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Sample records for enzymatic hydrogen transfer

  1. Vibrationally enhanced tunneling as a mechanism for enzymatic hydrogen transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, W J; Bialek, W

    1992-01-01

    We present a theory of enzymatic hydrogen transfer in which hydrogen tunneling is mediated by thermal fluctuations of the enzyme's active site. These fluctuations greatly increase the tunneling rate by shortening the distance the hydrogen must tunnel. The average tunneling distance is shown to decrease when heavier isotopes are substituted for the hydrogen or when the temperature is increased, leading to kinetic isotope effects (KIEs)--defined as the factor by which the reaction slows down when isotopically substituted substrates are used--that need be no larger than KIEs for nontunneling mechanisms. Within this theory we derive a simple KIE expression for vibrationally enhanced ground state tunneling that is able to fit the data for the bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO) system, correctly predicting the large temperature dependence of the KIEs. Because the KIEs in this theory can resemble those for nontunneling dynamics, distinguishing the two possibilities requires careful measurements over a range of temperatures, as has been done for BSAO. PMID:1420907

  2. Hydrogen transfer in SAM-mediated enzymatic radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Hioe, Johnny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-12-14

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) plays an essential role in a variety of enzyme-mediated radical reactions. One-electron reduction of SAM is currently believed to generate the C5'-desoxyadenosyl radical, which subsequently abstracts a hydrogen atom from the actual substrate in a catalytic or a non-catalytic fashion. Using a combination of theoretical and experimental bond dissociation energy (BDE) data, the energetics of these radical processes have now been quantified. SAM-derived radicals are found to react with their respective substrates in an exothermic fashion in enzymes using SAM in a stoichiometric (non-catalytic) way. In contrast, the catalytic use of SAM appears to be linked to a sequence of moderately endothermic and exothermic reaction steps. The use of SAM in spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) appears to fit neither of these general categories and appears to constitute the first example of a SAM-initiated radical reaction propagated independently of the cofactor. PMID:23139189

  3. A micellar model for investigating the chemical nature of hydrogen transfer in NAD(P)H-dependent enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Rao, U M

    1989-03-31

    Aqueous micelles of Triton X-100 were shown to catalyse the redox reaction between NADH and 2-p-iodophenyl-3-p-nitrophenyl-5-phenyltetrazolium chloride (INT) at the neutral pH. The transfer of reducing equivalents between the reactants in the micellar system appeared to be direct and quantitative. N-tert-butylphenyl-alpha-nitrone, a lipophilic free-radical scavenger which can enter micelles, and superoxide dismutase did not alter the stoichiometry of the reaction. The oxidation product of NADH was found to be 100% enzymatically active. The IR spectrum of INT-formazan (i.e., the product of INT reduction) showed an absorbance at 3,100-3,700 cm- due to NH-stretching. The presence of NH proton, confirmed further by IH-NMR, together with the above observations suggests that INT, as part of the over-all redox process, abstracts a C(4) hydrogen of the dihydropyridine nucleus of NADH with a simultaneous cleavage at N(2-3) position of its 1,2,3,4-tetrazole ring system and that the redox events are confined to a microenvironment as in the case of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymatic reactions. PMID:2930563

  4. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  5. Rate-promoting vibrations and coupled hydrogen-electron transfer reactions in the condensed phase: A model for enzymatic catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mincer, Joshua S.; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2004-04-01

    A model is presented for coupled hydrogen-electron transfer reactions in condensed phase in the presence of a rate promoting vibration. Large kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are found when the hydrogen is substituted with deuterium. While these KIEs are essentially temperature independent, reaction rates do exhibit temperature dependence. These findings agree with recent experimental data for various enzyme-catalyzed reactions, such as the amine dehydrogenases and soybean lipoxygenase. Consistent with earlier results, turning off the promoting vibration results in an increased KIE. Increasing the barrier height increases the KIE, while increasing the rate of electron transfer decreases it. These results are discussed in light of other views of vibrationally enhanced tunneling in enzymes.

  6. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, Jonathan; Mattingly, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch. The reaction mixture further comprises an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture.

  7. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

    1999-08-24

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch; the reaction mixture also comprising an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; (b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and (c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture. 8 figs.

  8. Enzymatic Hydrogen Production from Starch and Water

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Evans, Barbara R; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Hopkins, Robert C.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2007-01-01

    A novel enzymatic reaction was conducted for producing hydrogen from starch and water at 30oC. The overall reaction comprised of 13 enzymes, 1 cofactor (NADP+), and phosphate was driven by energy stored in carbohydrate starch according to the overall stoichiometry stoichiometric reaction of C6H10O5 (l) + 7 H2O (l) --> 12 H2 (g) + 6 CO2 (g). It is spontaneous and unidirectional because of negative Gibbs free energy and the removal of gaseous products from the aqueous reaction solution. With technology improvement and integration with fuel cells, this technology would be suitable for mobile applications and also solve the challenges associated with hydrogen storage, distribution, and infrastructure in a hydrogen economy.

  9. Enzymatic production of hydrogen from glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this research is to optimize conditions for the enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from biomass-derived glucose. This new project is funded at 0.5 PY level of effort for FY 1995. The rationale for the work is that cellulose is, potentially, a vast source of hydrogen and that enzymes offer a specific and efficient method for its extraction with minimal environmental impact. This work is related to the overall hydrogen program goal of technology development and validation. The approach is based on knowledge that glucose is oxidized by the NADP{sup +} requiring enzyme glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and that the resulting NADPH can donate its electrons to hydrogenase (H{sub 2}ase) which catalyzes the evolution of H{sub 2}. Thus hydrogen production from glucose was achieved using calf liver GDH and Pyrococcus furiosus H{sub 2}ase yielding 17% of theoretical maximum expected. The cofactor NADP{sup +} for this reaction was regenerated and recycled. Current and future work includes understanding the rate limiting steps of this process and the stabilization/immobilization of the enzymes for long term hydrogen production. Cooperative interactions with the Universities of Georgia and Bath for obtaining thermally stable enzymes are underway.

  10. Enzymatic production of hydrogen from glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S. M.

    The objective of this research is to optimize conditions for the enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from biomass-derived glucose. This new project is funded at 0.5 PY level of effort for FY 1995. The rationale for the work is that cellulose is, potentially, a vast source of hydrogen and that enzymes offer a specific and efficient method for its extraction with minimal environmental impact. This work is related to the overall hydrogen program goal of technology development and validation. The approach is based on knowledge that glucose is oxidized by the NADP(sup +) requiring enzyme glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and that the resulting NADPH can donate its electrons to hydrogenase (H2ase) which catalyzes the evolution of H2. Thus hydrogen production from glucose was achieved using calf liver GDH and Pyrococcus furiosus H2ase yielding 17% of theoretical maximum expected. The cofactor NADP(sup +) for this reaction was regenerated and recycled. Current and future work includes understanding the rate limiting steps of this process and the stabilization/immobilization of the enzymes for long term hydrogen production. Cooperative interactions with the Universities of Georgia and Bath for obtaining thermally sta

  11. Imino Transfer Hydrogenation Reductions.

    PubMed

    Wills, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This review contains a summary of recent developments in the transfer hydrogenation of C=N bonds, with a particularly focus on reports from within the last 10 years and asymmetric transformations. However, earlier work in the area is also discussed in order to provide context for the more recent results described. I focus strongly on the Ru/TsDPEN class of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reactions originally reported by Noyori et al., together with examples of their applications, particularly to medically valuable target molecules. The recent developments in the area of highly active imine-reduction catalysts, notably those based on iridium, are also described in some detail. I discuss diastereoselective reduction methods as a route to the synthesis of chiral amines using transfer hydrogenation. The recent development of a methodology for positioning reduction complexes within chiral proteins, permitting the generation of asymmetric reduction products through a directed modification of the protein environment in a controlled manner, is also discussed. PMID:27573139

  12. Metal-Catalysed Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Štefane, Bogdan; Požgan, Franc

    2016-04-01

    We highlight recent developments of catalytic transfer hydrogenation of ketones promoted by transition metals, while placing it within its historical context. Since optically active secondary alcohols are important building blocks in fine chemicals synthesis, the focus of this review is devoted to chiral catalyst types which are capable of inducing high stereoselectivities. Ruthenium complexes still represent the largest part of the catalysts, but other metals (e.g. Fe) are rapidly penetrating this field. While homogeneous transfer hydrogenation catalysts in some cases approach enzymatic performance, the interest in heterogeneous catalysts is constantly growing because of their reusability. Despite excellent activity, selectivity and compatibility of metal complexes with a variety of functional groups, no universal catalysts exist. Development of future catalyst systems is directed towards reaching as high as possible activity with low catalyst loadings, using "greener" conditions, and being able to operate under mild conditions and in a highly selective manner for a broad range of substrates. PMID:27573143

  13. Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Xiao, Jian

    2016-04-01

    The cascade [1,n]-hydrogen transfer/cyclization, recognized as the tert-amino effect one century ago, has received considerable interest in recent decades, and great achievements have been made. With the aid of this strategy, the inert C(sp(3))-H bonds can be directly functionalized into C-C, C-N, C-O bonds under catalysis of Lewis acids, Brønsted acids, as well as organocatalysts, and even merely under thermal conditions. Hydrogen can be transferred intramolecularly from hydrogen donor to acceptor in the form of hydride, or proton, followed by cyclization to furnish the cyclic products in processes featuring high atom economy. Methylene/methine adjacent to heteroatoms, e.g., nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, can be exploited as hydride donor as well as methylene/methine without heteroatom assistance. Miscellaneous electrophilic subunits or intermediates, e.g., alkylidene malonate, carbophilic metal activated alkyne or allene, α,β-unsaturated aldehydes/ketone, saturated aldehydes/iminium, ketenimine/carbodiimide, metal carbenoid, electron-withdrawing groups activated allene/alkyne, in situ generated carbocation, can serve as hydride acceptors. This methodology has shown preeminent power to construct 5-, 6-, or 7-membered heterocyclic as well as carbon rings. In this chapter, various hydrogen donors and acceptors are adequately discussed. PMID:27573142

  14. Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogen Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Ourida; Williams, Jonathan M. J.

    This chapter describes the application of iridium complexes to catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions. Transfer hydrogenation reactions provide an alternative to direct hydrogenation for the reduction of a range of substrates. A hydrogen donor, typically an alcohol or formic acid, can be used as the source of hydrogen for the reduction of carbonyl compounds, imines, and alkenes. Heteroaromatic compounds and even carbon dioxide have also been reduced by transfer hydrogenation reactions. In the reverse process, the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds can be achieved by iridium-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions, where a ketone or alkene is used as a suitable hydrogen acceptor. The reversible nature of many hydrogen transfer processes has been exploited for the racemization of alcohols, where temporary removal of hydrogen generates an achiral ketone intermediate. In addition, there is a growing body of work where temporary removal of hydrogen provides an opportunity for using alcohols as alkylating agents. In this chemistry, an iridium catalyst "borrows" hydrogen from an alcohol to give an aldehyde or ketone intermediate, which can be transformed into either an imine or alkene under the reaction conditions. Return of the hydrogen from the catalyst provides methodology for the formation of amines or C-C bonds where the only by-product is typically water.

  15. Low-barrier hydrogen bonds and enzymatic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cleland, W W

    2000-10-01

    Short, strong (low barrier) hydrogen bonds occur when the pK values of the atoms sharing the proton are similar. The overall distance is 2.5 A or less, the deuterium fractionation factor is less than 0.5, the proton NMR chemical shift can approach 20 ppm, and deuterium or tritium substitution causes an up-field change in the chemical shift. Such bonds can have deltaH values of 25 kcal/mol in the gas phase, and at least half that in water or other high-dielectric medium. The strength of the hydrogen bond in an active site drops by approximately 1 kcal/mol for each pH unit mismatch in pKs. When a weak hydrogen bond in the initial enzyme-substrate complex is converted into a low-barrier one by alteration of the pK of the substrate or catalytic group so that the pKs match, the increase in hydrogen bond strength can be used to help catalyze the reaction. A well-established example of this is the reaction catalyzed by serine proteases. The pK of neutral histidine is 14, while that of aspartate is approximately 6. Proton transfer from serine to permit attack on bound substrate produces protonated histidine, with a pK now matching that of aspartate. Studies with trifluoromethyl ketone inhibitors that form tetrahedral adducts show up to five orders of magnitude in binding strength as the result of formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond between aspartate and histidine. Other enzymes whose mechanisms appear to involve low-barrier hydrogen bonds include liver alcohol dehydrogenase, steroid isomerase, triose-P isomerase, aconitase, citrate synthase, and zinc proteases. It is likely that low-barrier hydrogen bonds form at the transition state of any reaction involving general-acid or general-base catalysis, as at that point the pKs of the catalytic group and reactant will be equal. PMID:11051090

  16. Silicon layer transfer using plasma hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Peng; Lau, S.S.; Chu, Paul K.; Henttinen, K.; Suni, T.; Suni, I.; Theodore, N. David; Alford, T.L.; Mayer, J.W.; Shao Lin; Nastasi, M.

    2005-09-12

    In this work, we demonstrate a novel approach for the transfer of Si layers onto handle wafers, induced by plasma hydrogenation. In the conventional ion-cut process, hydrogen ion implantation is used to initiate layer delamination at a desired depth, which leads to ion damage in the transferred layer. In this study, we investigated the use of plasma hydrogenation to achieve high-quality layer transfer. To place hydrogen atoms introduced during plasma hydrogenation at a specific depth, a uniform trapping layer for H atoms must be prepared in the substrate before hydrogenation. The hydrogenated Si wafer was then bonded to another Si wafer coated with a thermal oxide, followed by thermal annealing to induce Si layer transfer. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy showed that the transferred Si layer was relatively free of lattice damage. The H trapping during plasma hydrogenation, and the subsequent layer delamination mechanism, are discussed. These results show direct evidence of the feasibility of using plasma hydrogenation to transfer relatively defect-free Si layers.

  17. Radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Dolgov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents processes of hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and release from hydrogen-saturated condensed matters in atomic, molecular and ionized states under the influence of the electron beam and X-ray radiation in the pre-threshold region. The dependence is described between the hydrogen isotope release intensity and the current density and the electron beam energy affecting sample, hydrogen concentration in the material volume and time of radiation exposure to the sample. The energy distribution of the emitted positive ions of hydrogen isotopes is investigated herein. Mechanisms of radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in condensed matters are suggested.

  18. Rates and Routes of Electron Transfer of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase in an Enzymatic Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Alexander; Stein, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Hydrogenase enzymes are being used in enzymatic fuel cells immobilized on a graphite or carbon electrode surface, for example. The enzyme is used for the anodic oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2) to produce protons and electrons. The association and orientation of the enzyme at the anode electrode for a direct electron transfer is not completely resolved. The distal FeS-cluster in [NiFe]-hydrogenases contains a histidine residue which is known to play a critical role in the intermolecular electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase graphite electrode association was investigated using Brownian Dynamics simulations. Residues that were shown to be in proximity to the electrode surface were identified (His184, Ser196, Glu461, Glu464), and electron transfer routes connecting the distal FeS-cluster with the surface residues were investigated. Several possible pathways for electron transfer between the distal FeS-cluster and the terminal amino acid residues were probed in terms of their rates of electron transfer using DFT methods. The reorganization energies λ of the distal iron-sulfur cluster and coronene as a molecular model for graphite were calculated. The reorganization energy of the distal (His)(Cys)3 cluster was found to be not very different from that of a standard cubane clusters with a (Cys)4 coordination. Electronic coupling matrix elements and rates of electron transfer for the different pathways were calculated according to the Marcus equation. The rates for glutamate-mediated electrode binding were found to be incompatible with experimental data. A direct electron transfer from the histidine ligand of the distal FeS-cluster to the electrode yielded rates of electron transfer in excellent agreement with experiment. A second pathway, however, from the distal FeS-cluster to the Ser196 residue was found to be equally efficient and feasible. PMID:26218232

  19. High-Yield Hydrogen Production from Starch and Water by a Synthetic Enzymatic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Evans, Barbara R.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Adams, Michael W.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background The future hydrogen economy offers a compelling energy vision, but there are four main obstacles: hydrogen production, storage, and distribution, as well as fuel cells. Hydrogen production from inexpensive abundant renewable biomass can produce cheaper hydrogen, decrease reliance on fossil fuels, and achieve zero net greenhouse gas emissions, but current chemical and biological means suffer from low hydrogen yields and/or severe reaction conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate a synthetic enzymatic pathway consisting of 13 enzymes for producing hydrogen from starch and water. The stoichiometric reaction is C6H10O5 (l)+7 H2O (l)→12 H2 (g)+6 CO2 (g). The overall process is spontaneous and unidirectional because of a negative Gibbs free energy and separation of the gaseous products with the aqueous reactants. Conclusions Enzymatic hydrogen production from starch and water mediated by 13 enzymes occurred at 30°C as expected, and the hydrogen yields were much higher than the theoretical limit (4 H2/glucose) of anaerobic fermentations. Significance The unique features, such as mild reaction conditions (30°C and atmospheric pressure), high hydrogen yields, likely low production costs ($∼2/kg H2), and a high energy-density carrier starch (14.8 H2-based mass%), provide great potential for mobile applications. With technology improvements and integration with fuel cells, this technology also solves the challenges associated with hydrogen storage, distribution, and infrastructure in the hydrogen economy. PMID:17520015

  20. Thermal hydrogen-atom transfer from methane: A mechanistic exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Helmut

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) constitutes a key process in a broad range of chemical transformations as it covers heterogeneous, homogeneous, and enzymatic reactions. While open-shell metal oxo species [MO]rad are no longer regarded as being involved in the heterogeneously catalyzed oxidative coupling of methane (2CH4 + → C2H6 + H2O), these reagents are rather versatile in bringing about (gas-phase) hydrogen-atom transfer, even from methane at ambient conditions. In this mini-review, various mechanistic scenarios will be presented, and it will be demonstrated how these are affected by the composition of the metal-oxide cluster ions. Examples will be discussed, how 'doping' the clusters permits the control of the charge and spin situation at the active site and, thus, the course of the reaction. Also, the interplay between supposedly inert support material and the active site - the so-called 'aristocratic atoms' - of the gas-phase catalyst will be addressed. Finally, gas-phase HAT from methane will be analyzed in the broader context of thermal activation of inert Csbnd H bonds by metal-oxo species.

  1. Nickel nanoparticles in hydrogen transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Francisco; Riente, Paola; Yus, Miguel

    2011-05-17

    The transfer hydrogenation of organic compounds is a much safer and more environmentally benign process than reduction reactions involving molecular hydrogen, metal hydrides, or dissolving metals. In transfer hydrogenation, 2-propanol is often preferred as the source of hydrogen because it is cheap, easy to remove, and environmentally friendly. This class of transformation has been mostly pursued through the use of expensive noble metals, such as Ru, Pd, and so forth; research involving cheaper catalytically active metals has been relatively neglected. On the other hand, alcohols have recently emerged as desirable alkylating agents, a useful alternative to organic halides, in reactions of hydrogen autotransfer, also known as the "borrowing of hydrogen" methodology. For instance, the α-alkylation of ketones with alcohols is an atom-efficient process that produces water as the only byproduct in the presence of a noble metal catalyst. Hydrogen autotransfer is also successful in the synthesis of amines through a reductive aza-Wittig reaction, which involves an iminophosphorane and primary alcohol under iridium catalysis. The in situ oxidation-Wittig olefination of primary alcohols with stabilized phosphorus ylides is a commonly practiced method in organic synthesis that precludes the necessity of handling aldehydes. These reactions are normally performed in one pot but sequentially; thus the course of the alcohol oxidation needs monitoring before the ylide addition. In this Account, we describe the development of our discovery that nickel(0), in the form of nanoparticles, can replace the more expensive noble metals in both transfer hydrogenation and hydrogen autotransfer reactions. These nanoparticles were found to catalyze the transfer hydrogenation of olefins and carbonyl compounds, as well as the reductive amination of aldehydes, with 2-propanol as the hydrogen donor. All reactions proceeded in the absence of base, and the catalyst could be easily and successfully

  2. Enzymatic Functionalization of Carbon-Hydrogen Bonds1

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jared C.; Coelho, Pedro S.

    2010-01-01

    The development of new catalytic methods to functionalize carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds continues to progress at a rapid pace due to the significant economic and environmental benefits of these transformations over traditional synthetic methods. In nature, enzymes catalyze regio- and stereoselective C-H bond functionalization using transformations ranging from hydroxylation to hydroalkylation under ambient reaction conditions. The efficiency of these enzymes relative to analogous chemical processes has led to their increased use as biocatalysts in preparative and industrial applications. Furthermore, unlike small molecule catalysts, enzymes can be systematically optimized via directed evolution for a particular application and can be expressed in vivo to augment the biosynthetic capability of living organisms. While a variety of technical challenges must still be overcome for practical application of many enzymes for C-H bond functionalization, continued research on natural enzymes and on novel artificial metalloenzymes will lead to improved synthetic processes for efficient synthesis of complex molecules. In this critical review, we discuss the most prevalent mechanistic strategies used by enzymes to functionalize non-acidic C-H bonds, the application and evolution of these enzymes for chemical synthesis, and a number of potential biosynthetic capabilities uniquely enabled by these powerful catalysts. PMID:21079862

  3. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.; Grin, Daniel

    2010-12-15

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-{alpha} line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, we compute the impact of some radiative transfer effects that were previously ignored, or for which previous treatments were incomplete. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-{alpha} line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-{alpha} line blueward of the hydrogen line is investigated with an analytic approximation. It is shown that both effects are negligible during cosmological hydrogen recombination. Second, the importance of high-lying, nonoverlapping Lyman transitions is assessed. It is shown that escape from lines above Ly{gamma} and frequency diffusion in Ly{beta} and higher lines can be neglected without loss of accuracy. Third, a formalism generalizing the Sobolev approximation is developed to account for the overlap of the high-lying Lyman lines, which is shown to lead to negligible changes to the recombination history. Finally, the possibility of a cosmological hydrogen recombination maser is investigated. It is shown that there is no such maser in the purely radiative treatment presented here.

  4. A Simple Method To Demonstrate the Enzymatic Production of Hydrogen from Sugar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershlag, Natalie; Hurley, Ian; Woodward, Jonathan

    1998-10-01

    There is current interest in and concern for the development of environmentally friendly bioprocesses whereby biomass and the biodegradable content of municipal wastes can be converted to useful forms of energy. For example, cellulose, a glucose polymer that is the principal component of biomass and paper waste, can be enzymatically degraded to glucose, which can subsequently be converted by fermentation or further enzymatic reaction to fuels such as ethanol or hydrogen. These products represent alternative energy sources to fossil fuels such as oil. Demonstration of the relevant reactions in high-school and undergraduate college laboratories would have value not only in illustrating environmentally friendly biotechnology for the utilization of renewable energy sources, such as cellulosic wastes, but could also be used to teach the principles of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. In the experimental protocol described here, it has been demonstrated that the common sugar glucose can be used to produce hydrogen using two enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase. No sophisticated or expensive hydrogen detection equipment is required-only a redox dye, benzyl viologen, which turns purple when it is reduced. The color can be detected by a simple colorimeter. Furthermore, it is shown that the renewable resource cellulose, in its soluble derivative from carboxymethylcellulose, as well as aspen-wood waste, is also a source of hydrogen if the enzyme cellulase is included in the reaction mixture.

  5. Pretreatment of cane bagasse with alkaline hydrogen peroxide for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Azzam, A.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Pretreatment of the agrocellulosic waste, cane bagasse with alkaline hydrogen peroxide greatly enhances its susceptibility to enzymatic cellulolysis and thus the ethanol production from it. Various process conditions have been studied to optimize the enzymate effectiveness. These conditions include the contact time, the hydrogen peroxide concentration and the pretreatment temperature. Results obtained show, that about 50% of lignin and most of hemicellulose content of can bagasse was solubilized, by 2% alkaline hydrogen peroxide at 30{sup 0}C within 8 h. The cellulose content was consequently increased from 42% in the original cane bagasse to 75% in the oxidized pulp. Saccharification of this pulp residue with cellulase from Trichorderma viride at 45{sup 0}C for 24 h, yielded glucose with 95% efficiency. The efficiency of ethanol production from the insoluble fraction with S. cervisiae was 90% compared to about 50% for untreated cane bagasse.

  6. Promiscuity in the Enzymatic Catalysis of Phosphate and Sulfate Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pabis, Anna; Duarte, Fernanda; Kamerlin, Shina C L

    2016-06-01

    The enzymes that facilitate phosphate and sulfate hydrolysis are among the most proficient natural catalysts known to date. Interestingly, a large number of these enzymes are promiscuous catalysts that exhibit both phosphatase and sulfatase activities in the same active site and, on top of that, have also been demonstrated to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of other additional substrates with varying degrees of efficiency. Understanding the factors that underlie such multifunctionality is crucial both for understanding functional evolution in enzyme superfamilies and for the development of artificial enzymes. In this Current Topic, we have primarily focused on the structural and mechanistic basis for catalytic promiscuity among enzymes that facilitate both phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer in the same active site, while comparing this to how catalytic promiscuity manifests in other promiscuous phosphatases. We have also drawn on the large number of experimental and computational studies of selected model systems in the literature to explore the different features driving the catalytic promiscuity of such enzymes. Finally, on the basis of this comparative analysis, we probe the plausible origins and determinants of catalytic promiscuity in enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer. PMID:27187273

  7. Promiscuity in the Enzymatic Catalysis of Phosphate and Sulfate Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The enzymes that facilitate phosphate and sulfate hydrolysis are among the most proficient natural catalysts known to date. Interestingly, a large number of these enzymes are promiscuous catalysts that exhibit both phosphatase and sulfatase activities in the same active site and, on top of that, have also been demonstrated to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of other additional substrates with varying degrees of efficiency. Understanding the factors that underlie such multifunctionality is crucial both for understanding functional evolution in enzyme superfamilies and for the development of artificial enzymes. In this Current Topic, we have primarily focused on the structural and mechanistic basis for catalytic promiscuity among enzymes that facilitate both phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer in the same active site, while comparing this to how catalytic promiscuity manifests in other promiscuous phosphatases. We have also drawn on the large number of experimental and computational studies of selected model systems in the literature to explore the different features driving the catalytic promiscuity of such enzymes. Finally, on the basis of this comparative analysis, we probe the plausible origins and determinants of catalytic promiscuity in enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer. PMID:27187273

  8. Kinetics of catalytic transfer hydrogenation of soybean lecithin

    SciTech Connect

    Naglic, M.; Smidovnik, A.; Koloini, T.

    1997-12-01

    Catalytic transfer hydrogenation of soybean lecithin has been studied using aqueous sodium formate solution as hydrogen donor and palladium on carbon as catalyst. Kinetic constants and selectivity have been determined at intensive stirring. Hydrogenation reactions followed the first-order kinetics with respect to fatty acids. In addition to short reaction time, this method offers safe and easy handling. Hydrogenated soybean lecithin provides products with increased stability with respect to oxidation.

  9. Enhancement of the enzymatic digestibility of sugarcane bagasse by steam pretreatment impregnated with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Sarita Cândida; Vaz Rossell, Carlos Eduardo; de Moraes Rocha, George Jackson; Zacchi, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was subjected to steam pretreatment impregnated with hydrogen peroxide. Analyses were performed using 2(3) factorial designs and enzymatic hydrolysis was performed at two different solid concentrations and with washed and unwashed material to evaluate the importance of this step for obtaining high cellulose conversion. Similar cellulose conversion were obtained at different conditions of pretreatment and hydrolysis. When the cellulose was hydrolyzed using the pretreated material in the most severe conditions of the experimental design (210 °C, 15 min and 1.0% hydrogen peroxide), and using 2% (w/w) water-insoluble solids (WIS), and 15 FPU/g WIS, the cellulose conversion was 86.9%. In contrast, at a milder pretreatment condition (190 °C, 15 min and 0.2% hydrogen peroxide) and industrially more realistic conditions of hydrolysis (10% WIS and 10 FPU/g WIS), the cellulose conversion reached 82.2%. The step of washing the pretreated material was very important to obtain high concentrations of fermentable sugars. PMID:22753357

  10. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Westereng, Bjørge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Jørgensen, Henning; Larsen Andersen, Mogens; Eijsink, Vincent G.H.; Felby, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of cell wall polysaccharides by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) plays a pivotal role in the degradation of plant biomass. While experiments have shown that LPMOs are copper dependent enzymes requiring an electron donor, the mechanism and origin of the electron supply in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert. PMID:26686263

  11. Influence of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass: Effect of mass transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Wojtusik, Mateusz; Zurita, Mauricio; Villar, Juan C; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-09-01

    The effect of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) has been assessed. Runs were performed in stirred tanks at several stirrer speed values, under typical conditions of temperature (50°C), pH (4.8) and solid charge (20% w/w). A complex mixture of cellulases, xylanases and mannanases was employed for PCS saccharification. At low stirring speeds (<150rpm), estimated mass transfer coefficients and rates, when compared to chemical hydrolysis rates, lead to results that clearly show low mass transfer rates, being this phenomenon the controlling step of the overall process rate. However, for stirrer speed from 300rpm upwards, the overall process rate is controlled by hydrolysis reactions. The ratio between mass transfer and overall chemical reaction rates changes with time depending on the conditions of each run. PMID:27233094

  12. Amperometric Non-Enzymatic Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Based on Aligned Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hardan, Naif H.; Abdul Hamid, Muhammad Azmi; Shamsudin, Roslinda; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Kar Keng, Lim

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) have been synthesized via the hydrothermal process. The NRs were grown over a conductive glass substrate. A non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), based on the prepared ZnO NRs, was examined through the use of current-voltage measurements. The measured currents, as a function of H2O2 concentrations ranging from 10 μM to 700 μM, revealed two distinct behaviours and good performance, with a lower detection limit (LOD) of 42 μM for the low range of H2O2 concentrations (first region), and a LOD of 143.5 μM for the higher range of H2O2 concentrations (second region). The prepared ZnO NRs show excellent electrocatalytic activity. This enables a measurable and stable output current. The results were correlated with the oxidation process of the H2O2 and revealed a good performance for the ZnO NR non-enzymatic H2O2 sensor. PMID:27367693

  13. A reagentless non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor presented using electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Mutyala, Sankararao; Mathiyarasu, Jayaraman

    2016-12-01

    Herein, we report a simple, facile and reproducible non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor using electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The modified electrode was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV-Visible, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Cyclic voltammetric (CV) analysis revealed that ERGO/GCE exhibited virtuous charge transfer properties for a standard redox systems and showed excellent performance towards electroreduction of H2O2. Amperometric study using ERGO/GCE showed high sensitivity (0.3μA/μM) and faster response upon the addition of H2O2 at an applied potential of -0.25V vs. Ag/AgCl. The detection limit is assessed to be 0.7μM (S/N=3) and the time to reach a stable study state current is <3s for a linear range of H2O2 concentration (1-16μM). In addition, the modified electrode exhibited good reproducibility and long-term stability. PMID:27612728

  14. Formation of C-C Bonds via Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation and Transfer Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Bower, John F; Krische, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The formation of C-C bonds via catalytic hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation enables carbonyl and imine addition in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents. In this review, iridium-catalyzed C-C bond-forming hydrogenations and transfer hydrogenations are surveyed. These processes encompass selective, atom-economic methods for the vinylation and allylation of carbonyl compounds and imines. Notably, under transfer hydrogenation conditions, alcohol dehydrogenation drives reductive generation of organoiridium nucleophiles, enabling carbonyl addition from the aldehyde or alcohol oxidation level. In the latter case, hydrogen exchange between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants generates electrophile-nucleophile pairs en route to products of hydro-hydroxyalkylation, representing a direct method for the functionalization of carbinol C-H bonds. PMID:21822399

  15. Formation of C-C Bonds via Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation and Transfer Hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, John F.; Krische, Michael J.

    The formation of C-C bonds via catalytic hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation enables carbonyl and imine addition in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents. In this review, iridium-catalyzed C-C bond-forming hydrogenations and transfer hydrogenations are surveyed. These processes encompass selective, atom-economic methods for the vinylation and allylation of carbonyl compounds and imines. Notably, under transfer hydrogenation conditions, alcohol dehydrogenation drives reductive generation of organoiridium nucleophiles, enabling carbonyl addition from the aldehyde or alcohol oxidation level. In the latter case, hydrogen exchange between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants generates electrophile-nucleophile pairs en route to products of hydro-hydroxyalkylation, representing a direct method for the functionalization of carbinol C-H bonds.

  16. Investigation of plasma hydrogenation and trapping mechanism for layer transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Chu, Paul K.; Höchbauer, T.; Lee, J.-K.; Nastasi, M.; Buca, D.; Mantl, S.; Loo, R.; Caymax, M.; Alford, T.; Mayer, J. W.; Theodore, N. David; Cai, M.; Schmidt, B.; Lau, S. S.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen ion implantation is conventionally used to initiate the transfer of Si thin layers onto Si wafers coated with thermal oxide. In this work, we studied the feasibility of using plasma hydrogenation to replace high dose H implantation for layer transfer. Boron ion implantation was used to introduce H-trapping centers into Si wafers to illustrate the idea. Instead of the widely recognized interactions between boron and hydrogen atoms, this study showed that lattice damage, i.e., dangling bonds, traps H atoms and can lead to surface blistering during hydrogenation or upon postannealing at higher temperature. The B implantation and subsequent processes control the uniformity of H trapping and the trap depths. While the trap centers were introduced by B implantation in this study, there are many other means to do the same without implantation. Our results suggest an innovative way to achieve high quality transfer of Si layers without H implantation at high energies and high doses.

  17. Production of dimethylfuran from hydroxymethylfurfural through catalytic transfer hydrogenation with ruthenium supported on carbon.

    PubMed

    Jae, Jungho; Zheng, Weiqing; Lobo, Raul F; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2013-07-01

    RuC ees' transfer: Transfer hydrogenation using alcohols as hydrogen donors and supported ruthenium catalysts results in the selective conversion of hydroxymethylfurfural to dimethylfuran (>80% yield). During transfer hydrogenation, the hydrogen produced from alcohols is utilized in the hydrogenation of hydroxymethylfurfural. PMID:23754805

  18. Application of Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry in Analyses of Non-enzymatically Glycated Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Frolov, Andrej; Tang, Ning; Hoffman, Ralf; van der Goor, Tom; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-03-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in diabetes mellitus research, particularly in the context of development of diabetic complications. The fragmentation behavior of glycated peptides produced from reaction of D-glucose with lysine residues was investigated by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry. It was found that high abundance ions corresponding to various degrees of neutral water losses, as well as furylium ion production, dominate the CID spectra, and that the sequence informative b and y ions were rarely observed when Amadori-modified peptides were fragmented. Contrary to what was observed under CID conditions, ions corresponding to neutral losses of water or furylium ion production were not observed in the ETD spectra. Instead, abundant and almost complete series of c and z type ions were observed regardless of whether the modification site was located in the middle of the sequence or close to the N-terminus, greatly facilitating the peptide sequencing. This study strongly suggests that ETD is a better technique for proteomics studies of non-enzymatically glycated peptides and proteins.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits enzymatic browning of fresh-cut lotus root slices by regulating phenolic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Tao; Nie, Qixing; Zhang, Fengying; Zhu, Liqin

    2015-06-15

    The effect of fumigation with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas on inhibiting enzymatic browning of fresh-cut lotus root slices was investigated. Browning degree, changes in color, total phenol content, superoxide anion production rate (O2(-)), H2O2 content, antioxidant capacities (DPPH radical scavenging ability, ABTS radical scavenging activity and the reducing power) and activities of the phenol metabolism-associated enzymes including phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) were evaluated. The results showed that treatment with 15 μl L(-1) H2S significantly inhibited the browning of fresh-cut lotus root slices (P<0.05), reduced significantly O2(-) production rate and H2O2 content, and enhanced antioxidant capacities (P<0.05). PPO and POD activities in the fresh-cut lotus root slices were also significantly inhibited by treatment with H2S (P<0.05). This study suggested that treatment with exogenous H2S could inhibit the browning of fresh-cut lotus root slices by enhancing antioxidant capacities to alleviate the oxidative damage. PMID:25660900

  20. Novel Architectures for Achieving Direct Electron Transfer in Enzymatic Biofuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaik, Rita A.

    Enzymatic biofuel cells are a promising source of alternative energy for small device applications, but still face the challenge of achieving direct electron transfer with high enzyme concentrations in a simple system. In this dissertation, methods of constructing electrodes consisting of enzymes attached to nanoparticle-enhanced substrates that serve as high surface area templates are evaluated. In the first method described, glucose oxidase is covalently attached to gold nanoparticles that are assembled onto genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage. The resulting anodes achieve a high peak current per area and a significant improvement in enzyme surface coverage. In the second system, fructose dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound enzyme that has the natural ability to achieve direct electron transfer, is immobilized into a matrix consisting of binders and carbon nanotubes to extend the lifetime of the anode. For the cathode, bilirubin oxidase is immobilized in a carbon nanotube and sol-gel matrix to achieve direct electron transfer. Finally, a full fuel cell consisting of both an anode and cathode is constructed and evaluated with each system described.

  1. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  2. Towards a zinc-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation/transfer hydrogenation of imines.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, Svenja; Fleischer, Steffen; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2012-11-01

    The first asymmetric hydrogenation/transfer hydrogenation of imines to amines using zinc(II) triflate in combination with chiral ligands is described. The monodentate binaphthophosphepine ligand (3 g) provided the highest enantioselectivities. Using different imines, the corresponding amines were obtained in moderate yields and enantioselectivities. PMID:22807402

  3. Laser driven hydrogen transfer reactions in atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Marsha I.

    2015-03-01

    Ozonolysis of alkenes, an important non-photolytic source of OH radicals in the troposphere, proceeds through energized Criegee intermediates that undergo unimolecular decay to produce OH radicals. In this work, infrared laser activation of cold methyl-substituted Criegee intermediates is utilized to drive hydrogen transfer from the methyl group to the terminal oxygen, followed by dissociation to OH radicals. State-selective excitation of the Criegee intermediates in the CH stretch overtone region combined with sensitive OH detection reveals the infrared spectra of CH3CHOO and (CH3)2 COO, effective barrier heights for the critical hydrogen transfer step, and rapid decay dynamics to OH products. Complementary theory provides insights on the infrared overtone spectra as well as vibrational excitations, structural changes, and energy required to move from the minimum energy configuration of the Criegee intermediates to the transition state for the hydrogen transfer reaction. Research supported by the National Science Foundation.

  4. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. . Inst. de Physique); Bailey, J.M. ); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. ); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. ); Huber, T.M. ); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.

    1992-01-01

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of [mu][sup [minus]p] atoms in each target. The rates [lambda][sub pp[mu

  5. Characterisation of water hyacinth with microwave-heated alkali pretreatment for enhanced enzymatic digestibility and hydrogen/methane fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Song, Wenlu; Ding, Lingkan; Xie, Binfei; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-04-01

    Microwave-heated alkali pretreatment (MAP) was investigated to improve enzymatic digestibility and H2/CH4 production from water hyacinth. SEM revealed that MAP deconstructed the lignocellulose matrix and swelled the surfaces of water hyacinth. XRD indicated that MAP decreased the crystallinity index from 16.0 to 13.0 because of cellulose amorphisation. FTIR indicated that MAP effectively destroyed the lignin structure and disrupted the crystalline cellulose to reduce crystallinity. The reducing sugar yield of 0.296 g/gTVS was achieved at optimal hydrolysis conditions (microwave temperature = 190°C, time = 10 min, and cellulase dosage = 5 wt%). The sequentially fermentative hydrogen and methane yields from water hyacinth with MAP and enzymatic hydrolysis were increased to 63.9 and 172.5 mL/gTVS, respectively. The energy conversion efficiency (40.0%) in the two-stage hydrogen and methane cogeneration was lower than that (49.5%) in the one-stage methane production (237.4 mL/gTVS) from water hyacinth with MAP and enzymatic hydrolysis. PMID:25668753

  6. Microscale Synthesis of Chiral Alcohols via Asymmetric Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeters, Christine M.; Deliever, Rik; De Vos, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of pure enantiomers is a key issue in industry, especially in areas connected to life sciences. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis has emerged as a powerful and practical tool. Here we describe an experiment on racemic reduction and asymmetric reduction via a catalytic hydrogen transfer process. Acetophenone and substituted acetophenones are…

  7. Enzyme orientation for direct electron transfer in an enzymatic fuel cell with alcohol oxidase and laccase electrodes.

    PubMed

    Arrocha, Andrés A; Cano-Castillo, Ulises; Aguila, Sergio A; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2014-11-15

    A new full enzymatic fuel cell was built and characterized. Both enzymatic electrodes were molecularly oriented to enhance the direct electron transfer between the enzyme active site and the electrode surface. The anode consisted in immobilized alcohol oxidase on functionalized carbon nanotubes with 4-azidoaniline, which acts as active-site ligand to orientate the enzyme molecule. The cathode consisted of immobilized laccase on functionalized graphite electrode with 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzoic acid. The enzymatic fuel cell reaches 0.5 V at open circuit voltage with both, ethanol and methanol, while in short circuit the highest current intensity of 250 μA cm(-2) was obtained with methanol. Concerning the power density, the methanol was the best substrate reaching 60 μW cm(-2), while with ethanol 40 μW cm(-2) was obtained. PMID:24953844

  8. Nickel-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of ketones using ethanol as a solvent and a hydrogen donor.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Blanco, Nahury; Arévalo, Alma; García, Juventino J

    2016-09-14

    We report a nickel(0)-catalyzed direct transfer hydrogenation (TH) of a variety of alkyl-aryl, diaryl, and aliphatic ketones with ethanol. This protocol implies a reaction in which a primary alcohol serves as a hydrogen atom source and solvent in a one-pot reaction without any added base. The catalytic activity of the nickel complex [(dcype)Ni(COD)] (e) (dcype: 1,2-bis(dicyclohexyl-phosphine)ethane, COD: 1,5-cyclooctadiene), towards transfer hydrogenation (TH) of carbonyl compounds using ethanol as the hydrogen donor was assessed using a broad scope of ketones, giving excellent results (up to 99% yield) compared to other homogeneous phosphine-nickel catalysts. Control experiments and a mercury poisoning experiment support a homogeneous catalytic system; the yield of the secondary alcohols formed in the TH reaction was monitored by gas chromatography (GC) and NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27511528

  9. Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Imines using Alcohol: Efficiency and Selectivity are Influenced by the Hydrogen Donor.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Yao; Shan, Chunhui; Yu, Zhaoyuan; Lan, Yu; Zhao, Yu

    2016-08-01

    The influence of the alcohol, as the hydrogen donor, on the efficiency and selectivity of the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of imines is reported for the first time. This discovery not only leads to a highly enantioselective access to N-aryl and N-alkyl amines, but also provides new insight into the mechanism of the ATH of imines. Both experimental and computational studies provide support for the reaction pathway involving an iridium alkoxide as the reducing species. PMID:27374880

  10. Mediation of donor–acceptor distance in an enzymatic methyl transfer reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianyu; Kulik, Heather J.; Martinez, Todd J.; Klinman, Judith P.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic methyl transfer, catalyzed by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), is investigated using binding isotope effects (BIEs), time-resolved fluorescence lifetimes, Stokes shifts, and extended graphics processing unit (GPU)-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approaches. The WT enzyme is compared with mutants at Tyr68, a conserved residue that is located behind the reactive sulfur of cofactor. Small (>1) BIEs are observed for an S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-binary and abortive ternary complex containing 8-hydroxyquinoline, and contrast with previously reported inverse (<1) kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). Extended GPU-based computational studies of a ternary complex containing catecholate show a clear trend in ground state structures, from noncanonical bond lengths for WT toward solution values with mutants. Structural and dynamical differences that are sensitive to Tyr68 have also been detected using time-resolved Stokes shift measurements and molecular dynamics. These experimental and computational results are discussed in the context of active site compaction that requires an ionization of substrate within the enzyme ternary complex. PMID:26080432

  11. A multilateral mechanistic study into asymmetric transfer hydrogenation in water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Jianke; Di Tommaso, Devis; Iggo, Jonathan A; Catlow, C Richard A; Bacsa, John; Xiao, Jianliang

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of aqueous-phase asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of acetophenone (acp) with HCOONa catalyzed by Ru-TsDPEN has been investigated by stoichiometric reactions, NMR probing, kinetic and isotope effect measurements, DFT modeling, and X-ray structure analysis. The chloride [RuCl(TsDPEN)(p-cymene)] (1), hydride [RuH(TsDPEN)(p-cymene)] (3), and the 16-electorn species [Ru(TsDPEN-H)(p-cymene)] (4) were shown to be involved in the aqueous ATH, with 1 being the precatalyst, and 3 as the active catalyst detectable by NMR in both stoichiometric and catalytic reactions. The formato complex [Ru(OCOH)(TsDPEN)(p-cymene)] (2) was not observed; its existence, however, was demonstrated by its reversible decarboxylation to form 3. Both 1 and 3 were protonated under acidic conditions, leading to ring opening of the TsDPEN ligand. 4 reacted with water, affording a hydroxyl species. In a homogeneous DMF/H(2)O solvent, the ATH was found to be first order in the concentration of catalyst and acp, and inhibited by CO(2). In conjunction with the NMR results, this suggests that hydrogen transfer to ketone is the rate-determining step. The addition of water stabilized the ruthenium catalyst and accelerated the ATH reaction; it does so by participating in the catalytic cycle. DFT calculations revealed that water hydrogen bonds to the ketone oxygen at the transition state of hydrogen transfer, lowering the energy barrier by about 4 kcal mol(-1). The calculations also suggested that the hydrogen transfer is more step-wise in nature rather than concerted. This is supported to some degree by the kinetic isotope effects, which were obscured by extensive H/D scrambling. PMID:18604853

  12. Muon transfer from hydrogen and deuterium atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. )

    1995-03-01

    The muon exchange reactions from the ground state of muonic protium and deuterium atoms to neon are studied. Measurements have been performed in binary gas mixtures at room temperature. The transfer rate from thermalized muonic deuterium is found to exceed by about an order of magnitude the one from muonic protium. On the other hand, an energy dependence of the rate from [mu][ital d] is revealed, while none is observed from [mu][ital p]. The intensity patterns of the muonic Lyman series of neon resulting from the muon exchange differ from one hydrogen isotope to the other, the most obvious discrepancy being the presence of the muonic Ne(7-1) line after transfer from [mu][ital d], whereas this line is absent by transfer from [mu][ital p]. This indicates that the muon is transferred to the level [ital n][sub [ital p

  13. Selective ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenations of nitriles to amines with 2-butanol.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, Svenja; Bornschein, Christoph; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Transfer your hydrogen: Fast and general transfer hydrogenation of nitriles to form primary amines is possible with a homogeneous Ru/1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane (DPPB) catalyst (see scheme). The use of 2-butanol as the hydrogen-transfer reagent is essential for the selective reduction of aromatic, heteroaromatic, and aliphatic nitriles with this system. PMID:23450803

  14. Hydrogen transfer in catalysis by adenosylcobalamin-dependent diol dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Moore, K W; Bachovchin, W W; Gunter, J B; Richards, J H

    1979-06-26

    Studies [bachovchin, W. W., et al. (1978) Biochemistry 17, 2218] of the mechanism of inactivation of adenosylcobalamin-dependent diol dehydratase have led to the development of a general method to describe the kinetics of a reaction pathway containing a reservoir of mobile hydrogen. Analysis by this method of catalytic rate measurements for mixtures of 1,2-propanediol and 1,1-dideuterio-1,2-propanediol supports a mechanism involving an intermediate with three equivalent hydrogens, in which hydrogen transfer from this intermediate to product is the major rate-contributing step. Other results using tritium as a trace label [essenberg, M. K., et al. (1971) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 93, 1242] are considered in light of these deuterium isotope studies. PMID:383139

  15. Amide-Substituted Titanocenes in Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Jakoby, Verena; Stainer, Katharina; Schmer, Alexander; Klare, Sven; Bauer, Mirko; Grimme, Stefan; Cuerva, Juan Manuel; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-01-22

    Two new catalytic systems for hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) catalysis involving the N-H bonds of titanocene(III) complexes with pendant amide ligands are reported. In a monometallic system, a bifunctional catalyst for radical generation and reduction through HAT catalysis depending on the coordination of the amide ligand is employed. The pendant amide ligand is used to activate Crabtree's catalyst to yield an efficient bimetallic system for radical generation and HAT catalysis. PMID:26636435

  16. Role of Double Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions in Atmospheric Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Sinha, Amitabha; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-05-17

    Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions are ubiquitous and play a crucial role in chemistries occurring in the atmosphere, biology, and industry. In the atmosphere, the most common and traditional HAT reaction is that associated with the OH radical abstracting a hydrogen atom from the plethora of organic molecules in the troposphere via R-H + OH → R + H2O. This reaction motif involves a single hydrogen transfer. More recently, in the literature, there is an emerging framework for a new class of HAT reactions that involves double hydrogen transfers. These reactions are broadly classified into four categories: (i) addition, (ii) elimination, (iii) substitution, and (iv) rearrangement. Hydration and dehydration are classic examples of addition and elimination reactions, respectively whereas tautomerization or isomerization belongs to a class of rearrangement reactions. Atmospheric acids and water typically mediate these reactions. Organic and inorganic acids are present in appreciable levels in the atmosphere and are capable of facilitating two-point hydrogen bonding interactions with oxygenates possessing an hydroxyl and/or carbonyl-type functionality. As a result, acids influence the reactivity of oxygenates and, thus, the energetics and kinetics of their HAT-based chemistries. The steric and electronic effects of acids play an important role in determining the efficacy of acid catalysis. Acids that reduce the steric strain of 1:1 substrate···acid complex are generally better catalysts. Among a family of monocarboxylic acids, the electronic effects become important; barrier to the catalyzed reaction correlates strongly with the pKa of the acid. Under acid catalysis, the hydration of carbonyl compounds leads to the barrierless formation of diols, which can serve as seed particles for atmospheric aerosol growth. The hydration of sulfur trioxide, which is the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfuric acid formation, also becomes barrierless under acid catalysis

  17. Forced flow heat transfer of supercritical hydrogen for superconductor cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotsu, M.; Shirai, Y.; Tatsumoto, H.; Hata, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Naruo, Y.; Inatani, H.

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer from inner side of a vertical tube to forced flow of hydrogen was measured at the pressure of 1.5 MPa. The test tubes were made of stainless steel 316L with the inner diameters from 3 mm to 9 mm and lengths from 100 mm to 250 mm. Heat transfer curves were obtained by gradually increasing the heating current to the test tube and raising the surface temperature up to around 200 K. Inlet fluid temperature and flow velocity were varied from 21 to 30 K and 0.5 to 12 m/s, respectively. Effects of inlet temperature, flow velocity and tube dimension were clearly observed. The heat transfer curve for each flow velocity consists of a lower temperature region with a higher gradient and higher temperature region with a lower gradient. The experimental results were compared with the authors' correlation presented formerly. It was confirmed that this correlation can describe the experimental results obtained here.

  18. Slush hydrogen transfer studies at the NASA K-Site Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study was performed as part of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) effort to determine slush hydrogen production and transfer characteristics. Flow rate and pressure drop characteristics were determined for slush hydrogen flow through a vacuum-jacketed transfer system. These characteristics were compared to similar tests using normal boiling point and triple point hydrogen. In addition, experimental flow characteristic data was compared with predictions from the FLUSH analytical model. Slush hydrogen density loss during the transfer process was also examined.

  19. Boryl-mediated reversible H2 activation at cobalt: catalytic hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, and transfer hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Pin; Peters, Jonas C

    2013-10-16

    We describe the synthesis of a cobalt(I)-N2 complex (2) supported by a meridional bis-phosphino-boryl (PBP) ligand. Complex 2 undergoes a clean reaction with 2 equiv of dihydrogen to afford a dihydridoboratocobalt dihydride (3). The ability of boron to switch between a boryl and a dihydridoborate conformation makes possible the reversible conversion of 2 and 3. Complex 3 reacts with HMe2N-BH3 to give a hydridoborane cobalt tetrahydridoborate complex. We explore this boryl-cobalt system in the context of catalytic olefin hydrogenation as well as amine-borane dehydrogenation/transfer hydrogenation. PMID:24079337

  20. Radical-mediated dehydrogenation of bile acids by means of hydrogen atom transfer to triplet carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Miro, P; Marin, M L; Miranda, M A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present paper is to explore the potential of radical-mediated dehydrogenation of bile salts (BSs), which is reminiscent of the enzymatic action of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes (HSDH). The concept has been demonstrated using triplet carbonyls that can be efficiently generated upon selective UVA-excitation. Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from BSs to triplet benzophenone (BP) derivatives gave rise to radicals, ultimately leading to reduction of the BP chromophore with concomitant formation of the oxo-analogs of the corresponding BSs. The direct reactivity of triplet BP with BSs in the initial step was evaluated by determining the kinetic rate constants using laser flash photolysis (LFP). The BP triplet decay was monitored (λmax = 520 nm) upon addition of increasing BS concentrations, and the obtained rate constant values indicated a reactivity of the methine hydrogen atoms in the order of C-3 < C-12 < C-7. The steady-state kinetics of the overall process, monitored through the disappearance of the typical BP absorption band at 260 nm, was much faster under N2 than under O2, also supporting the role of the oxygen-quenchable triplet in the dehydrogenation process. Furthermore, irradiation of deaerated aqueous solutions of sodium cholate in the presence of KPMe provided the oxo-analogs, 3[O],7[O]-CA, 3[O]-CA and 7[O]-CA, arising from the HAT process. PMID:26833240

  1. Metal-free transfer hydrogenation of olefins via dehydrocoupling catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Manuel; Caputo, Christopher B.; Dobrovetsky, Roman; Stephan, Douglas W.

    2014-01-01

    A major advance in main-group chemistry in recent years has been the emergence of the reactivity of main-group species that mimics that of transition metal complexes. In this report, the Lewis acidic phosphonium salt [(C6F5)3PF][B(C6F5)4] 1 is shown to catalyze the dehydrocoupling of silanes with amines, thiols, phenols, and carboxylic acids to form the Si-E bond (E = N, S, O) with the liberation of H2 (21 examples). This catalysis, when performed in the presence of a series of olefins, yields the concurrent formation of the products of dehydrocoupling and transfer hydrogenation of the olefin (30 examples). This reactivity provides a strategy for metal-free catalysis of olefin hydrogenations. The mechanisms for both catalytic reactions are proposed and supported by experiment and density functional theory calculations. PMID:25002489

  2. Charge transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions under Debye plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, K.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of plasma environment on the 1s → nlm charge transfer, for arbitrary n, l, and m, in proton-hydrogen collisions has been investigated within the framework of a distorted wave approximation. The effect of external plasma has been incorporated using Debye screening model of the interacting charge particles. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogenic wave function, it has been possible to obtain the scattering amplitude in closed form. A detailed study has been made to investigate the effect of external plasma environment on the differential and total cross sections for electron capture into different angular momentum states for the incident energy in the range of 20–1000 keV. For the unscreened case, our results are in close agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  3. Charge transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions under Debye plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, K.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of plasma environment on the 1s → nlm charge transfer, for arbitrary n, l, and m, in proton-hydrogen collisions has been investigated within the framework of a distorted wave approximation. The effect of external plasma has been incorporated using Debye screening model of the interacting charge particles. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogenic wave function, it has been possible to obtain the scattering amplitude in closed form. A detailed study has been made to investigate the effect of external plasma environment on the differential and total cross sections for electron capture into different angular momentum states for the incident energy in the range of 20-1000 keV. For the unscreened case, our results are in close agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  4. Calculation of muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to atomic oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Dupays, Arnaud; Lepetit, Bruno; Beswick, J. Alberto; Rizzo, Carlo; Bakalov, Dimitar

    2003-06-01

    The muon-transfer probabilities between muonic hydrogen and an oxygen atom are calculated in a constrained geometry one-dimensional model for collision energies between 10{sup -6} and 10{sup 3} eV. For relative translational energies below 10{sup -1} eV, for which the de Broglie wavelength (>1 Aa) is much larger than the characteristic distance of the potential interaction ({approx}0.1 Aa), the problem corresponds to an ultracold collision. The close-coupling time-independent quantum equations are written in terms of hyperspherical coordinates and a diabatic-by-sectors basis set. The muon-transfer probabilities are qualitatively interpreted in terms of a model involving two Landau-Zener crossings together with the threshold energy dependence. Based on this analysis, a simple procedure to estimate the energy dependence of the muon-transfer rate in three dimensions is proposed. These estimated rates are discussed in the light of previous model calculations and available experimental data for this process. It is concluded that the high transfer rates at epithermal energies inferred from experiments are unlikely to be correct.

  5. Concerted or stepwise hydrogen transfer in the transfer hydrogenation of acetophenone catalyzed by ruthenium-acetamido complex: a theoretical mechanistic investigation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaojia; Tang, Yanhui; Zhang, Xin; Lei, Ming

    2011-11-10

    In this paper, the mechanism of transfer hydrogenation of acetophenone catalyzed by ruthenium-acetamido complex was studied using density function theory (DFT) method. The catalytic cycle of transfer hydrogenation consists of hydrogen transfer (HT) step and dehydrogenation (DH) step of isopropanol (IPA). Inner sphere mechanism (paths 1 and 7) and outer sphere mechanism (paths 2-6) in HT step are fully investigated. Calculated results indicate that DH step of IPA (from (i)1 to (i)2) is the rate-determining step in the whole catalytic cycle, which has a potential energy barrier of 16.2 kcal/mol. On the other hand, the maximum potential energy barriers of paths 1-7 in the HT step are 5.9, 12.7, 24.4, 16.8, 23.7, 7.2, and 6.1 kcal/mol, respectively. The inner sphere pathways (paths 1 and 7) are favorable hydrogen transfer modes compared with outer sphere pathways, and the proton transferred to the oxygen atom of acetophenone comes from the hydroxyl group but not from amino group of acetamido ligand. Those theoretical results are in agreement with experimental report. However, in view of this DFT study in the inner sphere mechanism of HT step, hydride transfer and proton transfer are concerted and asynchronous hydrogen transfer but not a stepwise one, and hydride transfer precedes proton transfer in this case. PMID:21974747

  6. Ab initio studies on hydrogen-transfer tunneling for Cl + HCl abstraction hydrogen reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yuxiang Bu; Zhaohua Cao; Xinyu Song

    1996-01-05

    This article presents a treatment scheme of the tunneling of hydrogen between two molecular centers (Cl...Cl). The purpose is to calculate the tunneling probabilities of hydrogen atom transfer from the initial (the proceeding complex) to the final-state energy minima (the succeeding complex) in two anharmonic vibrational states (0 {r_arrow} 0 and 1 {r_arrow} 1) in terms of the time-dependent perturbation theory expression and to see whether spectroscopic signatures of tunneling persist in the form of splittings of the vibrational modes. The analysis uses the realistic potential energy function calculated at the HF/6-31 + G** self-consistent-field basis-set level for the interaction between transferred hydrogen and its molecular skeleton (Cl ... H ... Cl). This potential energy surface is calibrated by comparing its properties with those from s POLO and the LEPS potential-energy surfaces. The anharmonic vibrational state is characterized by the corrected vibrational energy levels and a set of linear combination coefficients obtained via perturbation theory. The tunneling probabilities for two transitions (0 {r_arrow} 0 and 1 {r_arrow} 1) were calculated and compared with those from Gamow`s equation. Applicability of the time-dependent perturbation theory expression and Gamow`s equation to the [Cl-H ... Cl] system is discussed. The vibrational splitting energies are obtained, and a spectroscopic signature caused by tunneling is expected and should be observable. 28 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Batch dark fermentation from enzymatic hydrolyzed food waste for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Ye, Min; Zhu, Ai Jun; Zhao, Hong Ting; Li, Yong Feng

    2015-09-01

    A combination bioprocess of solid-state fermentation (SSF) and dark fermentative hydrogen production from food waste was developed. Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus oryzae were utilized in SSF from food waste to generate glucoamylase and protease which were used to hydrolyze the food waste suspension to get the nutrients-rich (glucose and free amino nitrogen (FAN)) hydrolysate. Both glucose and FAN increased with increasing of food waste mass ratio from 4% to 10% (w/v) and the highest glucose (36.9 g/L) and FAN (361.3mg/L) were observed at food waste mass ratio of 10%. The food waste hydrolysates were then used as the feedstock for dark fermentative hydrogen production by heat pretreated sludge. The best hydrogen yield of 39.14 ml H2/g food waste (219.91 ml H2/VSadded) was achieved at food waste mass ratio of 4%. The proposed combination bioprocess could effectively accelerate the hydrolysis rate, improve raw material utilization and enhance hydrogen yield. PMID:25978853

  8. Electrodeposited nanostructured MnO{sub 2} for non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, B. Jana, S. K.; Banerjee, S.

    2015-06-24

    Electrodeposited MnO{sub 2} nanostructure was synthesized on indium tin oxide coated glass electrode by cyclic voltammetry. The as obtained samples were subsequently characterized by atomic force microscopy and their electro-catalytic response towards hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium of 0.1M NaOH was studied using cyclic voltammetry and amperometry.

  9. Ligand-Induced Proton Transfer and Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bond Revealed by X-ray Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Derek A; Hargis, Jacqueline C; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Jaishankar, Priyadarshini; Defrees, Kyle; Smith, Emmanuel W; Wang, Kenneth K; Prati, Fabio; Renslo, Adam R; Woodcock, H Lee; Chen, Yu

    2015-07-01

    Ligand binding can change the pKa of protein residues and influence enzyme catalysis. Herein, we report three ultrahigh resolution X-ray crystal structures of CTX-M β-lactamase, directly visualizing protonation state changes along the enzymatic pathway: apo protein at 0.79 Å, precovalent complex with nonelectrophilic ligand at 0.89 Å, and acylation transition state (TS) analogue at 0.84 Å. Binding of the noncovalent ligand induces a proton transfer from the catalytic Ser70 to the negatively charged Glu166, and the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) between Ser70 and Lys73, with a length of 2.53 Å and the shared hydrogen equidistant from the heteroatoms. QM/MM reaction path calculations determined the proton transfer barrier to be 1.53 kcal/mol. The LBHB is absent in the other two structures although Glu166 remains neutral in the covalent complex. Our data represents the first X-ray crystallographic example of a hydrogen engaged in an enzymatic LBHB, and demonstrates that desolvation of the active site by ligand binding can provide a protein microenvironment conducive to LBHB formation. It also suggests that LBHBs may contribute to stabilization of the TS in general acid/base catalysis together with other preorganized features of enzyme active sites. These structures reconcile previous experimental results suggesting alternatively Glu166 or Lys73 as the general base for acylation, and underline the importance of considering residue protonation state change when modeling protein-ligand interactions. Additionally, the observation of another LBHB (2.47 Å) between two conserved residues, Asp233 and Asp246, suggests that LBHBs may potentially play a special structural role in proteins. PMID:26057252

  10. CNN pincer ruthenium catalysts for hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation of ketones: experimental and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Walter; Baldino, Salvatore; Calhorda, Maria José; Costa, Paulo J; Esposito, Gennaro; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Magnolia, Santo; Mealli, Carlo; Messaoudi, Abdelatif; Mason, Sax A; Veiros, Luis F

    2014-10-13

    Reaction of [RuCl(CNN)(dppb)] (1-Cl) (HCNN=2-aminomethyl-6-(4-methylphenyl)pyridine; dppb=Ph2 P(CH2 )4 PPh2 ) with NaOCH2 CF3 leads to the amine-alkoxide [Ru(CNN)(OCH2 CF3 )(dppb)] (1-OCH2 CF3 ), whose neutron diffraction study reveals a short RuO⋅⋅⋅HN bond length. Treatment of 1-Cl with NaOEt and EtOH affords the alkoxide [Ru(CNN)(OEt)(dppb)]⋅(EtOH)n (1-OEt⋅n EtOH), which equilibrates with the hydride [RuH(CNN)(dppb)] (1-H) and acetaldehyde. Compound 1-OEt⋅n EtOH reacts reversibly with H2 leading to 1-H and EtOH through dihydrogen splitting. NMR spectroscopic studies on 1-OEt⋅n EtOH and 1-H reveal hydrogen bond interactions and exchange processes. The chloride 1-Cl catalyzes the hydrogenation (5 atm of H2 ) of ketones to alcohols (turnover frequency (TOF) up to 6.5×10(4) h(-1) , 40 °C). DFT calculations were performed on the reaction of [RuH(CNN')(dmpb)] (2-H) (HCNN'=2-aminomethyl-6-(phenyl)pyridine; dmpb=Me2 P(CH2 )4 PMe2 ) with acetone and with one molecule of 2-propanol, in alcohol, with the alkoxide complex being the most stable species. In the first step, the Ru-hydride transfers one hydrogen atom to the carbon of the ketone, whereas the second hydrogen transfer from NH2 is mediated by the alcohol and leads to the key "amide" intermediate. Regeneration of the hydride complex may occur by reaction with 2-propanol or with H2 ; both pathways have low barriers and are alcohol assisted. PMID:25195979

  11. Recent advances on enzymatic glucose/oxygen and hydrogen/oxygen biofuel cells: Achievements and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosnier, Serge; J. Gross, Andrew; Le Goff, Alan; Holzinger, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of producing electrical power from chemical energy with biological catalysts has induced the development of biofuel cells as viable energy sources for powering portable and implanted electronic devices. These power sources employ biocatalysts, called enzymes, which are highly specific and catalytic towards the oxidation of a biofuel and the reduction of oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. Enzymes, on one hand, are promising candidates to replace expensive noble metal-based catalysts in fuel cell research. On the other hand, they offer the exciting prospect of a new generation of fuel cells which harvest energy from body fluids. Biofuel cells which use glucose as a fuel are particularly interesting for generating electricity to power electronic devices inside a living body. Hydrogen consuming biofuel cells represent an emerging alternative to platinum catalysts due to comparable efficiencies and the capability to operate at lower temperatures. Currently, these technologies are not competitive with existing commercialised fuel cell devices due to limitations including insufficient power outputs and lifetimes. The advantages and challenges facing glucose biofuel cells for implantation and hydrogen biofuel cells will be summarised along with recent promising advances and the future prospects of these exotic energy-harvesting devices.

  12. A Transferable Coarse-Grained Model for Hydrogen Bonding Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Golubkov, Pavel A.; Wu, Johnny C.; Ren, Pengyu

    2008-01-01

    We present here a recent development of a generalized coarse-grained model for use in molecular simulations. In this model, interactions between coarse-grained particles consist of both van der Waals and explicit electrostatic components. As a result, the coarse-grained model offers the transferability that is lacked by most current effectivepotential based approaches. The previous center-of-mass framework1 is generalized here to include arbitrary off-center interaction sites for both Gay-Berne and multipoles. The new model has been applied to molecular dynamic simulations of neat methanol liquid. By placing a single point multipole at the oxygen atom rather than at the center of mass of methanol, there is a significant improvement in the ability to capture hydrogen-bonding. The critical issue of transferability of the coarse-grained model is verified on methanol-water mixtures, using parameters derived from neat liquids without any modification. The mixture density and internal energy from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations show good agreement with experimental measurements, on a par with what has been obtained from more detailed atomic models. By mapping the dynamics trajectory from the coarse-grained simulation into the all-atom counterpart, we are able to investigate atomic .level structure and interaction. Atomic radial distribution functions of neat methanol, neat water and mixtures compare favorably to experimental measurements. Furthermore, hydrogen-bonded 6- and 7-molecule chains of water and methanol observed in the mixture are in agreement with previous atomic simulations. PMID:18688358

  13. Oxo-tethered ruthenium(II) complex as a bifunctional catalyst for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation and H2 hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Touge, Taichiro; Hakamata, Tomohiko; Nara, Hideki; Kobayashi, Tohru; Sayo, Noboru; Saito, Takao; Kayaki, Yoshihito; Ikariya, Takao

    2011-09-28

    Newly developed oxo-tethered Ru amido complexes (R,R)-1 and their HCl adducts (R,R)-2 exhibited excellent catalytic performance for both asymmetric transfer hydrogenation and the hydrogenation of ketonic substrates under neutral conditions without any cocatalysts to give chiral secondary alcohols with high levels of enantioselectivity. PMID:21870824

  14. Ruthenium supported on magnetic nanoparticles: An efficient and recoverable catalyst for hydrogenation of alkynes and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium supported on surface modified magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and applied for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The ...

  15. Ketone-alcohol hydrogen-transfer equilibria: is the biooxidation of halohydrins blocked?

    PubMed

    Bisogno, Fabricio R; García-Urdiales, Eduardo; Valdés, Haydee; Lavandera, Iván; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Suárez, Dimas; Gotor, Vicente

    2010-09-24

    To ensure the quasi-irreversibility of the oxidation of alcohols coupled with the reduction of ketones in a hydrogen-transfer (HT) fashion, stoichiometric amounts of α-halo carbonyl compounds have been employed as hydrogen acceptors. The reason that these substrates lead to quasi-quantitative conversions has been tacitly attributed to both thermodynamic and kinetic effects. To provide a clear rationale for this behavior, we investigate herein the redox equilibrium of a selected series of ketones and 2-propanol by undertaking a study that combines experimental and theoretical approaches. First, the activity of the (R)-specific alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (LBADH) with these substrates was studied. The docking of acetophenone/(R)-1-phenyethanol and α-chloroacetophenone/(S)-2-chloro-1-phenylethanol in the active site of the enzyme confirms that there seems to be no structural reason for the lack of reactivity of halohydrins. This assumption is confirmed by the fact that the corresponding aluminum-catalyzed Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley-Oppenauer (MPVO) reactions afford similar conversions to those obtained with LBADH, showing that the observed reactivity is independent of the catalyst employed. While the initial rates of the enzymatic reductions and the IR ν(C=O) values contradict the general belief that electron-withdrawing groups increase the electrophilicity of the carbonyl group, the calculated ΔG values of the isodesmic redox transformations of these series of ketones/alcohols with 2-propanol/acetone support the thermodynamic control of the reaction. As a result, a general method to predict the degree of conversion obtained in the HT-reduction process of a given ketone based on the IR absorption band of the carbonyl group is proposed, and a strategy to achieve the HT oxidation of halohydrins is also shown. PMID:20803580

  16. One-step preparation of silver-polyaniline nanotube composite for non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorestani, Farnaz; Shahnavaz, Zohreh; Nia, Pooria Moozarm; Alias, Y.; Manan, Ninie S. A.

    2015-08-01

    A modified glassy carbon electrode with silver nanoparticles-polyaniline nanotubes (AgNPs-PANINTs) composite is used as a non-enzymatic nanobiosensor for detecting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The electrocatalytic activity for the reduction was strongly affected by the concentration of silver ammonia solution in the nanocomposites, with the best electrocatalytic activity observed for the composite of 6:1 volume ratios of PANI to Ag(NH3)2OH (0.04 M). Field emission scanning electron microscope images and their size distribution diagrams indicated that using the silver ammonia complex instead of silver nitrate caused uniform distribution of nanometer-sized silver nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution in the composite. The corresponding calibration curve for the current response showed a linear detection range of 0.1-90 mM (R2 = 0.9986), while the limit of detection was estimated to be 0.2 μM at the signal to noise ratio of 3.

  17. Application of a novel enzymatic pretreatment using crude hydrolytic extracellular enzyme solution to microalgal biomass for dark fermentative hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yeo-Myeong; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Oh, You-Kwan; Shin, Hang-Sik; Jung, Kyung-Won

    2014-05-01

    In this study, a novel enzymatic pretreatment of Chlorella vulgaris for dark fermentative hydrogen production (DFHP) was performed using crude hydrolytic extracellular enzyme solution (CHEES) extracted from the H2 fermented effluent of food waste. It was found that the enzyme extracted at 52 h had the highest hydrolysis efficiency of microalgal biomass, resulting in the highest H2 yield of 43.1 mL H2/g dry cell weight along with shorter lag periods. Even though a high amount of VFAs was accumulated in CHEES, especially butyrate, the fermentative bacteria on the DFHP was not affected from product inhibition. It also appears that the presence of organic acids, especially lactate and acetate, contained in the CHEES facilitated enhancement of H2 production acted as a co-substrate. Therefore, all of the experimental results suggest that the enhancement of DFHP performance caused by CHEES has a dual role as the hydrolysis enhancer and the co-substrate supplier. PMID:24662313

  18. Weak Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds with Fluorine: Detection and Implications for Enzymatic/Chemical Reactions, Chemical Properties, and Ligand/Protein Fluorine NMR Screening.

    PubMed

    Dalvit, Claudio; Vulpetti, Anna

    2016-05-23

    It is known that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. However, weak or very weak hydrogen bonds, which are often difficult to detect and characterize, may also be relevant in many recognition and reaction processes. Fluorine serving as a hydrogen-bond acceptor has been the subject of many controversial discussions and there are different opinions about it. It now appears that there is compelling experimental evidence for the involvement of fluorine in weak intramolecular or intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Using established NMR methods, we have previously characterized and measured the strengths of intermolecular hydrogen-bond complexes involving the fluorine moieties CH2 F, CHF2 , and CF3 , and have compared them with the well-known hydrogen-bond complex formed between acetophenone and the strong hydrogen-bond donor p-fluorophenol. We now report evidence for the formation of hydrogen bonds involving fluorine with significantly weaker donors, namely 5-fluoroindole and water. A simple NMR method is proposed for the simultaneous measurement of the strengths of hydrogen bonds between an acceptor and a donor or water. Important implications of these results for enzymatic/chemical reactions involving fluorine, for chemical and physical properties, and for ligand/protein (19) F NMR screening are analyzed through experiments and theoretical simulations. PMID:27112430

  19. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, Kevin; Jovanovic, Goran; Paul, Brian

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  20. Efficient Estimators for Quantum Instanton Evaluation of theKinetic Isotope Effects: Application to the Intramolecular HydrogenTransfer in Pentadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Vanicek, Jiri; Miller, William H.

    2007-06-13

    The quantum instanton approximation is used to compute kinetic isotope effects for intramolecular hydrogen transfer in cis-1,3-pentadiene. Due to the importance of skeleton motions, this system with 13 atoms is a simple prototype for hydrogen transfer in enzymatic reactions. The calculation is carried out using thermodynamic integration with respect to the mass of the isotopes and a path integral Monte Carlo evaluation of relevant thermodynamic quantities. Efficient 'virial' estimators are derived for the logarithmic derivatives of the partition function and the delta-delta correlation functions. These estimators require significantly fewer Monte Carlo samples since their statistical error does not increase with the number of discrete time slices in the path integral. The calculation treats all 39 degrees of freedom quantum-mechanically and uses an empirical valence bond potential based on a modified general AMBER force field.

  1. Exploring the decomposition pathways of iron asymmetric transfer hydrogenation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lagaditis, Paraskevi O; Sues, Peter E; Lough, Alan J; Morris, Robert H

    2015-07-21

    Our group has developed a series of iron-based asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) catalysts for the reduction of polar double bonds. The activation of the precatalysts as well as the catalytic mechanism have been thoroughly investigated, but the decomposition pathways of these systems are poorly understood. Herein, we report a study of the deactivation pathways for an iron ATH catalyst under catalytically relevant conditions. The decomposition pathways were examined using experimental techniques and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The major decomposition products that formed, Fe(CO)((Et)2PCH2CH2CHCHNCH2CH2P(Et)2) (3a) and Fe(CO)((Et)2PCH2CH2C(Ph)C(Ph)NCH2CH2P(Et)2) (3b), had two amido donors as well as a C=C bond on the diamine backbone of the tetradentate ligand. These species were identified by NMR studies and one was isolated as a bimetallic complex with Ru(II)Cp*. Two minor iron hydride species also formed concurrently with 3a, as determined by NMR studies, one of which was isolated and contained a fully saturated ligand as well as a hydride ligand. None of the compounds that were isolated were found to be active ATH catalysts. PMID:25373607

  2. Hydrogen transfer in excited pyrrole-ammonia clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, O.; Dedonder-Lardeux, C.; Jouvet, C.; Kang, H.; Martrenchard, S.; Ebata, T.; Sobolewski, A. L.

    2004-06-01

    The excited state hydrogen atom transfer reaction (ESHT) has been studied in pyrrole-ammonia clusters [PyH-(NH3)n+hν→Py•+•NH4(NH3)n-1]. The reaction is clearly evidenced through two-color R2P1 experiments using delayed ionization and presents a threshold around 235 nm (5.3 eV). The cluster dynamics has also been explored by picosecond time scale experiments. The clusters decay in the 10-30 ps range with lifetimes increasing with the cluster size. The appearance times for the reaction products are similar to the decay times of the parent clusters. Evaporation processes are also observed in competition with the reaction, and the cluster lifetime after evaporation is estimated to be around 10 ns. The kinetic energy of the reaction products is fairly large and the energy distribution seems quasi mono kinetic. These experimental results rule out the hypothesis that the reaction proceeds through a direct N-H bond rupture but rather imply the existence of a fairly long-lived intermediate state. Calculations performed at the CASSCF/CASMP2 level confirm the experimental observations, and provide some hints regarding the reaction mechanism.

  3. Pressure drop and heat transfer in inverted film boiling hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasch, James

    Two-phase boiling hydrogen pressure drop and heat transfer is studied in the context of high velocity upflow in a constant, high heat flux, steady state, internal pipe flow environment. These data were generated by NASA in the early and mid 1960s in support of the manned space flight programs. Measurements taken were local pressure, temperature, and voltage drop. System measurements included mass flow rate, and test section inlet and discharge pressure and temperature. This effort establishes the nature of the flow as inverted film boiling, which has been studied to some degree. In this structure, the wall temperatures are too hot to allow liquid to remain at the surface. Therefore, a vapor film is established at the wall throughout the flow. The approach of this analysis is to reverse-engineer the data to determine mass quality, void fraction, and velocity slip. This is accomplished by applying a one-dimensional, five-equation model, with pressure gradient being the one combined equation for the liquid and vapor phases. Other major assumptions are that all of the vapor is at the mean film temperature, and the liquid core experiences no sensible heating. The resulting velocity slips are correlated for high and low pressure conditions, with the cutoff established at 600 kPa. Good agreement is achieved between the pressures predicted using the slip correlations and the measured pressures. Results are in general significantly better than those from the homogeneous equilibrium model. Various established heat transfer coefficient models are also applied to these data. It is shown that pre-critical heat flux models fail absolutely to predict the heat transfer coefficient. It is further shown that film boiling models that focus on buoyancy fail as well. While all forced convection film boiling models are within a reasonable range of the data, recommendations for appropriate models are made. The range of pipe inlet conditions are 188 kPa to 1265 kPa, mass fluxes from 327

  4. Enzymatic catalysis and transfers in solution. I. Theory and computations, a unified view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, R. A.

    2006-11-01

    The transfer of hydride, proton, or H atom between substrate and cofactor in enzymes has been extensively studied for many systems, both experimentally and computationally. A simple equation for the reaction rate, an analog of an equation obtained earlier for electron transfer rates, is obtained, but now containing an approximate analytic expression for the bond rupture-bond forming feature of these H transfers. A "symmetrization," of the potential energy surfaces is again introduced [R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 43, 679 (1965); J. Phys. Chem. 72, 891 (1968)], together with Gaussian fluctuations of the remaining coordinates of the enzyme and solution needed for reaching the transition state. Combining the two expressions for the changes in the difference of the two bond lengths of the substrate-cofactor subsystem and in the fluctuation coordinates of the protein leading to the transition state, an expression is obtained for the free energy barrier. To this end a two-dimensional reaction space (m,n) is used that contains the relative coordinates of the H in the reactants, the heavy atoms to which it is bonded, and the protein/solution reorganization coordinate, all leading to the transition state. The resulting expression may serve to characterize in terms of specific parameters (two "reorganization" terms, thermodynamics, and work terms), experimental and computational data for different enzymes, and different cofactor-substrate systems. A related characterization was used for electron transfers. To isolate these factors from nuclear tunneling, when the H-tunneling effect is large, use of deuterium and tritium transfers is of course helpful, although tunneling has frequently and understandably dominated the discussions. A functional form is suggested for the dependence of the deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) on ΔG ° and a different form for the C13 KIE. Pressure effects on deuterium and C13 KIEs are also discussed. Although formulated for a one

  5. Slush hydrogen propellant production, transfer, and expulsion studies at the NASA K-Site Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1991-01-01

    Slush hydrogen is currently being considered as a fuel for the National AeroSpace Plane (NASP) because it offers the potential for decreased vehicle size and weight. However, no large scale data was available on the production, transfer, and tank pressure control characteristics required to use the fuel for the NASP. Therefore, experiments were conducted at NASA-Lewis K-Site Facility to improve the slush hydrogen data base. Slush hydrogen was produced using the evaporative cooling, or freeze-thaw, technique in batches for approx. 800 gallons. This slush hydrogen was pressure transferred to a 5 ft diameter spherical test tank following production, and flow characteristics were measured during this transfer process. The slush hydrogen in the test tank was pressurized and expelled using a pressurized expulsion technique to obtain information on tank pressure control for the NASP. Results from the production, transfer, pressurization, and pressurized expulsion tests are described.

  6. Slush hydrogen propellant production, transfer, and expulsion studies at the NASA K-Site Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1991-01-01

    Slush hydrogen is currently being considered as a fuel for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) because it offers the potential for decreased vehicle size and weight. However, no large-scale data was available on the production, transfer, and tank pressure control characteristics required to use the fuel for the NASP. Therefore, experiments were conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center K-Site Facility to improve the slush hydrogen database. Slush hydrogen was produced using the evaporative cooling, or freeze-thaw, technique in batches of about 800 gallons. This slush hydrogen was pressure transferred to a 5 ft diameter spherical test tank following production, and flow characteristics were measured during this transfer process. The slush hydrogen in the test tank was pressurized and expelled using a pressurized expulsion technique to obtain information on tank pressure control for the NASP. Results from the production, transfer, pressurization, and pressurized expulsion tests are described.

  7. Pion transfer from hydrogen to deuterium in H2+D2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, P.; Armstrong, D. S.; Measday, D. F.; Noble, A. J.; Stanislaus, S.; Harston, M. R.; Aniol, K. A.; Horváth, D.

    1990-01-01

    The transfer of negative pions from pionic hydrogen to deuterium has been investigated in gas mixtures of H2 and D2 as a function of the D2 concentration (C). The concentration dependence of the transfer rate was fitted using a phenomenological model with two parameters. For C-->∞ (32+/-3)% of the pions undergo transfer. The fitted parameters reflect the ratio of pion capture to pion transfer in collisions of pionic hydrogen with protons or deuterons. No pressure dependence for pion transfer was found.

  8. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  9. Numerical Radiative Transfer and the Hydrogen Reionization of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, M.

    2011-03-01

    ) simulation code GADGET. It is based on a fast, robust and photon-conserving integration scheme where the radiation transport problem is approximated in terms of moments of the transfer equation and by using a variable Eddington tensor as a closure relation, following the "OTVET"-suggestion of Gnedin & Abel. We derive a suitable anisotropic diffusion operator for use in the SPH discretization of the local photon transport, and we combine this with an implicit solver that guarantees robustness and photon conservation. This entails a matrix inversion problem of a huge, sparsely populated matrix that is distributed in memory in our parallel code. We solve this task iteratively with a conjugate gradient scheme. Finally, to model photon sink processes we consider ionization and recombination processes of hydrogen, which is represented with a chemical network that is evolved with an implicit time integration scheme. We present several tests of our implementation, including single and multiple sources in static uniform density fields with and without temperature evolution, shadowing by a dense clump, and multiple sources in a static cosmological density field. All tests agree quite well with analytical computations or with predictions from other radiative transfer codes, except for shadowing. However, unlike most other radiative transfer codes presently in use for studying reionization, our new method can be used on-the-fly during dynamical cosmological simulations, allowing simultaneous treatments of galaxy formation and the reionization process of the Universe. We carry out hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation that simultaneously follow radiative transfer of hydrogen-ionizing photons, based on the optically-thin variable Eddington tensor approximation as implemented in the GADGET code. We consider only star-forming galaxies as sources and examine to what extent they can yield a reasonable reionization history and thermal state of the intergalactic medium at redshifts

  10. Pincer-Type Complexes for Catalytic (De)Hydrogenation and Transfer (De)Hydrogenation Reactions: Recent Progress.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, Svenja; Neumann, Jacob; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2015-08-24

    Pincer complexes are becoming increasingly important for organometallic chemistry and organic synthesis. Since numerous applications for such catalysts have been developed in recent decades, this Minireview covers progress in their use as catalysts for (de)hydrogenation and transfer (de)hydrogenation reactions during the last four years. Aside from noble-metal-based pincer complexes, the corresponding base metal complexes are also highlighted and their applications summarized. PMID:26179375

  11. Iron-, Cobalt-, and Nickel-Catalyzed Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation and Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Yun; Yu, Shen-Luan; Shen, Wei-Yi; Gao, Jing-Xing

    2015-09-15

    Chiral alcohols are important building blocks in the pharmaceutical and fine chemical industries. The enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones catalyzed by transition metal complexes, especially asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) and asymmetric hydrogenation (AH), is one of the most efficient and practical methods for producing chiral alcohols. In both academic laboratories and industrial operations, catalysts based on noble metals such as ruthenium, rhodium, and iridium dominated the asymmetric reduction of ketones. However, the limited availability, high price, and toxicity of these critical metals demand their replacement with abundant, nonprecious, and biocommon metals. In this respect, the reactions catalyzed by first-row transition metals, which are more abundant and benign, have attracted more and more attention. As one of the most abundant metals on earth, iron is inexpensive, environmentally benign, and of low toxicity, and as such it is a fascinating alternative to the precious metals for catalysis and sustainable chemical manufacturing. However, iron catalysts have been undeveloped compared to other transition metals. Compared with the examples of iron-catalyzed asymmetric reduction, cobalt- and nickel-catalyzed ATH and AH of ketones are even seldom reported. In early 2004, we reported the first ATH of ketones with catalysts generated in situ from iron cluster complex and chiral PNNP ligand. Since then, we have devoted ourselves to the development of ATH and AH of ketones with iron, cobalt, and nickel catalysts containing novel chiral aminophosphine ligands. In our study, the iron catalyst containing chiral aminophosphine ligands, which are expected to control the stereochemistry at the metal atom, restrict the number of possible diastereoisomers, and effectively transfer chiral information, are successful catalysts for enantioselective reduction of ketones. Among these novel chiral aminophosphine ligands, 22-membered macrocycle P2N4

  12. One-pot synthesis of quinazolinones via iridium-catalyzed hydrogen transfers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianguang; Fang, Jie

    2011-10-01

    A one-pot oxidative cyclization of primary alcohols with o-aminobenzamides to quinazolinones was successfully achieved using [Cp*IrCl(2)](2) (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) as a catalyst under hydrogen transfer conditions. PMID:21851120

  13. Silicon layer transfer by hydrogen implantation combined with wafer bonding in ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecioru, Alin Mihai; Senz, Stephan; Scholz, Roland; Gösele, Ulrich

    2006-11-01

    A layer transfer method was developed by combining in situ photothermal activation of hydrogen passivated surfaces, ultrahigh vacuum bonding, and hydrogen-implantation induced splitting. Structural and electrical investigations showed that ultrathin, single crystalline silicon layers can be transferred to appropriate substrates without the involvement of an intermediate layer such as an oxide or solder. Significant current flow across such produced silicon-silicon bonded interfaces was observed, making this approach very attractive for material integration.

  14. Theoretical analysis of intramolecular double-hydrogen transfer in bridged-ring compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedarchina, Zorka K.; Siebrand, Willem

    1993-08-01

    Model calculations are reported on double-hydrogen and double-deuterium transfer rates in two bridged-ring molecules recently investigated by Mackenzie. [Tetrahedron Letters, 33 (1992) 5629]. The calculations indicate that, contrary to an earlier interpretation, the two atoms are transferred by asynchronous tunnelling, the observed activation energy being representative of the energy of the biradical intermediate rather than the barrier height.

  15. Ab Initio Vibrational Levels For HO2 and Vibrational Splittings for Hydrogen Atom Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, V. J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Hamilton, I. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We calculate vibrational levels and wave functions for HO2 using the recently reported ab initio potential energy surface of Walch and Duchovic. There is intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer when the hydrogen atom tunnels through a T-shaped saddle point separating two equivalent equilibrium geometries, and correspondingly, the energy levels are split. We focus on vibrational levels and wave functions with significant splitting. The first three vibrational levels with splitting greater than 2/cm are (15 0), (0 7 1) and (0 8 0) where V(sub 2) is the O-O-H bend quantum number. We discuss the dynamics of hydrogen atom transfer; in particular, the O-O distances at which hydrogen atom transfer is most probable for these vibrational levels. The material of the proposed presentation was reviewed and the technical content will not reveal any information not already in the public domain and will not give any foreign industry or government a competitive advantage.

  16. Bimetallic promotion of cooperative hydrogen transfer and heteroatom removal in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Eisch, J.J.

    1991-07-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to uncover new catalytic processes for the liquefaction of coal and for upgrading coal-derived fuels by removing undesirable organosulfur, organonitrogen and organooxygen constituents. Basic to both the liquefaction of coal and the purification of coal liquids is the transfer of hydrogen from such sources as dihydrogen, metal hydrides or partially reduced aromatic hydrocarbons to the extensive aromatic rings in coal itself or to aromatic sulfides, amines or ethers. Accordingly, this study is exploring how such crucial hydrogen-transfer processes might be catalyzed by soluble, low-valent transition metal complexes and/or Lewis acids under moderate conditions of temperature and pressure. By learning the mechanism whereby H{sub 2}, metal hydrides or partially hydrogenated aromatics do transfer hydrogen to model aromatic compounds, with the aid of homogeneous, bimetallic catalysts, we hope to identify new methods for producing superior fuels from coal.

  17. Bimetallic promotion of cooperative hydrogen transfer and heteroatom removal in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Eisch, J.J.

    1991-10-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to uncover new catalytic processes for the liquefaction of coal and for upgrading coal-derived fuels by removing undesirable organosulfur, organonitrogen and organooxygen constituents. Basic to both the liquefaction of coal and the purification of coal liquids is the transfer of hydrogen from such sources as dihydrogen, metal hydrides or partially reduced aromatic hydrocarbons to the extensive aromatic rings in coal itself or to aromatic sulfides, amines or ethers. Accordingly, this study is exploring how such crucial hydrogen-transfer processes might be catalyzed by soluble, low-valent transition metal complexes and/or Lewis acids under moderate conditions of temperature and pressure. By learning the mechanism whereby H{sub 2}, metal hydrides or partially hydrogenated aromatics do transfer hydrogen to model aromatic compounds, with the aid of homogeneous, bimetallic catalysts, we hope to identify new methods for producing superior fuels from coal.

  18. Uncertainty Analysis of Heat Transfer to Supercritical Hydrogen in Cooling Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, Justin M.; Landrum, D. Brian

    2005-01-01

    Sound understanding of the cooling efficiency of supercritical hydrogen is crucial to the development of high pressure thrust chambers for regeneratively cooled LOX/LH2 rocket engines. This paper examines historical heat transfer correlations for supercritical hydrogen and the effects of uncertainties in hydrogen property data. It is shown that uncertainty due to property data alone can be as high as 10%. Previous heated tube experiments with supercritical hydrogen are summarized, and data from a number of heated tube experiments are analyzed to evaluate conditions for which the available correlations are valid.

  19. A theoretical and experimental study of unimolecular and biomolecular radical hydrogen transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, J.A.; Autrey, T.; Gleicher, G.J.; Camaioni, D.M; Ferris, K.F.

    1991-04-01

    We have examined the intramolecular radical hydrogen transfer (RHT) reaction of the 2-(2-phenylethyl)cyclohexadienyl radical. Intramolecular hydrogen shift from the cyclohexadienyl ring to the ipso position of the phenyl ring, followed by {beta}-scission would have given benzene and ethylbenzene as products. Competing with this reaction is {beta}-scission to give benzyl radical and isotoluene, or hydrogen loss to give bibenzyl. Studies to date suggest a barrier for thermoneutral hydrogen transfer in the RHT reaction between aromatic systems of ca. 18 kcal/mole. None of the studies of RHT or equivalent mechanisms have attempted to directly observe H{sub 2}, and direct determination of Arrhenius parameters and a detailed examination of the pathway of the hydrogen transfer process remains to be carried out. To better understand the structural and energetic aspects of RHT, we have carried out a semiempirical molecular orbital study of bimolecular and intramolecular RHT reactions for a variety of aromatic systems. We also examined in detail the energetics of hydrogen transfer between ethyl radical and ethylene via RHT, an addition/metathesis/scission pathway, and a hybrid concerted'' pathway. 11 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. Non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on rose-shaped FeMoO{sub 4} nanostructures produced by convenient microwave-hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongying; Gu, Chunchuan; Li, Dujuan; Zhang, Mingzhen

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: A non-enzymatic H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor with high selectivity and sensitivity based on rose-shaped FeMoO{sub 4} synthesized by the convenient microwave-assisted hydrothermal method, was fabricated. - Highlights: • Rose-shaped FeMoO{sub 4} is synthesized within 10 min via microwave-assisted hydrothermal approach. • Non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on FeMoO{sub 4} nanomaterials is fabricated. • The biosensor exhibits good performance. - Abstract: In this work, we demonstrated a simple, rapid and reliable microwave-assisted hydrothermal approach to synthesize the uniform rose-shaped FeMoO{sub 4} within 10 min. The morphologies of the synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, a non-enzymatic amperometric sensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was fabricated on the basis of the FeMoO{sub 4} as electrocatalysis. The resulting FeMoO{sub 4} exhibited high sensitivity and good stability for the detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which may be attributed to the rose-shaped structure of the material and the catalytic property of FeMoO{sub 4}. Amperometric response showed that the modified electrode had a good response for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with a linear range from 1 μM to 1.6 mM, a detection limit of 0.5 μM (S/N = 3), high selectivity and short response time. Additionally, good recoveries of analytes in real milk samples confirm the reliability of the prepared sensor in practical applications.

  1. Applications of light-induced electron-transfer and hydrogen-abstraction processes: photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen from reducing radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, K.; Whitten, D.G.

    1980-07-16

    A study of several photoprocesses which generate reducing radicals in similar photoelectrochemical cells was reported. Coupling of a light-induced reaction to produce a photocurrent concurrent with hydrogen generation in a second compartment can occur for a number of electron transfers and hydrogen abstractions in what appears to be a fairly general process. Irradiation of the RuL/sub 3//sup +2//Et/sub 3/N: photoanode compartment leads to production of a photocurrent together with generation of hydrogen at the cathode. A rather different type of reaction that also results in formation of two reducing radicals as primary photoproducts if the photoreduction of ketones and H-heteroaromatics by alcohols and other hydrogen atom donors. Irradiation of benzophenone/2-propanol/MV/sup +2/ solutions in the photoanode compartment (intensity 1.4 x 10/sup -8/ einstein/s) leads to a buildup of moderate levels of MV/sup +/ and to a steady photocurrent of 320 ..mu..A. The MV/sup +/ is oxidized at the anode of the photolyzed compartment with concomitant reduction of H/sup +/ in the cathode compartment. There was no decrease in benzophenone concentration over moderate periods of irradiation, and a steady production of hydrogen in the cathode compartment was observed. The photocurrent produced was linear with the square of absorbed light intensity. The quantum efficiency at the above-indicated intensity is 22%; quantitative analysis of the hydrogen produced gives good agreement with this value. 1 figure, 1 table. (DP)

  2. Airfoil Heat Transfer Characteristics in Syngas and Hydrogen Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzotta, D.W.; Chyu, M.K.; Alvin, M.A.

    2007-05-01

    Hydrogen or coal-derivative syngas turbines promise increased efficiency with exceptionally low NOx emissions compared to the natural gas based turbines. To reach this goal, turbine inlet temperature (TIT) will need to be elevated to a level exceeding 1700°C [1, 2]. The thermal load induced by such a temperature increase alone will lead to immense challenges in maintaining material integrity of turbine components. In addition, as working fluid in the gas path will primarily be steam, possibly mixed with carbon oxides, the aero-thermal characteristic in a hydrogen turbine is expected to be far different from that of air/nitrogen enriched gas stream in a gas turbine. For instance, steam has distinctly higher density and specific heat in comparison to a mixture of air and combustion gases as they are expanded in a conventional gas turbine. Even if the temperature limits remain about the same, the expansion in a hydrogen turbine will have to proceed with a greater enthalpy drop and therefore requires a larger number of stages. This also implies that the flow areas may need to be expanded and blade span to be enlarged. Meanwhile, a greater number of stages and hot surfaces need to be protected. This also suggests that current cooling technology available for modern day gas turbines has to be significantly improved. The ultimate goal of the present study is to systematically investigate critical issues concerning cooling technology as it is applicable to oxy-fuel and hydrogen turbine systems, and the main scope is to develop viable means to estimate the thermal load on the turbine “gas side”, that is eventually to be removed from the “coolant side”, and to comparatively quantify the implication of external heat load and potential thermal barrier coating (TBC) degradation on the component durability and lifing. The analysis is based on two well-tested commercial codes, FLUENT and ANSYS.

  3. Hydrogen Bonding Networks Tune Proton-Coupled Redox Steps during the Enzymatic Six-Electron Conversion of Nitrite to Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multielectron multiproton reactions play an important role in both biological systems and chemical reactions involved in energy storage and manipulation. A key strategy employed by nature in achieving such complex chemistry is the use of proton-coupled redox steps. Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) catalyzes the six-electron seven-proton reduction of nitrite to ammonia. While a catalytic mechanism for ccNiR has been proposed on the basis of studies combining computation and crystallography, there have been few studies directly addressing the nature of the proton-coupled events that are predicted to occur along the nitrite reduction pathway. Here we use protein film voltammetry to directly interrogate the proton-coupled steps that occur during nitrite reduction by ccNiR. We find that conversion of nitrite to ammonia by ccNiR adsorbed to graphite electrodes is defined by two distinct phases; one is proton-coupled, and the other is not. Mutation of key active site residues (H257, R103, and Y206) modulates these phases and specifically alters the properties of the detected proton-dependent step but does not inhibit the ability of ccNiR to conduct the full reduction of nitrite to ammonia. We conclude that the active site residues examined are responsible for tuning the protonation steps that occur during catalysis, likely through an extensive hydrogen bonding network, but are not necessarily required for the reaction to proceed. These results provide important insight into how enzymes can specifically tune proton- and electron transfer steps to achieve high turnover numbers in a physiological pH range. PMID:25137350

  4. Application of iridium(III) complex in label-free and non-enzymatic electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide based on a novel “on-off-on” switch platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xiangmin; Yang, Chao; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2016-05-01

    We herein report a label-free and non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor for the highly sensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based on a novel “on-off-on” switch system. In our design, MB was used as an electron mediator to accelerate the electron transfer while AuNPs was used to amplify the electrochemical signal due to its excellent biocompatibility and good conductivity. The “switch-off” state was achieved by introducing the guanine-rich capture probe (CP) and an iridium complex onto the electrode surface to form a hydrophobic layer, which then hinders electron transfer. Upon addition of H2O2, fenton reaction occurs and produces OH• in the presence of Fe2+. The OH• cleaves the CP into DNA fragments, thus resulting in the release of CP and iridium complex from the sensing interface, recovering the electrochemical signal to generate a “switch-on” state. Based on this novel switch system, a detection limit as low as 3.2 pM can be achieved for H2O2 detection. Moreover, satisfactory results were obtained by using this method for the detection of H2O2 in sterilized milk. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first G-quadruplex-based electrochemical sensor using an iridium(III) complex.

  5. Application of iridium(III) complex in label-free and non-enzymatic electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide based on a novel "on-off-on" switch platform.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiangmin; Yang, Chao; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a label-free and non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor for the highly sensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based on a novel "on-off-on" switch system. In our design, MB was used as an electron mediator to accelerate the electron transfer while AuNPs was used to amplify the electrochemical signal due to its excellent biocompatibility and good conductivity. The "switch-off" state was achieved by introducing the guanine-rich capture probe (CP) and an iridium complex onto the electrode surface to form a hydrophobic layer, which then hinders electron transfer. Upon addition of H2O2, fenton reaction occurs and produces OH• in the presence of Fe(2+). The OH• cleaves the CP into DNA fragments, thus resulting in the release of CP and iridium complex from the sensing interface, recovering the electrochemical signal to generate a "switch-on" state. Based on this novel switch system, a detection limit as low as 3.2 pM can be achieved for H2O2 detection. Moreover, satisfactory results were obtained by using this method for the detection of H2O2 in sterilized milk. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first G-quadruplex-based electrochemical sensor using an iridium(III) complex. PMID:27170211

  6. Application of iridium(III) complex in label-free and non-enzymatic electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide based on a novel “on-off-on” switch platform

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xiangmin; Yang, Chao; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a label-free and non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor for the highly sensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based on a novel “on-off-on” switch system. In our design, MB was used as an electron mediator to accelerate the electron transfer while AuNPs was used to amplify the electrochemical signal due to its excellent biocompatibility and good conductivity. The “switch-off” state was achieved by introducing the guanine-rich capture probe (CP) and an iridium complex onto the electrode surface to form a hydrophobic layer, which then hinders electron transfer. Upon addition of H2O2, fenton reaction occurs and produces OH• in the presence of Fe2+. The OH• cleaves the CP into DNA fragments, thus resulting in the release of CP and iridium complex from the sensing interface, recovering the electrochemical signal to generate a “switch-on” state. Based on this novel switch system, a detection limit as low as 3.2 pM can be achieved for H2O2 detection. Moreover, satisfactory results were obtained by using this method for the detection of H2O2 in sterilized milk. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first G-quadruplex-based electrochemical sensor using an iridium(III) complex. PMID:27170211

  7. Muon transfer from muonic atoms of hydrogen isotopes to He nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bystritskii, V.M.

    1995-05-01

    The entire body of experimental results on muon transfer from {mu} atoms of hydrogen isotopes to helium nuclei is discussed and subjected to comparative analysis. A program of further investigations aimed at obtaining more precise and detailed information about the characteristics of {mu}-atomic and {mu}-molecular processes in mixtures of hydrogen isotopes and helium is proposed. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Palladium-catalyzed one pot 2-arylquinazoline formation via hydrogen-transfer strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huamin; Chen, Hui; Chen, Ya; Deng, Guo-Jun

    2014-10-21

    The palladium catalytic system was first applied to 2-arylquinazoline synthesis via hydrogen transfer methodology. Various (E)-2-nitrobenzaldehyde O-methyl oximes reacted easily with alcohols or benzyl amines to provide N-heterocyclic compounds in good to high yields. Similarly, the heterocyclic products could be prepared by the reaction of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethanone, urea and benzyl alcohols. In these reactions, the nitro group was reduced in situ by hydrogen generated from the alcohol dehydrogenation step. PMID:25156121

  9. High-accuracy global time and frequency transfer with a space-borne hydrogen maser clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decher, R.; Allan, D. W.; Alley, C. O.; Baugher, C.; Duncan, B. J.; Vessot, R. F. C.; Winkler, G. M. R.

    1983-01-01

    A proposed system for high-accuracy global time and frequency transfer using a hydrogen maser clock in a space vehicle is discussed. Direct frequency transfer with a accuracy of 10 to the minus 14th power and time transfer with an estimated accuracy of 1 nsec are provided by a 3-link microwave system. A short pulse laser system is included for subnanosecond time transfer and system calibration. The results of studies including operational aspects, error sources, data flow, system configuration, and implementation requirements for an initial demonstration experiment using the Space Shuttle are discussed.

  10. Role of iron-based catalyst and hydrogen transfer in direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xian Li; Shuxun Hu; Lijun Jin; Haoquan Hu

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this research is to understand the major function of iron-based catalysts on direct coal liquefaction (DCL). Pyrolysis and direct liquefaction of Shenhua bituminous coal were carried out to investigate the effect of three solvents (wash-oil from coal-tar, cycle-oil from coal liquefaction, and tetralin) in a N{sub 2} or a H{sub 2} atmosphere and with or without catalyst. The hydrogen content in the solvent and liquid product and the H{sub 2} consumption for every run were calculated to understand the hydrogen transfer approach in DCL. The results showed that the iron-based catalyst promotes the coal pyrolysis, and the dominating function of the catalyst in DCL is to promote the formation of activated hydrogen and to accelerate the secondary distribution of H in the reaction system including the gas, liquid, and solid phases. The major transfer approach of the activated hydrogen is from molecular hydrogen to solvent and then from solvent to coal, and the solvent takes on the role of a 'bridge' in the hydrogen transfer approach. 31 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. An Updated Synthesis of the Diazo-Transfer Reagent Imidazole-1-sulfonyl Azide Hydrogen Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Potter, Garrett T; Jayson, Gordon C; Miller, Gavin J; Gardiner, John M

    2016-04-15

    Imidazole-1-sulfonyl azide and salts thereof are valuable reagents for diazo-transfer reactions, most particularly conversion of primary amines to azides. The parent reagent and its HCl salt present stability and detonation risks, but the hydrogen sulfate salt is significantly more stable. An updated procedure for the large-scale synthesis of this salt avoids isolation or concentration of the parent compound or HCl salt and will facilitate the use of hydrogen sulfate salt as the reagent of choice for diazo transfer. PMID:26998999

  12. Formation of C-C bonds via ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation().

    PubMed

    Moran, Joseph; Krische, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of diverse π-unsaturated reactants in the presence of aldehydes provides products of carbonyl addition. Dehydrogenation of primary alcohols in the presence of the same π-unsaturated reactants provides identical products of carbonyl addition. In this way, carbonyl addition is achieved from the alcohol or aldehyde oxidation level in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents or metallic reductants. In this account, the discovery of ruthenium-catalyzed C-C bond-forming transfer hydrogenations and the recent development of diastereo- and enantioselective variants are discussed. PMID:23430602

  13. Formation of C–C bonds via ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation*

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Joseph; Krische, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of diverse π-unsaturated reactants in the presence of aldehydes provides products of carbonyl addition. Dehydrogenation of primary alcohols in the presence of the same π-unsaturated reactants provides identical products of carbonyl addition. In this way, carbonyl addition is achieved from the alcohol or aldehyde oxidation level in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents or metallic reductants. In this account, the discovery of ruthenium-catalyzed C–C bond-forming transfer hydrogenations and the recent development of diastereo- and enantioselective variants are discussed. PMID:23430602

  14. Direct growth of MnOOH nanorod arrays on a carbon cloth for high-performance non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weina; Liu, Jianlin; Wang, Mingjun; Chen, Lin; Wang, Xue; Hu, Chenguo

    2016-03-24

    Novel MnOOH nanorod arrays directly growing on a flexible carbon cloth substrate (MnOOH/CC) is first synthesized through a facile hydrothermal technique and utilized as an electrocatalyst for non-enzymatic detection of hydrogen peroxide. The as-prepared MnOOH nanorods are uniformly distributed on the carbon cloth with a 3D porous network structure, which provides a high specific surface area and numerous electroactive sites. The electrode based on the carbon cloth-supported MnOOH nanorod arrays exhibits a higher sensitivity (692.42 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)) and a wider linear range (20 μm-9.67 mM) with a detection limit of 3.2 μM (S/N = 3) compared with the electrode based on the rigid graphite substrate supported the random distributed MnOOH nanorods. Further, the MnOOH/CC possesses an outstanding flexibility and can conveniently be assembled into the required shape for a specific use, thus the arc-shaped MnOOH/CC electrodes are fabricated whose electrocatalytic activity toward the hydrogen peroxide reduction remains nearly unchanged in comparison with the unbent state. Due to its excellent sensitivity, reproducibility, anti-interference and stability, the electrode based on the carbon cloth-supported MnOOH nanorod arrays is believed to be promising for applications in high efficiency flexible hydrogen peroxide sensing. PMID:26944997

  15. In situ plasma sputtering synthesis of ZnO nanorods-Ag nanoparticles hybrids and their application in non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yuxia; Yang, Chi; Ge, Cunwang; Wang, Yuanhong; Wang, Hao; Liu, Hongying

    2015-08-21

    In this paper, ZnO nanorods-Ag nanoparticles hybrids were first synthesized via a facile, rapid, and in situ plasma sputtering method without using any silver precursor. The obtained materials were then characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Based on the electrochemical catalytic properties of the obtained nanohybrids, a non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide biosensor was constructed by immobilizing the obtained ZnO nanorods-Ag nanoparticles hybrids on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. Under optimal conditions, the resulting biosensor displayed a good response for H2O2 with a linear range of 0.2 to 12.8 mM, and a detection limit of 7.8 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. In addition, it exhibited excellent anti-interference ability and fast response. The current work provides a feasible platform to fabricate a variety of non-enzymatic biosensors. PMID:26225726

  16. In situ plasma sputtering synthesis of ZnO nanorods-Ag nanoparticles hybrids and their application in non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yuxia; Yang, Chi; Ge, Cunwang; Wang, Yuanhong; Wang, Hao; Liu, Hongying

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, ZnO nanorods-Ag nanoparticles hybrids were first synthesized via a facile, rapid, and in situ plasma sputtering method without using any silver precursor. The obtained materials were then characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Based on the electrochemical catalytic properties of the obtained nanohybrids, a non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide biosensor was constructed by immobilizing the obtained ZnO nanorods-Ag nanoparticles hybrids on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. Under optimal conditions, the resulting biosensor displayed a good response for H2O2 with a linear range of 0.2 to 12.8 mM, and a detection limit of 7.8 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. In addition, it exhibited excellent anti-interference ability and fast response. The current work provides a feasible platform to fabricate a variety of non-enzymatic biosensors.

  17. Variation of geometries and electron properties along proton transfer in strong hydrogen-bond complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacios, L. F.; Gálvez, O.; Gómez, P. C.

    2005-06-01

    Proton transfer in hydrogen-bond systems formed by 4-methylimidazole in both neutral and protonated cationic forms and by acetate anion are studied by means of MP2/6-311++G(d,p) ab initio calculations. These two complexes model the histidine (neutral and protonated)-aspartate diad present in the active sites of enzymes the catalytic mechanism of which involves the formation of strong hydrogen bonds. We investigate the evolution of geometries, natural bond orbital populations of bonds and electron lone pairs, topological descriptors of the electron density, and spatial distributions of the electron localization function along the process N-H ⋯O→N⋯H⋯O→N⋯H-O, which represents the stages of the H-transfer. Except for a sudden change in the population of electron lone pairs in N and O at the middle N...H...O stage, all the properties analyzed show a smooth continuous behavior along the covalent → hydrogen bond transit inherent to the transfer, without any discontinuity that could identify a formation or breaking of the hydrogen bond. This way, the distinction between covalent or hydrogen-bonding features is associated to subtle electron rearrangement at the intermolecular space.

  18. Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for excitation-induced hydrogen dissociation on hydrogenated graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Junhyeok; Meng, Sheng; Sun, Yi-Yang; West, Damien; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Shengbai

    2013-01-15

    Understanding and controlling of excited carrier dynamics is of fundamental and practical importance, particularly in photochemistry and solar energy applications. However, theory of energy relaxation of excited carriers is still in its early stage. Here, using ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) coupled with time-dependent density functional theory, we show a coverage-dependent energy transfer of photoexcited carriers in hydrogenated graphene, giving rise to distinctively different ion dynamics. Graphene with sparsely populated H is difficult to dissociate due to inefficient transfer of the excitation energy into kinetic energy of the H. In contrast, H can easily desorb from fully hydrogenated graphane. The key is to bring down the H antibonding state to the conduction band minimum as the band gap increases. These results can be contrasted to those of standard ground-state MD which predicts H in the sparse case should be much less stable than that in fully hydrogenated graphane. Our findings thus signify the importance of carrying out explicit electronic dynamics in excited-state simulations.

  19. Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for excitation-induced hydrogen dissociation on hydrogenated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Junhyeok; Meng, Sheng; Sun, Yi-Yang; West, Damien; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Zhang, S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding and controlling of excited carrier dynamics is of fundamental and practical importance, particularly in photochemistry and solar energy applications. However, theory of energy relaxation of excited carriers is still in its early stage. Here, using ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) coupled with time-dependent density functional theory, we show a coverage-dependent energy transfer of photoexcited carriers in hydrogenated graphene, giving rise to distinctively different ion dynamics. Graphene with sparsely populated H is difficult to dissociate due to inefficient transfer of the excitation energy into kinetic energy of the H. In contrast, H can easily desorb from fully hydrogenated graphane. The key is to bring down the H antibonding state to the conduction band minimum as the band gap increases. These results can be contrasted to those of standard ground-state MD that predict H in the sparse case should be much less stable than that in fully hydrogenated graphane. Our findings thus signify the importance of carrying out explicit electronic dynamics in excited-state simulations. PMID:23277576

  20. Laboratory Measurements of Charge Transfer on Atomic Hydrogen at Thermal Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havener, C. C.; Vane, C. R.; Krause, H. F.; Stancil, P. C.; Mroczkowski, T.; Savin, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    We describe our ongoing program to measure velocity dependent charge transfer (CT) cross sections for selected ions on atomic hydrogen using the ion-aloin merged-beams apparatus at Oak Ridge Natioiial Laboralory. Our focus is on those ions for which CT plays an important role in determining the ionization structure, line emis sion, and thermal structure of observed cosmic photoionized plasmas.

  1. Magnetic Silica-Supported Ruthenium Nanoparticles: An Efficient Catalyst for Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium nano particles immobilization; the hydration of nitriles and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds occurs in hi...

  2. Energy Transfer with Hydrogen and Superconductivity - The Review of the First Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysotsky, V. S.; Antyukhov, I. V.; Firsov, V. P.; Blagov, E. V.; Kostyuk, V. V.; Nosov, A. A.; Fetisov, S. S.; Zanegin, S. Yu.; Rachuk, V. S.; Katorgin, B. I.

    The transfer of massive amounts of both electrical and chemical power over long distances will present a major challenge for the global energy enterprise in future. Attraction of hydrogen is apparent as a chemical energy agent, possessing among the highest energy density content of various common fuels, whose combustive "waste" is simply water. The usage of "gratis" cold to cool a superconducting cable made of proper superconductor permits to deliver extra electrical power with the same line. This, rather old theoretical idea recently found its experimental realization. The team of Russian institutes and organizations with using Italian-produced MgB2 wire has made and successfully tested two hybrid energy transfer lines with liquid hydrogen as a chemical source of power and superconducting cable as a source of electricity. The first line has been tested in 2011. It has length ∼10 m, maximum liquid hydrogen flow ∼250 g/s and maximum current of MgB2 superconducting cable 2600 A @ 20K. This test was the first experimental proof of conception of the hybrid energy transfer line. The second line has been tested in October 2013. It has length ∼30 m. The new MgB2 cable has critical current at 21 K ∼3500 A and successfully passed high voltage DC test of 50 kV. New hydrogen cryostat has three sections with different types of thermal insulation in each section. The idea of hybrid energy transfer is formulated and details of first experiments are reviewed.

  3. RANEY® Ni catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of levulinate esters to γ-valerolactone at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Huang, Yao-Bing; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2013-06-11

    A catalytic transfer hydrogenation process was developed for the production of γ-valerolactone (GVL) from ethyl levulinate (EL) and a H-donor at room temperature. Ethyl levulinate was almost quantitatively converted to γ-valerolactone. Further, a two step process for producing GVL from biomass derived platform molecules was also reported. PMID:23648801

  4. A 10,000-gpm liquid hydrogen transfer system for the Saturn/Apollo program.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wybranowski, E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Brief description of the design and operation of the liquid hydrogen transfer system used to service the Saturn V launch vehicle. The cryogenic loading of the huge booster begins eight hours before the scheduled liftoff. The first three hours of fueling are spent in cold hydrogen gas conditioning of the fuel tank. The cold hydrogen gas is provided by vaporizing liquid hydrogen from the storage tank and routing the resultant gas through the fill system. Boil-off losses after loading are continuously replaced through control valves which are driven by a computer system. The liquid hydrogen transfer system is made up of a number of subsystems including the 850,000 gal storage tank whose boil-off losses amount to only 200 gal/day, the pressurization system, the burn pond for controlled disposal of hydrogen waste gas, the storage tank fill manifold, and the hazardous gas monitoring system. Some of the subsystems and components are redundant to provide a high degree of reliability.

  5. A search for the radical hydrogen transfer pathway in coal hydroliquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Autrey, T.; Franz, J.

    1990-04-01

    It is generally accepted that the formation of petroleum liquids produced in the thermal liquefaction of coal can not be completely explained by simple homolytic cleavage of strong linkages in coal structures. Model compound studies have been employed to elucidate the mechanisms of scission of strong bonds in coal structures and have provided useful information for increasing the efficiency of the coal liquefaction processes. Radical Hydrogen Transfer (RHT), the transfer of a hydrogen atom from a solvent-derived cyclohexadienyl substituted radical to the ipso position of an aryl-alkyl linkage, has been proposed as an important pathway for the cleavage of strong bonds in coal structures during coal liquefaction. Elegant numerical modeling studies of the scission of diarylmethane model compounds in the presence of a variety of solvent molecules demonstrated that an alternative mechanism for the scission of the strong bonds in these model compounds may be operative that involves cyclohexadienyl-derived solvent molecules rather than free hydrogen atoms.

  6. Construction of the isocopalane skeleton: application of a desulfinylative 1,7-hydrogen atom transfer strategy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiong; Xu, ZhongYu; Zeng, Qian-Ding; Chen, Xi-Bo; Ji, Wen-Hao; Han, Ying; Wu, PeiYing; Ren, Jiangmeng; Zeng, Bu-Bing

    2015-06-01

    Two attractive chirons, aldehyde 6 and chloride 7, exhibiting functionalized ent-spongiane-type tricyclic skeletons (ABC ring system), have been constructed and their absolute configurations have been studied by NMR spectroscopy and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Both of these chirons are derived from commercially available andrographolide in good yield. Aldehyde 6 is obtained through a novel K2 S2 O8 -catalyzed aquatic ring-closing reaction of allylic sodium sulfonate and intramolecular 1,7-hydrogen atom transfer process. Further mechanistic investigations demonstrate that the 1,7-hydrogen atom transfer is a free-radical process, whereby hydrogen migrates from C18 to C17, as evidenced by double-18- deuterium-labeled isotope experiments. Prospective applications of these two chiral sources are also discussed. PMID:25907201

  7. Hydrogen isotope transfer in austenitic steels and high-nickel alloy during in-core irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Polosukhin, B.G.; Sulimov, E.M.; Zyrianov, A.P.; Kalinin, G.M.

    1995-10-01

    The transfer of protium and deuterium in austenitic chromium-nickel steels and in a high-nickel alloy was studied in a specially designed facility. The transfer parameters of protium and deuterium were found to change greatly during in-core irradiation, and the effects of irradiation increased as the temperature decreased. Thus, at temperature T<673K, the relative increase in the permeability of hydrogen isotopes under irradiation can be orders of magnitude higher in these steels. Other radiation effects were also observed, in addition to the changes from the initial values in the effects of protium and deuterium isotopic transfer. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Bimetallic promotion of cooperative hydrogen transfer and heteroatom removal in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Eisch, J.J.

    1992-04-07

    The ultimate objective of this research has been to uncover novel reagents and experimental conditions for heteroatom removal and hydrogen transfer processes, which would be applicable to the liquefaction of coal under low-severity conditions. To this end, one phase of this research has investigated the cleavage of carbon-heteroatom bonds involving sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen and halogen by subvalent transition-metal complexes. A second phase of the study has assessed the capability of the same transition-metal complexes or of organoaluminum Lewis acids to catalyze the cleavage of carbon-hydrogen bonds in aromatics and hence to promote hydrogen shuttling. Finally, a third phase of our work has uncovered a remarkable synergistic effect of combinations of transition metals with organoaluminum Lewis acids on hydrogen shuttling between aromatics and hydroaromatics. (VC)

  9. Heat transfer analysis of metal hydrides in metal-hydrogen secondary batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.; Dharia, D.; Gidaspow, D.

    1976-01-01

    The heat transfer between a metal-hydrogen secondary battery and a hydrogen-storing metal hydride was studied. Temperature profiles of the endothermic metal hydrides and the metal-hydrogen battery were obtained during discharging of the batteries assuming an adiabatic system. Two hydride materials were considered in two physical arrangements within the battery system. In one case the hydride is positioned in a thin annular region about the battery stack; in the other the hydride is held in a tube down the center of the stack. The results show that for a typical 20 ampere-hour battery system with lanthanum pentanickel hydride as the hydrogen reservoir the system could perform successfully.

  10. Note: Charge transfer in a hydrated peptide group is determined mainly by its intrinsic hydrogen-bond energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkin, Noemi G.; Krimm, Samuel

    2014-01-28

    Charge transfer in a hydrogen-bonded N-methylacetamide(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} system is obtained from ωB97X-D/6-31++G** and CHelpG atomic charge calculations of individual peptide-water interactions as well as that of the entire complex. In the latter, the electron transfer to water is 0.19 e, influenced primarily by the hydrogen bonds to the C=O group. The values of such charge transfer are paralleled by the corresponding intrinsic hydrogen-bond energies. These results support the desirability of incorporating charge transfer in molecular mechanics energy functions.

  11. Direct hybrid glucose-oxygen enzymatic fuel cell based on tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane charge transfer complex as anodic mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Ivan; Vidaković-Koch, Tanja; Sundmacher, Kai

    TTF-TCNQ has been used for the first time as a mediator in a direct glucose fuel cell operating on gas-phase oxygen. It has been shown that TTF-TCNQ forms highly irregular porous structure, which emphasizes the importance of optimization of mass transport and kinetic resistance in the catalyst layer. Kinetics resistance can be optimized by variation of the mediator and/or enzyme loading, while mass transport resistance mainly by the variation of other structural parameters such as electrode thickness. The optimized anode reached limiting current densities of nearly 400 μA cm -2 in presence of 5 mM glucose under rotation. The enzymatic fuel cell exhibited unexpectedly high OCV values (up to 0.99 V), which were tentatively ascribed to different pH conditions at the anode and the cathode. OCV was influenced by glucose crossover and was decreasing with an increase of glucose concentration or flow rate. Although the performance of the fuel cell is limited by the enzymatic anode, the long-term stability of the fuel cell is mainly influenced by the Pt cathode, while the enzymatic anode has higher stability. The fuel cell delivered power densities up to 120 μW cm -2 in presence of 5 mM glucose, depending on the glucose flow rate.

  12. Synthetic and mechanistic studies of metal-free transfer hydrogenations applying polarized olefins as hydrogen acceptors and amine borane adducts as hydrogen donors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xianghua; Fox, Thomas; Berke, Heinz

    2012-01-28

    Metal-free transfer hydrogenation of polarized olefins (RR'C=CEE': R, R' = H or organyl, E, E' = CN or CO(2)Me) using amine borane adducts RR'NH-BH(3) (R = R' = H, AB; R = Me, R' = H, MAB; R = (t)Bu, R' = H, tBAB; R = R' = Me, DMAB) as hydrogen donors, were studied by means of in situ NMR spectroscopy. Deuterium kinetic isotope effects and the traced hydroboration intermediate revealed that the double H transfer process occurred regio-specifically in two steps with hydride before proton transfer characteristics. Studies on substituent effects and Hammett correlation indicated that the rate determining step of the H(N) transfer is in agreement with a concerted transition state. The very reactive intermediate [NH(2)=BH(2)] generated from AB was trapped by addition of cyclohexene into the reaction mixture forming Cy(2)BNH(2). The final product borazine (BHNH)(3) is assumed to be formed by dehydrocoupling of [NH(2)=BH(2)] or its solvent stabilized derivative [NH(2)=BH(2)]-(solvent), rather than by dehydrogenation of cyclotriborazane (BH(2)NH(2))(3) which is the trimerization product of [NH(2)=BH(2)]. PMID:22124505

  13. Microwave Study of a Hydrogen-Transfer Methyl-Group Internal Rotation in 5-METHYLTROPOLONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyushin, Vadim V.; Cloessner, Emily A.; Chou, Yung-Ching; Picraux, Laura B.; Hougen, Jon T.; Lavrich, Richard

    2010-06-01

    We present here the first experimental and theoretical study of the microwave spectrum of 5-methyltropolone, which can be visualized as a 7-membered "aromatic" carbon ring with a five-membered hydrogen-bonded cyclic structure at the top and a methyl group at the bottom. The molecule exhibits two large-amplitude motions, an intramolecular hydrogen transfer and a methyl torsion. The former motion is particularly interesting because transfer of the hydrogen atom from the hydroxyl to the carbonyl group induces a tautomerization in the molecule, which then triggers a 60° internal rotation of the methyl group. Measurements were carried out by Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy in the 8 to 24 GHz frequency range. Theoretical analysis was carried out using a tunneling-rotational Hamiltonian based on a G12^m extended-group-theory formalism. Our global fit of 1015 transitions to 20 molecular parameters gave a root-mean-square deviation of 1.5 kHz. The tunneling splitting of the two J = 0 levels arising from a hypothetical pure hydrogen transfer motion is calculated to be 1310 MHz. The tunneling splitting of the two J = 0 levels arising from a hypothetical pure methyl-top internal rotation motion is calculated to be 885 MHz. Some theoretical difficulties in interpreting the low-order tunneling parameters in this and the related molecule 2-methylmalonaldehyde will be discussed.

  14. Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility: Initial hydrogen and nitrogen no-vent fill data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Nyland, Ted W.; Papell, S. Stephen

    1990-01-01

    The Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility is a versatile testbed for ground-based cryogenic fluid storage, handling, and transfer experimentation. The test rig contains two well instrumented tanks, and a third interchangeable tank, designed to accommodate liquid nitrogen or liquid hydrogen testing. The internal tank volumes are approx. 18, 5, and 1.2 cu. ft. Tank pressures can be varied from 2 to 30 psia. Preliminary no vent fill tests with nitrogen and hydrogen were successfully completed with the test rig. Initial results indicate that no vent fills of nitrogen above 90 percent full are achievable using this test configuration, in a 1-g environment, and with inlet liquid temperatures as high as 143 R, and an average tank wall temperature of nearly 300 R. This inlet temperature corresponds to a saturation pressure of 19 psia for nitrogen. Hydrogen proved considerably more difficult to transfer between tanks without venting. The highest temperature conditions resulting in a fill level greater than 90 percent were with an inlet liquid temperature of 34 R, and an estimated tank wall temperature of slightly more than 100 R. Saturation pressure for hydrogen at this inlet temperature is 10 psia. All preliminary no vent fill tests were performed with a top mounted full cone nozzle for liquid injection. The nozzle produces a 120 degree conical droplet spray at a differential pressure of 10 psi. Pressure in the receiving tank was held to less than 30 psia for all tests.

  15. Facile fabrication of Pt-Ag bimetallic nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide for highly sensitive non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Yanyan; Du, Xin; Chen, Yuan; Dong, Wenhao; Han, Bingkai; Chen, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    A new electrocatalyst, Pt-Ag bimetallic nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite, was successfully synthesized by a facile, eco-friendly and controllable route. The morphological characterization of RGO/Pt-Ag NPs nanocomposite was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyzer, X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum, and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR), respectively. And then, the RGO/Pt-Ag NPs nanocomposite was immobilized on the surface of glassy carbon (GC) electrode to fabricate a novel and highly sensitive non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor. The electrochemical behaviors of the prepared sensor were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The sensor showed excellent performance toward H2O2 with sensitivity as high as 699.6 μA mM(-1)cm(-2) and 402.7 μA mM(-1)cm(-2), wide linear range of 0.005-1.5mM and 1.5-7mM, and low detection limit of 0.04μM (S/N=3). Moreover, the prepared hydrogen peroxide sensor was applied to in real samples with satisfactory results. These excellent results indicate that the prepared RGO/Pt-Ag NPs nanocomposite has broad application prospect in the field of sensors. PMID:27474309

  16. Inner reorganization limiting electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding: intra- vs. intermolecular effects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Eduardo; Frontana, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    In this work, experimental evidence of the influence of the electron transfer kinetics during electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding between anion radicals of metronidazole and ornidazole, derivatives of 5-nitro-imidazole, and 1,3-diethylurea as the hydrogen bond donor, is presented. Analysis of the variations of voltammetric EpIcvs. log KB[DH], where KB is the binding constant, allowed us to determine the values of the binding constant and also the electron transfer rate k, confirmed by experiments obtained at different scan rates. Electronic structure calculations at the BHandHLYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level for metronidazole, including the solvent effect by the Cramer/Truhlar model, suggested that the minimum energy conformer is stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In this structure, the inner reorganization energy, λi,j, contributes significantly (0.5 eV) to the total reorganization energy of electron transfer, thus leading to a diminishment of the experimental k. PMID:24653999

  17. Hydrogen evolution from water by use of viologen polymers as electron transfer catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ageishi, K.; Endo, T.; Okawara, M.

    1981-05-01

    The behavior of viologen polymer (P-V/sup 2 +/) as an electron transfer catalyst in the reaction of hydrogen generation was studied. In the photoirradiation system, which contains triethanolamine (TEA), Ru(bpy)/sub 3//sup 3 +/, and P-V/sup 2 +/, the amount of hydrogen evolution was less than methyl viologen (MV/sup 2 +/); P-V/sup 2 +/, however, was more effective in sodium dithionite as the electron donor and showed higher initial rates than MV/sup 2 +/. 3 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Phosphothreonine as a catalytic residue in peptide-mediated asymmetric transfer hydrogenations of 8-aminoquinolines.

    PubMed

    Shugrue, Christopher R; Miller, Scott J

    2015-09-14

    Phosphothreonine (pThr) was found to constitute a new class of chiral phosphoric acid (CPA) catalyst upon insertion into peptides. To demonstrate the potential of these phosphopeptides as asymmetric catalysts, enantioselective transfer hydrogenations of a previously underexplored substrate class for CPA-catalyzed reductions were carried out. pThr-containing peptides lead to the observation of enantioselectivities of up to 94:6 e.r. with 2-substituted quinolines containing C8-amino functionality. NMR studies indicate that hydrogen-bonding interactions promote strong complexation between substrates and a rigid β-turn catalyst. PMID:26246129

  19. TD-DFT study on electron transfer mobility and intramolecular hydrogen bond of substituted indigo derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chi; Li, Hui; Yang, Yonggang; Li, Donglin; Liu, Yufang

    2015-10-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method were carried out to investigate the ground and excited states of indigo and its derivative molecules. The results demonstrate that the intramolecular hydrogen bond I is weakened and the intramolecular hydrogen bond II is strengthened upon photo-excitation to the S1 state. In the absorption spectra, the substitution at R4R4, of indigo causes a significant redshift. In addition, the halogen substitution obviously increases the electron transfer mobility of indigo. It is proved that the halogen substitution may be a new method to design high performance organic semiconductors.

  20. Formation of Ruthenium Carbenes by gem‐Hydrogen Transfer to Internal Alkynes: Implications for Alkyne trans‐Hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Leutzsch, Markus; Wolf, Larry M.; Gupta, Puneet; Fuchs, Michael; Thiel, Walter; Farès, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Insights into the mechanism of the unusual trans‐hydrogenation of internal alkynes catalyzed by {Cp*Ru} complexes were gained by para‐hydrogen (p‐H2) induced polarization (PHIP) transfer NMR spectroscopy. It was found that the productive trans‐reduction competes with a pathway in which both H atoms of H2 are delivered to a single alkyne C atom of the substrate while the second alkyne C atom is converted into a metal carbene. This “geminal hydrogenation” mode seems unprecedented; it was independently confirmed by the isolation and structural characterization of a ruthenium carbene complex stabilized by secondary inter‐ligand interactions. A detailed DFT study shows that the trans alkene and the carbene complex originate from a common metallacyclopropene intermediate. Furthermore, the computational analysis and the PHIP NMR data concur in that the metal carbene is the major gateway to olefin isomerization and over‐reduction, which frequently interfere with regular alkyne trans‐hydrogenation. PMID:27478268

  1. Formation of Ruthenium Carbenes by gem-Hydrogen Transfer to Internal Alkynes: Implications for Alkyne trans-Hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Leutzsch, Markus; Wolf, Larry M; Gupta, Puneet; Fuchs, Michael; Thiel, Walter; Farès, Christophe; Fürstner, Alois

    2015-01-01

    Insights into the mechanism of the unusual trans-hydrogenation of internal alkynes catalyzed by {Cp*Ru} complexes were gained by para-hydrogen (p-H2) induced polarization (PHIP) transfer NMR spectroscopy. It was found that the productive trans-reduction competes with a pathway in which both H atoms of H2 are delivered to a single alkyne C atom of the substrate while the second alkyne C atom is converted into a metal carbene. This “geminal hydrogenation” mode seems unprecedented; it was independently confirmed by the isolation and structural characterization of a ruthenium carbene complex stabilized by secondary inter-ligand interactions. A detailed DFT study shows that the trans alkene and the carbene complex originate from a common metallacyclopropene intermediate. Furthermore, the computational analysis and the PHIP NMR data concur in that the metal carbene is the major gateway to olefin isomerization and over-reduction, which frequently interfere with regular alkyne trans-hydrogenation. PMID:26332643

  2. Resonant charge transfer of hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a metallic sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, J. A.; Softley, T. P.

    2016-06-01

    A wavepacket propagation study is reported for the charge transfer of low principal quantum number (n = 2) hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at an isolated metallic sphere. Such a sphere acts as a model for a nanoparticle. The three-dimensional confinement of the sphere yields discrete surface-localized ‘well-image’ states, the energies of which vary with sphere radius. When the Rydberg atom energy is degenerate with one of the quantized nanoparticle states, charge transfer is enhanced, whereas for off-resonant cases little to no charge transfer is observed. Greater variation in charge-transfer probability is seen between the resonant and off-resonant examples in this system than for any other Rydberg-surface system theoretically investigated thus far. The results presented here indicate that it may be possible to use Rydberg-surface ionization as a probe of the surface electronic structure of a nanoparticle, and nanostructures in general.

  3. Nickel phlorin intermediate formed by proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen evolution mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Brian H.; Maher, Andrew G.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Nocera, Daniel G.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The development of more effective energy conversion processes is critical for global energy sustainability. The design of molecular electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction is an important component of these efforts. Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer, play an important role in these processes and can be enhanced by incorporating proton relays into the molecular electrocatalysts. Herein nickel porphyrin electrocatalysts with and without an internal proton relay are investigated to elucidate the hydrogen evolution mechanisms and thereby enable the design of more effective catalysts. Density functional theory calculations indicate that electrochemical reduction leads to dearomatization of the porphyrin conjugated system, thereby favoring protonation at the meso carbon of the porphyrin ring to produce a phlorin intermediate. A key step in the proposed mechanisms is a thermodynamically favorable PCET reaction composed of intramolecular electron transfer from the nickel to the porphyrin and proton transfer from a carboxylic acid hanging group or an external acid to the meso carbon of the porphyrin. The C–H bond of the active phlorin acts similarly to the more traditional metal-hydride by reacting with acid to produce H2. Support for the theoretically predicted mechanism is provided by the agreement between simulated and experimental cyclic voltammograms in weak and strong acid and by the detection of a phlorin intermediate through spectroelectrochemical measurements. These results suggest that phlorin species have the potential to perform unique chemistry that could prove useful in designing more effective electrocatalysts. PMID:26655344

  4. Forced Convection Heat Transfer of Liquid Hydrogen Through a 200-mm Long Heated Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, Hideki; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Hata, Koichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Kinoshita, Katsuhiro

    The heat transfer from the inner side of a vertically- mounted heated tube with a length of 200.0 mm and a diameter of 6.0 mm to a forced flow of liquid hydrogen was measured for wide ranges of flow rate and liquid temperature. The non-boiling heat transfer coefficients agreed well with the Dittus -Boelter equation. The heat fluxes at departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) were higher for higher flow velocities and greater subcooling. The effect of the tube length on the DNB heat flux was clarified through comparison with our previous data. It was confirmed that the experimental data agreed well with the authors' DNB correlation.

  5. Non-catalytic transfer hydrogenation in supercritical CO2 for coal liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhussien, Hussien

    This thesis presents the results of the investigation on developing and evaluating a low temperature (<150°C) non - catalytic process using a hydrogen transfer agent (instead of molecu-lar hydrogen) for coal dissolution in supercritical CO2. The main idea behind the thesis was that one hydrogen atom from water and one hydrogen atom from the hydrogen transfer agent (HTA) were used to hydrogenate the coal. The products of coal dissolution were non-polar and polar while the supercritical CO2, which enhanced the rates of hydrogenation and dissolution of the non-polar molecules and removal from the reaction site, was non-polar. The polar modifier (PM) for CO2 was added to the freed to aid in the dissolution and removal of the polar components. The addition of a phase transfer agent (PTA) allowed a seamless transport of the ions and by-product between the aqueous and organic phases. DDAB, used as the PTA, is an effective phase transfer catalyst and showed enhancement to the coal dissolution process. COAL + DH- +H 2O → COAL.H2 + DHO-- This process has a great feature due to the fact that the chemicals were obtained without requir-ing to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The experiments were conducted in a unique reactor set up that can be connected through two lines. one line to feed the reactor with supercritical CO 2 and the other connected to gas chromatograph. The use of the supercritical CO2 enhanced the solvent option due to the chemical extraction, in addition to the low environmental impact and energy cost. In this thesis the experiment were conducted at five different temperatures from atmos-pheric to 140°C, 3000 - 6000 psi with five component of feed mixture, namely water, HTA, PTA, coal, and PM in semi batch vessels reactor system with a volume of 100 mL. The results show that the chemicals were obtained without requiring to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The results show that

  6. A diabatic state model for double proton transfer in hydrogen bonded complexes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Ross H.

    2014-09-14

    Four diabatic states are used to construct a simple model for double proton transfer in hydrogen bonded complexes. Key parameters in the model are the proton donor-acceptor separation R and the ratio, D{sub 1}/D{sub 2}, between the proton affinity of a donor with one and two protons. Depending on the values of these two parameters the model describes four qualitatively different ground state potential energy surfaces, having zero, one, two, or four saddle points. Only for the latter are there four stable tautomers. In the limit D{sub 2} = D{sub 1} the model reduces to two decoupled hydrogen bonds. As R decreases a transition can occur from a synchronous concerted to an asynchronous concerted to a sequential mechanism for double proton transfer.

  7. Non-enzymatic amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide in human blood serum samples using a modified silver nanowire electrode.

    PubMed

    Thirumalraj, Balamurugan; Zhao, Duo-Han; Chen, Shen-Ming; Palanisamy, Selvakumar

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, we report a highly sensitive amperometric H2O2 sensor based on silver nanowires (AgNWs) modified screen printed carbon electrode. The AgNWs were synthesized using polyol method. The synthesized AgNWs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The average diameter and length of the synthesized AgNWs were found as 86±5 and 385nm, respectively. Under optimum conditions, the AgNWs modified electrode shows a stable amperometric response for H2O2 and was linear over the concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 704.8μM. The non-enzymatic sensor showed a high sensitivity of 662.6μAmM(-1)cm(-2) with a detection limit of 29nM. The response time of the sensor was found as 2s. Furthermore, the AgNWs modified electrode exhibited a good recovery of H2O2 (94.3%) in the human blood serum samples. PMID:26939075

  8. Iron-Catalyzed Regioselective Transfer Hydrogenative Couplings of Unactivated Aldehydes with Simple Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Long; Liu, Yan-Yao; Wu, Yi-Mei; Wang, Yin-Xia; Lin, Yu-Tong; Ye, Mengchun

    2016-05-17

    An FeBr3 -catalyzed reductive coupling of various aldehydes with alkenes that proceeds through a direct hydride transfer pathway has been developed. With (i) PrOH as the hydrogen donor under mild conditions, previously challenging coupling reactions of unactivated alkyl and aryl aldehydes with simple alkenes, such as styrene derivatives and α-olefins, proceeded smoothly to furnish a diverse range of functionalized alcohols with complete linear regioselectivity. PMID:27072872

  9. Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Production by an Aluminum(III) Complex: Ligand-Based Proton and Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Emily J; Berben, Louise A

    2015-09-28

    Environmentally sustainable hydrogen-evolving electrocatalysts are key in a renewable fuel economy, and ligand-based proton and electron transfer could circumvent the need for precious metal ions in electrocatalytic H2 production. Herein, we show that electrocatalytic generation of H2 by a redox-active ligand complex of Al(3+) occurs at -1.16 V vs. SCE (500 mV overpotential). PMID:26249108

  10. Coordinating Chiral Ionic Liquids: Design, Synthesis, and Application in Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation under Aqueous Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vasiloiu, Maria; Gaertner, Peter; Zirbs, Ronald; Bica, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophilic coordinating chiral ionic liquids with an amino alcohol substructure were developed and efficiently applied to the asymmetric reduction of ketones. Their careful design and adaptability to the desired reaction conditions allow for these chiral ionic liquids to be used as the sole source of chirality in a ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation reaction of aromatic ketones. When used in this reaction system, these chiral ionic liquids afforded excellent yields and high enantioselectivities. PMID:26279638

  11. 2D-IR spectroscopy of hydrogen-bond-mediated vibrational excitation transfer.

    PubMed

    Chuntonov, Lev

    2016-05-18

    Vibrational excitation transfer along the hydrogen-bond-mediated pathways in the complex of methyl acetate (MA) and 4-cyanophenol (4CP) was studied by dual-frequency femtosecond two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. We excited the energy-donating ester carbonyl stretching vibrational mode and followed the transfer to the energy-accepting benzene ring and cyano stretching vibrations. The complexes with no, one, and two hydrogen-bonded 4CP molecules were studied. Vibrational relaxation of the carbonyl mode is more efficient in both hydrogen-bonded complexes as compared with free MA molecules. The inter-molecular transport in a hydrogen-bonded complex involving a single 4CP molecule is slower than that in a complex with two 4CP molecules. In the former, vibrational relaxation leads to local heating, as shown by the spectroscopy of the carbonyl mode, whereas the local heating is suppressed in the latter because the excitation redistribution is more efficient. At early times, the transfer to the benzene ring is governed by its direct coupling with the energy-donating carbonyl mode, whereas at later times intermediate states are involved. The transfer to a more distant site of the cyano group in 4CP involves intermediate states at all times, since no direct coupling between the energy-donating and accepting modes was observed. We anticipate that our findings will be of importance for spectroscopic studies of bio-molecular structures and dynamics, and inter- and intra-molecular signaling pathways, and for developing molecular networking applications. PMID:27145861

  12. Ionic hydrogenations of hindered olefins at low temperature. Hydride transfer reactions of transition metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, R.M.; Song, J.S. )

    1994-09-21

    Sterically hindered olefins can be hydrogenated at -50[degree]C in dichloromethane using triflic acid (CF[sub 3]SO[sub 3]H) and a hydride donor. Mechanistic studies indicate that these reactions proceed by hydride transfer to the carbenium ion that is formed by protonation of the olefin. Olefins that form tertiary carbenium ions upon protonation are hydrogenated in high yields (90-100%). Styrenes generally produce lower yields of hydrogenated products (50-60%). Suitable hydride donors include HSiE[sub 3] and several transition metal carbonyl hydrides HW(CO)[sub 3]Cp, HW(CO)[sub 3]Cp[sup +], HMo-(CO)[sub 3]Cp, HMn(CO)[sub 5], HRe(CO)[sub 3], and HO[sub 3](CO)[sub 1]Cp*; Cp = [eta][sup 5]-C[sub 3]H[sub 5+], Cp* = [eta][sup 5]-C[sub 5]Me[sub 5]. A characteristic that is required for transition metal hydrides to be effective is that the cationic dihydrides (or dihydrogen complexes) that result from their protonation must have sufficient acidity to transfer a proton to the olefin, as well as sufficient thermal stability to avoid significant decomposition on the time scale of the hydrogenation reaction. Metal hydrides that fall due to insufficient stability of their protonated forms include HMo(CO)[sub 2](PPH[sub 3])Cp, HMo(CO)[sub 3]Cp*, and HFe(CO)[sub 2]Cp*. 62 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Quantitative dissection of hydrogen bond-mediated proton transfer in the ketosteroid isomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sigala, Paul A.; Fafarman, Aaron T.; Schwans, Jason P.; Fried, Stephen D.; Fenn, Timothy D.; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Pybus, Brandon; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.; Boxer, Steven G.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen bond networks are key elements of protein structure and function but have been challenging to study within the complex protein environment. We have carried out in-depth interrogations of the proton transfer equilibrium within a hydrogen bond network formed to bound phenols in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase. We systematically varied the proton affinity of the phenol using differing electron-withdrawing substituents and incorporated site-specific NMR and IR probes to quantitatively map the proton and charge rearrangements within the network that accompany incremental increases in phenol proton affinity. The observed ionization changes were accurately described by a simple equilibrium proton transfer model that strongly suggests the intrinsic proton affinity of one of the Tyr residues in the network, Tyr16, does not remain constant but rather systematically increases due to weakening of the phenol–Tyr16 anion hydrogen bond with increasing phenol proton affinity. Using vibrational Stark spectroscopy, we quantified the electrostatic field changes within the surrounding active site that accompany these rearrangements within the network. We were able to model these changes accurately using continuum electrostatic calculations, suggesting a high degree of conformational restriction within the protein matrix. Our study affords direct insight into the physical and energetic properties of a hydrogen bond network within a protein interior and provides an example of a highly controlled system with minimal conformational rearrangements in which the observed physical changes can be accurately modeled by theoretical calculations. PMID:23798390

  14. Coprocessing through fundamental and mechanistic studies in hydrogen transfer and catalysis. Quarterly report, December 27, 1991--March 27, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1992-12-31

    The research conducted this quarter evaluated hydrogen transfer from resids reduced using the Birch reduction method and their corresponding parent resid to an aromatic acceptor, anthracene (ANT). The reactions involved thermal and catalytic reactions using sulfur introduced as thiophenol. This catalyst has been shown by Rudnick to affect the hydrogen transfer from cycloalkane to aromatics/or coal. The purpose of this current study was to evaluate the efficacy of hydrogen transfer from the hydrogen-enriched reduced resid to an aromatic species and to compare that to the hydrogen transfer from the original resid. The analyses performed to evaluate hydrogen transfer were the determination of product slates from the hydrogenation of ANT and the fractionation of the resid into solubility fractions after reaction with ANT. The amount of coal conversion to THF solubles was higher in the coprocessing reactions with the reduced resids compared to the reactions with the corresponding untreated resid. The reduction of the resids by the Birch method increased the hydrogen donating ability of the resid to the same level as that obtained with the introduction of isotetralin (ISO) to the original resid. The ISO was introduced at a level of 0.5 wt % donable hydrogen. Both the original resids and the resids reduced by the Birch method were reacted in the presence of an aromatic species, anthracene (ANT). These reactions were performed under both nitrogen and hydrogen atmospheres at a pressure of 1250 psig introduced at ambient temperature. The reactions were performed both thermally and catalytically at 380{degree}C for 30 minutes. The catalyst used was thiophenol which is the same catalyst as has been used in the previously reported model compound studies involving hydrogen transfer from cycloalkanes to aromatics.

  15. Comparison of the regiospecific distribution from triacylglycerols after chemical and enzymatic interesterification of high oleic sunflower oil and fully hydrogenated high oleic sunflower oil blend by carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Thiago I B; Ribeiro, Marilene D M M; Ming, Chiu C; Grimaldi, Renato; Gonçalves, Lireny A G; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2016-12-01

    The nutritional and organoleptic attributes of oils can proceed via interesterification of oils blends catalyzed by enzymes or chemicals. Enzymatic interesterification processes are preferred due the regiospecific outcome. Traditionally, monitoring of distribution of fatty acids (FA) in glycerol backbone is performed by enzymatic and chromatographic methods that are time-consuming, involving a series of chemical manipulations employing large volumes of organic solvents. Alternatively, carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) is a fast and reliable technique that could be applied to determine the saturated and unsaturated FA distribution of the triacylglycerols (TAGs) present in high oleic sunflower oil (SO) and fully hydrogenated high oleic sunflower oil (HSO) blends and their interesterification products. The enzymatic interesterification was conducted employing the immobilized lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM), the results show that the process was not completely regiospecific at sn-1,3 positions, due to the spontaneous acyl migration from position sn-2 to sn-1,3. PMID:27374579

  16. Mechanism of ruthenium-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions. Concerted transfer of OH and CH hydrogens from an alcohol to a (Cyclopentadienone)ruthenium complex.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeffrey B; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2003-10-01

    Kinetic studies of the ruthenium-catalyzed dehydrogenation of 1-(4-fluorophenyl)ethanol (4) by tetrafluorobenzoquinone (7) using the Shvo catalyst 1 at 70 degrees C show that the dehydrogenation by catalytic intermediate 2 is rate-determining with the rate = k[4][1](1/2) and with deltaH++ = 17.7 kcal mol(-1) and deltaS++ = -13.0 eu. The use of specifically deuterated derivative 4-CHOD and 4-CDOH gave individual isotope effects of k(CHOH)/k(CHOD) = 1.87 +/- 0.17 and k(CHOH)/k(CDOH) = 2.57 +/- 0.26, respectively. Dideuterated derivative 4-CDOD gave a combined isotope effect of k(CHOH)/k(CDOD) = 4.61 +/- 0.37. These isotope effects are consistent with a concerted transfer of both hydrogens of the alcohol to ruthenium species 2. PMID:14510542

  17. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  18. Forced convection heat transfer of subcooled liquid hydrogen in horizontal tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, Hideki; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Hata, Koichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Kinoshita, K.

    2012-06-01

    Forced flow heat transfers of liquid hydrogen through horizontally-mounted tubes with the diameter of 3.0 mm and 6.0 mm were measured at the pressure of 0.7 MPa for various inlet temperatures and flow velocities. The measured non-boiling heat transfer coefficients agree with those by the Dittus-Boelter correlation. The heat fluxes at the onset of nucleate boiling and the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) heat fluxes, where the heat transfer continuously changes to film boiling regime, are higher for higher flow velocity, larger subcooling and larger tube diameter. The DNB heat fluxes for the horizontally-mounted tube are slightly lower than those for the vertically-mounted tube, although the effect of the tube attitude direction disappears for a small tube diameter. The measured DNB heat fluxes agree with the correlation for vertically-mounted tubes.

  19. A microwave study of hydrogen-transfer-triggered methyl-group rotation in 5-methyltropolone.

    PubMed

    Ilyushin, Vadim V; Cloessner, Emily A; Chou, Yung-Ching; Picraux, Laura B; Hougen, Jon T; Lavrich, Richard

    2010-11-14

    We present here the first experimental and theoretical study of the microwave spectrum of 5-methyltropolone, which can be visualized as a seven-membered "aromatic" carbon ring with a five-membered hydrogen-bonded cyclic structure at the top and a methyl group at the bottom. The molecule is known from earlier studies in the literature to exhibit two large-amplitude motions, an intramolecular hydrogen transfer and a methyl torsion. The former motion is particularly interesting because transfer of the hydrogen atom from the hydroxyl to the carbonyl group induces a tautomerization in the molecule, which then triggers a 60° internal rotation of the methyl group. Measurements were carried out by Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy in the 8-24 GHz frequency range. Theoretical analysis was carried out using a tunneling-rotational Hamiltonian based on a G(12)(m) extended-group-theory formalism. Our global fit of 1015 transitions to 20 molecular parameters gave a root-mean-square deviation of 1.5 kHz. The tunneling splitting of the two J=0 levels arising from a hypothetical pure hydrogen-transfer motion is calculated to be 1310 MHz. The tunneling splitting of the two J=0 levels arising from a hypothetical pure methyl top internal-rotation motion is calculated to be 885 MHz. We have also carried out ab initio calculations, which support the structural parameters determined from our spectroscopic analysis and give estimates of the barriers to the two large-amplitude motions. PMID:21073223

  20. Coolant-side heat-transfer rates for a hydrogen-oxygen rocket and a new technique for data correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schacht, R. L.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the coolant-side, heat transfer coefficients for a liquid cooled, hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chamber. Heat transfer rates were determined from measurements of local hot gas wall temperature, local coolant temperature, and local coolant pressure. A correlation incorporating an integration technique for the transport properties needed near the pseudocritical temperature of liquid hydrogen gives a satisfactory prediction of hot gas wall temperatures.

  1. Selective peracetic acid determination in the presence of hydrogen peroxide using a label free enzymatic method based on catalase.

    PubMed

    Galbán, Javier; Sanz, Vanesa; de Marcos, Susana

    2010-11-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is selectively determined in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) by using the self-indicating UV-Vis molecular absorption properties of catalase. The PAA reacts with the protein giving an intermediate (Cat-I) which is reduced back by the amino acid core surrounding the heme group. Since the original form of the enzyme and the Cat-I have different UV-Vis absorption properties, the absorbance changes can be used for PAA determination. The H(2)O(2)/catalase reaction is extremely fast so that neither Cat-I compound nor kinetic interferences are observed. The method permits PAA determination in the 5 × 10(-7) to 1.5 × 10(-5) M range, the reproducibility being between 1% and 10%. Using this method, PAA has been successfully determined in water samples treated with commercial PAA/H(2)O(2) biocides. A theoretical study has also been carried out for obtaining a mathematical model able to analytically describe the process. PMID:20824427

  2. Coupling of protein motions and hydrogen transfer during catalysis by Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Swanwick, Richard S.; Maglia, Giovanni; Tey, Lai-hock; Allemann, Rudolf K.

    2005-01-01

    The enzyme DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase) catalyses hydride transfer from NADPH to, and protonation of, dihydrofolate. The physical basis of the hydride transfer step catalysed by DHFR from Escherichia coli has been studied through the measurement of the temperature dependence of the reaction rates and the kinetic isotope effects. Single turnover experiments at pH 7.0 revealed a strong dependence of the reaction rates on temperature. The observed relatively large difference in the activation energies for hydrogen and deuterium transfer led to a temperature dependence of the primary kinetic isotope effects from 3.0±0.2 at 5 °C to 2.2±0.2 at 40 °C and an inverse ratio of the pre-exponential factors of 0.108±0.04. These results are consistent with theoretical models for hydrogen transfer that include contributions from quantum mechanical tunnelling coupled with protein motions that actively modulate the tunnelling distance. Previous work had suggested a coupling of a remote residue, Gly121, with the kinetic events at the active site. However, pre-steady-state experiments at pH 7.0 with the mutant G121V-DHFR, in which Gly121 was replaced with valine, revealed that the chemical mechanism of DHFR catalysis was robust to this replacement. The reduced catalytic efficiency of G121V-DHFR was mainly a consequence of the significantly reduced pre-exponential factors, indicating the requirement for significant molecular reorganization during G121V-DHFR catalysis. In contrast, steady-state measurements at pH 9.5, where hydride transfer is rate limiting, revealed temperature-independent kinetic isotope effects between 15 and 35 °C and a ratio of the pre-exponential factors above the semi-classical limit, suggesting a rigid active site configuration from which hydrogen tunnelling occurs. The mechanism by which hydrogen tunnelling in DHFR is coupled with the environment appears therefore to be sensitive to pH. PMID:16241906

  3. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  4. Heat and mass transfer in the sorption of hydrogen by intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Svinarev, S.V.; Trushevskii, S.N.

    1984-06-01

    Intermetallic compounds (IMC), which reversibly absorb hydrogen, are currently the subject of many investigations re their possible use in hydrogen accumulators, thermal machines, thermal pumps and accumulators, sorptional compressors, etc. The dynamics of hydrogen sorption in IMC must be investigated for the analysis and design of such devices. Trends in such studies can be distinguished: the study of the true chemical kinetics of sorption; the investigation of the sorption dynamics in extended IMC layers of dimensions characteristic for practical applications. However, these do not give criteria by which the experimental conditions may be chosen, and often the conditions themselves are not completely described. In connection with this, calculations of the sorption process in which the heat liberation and filtration of hydrogen through the IMC layer are taken into account are of interest both for practical applications and for the elucidation of the conditions in which the process may be regarded as purely kinetic or controlled by the heat and mass transfer in the layer. The authors devote themselves to this aspect in this presentation.

  5. Comparative investigation of surface transfer doping of hydrogen terminated diamond by high electron affinity insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verona, C.; Ciccognani, W.; Colangeli, S.; Limiti, E.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a comparative study of transfer doping of hydrogenated single crystal diamond surface by insulators featured by high electron affinity, such as Nb2O5, WO3, V2O5, and MoO3. The low electron affinity Al2O3 was also investigated for comparison. Hole transport properties were evaluated in the passivated hydrogenated diamond films by Hall effect measurements, and were compared to un-passivated diamond films (air-induced doping). A drastic improvement was observed in passivated samples in terms of conductivity, stability with time, and resistance to high temperatures. The efficiency of the investigated insulators, as electron accepting materials in hydrogenated diamond surface, is consistent with their electronic structure. These surface acceptor materials generate a higher hole sheet concentration, up to 6.5 × 1013 cm-2, and a lower sheet resistance, down to 2.6 kΩ/sq, in comparison to the atmosphere-induced values of about 1 × 1013 cm-2 and 10 kΩ/sq, respectively. On the other hand, hole mobilities were reduced by using high electron affinity insulator dopants. Hole mobility as a function of hole concentration in a hydrogenated diamond layer was also investigated, showing a well-defined monotonically decreasing trend.

  6. Mechanism of action of adenosylcobalamin: hydrogen transfer in the inactivation of diol dehydratase by glycerol.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, W W; Moore, K W; Richards, J H

    1978-05-30

    We have investigated the kinetic characteristics of the inactivation of the adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme propanediol dehydratase by glycerol, (RS)-1,1-dideuterioglycerol, (R)-1,1-dideuterioglycerol, and perdeuterioglycerol in the presence of 1,2-propanediol and 1,1-dideuterio-1,2-propanediol. The results imply that hydrogen (or deuterium) attached to C-1 of 1,2-propanediol participates in the inactivation process and contributes to the expression of a kinetic isotope effect on the rate of inactivation. The mechanism for this inactivation must involve the cofactor as an intermediate hydrogen carrier, presumably in the form of 5'-deoxyadenosine. Moreover, a mechanism involving a rate-determining transfer of hydrogen from an intermediate containing three equivalent hydrogens quantitatively accounts for all of the results. When diol dehydratase holoenzyme is inactivated by [1-3H]glycerol, 5'-deoxyadenosine which is enriched in tritium by a factor of 2.1 over that in glycerol can be isolated from the reaction mixture. PMID:667021

  7. Liquid Acquisition Device Hydrogen Outflow Testing on the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Engineering Design Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Greg; Statham, Geoff; Garces, Rachel; Cartagena, Will

    2015-01-01

    As part of the NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Engineering Design Unit (EDU) testing with liquid hydrogen, screen-channel liquid acquisition devices (LADs) were tested during liquid hydrogen outflow from the EDU tank. A stainless steel screen mesh (325x2300 Dutch T will weave) was welded to a rectangular cross-section channel to form the basic LAD channel. Three LAD channels were tested, each having unique variations in the basic design. The LADs fed a common outflow sump at the aft end of the 151 cu. ft. volume aluminum tank, and included a curved section along the aft end and a straight section along the barrel section of the tank. Wet-dry sensors were mounted inside the LAD channels to detect when vapor was ingested into the LADs during outflow. The use of warm helium pressurant during liquid hydrogen outflow, supplied through a diffuser at the top of the tank, always led to early breakdown of the liquid column. When the tank was pressurized through an aft diffuser, resulting in cold helium in the ullage, LAD column hold-times as long as 60 minutes were achieved, which was the longest duration tested. The highest liquid column height at breakdown was 58 cm, which is 23 less than the isothermal bubble-point model value of 75 cm. This paper discusses details of the design, construction, operation and analysis of LAD test data from the CPST EDU liquid hydrogen test.

  8. Impact of Distal Mutation on Hydrogen Transfer Interface and Substrate Conformation in Soybean Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Sarah J.; Soudackov, Alexander V.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of distal mutation on the hydrogen transfer interface properties and on the substrate mobility, conformation, and orientation in soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO) is examined. SLO catalyzes a hydrogen abstraction reaction that occurs by a proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism. Mutation of isoleucine 553 to less bulky residues has been found experimentally to increase the magnitude and temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect for this reaction. This residue borders the linoleic acid substrate but is ~15 Å from the active site iron. In the present study, we model these experimental data with a vibronically nonadiabatic theory and perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the complete solvated wild-type and mutant enzymes. Our calculations indicate that the proton transfer equilibrium distance increases and the associated frequency decreases as residue 553 becomes less bulky. The molecular dynamics simulations illustrate that this mutation impacts the mobility, geometrical conformation, and orientation of the linoleic acid within the active site. In turn, these effects alter the proton donor-acceptor equilibrium distance and frequency, leading to the experimentally observed changes in the magnitude and temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect. This study provides insight into how the effects of distal mutations may be transmitted in enzymes to ultimately impact the catalytic rates. PMID:20423074

  9. Electron, proton and hydrogen-atom transfers in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Tommos, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    When photosynthetic organisms developed so that they could use water as an electron source to reduce carbon dioxide, the stage was set for efficient proliferation. Algae and plants spread globally and provided the foundation for our atmosphere and for O(2)-based chemistry in biological systems. Light-driven water oxidation is catalysed by photosystem II, the active site of which contains a redox-active tyrosine denoted Y(Z), a tetramanganese cluster, calcium and chloride. In 1995, Gerald Babcock and co-workers presented the hypothesis that photosynthetic water oxidation occurs as a metallo-radical catalysed process. In this model, the oxidized tyrosine radical is generated by coupled proton/electron transfer and re-reduced by abstracting hydrogen atoms from substrate water or hydroxide-ligated to the manganese cluster. The proposed function of Y(Z) requires proton transfer from the tyrosine site upon oxidation. The oxidation mechanism of Y(Z) in an inhibited and O(2)-evolving photosystem II is discussed. Domino-deprotonation from Y(Z) to the bulk solution is shown to be consistent with a variety of data obtained on metal-depleted samples. Experimental data that suggest that the oxidation of Y(Z) in O(2)-evolving samples is coupled to proton transfer in a hydrogen-bonding network are described. Finally, a dielectric-dependent model for the proton release that is associated with the catalytic cycle of photosystem II is discussed. PMID:12437877

  10. Charge Transfer Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Dots Relevant to Solar Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Todd

    Artificial conversion of sunlight to chemical fuels has attracted attention for several decades as a potential source of clean, renewable energy. For example, in light-driven proton reduction to molecular hydrogen, a light-absorbing molecule (the photosensitizer) rapidly transfers a photoexcited electron to a catalyst for reducing protons. We recently found that CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and simple aqueous Ni2+ salts in the presence of a sacrificial electron donor form a highly efficient, active, and robust system for photochemical reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen. To understand why this system has such extraordinary catalytic behavior, ultrafast transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy studies of electron transfer (ET) processes from the QDs to the Ni catalysts were performed. CdSe QDs transfer photoexcited electrons to a Ni-dihydrolipoic acid (Ni-DHLA) catalyst complex extremely fast and with high efficiency. Even under high fluence, the relative fraction of TA signal due to ET remains well over 80%, and depopulation from exciton-exciton annihilation is minimal (6%). We also found that increasing QD size and/or shelling the core CdSe QDs with a shell of CdS slowed the ET rate, in agreement with the relative efficiency of photochemical H2 generation. The extremely fast ET provides a fundamental explanation for the exceptional photocatalytic H2 activity of the CdSe QD/Ni-DHLA system and guides new directions for further improvements.

  11. Hydrogen-Bound Complexes of Tropolone: Gateways for the Interrogation of Multiple Proton-Transfer Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchick, Deacon J.; Chew, Kathryn; Wolff, John E.; Vaccaro, Patrick H.

    2011-06-01

    Tropolone (TrOH) serves as a model system for the study of coherent proton-transfer processes, where a potential barrier of finite height hinders the symmetric exchange of a lone hydron between hydroxylic (proton-donating) and ketonic (proton-accepting) oxygen centers. This talk will discuss ongoing efforts to build upon the known structural and dynamical properties of tropolone so as to explore related multiple proton-transfer events that are mediated by successive formation and breaking of several hydrogen bonds. Of particular interest are weakly-bound complexes created in situ under ``cold'' molecular-beam conditions by docking amphoteric ligands (e.g., HF and HCOOH) into the reaction cleft of the TrOH substrate. Such species have the tantalizing possibility of undergoing double proton transfer, with resulting tunneling-induced bifurcation of rovibronic features reflecting the intrinsic vibrational and/or electronic specificity of the attendant unimolecular transformation. Spectroscopic studies of several hydrogen-bound TrOH complexes through use of the richly structured tilde{A}1B2-tilde{X}1A1 (π *← π ) absorption system will be presented, with complementary quantum-chemical calculations serving to guide the assignment and interpretation of observed spectral patterns. L. A. Burns, D. Murdock, and P. H. Vaccaro, Mol. Phys., 108, 1171 (2010).

  12. Optimized enzymatic colorimetric assay for determination of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging activity of plant extracts

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Chamira Dilanka; Soysa, Preethi

    2015-01-01

    The classical method to determine hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging activity of plant extracts is evaluated by measuring the disappearance of H2O2 at a wavelength of 230 nm. Since this method suffers from the interference of phenolics having strong absorption in the UV region, a simple and rapid colorimetric assay was developed where plant extracts are introduced to H2O2, phenol and 4-aminoantipyrine reaction system in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). This reaction yields a quinoneimine chromogen which can be measured at 504 nm. Decrease in the colour intensity reflects the H2O2 scavenged by the plant material. • Optimum conditions determined for this assay were 30 min reaction time, 37 °C, pH 7, enzyme concentration of 1 U/ml and H2O2 concentration of 0.7 mM. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were 136 μM and 411 μM, respectively. • Half maximal effective concentration required to scavenge 50% of H2O2 in the system (EC50 value) calculated for several plant extracts and standard antioxidants resulted in coefficient of variance (CV%) of the EC50 values less than 3.0% and correlation coefficient values (R2) > 0.95 for all dose response curves obtained. • This method is convenient and very precise which is suitable for the rapid quantification of H2O2 scavenging ability of standard antioxidants and natural antioxidants present in plant extracts. PMID:26285798

  13. Electron and Hydrogen Atom Transfers in the Hydride Carrier Protein EmoB.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Natacha; Lévy, Bernard; Moliner, Vicent; Demachy, Isabelle; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2014-11-11

    In this article, we investigate the mechanism of hydride transfer taking place within the EmoB protein of the Mesorhizobium species. The reaction involves the net transfer of one proton and two electrons from a reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor, which is anchored in the protein scaffold, to a diffusible oxidized FMN cofactor, both being held together by π-stacking interactions. To analyze the formal hydride transfer in terms of more elementary steps, electron transfer (ET), and hydrogen atom transfers (HAT), we employ a combination of classical molecular dynamics simulations and hybrid constrained Density Functional Theory/Molecular Mechanics (cDFT/MM) energy calculations to build the free energy profiles, for the ET before and after HAT occurs between the flavins. The main outcomes of our study are first to highlight the role of the protein in stabilizing the π-stacked FMN dimer and second to reveal the coupling between the ET and HAT. Before HAT has taken place, ET is unfavorable by 8 kcal/mol and become favorable by 8 kcal/mol after HAT. Our simulations show that such a coupling is not present for the analogous process in water (ET is almost athermal). This suggests a functional role for the protein matrix to ensure EmoB a role of hydride carrier in the Mesorhizobium species. PMID:26584385

  14. Evaluation of industrially applied heat-transfer fluids as liquid organic hydrogen carrier systems.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Nicole; Obesser, Katharina; Bösmann, Andreas; Teichmann, Daniel; Arlt, Wolfgang; Dungs, Jennifer; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) systems offer a very attractive method for the decentralized storage of renewable excess energy. In this contribution, industrially well-established heat-transfer oils (typically sold under trade names, e.g., Marlotherm) are proposed as a new class of LOHC systems. It is demonstrated that the liquid mixture of isomeric dibenzyltoluenes (m.p. -39 to -34 °C, b.p. 390 °C) can be readily hydrogenated to the corresponding mixture of perhydrogenated analogues by binding 6.2 wt% of H2. The liquid H2 -rich form can be stored and transported similarly to diesel fuel. It readily undergoes catalytic dehydrogenation at temperatures above 260 °C, which proves its applicability as a reversible H2 carrier. The presented LOHC systems are further characterized by their excellent technical availability at comparably low prices, full registration of the H2 -lean forms, and excellent thermal stabilities. PMID:23956191

  15. Sensitive non-radioactive determination of aminotransferase stereospecificity for C-4' hydrogen transfer on the coenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Jomrit, Juntratip; Summpunn, Pijug; Meevootisom, Vithaya; Wiyakrutta, Suthep

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Stereochemical mechanism of PLP enzymes is important but difficult to determine. {yields} This new method is significantly less complicated than the previous ones. {yields} This assay is as sensitive as the radioactive based method. {yields} LC-MS/MS positively identify the analyte coenzyme. {yields} The method can be used with enzyme whose apo form is unstable. -- Abstract: A sensitive non-radioactive method for determination of the stereospecificity of the C-4' hydrogen transfer on the coenzymes (pyridoxal phosphate, PLP; and pyridoxamine phosphate, PMP) of aminotransferases has been developed. Aminotransferase of unknown stereospecificity in its PLP form was incubated in {sup 2}H{sub 2}O with a substrate amino acid resulted in PMP labeled with deuterium at C-4' in the pro-S or pro-R configuration according to the stereospecificity of the aminotransferase tested. The [4'-{sup 2}H]PMP was isolated from the enzyme protein and divided into two portions. The first portion was incubated in aqueous buffer with apo-aspartate aminotransferase (a reference si-face specific enzyme), and the other was incubated with apo-branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (a reference re-face specific enzyme) in the presence of a substrate 2-oxo acid. The {sup 2}H at C-4' is retained with the PLP if the aminotransferase in question transfers C-4' hydrogen on the opposite face of the coenzyme compared with the reference aminotransferase, but the {sup 2}H is removed if the test and reference aminotransferases catalyze hydrogen transfer on the same face. PLP formed in the final reactions was analyzed by LC-MS/MS for the presence or absence of {sup 2}H. The method was highly sensitive that for the aminotransferase with ca. 50 kDa subunit molecular weight, only 2 mg of the enzyme was sufficient for the whole test. With this method, the use of radioactive substances could be avoided without compromising the sensitivity of the assay.

  16. Transient Ru-methyl formate intermediates generated with bifunctional transfer hydrogenation catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Richard H.; Brownell, Kristen R.; Chingin, Konstantin; Cahill, Thomas J.; Waymouth, Robert M.; Zare, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) coupled to high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) was used to study the reactivity of a (β-amino alcohol)(arene)RuCl transfer hydrogenation catalytic precursor in methanol (CH3OH). By placing [(p-cymene)RuCl2]2 on a surface and spraying a solution of β-amino alcohol in methanol, two unique transient intermediates having lifetimes in the submillisecond to millisecond range were detected. These intermediates were identified as Ru (II) and Ru (IV) complexes incorporating methyl formate (HCOOCH3). The Ru (IV) intermediate is not observed when the DESI spray solution is sparged with Ar gas, indicating that O2 dissolved in the solvent is necessary for oxidizing Ru (II) to Ru (IV). These proposed intermediates are supported by high-resolution and high mass accuracy measurements and by comparing experimental to calculated isotope profiles. Additionally, analyzing the bulk reaction mixture using gas chromatography-MS and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirms the formation of HCOOCH3. These results represent an example that species generated from the (β-amino alcohol)(arene)RuCl (II) catalytic precursor can selectively oxidize CH3OH to HCOOCH3. This observation leads us to propose a pathway that can compete with the hydrogen transfer catalytic cycle. Although bifunctional hydrogen transfer with Ru catalysts has been well-studied, the ability of DESI to intercept intermediates formed in the first few milliseconds of a chemical reaction allowed identification of previously unrecognized intermediates and reaction pathways in this catalytic system. PMID:22315417

  17. Bimetallic promotion of cooperative hydrogen transfer and heteroatom removal in coal liquefaction. Quarterly summary, June 1, 1991--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Eisch, J.J.

    1991-10-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to uncover new catalytic processes for the liquefaction of coal and for upgrading coal-derived fuels by removing undesirable organosulfur, organonitrogen and organooxygen constituents. Basic to both the liquefaction of coal and the purification of coal liquids is the transfer of hydrogen from such sources as dihydrogen, metal hydrides or partially reduced aromatic hydrocarbons to the extensive aromatic rings in coal itself or to aromatic sulfides, amines or ethers. Accordingly, this study is exploring how such crucial hydrogen-transfer processes might be catalyzed by soluble, low-valent transition metal complexes and/or Lewis acids under moderate conditions of temperature and pressure. By learning the mechanism whereby H{sub 2}, metal hydrides or partially hydrogenated aromatics do transfer hydrogen to model aromatic compounds, with the aid of homogeneous, bimetallic catalysts, we hope to identify new methods for producing superior fuels from coal.

  18. A continuous flow strategy for the coupled transfer hydrogenation and etherification of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural using Lewis acid zeolites.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Van de Vyver, Stijn; Crisci, Anthony J; Gunther, William R; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2014-08-01

    Hf-, Zr- and Sn-Beta zeolites effectively catalyze the coupled transfer hydrogenation and etherification of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural with primary and secondary alcohols into 2,5-bis(alkoxymethyl)furans, thus making it possible to generate renewable fuel additives without the use of external hydrogen sources or precious metals. Continuous flow experiments reveal nonuniform changes in the relative deactivation rates of the transfer hydrogenation and etherification reactions, which impact the observed product distribution over time. We found that the catalysts undergo a drastic deactivation for the etherification step while maintaining catalytic activity for the transfer hydrogenation step. (119) Sn and (29) Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies show that this deactivation can be attributed to changes in the local environment of the metal sites. Additional insights were gained by studying effects of various alcohols and water concentration on the catalytic reactivity. PMID:25045144

  19. Concerted proton-electron transfer in the oxidation of hydrogen-bonded phenols.

    PubMed

    Rhile, Ian J; Markle, Todd F; Nagao, Hirotaka; DiPasquale, Antonio G; Lam, Oanh P; Lockwood, Mark A; Rotter, Katrina; Mayer, James M

    2006-05-10

    Three phenols with pendant, hydrogen-bonded bases (HOAr-B) have been oxidized in MeCN with various one-electron oxidants. The bases are a primary amine (-CPh(2)NH(2)), an imidazole, and a pyridine. The product of chemical and quasi-reversible electrochemical oxidations in each case is the phenoxyl radical in which the phenolic proton has transferred to the base, (*)OAr-BH(+), a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) process. The redox potentials for these oxidations are lower than for other phenols, predominately from the driving force for proton movement. One-electron oxidation of the phenols occurs by a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism, based on thermochemical arguments, isotope effects, and DeltaDeltaG(++)/DeltaDeltaG degrees . The data rule out stepwise paths involving initial electron transfer to form the phenol radical cations [(*)(+)HOAr-B] or initial proton transfer to give the zwitterions [(-)OAr-BH(+)]. The rate constant for heterogeneous electron transfer from HOAr-NH(2) to a platinum electrode has been derived from electrochemical measurements. For oxidations of HOAr-NH(2), the dependence of the solution rate constants on driving force, on temperature, and on the nature of the oxidant, and the correspondence between the homogeneous and heterogeneous rate constants, are all consistent with the application of adiabatic Marcus theory. The CPET reorganization energies, lambda = 23-56 kcal mol(-)(1), are large in comparison with those for electron transfer reactions of aromatic compounds. The reactions are not highly non-adiabatic, based on minimum values of H(rp) derived from the temperature dependence of the rate constants. These are among the first detailed analyses of CPET reactions where the proton and electron move to different sites. PMID:16669677

  20. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Westlake, Brittany C.; Brennaman, Kyle M.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Paul, Jared J.; Bettis, Stephanie E.; Hampton, Shaun D.; Miller, Stephen A.; Lebedeva, Natalia V.; Forbes, Malcolm D. E.; Moran, Andrew M.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Papanikolas, John M.

    2011-05-24

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons—electron-proton transfer (EPT)—is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4'-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H⁺ is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck–Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated ⁺H–B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state.

  1. Easy To Synthesize, Robust Organo‐osmium Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Coverdale, James P. C.; Sanchez‐Cano, Carlos; Clarkson, Guy J.; Soni, Rina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) is an important process in organic synthesis for which the Noyori‐type RuII catalysts [(arene)Ru(Tsdiamine)] are now well established and widely used. We now demonstrate for the first time the catalytic activity of the osmium analogues. X‐ray crystal structures of the 16‐electron OsII catalysts are almost identical to those of RuII. Intriguingly the precursor complex was isolated as a dichlorido complex with a monodentate amine ligand. The OsII catalysts are readily synthesised (within 1 h) and exhibit excellent enantioselectivity in ATH reactions of ketones. PMID:25853228

  2. An annulative transfer hydrogenation strategy enables straightforward access to tetrahydro fused-pyrazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Biao; Zhang, Shu-Di; Chen, Lu; Li, Bin; Jiang, Huan-Feng; Zhang, Min

    2016-08-23

    A ruthenium-catalysed annulative transfer hydrogenation strategy, enabling straightforward access to tetrahydro fused-pyrazine derivatives from N-heteroaryl diamines and vicinal diols, has been demonstrated for the first time. Such a synthesis proceeds with unprecedented synthetic effectiveness including high step- and atom efficiency, generation of water as the sole by-product, short reaction time and no need for external high pressure H2 gas, offering an important basis for the transformation of vicinal diols, a class of bio-mass derived resources, into functionalized products. PMID:27499170

  3. Summarizing lecture: factors influencing enzymatic H-transfers, analysis of nuclear tunnelling isotope effects and thermodynamic versus specific effects

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, R.A

    2006-01-01

    In the articles in this Discussion, a wide variety of topics are treated, including reorganization energy, initially introduced for electron transfers (‘environmentally assisted tunnelling’), nuclear tunnelling, H/D and C12/C13 kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), the effect of changes of distal and nearby amino acid residues using site-directed mutagenesis, and dynamics versus statistical effects. A coordinate-free form of semi-classical theory is used to examine topics on data such as tunnelling versus ‘over-the-barrier’ paths and temperature and pressure effects on KIEs. The multidimensional semi-classical theory includes classically allowed and classically forbidden transitions. More generally, we address the question of relating kinetic to thermodynamic factors, as in the electron transfer field, so learning about specific versus thermodynamic effects in enzyme catalysis and KIEs. PMID:16873131

  4. Intermolecular interactions and proton transfer in the hydrogen halide-superoxide anion complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sebastian J R; Mullinax, J Wayne; Schaefer, Henry F

    2016-02-17

    The superoxide radical anion O2(-) is involved in many important chemical processes spanning different scientific disciplines (e.g., environmental and biological sciences). Characterizing its interaction with various substrates to help elucidate its rich chemistry may have far reaching implications. Herein, we investigate the interaction between O2(-) (X[combining tilde] (2)Πg) and the hydrogen halides (X[combining tilde] (1)Σ) with coupled-cluster theory. In contrast to the short (1.324 Å) hydrogen bond formed between the HF and O2(-) monomers, a barrierless proton transfer occurs for the heavier hydrogen halides with the resulting complexes characterized as long (>1.89 Å) hydrogen bonds between halide anions and the HO2 radical. The dissociation energy with harmonic zero-point vibrational energy (ZPVE) for FHO2(-) (X[combining tilde] (2)A'') → HF (X[combining tilde] (1)Σ) + O2(-) (X[combining tilde] (2)Πg) is 31.2 kcal mol(-1). The other dissociation energies with ZPVE for X(-)HO2 (X[combining tilde] (2)A'') → X(-) (X[combining tilde] (1)Σ) + HO2 (X[combining tilde] (2)A'') are 25.7 kcal mol(-1) for X = Cl, 21.9 kcal mol(-1) for X = Br, and 17.9 kcal mol(-1) for X = I. Additionally, the heavier hydrogen halides can form weak halogen bonds H-XO2(-) (X[combining tilde] (2)A'') with interaction energies including ZPVE of -2.3 kcal mol(-1) for HCl, -8.3 kcal mol(-1) for HBr, and -16.7 kcal mol(-1) for HI. PMID:26852733

  5. Test of an orbiting hydrogen maser clock system using laser time transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.; Mattison, Edward M.; Nystrom, G. U.; Decher, Rudolph

    1992-07-01

    We describe a joint Smithsonian Astrophysical Laboratory/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (SAO/NASA) program for flight testing a atomic hydrogen maser clock system designed for long-term operation in space. The clock system will be carried by a shuttle-launched EURECA spacecraft. Comparisons with earth clocks to measure the clock's long-term frequency stability (tau = 10(exp 4) seconds) will be made using laser time transfer from existing NASA laser tracking stations. We describe the design of the maser clock and its control systems, and the laser timing technique. We describe the precision of station time synchronization and the limitations in the comparison between the earth and space time scales owing to gravitational and relativistic effects. We will explore the implications of determining the spacecraft's location by an on-board Global Position System (GPS) receiver, and of using microwave techniques for time and frequency transfer.

  6. Test of an orbiting hydrogen maser clock system using laser time transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.; Mattison, Edward M.; Nystrom, G. U.; Decher, Rudolph

    1992-01-01

    We describe a joint Smithsonian Astrophysical Laboratory/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (SAO/NASA) program for flight testing a atomic hydrogen maser clock system designed for long-term operation in space. The clock system will be carried by a shuttle-launched EURECA spacecraft. Comparisons with earth clocks to measure the clock's long-term frequency stability (tau = 10(exp 4) seconds) will be made using laser time transfer from existing NASA laser tracking stations. We describe the design of the maser clock and its control systems, and the laser timing technique. We describe the precision of station time synchronization and the limitations in the comparison between the earth and space time scales owing to gravitational and relativistic effects. We will explore the implications of determining the spacecraft's location by an on-board Global Position System (GPS) receiver, and of using microwave techniques for time and frequency transfer.

  7. Low-energy charge transfer between C5+ and atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, Ilija N; Havener, Charles C; Seely, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Charge transfer with carbon ions has been identified as important in both magnetic fusion plasma devices and, more recently, in solar wind interactions with comets, planets, or neutrals in the heliosphere. A merged-beams technique is used to measure the absolute total charge-transfer cross section for C{sup 5+} and atomic H over four orders of magnitude in collision energy, from 12,000 to 0.64 eV/u. The present measurements are compared with previous measurements using an atomic hydrogen target and benchmark available classical trajectory Monte Carlo and molecular-orbital close-coupling calculations. An observed increasing cross section below 10 eV/u is attributed to trajectory effects due to the ion-induced dipole attraction between reactants.

  8. Low Energy Charge Transfer between C5+ and Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, Ilija N; Seely, D. G.; Havener, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Charge transfer (CT) with carbon ions has been identified for a long time as important in both magnetic fusion plasma devices and more recently in solar wind interactions with comets, planets, or neutrals in the heliosphere. A merged-beams technique is used to measure the absolute total charge transfer cross section for C5+ and atomic H over four orders of magnitude in collision energy, from 12,000 eV/u to 0.64 eV/u. The present measurements are compared with previous measurements using an atomic hydrogen target and benchmark available classical trajectory Monte-Carlo and molecular-orbital close-coupling calculations. An increasing cross section below 10 eV/u is attributed to trajectory effects due to the ion-induced dipole attraction between reactants.

  9. Non-enzymatic electrochemical biosensor based on Pt NPs/RGO-CS-Fc nano-hybrids for the detection of hydrogen peroxide in living cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhihao; Li, Guiyin; Liang, Jingtao; Su, Jing; Zhang, Yue; Chen, Huaizhou; Huang, Yong; Sui, Weiguo; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2016-08-15

    A highly sensitive non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor based on platinum nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide-chitosan-ferrocene carboxylic acid nano-hybrids (Pt NPs/RGO-CS-Fc biosensor) was developed for the measurement of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The RGO-CS-Fc nano-hybrids was prepared and characterized by UV-vis spectrum, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectrometer and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Under optimal experimental conditions, the Pt NPs/RGO-CS-Fc biosensor showed outstanding catalytic activity toward H2O2 reduction. The current response of the biosensor presented a linear relationship with H2O2 concentration from 2.0×10(-8)M to 3.0×10(-6)M with a correlation coefficient of R(2)=0.9968 and with logarithm of H2O2 concentration from 6.0×10(-6)M to 1.0×10(-2)M with a correlation coefficient of R(2)=0.9887, the low detection limit of 20nM was obtained at the signal/noise (S/N) ratio of 3. Moreover, the Pt NPs/RGO-CS-Fc biosensor exhibited excellent anti-interference capability and reproducibility for the detection of H2O2. The biosensor was also successfully applied for the detection of H2O2 from living cells containing normal and cancer cells. All these results prove that the Pt NPs/RGO-CS-Fc biosensor has the potential application in clinical diagnostics to evaluate oxidative stress of different living cells. PMID:27085950

  10. Effect of hydrogen ion concentration and electrostatic polarity on food powder coating transfer efficiency and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Setyo, D; Barringer, S

    2007-08-01

    Two kinds of soy protein isolate, rice protein, whey protein isolate, albumen, bovine collagen hydrolysate, NaCl, and corn starch were used in this study. Solutions were prepared by mixing the powder and distilled water (1:8 ratio) and either H(2)SO(4) or NH(4)OH to obtain pH 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. The solutions were dried to produce powders with different hydrogen ion concentrations and the powders were ground. Powders were coated nonelectrostatically and using negative and positive polarity corona electrostatically. There was no solution pH effect on transfer efficiency or adhesion for most powders. However, transfer efficiency and density of both of the soy protein isolates and corn starch changed with solution pH. Solution pH may have affected the density, which affected the transfer efficiency for these powders. Adhesion and cohesiveness of one of the soy protein isolates and corn starch also changed with solution pH. Solution pH may have affected the cohesiveness, which affected the adhesion for these powders. Negative and positive coronas produced the same results for most powders, with no solution pH effect, except for one of the soy protein isolates, rice protein, and corn starch. These powders accumulated on the electrode wires during negative corona electrostatic coating, reducing transfer efficiency and adhesion. This polarity effect was intermittent, implying it is due to tribocharging. PMID:17995680

  11. Organically modified titania having a metal catalyst: a new type of liquid-phase hydrogen-transfer photocatalyst working under visible light irradiation and H2-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Kominami, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Shin-Ya; Okubo, Yuki; Fukui, Makoto; Hashimoto, Keiji; Imamura, Kazuya

    2016-06-28

    Organically modified titania having a metal catalyst (OMTC), 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene-modified titania having palladium metal, successfully worked as a hydrogen-transfer (C[double bond, length as m-dash]C hydrogenation) photocatalyst in the presence of triethanolamine as the hydrogen source under visible light irradiation and hydrogen-free conditions. PMID:27198824

  12. Theoretical Design of Thermosyphon for Process Heat Transfer from NGNP to Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely produce electricity and process heat, with both being considered for hydrogen production. To capture nuclear process heat, and transport it to a distant industrial facility requires a high temperature system of heat exchangers, pumps and/or compressors. The heat transfer system is particularly challenging not only due to the elevated temperatures (up to ~ 1300K) and industrial scale power transport (=50 MW), but also due to a potentially large separation distance between the nuclear and industrial plants (100+m) dictated by safety and licensing mandates. The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase thermosyphon heat transfer performance with alkali metals. A thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. In contrast to single-phased forced convective heat transfer via ‘pumping a fluid’, a thermosyphon (also called a wickless heat pipe) transfers heat through the vaporization / condensing process. The condensate is further returned to the hot source by gravity, i.e. without any requirement of pumps or compressors. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. Two-phase heat transfer by a thermosyphon has the advantage of high enthalpy transport that includes the sensible heat of the liquid, the latent heat of vaporization, and vapor superheat. In contrast, single-phase forced convection transports only the sensible heat of the fluid. Additionally, vapor-phase velocities within a thermosyphon are much greater than single-phase liquid velocities within a forced convective loop. Thermosyphon performance can be limited by the sonic limit (choking) or vapor flow and/or by condensate entrainment. Proper thermosyphon requires analysis of both.

  13. Arginine Coordination in Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer: Evaluation of the Effect of Arg166 Mutations in Escherichia Coli Alkaline Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, P.J.; Lassila, J.K.; Fenn, T.D.; Zalatan, J.G.; Herschlag, D.

    2009-05-22

    Arginine residues are commonly found in the active sites of enzymes catalyzing phosphoryl transfer reactions. Numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments establish the importance of these residues for efficient catalysis, but their role in catalysis is not clear. To examine the role of arginine residues in the phosphoryl transfer reaction, we have measured the consequences of mutations to arginine 166 in Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase on hydrolysis of ethyl phosphate, on individual reaction steps in the hydrolysis of the covalent enzyme-phosphoryl intermediate, and on thio substitution effects. The results show that the role of the arginine side chain extends beyond its positive charge, as the Arg166Lys mutant is as compromised in activity as Arg166Ser. Through measurement of individual reaction steps, we construct a free energy profile for the hydrolysis of the enzyme-phosphate intermediate. This analysis indicates that the arginine side chain strengthens binding by {approx}3 kcal/mol and provides an additional 1-2 kcal/mol stabilization of the chemical transition state. A 2.1 {angstrom} X-ray diffraction structure of Arg166Ser AP is presented, which shows little difference in enzyme structure compared to the wild-type enzyme but shows a significant reorientation of the bound phosphate. Altogether, these results support a model in which the arginine contributes to catalysis through binding interactions and through additional transition state stabilization that may arise from complementarity of the guanidinum group to the geometry of the trigonal bipyramidal transition state.

  14. Ruthenium(ii) complexes of hemilabile pincer ligands: synthesis and catalysing the transfer hydrogenation of ketones.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ashwin G; McBurney, Roy T; Walker, D Barney; Page, Michael J; Gatus, Mark R D; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Messerle, Barbara A

    2016-09-28

    A series of Ru(ii) complexes were synthesised based on a hemilabile pyrazole-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-pyrazole (C3N2H3)CH2(C3N2H2)CH2(C3N2H3) NCN pincer ligand 1. All complexes were fully characterised using single crystal X-ray crystallography and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. Hemilabile ligands provide flexible coordination modes for the coordinating metal ion which can play a significant effect on the efficiency and mechanism of catalysis by the resulting complex. Here we observed and isolated mono-, bi- and tri-dentate complexes of both Ag(i) and Ru(ii) with 1 in which the resultant coordination mode was controlled by careful reagent selection. The catalytic activity of the Ru(ii) complexes for the transfer hydrogenation reaction of acetophenone with isopropanol was investigated. The unexpected formation of the pentaborate anion, [B5O6(OH)4](-), during the synthesis of complex 6a was found to have an unexpected positive effect by enhancing the catalysis rate. This work provides insights into the roles that different coordination modes, counterions and ligand hemilability play on the catalytic activity in transfer hydrogenations. PMID:27539740

  15. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation with a Methandiide-Based Carbene Complex: An Experimental and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Weismann, Julia; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2015-11-01

    The transfer hydrogenation (TH) reaction of ketones with catalytic systems based on a methandiide-derived ruthenium carbene complex was investigated and optimised. The complex itself makes use of the noninnocent behaviour of the carbene ligand (M=CR2 →MH-C(H)R2 ), but showed only moderate activity, thus requiring long reaction times to achieve sufficient conversion. DFT studies on the reaction mechanism revealed high reaction barriers for both the dehydrogenation of iPrOH and the hydrogen transfer. A considerable improvement of the catalytic activity could be achieved by employing triphenylphosphine as additive. Mechanistic studies on the role of PPh3 in the catalytic cycle revealed the formation of a cyclometalated complex upon phosphine coordination. This ruthenacycle was revealed to be the active species under the reaction conditions. The use of the isolated complex resulted in high catalytic activities in the TH of aromatic as well as aliphatic ketones. The complex was also found to be active under base-free conditions, suggesting that the cyclometalation is crucial for the enhanced activity. PMID:26403918

  16. Theoretical Investigation of the Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer of β-phosphoglucomutase: Revisiting Both Steps of the Catalytic Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Elsasser, Brigitta M.; Dohmeier-Fischer, Silvia; Fels, Gregor

    2012-07-12

    Enzyme catalyzed phosphate transfer is a part of almost all metabolic processes. Such reactions are of central importance for the energy balance in all organisms and play important roles in cellular control at all levels. Mutases transfer a phosphoryl group while nucleases cleave the phosphodiester linkages between two nucleotides. The subject of our present study is the Lactococcus lactis β-phosphoglucomutase (β-PGM), which effectively catalyzes the interconversion of β-D-glucose-1-phosphate (β-G1P) to β- D-glucose-6-phosphate (β-G6P) and vice versa via stabile intermediate β-D-glucose-1,6-(bis)phosphate (β-G1,6diP) in the presence of Mg2+. In this paper we revisited the reaction mechanism of the phosphoryl transfer starting from the bisphosphate β-G1,6diP in both directions (toward β-G1P and β-G6P) combining docking techniques and QM/MM theoretical method at the DFT/PBE0 level of theory. In addition we performed NEB (nudged elastic band) and free energy calculations to optimize the path and to identify the transition states and the energies involved in the catalytic cycle. Our calculations reveal that both steps proceed via dissociative pentacoordinated phosphorane, which is not a stabile intermediate but rather a transition state. In addition to the Mg2+ ion, Ser114 and Lys145 also play important roles in stabilizing the large negative charge on the phosphate through strong coordination with the phosphate oxygens and guiding the phosphate group throughout the catalytic process. The calculated energy barrier of the reaction for the β-G1P to β-G1,6diP step is only slightly higher than for the β-G1,6diP to β-G6P step (16.10 kcal mol-1 versus 15.10 kcal mol-1) and is in excellent agreement with experimental findings (14.65 kcal mol-1).

  17. The contrasting catalytic efficiency and cancer cell antiproliferative activity of stereoselective organoruthenium transfer hydrogenation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Soni, Rina; Romero-Canelon, Isolda; Hearn, Jessica M; Liu, Zhe; Wills, Martin; Sadler, Peter J

    2016-05-28

    The rapidly growing area of catalytic ruthenium chemistry has provided new complexes with potential as organometallic anticancer agents with novel mechanisms of action. Here we report the anticancer activity of four neutral organometallic Ru(II) arene N-tosyl-1,2-diphenylethane-1,2-diamine (TsDPEN) tethered transfer hydrogenation catalysts. The enantiomers (R,R)-[Ru(η(6)-C6H5(CH2)3-TsDPEN-N-Me)Cl] (8) and (S,S)-[Ru(η(6)-C6H5(CH2)3-TsDPEN-N-Me)Cl] (8a) exhibited higher potency than cisplatin against A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. When the N-methyl was replaced by N-H, i.e. to give (R,R)-[Ru(η(6)-Ph(CH2)3-TsDPEN-NH)Cl] (7) and (S,S)-[Ru(η(6)-Ph(CH2)3-TsDPEN-NH)Cl] (7a), respectively, anticancer activity decreased >5-fold. Their antiproliferative activity appears to be linked to their ability to accumulate in cells, and their mechanism of action might involve inhibition of tubulin polymerisation. This appears to be the first report of the potent anticancer activity of tethered Ru(II) arene complexes, and the structure-activity relationship suggests that the N-methyl substituents are important for potency. In the National Cancer Institute 60-cancer-cell-line screen, complexes 8 and 8a exhibited higher activity than cisplatin towards a broad range of cancer cell lines. Intriguingly, in contrast to their potent anticancer properties, complexes 8/8a are poor catalysts for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation, whereas complexes 7/7a are effective asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts. PMID:27109147

  18. Interspecies distances between propionic acid degraders and methanogens in syntrophic consortia for optimal hydrogen transfer.

    PubMed

    Felchner-Zwirello, Monika; Winter, Josef; Gallert, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    A mixed culture from an anaerobic biowaste digester was enriched on propionate and used to investigate interspecies hydrogen transfer in dependence of spatial distances between propionate degraders and methanogens. From 20.3 mM propionate, 20.8 mM acetate and 15.5 mM methane were formed. Maximum specific propionate oxidation and methane formation rates were 49 and 23 mmol mg(-1) day(-1), respectively. Propionate oxidation was inhibited by only 20 mM acetate by about 50 %. Intermediate formate formation during inhibited methanogensis was observed. The spatial distribution and the biovolume fraction of propionate degraders and of methanogens in relation to the total population during aggregate formation were determined. Measurements of interbacterial distances were conducted with fluorescence in situ hybridization by application of group-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes and 3D image analyses. With increasing incubation time, floc formation and growth up to 54 μm were observed. Propionate degraders and methanogens were distributed randomly in the flocs. The methanogenic biovolume fraction was high at the beginning and remained constant over 42 days, whereas the fraction of propionate degraders increased with time during propionate feeding. Interbacterial distances between propionate degraders and methanogens decreased with time from 5.30 to 0.29 μm, causing an increase of the maximum possible hydrogen flux from 1.1 to 10.3 nmol ml(-1) min(-1). The maximum possible hydrogen flux was always higher than the hydrogen formation and consumption rate, indicating that reducing the interspecies distance by aggregation is advantageous in complex ecosystems. PMID:23233207

  19. Improved performance in co-processing through fundamental and mechanistic studies in hydrogen transfer and catalysis: Quarterly report, December 27, 1988--March 27, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Guin, J.A.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    To gain fundamental understanding of the role and importance of hydrogen transfer reactions in thermal and catalytic coprocessing by examining possible donation from cycloalkane/aromatic systems and by understanding the chemistry and enhanced reactivity of hydrotreated residuum, by enriching petroleum solvent with potent new donors, nonaromatic hydroaromatics, thereby promoting hydrogen transfer reactions in coprocessing. This quarter, a complete literature search was performed on hydrogen donation in coprocessing and coal liquefaction. The objective of this search was to undercover the role of hydrogen transfer from different types of model molecules to one another as well as the role of hydrogen donation in coprocessing and coal liquefaction. 24 refs.

  20. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation for C-C Bond Formation: Hydrohydroxyalkylation and Hydroaminoalkylation via Reactant Redox Pairs.

    PubMed

    Perez, Felix; Oda, Susumu; Geary, Laina M; Krische, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Merging the chemistry of transfer hydrogenation and carbonyl or imine addition, a broad new family of redox-neutral or reductive hydrohydroxyalkylations and hydroaminomethylations have been developed. In these processes, hydrogen redistribution between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants is accompanied by C-C bond formation, enabling direct conversion of lower alcohols to higher alcohols. Similarly, hydrogen redistribution between amines to π-unsaturated reactants results in direct conversion of lower amines to higher amines. Alternatively, equivalent products of hydrohydroxyalkylation and hydroaminomethylation may be generated through the reaction of carbonyl compounds or imines with π-unsaturated reactants under the conditions of 2-propanol-mediated reductive coupling. Finally, using vicinally dioxygenated reactants, that is, diol, ketols, or diones, successive transfer hydrogenative coupling occurs to generate 2 C-C bonds, resulting in products of formal [4+2] cycloaddition. PMID:27573275

  1. Integration of Light Trapping Silver Nanostructures in Hydrogenated Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells by Transfer Printing.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hidenori; Sai, Hitoshi; Matsubara, Koji; Takato, Hidetaka; Kondo, Michio

    2015-01-01

    One of the potential applications of metal nanostructures is light trapping in solar cells, where unique optical properties of nanosized metals, commonly known as plasmonic effects, play an important role. Research in this field has, however, been impeded owing to the difficulty of fabricating devices containing the desired functional metal nanostructures. In order to provide a viable strategy to this issue, we herein show a transfer printing-based approach that allows the quick and low-cost integration of designed metal nanostructures with a variety of device architectures, including solar cells. Nanopillar poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps were fabricated from a commercially available nanohole plastic film as a master mold. On this nanopatterned PDMS stamps, Ag films were deposited, which were then transfer-printed onto block copolymer (binding layer)-coated hydrogenated microcrystalline Si (µc-Si:H) surface to afford ordered Ag nanodisk structures. It was confirmed that the resulting Ag nanodisk-incorporated µc-Si:H solar cells show higher performances compared to a cell without the transfer-printed Ag nanodisks, thanks to plasmonic light trapping effect derived from the Ag nanodisks. Because of the simplicity and versatility, further device application would also be feasible thorough this approach. PMID:26575244

  2. Homolytic N–H Activation of Ammonia: Hydrogen Transfer of Parent Iridium Ammine, Amide, Imide, and Nitride Species

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The redox series [Irn(NHx)(PNP)] (n = II–IV, x = 3–0; PNP = N(CHCHPtBu2)2) was examined with respect to electron, proton, and hydrogen atom transfer steps. The experimental and computational results suggest that the IrIII imido species [Ir(NH)(PNP)] is not stable but undergoes disproportionation to the respective IrII amido and IrIV nitrido species. N–H bond strengths are estimated upon reaction with hydrogen atom transfer reagents to rationalize this observation and are used to discuss the reactivity of these compounds toward E–H bond activation. PMID:26192601

  3. The effect of local substrate motion on quantum hydrogen transfer in soybean lipoxygenase-1 modeled with QTES-DFTB dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzuca, James W.; Garashchuk, Sophya; Jakowski, Jacek

    2014-10-01

    The motion of local substrate nuclei is incorporated into the quantum hydrogen transfer reaction which occurs in the active site of soybean lipoxygenase-1, modeled within a quantum trajectory (QT) framework. Interactions within the active site are obtained from on-the-fly electronic structure (ES) calculations at the density-functional tight-binding (DFTB) level. By selectively constraining substrate nuclei, changes in the rate constants and kinetic isotope effect are computed over a 100 K temperature range. Substrate motion, occurring on the time-scale of the hydrogen transfer, enhances both the rate constants and isotope effect, but does not change trends captured in a constrained substrate environment.

  4. Dynamic Kinetic Resolution Approach for the Asymmetric Synthesis of Tetrahydrobenzodiazepines Using Transfer Hydrogenation by Chiral Phosphoric Acid.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kosaku; Yamamoto, Eri; Saito, Kodai; Yamanaka, Masahiro; Akiyama, Takahiko

    2016-06-01

    Asymmetric synthesis of tetrahydrobenzodiazepines was achieved by transfer hydrogenation of dihydrobenzodiazepines with benzothiazoline having a hydrogen-bonding donor substituent by means of a newly synthesized chiral phosphoric acid. This method was applicable to various racemic dihydrobenzodiazepines to give the corresponding products in good yields with excellent diastereoselectivities and enantioselectivities taking advantage of the dynamic kinetic resolution. Furthermore, the effect of bulky substituent at 3,3'-position on the catalyst and hydrogen-bonding donor substituent on benzothiazoline was fully elucidated by the theoretical study. PMID:27150449

  5. Mechanistic Insights into Hydride Transfer for Catalytic Hydrogenation of CO2 with Cobalt Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Neeraj; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dupuis, Michel; Raugei, Simone; Appel, Aaron M.

    2014-08-21

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to formate by Co(dmpe)2H can proceeds via direct hydride transfer or via CO2 coordination to Co followed by reductive elimination of formate. Both pathways have activation barriers consistent with experiment (~17.5 kcal/mol). Controlling the basicity of Co by ligand design is key to improve catalysis. The research by N.K., D.M.C. and A.M.A. was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. The research by S.R. and M.D. was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for the DOE by Battelle.

  6. Catalytic enantioselective OFF ↔ ON activation processes initiated by hydrogen transfer: concepts and challenges.

    PubMed

    Quintard, Adrien; Rodriguez, Jean

    2016-08-18

    Hydrogen transfer initiated processes are eco-compatible transformations allowing the reversible OFF ↔ ON activation of otherwise unreactive substrates. The minimization of stoichiometric waste as well as the unique activation modes provided by these transformations make them key players for a greener future for organic synthesis. Long limited to catalytic reactions that form racemic products, considerable progress on the development of strategies for controlling diastereo- and enantioselectivity has been made in the last decade. The aim of this review is to present the different strategies that enable enantioselective transformations of this type and to highlight how they can be used to construct key synthetic building blocks in fewer operations with less waste generation. PMID:27381644

  7. High Precision Time Transfer in Space with a Hydrogen Maser on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1996-01-01

    An atomic hydrogen maser clock system designed for long term operation in space will be installed on the Russian space station Mir, in late 1997. The H-maser's frequency stability will be measured using pulsed laser time transfer techniques. Daily time comparisons made with a precision of better than 100 picoseconds will allow an assessment of the long term stability of the space maser at a level on the order of 1 part in 10(sup 15) or better. Laser pulse arrival times at the spacecraft will be recorded with a resolution of 10 picoseconds relative to the space clock's time scale. Cube corner reflectors will reflect the pulses back to the Earth laser station to determine the propagation delay and enable comparison with the Earth-based time scale. Data for relativistic and gravitational frequency corrections will be obtained from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver.

  8. Forced convection heat transfer of saturated liquid hydrogen in vertically-mounted heated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, Hideki; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Hata, Koichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Kobayasi, Hiroaki; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer from the inner side of vertically-mounted heated pipes to forced flow of saturated liquid hydrogen was measured with a quasi-steady increase of a heat generation rate for wide ranges of flow rate and saturated pressure. The tube heaters have lengths L of 100 mm and 167 mm with the diameter D of 4 mm and lengths of 150 mm and 250 mm with the diameter of 6 mm. The heat fluxes at departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) were higher for higher flow velocity, lower pressures and shorter L/D. The effect of L/D on the DNB heat flux was clarified. It is confirmed that our DNB correlation can describe the experimental data.

  9. Alkali-Metal-Ion-Assisted Hydrogen Atom Transfer in the Homocysteine Radical.

    PubMed

    Lesslie, Michael; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Lawler, John T; Siu, K W Michael; Oomens, Jos; Berden, Giel; Hopkinson, Alan C; Ryzhov, Victor

    2016-02-12

    Intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) was examined in homocysteine (Hcy) thiyl radical/alkali metal ion complexes in the gas phase by combination of experimental techniques (ion-molecule reactions and infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy) and theoretical calculations. The experimental results unequivocally show that metal ion complexation (as opposed to protonation) of the regiospecifically generated Hcy thiyl radical promotes its rapid isomerisation into an α-carbon radical via HAT. Theoretical calculations were employed to calculate the most probable HAT pathway and found that in alkali metal ion complexes the activation barrier is significantly lower, in full agreement with the experimental data. This is, to our knowledge, the first example of a gas-phase thiyl radical thermal rearrangement into an α-carbon species within the same amino acid residue and is consistent with the solution phase behaviour of Hcy radical. PMID:26836574

  10. Study of Thermodynamic Vent and Screen Baffle Integration for Orbital Storage and Transfer of Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical and experimental program was performed to determine the feasibility of integrating an internal thermodynamic vent system and a full wall-screen liner for the orbital storage and transfer of liquid hydrogen (LH2). Ten screens were selected from a comprehensive screen survey. The experimental study determined the screen bubble point, flow-through pressure loss, and pressure loss along rectangular channels lined with screen on one side, for the 10 screens using LH2 saturated at 34.5 N/cm2 (50 psia). The correlated experimental data were used in an analysis to determine the optimum system characteristics in terms of minimum weight for 6 tanks ranging from 141.6 m3 (5,000 ft3) to 1.416 m3 (50 ft3) for orbital storage times of 30 and 300 days.

  11. Transfer hydrogenation catalysis in cells as a new approach to anticancer drug design

    PubMed Central

    Soldevila-Barreda, Joan J.; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Habtemariam, Abraha; Sadler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Organometallic complexes are effective hydrogenation catalysts for organic reactions. For example, Noyori-type ruthenium complexes catalyse reduction of ketones by transfer of hydride from formate. Here we show that such catalytic reactions can be achieved in cancer cells, offering a new strategy for the design of safe metal-based anticancer drugs. The activity of ruthenium(II) sulfonamido ethyleneamine complexes towards human ovarian cancer cells is enhanced by up to 50 × in the presence of low non-toxic doses of formate. The extent of conversion of coenzyme NAD+ to NADH in cells is dependent on formate concentration. This novel reductive stress mechanism of cell death does not involve apoptosis or perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potentials. In contrast, iridium cyclopentadienyl catalysts cause cancer cell death by oxidative stress. Organometallic complexes therefore have an extraordinary ability to modulate the redox status of cancer cells. PMID:25791197

  12. Hydrodehalogenation of Alkyl Iodides with Base-Mediated Hydrogenation and Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation: Application to the Asymmetric Synthesis of N-Protected α-Methylamines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a very mild synthesis of N-protected α-methylamines from the corresponding amino acids. Carboxyl groups of amino acids are reduced to iodomethyl groups via hydroxymethyl intermediates. Reductive deiodination to methyl groups is achieved by hydrogenation or catalytic transfer hydrogenation under alkaline conditions. Basic hydrodehalogenation is selective for the iodomethyl group over hydrogenolysis-labile protecting groups, such as benzyloxycarbonyl, benzyl ester, benzyl ether, and 9-fluorenyloxymethyl, thus allowing the conversion of virtually any protected amino acid into the corresponding N-protected α-methylamine. PMID:25116734

  13. A transferable coarse-grained model for hydrogen-bonding liquids.

    PubMed

    Golubkov, Pavel A; Wu, Johnny C; Ren, Pengyu

    2008-04-21

    We present here a recent development of a generalized coarse-grained model for use in molecular simulations. In this model, interactions between coarse-grained particles consist of both van der Waals and explicit electrostatic components. As a result, the coarse-grained model offers the transferability that is lacked by most current effective-potential based approaches. The previous center-of-mass framework (P. A. Golubkov and P. Ren, J. Chem. Phys., 2006, 125, 64103) is generalized here to include arbitrary off-center interaction sites for both Gay-Berne and multipoles. The new model has been applied to molecular dynamic simulations of neat methanol liquid. By placing a single point multipole at the oxygen atom rather than at the center of mass of methanol, there is a significant improvement in the ability to capture hydrogen-bonding. The critical issue of transferability of the coarse-grained model is verified on methanol-water mixtures, using parameters derived from neat liquids without any modification. The mixture density and internal energy from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations show good agreement with experimental measurements, on a par with what has been obtained from more detailed atomic models. By mapping the dynamics trajectory from the coarse-grained simulation into the all-atom counterpart, we are able to investigate atomic-level structure and interaction. Atomic radial distribution functions of neat methanol, neat water and mixtures compare favorably to experimental measurements. Furthermore, hydrogen-bonded 6- and 7-molecule chains of water and methanol observed in the mixture are in agreement with previous atomic simulations. PMID:18688358

  14. Ionosphere-exosphere coupling through charge exchange and momentum transfer in hydrogen-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Breig, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The implications of a traditional assumption of exospheric physics, that collisions of hydrogen atoms and protons preferentially result in charge exchange with negligible momentum transfer are examined. Initially adopted as a necessary convenience to accommodate limited computer resources in exosphere model calculations, this approximation results in a direct transformation of the proton velocity distribution into a hot component of neutral hydrogen. With expanding computational facilities, the need for the approximation has passed. As the first step toward its replacement with a realistic, quantum mechanical model of the H - H(+) collision process, differential and cumulative cross sections were calculated for quantum elastic scattering of indistinguishable nuclei for a fine grid of encounter energies and scattering angles. These data are used to study the nature of ionosphere-exosphere coupling through H - H(+) collisions, and to demonstrate that the distribution of velocities of scattered H produced in the traditional exospheric charge exchange approximation, as well as that arising from an alternative, fluid dynamic approach, leads to unacceptable abundances of coronal atoms in long-term, highly elliptic trajectories.

  15. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D; Tulk, Christopher A; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Ivanov, Ilia N; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-09-19

    Acetonitrile (CH3 CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. It is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp(2) and sp(3) bonded carbon. Finally, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst. PMID:27561179

  16. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D.; Tulk, Christopher A.; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J.; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; et al

    2016-08-25

    Acetonitrile (CH3CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. In this study, it is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH···N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp2 and sp3more » bonded carbon. Lastly, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst.« less

  17. Predicting organic hydrogen atom transfer rate constants using the Marcus cross relation

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Mayer, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical reactions that involve net hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) are ubiquitous in chemistry and biology, from the action of antioxidants to industrial and metalloenzyme catalysis. This report develops and validates a procedure to predict rate constants for HAT reactions of oxyl radicals (RO•) in various media. Our procedure uses the Marcus cross relation (CR) and includes adjustments for solvent hydrogen-bonding effects on both the kinetics and thermodynamics of the reactions. Kinetic solvent effects (KSEs) are included by using Ingold’s model, and thermodynamic solvent effects are accounted for by using an empirical model developed by Abraham. These adjustments are shown to be critical to the success of our combined model, referred to as the CR/KSE model. As an initial test of the CR/KSE model we measured self-exchange and cross rate constants in different solvents for reactions of the 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl radical and the hydroxylamine 2,2′-6,6′-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-ol. Excellent agreement is observed between the calculated and directly determined cross rate constants. We then extend the model to over 30 known HAT reactions of oxyl radicals with OH or CH bonds, including biologically relevant reactions of ascorbate, peroxyl radicals, and α-tocopherol. The CR/KSE model shows remarkable predictive power, predicting rate constants to within a factor of 5 for almost all of the surveyed HAT reactions. PMID:20215463

  18. Hydrogenation and Transfer Hydrogenation Promoted by Tethered Ru-S Complexes: From Cooperative Dihydrogen Activation to Hydride Abstraction/Proton Release from Dihydrogen Surrogates.

    PubMed

    Lefranc, Alice; Qu, Zheng-Wang; Grimme, Stefan; Oestreich, Martin

    2016-07-11

    Hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation of imines with cyclohexa-1,4-dienes, as well as with a representative Hantzsch ester dihydrogen surrogate, are reported. Both processes are catalyzed by tethered Ru-S complexes but differ in the activation mode of the dihydrogen source: cooperative activation of the H-H bond at the Ru-S bond leads to the corresponding Ru-H complex and protonation of the sulfur atom, whereas the same cationic Ru-S catalyst abstracts a hydride from a donor-substituted cyclohexa-1,4-diene to form the neutral Ru-H complex and a low-energy Wheland intermediate. A sequence of proton and hydride transfers on the imine substrate then yields an amine. The reaction pathways are analyzed computationally, and the established mechanistic pictures are in agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:27311877

  19. A versatile ruthenium(II)-NNC complex catalyst for transfer hydrogenation of ketones and Oppenauer-type oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Du, Wangming; Wang, Liandi; Wu, Ping; Yu, Zhengkun

    2012-09-10

    A ruthenium(II)-NNC pincer complex containing an unsymmetrical tridentate pyrazolyl-pyridyl-tolyl ligand was synthesized and structually characterized. This complex exhibited excellent catalytic activity for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones in 2-propanol at reflux, and for the Oppenauer-type dehydrogenative oxidation of alcohols in acetone at reflux (see scheme). PMID:22887575

  20. C-Propargylation Overrides O-Propargylation in Reactions of Propargyl Chloride with Primary Alcohols: Rhodium-Catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tao; Woo, Sang Kook; Krische, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    The canonical SN 2 behavior displayed by alcohols and activated alkyl halides in basic media (O-alkylation) is superseded by a pathway leading to carbinol C-alkylation under the conditions of rhodium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation. Racemic and asymmetric propargylations are described. PMID:27321353

  1. Revisiting the Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley Reduction: A Sustainable Protocol for Transfer Hydrogenation of Aldehydes and Ketones

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metal-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds has received much interest because of the immense number of opportunities that exist to prepare high-value products. This reaction is featured in numerous multi-step organic syntheses and is arguably the most import...

  2. Selective conversion of polyenes to monoenes by RuCl(3) -catalyzed transfer hydrogenation: the case of cashew nutshell liquid.

    PubMed

    Perdriau, Sébastien; Harder, Sjoerd; Heeres, Hero J; de Vries, Johannes G

    2012-12-01

    Cardanol, a constituent of cashew nutshell liquid (CNSL), was subjected to transfer hydrogenation catalyzed by RuCl(3) using isopropanol as a reductant. The side chain of cardanol, which is a mixture of a triene, a diene, and a monoene, was selectively reduced to the monoene. Surprisingly, it is the C8-C9 double bond that is retained with high selectivity. A similar transfer hydrogenation of linoleic acid derivatives succeeded only if the substrate contained an aromatic ring, such as a benzyl ester. TEM and a negative mercury test showed that the catalyst was homogeneous. By using ESI-MS, ruthenium complexes were identified that contained one, two, or even three molecules of substrate, most likely as allyl complexes. The interaction between ruthenium and the aromatic ring determines selectivity in the hydrogenation reaction. PMID:23060315

  3. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  4. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems. PMID:27146955

  5. Improved performance in coprocessing through fundamental and mechanistic studies in hydrogen transfer and catalysis. Quarterly report, September 27, 1990--December 26, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1990-12-31

    The objective is to gain a fundamental understanding of the role and importance of hydrogen transfer reactions in thermal and catalytic coprocessing by examining possible hydrogen donation from cycloalkane/aromatic systems and by understanding the chemistry and enhanced reactivity of hydrotreated residuum, as well as by enriching petroleum solvent with potent new donors, nonaromatic hydroaromatics, thereby promoting hydrogen transfer reactions in coprocessing. The detailed results of experiments performed on several subtasks during the quarter are presented.

  6. Improved performance in coprocessing through fundamental and mechanistic studies in hydrogen transfer and catalysis. Quarterly report, September 26, 1989--December 26, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1989-12-31

    To gain a fundamental understanding of the role and importance of hydrogen transfer reactions in thermal and catalytic coprocessing by examining possible hydrogen donation from cycloalkane/aromatic systems and by understanding the chemistry and enhanced reactivity of hydrotreated residuum, as well as by enriching petroleum solvent with potent new donors, nonaromatic hydroaromatics, thereby promoting hydrogen transfer reactions in coprocessing. The detailed results of experiments performed on several subtasks during the quarter are presented.

  7. Improved performance in coprocessing through fundamental and mechanistic studies in hydrogen transfer and catalysis. Quarterly report, March 27, 1991--June 26, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    The objective is to gain a fundamental understanding of the role and importance of hydrogen transfer reactions in thermal and catalytic coprocessing by examining possible hydrogen donation from cycloalkane/aromatic systems and by understanding the chemistry and enhanced reactivity of hydrotreated residuum, as well as by enriching petroleum solvent with potent new donors, nonaromatic hydroaromatics, thereby promoting hydrogen transfer reactions in coprocessing. The detailed results of experiments performed on several subtasks during the quarter are presented.

  8. Improved performance in coprocessing through fundamental and mechanistic studies in hydrogen transfer and catalysis. Quarterly report, March 27, 1990--June 26, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1990-12-31

    To gain a fundamental understanding of the role and importance of hydrogen transfer reactions in thermal and catalytic coprocessing by examining possible hydrogen donation from cycloalkane/aromatic systems and by understanding the chemistry and enhanced reactivity of hydrotreated residuum, as well as by enriching petroleum solvent with potent new donors, nonaromatic hydroaromatics, thereby promoting hydrogen transfer reactions in coprocessing. The detailed results of experiments performed on several subtasks during the quarter are presented.

  9. Mechanism of Action of Sulforaphane as a Superoxide Radical Anion and Hydrogen Peroxide Scavenger by Double Hydrogen Transfer: A Model for Iron Superoxide Dismutase.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ajit Kumar; Mishra, P C

    2015-06-25

    The mechanism of action of sulforaphane as a scavenger of superoxide radical anion (O2(•-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) in both gas phase and aqueous media. Iron superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) involved in scavenging superoxide radical anion from biological media was modeled by a complex consisting of the ferric ion (Fe(3+)) attached to three histidine rings. Reactions related to scavenging of superoxide radical anion by sulforaphane were studied using DFT in the presence and absence of Fe-SOD represented by this model in both gas phase and aqueous media. The scavenging action of sulforaphane toward both superoxide radical anion and hydrogen peroxide was found to involve the unusual mechanism of double hydrogen transfer. It was found that sulforaphane alone, without Fe-SOD, cannot scavenge superoxide radical anion in gas phase or aqueous media efficiently as the corresponding reaction barriers are very high. However, in the presence of Fe-SOD represented by the above-mentioned model, the scavenging reactions become barrierless, and so sulforaphane scavenges superoxide radical anion by converting it to hydrogen peroxide efficiently. Further, sulforaphane was found to scavenge hydrogen peroxide also very efficiently by converting it into water. Thus, the mechanism of action of sulforaphane as an excellent antioxidant has been unravelled. PMID:26020652

  10. Slow Hydrogen Transfer Reactions of Oxo— and Hydroxo— Vanadium Compounds: the Importance of Intrinsic Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Waidmann, Christopher R.; Zhou, Xin; Tsai, Erin A.; Kaminsky, Werner; Hrovat, David A.; Borden, Weston Thatcher; Mayer, James M.

    2009-01-01

    barrier heights and show that transfer of a hydrogen atom involves more structural reorganization for vanadium than the Ru analogs. The vanadium complexes have larger changes in the metal–oxo and metal–hydroxo bond lengths, which is traced to the difference in d-orbital occupancy in the two systems. This study thus highlights the importance of intrinsic barriers in the transfer of a hydrogen atom, in addition to the thermochemical (bond strength) factors that have been previously emphasized. PMID:19292442

  11. Cu/MgAl(2)O(4) as bifunctional catalyst for aldol condensation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and selective transfer hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Pupovac, Kristina; Palkovits, Regina

    2013-11-01

    Copper supported on mesoporous magnesium aluminate has been prepared as noble-metal-free solid catalyst for aldol condensation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural with acetone, followed by hydrogenation of the aldol condensation products. The investigated mesoporous spinels possess high activity as solid-base catalysts. Magnesium aluminate exhibits superior activity compared to zinc and cobalt-based aluminates, reaching full conversion and up to 81 % yield of the 1:1 aldol product. The high activity can be correlated to a higher concentration of basic surface sites on magnesium aluminate. Applying continuous regeneration, the catalysts can be recycled without loss of activity. Focusing on the subsequent hydrogenation of aldol condensation products, Cu/MgAl2 O4 allows a selective hydrogenation and CO bond cleavage, delivering 3-hydroxybutyl-5-methylfuran as the main product with up to 84 % selectivity avoiding ring saturation. Analysis of the hydrogenation activity reveals that the reaction proceeds in the following order: CC>CO>CO cleavage>ring hydrogenation. Comparable activity and selectivity can be also achieved utilizing 2-propanol as solvent in the transfer hydrogenation, providing the possibility for partial recycling of acetone and optimization of the hydrogen management. PMID:24038987

  12. An Effective Degumming Enzyme from Bacillus sp. Y1 and Synergistic Action of Hydrogen Peroxide and Protease on Enzymatic Degumming of Ramie Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fenfen; Zou, Mouyong; Li, Xuezhi; Zhao, Jian; Qu, Yinbo

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic degumming, as an alternative to chemical processing, has attracted wide attention. However, to date, little information about other enzyme components with effective degumming except pectinase has been reported, and there is no report about the effect of bleaching agent (H2O2) on enzymatic degumming and combining enzymatic degumming and H2O2 bleaching process. In this study, we found that the crude enzyme of wild-type Bacillus sp. Y1 had a powerful and fast degumming ability. Its PGL activity was the highest at pH 9.6–10.0 and 60°C and stable at pH 7–10.5 and 30–50°C, having a wide scope of pH and temperature. Its PGL also had a high H2O2 tolerance, and the gum loss and brightness of fibers could be significantly improved when H2O2 was added into it for degumming. The synergistic action was also found between it and H2O2 on the degumming and bleaching of ramie fibers. All showed that it was very suitable for a joint process of enzymatic degumming and H2O2 bleaching. It also contained more proteins compared with a control pectinase, and its high protease content was further substantiated as a factor for effective degumming. Protease and pectinase also had a synergistic action on degumming. PMID:23586022

  13. Engineering design elements of a two-phase thermosyphon to transfer nuclear thermal energy to a hydrogen plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabharwall, Piyush

    Two hydrogen production processes, both powered by Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), are currently under investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory. The first is high-temperature steam electrolysis utilizing both heat and electricity and the second is thermo-chemical production through the sulfur-iodine process primarily utilizing heat. Both processes require high temperature (>850°C) for enhanced efficiency; temperatures indicative of NGNP. Safety and licensing mandates prudently dictate that the NGNP and the hydrogen production facility be physically isolated, perhaps requiring separation of over 100m. There are several options to transferring multi-megawatt thermal power over such a distance. One option is simply to produce only electricity, transfer by wire to the hydrogen plant, and then reconvert the electric energy to heat via Joule or induction heating. Electrical transport, however, suffers energy losses of 60-70% due to the thermal to electric conversion inherent in the Brayton cycle. A second option is thermal energy transport via a single-phase forced convection loop where a fluid is mechanically pumped between heat exchangers at the nuclear and hydrogen plants. High temperatures, however, present unique materials and pumping challenges. Single phase, low pressure helium is an attractive option for NGNP, but is not suitable for a single purpose facility dictated to hydrogen production because low pressure helium requires higher pumping power and makes the process very inefficient. A third option is two-phase heat transfer utilizing a high temperature thermosyphon. Heat transport occurs via evaporation and condensation, and the heat transport fluid is re-circulated by gravitational force. Thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. For process heat, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) are desired to transfer heat from

  14. Competition between Hydrogen Bonding and Proton Transfer during Specific Anion Recognition by Dihomooxacalix[4]arene Bidentate Ureas.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Eduardo; González, Felipe J; Ascenso, José R; Marcos, Paula M; Frontana, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Competition between hydrogen bonding and proton transfer reactions was studied for systems composed of electrogenerated dianionic species from dinitrobenzene isomers and substituted dihomooxacalix[4]arene bidentate urea derivatives. To analyze this competition, a second-order ErCrCi mechanism was considered where the binding process is succeeded by proton transfer and the voltammetric responses depend on two dimensionless parameters: the first related to hydrogen bonding reactions, and the second one to proton transfer processes. Experimental results indicated that, upon an increase in the concentration of phenyl-substituted dihomooxacalix[4]arene bidentate urea, voltammetric responses evolve from diffusion-controlled waves (where the binding process is at chemical equilibrium) into irreversible kinetic responses associated with proton transfer. In particular, the 1,3-dinitrobenzene isomer showed a higher proton transfer rate constant (∼25 M(-1) s(-1)) compared to that of the 1,2-dinitrobenzene (∼5 M(-1) s(-1)), whereas the 1,4-dinitrobenzene did not show any proton transfer effect in the experimental conditions employed. PMID:27384148

  15. Hydrogen generation in CSP plants and maintenance of DPO/BP heat transfer fluids - A simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuckelkorn, Thomas; Jung, Christian; Gnädig, Tim; Lang, Christoph; Schall, Christina

    2016-05-01

    The ageing of diphenyl oxide/ biphenyl (DPO/BP) Heat Transfer Fluids (HTFs) implies challenging tasks for operators of parabolic trough power plants in order to find the economic optimum between plant performance and O&M costs. Focusing on the generation of hydrogen, which is effecting from the HTF ageing process, the balance of hydrogen pressure in the HTF is simulated for different operation scenarios. Accelerated build-up of hydrogen pressure in the HTF is causing increased permeation into the annular vacuum space of the installed receivers and must be avoided in order to maintain the performance of these components. Therefore, the effective hydrogen partial pressure in the HTF has to be controlled and limited according to the specified values so that the vacuum lifetime of the receivers and the overall plant performance can be ensured. In order to simulate and visualize the hydrogen balance of a typical parabolic trough plant, initially a simple model is used to calculate the balance of hydrogen in the system and this is described. As input data for the simulation, extrapolated hydrogen generation rates have been used, which were calculated from results of lab tests performed by DLR in Cologne, Germany. Hourly weather data, surface temperatures of the tubing system calculated by using the simulation tool from NREL, and hydrogen permeation rates for stainless steel and carbon steel grades taken from literature have been added to the model. In a first step the effect of HTF ageing, build-up of hydrogen pressure in the HTF and hydrogen loss rates through piping and receiver components have been modeled. In a second step a selective hydrogen removal process has been added to the model. The simulation results are confirming the need of active monitoring and controlling the effective hydrogen partial pressure in parabolic trough solar thermal power plants with DPO/BP HTF. Following the results of the simulation, the expected plant performance can only be achieved

  16. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Hydrogen Atom Transfer (Tautomerization) Reactions for the DNA Base Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Salter, Latasha M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for four different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest single excited state potential energy surface are studied. The energetic order of the tautomers on the ground state potential surface is 9H less than 7H less than 3H less than 1H, while on the excited state surface this order is found to be different: 3H less than 1H less than 9H less than 7H. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (9 yields 3 tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic state. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic state, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. The barrier for this reaction in the excited state may become very low in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules, and therefore such tautomerization reaction may play an important role in the solution phase photochemistry of adenine.

  17. Manganese(III) corrole-oxidant adduct as the active intermediate in catalytic hydrogen atom transfer.

    PubMed

    Zdilla, Michael J; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2008-11-17

    Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from dihydroanthracene to ArINTs (Ar = 2- tert-butylsulfonyl)benzene and Ts = p-toluenesulfonyl) is catalyzed by Mn(tpfc) (tpfc = 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole). Kinetics of HAT was monitored by gas chromatography. Conversion to the major products anthracene, TsNH 2, and ArI is too fast to be explained by direct HAT from the terminal imido complex TsN=Mn(tpfc), which forms from the reaction of Mn(tpfc) with ArINTs. Steady-state kinetics, isotope effects, and variation of the initial catalyst form (Mn (III)(tpfc) vs TsN=Mn (V)(tpfc)) support a mechanism in which the active catalytic species is an adduct of manganese(III) with the oxidant, (ArINTs)Mn (III)(tpfc). This species was detected by rapid-scan stopped-flow absorption spectroscopy. Kinetic simulations demonstrated the viability of this mechanism in contrast to other proposals. PMID:18855381

  18. Synthesis and structures of ruthenium–NHC complexes and their catalysis in hydrogen transfer reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Lu, Chunxin; Zheng, Qing; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ruthenium complexes [Ru(L1)2(CH3CN)2](PF6)2 (1), [RuL1(CH3CN)4](PF6)2 (2) and [RuL2(CH3CN)3](PF6)2 (3) (L1= 3-methyl-1-(pyrimidine-2-yl)imidazolylidene, L2 = 1,3-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)benzimidazolylidene) were obtained through a transmetallation reaction of the corresponding nickel–NHC complexes with [Ru(p-cymene)2Cl2]2 in refluxing acetonitrile solution. The crystal structures of three complexes determined by X-ray analyses show that the central Ru(II) atoms are coordinated by pyrimidine- or pyridine-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene and acetonitrile ligands displaying the typical octahedral geometry. The reaction of [RuL1(CH3CN)4](PF6)2 with triphenylphosphine and 1,10-phenanthroline resulted in the substitution of one and two coordinated acetonitrile ligands and afforded [RuL1(PPh3)(CH3CN)3](PF6)2 (4) and [RuL1(phen)(CH3CN)2](PF6)2 (5), respectively. The molecular structures of the complexes 4 and 5 were also studied by X-ray diffraction analysis. These ruthenium complexes have proven to be efficient catalysts for transfer hydrogenation of various ketones. PMID:26664598

  19. Charge-Transfer Induced High Efficient Hydrogen Evolution of MoS2/graphene Cocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Honglin; Yu, Ke; Li, Chao; Tang, Zheng; Guo, Bangjun; Lei, Xiang; Fu, Hao; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2015-12-01

    The MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite has attracted intensive attention due to its favorable performance as hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, but still lacking is the theoretical understanding from a dynamic perspective regarding to the influence of electron transfer, as well as the connection between conductivity and the promoted HER performance. Based on the first-principles calculations, we here clearly reveal how an excess of negative charge density affects the variation of Gibbs free energy (ΔG) and the corresponding HER behavior. It is demonstrated that the electron plays a crucial role in the HER routine. To verify the theoretical analyses, the MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite with well defined 3-dimensional configuration was synthesized via a facile one-step approach for the first time. The experimental data show that the HER performance have a direct link to the conductivity. These findings pave the way for a further developing of 2-dimension based composites for HER applications.

  20. Charge-Transfer Induced High Efficient Hydrogen Evolution of MoS2/graphene Cocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    Li, Honglin; Yu, Ke; Li, Chao; Tang, Zheng; Guo, Bangjun; Lei, Xiang; Fu, Hao; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    The MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite has attracted intensive attention due to its favorable performance as hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, but still lacking is the theoretical understanding from a dynamic perspective regarding to the influence of electron transfer, as well as the connection between conductivity and the promoted HER performance. Based on the first-principles calculations, we here clearly reveal how an excess of negative charge density affects the variation of Gibbs free energy (ΔG) and the corresponding HER behavior. It is demonstrated that the electron plays a crucial role in the HER routine. To verify the theoretical analyses, the MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite with well defined 3-dimensional configuration was synthesized via a facile one-step approach for the first time. The experimental data show that the HER performance have a direct link to the conductivity. These findings pave the way for a further developing of 2-dimension based composites for HER applications. PMID:26688209

  1. Charge-Transfer Induced High Efficient Hydrogen Evolution of MoS2/graphene Cocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Honglin; Yu, Ke; Li, Chao; Tang, Zheng; Guo, Bangjun; Lei, Xiang; Fu, Hao; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    The MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite has attracted intensive attention due to its favorable performance as hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, but still lacking is the theoretical understanding from a dynamic perspective regarding to the influence of electron transfer, as well as the connection between conductivity and the promoted HER performance. Based on the first-principles calculations, we here clearly reveal how an excess of negative charge density affects the variation of Gibbs free energy (ΔG) and the corresponding HER behavior. It is demonstrated that the electron plays a crucial role in the HER routine. To verify the theoretical analyses, the MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) composite with well defined 3-dimensional configuration was synthesized via a facile one-step approach for the first time. The experimental data show that the HER performance have a direct link to the conductivity. These findings pave the way for a further developing of 2-dimension based composites for HER applications. PMID:26688209

  2. Ketyl Radical Formation via Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in an Aqueous Solution versus Hydrogen Atom Transfer in Isopropanol after Photoexcitation of Aromatic Carbonyl Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiting; Ma, Jiani; Li, Songbo; Li, Ming-De; Guan, Xiangguo; Lan, Xin; Zhu, Ruixue; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-07-01

    The excited nπ* and ππ* triplets of two benzophenone (BP) and two anthraquinone (AQ) derivatives have been observed in acetonitrile, isopropanol, and mixed aqueous solutions using time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopic and nanosecond transient absorption experiments. These experimental results, combined with results from density functional theory calculations, reveal the effects of solvent and substituents on the properties, relative energies, and chemical reactivities of the nπ* and ππ* triplets. The triplet nπ* configuration was found to act as the reactive species for a subsequent hydrogen atom transfer reaction to produce a ketyl radical intermediate in the isopropanol solvent, while the triplet ππ* undergoes a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) in aqueous solutions to produce a ketyl radical intermediate. This PCET reaction, which occurs via a concerted proton transfer (to the excited carbonyl group) and electron transfer (to the excited phenyl ring), can account for the experimental observation by several different research groups over the past 40 years of the formation of ketyl radicals after photolysis of a number of BP and AQ derivatives in aqueous solutions, although water is considered to be a relatively "inert" hydrogen-donor solvent. PMID:27266916

  3. Protective effect of enzymatic hydrolysates from highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line

    PubMed Central

    Senevirathne, Mahinda; Kim, Soo-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Blueberry was enzymatically hydrolyzed using selected commercial food grade carbohydrases (AMG, Celluclast, Termamyl, Ultraflo and Viscozyme) and proteases (Alcalase, Flavourzyme, Kojizyme, Neutrase and Protamex) to obtain water soluble compounds, and their protective effect was investigated against H2O2-induced damage in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line (V79-4) via various published methods. Both AMG and Alcalase hydrolysates showed higher total phenolic content as well as higher cell viability and ROS scavenging activities, and hence, selected for further antioxidant assays. Both AMG and Alcalase hydrolysates also showed higher protective effects against lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptotic body formation in a dose-dependent fashion. Thus, the results indicated that water soluble compounds obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of blueberry possess good antioxidant activity against H2O2-induced cell damage in vitro. PMID:20607062

  4. Trends in Ground-State Entropies for Transition Metal Based Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Elizabeth A.; Manner, Virginia W.; Markle, Todd F.; Wu, Adam; Franz, James A.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Reported herein are thermochemical studies of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions involving transition metal H-atom donors MIILH and oxyl radicals. [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, [FeII(H2bim)3]2+, [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ and RuII(acac)2(py-imH) [H2bip = 2,2’-bi-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine, H2bim = 2,2’-bi-imidazoline, acac = 2,4-pentandionato, py-imH = 2-(2’-pyridyl)-imidazole)] each react with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl) or tBu3PhO• (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) to give the deprotonated, oxidized metal complex MIIIL, and TEMPOH or tBu3PhOH. Solution equilibrium measurements for the reaction of [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ with TEMPO show a large, negative ground-state entropy for hydrogen atom transfer, −41 ± 2 cal mol−1 K−1. This is even more negative than the ΔSoHAT = −30 ± 2 cal mol−1 K−1 for the two iron complexes and the ΔSoHAT for RuII(acac)2(py-imH) + TEMPO, 4.9 ± 1.1 cal mol−1 K−1, as reported earlier. Calorimetric measurements quantitatively confirm the enthalpy of reaction for [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ + TEMPO, thus also confirming ΔSoHAT. Calorimetry on TEMPOH + tBu3PhO• gives ΔHoHAT = −11.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol−1 which matches the enthalpy predicted from the difference in literature solution BDEs. A brief evaluation of the literature thermochemistry of TEMPOH and tBu3PhOH supports the common assumption that ΔSoHAT ≈ 0 for HAT reactions of organic and small gas-phase molecules. However, this assumption does not hold for transition metal based HAT reactions. The trend in magnitude of |ΔSoHAT| for reactions with TEMPO, RuII(acac)2(py-imH) << [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ = [FeII(H2bim)3]2+ < [CoII(H2bim)3]2+, is surprisingly well predicted by the trends for electron transfer half-reaction entropies, ΔSoET, in aprotic solvents. This is because both ΔSoET and ΔSoHAT have substantial contributions from vibrational entropy, which varies significantly with the metal center involved. The close connection between ΔSoHAT and ΔSoET provides an important

  5. Trends in Ground-State Entropies for Transition Metal Based Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, Elizabeth A.; Manner, Virginia W.; Markle, Todd F.; Wu, Adam; Franz, James A.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-03-10

    Reported herein are thermochemical studies of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions involving transition metal H-atom donors MIILH and oxyl radicals. [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, [FeII(H2bim)3]2+, [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ and RuII(acac)2(py-imH) [H2bip = 2,2’-bi-1,4,5,6-tetrahydro¬pyrimidine, H2bim = 2,2’-bi-imidazoline, acac = 2,4-pentandionato, py-imH = 2-(2’-pyridyl)¬imidazole)] each react with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl) or tBu3PhO• (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) to give the deprotonated, oxidized metal complex MIIIL, and TEMPOH or tBu3PhOH. Solution equilibrium measurements for the reactions of Co and Fe complexes with TEMPO show a large, negative ground-state entropy for hydrogen atom transfer: ΔSºHAT = -30 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for the two iron complexes and -41 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for [CoII(H2bim)3]2+. The ΔSºHAT for TEMPO + RuII(acac)2(py-imH) is much closer to zero, 4.9 ± 1.1 cal mol-1 K-1. Calorimetric measurements quantitatively confirm the enthalpy of reaction for [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ + TEMPO, thus also confirming ΔSºHAT. Calorimetry on TEMPOH + tBu3PhO• gives ΔHºHAT = 11.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol-1 which matches the enthalpy predicted from the difference in literature solution BDEs. An evaluation of the literature BDEs of both TEMPOH and tBu3PhOH is briefly presented and new estimates are included on the relative enthalpy of solvation for tBu3PhO• vs. tBu3PhOH. The primary contributor to the large magnitude of the ground-state entropy |ΔSºHAT| for the metal complexes is vibrational entropy, ΔSºvib. The common assumption that ΔSºHAT ≈ 0 for HAT reactions, developed for organic and small gas phase molecules, does not hold for transition metal based HAT reactions. The trend in magnitude of |ΔSºHAT| for reactions with TEMPO, RuII(acac)2(py-imH) << [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ = [FeII(H2bim)3]2+ < [CoII(H2bim)3]2+, is surprisingly well predicted by the trends for electron transfer half-reaction entropies, ΔSºET, in aprotic solvents. ΔSºET and

  6. Protonic transport through solitons in hydrogen-bonded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, L.; Jayanthi, S.; Muniyappan, A.; Gopi, D.

    2011-09-01

    We offer an alternative route for investigating soliton solutions in hydrogen-bonded (HB) chains. We invoke the modified extended tangent hyperbolic function method coupled with symbolic computation to solve the governing equation of motion for proton dynamics. We investigate the dynamics of proton transfer in HB chains through bell-shaped soliton excitations, which trigger the bio-energy transport in most biological systems. This solitonic mechanism of proton transfer could play functional roles in muscular contraction, enzymatic activity and oxidative phosphorylation.

  7. Ab initio molecular treatment for charge transfer by P{sup 3+} ions on hydrogen and helium

    SciTech Connect

    Moussa, A.; Zaidi, A.; Lahmar, S.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.

    2010-02-15

    A theoretical treatment of charge-transfer processes induced by collision of phosphorus P{sup 3+}(3s{sup 2}){sup 1}S ions on atomic hydrogen and helium has been carried out using ab initio potential-energy curves and couplings at the multireference configuration interaction level of theory. The cross sections calculated by means of semiclassical collision methods show the existence of a significant charge transfer in the 0.1-700-keV laboratory energy range. Radial and rotational coupling interactions were analyzed for both collision systems.

  8. A practical access to highly enantiomerically pure flavanones by catalytic asymmetric transfer hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Marie-Kristin; Schwab, Pia; Fischer, Petra; Tischer, Sandra; Witt, Morris; Noehringer, Laurence; Rogachev, Victor; Jäger, Anne; Kataeva, Olga; Fröhlich, Roland; Metz, Peter

    2013-10-25

    A surprisingly selective, non-enzymatic kinetic resolution of readily available, racemic β-chiral ketones enabled the title process, which was applied to a rapid synthesis of several bioactive flavanones in virtually enantiopure form (see scheme; MOM=methoxymethyl, Ts=p-toluenesulfonyl). PMID:24027174

  9. Evidence for Dominant Role of Tunneling in Condensed Phases and at High Temperatures: Double Hydrogen Transfer in Porphycenes.

    PubMed

    Ciąćka, Piotr; Fita, Piotr; Listkowski, Arkadiusz; Radzewicz, Czesław; Waluk, Jacek

    2016-01-21

    Investigation of the double hydrogen transfer in porphycene, its 2,7,12,17-tetra-tert-butyl derivative, and their N-deuterated isotopologues revealed the dominant role of tunneling, even at room temperature in condensed phase. Ultrafast optical spectroscopy with polarized light employed in a wide range of temperatures allowed the identification and evaluation of contributions of two tunneling modes: vibrational ground-state tunneling, occurring from the zero vibrational level, and vibrationally activated, via a large amplitude, low-frequency mode. Good correspondence was found between the rates of incoherent tunneling occurring in condensed phase and the values estimated on the basis of tunneling splittings observed in molecules isolated in supersonic jets or helium nanodroplets. The results provide solid experimental insight into widely proposed quantum facets of ubiquitous hydrogen-transfer phenomena. PMID:26727277

  10. Hydrogen photogeneration promoted by efficient electron transfer from iridium sensitizers to colloidal MoS2 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong-Jun; Yu, Zhen-Tao; Liu, Xiao-Jie; Cai, Jian-Guang; Guan, Zhong-Jie; Zou, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    We report the utilization of colloidal MoS2 nanoparticles (NPs) for multicomponent photocatalytic water reduction systems in cooperation with a series of cyclometalated Ir(III) sensitizers. The effects of the particle size and particle dispersion of MoS2 NPs catalyst, reaction solvent and the concentration of the components on hydrogen evolution efficiency were investigated. The MoS2 NPs exhibited higher catalytic performance than did other commonly used water reduction catalysts under identical experiment conditions. The introduction of the carboxylate anchoring groups in the iridium complexes allows the species to be favorably chem-adsorbed onto the MoS2 NPs surface to increase the electron transfer, resulting in enhancement of hydrogen evolution relative to the non-attached systems. The highest apparent quantum yield, which was as high as 12.4%, for hydrogen evolution, was obtained (λ = 400 nm). PMID:24509729