or adapted noise caused a small but significant reduction in N100-P180 amplitude, but the largest reduction was achieved when combining a layer of foam, placed between coil and head, with white or adapted noise. The deaf subject also showed a N100-P180 complex. We conclude that both the TMS clicking sound and cortical activation by the magnetic pulse contribute to the N100-P180 amplitude. PMID:23996091

  1. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  2. Mask lithography for display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Ekberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    The last ten years have seen flat displays conquer our briefcases, desktops, and living rooms. There has been an enormous development in production technology, not least in lithography and photomasks. Current masks for large displays are more than 2 m2 and make 4-6 1X prints on glass substrates that are 9 m2. One of the most challenging aspects of photomasks for displays is the so called mura, stripes or blemishes which cause visible defects in the finished display. For the future new and even tighter maskwriter specifications are driven by faster transistors and more complex pixel layouts made necessary by the market's wish for still better image quality, multi-touch panels, 3D TVs, and the next wave of e-book readers. Large OLED screens will pose new challenges. Many new types of displays will be lowcost and use simple lithography, but anything which can show video and high quality photographic images needs a transistor backplane and sophisticated masks for its production.

  3. VIIRS Cloud Mask Validation Exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, R.; Heidinger, A. K.; Hutchison, K.; Dutcher, S.

    2011-12-01

    The NPP Satellite is scheduled for launch October 25, 2011. Included on the platform is the VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Suite) instrument which features 16 bands at about 0.75 m spatial resolution and 5 imager bands at roughly 0.375 m resolution. The basic VIIRS cloud mask (VCM) output is a flag that indicates one of four possible cloudy vs. clear conditions for each 0.75 m pixel: confident clear, probably clear, probably cloudy, and confident cloudy. Pre-launch assessment of the VCM algorithm has been performed with use of MODIS observations as proxy input. Several comparisons are shown between VCM results and cloud detection from other instruments and/or algorithms: MODIS cloud mask (MOD35) at the five-minute granule level (L2), global and regional monthly average cloud amounts from MODIS (MOD35) and MODIS-CERES, ISCCP, PATMOS-x (AVHRR), and CALIOP (lidar). In addition to overall results, collocated MODIS observations, CALIOP and VCM cloud determinations are used to evaluate VCM cloud test thresholds and other tunable parameters. The methods shown will be among those used during the Intensive Calibration and Validation period and beyond.

  4. Traffic noise reduces foraging efficiency in wild owls.

    PubMed

    Senzaki, Masayuki; Yamaura, Yuichi; Francis, Clinton D; Nakamura, Futoshi

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise has been increasing globally. Laboratory experiments suggest that noise disrupts foraging behavior across a range of species, but to reveal the full impacts of noise, we must examine the impacts of noise on foraging behavior among species in the wild. Owls are widespread nocturnal top predators and use prey rustling sounds for localizing prey when hunting. We conducted field experiments to examine the effect of traffic noise on owls' ability to detect prey. Results suggest that foraging efficiency declines with increasing traffic noise levels due to acoustic masking and/or distraction and aversion to traffic noise. Moreover, we estimate that effects of traffic noise on owls' ability to detect prey reach >120 m from a road, which is larger than the distance estimated from captive studies with bats. Our study provides the first evidence that noise reduces foraging efficiency in wild animals, and highlights the possible pervasive impacts of noise. PMID:27537709

  5. Traffic noise reduces foraging efficiency in wild owls

    PubMed Central

    Senzaki, Masayuki; Yamaura, Yuichi; Francis, Clinton D.; Nakamura, Futoshi

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise has been increasing globally. Laboratory experiments suggest that noise disrupts foraging behavior across a range of species, but to reveal the full impacts of noise, we must examine the impacts of noise on foraging behavior among species in the wild. Owls are widespread nocturnal top predators and use prey rustling sounds for localizing prey when hunting. We conducted field experiments to examine the effect of traffic noise on owls’ ability to detect prey. Results suggest that foraging efficiency declines with increasing traffic noise levels due to acoustic masking and/or distraction and aversion to traffic noise. Moreover, we estimate that effects of traffic noise on owls’ ability to detect prey reach >120 m from a road, which is larger than the distance estimated from captive studies with bats. Our study provides the first evidence that noise reduces foraging efficiency in wild animals, and highlights the possible pervasive impacts of noise. PMID:27537709

  6. Evaluation of a native vegetation masking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinsler, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A crop masking technique based on Ashburn's vegetative index (AVI) was used to evaluate native vegetation as an indicator of crop moisture condition. A mask of the range areas (native vegetation) was generated for each of thirteen Great Plains LANDSAT MSS sample segments. These masks were compared to the digitized ground truth and accuracies were computed. An analysis of the types of errors indicates a consistency in errors among the segments. The mask represents a simple quick-look technique for evaluating vegetative cover.

  7. Community noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  8. Determination of mask induced polarization effects on AltPSM mask structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollein, Ingo; Teuber, Silvio; Bubke, Karsten

    2005-06-01

    In the process of discussion of possible mask-types for the 5x nm node (half-pitch) and below, the alternating phase-shifting mask (AltPSM) is a potential candidate to be screened. The current scenario suggests using 193 nm immersion lithography with NA values of up to 1.2 and above. New optical effects from oblique incident angles, mask-induced polarization of the transmitted light and birefringence from the substrate need to be taken into account when the optical performance of a mask is evaluated. This paper addresses mask induced polarization effects from dense lines-and-space structures on a real mask. Measurements of the polarization dependent diffraction efficiencies have been performed on AltPSM masks. Experimental results show good agreement with simulations. A comparison with Binary Masks is made.

  9. A cluster randomised trial of cloth masks compared with medical masks in healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, C Raina; Seale, Holly; Dung, Tham Chi; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Nga, Phan Thi; Chughtai, Abrar Ahmad; Rahman, Bayzidur; Dwyer, Dominic E; Wang, Quanyi

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of cloth masks to medical masks in hospital healthcare workers (HCWs). The null hypothesis is that there is no difference between medical masks and cloth masks. Setting 14 secondary-level/tertiary-level hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam. Participants 1607 hospital HCWs aged ≥18 years working full-time in selected high-risk wards. Intervention Hospital wards were randomised to: medical masks, cloth masks or a control group (usual practice, which included mask wearing). Participants used the mask on every shift for 4 consecutive weeks. Main outcome measure Clinical respiratory illness (CRI), influenza-like illness (ILI) and laboratory-confirmed respiratory virus infection. Results The rates of all infection outcomes were highest in the cloth mask arm, with the rate of ILI statistically significantly higher in the cloth mask arm (relative risk (RR)=13.00, 95% CI 1.69 to 100.07) compared with the medical mask arm. Cloth masks also had significantly higher rates of ILI compared with the control arm. An analysis by mask use showed ILI (RR=6.64, 95% CI 1.45 to 28.65) and laboratory-confirmed virus (RR=1.72, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.94) were significantly higher in the cloth masks group compared with the medical masks group. Penetration of cloth masks by particles was almost 97% and medical masks 44%. Conclusions This study is the first RCT of cloth masks, and the results caution against the use of cloth masks. This is an important finding to inform occupational health and safety. Moisture retention, reuse of cloth masks and poor filtration may result in increased risk of infection. Further research is needed to inform the widespread use of cloth masks globally. However, as a precautionary measure, cloth masks should not be recommended for HCWs, particularly in high-risk situations, and guidelines need to be updated. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000887077. PMID

  10. Procedures for dealing with certain types of noise and systematic errors common to many Hadamard transform optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, M.

    1977-01-01

    Sources of noise and error correcting procedures characteristic of Hadamard transform optical systems were investigated. Reduction of spectral noise due to noise spikes in the data, the effect of random errors, the relative performance of Fourier and Hadamard transform spectrometers operated under identical detector-noise-limited conditions, and systematic means for dealing with mask defects are among the topics discussed. The distortion in Hadamard transform optical instruments caused by moving Masks, incorrect mask alignment, missing measurements, and diffraction is analyzed and techniques for reducing or eliminating this distortion are described.

  11. Evaluating Texture Compression Masking Effects Using Objective Image Quality Assessment Metrics.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Wesley; Olano, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Texture compression is widely used in real-time rendering to reduce storage and bandwidth requirements. Recent research in compression algorithms has explored both reduced fixed bit rate and variable bit rate algorithms. The results are evaluated at the individual texture level using mean square error, peak signal-to-noise ratio, or visual image inspection. We argue this is the wrong evaluation approach. Compression artifacts in individual textures are likely visually masked in final rendered images and this masking is not accounted for when evaluating individual textures. This masking comes from both geometric mapping of textures onto models and the effects of combining different textures on the same model such as diffuse, gloss, and bump maps. We evaluate final rendered images using rigorous perceptual error metrics. Our method samples the space of viewpoints in a scene, renders the scene from each viewpoint using variations of compressed textures, and then compares each to a ground truth using uncompressed textures from the same viewpoint. We show that masking has a significant effect on final rendered image quality, masking effects and perceptual sensitivity to masking varies by the type of texture, graphics hardware compression algorithms are too conservative, and reduced bit rates are possible while maintaining final rendered image quality. PMID:26357259

  12. Musicians and non-musicians are equally adept at perceiving masked speech.

    PubMed

    Boebinger, Dana; Evans, Samuel; Rosen, Stuart; Lima, César F; Manly, Tom; Scott, Sophie K

    2015-01-01

    There is much interest in the idea that musicians perform better than non-musicians in understanding speech in background noise. Research in this area has often used energetic maskers, which have their effects primarily at the auditory periphery. However, masking interference can also occur at more central auditory levels, known as informational masking. This experiment extends existing research by using multiple maskers that vary in their informational content and similarity to speech, in order to examine differences in perception of masked speech between trained musicians (n = 25) and non-musicians (n = 25). Although musicians outperformed non-musicians on a measure of frequency discrimination, they showed no advantage in perceiving masked speech. Further analysis revealed that non-verbal IQ, rather than musicianship, significantly predicted speech reception thresholds in noise. The results strongly suggest that the contribution of general cognitive abilities needs to be taken into account in any investigations of individual variability for perceiving speech in noise. PMID:25618067

  13. Envelope and intensity based prediction of psychoacoustic masking and speech intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Biberger, Thomas; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-08-01

    Human auditory perception and speech intelligibility have been successfully described based on the two concepts of spectral masking and amplitude modulation (AM) masking. The power-spectrum model (PSM) [Patterson and Moore (1986). Frequency Selectivity in Hearing, pp. 123-177] accounts for effects of spectral masking and critical bandwidth, while the envelope power-spectrum model (EPSM) [Ewert and Dau (2000). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181-1196] has been successfully applied to AM masking and discrimination. Both models extract the long-term (envelope) power to calculate signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Recently, the EPSM has been applied to speech intelligibility (SI) considering the short-term envelope SNR on various time scales (multi-resolution speech-based envelope power-spectrum model; mr-sEPSM) to account for SI in fluctuating noise [Jørgensen, Ewert, and Dau (2013). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 436-446]. Here, a generalized auditory model is suggested combining the classical PSM and the mr-sEPSM to jointly account for psychoacoustics and speech intelligibility. The model was extended to consider the local AM depth in conditions with slowly varying signal levels, and the relative role of long-term and short-term SNR was assessed. The suggested generalized power-spectrum model is shown to account for a large variety of psychoacoustic data and to predict speech intelligibility in various types of background noise. PMID:27586734

  14. Set Size and Mask Duration Do Not Interact in Object-Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argyropoulos, Ioannis; Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Carter, Wakefield

    2013-01-01

    Object-substitution masking (OSM) occurs when a mask, such as four dots that surround a brief target item, onsets simultaneously with the target and offsets a short time after the target, rather than simultaneously with it. OSM is a reduction in accuracy of reporting the target with the temporally trailing mask, compared with the simultaneously…

  15. Industrial noise control: architectural and environmental aspects. January, 1975-August, 1981 (citations from the International Information Service for the Physics and Engineering Communities Data Base). Report for Jan 75-Aug 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The architectural and environmental aspects of noise control are discussed in terms of the effect of building standards as well as the proper installation of equipment to reduce vibration of air control equipment. (Contains 114 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  16. Fast mask writers: technology options and considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Lloyd C.; Groves, Timothy; Hughes, Greg

    2011-04-01

    The semiconductor industry is under constant pressure to reduce production costs even as the complexity of technology increases. Lithography represents the most expensive process due to its high capital equipment costs and the implementation of low-k1 lithographic processes, which have added to the complexity of making masks because of the greater use of optical proximity correction, pixelated masks, and double or triple patterning. Each of these mask technologies allows the production of semiconductors at future nodes while extending the utility of current immersion tools. Low-k1 patterning complexity combined with increased data due to smaller feature sizes is driving extremely long mask write times. While a majority of the industry is willing to accept times of up to 24 hours, evidence suggests that the write times for many masks at the 22 nm node and beyond will be significantly longer. It has been estimated that funding on the order of 50M to 90M for non-recurring engineering (NRE) costs will be required to develop a multiple beam mask writer system, yet the business case to recover this kind of investment is not strong. Moreover, funding such a development poses a high risk for an individual supplier. The structure of the mask fabrication marketplace separates the mask writer equipment customer (the mask supplier) from the final customer (wafer manufacturer) that will be most effected by the increase in mask cost that will result if a high speed mask writer is not available. Since no individual company will likely risk entering this market, some type of industry-wide funding model will be needed.

  17. Shadows Alter Facial Expressions of Noh Masks

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Miyata, Hiromitsu; Nishimura, Ritsuko; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Background A Noh mask, worn by expert actors during performance on the Japanese traditional Noh drama, conveys various emotional expressions despite its fixed physical properties. How does the mask change its expressions? Shadows change subtly during the actual Noh drama, which plays a key role in creating elusive artistic enchantment. We here describe evidence from two experiments regarding how attached shadows of the Noh masks influence the observers’ recognition of the emotional expressions. Methodology/Principal Findings In Experiment 1, neutral-faced Noh masks having the attached shadows of the happy/sad masks were recognized as bearing happy/sad expressions, respectively. This was true for all four types of masks each of which represented a character differing in sex and age, even though the original characteristics of the masks also greatly influenced the evaluation of emotions. Experiment 2 further revealed that frontal Noh mask images having shadows of upward/downward tilted masks were evaluated as sad/happy, respectively. This was consistent with outcomes from preceding studies using actually tilted Noh mask images. Conclusions/Significance Results from the two experiments concur that purely manipulating attached shadows of the different types of Noh masks significantly alters the emotion recognition. These findings go in line with the mysterious facial expressions observed in Western paintings, such as the elusive qualities of Mona Lisa’s smile. They also agree with the aesthetic principle of Japanese traditional art “yugen (profound grace and subtlety)”, which highly appreciates subtle emotional expressions in the darkness. PMID:23940748

  18. Rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.

  19. Aircraft noise, hearing ability, and annoyance

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Trong-Neng; Jim Shoung Lai; Chen-Yang Shen

    1995-11-01

    The relationship between aircraft noise, loss of hearing, and annoyance was explored in a study in two schools located near an international airport in Taiwan. Sixth-grade students (N = 242) were recruited from two schools and were classified into high-and low-noise-exposure groups, based on environmental noise measurements. Person-equivalent 24-h noise exposure was measured to determine noise exposure at the individual level, and it was compared with hearing threshold level and with aircraft noise measured at the environmental level. Individual hearing threshold levels did not differ between environmental high- and low-noise-exposure groups, as evidenced by the lack of difference between the two groups for noise exposure measured at the individual level. However, the proportion of students who were annoyed by aircraft noise was higher in the environmental high-noise-exposure group, although personal 24-h noise exposure was not a factor for annoyance. The results indicated that environmental noise measurement was not an appropriate criterion for assessment of auditory damage (or noise-induced hearing loss) in Taiwan. As well, aircraft-noise exposure in Taiwan did not appear to affect the hearing threshold but nonetheless annoyed school children near the airport. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Masking Technique for Ion-Beam Sputter Etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Improved process for fabrication of integrated circuits developed. Technique utilizes simultaneous ion-beam sputter etching and carbon sputter deposition in conjunction with carbon sputter mask or organic mask decomposed to produce carbon-rich sputter-mask surface. Sputter etching process replenishes sputter mask with carbon to prevent premature mask loss.

  1. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a substantial... mask it contains and all appropriate approval labels. (b) Containers for gas masks shall be...

  2. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a substantial... mask it contains and all appropriate approval labels. (b) Containers for gas masks shall be...

  3. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a substantial... mask it contains and all appropriate approval labels. (b) Containers for gas masks shall be...

  4. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a substantial... mask it contains and all appropriate approval labels. (b) Containers for gas masks shall be...

  5. 42 CFR 84.110 - Gas masks; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas masks; description. 84.110 Section 84.110... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.110 Gas masks; description. (a) Gas masks including all completely assembled air purifying masks designed...

  6. 42 CFR 84.110 - Gas masks; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas masks; description. 84.110 Section 84.110... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.110 Gas masks; description. (a) Gas masks including all completely assembled air purifying masks designed...

  7. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  9. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  10. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  11. EUV mask cleans comparison of frontside and dual-sided concurrent cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Lin Lee; Kindt, Louis; Turley, Christina; Leonhard, Dusty; Boyle, John; Robinson, Chris; Rankin, Jed; Corliss, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The cleaning requirements for EUV masks are more complex than optical masks due to the absence of available EUVcompatible pellicles. EUV masks must therefore be capable of undergoing more than 100 cleaning cycles with minimum impact to lithographic performance. EUV masks are created on substrates with 40 multilayers of silicon and molybdenum to form a Bragg reflector, capped with a 2.5nm-thick ruthenium layer and a tantalum-based absorber; during usage, both ruthenium and absorber are exposed to the cleaning process. The CrN layer on the backside is used to enable electrostatic clamping. This clamp side must also be free of particles that could impact printing and overlay, and particles could also potentially migrate to the frontside and create defects. Thus, the cleaning process must provide decent particle removal efficiencies on both front- and backside while maintaining reflectivity with minimal surface roughness change. In this paper, we report progress developing a concurrent patterned-side and clamped-side cleaning process that achieves minimal reflectivity change over 120 cleaning cycles, with XPS and EDS indicating the presence of ruthenium after 125 cleaning cycles. The change in surface roughness over 100 cleaning cycles is within the noise (0.0086nm) on a mask blank, and SEM inspection of 100nm and 200nm features on patterned masks after undergoing 100 cleaning cycles show no indications of ruthenium pitting or significant surface damage. This process was used on test masks to remove particles from both sides that would otherwise inhibit these masks from being used in the scanner.

  12. Implicit Semantic Perception in Object Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhew, Stephanie C.; Visser, Troy A. W.; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research on visual perception has uncovered many phenomena, such as binocular rivalry, backward masking, and the attentional blink, that reflect "failures of consciousness". Although stimuli do not reach awareness in these paradigms, there is evidence that they nevertheless undergo semantic processing. Object substitution masking (OSM),…

  13. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emission masks. 90.210 Section 90.210 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.210 Emission masks. Except as indicated elsewhere in this part, transmitters used in...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  15. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  16. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  18. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  19. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  20. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  1. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  2. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  3. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  4. GEWEX-RFA Land-Ocean Mask

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-20

    GEWEX RFA Land-Ocean Mask A 2.5° resolution land-ocean mask has been developed for the Radiative Flux Assessment. It can be used ... creating global, regional, or zonal time series for land or ocean. Format - Pixels are arranged as in global map standard . ...

  5. A facial mask comprising Dead Sea mud.

    PubMed

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Mohameed, Hazim A

    2006-01-01

    Many investigators have proved that Dead Sea salt and mud are useful in treating skin disorders and skin diseases. Therefore, the black mud has been extensively used as a base for the preparation of soaps, creams, and unguents for skin care. This study concerns a facial mask made mainly of Dead Sea mud. The effects of temperature and shearing conditions on the rheological behavior of the facial mask were investigated. The mud facial mask exhibited a shear thinning behavior with a yield stress. It was found that the apparent viscosity of the mask has a strong dependence on the shear rate as well as on the temperature. The facial mask exhibited a maximum yield stress and very shear thinning behavior at 40 degrees C, which is attributed to the gelatinization of the polysaccharide used to stabilize the mud particles. On the other hand, the mud mask exhibited a time-independent behavior at low temperatures and shear rates and changed to a thixotropic behavior upon increasing both the temperature and the shear rate. The shear thinning and thixotropic behaviors have a significant importance in the ability of the facial mask to spread on the skin: the Dead Sea mud mask can break down for easy spreading, and the applied film can gain viscosity instantaneously to resist running. Moreover, particle sedimentation, which in this case would negatively affect consumer acceptance of the product, occurs slowly due to high viscosity at rest conditions. PMID:17256074

  6. Masking the Feeling of Being Stupid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sally L.

    1988-01-01

    Teaching experience at The Lab School of Washington has shown that learning-disabled children and adults cope with their lack of self-esteem and feelings of stupidity by developing masks to hide their hurt. These include masks of super-competence, helplessness, invisibility, clowning, injustice collecting, indifference, boredom, outrageousness,…

  7. Mask industry assessment trend analysis 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Marmillion, Patricia

    2007-02-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. This year's survey data was presented at BACUS and a detailed trend analysis is presented here. The annual survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the fifth in the current series of annual reports. With continued industry support the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify trends in the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 survey. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss, Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns and Services, Operating Cost Factors, and Equipment Utilization. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. Note: the questions covering operating cost factors and equipment utilization were only added to the survey in 2005; therefore meaningful trend analysis is not yet available.

  8. Mask industry assessment trend analysis: 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Yun, Henry

    2010-05-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders consistently cite the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was designed with input from semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers and support from SEMATECH to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. This year's assessment was the eighth in the current series of annual reports. Its data were presented in detail at BACUS, and the detailed trend analysis is presented at EMLC. With continued industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. Its results will be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the surveys in 2005 through 2009. Questions are grouped into six categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category is a multitude of questions that creates a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  9. Computing Challenges in Coded Mask Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This slide presaentation reviews the complications and challenges in developing computer systems for Coded Mask Imaging telescopes. The coded mask technique is used when there is no other way to create the telescope, (i.e., when there are wide fields of view, high energies for focusing or low energies for the Compton/Tracker Techniques and very good angular resolution.) The coded mask telescope is described, and the mask is reviewed. The coded Masks for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) instruments are shown, and a chart showing the types of position sensitive detectors used for the coded mask telescopes is also reviewed. Slides describe the mechanism of recovering an image from the masked pattern. The correlation with the mask pattern is described. The Matrix approach is reviewed, and other approaches to image reconstruction are described. Included in the presentation is a review of the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) / High Energy Telescope (HET), with information about the mission, the operation of the telescope, comparison of the EXIST/HET with the SWIFT/BAT and details of the design of the EXIST/HET.

  10. EUV mask process development status for full field EUV exposure tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tsukasa; Adachi, Takashi; Akizuki, Hideo; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya; Ishikiriyama, Kosuke

    2008-05-01

    Extreme Ultra Violet Lithography (EUVL) is one of promising candidates for next generation lithography, 32nm node and beyond. Authors are developing EUV mask process targeting full field EUV exposure tool. Unlike the conventional optical mask, EUV mask is reflective type mask. To reflect 13.5nm wavelength light, 40 pairs of Mo/Si multilayer (ML) is used for reflective layer. Reflective layer is covered by capping layer. The capping layer protect reflective layer from absorber etching, defect repair and environmental condition. Top of absorber layer is covered by low reflective (LR) layer to achieve high contrast between the etched and not etched portion. Back side of EUV mask is covered by conductive film for electrostatic chuck use. In this paper, we will report current process development status of EUV mask for full field EUV exposure tool. Absorber patterning process including resist patterning and absorber etching were developed. Thin resist use and small resist damage dry etching process achieved pattern resolution of 32nm node. Defect inspection was also evaluated using DUV reticle inspection tool. Ta-based absorber on ruthenium (Ru) capped ML blanks was used for this evaluation. Because, Ru material has high resistivity to absorber etching plasma, it enable buffer layer less EUV mask structure. Ru also has better property on oxidation resistance compared to standard silicon (Si) capping layer.

  11. Health Effects of Noise Exposure in Children.

    PubMed

    Stansfeld, Stephen; Clark, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    Environmental noise exposure, such as road traffic noise and aircraft noise, is associated with a range of health outcomes in children. Children demonstrate annoyance responses to noise, and noise is also related to lower well-being and stress responses, such as increased levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline. Noise does not cause more serious mental health problems, but there is growing evidence for an association with increased hyperactivity symptoms. Studies also suggest that noise might cause changes in cardiovascular functioning, and there is some limited evidence for an effect on low birth weight. There is robust evidence for an effect of school noise exposure on children's cognitive skills such as reading and memory, as well as on standardised academic test scores. Environmental noise does not usually reach levels that are likely to affect children's hearing; however, increasing use of personal electronic devices may leave some children exposed to harmful levels of noise. PMID:26231366

  12. A mask manufacturer's perspective on maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Peter; Biechler, Charles; Kalk, Franklin

    2005-11-01

    Maskless Lithography (ML2) is again being considered for use in mainstream CMOS IC manufacturing. Sessions at technical conferences are being devoted to ML2. A multitude of new companies have been formed in the last several years to apply new concepts to breaking the throughput barrier that has in the past prevented ML2 from achieving the cost and cycle time performance necessary to become economically viable, except in rare cases. Has Maskless Lithography's (we used to call it "Direct Write Lithography") time really come? If so, what is the expected impact on the mask manufacturer and does it matter? The lithography tools used today in mask manufacturing are similar in concept to ML2 except for scale, both in throughput and feature size. These mask tools produce highly accurate lithographic images directly from electronic pattern files, perform multi-layer overlay, and mix-n-match across multiple tools, tool types and sites. Mask manufacturers are already accustomed to the ultimate low volume - one substrate per design layer. In order to achieve the economically required throughput, proposed ML2 systems eliminate or greatly reduce some of the functions that are the source of the mask writer's accuracy. Can these ML2 systems meet the demanding lithographic requirements without these functions? ML2 may eliminate the reticle but many of the processes and procedures performed today by the mask manufacturer are still required. Examples include the increasingly complex mask data preparation step and the verification performed to ensure that the pattern on the reticle is accurately representing the design intent. The error sources that are fixed on a reticle are variable with time on an ML2 system. It has been proposed that if ML2 is successful it will become uneconomical to be in the mask business - that ML2, by taking the high profit masks will take all profitability out of mask manufacturing and thereby endanger the entire semiconductor industry. Others suggest that a

  13. A social survey on the noise impact in open-plan working environments in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Kang, Jian; Jiao, Fenglei

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal noise impact in open-plan working environments in China, through a series of questionnaire surveys and acoustic measurements in typical open-plan working environments. It has been found that compared to other physical environmental factors in open-plan working environments, people are much less satisfied with the acoustic environment. The noise impact in the surveyed working environments is rather significant, in terms of sound level inside the office, understanding of colleagues' conversation, and the use of background music such as music players. About 30-50% of the interviewees think that various noise sources inside and outside offices are 'very disturbing' and 'disturbing', and the most annoying sounds include noises from outside, ventilation systems, office equipment, and keyboard typing. Using higher panels to separate work space, or working in enclosed offices, are regarded as effective improvement measures, whereas introducing natural sounds to mask unwanted sounds seems to be not preferable. There are significant correlations between the evaluation of acoustic environment and office symptoms, including hypersensitivity to loud sounds, easily getting tired and depression. There are also significant correlations between evaluation of various acoustics-related factors and certain statements relating to job satisfaction, including sensitivity to noise, as well as whether conversations could be heard by colleagues. PMID:23032568

  14. Inherent Directionality Determines Spatial Release from Masking at the Tympanum in a Vertebrate with Internally Coupled Ears.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Michael S; Lee, Norman; Bee, Mark A

    2016-08-01

    In contrast to humans and other mammals, many animals have internally coupled ears that function as inherently directional pressure-gradient receivers. Two important but unanswered questions are to what extent and how do animals with such ears exploit spatial cues in the perceptual analysis of noisy and complex acoustic scenes? This study of Cope's gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) investigated how the inherent directionality of internally coupled ears contributes to spatial release from masking. We used laser vibrometry and signal detection theory to determine the threshold signal-to-noise ratio at which the tympanum's response to vocalizations could be reliably detected in noise. Thresholds were determined as a function of signal location, noise location, and signal-noise separation. Vocalizations were broadcast from one of three azimuthal locations: frontal (0 °), to the right (+90 °), and to the left (-90 °). Masking noise was broadcast from each of 12 azimuthal angles around the frog (0 to 330 °, 30 ° separation). Variation in the position of the noise source resulted in, on average, 4 dB of spatial release from masking relative to co-located conditions. However, detection thresholds could be up to 9 dB lower in the "best ear for listening" compared to the other ear. The pattern and magnitude of spatial release from masking were well predicted by the tympanum's inherent directionality. We discuss how the magnitude of masking release observed in the tympanum's response to spatially separated signals and noise relates to that observed in previous behavioral and neurophysiological studies of frog hearing and communication. PMID:27125545

  15. A Novel Anti-Influenza Copper Oxide Containing Respiratory Face Mask

    PubMed Central

    Borkow, Gadi; Zhou, Steve S.; Page, Tom; Gabbay, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    may significantly reduce the risk of hand or environmental contamination, and thereby subsequent infection, due to improper handling and disposal of the masks. PMID:20592763

  16. Evaluation of the efficiency of medical masks and the creation of new medical masks.

    PubMed

    Huang, J T; Huang, V I

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of medical masks in preventing respiratory infection was investigated by testing bacterial leakage, filtration efficiency, respiratory resistance and oxygen concentration of the enclosed space. Polypropylene (PP) fibres were treated with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide to impart a positive electrical charge capable of attracting bacteria. The fluffed PP fibres were used to make a polypropylene mask and to edge standard surgical and N-95 respirators to prevent leakage. A PP napkin was created by melting and blowing PP. The PP edging seal dramatically reduced bacterial leakage of standard masks and was more effective than adhesive paper tape edging in reducing respiratory resistance. Bacterial or viral filtration efficiency was almost 100% for the PP mask and the PP napkin. The specially designed PP mask with a synthetic adhesive at the edge of the mask may be more effective than the standard surgical mask and the N-95 respirator. The PP napkin is an important tool in preventing the spread of pathogens. PMID:17542408

  17. Ship detection from high-resolution imagery based on land masking and cloud filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Tianming; Zhang, Junping

    2015-12-01

    High resolution satellite images play an important role in target detection application presently. This article focuses on the ship target detection from the high resolution panchromatic images. Taking advantage of geographic information such as the coastline vector data provided by NOAA Medium Resolution Coastline program, the land region is masked which is a main noise source in ship detection process. After that, the algorithm tries to deal with the cloud noise which appears frequently in the ocean satellite images, which is another reason for false alarm. Based on the analysis of cloud noise's feature in frequency domain, we introduce a windowed noise filter to get rid of the cloud noise. With the help of morphological processing algorithms adapted to target detection, we are able to acquire ship targets in fine shapes. In addition, we display the extracted information such as length and width of ship targets in a user-friendly way i.e. a KML file interpreted by Google Earth.

  18. Airframe noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, David G.

    1991-08-01

    Current understanding of airframe noise was reviewed as represented by experiment at model and full scale, by theoretical modeling, and by empirical correlation models. The principal component sources are associated with the trailing edges of wing and tail, deflected trailing edge flaps, flap side edges, leading edge flaps or slats, undercarriage gear elements, gear wheel wells, fuselage and wing boundary layers, and panel vibration, together with many minor protrusions like radio antennas and air conditioning intakes which may contribute significantly to perceived noise. There are also possibilities for interactions between the various mechanisms. With current engine technology, the principal airframe noise mechanisms dominate only at low frequencies, typically less than 1 kHz and often much lower, but further reduction of turbomachinery noise in particular may make airframe noise the principal element of approach noise at frequencies in the sensitive range.

  19. Wearable Monitor Helps Spot 'Masked' High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_158860.html Wearable Monitor Helps Spot 'Masked' High Blood Pressure Black people with undetected problem twice as likely ... doctors spot black people with "masked," or undetected, high blood pressure, a new study suggests. "Masked" high blood pressure ...

  20. Cheap Face Masks Little Help Against Air Pollutants

    MedlinePlus

    ... News) -- Inexpensive cloth masks offer little protection against air pollution, a new study suggests. Many people in Asia ... or washable cloth masks to protect against small air pollution particles. But tests on different types of masks ...

  1. Nasal mask ventilation is better than face mask ventilation in edentulous patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Mukul Chandra; Rana, Sandeep; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Vishal, Vindhya; Sikdar, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Face mask ventilation of the edentulous patient is often difficult as ineffective seating of the standard mask to the face prevents attainment of an adequate air seal. The efficacy of nasal ventilation in edentulous patients has been cited in case reports but has never been investigated. Material and Methods: Consecutive edentulous adult patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, during a 17-month period, were prospectively evaluated. After induction of anesthesia and administration of neuromuscular blocker, lungs were ventilated with a standard anatomical face mask of appropriate size, using a volume controlled anesthesia ventilator with tidal volume set at 10 ml/kg. In case of inadequate ventilation, the mask position was adjusted to achieve best-fit. Inspired and expired tidal volumes were measured. Thereafter, the face mask was replaced by a nasal mask and after achieving best-fit, the inspired and expired tidal volumes were recorded. The difference in expired tidal volumes and airway pressures at best-fit with the use of the two masks and number of patients with inadequate ventilation with use of the masks were statistically analyzed. Results: A total of 79 edentulous patients were recruited for the study. The difference in expiratory tidal volumes with the use of the two masks at best-fit was statistically significant (P = 0.0017). Despite the best-fit mask placement, adequacy of ventilation could not be achieved in 24.1% patients during face mask ventilation, and 12.7% patients during nasal mask ventilation and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Nasal mask ventilation is more efficient than standard face mask ventilation in edentulous patients. PMID:27625477

  2. Helicopter external noise requirements: FAA perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    Enactment of helicopter noise certification standards for the control of noise impact contributing to community annoyance is considered in terms of the development of helicopters as an environmentally compatible air transportation mode. Increased use of helicopters for commercial applications and public awareness of aircraft noise are cited as factors making development of helicopter noise standards necessary both for the protection of the environmental interest of the community and to ensure the orderly growth of the helicopter industry itself. Noise sources, technology trends in helicopter design, and design concepts to control helicopter noise are discussed along with the regulatory background and specific helicopter regulatory concepts.

  3. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  4. Masking property of quantum random cipher with phase mask encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohma, Masaki; Hirota, Osamu

    2014-10-01

    The security analysis of physical encryption protocol based on coherent pulse position modulation (CPPM) originated by Yuen is one of the most interesting topics in the study of cryptosystem with a security level beyond the Shannon limit. Although the implementation of CPPM scheme has certain difficulty, several methods have been proposed recently. This paper deals with the CPPM encryption in terms of symplectic transformation, which includes a phase mask encryption as a special example, and formulates a unified security analysis for such encryption schemes. Specifically, we give a lower bound of Eve's symbol error probability using reliability function theory to ensure that our proposed system exceeds the Shannon limit. Then we assume the secret key is given to Eve after her heterodyne measurement. Since this assumption means that Eve has a great advantage in the sense of the conventional cryptography, the lower bound of her error indeed ensures the security level beyond the Shannon limit. In addition, we show some numerical examples of the security performance.

  5. Observations and Modeling of Seismic Background Noise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jon R.

    1993-01-01

    TERRAscope network deployed by the California Institute of Technology in cooperation with other institutions. A map showing the approximate locations of the stations used in this study is provided in Figure 1. One might hope for a better distribution of stations in the southern hemisphere, especially Africa and South America, in order to look for regional variations in seismic noise (apart from the major differences between continental, coastal and island sites). Unfortunately, anyone looking for subtle regional variations in seismic noise is probably going to be disappointed by the spectral data presented in this report because much of the station data appear to be dominated by local disturbances caused by instrumental, environmental, cultural, or surf noise. Better instruments and better instrument siting, or a well-funded field program, will be needed before a global isoseismal noise map can be produced. However, by assembling a composite of background noise from a large network of stations, many of the local station variables are masked, and it is possible to create generalized spectral plots of Earth noise for hypothetical quiet and noisy station sites.

  6. Noise Assessment Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Theodore J.; McMahon, Nancy M.

    The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), in its efforts to provide decent housing and a suitable living environment, is concerned with noise as a major source of environmental pollution. To this end, these guidelines are presented to provide site screening techniques. The procedures described have been developed so that people…

  7. Global image placement of LEEPL mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Hideyuki; Susa, Takashi; Sumida, Tomoya; Kurosu, Toshiaki; Yoshii, Takashi; Yotsui, Kenta; Sugimura, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kojiro; Tamura, Akira

    2004-12-01

    Two types of strut-supported low energy electron-beam proximity projection lithography (LEEPL) masks which are grid-type mask and COSMOS-type mask, were investigated for Global image placement (IP). First, we evaluated the dynamic repeatability measurement performance for global IP, measuring a same mask 10 times on a 46 x 46 mm pattern area by using LEEPL electrostatic chuck (ESC). The measurement repeatability for grid type and COSMOS type were 5.1/7.8 nm and 4.4/5.8 nm in x/y directions respectively. And then global in-plane distortion (IPD) of COSMOS type masks with various stress and flatness were measured. The global IPD of a COSMOS-type mask with a low stress of 10 MPa and a flatness of 3.1 μm was 6.5/6.4 nm in x/y directions, which is negligible assuming the measurement repeatability. Finally the global IPs of the two-type masks were measured. The global IPs for the grid-type and COSMOS-type were 24.5/15.7 nm and 23.2/16.4 nm in x/y directions respectively. Thus we confirmed that the global IP obtained meet the required value of less than 30 nm.

  8. LCD masks for spatial augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithwick, Quinn Y. J.; Reetz, Daniel; Smoot, Lanny

    2014-03-01

    One aim of Spatial Augmented Reality is to visually integrate synthetic objects into real-world spaces amongst physical objects, viewable by many observers without 3D glasses, head-mounted displays or mobile screens. In common implementations, using beam-combiners, scrim projection, or transparent self-emissive displays, the synthetic object's and real-world scene's light combine additively. As a result, synthetic objects appear low-contrast and semitransparent against well-lit backgrounds, and do not cast shadows. These limitations prevent synthetic objects from appearing solid and visually integrated into the real-world space. We use a transparent LCD panel as a programmable dynamic mask. The LCD panel displaying the synthetic object's silhouette mask is colocated with the object's color image, both staying aligned for all points-of-view. The mask blocks the background providing occlusion, presents a black level for high-contrast images, blocks scene illumination thus casting true shadows, and prevents blow-by in projection scrim arrangements. We have several implementations of SAR with LCD masks: 1) beam-combiner with an LCD mask, 2) scrim projection with an LCD mask, and 3) transparent OLED display with an LCD mask. Large format (80" diagonal) and dual layer volumetric variations are also implemented.

  9. An interactive tool for gamut masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ying; Lau, Cheryl; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2014-02-01

    Artists often want to change the colors of an image to achieve a particular aesthetic goal. For example, they might limit colors to a warm or cool color scheme to create an image with a certain mood or feeling. Gamut masking is a technique that artists use to limit the set of colors they can paint with. They draw a mask over a color wheel and only use the hues within the mask. However, creating the color palette from the mask and applying the colors to the image requires skill. We propose an interactive tool for gamut masking that allows amateur artists to create an image with a desired mood or feeling. Our system extracts a 3D color gamut from the 2D user-drawn mask and maps the image to this gamut. The user can draw a different gamut mask or locally refine the image colors. Our voxel grid gamut representation allows us to represent gamuts of any shape, and our cluster-based image representation allows the user to change colors locally.

  10. Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khanh Bao

    1994-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 {mu}m wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

  11. Mask industry assessment trend analysis: 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. David

    2012-02-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders consistently cite the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply among the top critical issues for lithography. A survey was designed by SEMATECH with input from semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers to objectively assess the overall conditions of the mask industry. With the continued support of the industry, this year's assessment was the tenth in the current series of annual reports. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 through 2011 surveys. Questions are grouped into six categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category is a multitude of questions that ultimately produce a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. We received data from 11 companies this year, which was a record high since the beginning of the series. The responding companies represented more than 96% of the volume shipped and about 90% of the 2011 revenue for the photomask industry. These survey reports are often used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. They will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify strengths and opportunities. Results can also be used to guide future investments in critical path issues.

  12. On cross-language consonant identification in second language noise.

    PubMed

    Marchegiani, Letizia; Fafoutis, Xenofon

    2015-10-01

    Speech perception in everyday conditions is highly affected by the presence of noise of a different nature. The presence of overlapping speakers is considered an especially challenging scenario, as it introduces both energetic and informational masking. The efficacy of the masking also depends on the familiarity with the language of both the target and masking stimuli. This work analyses consonant identification by non-native English speakers in N-talker natural babble noise and babble-modulated noise, by varying the number of talkers in the babble. In particular, only English consonants that are also present in all the native languages of the subjects are used. As the subjects are familiar with the consonants used, this study can be considered a step towards a deeper analysis on perception of first language speech in the presence of second language maskers. PMID:26520302

  13. Electron beam EUV patterned mask inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Keizo; Kitayama, Yasunobu; Fiekowsky, Peter

    2011-11-01

    EUV lithography is expected to begin production in 2014. Production of successful EUV photomasks requires patterned mask inspection (PMI). The ultimate PMI tool is expected to utilize actinic (EUV) illumination. Development of such a tool is expected to require three years after funding. Current test EUV masks, such as 22 nm, can be inspected using 193 nm wavelength deep UV (DUV) inspection tools similar to those currently being used for DUV masks. The DUV inspection tools may be extended for the 16 nm node. However EUV production is expected to start with 11 nm node masks which cannot be inspected with proposed DUV inspection tools. Therefore E-beam inspection (EBI) is discussed as the interim PMI method. EBI has the advantage of high resolution and the disadvantages of low inspection speed and relative insensitivity to ML defects (in the multi-layer material). EBI inspection speed is limited by the pixel size, pixel capture rate and the number of electron columns. The pixel rate is limited by the detector time-resolution, the beam current, and the detection efficiency. Technical improvements in beam focus, secondary electron detection, and defect detection and analysis provide good performance for 22 nm node masks. We discuss the advances and show that performance can be extrapolated for 16 and 11 nm node patterned mask inspections. We present sensitivity and false-defect frequency results of using the Holon EBI tool on 22 nm test masks and a roadmap for extending its operation for use on 16 and 11 nm node masks for inspections requiring 2-5 hours per mask.

  14. Aircraft Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Ulf; Dobrzynski, Werner; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Delfs, Jan; Isermann, Ullrich; Obermeier, Frank

    Aircraft industry is exposed to increasing public pressure aiming at a continuing reduction of aircraft noise levels. This is necessary to both compensate for the detrimental effect on noise of the expected increase in air traffic and improve the quality of living in residential areas around airports.

  15. Next-generation lithography mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareket, Noah; Biellak, Steve; Pettibone, Donald W.; Stokowski, Stanley E.

    2000-07-01

    KLA-Tencor and industry partners are collaborating on a project for developing early capabilities of inspecting NGL masks. The project, partially funded by NIST as part of the ATP program, is focusing on building a research tool that will provide experimental data for development of a production capable tool. Some of the key technical issues include contrast in transmission and reflection, defect sources and types, and maintaining mask cleanliness in the absence of pellicles. The masks need to be inspected at multiple process stages, starting with unpatterned substrates, and ending with the pattern inspection. System issues include defect sensitivity and inspection time, which need to be balanced.

  16. Actinic review of EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Heiko; Ruoff, Johannes; Harnisch, Wolfgang; Kaiser, Winfried

    2010-04-01

    Management of mask defects is a major challenge for the introduction of EUV for HVM production. Once a defect has been detected, its printing impact needs to be predicted. Potentially the defect requires some repair, the success of which needs to be proven. This defect review has to be done with an actinic inspection system that matches the imaging conditions of an EUV scanner. During recent years, several concepts for such an aerial image metrology system (AIMS™) have been proposed. However, until now no commercial solution exists for EUV. Today, advances in EUV optics technology allow envisioning a solution that has been discarded before as unrealistic. We present this concept and its technical cornerstones.While the power requirement for the EUV source is less demanding than for HVM lithography tools, radiance, floor space, and stability are the main criteria for source selection. The requirement to emulate several generations of EUV scanners demands a large flexibility for the ilumination and imaging systems. New critical specifications to the EUV mirrors in the projection microscope can be satisfied using our expertise from lithographic mirrors. In summary, an EUV AIMS™ meeting production requirements seems to be feasible.

  17. When Bad Masks Turn Good

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Roberto G.

    In keeping with the spirit of a meeting on ‘masks,' this talk presents two short stories on the theme of dust. In the first, dust plays the familiar role of the evil obscurer, the enemy to bedefeated by the cunning observer in order to allow a key future technology (adaptive optics) to be exploited fully by heroic astronomers. In the second story, dust itself emerges as the improbable hero, in the form of a circumstellar debris disks. I will present evidence of a puzzling near-infrared excess in the continuum of high-redshift galaxies and will argue that the seemingly improbable origin of this IR excess is a population of young circumstellar disks formed around high-mass stars in distant galaxies. Assuming circumstellar disks extend down to lower masses,as they do in our own Galaxy, the excess emission presents us with an exciting opportunity to measure the formation rate of planetary systems in distant galaxies at cosmic epochs before our own solar system formed.

  18. Masked PDAMNA Film On Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Polydiacetylenes are a unique class of highly conjugated organic polymers that are of interest for both electronic and photonic applications. Photodeposition from solutions is a novel process superior to those grown by conventional techniques. Evidence of this is seen when the films are viewed under a microscope; they exhibit small particles of solid polymer which form in the bulk solution, get transported by convection to the surface of the growing film, and become embedded. Also convection tends to cause the film thickness to be less uniform, and may even affect the molecular orientation of the films. The thrust of the research is to investigate in detail, both in 1-g and low-g, the effects of convection (and lack thereof) on this novel and interesting reaction. In this example, a portion of the substrate was blocked from exposure to the UV light by the mask, which was placed on the opposite side of the glass disk as the film, clearly demonstrating that photodeposition occurs only where the substrate is irradiated directly.

  19. Consideration of some noise sources due to railway operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanworth, C. G.

    1983-03-01

    A number of railway operation noise sources other than those leading to the far field (largely wheel/rail), train pass-by noise, are identified and briefly discussed. People primarily affected by these may include railway staff and passengers on the train, railway trackside staff, and wayside residents. Both environmental pollution and hearing protection may be involved. Sources considered include the following: close proximity wheel/rail noise; locomotive noise; freight vehicle noise; warning signal noise; near field bridge noise; marshalling yard noise; flange squeal on tight curves; maintenance machine noise; and track machinery warning horn noise.

  20. Stent enhancement using a locally adaptive unsharp masking filter in digital x-ray fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuhao; Ekanayake, Eranda

    2014-03-01

    Low exposure X-ray fluoroscopy is used to guide some complicate interventional procedures. Due to the inherent high levels of noise, improving the visibility of some interventional devices such as stent will greatly benefit those interventional procedures. Stent, which is made up of tiny steel wires, is also suffered from contrast dilutions of large flat panel detector pixels. A novel adaptive unsharp masking filter has been developed to improve stent contrast in real-time applications. In unsharp masking processing, the background is estimated and subtracted from the original input image to create a foreground image containing objects of interest. A background estimator is therefore critical in the unsharp masking processing. In this specific study, orientation filter kernels are used as the background estimator. To make the process simple and fast, the kernels average along a line of pixels. A high orientation resolution of 18° is used. A nonlinear operator is then used to combine the information from the images generated from convolving the original background and noise only images with orientation filters. A computerized Monte Carlo simulation followed by ROC study is used to identify the best nonlinear operator. We then apply the unsharp masking filter to the images with stents present. It is shown that the locally adaptive unsharp making filter is an effective filter for improving stent visibility in the interventional fluoroscopy. We also apply a spatio-temporal channelized human observer model to quantitatively optimize and evaluate the filter.