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Sample records for enzymatic phosphoryl transfer

  1. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  2. Arginine Coordination in Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer: Evaluation of the Effect of Arg166 Mutations in Escherichia Coli Alkaline Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, P.J.; Lassila, J.K.; Fenn, T.D.; Zalatan, J.G.; Herschlag, D.

    2009-05-22

    Arginine residues are commonly found in the active sites of enzymes catalyzing phosphoryl transfer reactions. Numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments establish the importance of these residues for efficient catalysis, but their role in catalysis is not clear. To examine the role of arginine residues in the phosphoryl transfer reaction, we have measured the consequences of mutations to arginine 166 in Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase on hydrolysis of ethyl phosphate, on individual reaction steps in the hydrolysis of the covalent enzyme-phosphoryl intermediate, and on thio substitution effects. The results show that the role of the arginine side chain extends beyond its positive charge, as the Arg166Lys mutant is as compromised in activity as Arg166Ser. Through measurement of individual reaction steps, we construct a free energy profile for the hydrolysis of the enzyme-phosphate intermediate. This analysis indicates that the arginine side chain strengthens binding by {approx}3 kcal/mol and provides an additional 1-2 kcal/mol stabilization of the chemical transition state. A 2.1 {angstrom} X-ray diffraction structure of Arg166Ser AP is presented, which shows little difference in enzyme structure compared to the wild-type enzyme but shows a significant reorientation of the bound phosphate. Altogether, these results support a model in which the arginine contributes to catalysis through binding interactions and through additional transition state stabilization that may arise from complementarity of the guanidinum group to the geometry of the trigonal bipyramidal transition state.

  3. Theoretical Investigation of the Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer of β-phosphoglucomutase: Revisiting Both Steps of the Catalytic Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Elsasser, Brigitta M.; Dohmeier-Fischer, Silvia; Fels, Gregor

    2012-07-12

    Enzyme catalyzed phosphate transfer is a part of almost all metabolic processes. Such reactions are of central importance for the energy balance in all organisms and play important roles in cellular control at all levels. Mutases transfer a phosphoryl group while nucleases cleave the phosphodiester linkages between two nucleotides. The subject of our present study is the Lactococcus lactis β-phosphoglucomutase (β-PGM), which effectively catalyzes the interconversion of β-D-glucose-1-phosphate (β-G1P) to β- D-glucose-6-phosphate (β-G6P) and vice versa via stabile intermediate β-D-glucose-1,6-(bis)phosphate (β-G1,6diP) in the presence of Mg2+. In this paper we revisited the reaction mechanism of the phosphoryl transfer starting from the bisphosphate β-G1,6diP in both directions (toward β-G1P and β-G6P) combining docking techniques and QM/MM theoretical method at the DFT/PBE0 level of theory. In addition we performed NEB (nudged elastic band) and free energy calculations to optimize the path and to identify the transition states and the energies involved in the catalytic cycle. Our calculations reveal that both steps proceed via dissociative pentacoordinated phosphorane, which is not a stabile intermediate but rather a transition state. In addition to the Mg2+ ion, Ser114 and Lys145 also play important roles in stabilizing the large negative charge on the phosphate through strong coordination with the phosphate oxygens and guiding the phosphate group throughout the catalytic process. The calculated energy barrier of the reaction for the β-G1P to β-G1,6diP step is only slightly higher than for the β-G1,6diP to β-G6P step (16.10 kcal mol-1 versus 15.10 kcal mol-1) and is in excellent agreement with experimental findings (14.65 kcal mol-1).

  4. Arginine Coordination in Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer: Evaluation of the Effect of Arg166 Mutations in Escherichia coli Alkaline Phosphatase†,‡

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Patrick J.; Lassila, Jonathan Kyle; Fenn, Timothy D.; Zalatan, Jesse G.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Arginine residues are commonly found in the active sites of enzymes catalyzing phosphoryl transfer reactions. Numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments establish the importance of these residues for efficient catalysis, but their role in catalysis is not clear. To examine the role of arginine residues in the phosphoryl transfer reaction, we have measured the consequences of mutations to arginine 166 in Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase on hydrolysis of ethyl phosphate, on individual reaction steps in the hydrolysis of the covalent enzyme-phosphoryl intermediate, and on thio-substitution effects. The results show that the role of the arginine side chain extends beyond its positive charge, as the Arg166Lys mutant is as compromised in activity as Arg166Ser. Through measurement of individual reaction steps, we construct a free-energy profile for the hydrolysis of the enzyme-phosphate intermediate. This analysis indicates that the arginine side chain strengthens binding by ∼3 kcal/mol and provides an additional 1-2 kcal/mol stabilization of the chemical transition state. A 2.1 Å x-ray diffraction structure of Arg166Ser AP is presented, which shows little difference in enzyme structure compared to the wild-type enzyme, but shows a significant reorientation of the bound phosphate. Altogether, these results support a model in which the arginine contributes to catalysis through binding interactions and through additional transition state stabilization that may arise from complementarity of the guanidinum group to the geometry of the trigonal bipyramidal transition state. PMID:18627128

  5. Phosphorylated aminosugars: Synthesis, properties, and reactivity in enzymatic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sem, D.S.; Cleland, W.W. )

    1991-05-21

    A number of phosphorylated aminosugars have been prepared and tested as substrates for metabolic reactions. 6-Aminoglucose is a slow substrate for yeast hexokinase with a V{sub max} that is only 0.012% that of glucose. While V{sub max} is pH independent, V/K decreases below the pK of 9.0 of the amino group. 6-Aminoglucose is a competitive inhibitor vs glucose with a K{sub i} value increasing below the pK of 9 but leveling off at 33 mM below pH 7.16. Thus, protonation decreases binding affinity by 2.4 kcal/mol and only the neutral amine is catalytically competent. 6-Aminoglucose-6-P was synthesized enzymatically with hexokinase. Its pK's determined by {sup 31}P NMR were 2.46 and 8.02 ({alpha} anomer) and 2.34 and 7.85 ({beta} anomer), with a {beta}:{alpha} ratio of 3.0. It is most stable at pH 12, while as a monoanion its half-life is 3 h. The {sup 31}P NMR chemical shifts of the analogues are 8-8.5 ppm at pH 9.5. Their relative stability is 6-aminogluconate-6-P > 3-aminoglyceraldehyde-3-P > 6-aminoglucose-6-P > 6-aminofructose-1,6-bis-P{approx equal}6-aminofructose-6-P > 5-aminoribulose-5-P. These analogues were tested as substrates for their respective enzymes. Phosphorylated aminosugars are thus excellent isosteric analogues of normal metabolic intermediates, except for reactions catalyzed by kinases.

  6. Enzymatic phosphorylation of hair keratin enhances fast adsorption of cationic moieties.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-04-01

    The current study describes the in vitro phosphorylation of a human hair keratin, using protein kinase for the first time. Phosphorylation of keratin was demonstrated by (31)P NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) techniques. Phosphorylation induced a 2.5 fold increase of adsorption capacity in the first 10 min for cationic moiety like methylene blue (MB). Thorough description of MB adsorption process was performed by several isothermal models. Reconstructed fluorescent microscopy images depict distinct amounts of dye bound to the differently treated hair. The results of this work suggest that the enzymatic phosphorylation of keratins might have significant implications in hair shampooing and conditioning, where short application times of cationic components are of prime importance. PMID:26756110

  7. Biological phosphoryl-transfer reactions: understanding mechanism and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Jonathan K; Zalatan, Jesse G; Herschlag, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Phosphoryl-transfer reactions are central to biology. These reactions also have some of the slowest nonenzymatic rates and thus require enormous rate accelerations from biological catalysts. Despite the central importance of phosphoryl transfer and the fascinating catalytic challenges it presents, substantial confusion persists about the properties of these reactions. This confusion exists despite decades of research on the chemical mechanisms underlying these reactions. Here we review phosphoryl-transfer reactions with the goal of providing the reader with the conceptual and experimental background to understand this body of work, to evaluate new results and proposals, and to apply this understanding to enzymes. We describe likely resolutions to some controversies, while emphasizing the limits of our current approaches and understanding. We apply this understanding to enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer and provide illustrative examples of how this mechanistic background can guide and deepen our understanding of enzymes and their mechanisms of action. Finally, we present important future challenges for this field. PMID:21513457

  8. A comparison of enzymatic phosphorylation and phosphatidylation of beta-L- and beta-D-nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Birichevskaya, Larisa L; Kvach, Sergei V; Sivets, Grigorii G; Kalinichenko, Elena N; Zinchenko, Anatoly I; Mikhailopulo, Igor A

    2007-04-01

    Enzymatic 5'-monophosphorylation and 5'-phosphatidylation of a number of beta-L- and beta-D-nucleosides was investigated. The first reaction, catalyzed by nucleoside phosphotransferase (NPT) from Erwinia herbicola, consisted of the transfer of the phosphate residue from p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) to the 5'-hydroxyl group of nucleoside; the second was the phospholipase D (PLD)-catalyzed transphosphatidylation of L-alpha-lecithin with a series of beta-L- and beta-D-nucleosides as the phosphatidyl acceptor resulted in the formation of the respective phospholipid-nucleoside conjugates. Some beta-L-nucleosides displayed similar or even higher substrate activity compared to the beta-D-enantiomers. PMID:17206374

  9. Promiscuity in the Enzymatic Catalysis of Phosphate and Sulfate Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pabis, Anna; Duarte, Fernanda; Kamerlin, Shina C L

    2016-06-01

    The enzymes that facilitate phosphate and sulfate hydrolysis are among the most proficient natural catalysts known to date. Interestingly, a large number of these enzymes are promiscuous catalysts that exhibit both phosphatase and sulfatase activities in the same active site and, on top of that, have also been demonstrated to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of other additional substrates with varying degrees of efficiency. Understanding the factors that underlie such multifunctionality is crucial both for understanding functional evolution in enzyme superfamilies and for the development of artificial enzymes. In this Current Topic, we have primarily focused on the structural and mechanistic basis for catalytic promiscuity among enzymes that facilitate both phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer in the same active site, while comparing this to how catalytic promiscuity manifests in other promiscuous phosphatases. We have also drawn on the large number of experimental and computational studies of selected model systems in the literature to explore the different features driving the catalytic promiscuity of such enzymes. Finally, on the basis of this comparative analysis, we probe the plausible origins and determinants of catalytic promiscuity in enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer. PMID:27187273

  10. Promiscuity in the Enzymatic Catalysis of Phosphate and Sulfate Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The enzymes that facilitate phosphate and sulfate hydrolysis are among the most proficient natural catalysts known to date. Interestingly, a large number of these enzymes are promiscuous catalysts that exhibit both phosphatase and sulfatase activities in the same active site and, on top of that, have also been demonstrated to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of other additional substrates with varying degrees of efficiency. Understanding the factors that underlie such multifunctionality is crucial both for understanding functional evolution in enzyme superfamilies and for the development of artificial enzymes. In this Current Topic, we have primarily focused on the structural and mechanistic basis for catalytic promiscuity among enzymes that facilitate both phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer in the same active site, while comparing this to how catalytic promiscuity manifests in other promiscuous phosphatases. We have also drawn on the large number of experimental and computational studies of selected model systems in the literature to explore the different features driving the catalytic promiscuity of such enzymes. Finally, on the basis of this comparative analysis, we probe the plausible origins and determinants of catalytic promiscuity in enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer. PMID:27187273

  11. Vibrationally enhanced tunneling as a mechanism for enzymatic hydrogen transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, W J; Bialek, W

    1992-01-01

    We present a theory of enzymatic hydrogen transfer in which hydrogen tunneling is mediated by thermal fluctuations of the enzyme's active site. These fluctuations greatly increase the tunneling rate by shortening the distance the hydrogen must tunnel. The average tunneling distance is shown to decrease when heavier isotopes are substituted for the hydrogen or when the temperature is increased, leading to kinetic isotope effects (KIEs)--defined as the factor by which the reaction slows down when isotopically substituted substrates are used--that need be no larger than KIEs for nontunneling mechanisms. Within this theory we derive a simple KIE expression for vibrationally enhanced ground state tunneling that is able to fit the data for the bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO) system, correctly predicting the large temperature dependence of the KIEs. Because the KIEs in this theory can resemble those for nontunneling dynamics, distinguishing the two possibilities requires careful measurements over a range of temperatures, as has been done for BSAO. PMID:1420907

  12. Phosphoryl transfer from α-d-glucose 1-phosphate catalyzed by Escherichia coli sugar-phosphate phosphatases of two protein superfamily types.

    PubMed

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Rechberger, Gerald N; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    The Cori ester α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (αGlc 1-P) is a high-energy intermediate of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Its glycosidic phosphomonoester moiety primes αGlc 1-P for flexible exploitation in glucosyl and phosphoryl transfer reactions. Two structurally and mechanistically distinct sugar-phosphate phosphatases from Escherichia coli were characterized in this study for utilization of αGlc 1-P as a phosphoryl donor substrate. The agp gene encodes a periplasmic αGlc 1-P phosphatase (Agp) belonging to the histidine acid phosphatase family. Had13 is from the haloacid dehydrogenase-like phosphatase family. Cytoplasmic expression of Agp (in E. coli Origami B) gave a functional enzyme preparation (kcat for phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water, 40 s(-1)) that was shown by mass spectrometry to exhibit no free cysteines and the native intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys(189) and Cys(195). Enzymatic phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water in H2 (18)O solvent proceeded with complete (18)O label incorporation into the phosphate released, consistent with catalytic reaction through O-1-P, but not C-1-O, bond cleavage. Hydrolase activity of both enzymes was not restricted to a glycosidic phosphomonoester substrate, and d-glucose 6-phosphate was converted with a kcat similar to that of αGlc 1-P. By examining phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to an acceptor substrate other than water (d-fructose or d-glucose), we discovered that Agp exhibited pronounced synthetic activity, unlike Had13, which utilized αGlc 1-P mainly for phosphoryl transfer to water. By applying d-fructose in 10-fold molar excess over αGlc 1-P (20 mM), enzymatic conversion furnished d-fructose 1-phosphate as the main product in a 55% overall yield. Agp is a promising biocatalyst for use in transphosphorylation from αGlc 1-P. PMID:25527541

  13. PLD2 has both enzymatic and cell proliferation-inducing capabilities, that are differentially regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Henkels, Karen M.; Short, Stephen; Peng, Hong-Juan; Fulvio, Mauricio Di; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2009-11-13

    Phospholipase D2 (PLD2) overexpression in mammalian cells results in cell transformation. We have hypothesized that this is due to an increase of de novo DNA synthesis. We show here that overexpression of PLD2-WT leads to an increased DNA synthesis, as measured by the expression levels of the proliferation markers PCNA, p27{sup KIP1} and phospho-histone-3. The enhancing effect was even higher with phosphorylation-deficient PLD2-Y179F and PLD2-Y511F mutants. The mechanism for this did not involve the enzymatic activity of the lipase, but, rather, the presence of the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45, as silencing with siRNA for CD45 abrogated the effect. The two Y{yields}F mutants had in common a YxN consensus site that, in the phosphorylated counterparts, could be recognized by SH2-bearing proteins, such as Grb2. Even though Y179F and Y511F cannot bind Grb2, they could still find other protein partners, one of which, we have reasoned, could be CD45 itself. Affinity purified PLD2 is indeed activated by Grb2 and deactivated by CD45 in vitro. We concluded that phosphorylated PLD2, aided by Grb2, mediates lipase activity, whereas dephosphorylated PLD2 mediates an induction of cell proliferation, and the specific residues involved in this newly discovered regulation of PLD2 are Y{sup 179} and Y{sup 511}.

  14. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and protein-protein interaction in the PTS system-an NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    HPr and Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} are two of the components of the bacterial PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotranferase system) and are involved in the phosphorylation and concomitant translocation of sugars across the membrane. These PTS protein complexes also regulate sugar transport. HPr, phosphorylated at a histidine N1 site by Enzyme I and phosphoenol pyruvate, transfers the phosphoryl group to a histidine N3 position in Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. HPrs from Gram-positive bacteria undergo regulatory phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}, whereby phosphorylation of the histidine residue is inhibited. Conversely, histidine phosphorylation inhibits phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}. HPrs from Gram-negative bacteria possess a serine residue at position 46, but do not undergo regulatory phosphorylation. HPr forms an open-faced sandwich structure with a four-strand S-sheet and 2 to 3 helices lying on top of the sheet. The active-site histidine and Ser{sup 46} occur in conformationally flexible regions. P-His-HPr from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilus has been investigated by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments using an in-situ enzymatic regeneration system to maintain a constant level of P-His-HPr. The results show that localized conformational changes occur in the vicinity of the active-site histidine and also near Ser{sup 46}. HPr-Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} complexes from both Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were also studied by a variety of {sup 15}N-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments, which were performed on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled HPr complexed to unlabeled Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. The complex is in fast exchange with a molecular weight of about 27 kDa. The focus of our work is to assess the changes undergone by HPr (the smaller of the two components), and so all the experiments were performed with excess Enzyme IIA present in the system.

  15. Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) reduces phosphorylation of tau in human neuronal cells (HCN2)

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Weijiang; Albers, John J.; Vuletic, Simona

    2009-01-01

    Tau function is regulated by phosphorylation, and abnormal tau phosphorylation in neurons is one of the key processes associated with development of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies. In this study we provide evidence that phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), one of the main lipid transfer proteins in the brain, significantly reduces levels of phosphorylated tau, and increases levels of the inactive form of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) in HCN2 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) reversed the PLTP-induced increase in levels of GSK3β phosphorylated at serine 9 (pGSK3βSer9) and partially reversed the PLTP-induced reduction in tau phosphorylation. We provide evidence that the PLTP-induced changes are not due to activation of Disabled-1 (Dab1), since PLTP reduced levels of total and phosphorylated Dab1 in HCN2 cells. We have also shown that inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity of insulin receptor (IR) and/or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) receptor (IGFR) reverses PLTP-induced increase in levels of phosphorylated Akt (pAktThr308 and pAktSer473), suggesting that PLTP-mediated activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway is dependent on IR/IGFR receptor tyrosine kinase activity. Our study suggests that PLTP may be an important modulator of signal transduction pathways in human neurons. PMID:19472218

  16. Phosphoryl Transfer from α-d-Glucose 1-Phosphate Catalyzed by Escherichia coli Sugar-Phosphate Phosphatases of Two Protein Superfamily Types

    PubMed Central

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The Cori ester α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (αGlc 1-P) is a high-energy intermediate of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Its glycosidic phosphomonoester moiety primes αGlc 1-P for flexible exploitation in glucosyl and phosphoryl transfer reactions. Two structurally and mechanistically distinct sugar-phosphate phosphatases from Escherichia coli were characterized in this study for utilization of αGlc 1-P as a phosphoryl donor substrate. The agp gene encodes a periplasmic αGlc 1-P phosphatase (Agp) belonging to the histidine acid phosphatase family. Had13 is from the haloacid dehydrogenase-like phosphatase family. Cytoplasmic expression of Agp (in E. coli Origami B) gave a functional enzyme preparation (kcat for phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water, 40 s−1) that was shown by mass spectrometry to exhibit no free cysteines and the native intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys189 and Cys195. Enzymatic phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water in H218O solvent proceeded with complete 18O label incorporation into the phosphate released, consistent with catalytic reaction through O-1–P, but not C-1–O, bond cleavage. Hydrolase activity of both enzymes was not restricted to a glycosidic phosphomonoester substrate, and d-glucose 6-phosphate was converted with a kcat similar to that of αGlc 1-P. By examining phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to an acceptor substrate other than water (d-fructose or d-glucose), we discovered that Agp exhibited pronounced synthetic activity, unlike Had13, which utilized αGlc 1-P mainly for phosphoryl transfer to water. By applying d-fructose in 10-fold molar excess over αGlc 1-P (20 mM), enzymatic conversion furnished d-fructose 1-phosphate as the main product in a 55% overall yield. Agp is a promising biocatalyst for use in transphosphorylation from αGlc 1-P. PMID:25527541

  17. Parkin-catalyzed Ubiquitin-Ester Transfer Is Triggered by PINK1-dependent Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Masahiro; Kujuro, Yuki; Okatsu, Kei; Koyano, Fumika; Kosako, Hidetaka; Kimura, Mayumi; Suzuki, Norihiro; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Keiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    PINK1 and PARKIN are causal genes for autosomal recessive familial Parkinsonism. PINK1 is a mitochondrial Ser/Thr kinase, whereas Parkin functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Under steady-state conditions, Parkin localizes to the cytoplasm where its E3 activity is repressed. A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential triggers Parkin E3 activity and recruits it to depolarized mitochondria for ubiquitylation of mitochondrial substrates. The molecular basis for how the E3 activity of Parkin is re-established by mitochondrial damage has yet to be determined. Here we provide in vitro biochemical evidence for ubiquitin-thioester formation on Cys-431 of recombinant Parkin. We also report that Parkin forms a ubiquitin-ester following a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential in cells, and that this event is essential for substrate ubiquitylation. Importantly, the Parkin RING2 domain acts as a transthiolation or acyl-transferring domain rather than an E2-recruiting domain. Furthermore, formation of the ubiquitin-ester depends on PINK1 phosphorylation of Parkin Ser-65. A phosphorylation-deficient mutation completely inhibited formation of the Parkin ubiquitin-ester intermediate, whereas phosphorylation mimics, such as Ser to Glu substitution, enabled partial formation of the intermediate irrespective of Ser-65 phosphorylation. We propose that PINK1-dependent phosphorylation of Parkin leads to the ubiquitin-ester transfer reaction of the RING2 domain, and that this is an essential step in Parkin activation. PMID:23754282

  18. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, themore » thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.« less

  19. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  20. A redox beginning: Which came first phosphoryl, acyl, or electron transfer ?. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic information available on the synthesis of prebiotic monomers and polymers will be examined in order to illuminate the prebiotic plausibility of polymer syntheses based on (a) phosphoryl transfer that yields phosphodiester polymers, (b) acyl transfer that gives polyamides, and (c) electron transfer that produces polydisulfide or poly(thio)ester polymers. New experimental results on the oxidative polymerization of 2,3-dimercaptopropanol by ferric ions on the surface of ferric hydroxide oxide will be discussed as a chemical model of polymerization by electron transfer. This redox polymerization that yields polymers with a polydisulfide backbone was found to give oligomers up to the 15-mer from 1 mM of 2,3-dimercaptopropanol after one day at 25 C. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the oligomers was carried out on an Alltech OH-100 column eluted with acetonitrile-water.

  1. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Westereng, Bjørge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Jørgensen, Henning; Larsen Andersen, Mogens; Eijsink, Vincent G.H.; Felby, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of cell wall polysaccharides by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) plays a pivotal role in the degradation of plant biomass. While experiments have shown that LPMOs are copper dependent enzymes requiring an electron donor, the mechanism and origin of the electron supply in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert. PMID:26686263

  2. Influence of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass: Effect of mass transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Wojtusik, Mateusz; Zurita, Mauricio; Villar, Juan C; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-09-01

    The effect of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) has been assessed. Runs were performed in stirred tanks at several stirrer speed values, under typical conditions of temperature (50°C), pH (4.8) and solid charge (20% w/w). A complex mixture of cellulases, xylanases and mannanases was employed for PCS saccharification. At low stirring speeds (<150rpm), estimated mass transfer coefficients and rates, when compared to chemical hydrolysis rates, lead to results that clearly show low mass transfer rates, being this phenomenon the controlling step of the overall process rate. However, for stirrer speed from 300rpm upwards, the overall process rate is controlled by hydrolysis reactions. The ratio between mass transfer and overall chemical reaction rates changes with time depending on the conditions of each run. PMID:27233094

  3. Unblocking the Sink: Improved CID-Based Analysis of Phosphorylated Peptides by Enzymatic Removal of the Basic C-Terminal Residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanucara, Francesco; Chi Hoo Lee, Dave; Eyers, Claire E.

    2013-12-01

    A one-step enzymatic reaction for improving the collision-induced dissociation (CID)-based tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis of phosphorylated peptides in an ion trap is presented. Carboxypeptidase-B (CBP-B) was used to selectively remove C-terminal arginine or lysine residues from phosphorylated tryptic/Lys-C peptides prior to their MS/MS analysis by CID with a Paul-type ion trap. Removal of this basic C-terminal residue served to limit the extent of gas-phase neutral loss of phosphoric acid (H3PO4), favoring the formation of diagnostic b and y ions as determined by an increase in both the number and relative intensities of the sequence-specific product ions. Such differential fragmentation is particularly valuable when the H3PO4 elimination is so predominant that localizing the phosphorylation site on the peptide sequence is hindered. Improvement in the quality of tandem mass spectral data generated by CID upon CBP-B treatment resulted in greater confidence both in assignment of the phosphopeptide primary sequence and for pinpointing the site of phosphorylation. Higher Mascot ion scores were also generated, combined with lower expectation values and higher delta scores for improved confidence in site assignment; Ascore values also improved. These results are rationalized in accordance with the accepted mechanisms for the elimination of H3PO4 upon low energy CID and insights into the factors dictating the observed dissociation pathways are presented. We anticipate this approach will be of utility in the MS analysis of phosphorylated peptides, especially when alternative electron-driven fragmentation techniques are not available.

  4. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D-mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A

    2007-07-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  5. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D–mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  6. Protein phosphorylation and intermolecular electron transfer: a joint experimental and computational study of a hormone biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Andy; Pasquinelli, Melissa A; Bernhardt, Rita; Beratan, David N

    2007-04-11

    Protein phosphorylation is a common regulator of enzyme activity. Chemical modification of a protein surface, including phosphorylation, could alter the function of biological electron-transfer reactions. However, the sensitivity of intermolecular electron-transfer kinetics to post-translational protein modifications has not been widely investigated. We have therefore combined experimental and computational studies to assess the potential role of phosphorylation in electron-transfer reactions. We investigated the steroid hydroxylating system from bovine adrenal glands, which consists of adrenodoxin (Adx), adrenodoxin reductase (AdR), and a cytochrome P450, CYP11A1. We focused on the phosphorylation of Adx at Thr-71, since this residue is located in the acidic interaction domain of Adx, and a recent study has demonstrated that this residue is phosphorylated by casein kinase 2 (CK2) in vitro.1 Optical biosensor experiments indicate that the presence of this phosphorylation slightly increases the binding affinity of oxidized Adx with CYP11A1ox but not AdRox. This tendency was confirmed by KA values extracted from Adx concentration-dependent stopped-flow experiments that characterize the interaction between AdRred and Adxox or between Adxred and CYP11A1ox. In addition, acceleration of the electron-transfer kinetics measured with stopped-flow is seen only for the phosphorylated Adx-CYP11A1 reaction. Biphasic reaction kinetics are observed only when Adx is phosphorylated at Thr-71, and the Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations suggest that this phosphorylation may enhance the formation of a secondary Adx-CYP11A1 binding complex that provides an additional electron-transfer pathway with enhanced coupling. PMID:17358057

  7. Recombinant production of enzymatically active male contraceptive drug target hTSSK2 - Localization of the TSKS domain phosphorylated by TSSK2.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Jagathpala; Sinville, Rondedrick; Shumilin, Igor A; Minor, Wladek; Zhang, Jianhai; Hawkinson, Jon E; Georg, Gunda I; Flickinger, Charles J; Herr, John C

    2016-05-01

    The testis-specific serine/threonine kinase 2 (TSSK2) has been proposed as a candidate male contraceptive target. Development of a selective inhibitor for this kinase first necessitates the production of highly purified, soluble human TSSK2 and its substrate, TSKS, with high yields and retention of biological activity for crystallography and compound screening. Strategies to produce full-length, soluble, biologically active hTSSK2 in baculovirus expression systems were tested and refined. Soluble preparations of TSSK2 were purified by immobilized-metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) followed by gel filtration chromatography. The biological activities of rec.hTSSK2 were verified by in vitro kinase and mobility shift assays using bacterially produced hTSKS (isoform 2), casein, glycogen synthase peptide (GS peptide) and various TSKS peptides as target substrates. Purified recombinant hTSSK2 showed robust kinase activity in the in vitro kinase assay by phosphorylating hTSKS isoform 2 and casein. The ATP Km values were similar for highly and partially purified fractions of hTSSK2 (2.2 and 2.7 μM, respectively). The broad spectrum kinase inhibitor staurosporine was a potent inhibitor of rec.hTSSK2 (IC50 = 20 nM). In vitro phosphorylation experiments carried out with TSKS (isoform 1) fragments revealed particularly strong phosphorylation of a recombinant N-terminal region representing aa 1-150 of TSKS, indicating that the N-terminus of human TSKS is phosphorylated by human TSSK2. Production of full-length enzymatically active recombinant TSSK2 kinase represents the achievement of a key benchmark for future discovery of TSSK inhibitors as male contraceptive agents. PMID:26777341

  8. Rates and Routes of Electron Transfer of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase in an Enzymatic Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Alexander; Stein, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Hydrogenase enzymes are being used in enzymatic fuel cells immobilized on a graphite or carbon electrode surface, for example. The enzyme is used for the anodic oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2) to produce protons and electrons. The association and orientation of the enzyme at the anode electrode for a direct electron transfer is not completely resolved. The distal FeS-cluster in [NiFe]-hydrogenases contains a histidine residue which is known to play a critical role in the intermolecular electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase graphite electrode association was investigated using Brownian Dynamics simulations. Residues that were shown to be in proximity to the electrode surface were identified (His184, Ser196, Glu461, Glu464), and electron transfer routes connecting the distal FeS-cluster with the surface residues were investigated. Several possible pathways for electron transfer between the distal FeS-cluster and the terminal amino acid residues were probed in terms of their rates of electron transfer using DFT methods. The reorganization energies λ of the distal iron-sulfur cluster and coronene as a molecular model for graphite were calculated. The reorganization energy of the distal (His)(Cys)3 cluster was found to be not very different from that of a standard cubane clusters with a (Cys)4 coordination. Electronic coupling matrix elements and rates of electron transfer for the different pathways were calculated according to the Marcus equation. The rates for glutamate-mediated electrode binding were found to be incompatible with experimental data. A direct electron transfer from the histidine ligand of the distal FeS-cluster to the electrode yielded rates of electron transfer in excellent agreement with experiment. A second pathway, however, from the distal FeS-cluster to the Ser196 residue was found to be equally efficient and feasible. PMID:26218232

  9. Secondary sup 18 O isotope effects for hexokinase-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer from ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.P.; Weiss, P.M.; Cleland, W.W. )

    1991-04-16

    Secondary {sup 18}O isotope effects in the {gamma}-position of ATP have been measured on phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by yeast hexokinase in an effort to deduce the structure of the transition state. The isotope effects were measured by the remote-label method with the exocyclic amino group of adenine as the remote label. With glucose as substrate, the secondary {sup 18}O isotope effect per {sup 18}O was 0.9987 at pH 8.2 and 0.9965 at pH 5.3, which is below the pK of 6.15 seen in the V/K profile for MgATP. With the slow substrate 1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol, the value was 0.9976 at pH 8.2. While part of the inverse nature of the isotope effect may result from an isotope effect on binding, the more inverse values when catalysis is made more rate limiting by decreasing the pH or switching to a slower substrate suggest a dissociative transition state for phosphoryl transfer, in agreement with predictions from model chemistry. The {sup 18}O equilibrium isotope effect for deprotonation of HATP{sup 3{minus}} is 1.0156, while Mg{sup 2+} coordination to ATP{sup 4{minus}} does not appear to be accompanied by an {sup 18}O isotope effect larger than 1.001.

  10. Application of Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry in Analyses of Non-enzymatically Glycated Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Frolov, Andrej; Tang, Ning; Hoffman, Ralf; van der Goor, Tom; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-03-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in diabetes mellitus research, particularly in the context of development of diabetic complications. The fragmentation behavior of glycated peptides produced from reaction of D-glucose with lysine residues was investigated by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry. It was found that high abundance ions corresponding to various degrees of neutral water losses, as well as furylium ion production, dominate the CID spectra, and that the sequence informative b and y ions were rarely observed when Amadori-modified peptides were fragmented. Contrary to what was observed under CID conditions, ions corresponding to neutral losses of water or furylium ion production were not observed in the ETD spectra. Instead, abundant and almost complete series of c and z type ions were observed regardless of whether the modification site was located in the middle of the sequence or close to the N-terminus, greatly facilitating the peptide sequencing. This study strongly suggests that ETD is a better technique for proteomics studies of non-enzymatically glycated peptides and proteins.

  11. Non-enzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes, uridine diphosphate glucose and cytidine diphosphate choline, and other phosphorylated metabolic intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Dworkin, J.; Oro, J.

    1987-01-01

    Using urea and cyanamide, the two condensing agents considered to have been present on the primitive earth, uridine diphosphate glucose (UDPG), cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline), glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), and glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) were synthesized under simulated prebiotic conditions. The reaction products were separated and identified using paper chromatography, thin layer chromatography, enzymatic analyses, and ion-pair reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The possibility of nonenzymatic synthesis of metabolic intermediates on the primitive earth from simple precursors was thus demonstrated.

  12. Novel Architectures for Achieving Direct Electron Transfer in Enzymatic Biofuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaik, Rita A.

    Enzymatic biofuel cells are a promising source of alternative energy for small device applications, but still face the challenge of achieving direct electron transfer with high enzyme concentrations in a simple system. In this dissertation, methods of constructing electrodes consisting of enzymes attached to nanoparticle-enhanced substrates that serve as high surface area templates are evaluated. In the first method described, glucose oxidase is covalently attached to gold nanoparticles that are assembled onto genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage. The resulting anodes achieve a high peak current per area and a significant improvement in enzyme surface coverage. In the second system, fructose dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound enzyme that has the natural ability to achieve direct electron transfer, is immobilized into a matrix consisting of binders and carbon nanotubes to extend the lifetime of the anode. For the cathode, bilirubin oxidase is immobilized in a carbon nanotube and sol-gel matrix to achieve direct electron transfer. Finally, a full fuel cell consisting of both an anode and cathode is constructed and evaluated with each system described.

  13. Metal-Free cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Can Catalyze Phosphoryl Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    X-ray structures of several ternary product complexes of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKAc) have been determined with no bound metal ions and with Na+ or K+ coordinated at two metal-binding sites. The metal-free PKAc and the enzyme with alkali metals were able to facilitate the phosphoryl transfer reaction. In all studied complexes, the ATP and the substrate peptide (SP20) were modified into the products ADP and the phosphorylated peptide. The products of the phosphotransfer reaction were also found when ATP-γS, a nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue, reacted with SP20 in the PKAc active site containing no metals. Single turnover enzyme kinetics measurements utilizing 32P-labeled ATP confirmed the phosphotransferase activity of the enzyme in the absence of metal ions and in the presence of alkali metals. In addition, the structure of the apo-PKAc binary complex with SP20 suggests that the sequence of binding events may become ordered in a metal-free environment, with SP20 binding first to prime the enzyme for subsequent ATP binding. Comparison of these structures reveals conformational and hydrogen bonding changes that might be important for the mechanism of catalysis. PMID:24786636

  14. A computational study of the phosphoryl transfer reaction between ATP and Dha in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Bordes, I; Ruiz-Pernía, J J; Castillo, R; Moliner, V

    2015-10-28

    Phosphoryl transfer reactions are ubiquitous in biology, being involved in processes ranging from energy and signal transduction to the replication genetic material. Dihydroxyacetone phosphate (Dha-P), an intermediate of the synthesis of pyruvate and a very important building block in nature, can be generated by converting free dihydroxyacetone (Dha) through the action of the dihydroxyacetone kinase enzyme. In this paper the reference uncatalyzed reaction in solution has been studied in order to define the foundations of the chemical reaction and to determine the most adequate computational method to describe this electronically complex reaction. In particular, the phosphorylation reaction mechanism between adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Dha in aqueous solution has been studied by means of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations with the QM subset of atoms described with semi-empirical and DFT methods. The results appear to be strongly dependent on the level of calculation, which will have to be taken into account for future studies of the reaction catalyzed by enzymes. In particular, PM3/MM renders lower free energy barriers and a less endergonic process than AM1d/MM and PM6/MM methods. Nevertheless, the concerted pathway was not located with the former combination of potentials. PMID:26303076

  15. Ground State Destabilization by Anionic Nucleophiles Contributes to the Activity of Phosphoryl Transfer Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Logan D.; Fenn, Tim D.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes stabilize transition states of reactions while limiting binding to ground states, as is generally required for any catalyst. Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) and other nonspecific phosphatases are some of Nature's most impressive catalysts, achieving preferential transition state over ground state stabilization of more than 1022-fold while utilizing interactions with only the five atoms attached to the transferred phosphorus. We tested a model that AP achieves a portion of this preference by destabilizing ground state binding via charge repulsion between the anionic active site nucleophile, Ser102, and the negatively charged phosphate monoester substrate. Removal of the Ser102 alkoxide by mutation to glycine or alanine increases the observed Pi affinity by orders of magnitude at pH 8.0. To allow precise and quantitative comparisons, the ionic form of bound Pi was determined from pH dependencies of the binding of Pi and tungstate, a Pi analog lacking titratable protons over the pH range of 5–11, and from the 31P chemical shift of bound Pi. The results show that the Pi trianion binds with an exceptionally strong femtomolar affinity in the absence of Ser102, show that its binding is destabilized by ≥108-fold by the Ser102 alkoxide, and provide direct evidence for ground state destabilization. Comparisons of X-ray crystal structures of AP with and without Ser102 reveal the same active site and Pi binding geometry upon removal of Ser102, suggesting that the destabilization does not result from a major structural rearrangement upon mutation of Ser102. Analogous Pi binding measurements with a protein tyrosine phosphatase suggest the generality of this ground state destabilization mechanism. Our results have uncovered an important contribution of anionic nucleophiles to phosphoryl transfer catalysis via ground state electrostatic destabilization and an enormous capacity of the AP active site for specific and strong recognition of the phosphoryl group in the transition

  16. Structural characterization of the novel aminoglycoside phosphotransferase AphVIII from Streptomyces rimosus with enzymatic activity modulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Konstantin M; Gorbacheva, Marina A; Korzhenevskiy, Dmitry A; Alekseeva, Maria G; Mavletova, Dilara A; Zakharevich, Natalia V; Elizarov, Sergey M; Rudakova, Natalia N; Danilenko, Valery N; Popov, Vladimir O

    2016-09-01

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases represent a broad class of enzymes that promote bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics via the phosphorylation of hydroxyl groups in the latter. Here we report the spatial structure of the 3'-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase of novel VIII class (AphVIII) solved by X-ray diffraction method with a resolution of 2.15 Å. Deep analysis of APHVIII structure and its comparison with known structures of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases of various types reveals that AphVIII has a typical two-domain fold and, however, possesses some unique characteristics that distinguish the enzyme from its known homologues. The most important difference is the presence of the activation loop with unique Ser146 residue. We demonstrate that in the apo-state of the enzyme the activation loop does not interact with other parts of the enzyme and seems to adopt catalytically competent state only after substrate binding. PMID:27338640

  17. Enzyme orientation for direct electron transfer in an enzymatic fuel cell with alcohol oxidase and laccase electrodes.

    PubMed

    Arrocha, Andrés A; Cano-Castillo, Ulises; Aguila, Sergio A; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2014-11-15

    A new full enzymatic fuel cell was built and characterized. Both enzymatic electrodes were molecularly oriented to enhance the direct electron transfer between the enzyme active site and the electrode surface. The anode consisted in immobilized alcohol oxidase on functionalized carbon nanotubes with 4-azidoaniline, which acts as active-site ligand to orientate the enzyme molecule. The cathode consisted of immobilized laccase on functionalized graphite electrode with 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzoic acid. The enzymatic fuel cell reaches 0.5 V at open circuit voltage with both, ethanol and methanol, while in short circuit the highest current intensity of 250 μA cm(-2) was obtained with methanol. Concerning the power density, the methanol was the best substrate reaching 60 μW cm(-2), while with ethanol 40 μW cm(-2) was obtained. PMID:24953844

  18. Thylakoid Protein Phosphorylation in Higher Plant Chloroplasts Optimizes Electron Transfer under Fluctuating Light1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Grieco, Michele; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2010-01-01

    Several proteins of photosystem II (PSII) and its light-harvesting antenna (LHCII) are reversibly phosphorylated according to light quantity and quality. Nevertheless, the interdependence of protein phosphorylation, nonphotochemical quenching, and efficiency of electron transfer in the thylakoid membrane has remained elusive. These questions were addressed by investigating in parallel the wild type and the stn7, stn8, and stn7 stn8 kinase mutants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), using the stn7 npq4, npq4, npq1, and pgr5 mutants as controls. Phosphorylation of PSII-LHCII proteins is strongly and dynamically regulated according to white light intensity. Yet, the changes in phosphorylation do not notably modify the relative excitation energy distribution between PSII and PSI, as typically occurs when phosphorylation is induced by “state 2” light that selectively excites PSII and induces the phosphorylation of both the PSII core and LHCII proteins. On the contrary, under low-light conditions, when excitation energy transfer from LHCII to reaction centers is efficient, the STN7-dependent LHCII protein phosphorylation guarantees a balanced distribution of excitation energy to both photosystems. The importance of this regulation diminishes at high light upon induction of thermal dissipation of excitation energy. Lack of the STN7 kinase, and thus the capacity for equal distribution of excitation energy to PSII and PSI, causes relative overexcitation of PSII under low light but not under high light, leading to disturbed maintenance of fluent electron flow under fluctuating light intensities. The physiological relevance of the STN7-dependent regulation is evidenced by severely stunted phenotypes of the stn7 and stn7 stn8 mutants under strongly fluctuating light conditions. PMID:19965965

  19. Ground state destabilization by anionic nucleophiles contributes to the activity of phosphoryl transfer enzymes.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Logan D; Fenn, Tim D; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Enzymes stabilize transition states of reactions while limiting binding to ground states, as is generally required for any catalyst. Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) and other nonspecific phosphatases are some of Nature's most impressive catalysts, achieving preferential transition state over ground state stabilization of more than 10²²-fold while utilizing interactions with only the five atoms attached to the transferred phosphorus. We tested a model that AP achieves a portion of this preference by destabilizing ground state binding via charge repulsion between the anionic active site nucleophile, Ser102, and the negatively charged phosphate monoester substrate. Removal of the Ser102 alkoxide by mutation to glycine or alanine increases the observed Pi affinity by orders of magnitude at pH 8.0. To allow precise and quantitative comparisons, the ionic form of bound P(i) was determined from pH dependencies of the binding of Pi and tungstate, a P(i) analog lacking titratable protons over the pH range of 5-11, and from the ³¹P chemical shift of bound P(i). The results show that the Pi trianion binds with an exceptionally strong femtomolar affinity in the absence of Ser102, show that its binding is destabilized by ≥10⁸-fold by the Ser102 alkoxide, and provide direct evidence for ground state destabilization. Comparisons of X-ray crystal structures of AP with and without Ser102 reveal the same active site and P(i) binding geometry upon removal of Ser102, suggesting that the destabilization does not result from a major structural rearrangement upon mutation of Ser102. Analogous Pi binding measurements with a protein tyrosine phosphatase suggest the generality of this ground state destabilization mechanism. Our results have uncovered an important contribution of anionic nucleophiles to phosphoryl transfer catalysis via ground state electrostatic destabilization and an enormous capacity of the AP active site for specific and strong recognition of the phosphoryl group in

  20. The cellular and compartmental profile of mouse retinal glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and ~P transferring kinases

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Elda M.; Johnson, Jerry E.; Giddabasappa, Anand; Swaroop, Anand; Brooks, Matthew J.; Sigel, Irena; Chaney, Shawnta Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The homeostatic regulation of cellular ATP is achieved by the coordinated activity of ATP utilization, synthesis, and buffering. Glucose is the major substrate for ATP synthesis through glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), whereas intermediary metabolism through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle utilizes non-glucose-derived monocarboxylates, amino acids, and alpha ketoacids to support mitochondrial ATP and GTP synthesis. Cellular ATP is buffered by specialized equilibrium-driven high-energy phosphate (~P) transferring kinases. Our goals were twofold: 1) to characterize the gene expression, protein expression, and activity of key synthesizing and regulating enzymes of energy metabolism in the whole mouse retina, retinal compartments, and/or cells and 2) to provide an integrative analysis of the results related to function. Methods mRNA expression data of energy-related genes were extracted from our whole retinal Affymetrix microarray data. Fixed-frozen retinas from adult C57BL/6N mice were used for immunohistochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and enzymatic histochemistry. The immunoreactivity levels of well-characterized antibodies, for all major retinal cells and their compartments, were obtained using our established semiquantitative confocal and imaging techniques. Quantitative cytochrome oxidase (COX) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was determined histochemically. Results The Affymetrix data revealed varied gene expression patterns of the ATP synthesizing and regulating enzymes found in the muscle, liver, and brain. Confocal studies showed differential cellular and compartmental distribution of isozymes involved in glucose, glutamate, glutamine, lactate, and creatine metabolism. The pattern and intensity of the antibodies and of the COX and LDH activity showed the high capacity of photoreceptors for aerobic glycolysis and OXPHOS. Competition assays with pyruvate revealed that LDH-5 was localized in the photoreceptor

  1. Mediation of donor–acceptor distance in an enzymatic methyl transfer reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianyu; Kulik, Heather J.; Martinez, Todd J.; Klinman, Judith P.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic methyl transfer, catalyzed by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), is investigated using binding isotope effects (BIEs), time-resolved fluorescence lifetimes, Stokes shifts, and extended graphics processing unit (GPU)-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approaches. The WT enzyme is compared with mutants at Tyr68, a conserved residue that is located behind the reactive sulfur of cofactor. Small (>1) BIEs are observed for an S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-binary and abortive ternary complex containing 8-hydroxyquinoline, and contrast with previously reported inverse (<1) kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). Extended GPU-based computational studies of a ternary complex containing catecholate show a clear trend in ground state structures, from noncanonical bond lengths for WT toward solution values with mutants. Structural and dynamical differences that are sensitive to Tyr68 have also been detected using time-resolved Stokes shift measurements and molecular dynamics. These experimental and computational results are discussed in the context of active site compaction that requires an ionization of substrate within the enzyme ternary complex. PMID:26080432

  2. Molecular Basis of 1,6-Anhydro Bond Cleavage and Phosphoryl Transfer by Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1,6-Anhydro-N-acetylmuramic Acid Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Bacik, John-Paul; Whitworth, Garrett E.; Stubbs, Keith A.; Yadav, Anuj K.; Martin, Dylan R.; Bailey-Elkin, Ben A.; Vocadlo, David J.; Mark, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    Anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of the Gram-negative peptidoglycan (PG) recycling intermediate 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid (anhMurNAc) to N-acetylmuramic acid-6-phosphate (MurNAc-6-P). Here we present crystal structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AnmK in complex with its natural substrate, anhMurNAc, and a product of the reaction, ADP. AnmK is homodimeric, with each subunit comprised of two subdomains that are separated by a deep active site cleft, which bears similarity to the ATPase core of proteins belonging to the hexokinase-hsp70-actin superfamily of proteins. The conversion of anhMurNAc to MurNAc-6-P involves both cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring of anhMurNAc along with addition of a phosphoryl group to O6 of the sugar, and thus represents an unusual enzymatic mechanism involving the formal addition of H3PO4 to anhMurNAc. The structural complexes and NMR analysis of the reaction suggest that a water molecule, activated by Asp-182, attacks the anomeric carbon of anhMurNAc, aiding cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro bond and facilitating the capture of the γ phosphate of ATP by O6 via an in-line phosphoryl transfer. AnmK is active only against anhMurNAc and not the metabolically related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramyl peptides, suggesting that the cytosolic N-acetyl-anhydromuramyl-l-alanine amidase AmpD must first remove the stem peptide from these PG muropeptide catabolites before anhMurNAc can be acted upon by AnmK. Our studies provide the foundation for a mechanistic model for the dual activities of AnmK as a hydrolase and a kinase of an unusual heterocyclic monosaccharide. PMID:21288904

  3. Aluminum coordination chemistry and the inhibition of phosphoryl-transferring enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Furumo, N.C.; Viola, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    Aluminium ion is a potent inhibitor of the enzymes hexokinase (K/sub i/ = 0.16 ..mu..M) and glycerokinase (K/sub i/ = 4.0 ..mu..M). It has been shown that aluminum forms a complex with ATP that is 80 times more stable than the magnesium complex with ATP which is the normal substrate for phosphoryl-transferring enzymes. Kinetic studies performed on several kinases at pH 7.0 have shown that Al-ATP is a competitive inhibitor vs. Mg-ATP with moderate K/sub i/ values (0.1-0.5 mM) for creatine kinase(CK) and myokinase(MK), and weakly competitive (K/sub i/ > 0.5 mM) with acetate, galactose, arginine and gluconate kinases. Equilibrium dialysis binding studies indicate no significant binding of aluminum ion by the enzymes, while the interaction of aluminum ion with ADP and ATP has been characterized by /sup 13/C, /sup 27/Al, and /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy. It appears that the inhibition by aluminum is as the Al-nucleotide complex rather than direct binding of free aluminum ion by the enzyme. Kinetic studies indicate that Al/sup 3 +/ inhibition of CK and MK is pH dependent with decreased values of K/sub i/ at lower pH. At pH 6.1 K/sub i/ = 25 ..mu..M for MK (160 ..mu..M at pH 7.0) and 53 ..mu..M for CK (240 ..mu..M at pH 7.0). This may be due to an increased effective concentration of aluminum ion at lower pH.

  4. Protein kinase D negatively regulates hepatitis C virus secretion through phosphorylation of oxysterol-binding protein and ceramide transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Amako, Yutaka; Syed, Gulam H; Siddiqui, Aleem

    2011-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA replicates its genome on specialized endoplasmic reticulum modified membranes termed membranous web and utilizes lipid droplets for initiating the viral nucleocapsid assembly. HCV maturation and/or the egress pathway requires host sphingolipid synthesis, which occur in the Golgi. Ceramide transfer protein (CERT) and oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) play a crucial role in sphingolipid biosynthesis. Protein kinase D (PKD), a serine/threonine kinase, is recruited to the trans-Golgi network where it influences vesicular trafficking to the plasma membrane by regulation of several important mediators via phosphorylation. PKD attenuates the function of both CERT and OSBP by phosphorylation at their respective Ser(132) and Ser(240) residues (phosphorylation inhibition). Here, we investigated the functional role of PKD in HCV secretion. Our studies show that HCV gene expression down-regulated PKD activation. PKD depletion by shRNA or inhibition by pharmacological inhibitor Gö6976 enhanced HCV secretion. Overexpression of a constitutively active form of PKD suppressed HCV secretion. The suppression by PKD was subverted by the ectopic expression of nonphosphorylatable serine mutant CERT S132A or OSBP S240A. These observations imply that PKD negatively regulates HCV secretion/release by attenuating OSBP and CERT functions by phosphorylation inhibition. This study identifies the key role of the Golgi components in the HCV maturation process. PMID:21285358

  5. A micellar model for investigating the chemical nature of hydrogen transfer in NAD(P)H-dependent enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Rao, U M

    1989-03-31

    Aqueous micelles of Triton X-100 were shown to catalyse the redox reaction between NADH and 2-p-iodophenyl-3-p-nitrophenyl-5-phenyltetrazolium chloride (INT) at the neutral pH. The transfer of reducing equivalents between the reactants in the micellar system appeared to be direct and quantitative. N-tert-butylphenyl-alpha-nitrone, a lipophilic free-radical scavenger which can enter micelles, and superoxide dismutase did not alter the stoichiometry of the reaction. The oxidation product of NADH was found to be 100% enzymatically active. The IR spectrum of INT-formazan (i.e., the product of INT reduction) showed an absorbance at 3,100-3,700 cm- due to NH-stretching. The presence of NH proton, confirmed further by IH-NMR, together with the above observations suggests that INT, as part of the over-all redox process, abstracts a C(4) hydrogen of the dihydropyridine nucleus of NADH with a simultaneous cleavage at N(2-3) position of its 1,2,3,4-tetrazole ring system and that the redox events are confined to a microenvironment as in the case of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymatic reactions. PMID:2930563

  6. Solution NMR of a 463-Residue Phosphohexomutase: Domain 4 Mobility, Substates, and Phosphoryl Transfer Defect

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Akella V. S.; Anbanandam, Asokan; Kelm, Allek; Mehra-Chaudhary, Ritcha; Wei, Yirui; Qin, Peiwu; Lee, Yingying; Berjanskii, Mark V.; Mick, Jacob A.; Beamer, Lesa J.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2012-01-05

    Phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase contributes to the infectivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, retains and reorients its intermediate by 180°, and rotates domain 4 to close the deep catalytic cleft. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the backbone of wild-type and S108C-inactivated enzymes were assigned to at least 90%. 13C secondary chemical shifts report excellent agreement of solution and crystallographic structure over the 14 α-helices, C-capping motifs, and 20 of the 22 β-strands. Major and minor NMR peaks implicate substates affecting 28% of assigned residues. These can be attributed to the phosphorylation state and possibly to conformational interconversions. The S108C substitution of the phosphoryl donor and acceptor slowed transformation of the glucose 1-phosphate substrate by impairing kcat. Addition of the glucose 1,6-bisphosphate intermediate accelerated this reaction by 2–3 orders of magnitude, somewhat bypassing the defect and apparently relieving substrate inhibition. The S108C mutation perturbs the NMR spectra and electron density map around the catalytic cleft while preserving the secondary structure in solution. Diminished peak heights and faster 15N relaxation suggest line broadening and millisecond fluctuations within four loops that can contact phosphosugars. 15N NMR relaxation and peak heights suggest that domain 4 reorients slightly faster in solution than domains 1–3, and with a different principal axis of diffusion. Finally, this adds to the crystallographic evidence of domain 4 rotations in the enzyme, which were previously suggested to couple to reorientation of the intermediate, substrate binding, and product release.

  7. Associative mechanism for phosphoryl transfer: a molecular dynamics simulation of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase complexed with its substrates.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Harini; Lou, Hongfeng; Kimple, Adam; Vieille, Claire; Cukier, Robert I

    2005-01-01

    The ternary complex of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (ECAK) with its substrates adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and Mg-ATP, which catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphoryl group between adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and AMP, was studied using molecular dynamics. The starting structure for the simulation was assembled from the crystal structures of ECAK complexed with the bisubstrate analog diadenosine pentaphosphate (AP(5)A) and of Bacillus stearothermophilus adenylate kinase complexed with AP(5)A, Mg(2+), and 4 coordinated water molecules, and by deleting 1 phosphate group from AP(5)A. The interactions of ECAK residues with the various moieties of ATP and AMP were compared to those inferred from NMR, X-ray crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, and enzyme kinetic studies. The simulation supports the hypothesis that hydrogen bonds between AMP's adenine and the protein are at the origin of the high nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) specificity of AK. The ATP adenine and ribose moieties are only loosely bound to the protein, while the ATP phosphates are strongly bound to surrounding residues. The coordination sphere of Mg(2+), consisting of 4 waters and oxygens of the ATP beta- and gamma-phosphates, stays approximately octahedral during the simulation. The important role of the conserved Lys13 in the P loop in stabilizing the active site by bridging the ATP and AMP phosphates is evident. The influence of Mg(2+), of its coordination waters, and of surrounding charged residues in maintaining the geometry and distances of the AMP alpha-phosphate and ATP beta- and gamma-phosphates is sufficient to support an associative reaction mechanism for phosphoryl transfer. PMID:15521058

  8. Cardiac mitochondrial matrix and respiratory complex protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Covian, Raul

    2012-01-01

    It has become appreciated over the last several years that protein phosphorylation within the cardiac mitochondrial matrix and respiratory complexes is extensive. Given the importance of oxidative phosphorylation and the balance of energy metabolism in the heart, the potential regulatory effect of these classical signaling events on mitochondrial function is of interest. However, the functional impact of protein phosphorylation and the kinase/phosphatase system responsible for it are relatively unknown. Exceptions include the well-characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase and branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase regulatory system. The first task of this review is to update the current status of protein phosphorylation detection primarily in the matrix and evaluate evidence linking these events with enzymatic function or protein processing. To manage the scope of this effort, we have focused on the pathways involved in energy metabolism. The high sensitivity of modern methods of detecting protein phosphorylation and the low specificity of many kinases suggests that detection of protein phosphorylation sites without information on the mole fraction of phosphorylation is difficult to interpret, especially in metabolic enzymes, and is likely irrelevant to function. However, several systems including protein translocation, adenine nucleotide translocase, cytochrome c, and complex IV protein phosphorylation have been well correlated with enzymatic function along with the classical dehydrogenase systems. The second task is to review the current understanding of the kinase/phosphatase system within the matrix. Though it is clear that protein phosphorylation occurs within the matrix, based on 32P incorporation and quantitative mass spectrometry measures, the kinase/phosphatase system responsible for this process is ill-defined. An argument is presented that remnants of the much more labile bacterial protein phosphoryl transfer system may be present in the matrix and that the

  9. Enzymatic catalysis and transfers in solution. I. Theory and computations, a unified view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, R. A.

    2006-11-01

    The transfer of hydride, proton, or H atom between substrate and cofactor in enzymes has been extensively studied for many systems, both experimentally and computationally. A simple equation for the reaction rate, an analog of an equation obtained earlier for electron transfer rates, is obtained, but now containing an approximate analytic expression for the bond rupture-bond forming feature of these H transfers. A "symmetrization," of the potential energy surfaces is again introduced [R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 43, 679 (1965); J. Phys. Chem. 72, 891 (1968)], together with Gaussian fluctuations of the remaining coordinates of the enzyme and solution needed for reaching the transition state. Combining the two expressions for the changes in the difference of the two bond lengths of the substrate-cofactor subsystem and in the fluctuation coordinates of the protein leading to the transition state, an expression is obtained for the free energy barrier. To this end a two-dimensional reaction space (m,n) is used that contains the relative coordinates of the H in the reactants, the heavy atoms to which it is bonded, and the protein/solution reorganization coordinate, all leading to the transition state. The resulting expression may serve to characterize in terms of specific parameters (two "reorganization" terms, thermodynamics, and work terms), experimental and computational data for different enzymes, and different cofactor-substrate systems. A related characterization was used for electron transfers. To isolate these factors from nuclear tunneling, when the H-tunneling effect is large, use of deuterium and tritium transfers is of course helpful, although tunneling has frequently and understandably dominated the discussions. A functional form is suggested for the dependence of the deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) on ΔG ° and a different form for the C13 KIE. Pressure effects on deuterium and C13 KIEs are also discussed. Although formulated for a one

  10. Lewis acid catalysis of phosphoryl transfer from a copper(II)-NTP complex in a kinase ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Poudyal, Raghav R.; Forgy, Joshua C.; Sawyer, Andrew W.; Maxwell, Adam W. R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical strategies used by ribozymes to enhance reaction rates are revealed in part from their metal ion and pH requirements. We find that kinase ribozyme K28(1-77)C, in contrast with previously characterized kinase ribozymes, requires Cu2+ for optimal catalysis of thiophosphoryl transfer from GTPγS. Phosphoryl transfer from GTP is greatly reduced in the absence of Cu2+, indicating a specific catalytic role independent of any potential interactions with the GTPγS thiophosphoryl group. In-line probing and ATPγS competition both argue against direct Cu2+ binding by RNA; rather, these data establish that Cu2+ enters the active site within a Cu2+•GTPγS or Cu2+•GTP chelation complex, and that Cu2+•nucleobase interactions further enforce Cu2+ selectivity and position the metal ion for Lewis acid catalysis. Replacing Mg2+ with [Co(NH3)6]3+ significantly reduced product yield, but not kobs, indicating that the role of inner-sphere Mg2+ coordination is structural rather than catalytic. Replacing Mg2+ with alkaline earths of increasing ionic radii (Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+) gave lower yields and approximately linear rates of product accumulation. Finally, we observe that reaction rates increased with pH in log-linear fashion with an apparent pKa = 8.0 ± 0.1, indicating deprotonation in the rate-limiting step. PMID:23358821

  11. Lewis acid catalysis of phosphoryl transfer from a copper(II)-NTP complex in a kinase ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Elisa; Poudyal, Raghav R; Forgy, Joshua C; Sawyer, Andrew W; Maxwell, Adam W R; Burke, Donald H

    2013-03-01

    The chemical strategies used by ribozymes to enhance reaction rates are revealed in part from their metal ion and pH requirements. We find that kinase ribozyme K28(1-77)C, in contrast with previously characterized kinase ribozymes, requires Cu(2+) for optimal catalysis of thiophosphoryl transfer from GTPγS. Phosphoryl transfer from GTP is greatly reduced in the absence of Cu(2+), indicating a specific catalytic role independent of any potential interactions with the GTPγS thiophosphoryl group. In-line probing and ATPγS competition both argue against direct Cu(2+) binding by RNA; rather, these data establish that Cu(2+) enters the active site within a Cu(2+)•GTPγS or Cu(2+)•GTP chelation complex, and that Cu(2+)•nucleobase interactions further enforce Cu(2+) selectivity and position the metal ion for Lewis acid catalysis. Replacing Mg(2+) with [Co(NH3)6](3+) significantly reduced product yield, but not kobs, indicating that the role of inner-sphere Mg(2+) coordination is structural rather than catalytic. Replacing Mg(2+) with alkaline earths of increasing ionic radii (Ca(2+), Sr(2+) and Ba(2+)) gave lower yields and approximately linear rates of product accumulation. Finally, we observe that reaction rates increased with pH in log-linear fashion with an apparent pKa = 8.0 ± 0.1, indicating deprotonation in the rate-limiting step. PMID:23358821

  12. Thiamine intestinal transport and phosphorylation : a study in vitro of potential inhibitors of small intestinal thiamine-pyrophosphokinase using a crude enzymatic preparation.

    PubMed

    Basilico, V; Ferrari, G; Rindi, G; D'Andrea, G

    1979-12-01

    Using as enzymatic source the cytoplasmatic fraction of enterocytes isolated from the rat small intestine, thiamine-pyrophosphokinase activity was studied with a radiometric method using [thiazole-2-(14)C] thiamine. The Km value for thiamine was 2.14 X 10(-6) M and V 0.87 nmol of thiamine pyrophosphate mg-1 protein h-1. Eleven thiamine structural analogs and derivatives were assayed for their inhibitory action on the small intestine thiamine-pyrophosphokinase activity. Their Ki values were : pyrithiamine, 2.25 X 10(-6) M; thiamine monophosphate, 4 X 10(-6) M; 2'-ethylthiamine, 8 X 10(-6) M; 2'-butylthiamine, 6 X 10(-6) M; chloroethylthiamine and dimethalium, 1.5 X 10(-5) M; amprolium, 1.8 X 10(-4) M; L-582571, 1.65 X 10(-4) M; oxythiamine, 4.2 X 10(-3) M. Of the miscellaneous compounds tested (toxopyrimidine, Na-pyrophosphate, choline, L-phenylalanine, ethyl-urethane and 5-fluorouracil), none had any inhibitory action on intestinal thiamine-pyrophosphokinase activity, even if used at concentrations hundred times higher than that of labelled thiamine. PMID:94830

  13. Starch phosphorylation: insights and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mahlow, Sebastian; Orzechowski, Sławomir; Fettke, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    During starch metabolism, the phosphorylation of glucosyl residues of starch, to be more precise of amylopectin, is a repeatedly observed process. This phosphorylation is mediated by dikinases, the glucan, water dikinase (GWD) and the phosphoglucan, water dikinase (PWD). The starch-related dikinases utilize ATP as dual phosphate donor transferring the terminal γ-phosphate group to water and the β-phosphate group selectively to either C6 position or C3 position of a glucosyl residue within amylopectin. By the collaborative action of both enzymes, the initiation of a transition of α-glucans from highly ordered, water-insoluble state to a less order state is realized and thus the initial process of starch degradation. Consequently, mutants lacking either GWD or PWD reveal a starch excess phenotype as well as growth retardation. In this review, we focus on the increased knowledge collected over the last years related to enzymatic properties, the precise definition of the substrates, the physiological implications, and discuss ongoing questions. PMID:27147464

  14. Vibrational studies of phosphoryl transfer enzymes: ras- p21(*)magnesium-GTP and Myosin S1(*)magnesium-ADP- vanadate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianghua

    1999-07-01

    between the attacking and leaving group oxygens with the central vanadium ion in the S1•MgADP -Vi complex was found to increase only slightly compared with the bond order of the ester V-O bond of a monoester vanadate model compound in solution, suggesting an SN2 like mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by myosin.

  15. Direct hybrid glucose-oxygen enzymatic fuel cell based on tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane charge transfer complex as anodic mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Ivan; Vidaković-Koch, Tanja; Sundmacher, Kai

    TTF-TCNQ has been used for the first time as a mediator in a direct glucose fuel cell operating on gas-phase oxygen. It has been shown that TTF-TCNQ forms highly irregular porous structure, which emphasizes the importance of optimization of mass transport and kinetic resistance in the catalyst layer. Kinetics resistance can be optimized by variation of the mediator and/or enzyme loading, while mass transport resistance mainly by the variation of other structural parameters such as electrode thickness. The optimized anode reached limiting current densities of nearly 400 μA cm -2 in presence of 5 mM glucose under rotation. The enzymatic fuel cell exhibited unexpectedly high OCV values (up to 0.99 V), which were tentatively ascribed to different pH conditions at the anode and the cathode. OCV was influenced by glucose crossover and was decreasing with an increase of glucose concentration or flow rate. Although the performance of the fuel cell is limited by the enzymatic anode, the long-term stability of the fuel cell is mainly influenced by the Pt cathode, while the enzymatic anode has higher stability. The fuel cell delivered power densities up to 120 μW cm -2 in presence of 5 mM glucose, depending on the glucose flow rate.

  16. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  17. A Theoretical Study of Phosphoryl Transfers of Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase I (Tdp1) and the Possibility of a "Dead-End" Phosphohistidine Intermediate.

    PubMed

    DeYonker, Nathan J; Webster, Charles Edwin

    2015-07-14

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I (Tdp1) is a DNA repair enzyme conserved across eukaryotes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond between the tyrosine residue of topoisomerase I and the 3'-phosphate of DNA. Atomic level details of the mechanism of Tdp1 are proposed and analyzed using a fully quantum mechanical, geometrically constrained model. The structural basis for the computational model is the vanadate-inhibited crystal structure of human Tdp1 (hTdp1, Protein Data Bank entry 1RFF ). Density functional theory computations are used to acquire thermodynamic and kinetic data along the catalytic pathway, including the phosphoryl transfer and subsequent hydrolysis. Located transition states and intermediates along the reaction coordinate suggest an associative phosphoryl transfer mechanism with five-coordinate phosphorane intermediates. Similar to both theoretical and experimental results for phospholipase D, the proposed mechanism for hTdp1 also includes the thermodynamically favorable possibility of a four-coordinate phosphohistidine "dead-end" product. PMID:26121557

  18. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  19. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  20. Histone phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Dorine; Avvakumov, Nikita; Côté, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications are key components of diverse processes that modulate chromatin structure. These marks function as signals during various chromatin-based events, and act as platforms for recruitment, assembly or retention of chromatin-associated factors. The best-known function of histone phosphorylation takes place during cellular response to DNA damage, when phosphorylated histone H2A(X) demarcates large chromatin domains around the site of DNA breakage. However, multiple studies have also shown that histone phosphorylation plays crucial roles in chromatin remodeling linked to other nuclear processes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of histone phosphorylation and describe the many kinases and phosphatases that regulate it. We discuss the key roles played by this histone mark in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin compaction during cell division and apoptosis. Additionally, we describe the intricate crosstalk that occurs between phosphorylation and other histone modifications and allows for sophisticated control over the chromatin remodeling processes. PMID:22948226

  1. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  2. Rate-promoting vibrations and coupled hydrogen-electron transfer reactions in the condensed phase: A model for enzymatic catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mincer, Joshua S.; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2004-04-01

    A model is presented for coupled hydrogen-electron transfer reactions in condensed phase in the presence of a rate promoting vibration. Large kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are found when the hydrogen is substituted with deuterium. While these KIEs are essentially temperature independent, reaction rates do exhibit temperature dependence. These findings agree with recent experimental data for various enzyme-catalyzed reactions, such as the amine dehydrogenases and soybean lipoxygenase. Consistent with earlier results, turning off the promoting vibration results in an increased KIE. Increasing the barrier height increases the KIE, while increasing the rate of electron transfer decreases it. These results are discussed in light of other views of vibrationally enhanced tunneling in enzymes.

  3. Summarizing lecture: factors influencing enzymatic H-transfers, analysis of nuclear tunnelling isotope effects and thermodynamic versus specific effects

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, R.A

    2006-01-01

    In the articles in this Discussion, a wide variety of topics are treated, including reorganization energy, initially introduced for electron transfers (‘environmentally assisted tunnelling’), nuclear tunnelling, H/D and C12/C13 kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), the effect of changes of distal and nearby amino acid residues using site-directed mutagenesis, and dynamics versus statistical effects. A coordinate-free form of semi-classical theory is used to examine topics on data such as tunnelling versus ‘over-the-barrier’ paths and temperature and pressure effects on KIEs. The multidimensional semi-classical theory includes classically allowed and classically forbidden transitions. More generally, we address the question of relating kinetic to thermodynamic factors, as in the electron transfer field, so learning about specific versus thermodynamic effects in enzyme catalysis and KIEs. PMID:16873131

  4. Structure of NDP-forming Acetyl-CoA synthetase ACD1 reveals a large rearrangement for phosphoryl transfer.

    PubMed

    Weiße, Renato H-J; Faust, Annette; Schmidt, Marcel; Schönheit, Peter; Scheidig, Axel J

    2016-02-01

    The NDP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases (ACDs) catalyze the conversion of various CoA thioesters to the corresponding acids, conserving their chemical energy in form of ATP. The ACDs are the major energy-conserving enzymes in sugar and peptide fermentation of hyperthermophilic archaea. They are considered to be primordial enzymes of ATP synthesis in the early evolution of life. We present the first crystal structures, to our knowledge, of an ACD from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Candidatus Korachaeum cryptofilum. These structures reveal a unique arrangement of the ACD subunits alpha and beta within an α2β2-heterotetrameric complex. This arrangement significantly differs from other members of the superfamily. To transmit an activated phosphoryl moiety from the Ac-CoA binding site (within the alpha subunit) to the NDP-binding site (within the beta subunit), a distance of 51 Å has to be bridged. This transmission requires a larger rearrangement within the protein complex involving a 21-aa-long phosphohistidine-containing segment of the alpha subunit. Spatial restraints of the interaction of this segment with the beta subunit explain the necessity for a second highly conserved His residue within the beta subunit. The data support the proposed four-step reaction mechanism of ACDs, coupling acyl-CoA thioesters with ATP synthesis. Furthermore, the determined crystal structure of the complex with bound Ac-CoA allows first insight, to our knowledge, into the determinants for acyl-CoA substrate specificity. The composition and size of loops protruding into the binding pocket of acyl-CoA are determined by the individual arrangement of the characteristic subdomains. PMID:26787904

  5. On the mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate synthetase (PEPs) and its inhibition by sodium fluoride: potential magnesium and aluminum fluoride complexes of phosphoryl transfer.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Nicole E; Jakeman, David L

    2015-06-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PEPs) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) using a two-step mechanism invoking a phosphorylated-His intermediate. Formation of PEP is an initial step in gluconeogenesis, and PEPs is essential for growth of Escherichia coli on 3-carbon sources such as pyruvate. The production of PEPs has also been linked to bacterial virulence and antibiotic resistance. As such, PEPs is of interest as a target for antibiotic development, and initial investigations of PEPs have indicated inhibition by sodium fluoride. Similar inhibition has been observed in a variety of phospho-transfer enzymes through the formation of metal fluoride complexes within the active site. Herein we quantify the inhibitory capacity of sodium fluoride through a coupled spectrophotometric assay. The observed inhibition provides indirect evidence for the formation of a MgF3(-) complex within the enzyme active site and insight into the phospho-transfer mechanism of PEPs. The effect of AlCl3 on PEPs enzyme activity was also assessed and found to decrease substrate binding and turnover. PMID:25707819

  6. Inhibition of the Conversion of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid to Ethylene by Structural Analogs, Inhibitors of Electron Transfer, Uncouplers of Oxidative Phosphorylation, and Free Radical Scavengers 1

    PubMed Central

    Apelbaum, Akiva; Wang, Shiow Y.; Burgoon, Alan C.; Baker, James E.; Lieberman, Morris

    1981-01-01

    Cyclopropane carboxylic acid (CCA) at 1 to 5 millimolar, unlike related cyclopropane ring analogs of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) which were virtually ineffective, inhibited C2H4 production, and this inhibition was nullified by ACC. Inhibition by CCA is not competitive with ACC since there is a decline, rather than an increase, in native endogenous ACC in the presence of CCA. Similarly, short-chain organic acids from acetic to butyric acid and α-aminoisobutyric acid inhibited C2H4 production at 1 to 5 millimolar and lowered endogenous ACC levels. These inhibitions, like that of CCA, were overcome with ACC. Inhibitors of electron transfer and oxidative phosphorylation effectively inhibited ACC conversion to C2H4 in pea and apple tissues. The most potent inhibitors were 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) which virtually eliminated ACC-stimulated C2H4 production in both tissues. Still other inhibitors of the conversion of ACC to C2H4 were putative free radical scavengers which reduced chemiluminescence in the free radical-activated luminol reaction. These inhibitor studies suggest the involvement of a free radical in the reaction sequence which converts ACC to C2H4. Additionally, the potent inhibition of this reaction by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation (DNP and CCCP) suggest the involvement of ATP or the necessity for an intact membrane for C2H4 production from ACC. In the latter case, CCCP may be acting as a proton ionophore to destroy the membrane integrity necessary for C2H4 production. PMID:16661637

  7. In vitro phosphorylation as tool for modification of silk and keratin fibrous materials.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-05-01

    An overview is given of the recent work on in vitro enzymatic phosphorylation of silk fibroin and human hair keratin. Opposing to many chemical "conventional" approaches, enzymatic phosphorylation is in fact a mild reaction and the treatment falls within "green chemistry" approach. Silk and keratin are not phosphorylated in vivo, but in vitro. This enzyme-driven modification is a major technological breakthrough. Harsh chemical chemicals are avoided, and mild conditions make enzymatic phosphorylation a real "green chemistry" approach. The current communication presents a novel approach stating that enzyme phosphorylation may be used as a tool to modify the surface charge of biocompatible materials such as keratin and silk. PMID:27075736

  8. Identification of a potential general acid/base in the reversible phosphoryl transfer reactions catalyzed by tyrosine recombinases: Flp H305

    PubMed Central

    Whiteson, Katrine L.; Chen, Yu; Chopra, Neeraj; Raymond, Amy C.; Rice, Phoebe A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Flp provides a unique opportunity to apply the tools of chemical biology to phosphoryl transfer reactions. Flp and other tyrosine recombinases catalyze site-specific DNA rearrangements via a phosphotyrosine intermediate, similar to the mechanism of type Ib topoisomerases [1]. Unlike most related enzymes, Flp’s nucleophilic tyrosine derives from a different protomer than the remainder of its active site [2, 3]. Because the tyrosine can be supplied exogenously, non-natural synthetic analogs can be used. Here we examine the catalytic role of Flp’s conserved H305. DNA cleavage was studied using a peptide containing either tyrosine (pKa≅10), or 3-fluoro-tyrosine (pKa≅8.4). Religation was studied using DNA substrates with 3’-phospho-cresol (pKa≅10) or 3’-para-nitro-phenol (pKa≅7.1) mimicking the covalent protein-DNA intermediate. In both cases, the tyrosine analog with the lower pKa specifically restored the activity of an H305 mutant. These results provide the first experimental evidence that this conserved histidine functions as a general acid/base catalyst in tyrosine recombinases. PMID:17317566

  9. Demonstration of phosphoryl group transfer indicates that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) exhibits adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J

    2012-10-19

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl(-) channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP <==> 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the (32)P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase. PMID:22948143

  10. Demonstration of Phosphoryl Group Transfer Indicates That the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Exhibits Adenylate Kinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl− channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the 32P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase. PMID:22948143

  11. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  12. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems. PMID:27146955

  13. Cellular regulation by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Edmond H

    2013-01-11

    A historical account of the discovery of reversible protein phosphorylation is presented. This process was uncovered in the mid 1950s in a study undertaken with Edwin G. Krebs to elucidate the complex hormonal regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase. Contrary to the known activation of this enzyme by AMP which serves as an allosteric effector, its hormonal regulation results from a phosphorylation of the protein by phosphorylase kinase following the activation of the latter by Ca(2+) and ATP. The study led to the establishment of the first hormonal cascade of successive enzymatic reactions, kinases acting on kinases, initiated by cAMP discovered by Earl Sutherland. It also showed how two different physiological processes, carbohydrate metabolism and muscle contraction, could be regulated in concert. PMID:23058924

  14. Structural Characterizations of Glycerol Kinase: Unraveling Phosphorylation-Induced Long-Range Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Kettering, Regina; Saxl, Ruth; Bourand, Alexa; Darbon, Emmanuelle; Joly, Nathalie; Briozzo, Pierre; Deutscher, Josef

    2009-09-11

    Glycerol metabolism provides a central link between sugar and fatty acid catabolism. In most bacteria, glycerol kinase plays a crucial role in regulating channel/facilitator-dependent uptake of glycerol into the cell. In the firmicute Enterococcus casseliflavus, this enzyme's activity is enhanced by phosphorylation of the histidine residue (His232) located in its activation loop, approximately 25 A from its catalytic cleft. We reported earlier that some mutations of His232 altered enzyme activities; we present here the crystal structures of these mutant GlpK enzymes. The structure of a mutant enzyme with enhanced enzymatic activity, His232Arg, reveals that residues at the catalytic cleft are more optimally aligned to bind ATP and mediate phosphoryl transfer. Specifically, the position of Arg18 in His232Arg shifts by approximately 1 A when compared to its position in wild-type (WT), His232Ala, and His232Glu enzymes. This new conformation of Arg18 is more optimally positioned at the presumed gamma-phosphate location of ATP, close to the glycerol substrate. In addition to structural changes exhibited at the active site, the conformational stability of the activation loop is decreased, as reflected by an approximately 35% increase in B factors ('thermal factors') in a mutant enzyme displaying diminished activity, His232Glu. Correlating conformational changes to alteration of enzymatic activities in the mutant enzymes identifies distinct localized regions that can have profound effects on intramolecular signal transduction. Alterations in pairwise interactions across the dimer interface can communicate phosphorylation states over 25 A from the activation loop to the catalytic cleft, positioning Arg18 to form favorable interactions at the beta,gamma-bridging position with ATP. This would offset loss of the hydrogen bonds at the gamma-phosphate of ATP during phosphoryl transfer to glycerol, suggesting that appropriate alignment of the second substrate of glycerol kinase

  15. Insights into the Phosphoryl Transfer Catalyzed by cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase: An X-ray Crystallographic Study of Complexes with Various Metals and Peptide Substrate SP20

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    X-ray structures of several ternary substrate and product complexes of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKAc) have been determined with different bound metal ions. In the PKAc complexes, Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+ metal ions could bind to the active site and facilitate the phosphoryl transfer reaction. ATP and a substrate peptide (SP20) were modified, and the reaction products ADP and the phosphorylated peptide were found trapped in the enzyme active site. Finally, we determined the structure of a pseudo-Michaelis complex containing Mg2+, nonhydrolyzable AMP-PCP (β,γ-methyleneadenosine 5′-triphosphate) and SP20. The product structures together with the pseudo-Michaelis complex provide snapshots of different stages of the phosphorylation reaction. Comparison of these structures reveals conformational, coordination, and hydrogen bonding changes that might occur during the reaction and shed new light on its mechanism, roles of metals, and active site residues. PMID:23672593

  16. Defining roles of PARKIN and ubiquitin phosphorylation by PINK1 in mitochondrial quality control using a ubiquitin replacement strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ordureau, Alban; Heo, Jin-Mi; Duda, David M.; Paulo, Joao A.; Olszewski, Jennifer L.; Yanishevski, David; Rinehart, Jesse; Schulman, Brenda A.; Harper, J. Wade

    2015-01-01

    The PTEN-induced putative kinase protein 1 (PINK1) and ubiquitin (UB) ligase PARKIN direct damaged mitochondria for mitophagy. PINK1 promotes PARKIN recruitment to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) for ubiquitylation of MOM proteins with canonical and noncanonical UB chains. PINK1 phosphorylates both Ser65 (S65) in the UB-like domain of PARKIN and the conserved Ser in UB itself, but the temporal sequence and relative importance of these events during PARKIN activation and mitochondria quality control remain poorly understood. Using “UBS65A-replacement,” we find that PARKIN phosphorylation and activation, and ubiquitylation of Lys residues on a cohort of MOM proteins, occur similarly irrespective of the ability of the UB-replacement to be phosphorylated on S65. In contrast, polyubiquitin (poly-UB) chain synthesis, PARKIN retention on the MOM, and mitophagy are reduced in UBS65A-replacement cells. Analogous experiments examining roles of individual UB chain linkage types revealed the importance of K6 and K63 chain linkages in mitophagy, but phosphorylation of K63 chains by PINK1 did not enhance binding to candidate mitophagy receptors optineurin (OPTN), sequestosome-1 (p62), and nuclear dot protein 52 (NDP52) in vitro. Parallel reaction monitoring proteomics of total mitochondria revealed the absence of p-S65-UB when PARKIN cannot build UB chains, and <0.16% of the monomeric UB pool underwent S65 phosphorylation upon mitochondrial damage. Combining p-S65-UB and p-S65-PARKIN in vitro showed accelerated transfer of nonphosphorylated UB to PARKIN itself, its substrate mitochondrial Rho GTPase (MIRO), and UB. Our data further define a feed-forward mitochondrial ubiquitylation pathway involving PARKIN activation upon phosphorylation, UB chain synthesis on the MOM, UB chain phosphorylation, and further PARKIN recruitment and enzymatic amplification via binding to phosphorylated UB chains. PMID:25969509

  17. What’s New in Enzymatic Halogenations

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Danica Galoniæ; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The halogenation of thousands of natural products occurs during biosynthesis and often confers important functional properties. While haloperoxidases had been the default paradigm for enzymatic incorporation of halogens, via X+ equivalents into organic scaffolds, a combination of microbial genome sequencing, enzymatic studies and structural biology have provided deep new insights into enzymatic transfer of halide equivalents in three oxidation states. These are: (1) the halide ions (X−) abundant in nature, (2) halogen atoms (X•), and (3) the X+ equivalents. The mechanism of halogen incorporation is tailored to the electronic demands of specific substrates and involves enzymes with distinct redox coenzyme requirements. PMID:17881282

  18. A strategy to quantitate global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-04-15

    Current studies of protein phosphorylation focus primarily on the importance of specific phosphoproteins and their landscapes of phosphorylation in the regulation of different cellular functions. However, global changes in phosphorylation of extracellular matrix phosphoproteins measured "in bulk" are equally important. For example, correct global phosphorylation of different bone matrix proteins is critical to healthy tissue biomineralization. To study changes of bone matrix global phosphorylation, we developed a strategy that combines a procedure for in vitro phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of fully mineralized bone in addition to quantitation of the global phosphorylation levels of bone matrix proteins. For the first time, we show that it is possible to enzymatically phosphorylate/dephosphorylate fully mineralized bone originating from either cadaveric human donors or laboratory animals (mice). Using our strategy, we detected the difference in the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from wild-type and osteopontin knockout mice. We also observed that the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from human cortical bone were lower than those isolated from trabecular bone. The developed strategy has the potential to open new avenues for studies on the global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins and their role in biomineralization as well for other tissues/cells and protein-based materials. PMID:26851341

  19. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chunxia; Yi, Bin; Bai, Li; Xia, Yongzhi; Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng; Feng, Hua

    2010-07-02

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  20. Toward a systems-level view of dynamic phosphorylation networks

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Robert H.; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Heng

    2014-01-01

    To better understand how cells sense and respond to their environment, it is important to understand the organization and regulation of the phosphorylation networks that underlie most cellular signal transduction pathways. These networks, which are composed of protein kinases, protein phosphatases and their respective cellular targets, are highly dynamic. Importantly, to achieve signaling specificity, phosphorylation networks must be regulated at several levels, including at the level of protein expression, substrate recognition, and spatiotemporal modulation of enzymatic activity. Here, we briefly summarize some of the traditional methods used to study the phosphorylation status of cellular proteins before focusing our attention on several recent technological advances, such as protein microarrays, quantitative mass spectrometry, and genetically-targetable fluorescent biosensors, that are offering new insights into the organization and regulation of cellular phosphorylation networks. Together, these approaches promise to lead to a systems-level view of dynamic phosphorylation networks. PMID:25177341

  1. SOLID-PHASE ASSAY FOR THE PHOSPHORYLATION OF PROTEINS BLOTTED ON NITROCELLULOSE MEMBRANE FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new procedure for the phosphorylation and assay of phosphoproteins is described. Proteins are solubilized from tissue samples, separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred onto nitrocellulose membrane filters and the blotted polypeptides are phosphorylated with ...

  2. Structural and Biochemical Insights into the Mechanism of Fosfomycin Phosphorylation by Fosfomycin Resistance Kinase FomA

    PubMed Central

    Pakhomova, Svetlana; Bartlett, Sue G.; Doerner, Pamela A.; Newcomer, Marcia E.

    2011-01-01

    We present here the crystal structures of fosfomycin resistance protein (FomA) complexed with MgATP, with ATP and fosfomycin, with MgADP and fosfomycin vanadate, with MgADP and the product of the enzymatic reaction, fosfomycin monophosphate, and with ADP at 1.87, 1.58, 1.85, 1.57, and 1.85 Å resolution, respectively. Structures of these complexes that approximate different reaction steps allowed us to distinguish the catalytically active conformation of ATP and to reconstruct the model of the MgATP·fosfomycin complex. According to the model, the triphosphate tail of the nucleotide is aligned toward the phosphonate moiety of fosfomycin, in contast to the previously published MgAMPPNP complex, with the attacking fosfomycin oxygen positioned 4 Å from the γ-phosphorus of ATP. Site-directed mutagenesis studies and comparison of these structures with that of homologous N-acetyl-l-glutamate and isopentenyl phosphate kinases allowed us to propose a model of phosphorylation of fosfomycin by FomA enzyme. A Mg cation ligates all three phosphate groups of ATP and together with positively charged K216, K9, K18, and H58 participates in the dissipation of negative charge during phosphoryl transfer, indicating that the transferred phosphate group is highly negatively charged, which would be expected for an associative mechanism. K216 polarizes the γ-phosphoryl group of ATP. K9, K18, and H58 participate in stabilization of the transition state. D150 and D208 play organizational roles in catalysis. S148, S149, and T210 participate in fosfomycin binding, with T210 being crucial for catalysis. Hence, it appears that as in the homologous enzymes, FomA-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer takes place by an in-line predominantly associative mechanism. PMID:21728358

  3. Structural and biochemical insights into the mechanism of fosfomycin phosphorylation by fosfomycin resistance kinase FomA.

    PubMed

    Pakhomova, Svetlana; Bartlett, Sue G; Doerner, Pamela A; Newcomer, Marcia E

    2011-08-16

    We present here the crystal structures of fosfomycin resistance protein (FomA) complexed with MgATP, with ATP and fosfomycin, with MgADP and fosfomycin vanadate, with MgADP and the product of the enzymatic reaction, fosfomycin monophosphate, and with ADP at 1.87, 1.58, 1.85, 1.57, and 1.85 Å resolution, respectively. Structures of these complexes that approximate different reaction steps allowed us to distinguish the catalytically active conformation of ATP and to reconstruct the model of the MgATP·fosfomycin complex. According to the model, the triphosphate tail of the nucleotide is aligned toward the phosphonate moiety of fosfomycin, in contest to the previously published MgAMPPNP complex, with the attacking fosfomycin oxygen positioned 4 Å from the γ-phosphorus of ATP. Site-directed mutagenesis studies and comparison of these structures with that of homologous N-acetyl-l-glutamate and isopentenyl phosphate kinases allowed us to propose a model of phosphorylation of fosfomycin by FomA enzyme. A Mg cation ligates all three phosphate groups of ATP and together with positively charged K216, K9, K18, and H58 participates in the dissipation of negative charge during phosphoryl transfer, indicating that the transferred phosphate group is highly negatively charged, which would be expected for an associative mechanism. K216 polarizes the γ-phosphoryl group of ATP. K9, K18, and H58 participate in stabilization of the transition state. D150 and D208 play organizational roles in catalysis. S148, S149, and T210 participate in fosfomycin binding, with T210 being crucial for catalysis. Hence, it appears that as in the homologous enzymes, FomA-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer takes place by an in-line predominantly associative mechanism. PMID:21728358

  4. Microwave-mediated enzymatic modifications of DNA.

    PubMed

    Das, Rakha Hari; Ahirwar, Rajesh; Kumar, Saroj; Nahar, Pradip

    2015-02-15

    Here we report microwave-induced specific cleavage, ligation, dephosphorylation, and phosphorylation of nucleic acids catalyzed by restriction endonucleases, T4 DNA ligase, T4 polynucleotide kinase, and calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase. The microwave-mediated method has dramatically reduced the reaction time to 20 to 50s. In control experiments, the same reactions failed to give the desired reaction products when carried out in the same time periods but without microwave irradiation. Because the microwave method is rapid, it could be a useful alternative to the time-consuming conventional procedure for enzymatic modification of DNA. PMID:25447491

  5. A Simple Hydraulic Analog Model of Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Willis, Wayne T; Jackman, Matthew R; Messer, Jeffrey I; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Glancy, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is the primary source of cellular energy transduction in mammals. This energy conversion involves dozens of enzymatic reactions, energetic intermediates, and the dynamic interactions among them. With the goal of providing greater insight into the complex thermodynamics and kinetics ("thermokinetics") of mitochondrial energy transduction, a simple hydraulic analog model of oxidative phosphorylation is presented. In the hydraulic model, water tanks represent the forward and back "pressures" exerted by thermodynamic driving forces: the matrix redox potential (ΔGredox), the electrochemical potential for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane (ΔGH), and the free energy of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) (ΔGATP). Net water flow proceeds from tanks with higher water pressure to tanks with lower pressure through "enzyme pipes" whose diameters represent the conductances (effective activities) of the proteins that catalyze the energy transfer. These enzyme pipes include the reactions of dehydrogenase enzymes, the electron transport chain (ETC), and the combined action of ATP synthase plus the ATP-adenosine 5'-diphosphate exchanger that spans the inner membrane. In addition, reactive oxygen species production is included in the model as a leak that is driven out of the ETC pipe by high pressure (high ΔGredox) and a proton leak dependent on the ΔGH for both its driving force and the conductance of the leak pathway. Model water pressures and flows are shown to simulate thermodynamic forces and metabolic fluxes that have been experimentally observed in mammalian skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise, chronic endurance training, and reduced substrate availability, as well as account for the thermokinetic behavior of mitochondria from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle and the metabolic capacitance of the creatine kinase reaction. PMID:26807634

  6. A graphene oxide based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingyu; Guo, Jiubiao; Bai, Gongxun; Chan, Chunyu; Liu, Xuan; Ye, Weiwei; Hao, Jianhua; Chen, Sheng; Yang, Mo

    2014-10-23

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most potent toxic bacterial proteins for humans, which make them potential agents for bioterrorism. Therefore, an ultrasensitive detection of BoNTs and their active states is in great need as field-deployable systems for anti-terrorism applications. We report the construction of a novel graphene oxide (GO)-peptide based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of the BoNT serotype A light chain (BoNT-LcA) protease activity. A green fluorescence protein (GFP) modified SNAP-25 peptide substrate (SNAP-25-GFP) was optimally designed and synthesized with the centralized recognition/cleavage sites. This FRET platform was constructed by covalent immobilization of peptide substrate on GO with BSA passivation which have advantages of low non-specific adsorption and high stability in protein abundant solution. BoNT-LcA can specifically cleave SNAP-25-GFP substrate covalently immobilized on GO to release the fragment with GFP. Based on fluorescence signal recovery measurement, the target BoNT-LcA was detected sensitively and selectively with the linear detection range from 1fg/mL to 1pg/mL. The limit of detection (LOD) for BoNT-LcA is around 1fg/mL. PMID:25461164

  7. Regulation of protein phosphorylation in oat mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, C.; Kopeck, K.; Sceppa, E. )

    1989-04-01

    We sought to identify phosphorylated proteins in isolated oat mitocchondria and to characterize the enzymatic and regulatory properties of the protein kinase(s). Mitochondria from oats (Avena sativa L. cv. Garry) were purified on Percoll gradients. Mitochondria were incubated with {sup 32}P-{gamma}-ATP; proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. A small number of bands was detected on autoradiograms, most prominently at 70 kD and 42 kD; the latter band has been tentatively identified as a subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a well-known phosphoprotein. The protein kinase(s) could also phosphorylate casein, but not histone. Spermine enhanced the phosphorylation of casein and inhibited the phosphorylation of the 42 kD band. These studies were carried out on both intact and burst mitochondria. Control by calcium and other ions was investigated. The question of the action of regulators on protein kinase or protein phosphatase was studied by the use of {sup 35}S-adenosine thiotriphosphate.

  8. Phosphorylation and RLK signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant genomes encode hundreds of receptor-like kinases (RLKs) with an organization of functional domains similar to that of animal receptor kinases. Ligand-dependent phosphorylation has now been demonstrated for several plant RLKs and identification of specific phosphorylation sites followed by thei...

  9. The Enzymatic Paradox of Yeast Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase: Exclusive Arginine Transfer Controlled by a Flexible Mechanism of tRNA Recognition.

    PubMed

    McShane, Ariel; Hok, Eveline; Tomberlin, Jensen; Eriani, Gilbert; Geslain, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Identity determinants are essential for the accurate recognition of transfer RNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. To date, arginine determinants in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been identified exclusively in vitro and only on a limited number of tRNA Arginine isoacceptors. In the current study, we favor a full cellular approach and expand the investigation of arginine determinants to all four tRNA Arg isoacceptors. More precisely, this work scrutinizes the relevance of the tRNA nucleotides at position 20, 35 and 36 in the yeast arginylation reaction. We built 21 mutants by site-directed mutagenesis and tested their functionality in YAL5, a previously engineered yeast knockout deficient for the expression of tRNA Arg CCG. Arginylation levels were also monitored using Northern blot. Our data collected in vivo correlate with previous observations. C35 is the prominent arginine determinant followed by G36 or U36 (G/U36). In addition, although there is no major arginine determinant in the D loop, the recognition of tRNA Arg ICG relies to some extent on the nucleotide at position 20. This work refines the existing model for tRNA Arg recognition. Our observations indicate that yeast Arginyl-tRNA synthetase (yArgRS) relies on distinct mechanisms to aminoacylate the four isoacceptors. Finally, according to our refined model, yArgRS is able to accommodate tRNA Arg scaffolds presenting N34, C/G35 and G/A/U36 anticodons while maintaining specificity. We discuss the mechanistic and potential physiological implications of these findings. PMID:26844776

  10. The Enzymatic Paradox of Yeast Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase: Exclusive Arginine Transfer Controlled by a Flexible Mechanism of tRNA Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Eriani, Gilbert; Geslain, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Identity determinants are essential for the accurate recognition of transfer RNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. To date, arginine determinants in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been identified exclusively in vitro and only on a limited number of tRNA Arginine isoacceptors. In the current study, we favor a full cellular approach and expand the investigation of arginine determinants to all four tRNA Arg isoacceptors. More precisely, this work scrutinizes the relevance of the tRNA nucleotides at position 20, 35 and 36 in the yeast arginylation reaction. We built 21 mutants by site-directed mutagenesis and tested their functionality in YAL5, a previously engineered yeast knockout deficient for the expression of tRNA Arg CCG. Arginylation levels were also monitored using Northern blot. Our data collected in vivo correlate with previous observations. C35 is the prominent arginine determinant followed by G36 or U36 (G/U36). In addition, although there is no major arginine determinant in the D loop, the recognition of tRNA Arg ICG relies to some extent on the nucleotide at position 20. This work refines the existing model for tRNA Arg recognition. Our observations indicate that yeast Arginyl-tRNA synthetase (yArgRS) relies on distinct mechanisms to aminoacylate the four isoacceptors. Finally, according to our refined model, yArgRS is able to accommodate tRNA Arg scaffolds presenting N34, C/G35 and G/A/U36 anticodons while maintaining specificity. We discuss the mechanistic and potential physiological implications of these findings. PMID:26844776

  11. Phosphorylation Modulates Catalytic Activity of Mycobacterial Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ghanshyam S.; Ravala, Sandeep K.; Malhotra, Neha; Chakraborti, Pradip K.

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD+-dependent deacetylases involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes and are conserved throughout phylogeny. Here we report about in vitro transphosphorylation of the only NAD+-dependent deacetylase (mDAC) present in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases, particularly PknA. The phosphorylated mDAC displayed decreased deacetylase activity compared to its unphosphorylated counterpart. Mass-spectrometric study identified seven phosphosites in mDAC; however, mutational analysis highlighted major contribution of Thr-214 for phosphorylation of the protein. In concordance to this observation, variants of mDAC substituting Thr-214 with either Ala (phospho-ablated) or Glu (phosphomimic) exhibited significantly reduced deacetylase activity suggesting phosphorylation mediated control of enzymatic activity. To assess the role of phosphorylation towards functionality of mDAC, we opted for a sirtuin knock-out strain of Escherichia coli (Δdac), where interference of endogenous mycobacterial kinases could be excluded. The Δdac strain in nutrient deprived acetate medium exhibited compromised growth and complementation with mDAC reversed this phenotype. The phospho-ablated or phosphomimic variant, on the other hand, was unable to restore the functionality of mDAC indicating the role of phosphorylation per se in the process. We further over-expressed mDAC or mDAC-T214A as His-tagged protein in M. smegmatis, where endogenous eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases are present. Anti-phosphothreonine antibody recognized both mDAC and mDAC-T214A proteins in western blotting. However, the extent of phosphorylation as adjudged by scanning the band intensity, was significantly low in the mutant protein (mDAC-T214A) compared to that of the wild-type (mDAC). Furthermore, expression of PknA in the mDAC complemented Δdac strain was able to phosphorylate M. tuberculosis sirtuin. The growth profile of this culture in acetate medium was

  12. Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-01

    Activities in this project are aimed at overcoming barriers associated with high capital and operating costs and sub-optimal sugar yields resulting from pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass.

  13. Enzymatic modification of schizophyllan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An enzymatic method was developed for the progressive modification of the polysaccharide schizophyllan. Fungal strains Hypocrea nigricans NRRL 62555, Penicillium crustosum NRRL 62558, and Penicillium simplicissimum NRRL 62550 were previously identified as novel sources of ß-endoglucanase with specif...

  14. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, J.K. . School of Medicine); Kitchell, J.P. )

    1988-10-07

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology, emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes or commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of model'' organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix.

  15. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, J.K. . School of Medicine); Kitchell, J.P. )

    1988-12-15

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes or commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of model'' organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix.

  16. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Y.N.; Crooker, S.C.; Kitchell, J.P.; Nochur, S.V. ); Marquis, J.K. . School of Medicine)

    1989-06-16

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes as well as commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of model'' organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix.

  17. An isotope labeling strategy for quantifying the degree of phosphorylation at multiple sites in proteins.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, Adrian D; Harms, Amy C; Sussman, Michael R; Bunner, Anne E; Harper, Jeffrey F

    2004-05-01

    A procedure for determining the extent of phosphorylation at individual sites of multiply phosphorylated proteins was developed and applied to two polyphosphorylated proteins. The protocol, using simple chemical (Fischer methyl-esterification) and enzymatic (phosphatase) modification steps and an accessible isotopic labeling reagent (methyl alcohol-d(4)), is described in detail. Site-specific phosphorylation stoichiometries are derived from the comparison of chemically identical but isotopically distinct peptide species analyzed by microspray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (microLC-MS) using a Micromass Q-TOF2 mass spectrometer. Ten phosphorylation sites were unambiguously identified in tryptic digests of both proteins, and phosphorylation stoichiometries were determined for eight of the ten sites using the isotope-coded strategy. The extent of phosphorylation was also estimated from the mass spectral peak areas for the phosphorylated and unmodified peptides, and these estimates, when compared with stoichiometries determined using the isotope-coded technique, differed only marginally (within approximately 20%). PMID:15121193

  18. HMA6 and HMA8 are two chloroplast Cu+-ATPases with different enzymatic properties

    PubMed Central

    Sautron, Emeline; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Giustini, Cécile; Pro, Danièle; Crouzy, Serge; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Rolland, Norbert; Catty, Patrice; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) plays a key role in the photosynthetic process as cofactor of the plastocyanin (PC), an essential component of the chloroplast photosynthetic electron transfer chain. Encoded by the nuclear genome, PC is translocated in its apo-form into the chloroplast and the lumen of thylakoids where it is processed to its mature form and acquires Cu. In Arabidopsis, Cu delivery into the thylakoids involves two transporters of the PIB-1 ATPases family, heavy metal associated protein 6 (HMA6) located at the chloroplast envelope and HMA8 at the thylakoid membrane. To gain further insight into the way Cu is delivered to PC, we analysed the enzymatic properties of HMA8 and compared them with HMA6 ones using in vitro phosphorylation assays and phenotypic tests in yeast. These experiments reveal that HMA6 and HMA8 display different enzymatic properties: HMA8 has a higher apparent affinity for Cu+ but a slower dephosphorylation kinetics than HMA6. Modelling experiments suggest that these differences could be explained by the electrostatic properties of the Cu+ releasing cavities of the two transporters and/or by the different nature of their cognate Cu+ acceptors (metallochaperone/PC). PMID:26182363

  19. Mining Conditional Phosphorylation Motifs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jun; Gong, Haipeng; Deng, Shengchun; He, Zengyou

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation motifs represent position-specific amino acid patterns around the phosphorylation sites in the set of phosphopeptides. Several algorithms have been proposed to uncover phosphorylation motifs, whereas the problem of efficiently discovering a set of significant motifs with sufficiently high coverage and non-redundancy still remains unsolved. Here we present a novel notion called conditional phosphorylation motifs. Through this new concept, the motifs whose over-expressiveness mainly benefits from its constituting parts can be filtered out effectively. To discover conditional phosphorylation motifs, we propose an algorithm called C-Motif for a non-redundant identification of significant phosphorylation motifs. C-Motif is implemented under the Apriori framework, and it tests the statistical significance together with the frequency of candidate motifs in a single stage. Experiments demonstrate that C-Motif outperforms some current algorithms such as MMFPh and Motif-All in terms of coverage and non-redundancy of the results and efficiency of the execution. The source code of C-Motif is available at: https://sourceforge. net/projects/cmotif/. PMID:26356863

  20. Enzymatic synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Arati G; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T Randall; Willson, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing. PMID:25854425

  1. Enzymatic Synthesis of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C.; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T. Randall; Willson, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing. PMID:25854425

  2. Enzymatic characterization of recombinant nitrate reductase expressed and purified from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Phillip; Probst, Corinna; Dammeyer, Thorben; Buchmeier, Sabine; Jänsch, Lothar; Wissing, Josef; Tinnefeld, Philip; Mendel, Ralf R; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Kruse, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    We established an expression and purification procedure for recombinant protein production in Neurospora crassa (N. crassa). This Strep-tag® based system was successfully used for purifying recombinant N. crassa nitrate reductase (NR), whose enzymatic activity was compared to recombinant N. crassa NR purified from Escherichia coli. The purity of the two different NR preparations was similar but NR purified from N. crassa showed a significantly higher nitrate turnover rate. Two phosphorylation sites were identified for NR purified from the endogenous expression system. We conclude that homologous expression of N. crassa NR yields a higher active enzyme and propose that NR phosphorylation causes enhanced enzymatic activity. PMID:25914160

  3. Synthesis of Isomeric Phosphoubiquitin Chains Reveals that Phosphorylation Controls Deubiquitinase Activity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Huguenin-Dezot, Nicolas; De Cesare, Virginia; Peltier, Julien; Knebel, Axel; Kristaryianto, Yosua Adi; Rogerson, Daniel T; Kulathu, Yogesh; Trost, Matthias; Chin, Jason W

    2016-07-26

    Ubiquitin is post-translationally modified by phosphorylation at several sites, but the consequences of these modifications are largely unknown. Here, we synthesize multi-milligram quantities of ubiquitin phosphorylated at serine 20, serine 57, and serine 65 via genetic code expansion. We use these phosphoubiquitins for the enzymatic assembly of 20 isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers, with different sites of isopeptide linkage and/or phosphorylation. We discover that phosphorylation of serine 20 on ubiquitin converts UBE3C from a dual-specificity E3 ligase into a ligase that primarily synthesizes K48 chains. We profile the activity of 31 deubiquitinases on the isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers in 837 reactions, and we discover that phosphorylation at distinct sites in ubiquitin can activate or repress cleavage of a particular linkage by deubiquitinases and that phosphorylation at a single site in ubiquitin can control the specificity of deubiquitinases for distinct ubiquitin linkages. PMID:27425610

  4. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  5. Enzymatic Modifications of Polysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polysaccharides are often modified chemically in order to improve its properties or to impart specific characteristics. Indeed quite a few commercial products are based on modified polysaccharides. In this talk, I shall describe a new set of modified polysaccharides based on enzymatic reactions. ...

  6. Charge changing phosphorylated polymers: Proof of in situ mucoadhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Bonengel, Sonja; Jelkmann, Max; Oh, Sejin; Mahmood, Arshad; Ijaz, Muhammad; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to design a novel polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivative exhibiting mucus permeating and mucoadhesive properties. Therefore, the enzymatically degradable phosphate ester, phosphotyrosine (Ptyr) was covalently attached to PEG-diamine. The synthesized PEG-Ptyr was studied in terms of enzymatic degradability on Caco 2 cells and by isolated intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP). Furthermore, the influence of enzymatic degradation on charge distribution of the polymer as well as on mucus diffusion and mucoadhesion was investigated. Within this study, the phosphate ester in PEG-Ptyr could be cleaved on the cell monolayer and by the isolated IAP, whereby the degradation rate was 10-fold higher utilizing the isolated enzyme. Implementation of negative charges on PEG due to modification with Ptyr led to an increased electrophoretic mobility, which was reduced after enzymatic degradation of the phosphate ester, most likely due to the alterations in charge distribution on the polymeric backbone. Interactions with mucus components were determined within mucus diffusion studies and rheological investigations. Herein, PEG-Ptyr showed a 3-fold lower mucus diffusion, after incubation with IAP. Within rheological investigations, dynamic viscosities increased by the factor of 3, after the phosphate ester in PEG-Ptyr was degraded by IAP. Results obtained within these experiments provided evidence for the in situ mucoadhesive properties of charge changing phosphorylated polymers. The combination of mucus permeating and mucoadhesive features of phosphorylated PEGs could be a highly interesting tool for future applications, such as for coating nanoparticles. PMID:27320696

  7. Mumps Virus Nucleoprotein Enhances Phosphorylation of the Phosphoprotein by Polo-Like Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, Adrian; Zengel, James; Xu, Pei; Li, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (vRdRps) of nonsegmented, negative-sense viruses (NNSVs) consist of the enzymatic large protein (L) and the phosphoprotein (P). P is heavily phosphorylated, and its phosphorylation plays a critical role in viral RNA synthesis. Since NNSVs do not encode kinases, P is phosphorylated by host kinases. In this study, we investigate the roles that viral proteins play in the phosphorylation of mumps virus (MuV) P. We found that nucleoprotein (NP) enhances the phosphorylation of P. We have identified the serine/threonine kinase Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) as a host kinase that phosphorylates P and have found that phosphorylation of P by PLK1 is enhanced by NP. The PLK1 binding site in MuV P was mapped to residues 146 to 148 within the S(pS/T)P motif, and the phosphorylation site was identified as residues S292 and S294. IMPORTANCE It has previously been shown that P acts as a chaperone for NP, which encapsidates viral genomic RNA to form the NP-RNA complex, the functional template for viral RNA synthesis. Thus, it is assumed that phosphorylation of P may regulate NP's ability to form the NP-RNA complex, thereby regulating viral RNA synthesis. Our work demonstrates that MuV NP affects phosphorylation of P, suggesting that NP can regulate viral RNA synthesis by regulating phosphorylation of P. PMID:26608325

  8. ZDHHC3 Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulates Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Cesca, Fabrizia; Gorinski, Natalya; Galil, Dalia Abdel; Cherkas, Volodimir; Ronkina, Natalia; Lafera, Juri; Gaestel, Matthias; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Dityatev, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. It is broadly expressed in the nervous system and regulates neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. Previous in vitro studies revealed that palmitoylation of NCAM is required for fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2)-stimulated neurite outgrowth and identified the zinc finger DHHC (Asp-His-His-Cys)-containing proteins ZDHHC3 and ZDHHC7 as specific NCAM-palmitoylating enzymes. Here, we verified that FGF2 controlled NCAM palmitoylation in vivo and investigated molecular mechanisms regulating NCAM palmitoylation by ZDHHC3. Experiments with overexpression and pharmacological inhibition of FGF receptor (FGFR) and Src revealed that these kinases control tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 and that ZDHHC3 is phosphorylated by endogenously expressed FGFR and Src proteins. By site-directed mutagenesis, we found that Tyr18 is an FGFR1-specific ZDHHC3 phosphorylation site, while Tyr295 and Tyr297 are specifically phosphorylated by Src kinase in cell-based and cell-free assays. Abrogation of tyrosine phosphorylation increased ZDHHC3 autopalmitoylation, enhanced interaction with NCAM, and upregulated NCAM palmitoylation. Expression of ZDHHC3 with tyrosine mutated in cultured hippocampal neurons promoted neurite outgrowth. Our findings for the first time highlight that FGFR- and Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 modulates ZDHHC3 enzymatic activity and plays a role in neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:27247265

  9. Screening for protein phosphorylation using nanoscale reactions on microdroplet arrays.

    PubMed

    Küster, Simon K; Pabst, Martin; Zenobi, Renato; Dittrich, Petra S

    2015-01-26

    We present a novel and straightforward screening method to detect protein phosphorylations in complex protein mixtures. A proteolytic digest is separated by a conventional nanoscale liquid chromatography (nano-LC) separation and the eluate is immediately compartmentalized into microdroplets, which are spotted on a microarray MALDI plate. Subsequently, the enzyme alkaline phosphatase is applied to every second microarray spot to remove the phosphate groups from phosphorylated peptides, which results in a mass shift of n×-80 Da. The MALDI-MS scan of the microarray is then evaluated by a software algorithm to automatically identify the phosphorylated peptides by exploiting the characteristic chromatographic peak profile induced by the phosphatase treatment. This screening method does not require extensive MS/MS experiments or peak list evaluation and can be easily extended to other enzymatic or chemical reactions. PMID:25504774

  10. Struvite and prebiotic phosphorylation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, G. J.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Struvite rather than apatite or amorphous calcium phosphate is precipitated when phosphate is added to seawater containing more than 0.01M NH4+ ions. Struvite may have precipitated from evaporating seawater on the primitive earth, and may have been important for prebiotic phosphorylation.

  11. Enzymatic production of cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Biwer, A; Antranikian, G; Heinzle, E

    2002-09-01

    Cyclodextrins (CD) are enzymatically modified starches with a wide range of applications in food, pharmaceutical and chemical industries, agriculture and environmental engineering. They are produced from starch via enzymatic conversion using cyclodextrin glycosyl transferases (CGTases) and partly alpha-amylases. Due to its low solubility in water, separation and purification of beta-CD is relatively easy compared to alpha- and gamma-CD. In recent years more economic processes for gamma-CD and especially alpha-CD production have been developed using improved CGTases and downstream processing. New purification steps, e.g. affinity adsorption, may reduce the use of complexing agents. The implementation of thermostable CGTases can simplify the production process and increase the selectivity of the reaction. A tabular overview of alpha-CD production processes is presented. PMID:12226716

  12. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Y.N.; Crooker, S.C.; Kitchell, J.P.; Nochur, S.V.

    1991-05-16

    The overall objective of this program was to investigate the feasibility of an enzymatic desulfurization process specifically intended for organic sulfur removal from coal. Toward that end, a series of specific objectives were defined: (1) establish the feasibility of (bio)oxidative pretreatment followed by biochemical sulfate cleavage for representative sulfur-containing model compounds and coals using commercially-available enzymes; (2) investigate the potential for the isolation and selective use of enzyme preparations from coal-utilizing microbial systems for desulfurization of sulfur-containing model compounds and coals; and (3) develop a conceptual design and economic analysis of a process for enzymatic removal of organic sulfur from coal. Within the scope of this program, it was proposed to carry out a portion of each of these efforts concurrently. (VC)

  13. Graphene based enzymatic bioelectrodes and biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Anahita; Othman, Ali; Uzunoglu, Aytekin; Stanciu, Lia; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-04-01

    The excellent electrical conductivity and ease of functionalization make graphene a promising material for use in enzymatic bioelectrodes and biofuel cells. Enzyme based biofuel cells have attracted substantial interest due to their potential to harvest energy from organic materials. This review provides an overview of the functional properties and applications of graphene in the construction of biofuel cells as alternative power sources. The review covers the current state-of-the-art research in graphene based nanomaterials (physicochemical properties and surface functionalities), the role of these parameters in enhancing electron transfer, the stability and activity of immobilized enzymes, and how enhanced power density can be achieved. Specific examples of enzyme immobilization methods, enzyme loading, stability and function on graphene, functionalized graphene and graphene based nanocomposite materials are discussed along with their advantages and limitations. Finally, a critical evaluation of the performance of graphene based enzymatic biofuel cells, the current status, challenges and future research needs are provided.

  14. Phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 in human malonyl-CoA decarboxylase expressed in silkworm Bombyx mori regulates catalytic decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Wook; Makishima, Yu; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Chung, Shin-Kyo; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-11-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is a vital catalytic reaction of lipid metabolism. While it is established that phosphorylation of MCD modulates the enzymatic activity, the specific phosphorylation sites associated with the catalytic function have not been documented due to lack of sufficient production of MCD with proper post-translational modifications. Here, we used the silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid system to express human MCD (hMCD) and mapped phosphorylation effects on enzymatic function. Purified MCD from silkworm displayed post-translational phosphorylation and demonstrated coherent enzymatic activity with high yield (-200 μg/silkworm). Point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites, Ser-204 or Tyr-405 of hMCD, identified by bioinformatics and proteomics analyses reduced the catalytic activity, underscoring the functional significance of phosphorylation in modulating decarboxylase-based catalysis. Identified phosphorylated residues are distinct from the decarboxylation catalytic site, implicating a phosphorylation-induced global conformational change of MCD as responsible in altering catalytic function. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 regulates the decarboxylase function of hMCD leveraging the silkworm-based BmNPV bacmid expression system that offers a fail-safe eukaryotic production platform implementing proper post-translational modification such as phosphorylation. PMID:26004805

  15. Determining in vivo Phosphorylation Sites using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Asara, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most studied protein post-translational modification (PTM) in biological systems since it controls cell growth, proliferation, survival, etc. High resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometers are used to identify protein phosphorylation sites due to their speed, sensitivity, selectivity and throughput. The protocol described here focuses on two common strategies: 1) Identifying phosphorylation sites from individual proteins and small protein complexes, and 2) Identifying global phosphorylation sites from whole cell and tissue extracts. For the first, endogenous or epitope tagged proteins are typically immunopurified (IP) from cell lysates, purified via gel electrophoresis or precipitation and enzymatically digested into peptides. Samples can be optionally enriched for phosphopeptides using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or titanium dioxide (TiO2) and then analyzed by microcapillary liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Global phosphorylation site analyses that capture pSer/pThr/pTyr sites from biological sources sites are more resource and time-consuming and involve digesting the whole cell lysate, followed by peptide fractionation by strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX), phosphopeptide enrichment by IMAC or TiO2 and LC-MS/MS. Alternatively, one can fractionate the protein lysate by SDS-PAGE, followed by digestion, phosphopeptide enrichment and LC-MS/MS. One can also IP only phospho-tyrosine peptides using a pTyr antibody followed by LC-MS/MS. PMID:22470061

  16. Enzymatic temperature change indicator

    DOEpatents

    Klibanov, Alexander M.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    1989-01-21

    A temperature change indicator is described which is composed of an enzyme and a substrate for that enzyme suspended in a solid organic solvent or mixture of solvents as a support medium. The organic solvent or solvents are chosen so as to melt at a specific temperature or in a specific temperature range. When the temperature of the indicator is elevated above the chosen, or critical temperature, the solid organic solvent support will melt, and the enzymatic reaction will occur, producing a visually detectable product which is stable to further temperature variation.

  17. Enzymatic cascade bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Blake A.; Volponi, Joanne V.; Ingersoll, David; Walker, Andrew

    2007-09-04

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for continuously converting sucrose to .beta.-D-glucose. The method comprises a three stage enzymatic reactor in which an aqueous solution of sucrose is first converted into a solution of fructose and .alpha.-D-glucose by passing it through a porous, packed column containing an inert media on which invertase is immobilized. This solution is then sent through a second packed column containing glucose isomerase and finally a third packed column containing mutarotase. Solution temperature and pH are adjusted to maximize glucose output.

  18. Structural basis of enzymatic benzene ring reduction.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Tobias; Huwiler, Simona G; Kung, Johannes W; Weidenweber, Sina; Hellwig, Petra; Stärk, Hans-Joachim; Biskup, Till; Weber, Stefan; Cotelesage, Julien J H; George, Graham N; Ermler, Ulrich; Boll, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    In chemical synthesis, the widely used Birch reduction of aromatic compounds to cyclic dienes requires alkali metals in ammonia as extremely low-potential electron donors. An analogous reaction is catalyzed by benzoyl-coenzyme A reductases (BCRs) that have a key role in the globally important bacterial degradation of aromatic compounds at anoxic sites. Because of the lack of structural information, the catalytic mechanism of enzymatic benzene ring reduction remained obscure. Here, we present the structural characterization of a dearomatizing BCR containing an unprecedented tungsten cofactor that transfers electrons to the benzene ring in an aprotic cavity. Substrate binding induces proton transfer from the bulk solvent to the active site by expelling a Zn(2+) that is crucial for active site encapsulation. Our results shed light on the structural basis of an electron transfer process at the negative redox potential limit in biology. They open the door for biological or biomimetic alternatives to a basic chemical synthetic tool. PMID:26120796

  19. Synaptic plasticity and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2009-01-01

    A number of neuronal functions, including synaptic plasticity, depend on proper regulation of synaptic proteins, many of which can be rapidly regulated by phosphorylation. Neuronal activity controls the function of these synaptic proteins by exquisitely regulating the balance of various protein kinase and protein phosphatase activity. Recent understanding of synaptic plasticity mechanisms underscores important roles that these synaptic phosphoproteins play in regulating both pre- and post-synaptic functions. This review will focus on key postsynaptic phosphoproteins that have been implicated to play a role in synaptic plasticity. PMID:16904750

  20. Determination of GPCR Phosphorylation Status: Establishing a Phosphorylation Barcode.

    PubMed

    Prihandoko, Rudi; Bradley, Sophie J; Tobin, Andrew B; Butcher, Adrian J

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are rapidly phosphorylated following agonist occupation in a process that mediates receptor uncoupling from its cognate G protein, a process referred to as desensitization. In addition, this process provides a mechanism by which receptors can engage with arrestin adaptor molecules and couple to downstream signaling pathways. The importance of this regulatory process has been highlighted recently by the understanding that ligands can direct receptor signaling along one pathway in preference to another, the phenomenon of signaling bias that is partly mediated by the phosphorylation status or phosphorylation barcode of the receptor. Methods to determine the phosphorylation status of a GPCR in vitro and in vivo are necessary to understand not only the physiological mechanisms involved in GPCR signaling, but also to fully examine the signaling properties of GPCR ligands. This unit describes detailed methods for determining the overall phosphorylation pattern on a receptor (the phosphorylation barcode), as well as mass spectrometry approaches that can define the precise sites that become phosphorylated. These techniques, coupled with the generation and characterization of receptor phosphorylation-specific antibodies, provide a full palate of techniques necessary to determine the phosphorylation status of any given GPCR subtype. PMID:26344213

  1. Enzymatic Biofuel Cells on Porous Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dan; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Biofuel cells (BFCs) that utilize enzymes as catalysts represent a new sustainable and renewable energy technology. Numerous efforts have been directed to improve the performance of the enzymatic BFCs (EBFCs) with respect to power output and operational stability for further applications in portable power sources, self-powered electrochemical sensing, implantable medical devices, etc. The latest advances in EBFCs based on porous nanoarchitectures over the past 5 years are detailed here. Porous matrices from carbon, noble metals, and polymers promote the development of EBFCs through the electron transfer and mass transport benefits. Some key issues regarding how these nanostructured porous media improve the performance of EBFCs are also discussed. PMID:27377976

  2. Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Terada, H

    1990-07-01

    Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria inhibit the coupling between the electron transport and phosphorylation reactions and thus inhibit ATP synthesis without affecting the respiratory chain and ATP synthase (H(+)-ATPase). Miscellaneous compounds are known to be uncouplers, but weakly acidic uncouplers are representative because they show very potent activities. The most potent uncouplers discovered so far are the hindered phenol SF 6847, and hydrophobic salicylanilide S-13, which are active in vitro at concentrations in the 10 nM range. For induction of uncoupling, an acid dissociable group, bulky hydrophobic moiety and strong electron-withdrawing group are required. Weakly acidic uncouplers are considered to produce uncoupling by their protonophoric action in the H(+)-impermeable mitochondrial membrane. For exerting these effects, the stability of the respective uncoupler anions in the hydrophobic membrane is very important. High stability is achieved by delocalization of the polar ionic charge through uncoupler (chemical)-specific mechanisms. Such an action of weakly acidic uncouplers is characteristic of the highly efficient membrane targeting action of a nonsite-specific type of bioactive compound. PMID:2176586

  3. Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Terada, H

    1990-01-01

    Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria inhibit the coupling between the electron transport and phosphorylation reactions and thus inhibit ATP synthesis without affecting the respiratory chain and ATP synthase (H(+)-ATPase). Miscellaneous compounds are known to be uncouplers, but weakly acidic uncouplers are representative because they show very potent activities. The most potent uncouplers discovered so far are the hindered phenol SF 6847, and hydrophobic salicylanilide S-13, which are active in vitro at concentrations in the 10 nM range. For induction of uncoupling, an acid dissociable group, bulky hydrophobic moiety and strong electron-withdrawing group are required. Weakly acidic uncouplers are considered to produce uncoupling by their protonophoric action in the H(+)-impermeable mitochondrial membrane. For exerting these effects, the stability of the respective uncoupler anions in the hydrophobic membrane is very important. High stability is achieved by delocalization of the polar ionic charge through uncoupler (chemical)-specific mechanisms. Such an action of weakly acidic uncouplers is characteristic of the highly efficient membrane targeting action of a nonsite-specific type of bioactive compound. PMID:2176586

  4. Enzymatic modification of schizophyllan.

    PubMed

    Leathers, Timothy D; Sutivisedsak, Nongnuch; Nunnally, Melinda S; Price, Neil P J; Stanley, April M

    2015-03-01

    An enzymatic method was developed for the progressive modification of the polysaccharide schizophyllan. Fungal strains Hypocrea nigricans NRRL 62555, Penicillium crustosum NRRL 62558, and Penicillium simplicissimum NRRL 62550 were previously identified as novel sources of β-endoglucanase with specificity towards schizophyllan. Concentrated enzyme preparations from these strains showed specific activities of 1.7-4.3 U β-glucanase/mg protein. Using dilutions of these enzymes in time course digestions, schizophyllan was progressively modified to reduced molecular weight species. Glucose and oligosaccharides were found only in the more complete digestions, and thus modified schizophyllan can be produced quantitatively, without loss, to small molecules. Permethylation analysis confirmed that modified schizophyllan retains the fundamental linkage structure of native schizophyllan. Modified schizophyllan species showed progressively reduced viscosity profiles, and all exhibited pseudoplasticity in response to shear thinning. PMID:25335747

  5. Phosphorylation site prediction in plants.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuming; Schulze, Waltraud X; Xu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation events on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues are the most pervasive protein covalent bond modifications in plant signaling. Both low and high throughput studies reveal the importance of phosphorylation in plant molecular biology. Although becoming more and more common, the proteome-wide screening on phosphorylation by experiments remains time consuming and costly. Therefore, in silico prediction methods are proposed as a complementary analysis tool to enhance the phosphorylation site identification, develop biological hypothesis, or help experimental design. These methods build statistical models based on the experimental data, and they do not have some of the technical-specific bias, which may have advantage in proteome-wide analysis. More importantly computational methods are very fast and cheap to run, which makes large-scale phosphorylation identifications very practical for any types of biological study. Thus, the phosphorylation prediction tools become more and more popular. In this chapter, we will focus on plant specific phosphorylation site prediction tools, with essential illustration of technical details and application guidelines. We will use Musite, PhosPhAt and PlantPhos as the representative tools. We will present the results on the prediction of the Arabidopsis protein phosphorylation events to give users a general idea of the performance range of the three tools, together with their strengths and limitations. We believe these prediction tools will contribute more and more to the plant phosphorylation research community. PMID:25930706

  6. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  7. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  8. Phosphorylated. beta. -dicarbonyl compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Liorber, B.G.; Tarzivolova, T.A.; Pavlov, V.A.; Zykova, T.V.; Kisilev, V.V.; Tumasheva, N.A.; Slizkii, A.Yu.; Shagvaleev, F.S.

    1987-08-20

    The reaction of trialkyl phosphites with alkyl malonyl chlorides leads to alkyl 3-dialkoxyphosphoryl-3-oxopropionates, which exist in the stable E-enol form. Depending on the basicities of the bases, the reactions of alkyl 3-dialkoxyphosphoryl-3-oxopropionates with nitrogen bases proceed with retention of the C-P bond and the formation of phosphorylated azomethine derivatives or with cleavage of the C-P bond and the liberation of nitrogen-containing derivatives of malonic acid. The /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 13/P NMR spectra were recorded with a Bruker WP-80 NMR spectrometer. The chemical shifts of the protons and carbon atoms are presented relative to tetramethylsilane (TMS). The chemical shifts of the /sup 31/P nuclei were determined relative to H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/.

  9. Biocatalytic functionalization of hydroxyalkyl acrylates and phenoxyethanol via phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tasnádi, Gábor; Hall, Mélanie; Baldenius, Kai; Ditrich, Klaus; Faber, Kurt

    2016-09-10

    The enzymatic phosphorylation of phenoxyethanol, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate and 4-hydroxybutyl acrylate catalyzed by acid phosphatases PhoN-Sf and PiACP at the expense of inorganic di-, tri-, hexameta- or polyphosphate was applied to the preparative-scale synthesis of phosphorylated compounds. The reaction conditions were optimized with respect to enzyme immobilization, substrate concentration, pH and type of phosphate donor. The mild reaction conditions prevented undesired polymerization and hydrolysis of the acrylate ester moiety. Application of a continuous flow system allowed facile scale-up and mono-phosphates were obtained in up to 26% isolated yield with space-time yields of 0.89kgL(-1)h(-1). PMID:27422352

  10. Phosphorylation by PINK1 Releases the UBL Domain and Initializes the Conformational Opening of the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L.; Dourado, Daniel F. A. R.; Flores, Samuel C.; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in PINK1 or PARKIN are the most common causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease. Both gene products, the Ser/Thr kinase PINK1 and the E3 Ubiquitin ligase Parkin, functionally cooperate in a mitochondrial quality control pathway. Upon stress, PINK1 activates Parkin and enables its translocation to and ubiquitination of damaged mitochondria to facilitate their clearance from the cell. Though PINK1-dependent phosphorylation of Ser65 is an important initial step, the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of Parkin's enzymatic functions remain unclear. Using molecular modeling, we generated a complete structural model of human Parkin at all atom resolution. At steady state, the Ub ligase is maintained inactive in a closed, auto-inhibited conformation that results from intra-molecular interactions. Evidently, Parkin has to undergo major structural rearrangements in order to unleash its catalytic activity. As a spark, we have modeled PINK1-dependent Ser65 phosphorylation in silico and provide the first molecular dynamics simulation of Parkin conformations along a sequential unfolding pathway that could release its intertwined domains and enable its catalytic activity. We combined free (unbiased) molecular dynamics simulation, Monte Carlo algorithms, and minimal-biasing methods with cell-based high content imaging and biochemical assays. Phosphorylation of Ser65 results in widening of a newly defined cleft and dissociation of the regulatory N-terminal UBL domain. This motion propagates through further opening conformations that allow binding of an Ub-loaded E2 co-enzyme. Subsequent spatial reorientation of the catalytic centers of both enzymes might facilitate the transfer of the Ub moiety to charge Parkin. Our structure-function study provides the basis to elucidate regulatory mechanisms and activity of the neuroprotective Parkin. This may open up new avenues for the development of small molecule Parkin activators through

  11. Enzymatically active ultrathin pepsin membranes.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Michiel J T; Schmidt, Thomas; Barth, Monika; Tutus, Murat; Benes, Nieck E; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-05-11

    Enzymatically active proteins enable efficient and specific cleavage reactions of peptide bonds. Covalent coupling of the enzymes permits immobilization, which in turn reduces autolysis-induced deactivation. Ultrathin pepsin membranes were prepared by facile interfacial polycondensation of pepsin and trimesoyl chloride. The pepsin membrane allows for simultaneous enzymatic conversion and selective removal of digestion products. The large water fluxes through the membrane expedite the transport of large molecules through the pepsin layers. The presented method enables the large-scale production of ultrathin, cross-linked, enzymatically active membranes. PMID:25779668

  12. A Cholesterol-Based Allostery Model of T Cell Receptor Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Mahima; Beck-Garcia, Katharina; Beck-Garcia, Esmeralda; Hartl, Frederike A; Morath, Anna; Yousefi, O Sascha; Dopfer, Elaine Pashupati; Molnár, Eszter; Schulze, Anna K; Blanco, Raquel; Borroto, Aldo; Martín-Blanco, Nadia; Alarcon, Balbino; Höfer, Thomas; Minguet, Susana; Schamel, Wolfgang W A

    2016-05-17

    Signaling through the T cell receptor (TCR) controls adaptive immune responses. Antigen binding to TCRαβ transmits signals through the plasma membrane to induce phosphorylation of the CD3 cytoplasmic tails by incompletely understood mechanisms. Here we show that cholesterol bound to the TCRβ transmembrane region keeps the TCR in a resting, inactive conformation that cannot be phosphorylated by active kinases. Only TCRs that spontaneously detached from cholesterol could switch to the active conformation (termed primed TCRs) and then be phosphorylated. Indeed, by modulating cholesterol binding genetically or enzymatically, we could switch the TCR between the resting and primed states. The active conformation was stabilized by binding to peptide-MHC, which thus controlled TCR signaling. These data are explained by a model of reciprocal allosteric regulation of TCR phosphorylation by cholesterol and ligand binding. Our results provide both a molecular mechanism and a conceptual framework for how lipid-receptor interactions regulate signal transduction. PMID:27192576

  13. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  14. Fluorous enzymatic synthesis of phosphatidylinositides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weigang; Proctor, Angela; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L; Zhang, Qisheng

    2014-03-18

    A fluorous tagging strategy coupled with enzymatic synthesis is introduced to efficiently synthesize multiple phosphatidylinositides, which are then directly immobilized on a fluorous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane to probe protein-lipid interactions. PMID:24496473

  15. How Phosphotransferase System-Related Protein Phosphorylation Regulates Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Deutscher, Josef; Francke, Christof; Postma, Pieter W.

    2006-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate(PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is found only in bacteria, where it catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of numerous monosaccharides, disaccharides, amino sugars, polyols, and other sugar derivatives. To carry out its catalytic function in sugar transport and phosphorylation, the PTS uses PEP as an energy source and phosphoryl donor. The phosphoryl group of PEP is usually transferred via four distinct proteins (domains) to the transported sugar bound to the respective membrane component(s) (EIIC and EIID) of the PTS. The organization of the PTS as a four-step phosphoryl transfer system, in which all P derivatives exhibit similar energy (phosphorylation occurs at histidyl or cysteyl residues), is surprising, as a single protein (or domain) coupling energy transfer and sugar phosphorylation would be sufficient for PTS function. A possible explanation for the complexity of the PTS was provided by the discovery that the PTS also carries out numerous regulatory functions. Depending on their phosphorylation state, the four proteins (domains) forming the PTS phosphorylation cascade (EI, HPr, EIIA, and EIIB) can phosphorylate or interact with numerous non-PTS proteins and thereby regulate their activity. In addition, in certain bacteria, one of the PTS components (HPr) is phosphorylated by ATP at a seryl residue, which increases the complexity of PTS-mediated regulation. In this review, we try to summarize the known protein phosphorylation-related regulatory functions of the PTS. As we shall see, the PTS regulation network not only controls carbohydrate uptake and metabolism but also interferes with the utilization of nitrogen and phosphorus and the virulence of certain pathogens. PMID:17158705

  16. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides.

    PubMed

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICB(Glc), which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes. PMID:27586301

  17. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: phosphorylation of galactose and glucose moieties in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J

    1979-01-01

    Starved cells of Streptococcus lactis ML3 grown previously on lactose, galactose, or maltose were devoid of adenosine 5'-triphosphate contained only three glycolytic intermediates: 3-phosphoglycerate, 2-phosphoglycerate, and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The three metabolites (total concentration, ca 40 mM) served as the intracellular PEP potential for sugar transport via PEP-dependent phosphotransferase systems. When accumulation of [14C]lactose by iodoacetate-inhibited starved cells was abolished within 1 s of commencement of transport, a phosphorylated disaccharide was identified by autoradiography. The compound was isolated by ion-exchange (borate) chromatography, and enzymatic analysis showed that the derivative was 6-phosphoryl-O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl (1 leads to 4')-alpha-D-glucopyranose (lactose 6-phosphate). After maximum lactose uptake (ca. 15 mM in 15 s) the cells were collected by membrane filtration and extracted with trichloroacetic acid. Neither free nor phosphorylated lactose was detected in cell extracts, but enzymatic analysis revealed high levels of galactose 6-phosphate and glucose 6-phosphate. The starved organisms rapidly accumulated glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, methyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside, and o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside in phosphorylated form to intracellular concentrations of 32, 32, 42, and 38.5 mM, respectively. In contrast, maximum accumulation of lactose (ca. 15 mM) was only 40 to 50% that of the monosaccharides. From the stoichiometry of PEP-dependent lactose transport and the results of enzymatic analysis, it was concluded that (i) ca. 60% of the PEP potential was utilized via the lactose phosphotransferase system for phosphorylation of the galactosyl moiety of the disaccharide, and (ii) the residual potential (ca. 40%) was consumed during phosphorylation of the glucose moiety. Images PMID:118155

  18. Oxidative and Photosynthetic Phosphorylation Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jui H.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes a molecular mechanism for the coupling of phosphorylation to electron transport in both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Justifies the proposed reaction schemes in terms of thermodynamics and biochemical data. Suggests how areobic respiration could have evolved. (EB)

  19. Exploiting Acid Phosphatases in the Synthesis of Phosphorylated Monoalcohols and Diols

    PubMed Central

    Tasnádi, Gábor; Lukesch, Michael; Zechner, Michaela; Jud, Wolfgang; Hall, Mélanie; Ditrich, Klaus; Baldenius, Kai; Hartog, Aloysius F.; Wever, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A set of phosphatases was evaluated for their potential to catalyze the regio‐ and stereoselective phosphorylation of alcohols using a high‐energy inorganic phosphate donor, such as di‐, tri‐ and polyphosphate. Parameters such as type and amount of phosphate donor and pH of the reaction were investigated in order to minimize the thermodynamically favored hydrolysis of the phosphate donor and the formed phosphate ester. Diols were monophosphorylated with high selectivities. This biocatalytic phosphorylation method provides selectively activated and/or protected synthetic intermediates for further chemical and/or enzymatic transformations and is applicable to a large scale (6.86 g) in a flow setup with immobilized phosphatase.

  20. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Paweł; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous mRNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and FdUrd-resistant mouse leukemia L1210 cells, differing in sensitivity to inactivation by FdUMP, demonstrated phosphorylation of Ser(10) and Ser(16) in the resistant enzyme only, although PGS staining pointed to the modification of both L1210 TS proteins. The TS proteins phosphorylated in bacterial cells were shown by (31)P NMR to be modified only on histidine residues, like potassium phosphoramidate (KPA)-phosphorylated TS proteins. NanoLC-MS/MS, enabling the use of CID and ETD peptide fragmentation methods, identified several phosphohistidine residues, but certain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues were also implicated. Molecular dynamics studies, based on the mouse TS crystal structure, allowed one to assess potential of several phosphorylated histidine residues to affect catalytic activity, the effect being phosphorylation site dependent. PMID:26315778

  1. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-08-22

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  2. Solid-phase assay for the phosphorylation of proteins blotted on nitrocellulose membrane filters

    SciTech Connect

    Valtorta, F.; Schiebler, W.; Jahn, R.; Ceccarelli, B.; Greengard, P.

    1986-10-01

    A new procedure for the phosphorylation and assay of phosphoproteins is described. Proteins are solubilized from tissue samples, separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred onto nitrocellulose membrane filters, and the blotted polypeptides are phyosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP (adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate)-dependent protein kinase. The method was developed for the assay of dephosphosynapsin I, but it has also proven suitable for the phosphorylation of other proteins. The patterns of phosphorylation of tissue samples phosphorylated using the new method are similar to those obtained using the conventional test tube assay. Once phosphorylated, the adsorbed proteins can be digested with proteases and subjected to phosphopeptide mapping. The phosphorylated blotted proteins can also be analyzed by overlay techniques for the immunological detection of polypeptides.

  3. Protein phosphorylation and regulation of adaptive responses in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stock, J B; Ninfa, A J; Stock, A M

    1989-01-01

    Bacteria continuously adapt to changes in their environment. Responses are largely controlled by signal transduction systems that contain two central enzymatic components, a protein kinase that uses adenosine triphosphate to phosphorylate itself at a histidine residue and a response regulator that accepts phosphoryl groups from the kinase. This conserved phosphotransfer chemistry is found in a wide range of bacterial species and operates in diverse systems to provide different regulatory outputs. The histidine kinases are frequently membrane receptor proteins that respond to environmental signals and phosphorylate response regulators that control transcription. Four specific regulatory systems are discussed in detail: chemotaxis in response to attractant and repellent stimuli (Che), regulation of gene expression in response to nitrogen deprivation (Ntr), control of the expression of enzymes and transport systems that assimilate phosphorus (Pho), and regulation of outer membrane porin expression in response to osmolarity and other culture conditions (Omp). Several additional systems are also examined, including systems that control complex developmental processes such as sporulation and fruiting-body formation, systems required for virulent infections of plant or animal host tissues, and systems that regulate transport and metabolism. Finally, an attempt is made to understand how cross-talk between parallel phosphotransfer pathways can provide a global regulatory curcuitry. PMID:2556636

  4. Protein phosphorylation in chloroplasts - a survey of phosphorylation targets.

    PubMed

    Baginsky, Sacha

    2016-06-01

    The development of new software tools, improved mass spectrometry equipment, a suite of optimized scan types, and better-quality phosphopeptide affinity capture have paved the way for an explosion of mass spectrometry data on phosphopeptides. Because phosphoproteomics achieves good sensitivity, most studies use complete cell extracts for phosphopeptide enrichment and identification without prior enrichment of proteins or subcellular compartments. As a consequence, the phosphoproteome of cell organelles often comes as a by-product from large-scale studies and is commonly assembled from these in meta-analyses. This review aims at providing some guidance on the limitations of meta-analyses that combine data from analyses with different scopes, reports on the current status of knowledge on chloroplast phosphorylation targets, provides initial insights into phosphorylation site conservation in different plant species, and highlights emerging information on the integration of gene expression with metabolism and photosynthesis by means of protein phosphorylation. PMID:26969742

  5. Interphase phosphorylation of lamin A.

    PubMed

    Kochin, Vitaly; Shimi, Takeshi; Torvaldson, Elin; Adam, Stephen A; Goldman, Anne; Pack, Chan-Gi; Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Goldman, Robert D; Eriksson, John E

    2014-06-15

    Nuclear lamins form the major structural elements that comprise the nuclear lamina. Loss of nuclear structural integrity has been implicated as a key factor in the lamin A/C gene mutations that cause laminopathies, whereas the normal regulation of lamin A assembly and organization in interphase cells is still undefined. We assumed phosphorylation to be a major determinant, identifying 20 prime interphase phosphorylation sites, of which eight were high-turnover sites. We examined the roles of these latter sites by site-directed mutagenesis, followed by detailed microscopic analysis - including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and nuclear extraction techniques. The results reveal three phosphorylation regions, each with dominant sites, together controlling lamin A structure and dynamics. Interestingly, two of these interphase sites are hyper-phosphorylated in mitotic cells and one of these sites is within the sequence that is missing in progerin of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. We present a model where different phosphorylation combinations yield markedly different effects on the assembly, subunit turnover and the mobility of lamin A between, and within, the lamina, the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm of interphase cells. PMID:24741066

  6. Bioluminescence methods for enzymatic determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Denton, M.S.; Dinsmore, S.R.

    1982-11-02

    An enzymatic method for continuous, on-line and rapid detection of diagnostically useful biomarkers, which are symptomatic of disease or trauma-related tissue damage, is disclosed. The method is characterized by operability on authentic samples of complex biological fluids which contain the biomarkers.

  7. Bioluminescence methods for enzymatic determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, William D.; Denton, Mark S.; Dinsmore, Stanley R.

    1982-01-01

    An enzymatic method for continuous, on-line and rapid detection of diagnostically useful biomarkers, which are symptomatic of disease or trauma-related tissue damage, is disclosed. The method is characterized by operability on authentic samples of complex biological fluids which contain the biomarkers.

  8. Enzymatic hydrolysis of organic phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orthophosphate-releasing enzymatic hydrolysis is an alternative means for characterizing organic phosphorus (Po) in animal manure. The approach is not only simple and fast, but can also provide information difficult to obtain by other methods. Currently, commercially available phosphatases are mainl...

  9. Herpes simplex virus 2 VP22 phosphorylation induced by cellular and viral kinases does not influence intracellular localization

    SciTech Connect

    Geiss, Brian J.; Cano, Gina L.; Tavis, John E.; Morrison, Lynda A. . E-mail: morrisla@slu.edu

    2004-12-05

    Phosphorylation of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) VP22 protein is regulated by cellular kinases and the UL13 viral kinase, but the sites at which these enzymes induce phosphorylation of HSV-2 VP22 are not known. Using serine-to-alanine mutants to map phosphorylation sites on HSV-2 VP22 in cells, we made three major observations. First, phosphorylation by a cellular kinase mapped to serines 70, 71, and/or 72 within CKII consensus sites analogous to previously identified phosphorylation sites in HSV-1 VP22. Second, we mapped UL13-mediated phosphorylation of HSV-2 VP22 to serines 28 and 34, describing for the first time UL13-dependent phosphorylation sites on VP22. Third, previously identified VP22-associated cellular kinase sites in HSV-1 VP22 (serines 292 and 294) were not phosphorylated in HSV-2 VP22 (serines 291 and 293). VP22 expressed alone accumulated in the cytoplasm and to a lesser extent in the nucleus. Phosphorylation by endogenous cellular kinase(s) did not alter the localization of VP22. Co-expression of HSV-2 VP22 with active UL13, but not with enzymatically inactive UL13, resulted in nuclear accumulation of VP22 and altered nuclear morphology. Surprisingly, redistribution of VP22 to the nucleus occurred independently of UL13-induced phosphorylation of VP22. The altered nuclear morphology of UL13-expressing cells was not due to apoptosis. These results demonstrate that phosphorylation of HSV-2 VP22 at multiple serine residues is induced by UL13 and cellular kinase(s), and that the nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution of VP22 is independent of its phosphorylation status but is controlled indirectly by UL13 kinase activity.

  10. Enzymatic conversion of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiafu; Jiang, Yanjun; Jiang, Zhongyi; Wang, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Shaohua; Han, Pingping; Yang, Chen

    2015-10-01

    With the continuous increase in fossil fuels consumption and the rapid growth of atmospheric CO2 concentration, the harmonious state between human and nature faces severe challenges. Exploring green and sustainable energy resources and devising efficient methods for CO2 capture, sequestration and utilization are urgently required. Converting CO2 into fuels/chemicals/materials as an indispensable element for CO2 capture, sequestration and utilization may offer a win-win strategy to both decrease the CO2 concentration and achieve the efficient exploitation of carbon resources. Among the current major methods (including chemical, photochemical, electrochemical and enzymatic methods), the enzymatic method, which is inspired by the CO2 metabolic process in cells, offers a green and potent alternative for efficient CO2 conversion due to its superior stereo-specificity and region/chemo-selectivity. Thus, in this tutorial review, we firstly provide a brief background about enzymatic conversion for CO2 capture, sequestration and utilization. Next, we depict six major routes of the CO2 metabolic process in cells, which are taken as the inspiration source for the construction of enzymatic systems in vitro. Next, we focus on the state-of-the-art routes for the catalytic conversion of CO2 by a single enzyme system and by a multienzyme system. Some emerging approaches and materials utilized for constructing single-enzyme/multienzyme systems to enhance the catalytic activity/stability will be highlighted. Finally, a summary about the current advances and the future perspectives of the enzymatic conversion of CO2 will be presented. PMID:26055659

  11. Dynamic phosphorylation of Histone Deacetylase 1 by Aurora kinases during mitosis regulates zebrafish embryos development

    PubMed Central

    Loponte, Sara; Segré, Chiara V.; Senese, Silvia; Miccolo, Claudia; Santaguida, Stefano; Deflorian, Gianluca; Citro, Simona; Mattoscio, Domenico; Pisati, Federica; Moser, Mirjam A.; Visintin, Rosella; Seiser, Christian; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of acetyl molecules from histone and non-histone substrates playing important roles in chromatin remodeling and control of gene expression. Class I HDAC1 is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression, cellular proliferation and differentiation during development; it is also regulated by many post-translational modifications (PTMs). Herein we characterize a new mitosis-specific phosphorylation of HDAC1 driven by Aurora kinases A and B. We show that this phosphorylation affects HDAC1 enzymatic activity and it is critical for the maintenance of a proper proliferative and developmental plan in a complex organism. Notably, we find that Aurora-dependent phosphorylation of HDAC1 regulates histone acetylation by modulating the expression of genes directly involved in the developing zebrafish central nervous system. Our data represent a step towards the comprehension of HDAC1 regulation by its PTM code, with important implications in unravelling its roles both in physiology and pathology. PMID:27458029

  12. Dynamic phosphorylation of Histone Deacetylase 1 by Aurora kinases during mitosis regulates zebrafish embryos development.

    PubMed

    Loponte, Sara; Segré, Chiara V; Senese, Silvia; Miccolo, Claudia; Santaguida, Stefano; Deflorian, Gianluca; Citro, Simona; Mattoscio, Domenico; Pisati, Federica; Moser, Mirjam A; Visintin, Rosella; Seiser, Christian; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of acetyl molecules from histone and non-histone substrates playing important roles in chromatin remodeling and control of gene expression. Class I HDAC1 is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression, cellular proliferation and differentiation during development; it is also regulated by many post-translational modifications (PTMs). Herein we characterize a new mitosis-specific phosphorylation of HDAC1 driven by Aurora kinases A and B. We show that this phosphorylation affects HDAC1 enzymatic activity and it is critical for the maintenance of a proper proliferative and developmental plan in a complex organism. Notably, we find that Aurora-dependent phosphorylation of HDAC1 regulates histone acetylation by modulating the expression of genes directly involved in the developing zebrafish central nervous system. Our data represent a step towards the comprehension of HDAC1 regulation by its PTM code, with important implications in unravelling its roles both in physiology and pathology. PMID:27458029

  13. Enzymatic membranes for the selective transport of neutral molecules by electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Bernard; Couturier, Roger; Fiaty, Koffi; Charcosset, Catherine; Maïsterrena, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    The active and selective transport of glucose and glycerol was carried out using electrophoresis and artificial enzymatic membranes. These positively charged composite membranes carry, on the face adjacent to the donor compartment of an electrophoresis module, a specific kinase (hexokinase or glycerokinase) and, on the opposite face, an alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Phosphorylation of the neutral substrate (glucose or glycerol) on the donor side by the kinase generates a negatively charged phosphorylated substrate, whose transmembrane migration is promoted by an electric field and by the membrane's positive charge. Dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated substrate by ALP on the opposite face regenerates the neutral substrate, which accumulates in the receiver compartment of the electrophoresis module. Using an electrophoresis module specifically designed for this study, our experiments were carried out enabling glucose and glycerol to be concentrated approximately eight- and twelve-fold, respectively, in 8 h. PMID:18435500

  14. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  15. Autophagy proteins regulate ERK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Athonvarangkul, Diana; Mishall, Priti; Sahu, Srabani; Singh, Rajat

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved pathway that maintains cellular quality control. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) controls various aspects of cell physiology including proliferation. Multiple signalling cascades, including ERK, have been shown to regulate autophagy, however whether autophagy proteins (ATG) regulate cell signalling is unknown. Here we show that growth factor exposure increases the interaction of ERK cascade components with ATG proteins in the cytosol and nucleus. ERK and its upstream kinase MEK localize to the extra-luminal face of autophagosomes. ERK2 interacts with ATG proteins via its substrate-binding domains. Deleting Atg7 or Atg5 or blocking LC3 lipidation or ATG5–ATG12 conjugation decreases ERK phosphorylation. Conversely, increasing LC3-II availability by silencing the cysteine protease ATG4B or acute trehalose exposure increases ERK phosphorylation. Decreased ERK phosphorylation in Atg5−/− cells does not occur from overactive phosphatases. Our findings thus reveal an unconventional function of ATG proteins as cellular scaffolds in the regulation of ERK phosphorylation. PMID:24240988

  16. Phosphorylation in halobacterial signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, J; Tolliday, N; Schmitt, C; Schuster, S C; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-01-01

    Regulated phosphorylation of proteins has been shown to be a hallmark of signal transduction mechanisms in both Eubacteria and Eukarya. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are also the underlying mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in Archaea, the third branch of the living world. Cloning and sequencing of the region upstream of the cheA gene, known to be required for chemo- and phototaxis in Halobacterium salinarium, has identified cheY and cheB analogs which appear to form part of an operon which also includes cheA and the following open reading frame of 585 nucleotides. The CheY and CheB proteins have 31.3 and 37.5% sequence identity compared with the known signal transduction proteins CheY and CheB from Escherichia coli, respectively. The biochemical activities of both CheA and CheY were investigated following their expression in E.coli, isolation and renaturation. Wild-type CheA could be phosphorylated in a time-dependent manner in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP and Mg2+, whereas the mutant CheA(H44Q) remained unlabeled. Phosphorylated CheA was dephosphorylated rapidly by the addition of wild-type CheY. The mutant CheY(D53A) had no effect on phosphorylated CheA. The mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in the Archaeon H.salinarium, therefore, is similar to the two-component signaling system known from chemotaxis in the eubacterium E.coli. Images PMID:7556066

  17. The Enzymatic Oxidation of Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Kotchey, Gregg P.; Allen, Brett L.; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E.; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon – the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (~40 µM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP failed to oxidize chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The enzymatic oxidation was characterized by Raman, UV-Vis, EPR and FT-IR spectroscopy, TEM, AFM, SDS-PAGE, and GC-MS. Computational docking studies indicated that HRP was preferentially bound to the basal plane rather than the edge for both graphene oxide and RGO. Due to the more dynamic nature of HRP on graphene oxide, the heme active site of HRP was in closer proximity to graphene oxide compared to RGO, thereby facilitating the oxidation of the basal plane of graphene oxide. We also studied the electronic properties of the reduced intermediate product, holey reduced graphene oxide (hRGO), using field-effect transistor (FET) measurements. While RGO exhibited a V-shaped transfer characteristic similar to a single layer of graphene that was attributed to its zero band gap, hRGO demonstrated a p-type semiconducting behavior with a positive shift in the Dirac points. This p-type behavior rendered hRGO, which can be conceptualized as interconnected graphene nanoribbons, as a potentially attractive material for FET sensors. PMID:21344859

  18. A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, T J

    1989-01-01

    A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IIA has been partially purified and characterized. The kinase has a native molecular weight of about 200 kilodaltons. This kinase utilizes Mg2+ and ATP and transfers about 20 phosphates to the heptapeptide repeats Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser-Tyr-Ser in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the 220-kilodalton subunit of soybean RNA polymerase II. This phosphorylation results in a mobility shift of the 220-kilodalton subunits of a variety of eukaryotic RNA polymerases to polypeptides ranging in size from greater than 220 kilodaltons to 240 kilodaltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The phosphorylation is highly specific to the heptapeptide repeats since a degraded subunit polypeptide of 180 kilodaltons that lacks the heptapeptide repeats is poorly phosphorylated. Synthetic heptapeptide repeat multimers inhibit the phosphorylation of the 220-kilodalton subunit. PMID:2535525

  19. Electrochemical enzymatic biosensors using carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Li, Yi-fen; Swisher, Luxi Z.; Syed, Lateef U.; Prior, Allan M.; Nguyen, Thu A.; Hua, Duy H.

    2012-10-01

    The reduction of electrode size down to nanometers could dramatically enhance detection sensitivity and temporal resolution. Nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) are of particular interest for ultrasensitive biosensors. Here we report the study of two types of biosensors for measuring enzyme activities using NEAs fabricated with vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs). VACNFs of ~100 nm in average diameter and 3-5 μm in length were grown on conductive substrates as uniform vertical arrays which were then encapsulated in SiO2 matrix leaving only the tips exposed. We demonstrate that such VACNF NEAs can be used in profiling enzyme activities through monitoring the change in electrochemical signals induced by enzymatic reactions to the peptides attached to the VACNF tip. The cleavage of the tetrapeptide with a ferrocene tag by a cancerrelated protease (legumain) was monitored with AC voltammetry. Real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (REIS) was used for fast label-free detection of two reversible processes, i.e. phosphorylation by c-Src tyrosine kinase and dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). The REIS data of phosphorylation were slow and unreliable, but those of dephosphorylation showed large and fast exponential decay due to much higher activity of phosphatase PTP1B. The kinetic data were analyzed with a heterogeneous Michaelis-Menten model to derive the "specificity constant" kcat/Km, which is 8.2x103 M-1s-1 for legumain and (2.1 ± 0.1) x 107 M-1s-1 for phosphatase (PTP1B), well consistent with literature. It is promising to develop VACNF NEA based electrochemical enzymatic biosensors as portable multiplex electronic techniques for rapid cancer diagnosis and treatment monitoring.

  20. Non-enzymatic amperometric glucose biosensor from zinc oxide nanoparticles decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Baby, Tessy Theres; Ramaprabhu, S

    2011-06-01

    The present work describes the development of novel ZnO dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) based non-enzymatic glucose biosensor with 1 M NaOH solution as the supporting electrolyte. For a comparison, the same material has been used for the fabrication of enzymatic biosensor and studied its electrochemical activity with phosphate buffer solution as the electrolyte. MWNT have been synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor decomposition (CCVD) and a simple sol-gel method was used for decorating crystalline ZnO nanoparticles on MWNT. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were used to study and optimize the electrochemical performance of the resulting enzymatic and non-enzymatic ZnO/MWNT biosensors. The non enzymatic Nafion/ZnO/MWNT/GC electrode shows linearity in the range 700 nM to 31 mM with the detection limit of 500 nM. Similarly enzymatic biosensor fabricated using Nafion/GOD/ZnO/MWNT on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) shows a linearity from 1 microM to 22 mM. This excellent performance of non enzymatic Nafion/ZnO/MWNT/GC is due to high surface area, good electron transfer rate of ZnO/MWNT and the high electrochemical catalytic activity of ZnO in NaOH solution. PMID:21770093

  1. Monitoring protein phosphorylation by acrylamide pendant Phos-Tag™ in various plants

    PubMed Central

    Bekešová, Slávka; Komis, George; Křenek, Pavel; Vyplelová, Petra; Ovečka, Miroslav; Luptovčiak, Ivan; Illés, Peter; Kuchařová, Anna; Šamaj, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to rationalize acrylamide pendant Phos-Tag™ in-gel discrimination of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated plant protein species with standard immunoblot analysis, and optimize sample preparation, efficient electrophoretic separation and transfer. We tested variants of the method including extraction buffers suitable for preservation of phosphorylated protein species in crude extracts from plants and we addressed the importance of the cation (Mn2+ or Zn2+) used in the gel recipe for efficient transfer to PVDF membranes for further immunoblot analysis. We demonstrate the monitoring of Medicago sativa stress-induced mitogen activated protein kinase (SIMK) in stress-treated wild type plants and transgenic SIMKK RNAi line. We further show the hyperosmotically-induced phosphorylation of the previously uncharacterized HvMPK4 of barley. The method is validated using inducible phosphorylation of barley and wheat α-tubulin and of Arabidopsis MPK6. Acrylamide pendant Phos-Tag™offers a flexible tool for studying protein phosphorylation in crops and Arabidopsis circumventing radioactive labeling and the use of phosphorylation specific antibodies. PMID:26029234

  2. Histidine to aspartate phosphotransferase activity of nm23 proteins: phosphorylation of aldolase C on Asp-319.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, P D; Vu, N D

    2000-01-01

    nm23 genes have been implicated in the suppression of tumour metastasis and cell motility; however, the biochemical mechanisms for these suppressions are not known. We have previously described the transfer of phosphate from the catalytic histidine residues of nm23 proteins to an aspartic or a glutamic residue on one or more 43 kDa proteins in detergent extracts of bovine brain membranes. To gain a better understanding of this transferase activity, we partly purified this 43 kDa protein and identified aldolases A and C as the major 43 kDa proteins present in the preparation. Aldolase was purified from brain cytosol; its phosphorylation by rat liver nm23 proteins and by recombinant human nm23-H1 was examined. The site of phosphorylation was identified as Asp-319 on aldolase C. The equivalent residue on aldolase A, a glutamic residue, was not phosphorylated. Aldolase C was rapidly phosphorylated by wild-type nm23-H1 but was not phosphorylated, or was phosphorylated very slowly, by either nm23-H1(P96S) or nm23-H1(S120G), mutants of nm23-H1 that do not suppress cell motility. This is the first identification of a protein that is phosphorylated on an aspartic residue by nm23 proteins. The sequence around Asp-319 of aldolase C has some similarities to those around the histidine residues on ATP-citrate lyase and succinic thiokinase that are phosphorylated by nm23 proteins. PMID:10698688

  3. Insights into the Unique Phosphorylation of the Lasso Peptide Paeninodin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaozhou; Hegemann, Julian D; Fage, Christopher D; Zimmermann, Marcel; Xie, Xiulan; Linne, Uwe; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2016-06-24

    Lasso peptides are a new class of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides and thus far are only isolated from proteo- and actinobacterial sources. Typically, lasso peptide biosynthetic gene clusters encode enzymes for biosynthesis and export but not for tailoring. Here, we describe the isolation of the novel lasso peptide paeninodin from the firmicute Paenibacillus dendritiformis C454 and reveal within its biosynthetic cluster a gene encoding a kinase, which we have characterized as a member of a new class of lasso peptide-tailoring kinases. By employing a wide variety of peptide substrates, it was shown that this novel type of kinase specifically phosphorylates the C-terminal serine residue while ignoring those located elsewhere. These experiments also reveal that no other recognition motif is needed for efficient enzymatic phosphorylation of the C-terminal serine. Furthermore, through comparison with homologous HPr kinases and subsequent mutational analysis, we confirmed the essential catalytic residues. Our study reveals how lasso peptides are chemically diversified and sets the foundation for rational engineering of these intriguing natural products. PMID:27151214

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis supports protein tyrosine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kusebauch, Ulrike; Ortega, Corrie; Ollodart, Anja; Rogers, Richard S.; Sherman, David R.; Moritz, Robert L.; Grundner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation determines growth and adaptive decisions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). At least 11 two-component systems and 11 Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) mediate phosphorylation on Asp, His, Ser, and Thr. In contrast, protein phosphorylation on Tyr has not been described previously in Mtb. Here, using a combination of phospho-enrichment and highly sensitive mass spectrometry, we show extensive protein Tyr phosphorylation of diverse Mtb proteins, including STPKs. Several STPKs function as dual-specificity kinases that phosphorylate Tyr in cis and in trans, suggesting that dual-specificity kinases have a major role in bacterial phospho-signaling. Mutation of a phosphotyrosine site of the essential STPK PknB reduces its activity in vitro and in live Mtb, indicating that Tyr phosphorylation has a functional role in bacterial growth. These data identify a previously unrecognized phosphorylation system in a human pathogen that claims ∼1.4 million lives every year. PMID:24927537

  5. Phosphorylation of Single Stranded RNA Virus Proteins and Potential for Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Forrest; Ataey, Pouya; Amaya, Moushimi; Bailey, Charles; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modification of proteins is a critical requirement that regulates function. Among the diverse kinds of protein post translational modifications, phosphorylation plays essential roles in protein folding, protein:protein interactions, signal transduction, intracellular localization, transcription regulation, cell cycle progression, survival and apoptosis. Protein phosphorylation is also essential for many intracellular pathogens to establish a productive infection cycle. Preservation of protein phosphorylation moieties in pathogens in a manner that mirrors the host components underscores the co-evolutionary trajectory of pathogens and hosts, and sheds light on how successful pathogens have usurped, either in part or as a whole, the host enzymatic machinery. Phosphorylation of viral proteins for many acute RNA viruses including Flaviviruses and Alphaviruses has been demonstrated to be critical for protein functionality. This review focuses on phosphorylation modifications that have been documented to occur on viral proteins with emphasis on acutely infectious, single stranded RNA viruses. The review additionally explores the possibility of repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved inhibitors as antivirals for the treatment of acute RNA viral infections. PMID:26473910

  6. Aluminum interaction with human brain tau protein phosphorylation by various kinases

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sebae, A.H.; Zeid, M.M.A.; Saleh, M.A. . Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology Lab.); Abdel-Ghany, M.E.; Shalloway, D. ); Blancato, J. . Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab.)

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an indispensable process for energy and signal transduction in biological systems. AlCl[sub 3] at 10 nM to 10 uM range activated in-vitro [[gamma]-[sup 32]P] ATP phosphorylation of the brain (tau) [Tau] protein in both normal human or E. coli expressed [Tau] forms; in the presence of the kinases P34, PKP, and PKC to a maximum at 1 mM level. AlCl[sub 3] at 100 uM to 500 uM range induced non-enzymatic phosphorylation of [Tau] with [gamma]-ATP, [gamma]-GTP, and [alpha]-GTP, and [alpha]-GTP. AlCl[sub 3] activated histone phosphorylation by P34 in a similar pattern. The hyperphosphorylation of [Tau] with [gamma]-ATP, [gamma]-GTP, and [alpha]-GTP. AlCl[sub 3] activated histone phosphorylation by P34 in a similar pattern. The hyperphosphorylation of [Tau] by Al[sup 3+] was accompanied by molecular shift and mobility retardation in SDS-PAGE. This may demonstrate the mechanism of the longterm neurological effect of Al[sup 3+] in human brain leading to the formation of the neurofibrillary tangles related to Alzeheimer's disease.

  7. Aluminum interaction with human brain tau protein phosphorylation by various kinases

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sebae; Abou Zeid, M.M.; Saleh, M.A. . Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology Lab.); Abdel-Ghany, M.E.; Shalloway, D. . Section of Biochemistry, Mol, and Cell Biology); Blancato, J. . Environmental Monit. Systems Lab.)

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an indispensable process for energy and signal transduction in biological systems. AlCl[sub 3] at 10 nM to 10 [mu]M range activated in-vitro [[gamma][sup [minus]32]P]ATP phosphorylation of the brain ([tau]) [Gamma] protein in both normal human or E.coli expressed [Gamma] forms; in the presence of the kinases P34,PKP, and PKC. However, higher concentrations of AlCl[sub 3] inhibited the [Gamma] phosphorylation with P34, PKP, and PKC to a maximum at 1 mM level. AlCl[sub 3] at 100 [mu]M to 500 [mu]M range induced non-enzymatic phosphorylation of [Gamma] with [gamma]-ATP, [gamma]-GTP, and [alpha]-GRP. AlCl[sub 3] activated histone phosphorylation by P34 in a similar pattern. The hyperphosphorylation of [Gamma] by Al[sup 3+] was accompanied in molecular shift and mobility retardation in SDS-PAGE. This may demonstrate the mechanism of the long term neurological effect of Al[sub 3+] in human brain leading to the formation of the neutrofibrillary tangles related to Alzeheimer's disease.

  8. Regulation of Xenopus laevis DNA topoisomerase I activity by phosphorylation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiserman, H.B.; Ingebritsen, T.S.; Benbow, R.M.

    1988-05-03

    DNA topoisomerase I has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from ovaries of the frog Xenopus laevis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the most purified fraction revealed a single major band at 110 kDa and less abundant minor bands centered at 62 kDa. Incubation of the most purified fraction with immobilized calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase abolished all DNA topoisomerase enzymatic activity in a time-dependent reaction. Treatment of the dephosphorylated X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I with a X. laevis casein kinase type II activity and ATP restored DNA topoisomerase activity to a level higher than that observed in the most purified fraction. In vitro labeling experiments which employed the most purified DNA topoisomerase I fraction, (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP, and the casein kinase type II enzyme showed that both the 110- and 62-kDa bands became phosphorylated in approximately molar proportions. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that only serine residues became phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was accompanied by an increase in DNA topoisomerase activity in vitro. Dephosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase I appears to block formation of the initial enzyme-substrate complex on the basis of the failure of the dephosphorylated enzyme to nick DNA in the presence of camptothecin. The authors conclude that X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I is partially phosphorylated as isolated and that this phosphorylation is essential for expression of enzymatic activity in vitro. On the basis of the ability of the casein kinase type II activity to reactivate dephosphorylated DNA topoisomerase I, they speculate that this kinase may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity.

  9. Enzymatic reaction paths as determined by transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Jean Emily

    Enzymes are biological catalysts capable of enhancing the rates of chemical reactions by many orders of magnitude as compared to solution chemistry. Since the catalytic power of enzymes routinely exceeds that of the best artificial catalysts available, there is much interest in understanding the complete nature of chemical barrier crossing in enzymatic reactions. Two specific questions pertaining to the source of enzymatic rate enhancements are investigated in this work. The first is the issue of how fast protein motions of an enzyme contribute to chemical barrier crossing. Our group has previously identified sub-picosecond protein motions, termed promoting vibrations (PVs), that dynamically modulate chemical transformation in several enzymes. In the case of human heart lactate dehydrogenase (hhLDH), prior studies have shown that a specific axis of residues undergoes a compressional fluctuation towards the active site, decreasing a hydride and a proton donor--acceptor distance on a sub-picosecond timescale to promote particle transfer. To more thoroughly understand the contribution of this dynamic motion to the enzymatic reaction coordinate of hhLDH, we conducted transition path sampling (TPS) using four versions of the enzymatic system: a wild type enzyme with natural isotopic abundance; a heavy enzyme where all the carbons, nitrogens, and non-exchangeable hydrogens were replaced with heavy isotopes; and two versions of the enzyme with mutations in the axis of PV residues. We generated four separate ensembles of reaction paths and analyzed each in terms of the reaction mechanism, time of barrier crossing, dynamics of the PV, and residues involved in the enzymatic reaction coordinate. We found that heavy isotopic substitution of hhLDH altered the sub-picosecond dynamics of the PV, changed the favored reaction mechanism, dramatically increased the time of barrier crossing, but did not have an effect on the specific residues involved in the PV. In the mutant systems

  10. Enzymatic approach to biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Casimir C; Chang, Shu-Wei; Lee, Guan-Chiun; Shaw, Jei-Fu

    2007-10-31

    The need for alternative energy sources that combine environmental friendliness with biodegradability, low toxicity, renewability, and less dependence on petroleum products has never been greater. One such energy source is referred to as biodiesel. This can be produced from vegetable oils, animal fats, microalgal oils, waste products of vegetable oil refinery or animal rendering, and used frying oils. Chemically, they are known as monoalkyl esters of fatty acids. The conventional method for producing biodiesel involves acid and base catalysts to form fatty acid alkyl esters. Downstream processing costs and environmental problems associated with biodiesel production and byproducts recovery have led to the search for alternative production methods and alternative substrates. Enzymatic reactions involving lipases can be an excellent alternative to produce biodiesel through a process commonly referred to alcoholysis, a form of transesterification reaction, or through an interesterification (ester interchange) reaction. Protein engineering can be useful in improving the catalytic efficiency of lipases as biocatalysts for biodiesel production. The use of recombinant DNA technology to produce large quantities of lipases, and the use of immobilized lipases and immobilized whole cells, may lower the overall cost, while presenting less downstream processing problems, to biodiesel production. In addition, the enzymatic approach is environmentally friendly, considered a "green reaction", and needs to be explored for industrial production of biodiesel. PMID:17902621

  11. Multiple Peroxisomal Enzymatic Deficiency Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vamecq, Joseph; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Van Hoof, François; Misson, Jean-Paul; Evrard, Philippe; Verellen, Gaston; Eyssen, Hendrik J.; Van Eldere, Johan; Schutgens, Ruud B. H.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Roels, Frank; Goldfischer, Sidney L.

    1986-01-01

    Biologic, morphologic, and biochemical investigations performed in 2 patients demonstrate multiple peroxisomal deficiencies in the cerebrohepatorenal syndrome of Zellweger (CHRS) and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD). Very long chain fatty acids, abnormal bile acids, including bile acid precursors (di- and trihydroxycoprostanoic acids), and C29-dicarboxylic acid accumulated in plasma in both patients. Generalized hyperaminoaciduria was also present. Peroxisomes could not be detected in CHRS liver and kidney; however, in the NALD patient, small and sparse cytoplasmic bodies resembling altered peroxisomes were found in hepatocytes. Hepatocellular and Kupffer cell lysosomes were engorged with ferritin and contained clefts and trilaminar structures believed to represent very long chain fatty acids. Enzymatic deficiencies reflected the peroxisomal defects. Hepatic glycolate oxidase and palmitoyl-CoA oxidase activities were deficient. No particle-bound catalase was found in cultured fibroblasts, and ether glycerolipid (plasmalogen) biosynthesis was markedly reduced. Administration of phenobarbital and clofibrate, an agent that induces peroxisomal proliferation and enzymatic activities, to the NALD patient did not bring about any changes in plasma metabolites, liver peroxisome population, or oxidizing activities. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:2879480

  12. Economics of enzymatic hydrolysis processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.D.

    1988-02-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis processes have the ability to produce high yields of sugars for fermentation to fuel ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. However, these systems have been plagued with yields, product concentrations, and reactions rates far below those that are theoretically possible. Engineering and economic analyses are presented on several fungal enzyme hydrolysis processes to illustrate the effects of the important process parameters, to quantify the progress that has been made to date, and to estimate the cost reductions that can be made through research improvements. All enzymatic hydrolysis processes require pretreatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, and enzyme production. The key effect of pretreatment is to allow access of the enzymes to the substrate. Pretreatments have been devised that make the biomass completely digestible that increase the xylose yield and concentration, and that integrate pretreatment with lignin utilization. Major improvements in enzyme activity and use of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) have greatly reduced the inhibition of the enzymes. It now appears that ethanol inhibition of the yeast is the limiting factor. Enzyme production costs have been dramatically reduced because use of SSF has reduced enzyme loading. However, further improvements may be possible by using soluble carbon sources for production. Over the past decade, the predicted cost of ethanol from such processes has dropped from more than $4.00/gallon to approximately $1.60. Research is currently under way in the United States and has the potential to reduce the projected cost to less than $1.00/gallon. 65 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, Jonathan; Mattingly, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch. The reaction mixture further comprises an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture.

  14. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

    1999-08-24

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch; the reaction mixture also comprising an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; (b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and (c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture. 8 figs.

  15. Phosphorylated nano-diamond/ Polyimide Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Vezir Kahraman, Memet

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a novel route to synthesize polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond films with improved thermal and mechanical properties was developed. Surface phosphorylation of nano-diamond was performed in dichloromethane. Phosphorylation dramatically enhanced the thermal stability of nano-diamond. Poly(amic acid) (PAA), which is the precursor of PI, was successfully synthesized with 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-oxydianiline (4,4'-ODA) in the solution of N,N- dimethylformamide (DMF). Pure BTDA-ODA polyimide films and phosphorylated nanodiamond containing BTDA-ODA PI films were prepared. The PAA displayed good compatibility with phosphorylated nano-diamond. The morphology of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structure of polyimide and polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the phosphorylated nano-diamond was successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA results showed that the thermal stability of (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond film was increased.

  16. beta. -Sulfopyruvate: chemical and enzymatic syntheses and enzymatic assay

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, C.L.; Griffith, O.W.

    1986-01-01

    BETA-Sulfopyruvic acid (2-carboxy-2-oxoethanesulfonic acid) is prepared in greater than 90% yield by reaction of bromopyruvic acid with sodium sulfite. ..beta..-(/sup 35/S)Sulfopyruvate is prepared by transamination between (/sup 35/)cysteinesulfonate (cysteate) and ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate using mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase isolated from rat liver. Following either chemical or enzymatic synthesis the crude reaction product is conveniently purified by chromatography on Dowex 1; ..beta..-sulfopyruvate is isolated as the stable, water-soluble dilithium salt. ..beta..-Sulfopyruvate is shown to be an alternative substrate of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase; in the presence of 0.25 mM NADH, ..beta..-sulfopyruvate is reduced with an apparent K/sub m/ of 6.3 mM and a V/sub max/ equal to about 40% of that observed with oxaloacetate. This finding forms the basis of a convenient spectrophotometric assay of ..beta..-sulfopyruvate.

  17. Mammalian liver cytochrome c is tyrosine-48 phosphorylated in vivo, inhibiting mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Lee, Icksoo; Salomon, Arthur R.; Yu, Kebing; Hüttemann, Maik

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome c (Cyt c) is part of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), accepting electrons from bc1 complex and transferring them to cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). The ETC generates the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is used by ATP synthase to produce ATP. In addition, the release of Cyt c from the mitochondria often commits a cell to undergo apoptosis. Considering its central role in life (respiration) and death (apoptosis) decisions one would expect tight regulation of Cyt c function. Reversible phosphorylation is a main cellular regulatory mechanism, but the effect of cell signaling targeting the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system is not well understood, and only a small number of proteins that can be phosphorylated have been identified to date. We have recently shown that Cyt c isolated from cow heart tissue is phosphorylated on tyrosine 97 in vivo, which leads to inhibition of respiration in the reaction with CcO. In this study we isolated Cyt c from a different organ, cow liver, under conditions preserving the physiological phosphorylation state. Western analysis with a phospho-tyrosine specific antibody suggested that liver Cyt c is phosphorylated. Surprisingly, the phosphorylation site was unambiguously assigned to Tyr-48 by immobilized metal affinity chromatography/nano-liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (IMAC/nano-LC/ESI-MS), and not to the previously identified phospho-Tyr-97 in cow heart. As is true of Tyr-97, Tyr-48 is conserved in eukaryotes. As one possible consequence of Tyr-48 phosphorylation we analyzed the in vitro reaction kinetics with isolated cow liver CcO revealing striking differences. Maximal turnover of Tyr-48 phosphorylated Cyt c was 3.7 s−1 whereas dephosphorylation resulted in a 2.2 fold increase in activity to 8.2 s−1. Effects of Tyr-48 phosphorylation based on the Cyt c crystal structure are discussed. PMID:18471988

  18. Hydrogen transfer in SAM-mediated enzymatic radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Hioe, Johnny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-12-14

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) plays an essential role in a variety of enzyme-mediated radical reactions. One-electron reduction of SAM is currently believed to generate the C5'-desoxyadenosyl radical, which subsequently abstracts a hydrogen atom from the actual substrate in a catalytic or a non-catalytic fashion. Using a combination of theoretical and experimental bond dissociation energy (BDE) data, the energetics of these radical processes have now been quantified. SAM-derived radicals are found to react with their respective substrates in an exothermic fashion in enzymes using SAM in a stoichiometric (non-catalytic) way. In contrast, the catalytic use of SAM appears to be linked to a sequence of moderately endothermic and exothermic reaction steps. The use of SAM in spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) appears to fit neither of these general categories and appears to constitute the first example of a SAM-initiated radical reaction propagated independently of the cofactor. PMID:23139189

  19. Histone tyrosine phosphorylation comes of age

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Histones were discovered over a century ago and have since been found to be the most extensively post-translationally modified proteins, although tyrosine phosphorylation of histones had remained elusive until recently. The year 2009 proved to be a landmark year for histone tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation as five research groups independently discovered this modification. Three groups describe phosphorylation of Y142 in the variant histone H2A.X, where it may be involved in the cellular decision making process to either undergo DNA repair or apoptosis in response to DNA damage. Further, one group suggests that phosphorylation of histone H3 on Y99 is crucial for its regulated proteolysis in yeast, while another found that Y41 phosphorylation modulates chromatin architecture and oncogenesis in mammalian cells. These pioneering studies provide the initial conceptual framework for further analyses of the diverse roles of tyrosine phosphorylation on different histones, with far reaching implications for human health and disease. PMID:20935492

  20. Prebiotic phosphorylation of nucleosides in formamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoffstall, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study intended to assess phosphorylation under neither aqueous nor dry thermal conditions. Instead, phosphorylations were attempted in possible nonaqueous prebiotic solvents. Formamide appeared to be the most obvious candidate for phosphorylation studies. Three main classes of phosphorylated products were formed in formamide solution: adenosine monophosphates, cyclic adenosine phosphate, and adenosine diphosphates. Experiments were designed to investigate the extent of phosphorylation of nucleosides in formamide, the relative amounts of nucleoside monophosphate, diphosphates and cyclic phosphate formed and the relative effectiveness of different sources of phosphate as phosphorylating agents in formamide. Reaction variables were temperature, nature of the phosphate or condensed phosphate, nucleoside, concentration of reactants and possible effects of additives. Product identification was based on qualitative and quantitative thin layer chromatography.

  1. [Sugar phosphorylation activities in acetogenic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Patterson, J A

    1999-12-01

    Seven acetogenic bacteria (Acetitomaculum ruminis, Acetobacterium woodii, Eubacterium limosum as well as isolates A2, A4, A10 and H3HH) were tested for PEP- and ATP-dependent phosphorylation of glucose and 2-deoxyglucose. Although all organisms had detectable phosphorylation activity, substantial variation existed in the rates of both PEP- and ATP-dependent phosphorylation. Isolate Alo had the highest rate of PEP-dependent phosphorylation of 11.62 nmol.L-1.mg-1.min-1. Isolate A10, H3HH as well as E. limosum most likely have a glucose phosphotransferase system(PTS). In contrast, A ruminis, A. woodii and isolate A2, A4 had PEP-dependent glucose phosphorylation rates very similar to control rates, suggesting the lack of PTS activity. The rates of ATP-dependent glucose phosphorylation were higher than PEP-dependent phosphorylation in all organisms surveyed. However, substantial variation existed in the rates of ATP-dependent glucose phosphorylation. The glucose PTS of isolates A10 and H3HH were induced by the presence of extracellular glucose. Moreover, the specific activity of the glucose PTS of both isolates increased as cultures progressed from the early log to late log phase of growth. ATP- and PEP-dependent maltose and sucrose phosphorylation was detected in isolates A10 and H3HH. Although activity was detected in both isolates(A10 and H3HH), the rate of activity varied considerably, depending on the sugar and organism tested. PMID:12555560

  2. Metabolic, enzymatic and gene involvement in cerebral glucose dysmetabolism after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Amorini, Angela Maria; Lazzarino, Giacomo; Di Pietro, Valentina; Signoretti, Stefano; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Belli, Antonio; Tavazzi, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the metabolic, enzymatic and gene changes causing cerebral glucose dysmetabolism following graded diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) were evaluated. TBI was induced in rats by dropping 450g from 1 (mild TBI; mTBI) or 2m height (severe TBI; sTBI). After 6, 12, 24, 48, and 120h gene expressions and enzymatic activities of glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) enzymes, and levels of lactate, ATP, ADP, ATP/ADP (indexing mitochondrial phosphorylating capacity), NADP(+), NADPH and GSH were determined in whole brain extracts (n=9 rats at each time for both TBI levels). Sham-operated animals (n=9) were used as controls. Results demonstrated that mTBI caused a late increase (48-120h post injury) of glycolytic gene expression and enzymatic activities, concomitantly with mitochondrial functional recovery (ATP and ATP/ADP normalization). No changes in lactate and PPP genes and enzymes, were accompanied by transient decrease in GSH, NADP(+), NADPH and NADPH/NADP(+). Animals following sTBI showed early increase (6-24h post injury) of glycolytic gene expression and enzymatic activities, occurring during mitochondrial malfunctioning (50% decrease in ATP and ATP/ADP). Higher lactate and lower GSH, NADP(+), NADPH, NADPH/NADP(+) than controls were recorded at anytime post injury (p<0.01). Both TBI levels caused metabolic and gene changes affecting glucose metabolism. Following mTBI, increased glucose flux through glycolysis is coupled to mitochondrial glucose oxidation. "True" hyperglycolysis occurs only after sTBI, where metabolic changes, caused by depressed mitochondrial phosphorylating capacity, act on genes causing net glycolytic flux increase uncoupled from mitochondrial glucose oxidation. PMID:26844378

  3. Phosphorylation of human link proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Oester, D.A.; Caterson, B.; Schwartz, E.R.

    1986-06-13

    Three link proteins of 48, 44 and 40 kDa were purified from human articular cartilage and identified with monoclonal anti-link protein antibody 8-A-4. Two sets of lower molecular weight proteins of 30-31 kDa and 24-26 kDa also contained link protein epitopes recognized by the monoclonal antibody and were most likely degradative products of the intact link proteins. The link proteins of 48 and 40 kDa were identified as phosphoproteins while the 44 kDa link protein did not contain /sup 32/P. The phosphorylated 48 and 40 kDa link proteins contained approximately 2 moles PO/sub 4//mole link protein.

  4. Microbial Transformation of Antibiotics: Phosphorylation of Clindamycin by Streptomyces coelicolor Müller1

    PubMed Central

    Coats, John H.; Argoudelis, Alexander D.

    1971-01-01

    Addition of clindamycin to whole-cell cultures of Streptomyces coelicolor Müller resulted in the loss of in vitro activity against organisms sensitive to clindamycin. Incubation of such culture filtrates with alkaline phosphatase generated a biologically active material identified as clindamycin. Fermentation broths containing inactivated clindamycin yielded clindamycin 3-phosphate, the structure of which was established by physical-chemical and enzymatic studies. Clindamycin was phosphorylated by lysates and partially purified enzyme preparations from S. coelicolor Müller. These reactions require a ribonucleoside triphosphate and Mg2+. The product of the cell-free reactions was identified as clindamycin 3-phosphate. PMID:5166238

  5. Prebiotic phosphorylation of thymidine at 65 C in simulated desert conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, M. J.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    The phosphorylation of thymidine is described for a variety of conditions at 65 C to demonstrate that the reaction could readily take place in deserts at the present time. This might be used as an indication that urea-phosphate mixtures could have been important as phosphorylating agents on the primitive earth. Reaction products were identified by comparing their chromatographic and electrophoretic mobilities with those of authentic materials and by enzymatic degradation. The results show that good yields of nucleotides are obtained when nucleosides are heated with urea-phospate mixtures at 65 C. Reactions proceed more rapidly at moderate humidities than in a stream of dry nitrogen. Occasional wetting results in even faster and more extensive reactions. There was no reaction for a mixture of urea and trimetaphosphate.

  6. Correlation between persistent forms of zeaxanthin-dependent energy dissipation and thylakoid protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ebbert, V; Demmig-Adams, B; Adams, W W; Mueh, K E; Staehelin, L A

    2001-01-01

    High light stress induced not only a sustained form of xanthophyll cycle-dependent energy dissipation but also sustained thylakoid protein phosphorylation. The effect of protein phosphatase inhibitors (fluoride and molybdate ions) on recovery from a 1-h exposure to a high PFD was examined in leaf discs of Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper). Inhibition of protein dephosphorylation induced zeaxanthin retention and sustained energy dissipation (NPQ) upon return to low PFD for recovery, but had no significant effects on pigment and Chl fluorescence characteristics under high light exposure. In addition, whole plants of Monstera deliciosa and spinach grown at low to moderate PFDs were transferred to high PFDs, and thylakoid protein phosphorylation pattern (assessed with anti-phosphothreonine antibody) as well as pigment and Chl fluorescence characteristics were examined over several days. A correlation was obtained between dark-sustained D1/D2 phosphorylation and dark-sustained zeaxanthin retention and maintenance of PS II in a state primed for energy dissipation in both species. The degree of these dark-sustained phenomena was more pronounced in M. deliciosa compared with spinach. Moreover, M. deliciosa but not spinach plants showed unusual phosphorylation patterns of Lhcb proteins with pronounced dark-sustained Lhcb phosphorylation even under low PFD growth conditions. Subsequent to the transfer to a high PFD, dark-sustained Lhcb protein phosphorylation was further enhanced. Thus, phosphorylation patterns of D1/D2 and Lhcb proteins differed from each other as well as among plant species. The results presented here suggest an association between dark-sustained D1/D2 phosphorylation and sustained retention of zeaxanthin and energy dissipation (NPQ) in light-stressed, and particularly 'photoinhibited', leaves. Functional implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:16228317

  7. Mitochondrial respiratory control and early defects of oxidative phosphorylation in the failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Hélène; Semsroth, Severin; Antretter, Herwig; Höfer, Daniel; Gnaiger, Erich

    2011-12-01

    Heart failure is a consequence of progressive deterioration of cardiac performance. Little is known about the role of impaired oxidative phosphorylation in the progression of the disease, since previous studies of mitochondrial injuries are restricted to end-stage chronic heart failure. The present study aimed at evaluating the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of human heart failure. We measured the control of oxidative phosphorylation with high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized myocardial fibres from donor hearts (controls), and patients with no or mild heart failure but presenting with heart disease, or chronic heart failure due to dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy. The capacity of the phosphorylation system exerted a strong limitation on oxidative phosphorylation in the human heart, estimated at 121 pmol O(2)s(-1)mg(-1) in the healthy left ventricle. In heart disease, a specific defect of the phosphorylation system, Complex I-linked respiration, and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation were identified. These early defects were also significant in chronic heart failure, where the capacities of the oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer systems per cardiac tissue mass were decreased with all tested substrate combinations, suggesting a decline of mitochondrial density. Oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer system capacities were higher in ventricles compared to atria, but the impaired mitochondrial quality was identical in the four cardiac chambers of chronic heart failure patients. Coupling was preserved in heart disease and chronic heart failure, in contrast to the mitochondrial dysfunction observed after prolonged cold storage of cardiac tissue. Mitochondrial defects in the phosphorylation system, Complex I respiration and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation occurred early in the development of heart failure. Targeting these mitochondrial injuries with metabolic therapy may offer a promising approach to delay

  8. CK2 phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5 potentiates cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Miwako Kato; Wada, Ikuo; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yamaki, Junko; Krebs, Edwin G.; Homma, Yoshimi

    2005-01-01

    Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic Ser/Thr protein kinase that plays an important role in cell cycle progression. Although its function in this process remains unclear, it is known to be required for the G1 and G2/M phase transitions in yeast. Here, we show that CK2 activity changes notably during cell cycle progression and is increased within 3 h of serum stimulation of quiescent cells. During the time period in which it exhibits high enzymatic activity, CK2 associates with and phosphorylates a key molecule for translation initiation, eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 5. Using MS, we show that Ser-389 and -390 of eIF5 are major sites of phosphorylation by CK2. This is confirmed using eIF5 mutants that lack CK2 sites; the phosphorylation levels of mutant eIF5 proteins are significantly reduced, relative to WT eIF5, both in vitro and in vivo. Expression of these mutants reveals that they have a dominant-negative effect on phosphorylation of endogenous eIF5, and that they perturb synchronous progression of cells through S to M phase, resulting in a significant reduction in growth rate. Furthermore, the formation of mature eIF5/eIF2/eIF3 complex is reduced in these cells, and, in fact, restricted diffusional motion of WT eIF5 was almost abolished in a GFP-tagged eIF5 mutant lacking CK2 phosphorylation sites, as measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. These results suggest that CK2 may be involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression by associating with and phosphorylating a key molecule for translation initiation. PMID:16227438

  9. Recent Advances in Carbon Nanotube-Based Enzymatic Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cosnier, Serge; Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes recent trends in the field of enzymatic fuel cells. Thanks to the high specificity of enzymes, biofuel cells can generate electrical energy by oxidation of a targeted fuel (sugars, alcohols, or hydrogen) at the anode and reduction of oxidants (O2, H2O2) at the cathode in complex media. The combination of carbon nanotubes (CNT), enzymes and redox mediators was widely exploited to develop biofuel cells since the electrons involved in the bio-electrocatalytic processes can be efficiently transferred from or to an external circuit. Original approaches to construct electron transfer based CNT-bioelectrodes and impressive biofuel cell performances are reported as well as biomedical applications. PMID:25386555

  10. Recent advances in carbon nanotube-based enzymatic fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Cosnier, Serge; Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes recent trends in the field of enzymatic fuel cells. Thanks to the high specificity of enzymes, biofuel cells can generate electrical energy by oxidation of a targeted fuel (sugars, alcohols, or hydrogen) at the anode and reduction of oxidants (O2, H2O2) at the cathode in complex media. The combination of carbon nanotubes (CNT), enzymes and redox mediators was widely exploited to develop biofuel cells since the electrons involved in the bio-electrocatalytic processes can be efficiently transferred from or to an external circuit. Original approaches to construct electron transfer based CNT-bioelectrodes and impressive biofuel cell performances are reported as well as biomedical applications. PMID:25386555

  11. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado, W.; Horwitz, S.B.

    1987-11-03

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistant phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl/sub 2/ was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 ..mu..M cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance.

  12. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Mellado, W; Horwitz, S B

    1987-11-01

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistance phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl2 was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 microM cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by [gamma-32P]ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance. PMID:3427052

  13. Cisplatin stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shrivastava, A; Sodhi, A

    1995-03-01

    Cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiamine platinum (II)], a potent anti-tumor compound, stimulates immune responses by activating monocyte-macrophages and other cells of the immune system. The mechanism by which cisplatin activates these cells is poorly characterized. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event that mediates cellular responses, we examined whether cisplatin alters tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. We found that cisplatin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in peritoneal macrophages and in P388D1 and IC-21 macrophage cell lines. Treatment of macrophages with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genestein and lavendustin A, inhibited cisplatin-stimulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. Macrophages treated with cisplatin also exhibit increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These data indicate that protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in cisplatin-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539662

  14. Enzymatic Vitrectomy and Pharmacologic Vitreodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankoor R; Trese, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    The field of vitreoretinal surgery has evolved substantially over the last several decades. Scientific advances have improved our understanding of disease pathophysiology, and new surgical adjuncts and techniques have decreased surgical time and improved patient outcomes. Pharmacologic agents have recently been developed for intraocular use in order to enhance vitreous removal and even as a nonsurgical treatment for pathology due to an abnormal vitreoretinal interface. Plasmin can successfully cause vitreous liquefaction and induce a posterior vitreous detachment. Additionally, ocriplasmin has been approved for symptomatic vitreomacular adhesion and others appear to be promising for pharmacologic manipulation of the vitreous. The ability to induce vitreous liquefaction and a complete posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) with a single intravitreal injection has potential implications for the management of multiple vitreoretinopathies. Enzymatic vitrectomy may help to reduce vitreous viscosity, thereby facilitating removal during vitrectomy and reducing surgical time, especially when using smaller-gauge vitrectomy instruments. The induction of a PVD also has the potential to reduce intraoperative complications. As we improve our understanding of the molecular flux in the vitreous cavity, pharmacologic vitreodynamics will likely become more important as it may allow for improved manipulation of intravitreal molecules. PMID:26501959

  15. Light-driven Enzymatic Decarboxylation

    PubMed Central

    Köninger, Katharina; Grote, Marius; Zachos, Ioannis; Hollmann, Frank; Kourist, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Oxidoreductases belong to the most-applied industrial enzymes. Nevertheless, they need external electrons whose supply is often costly and challenging. Recycling of the electron donors NADH or NADPH requires the use of additional enzymes and sacrificial substrates. Interestingly, several oxidoreductases accept hydrogen peroxide as electron donor. While being inexpensive, this reagent often reduces the stability of enzymes. A solution to this problem is the in situ generation of the cofactor. The continuous supply of the cofactor at low concentration drives the reaction without impairing enzyme stability. This paper demonstrates a method for the light-catalyzed in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide with the example of the heme-dependent fatty acid decarboxylase OleTJE. The fatty acid decarboxylase OleTJE was discovered due to its unique ability to produce long-chain 1-alkenes from fatty acids, a hitherto unknown enzymatic reaction. 1-alkenes are widely used additives for plasticizers and lubricants. OleTJE has been shown to accept electrons from hydrogen peroxide for the oxidative decarboxylation. While addition of hydrogen peroxide damages the enzyme and results in low yields, in situ generation of the cofactor circumvents this problem. The photobiocatalytic system shows clear advantages regarding enzyme activity and yield, resulting in a simple and efficient system for fatty acid decarboxylation. PMID:27286035

  16. Light-driven Enzymatic Decarboxylation.

    PubMed

    Köninger, Katharina; Grote, Marius; Zachos, Ioannis; Hollmann, Frank; Kourist, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Oxidoreductases belong to the most-applied industrial enzymes. Nevertheless, they need external electrons whose supply is often costly and challenging. Recycling of the electron donors NADH or NADPH requires the use of additional enzymes and sacrificial substrates. Interestingly, several oxidoreductases accept hydrogen peroxide as electron donor. While being inexpensive, this reagent often reduces the stability of enzymes. A solution to this problem is the in situ generation of the cofactor. The continuous supply of the cofactor at low concentration drives the reaction without impairing enzyme stability. This paper demonstrates a method for the light-catalyzed in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide with the example of the heme-dependent fatty acid decarboxylase OleTJE. The fatty acid decarboxylase OleTJE was discovered due to its unique ability to produce long-chain 1-alkenes from fatty acids, a hitherto unknown enzymatic reaction. 1-alkenes are widely used additives for plasticizers and lubricants. OleTJE has been shown to accept electrons from hydrogen peroxide for the oxidative decarboxylation. While addition of hydrogen peroxide damages the enzyme and results in low yields, in situ generation of the cofactor circumvents this problem. The photobiocatalytic system shows clear advantages regarding enzyme activity and yield, resulting in a simple and efficient system for fatty acid decarboxylation. PMID:27286035

  17. Growth factor-induced activation of a kinase activity which causes regulatory phosphorylation of p42/microtubule-associated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    L'Allemain, G; Her, J H; Wu, J; Sturgill, T W; Weber, M J

    1992-01-01

    p42/microtubule-associated protein kinase (p42mapk) is activated by tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation, and its regulatory phosphorylation is likely to be important in signalling pathways involved in growth control, secretion, and differentiation. Here we show that treatment of quiescent 3T3 cells with diverse agonists results in the appearance of an activity capable of causing the in vitro phosphorylation of p42mapk on the regulatory tyrosine and to a lesser extent on the regulatory threonine, resulting in enzymatic activation of the p42mapk. This p42mapk-activating activity is capable of phosphorylating a kinase-defective p42mapk mutant, thus confirming its activity as a kinase. Images PMID:1314951

  18. IMPORTANCE OF ENZYMATIC BIOTRANSFORMATION IN IMMUNOTOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many immunotoxic compounds, such as benzene and other organic solvents, pesticides, mycotoxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, can alter immune function only after undergoing enzyme-mediated reactions within various tissues. In the review that follows, the role of enzymatic...

  19. Subcritical Water Processing of Proteins: An Alternative to Enzymatic Digestion?

    PubMed

    Powell, Thomas; Bowra, Steve; Cooper, Helen J

    2016-06-21

    Subcritical water is an emerging tool in the processing of bioorganic waste. Subcritical water is an environmentally benign solvent which has the potential to provide an alternative to traditional methods of protein hydrolysis without the inclusion of expensive acids or enzymes. To date, most studies on the subcritical water mediated hydrolysis of proteins have focused on the production of amino acids, rather than the intermediate peptides. Here, we investigate the specificity of subcritical water with respect to the production of peptides from three model proteins, hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and β-casein, and compare the results with enzymatic digestion of proteins by trypsin. In addition, the effect of subcritical water (SCW) treatment on two protein post-translational modifications, disulfide bonds and phosphorylation, was investigated. The results show that high protein sequence coverages (>80%) can be obtained following subcritical water hydrolysis. These are comparable to those obtained following treatment with tryspin. Under mild subcritical water conditions (160 °C), all proteins showed favored cleavage of the Asp-X bond. The results for β-casein revealed favored cleavage of the Glu-X bond at subcritical water temperatures of 160 and 207 °C. That was similarly observed for bovine serum albumin at a subcritical water temperature of 207 °C. Subcritical water treatment results in very limited cleavage of disulfide bonds. Reduction and alkylation of proteins either prior to or post subcritical water treatment improve reported protein sequence coverages. The results for phosphoprotein β-casein show that, under mild subcritical water conditions, phosphorylation may be retained on the peptide hydrolysis products. PMID:27181872

  20. Chemo-Enzymatic Synthesis of Oligoglycerol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek K; Nguyen, Remi; Galy, Nicolas; Haag, Rainer; Sharma, Sunil K; Len, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    A cleaner and greener method has been developed and used to synthesize 14 different functionalized oligomer derivatives of glycerol in moderate 29%-39% yields over three steps. After successive regioselective enzymatic acylation of the primary hydroxyl groups, etherification or esterification of the secondary hydroxyl groups and chemoselective enzymatic saponification, the target compounds can efficiently be used as versatile building blocks in organic and supramolecular chemistry. PMID:27517886

  1. Oxidative phosphorylation and lacunar stroke

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher D.; Hurford, Robert; Bevan, Steve; Markus, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) abnormalities were associated with lacunar stroke, hypothesizing that these would be more strongly associated in patients with multiple lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis (LA). Methods: In 1,012 MRI-confirmed lacunar stroke cases and 964 age-matched controls recruited from general practice surgeries, we investigated associations between common genetic variants within the OXPHOS pathway and lacunar stroke using a permutation-based enrichment approach. Cases were phenotyped using MRI into those with multiple infarcts or LA (MLI/LA) and those with isolated lacunar infarcts (ILI) based on the number of subcortical infarcts and degree of LA, using the Fazekas grading. Using gene-level association statistics, we tested for enrichment of genes in the OXPHOS pathway with all lacunar stroke and the 2 subtypes. Results: There was a specific association with strong evidence of enrichment in the top 1% of genes in the MLI/LA (subtype p = 0.0017) but not in the ILI subtype (p = 1). Genes in the top percentile for the all lacunar stroke analysis were not significantly enriched (p = 0.07). Conclusions: Our results implicate the OXPHOS pathway in the pathogenesis of lacunar stroke, and show the association is specific to patients with the MLI/LA subtype. They show that MRI-based subtyping of lacunar stroke can provide insights into disease pathophysiology, and imply that different radiologic subtypes of lacunar stroke subtypes have distinct underlying pathophysiologic processes. PMID:26674331

  2. In the Beginning, There Was Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakis, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of reversible protein phosphorylation to cellular regulation cannot be overstated. In eukaryotic cells, protein kinase/phosphatase signaling pathways regulate a staggering number of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, cell death (apoptosis, necroptosis, necrosis), metabolism (at both the cellular and organismal levels), behavior and neurological function, development, and pathogen resistance. Although protein phosphorylation as a mode of eukaryotic cell regulation is familiar to most biochemists, many are less familiar with protein kinase/phosphatase signaling networks that function in prokaryotes. In this thematic minireview series, we present four minireviews that cover the important field of prokaryotic protein phosphorylation. PMID:24554697

  3. Selective Sensing of Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Peptides Using Terbium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Sumaoka, Jun; Akiba, Hiroki; Komiyama, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins, as well as their dephosphorylation, is closely related to various diseases. However, this phosphorylation is usually accompanied by more abundant phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues in the proteins and covers only 0.05% of the total phosphorylation. Accordingly, highly selective detection of phosphorylated tyrosine in proteins is an urgent subject. In this review, recent developments in this field are described. Monomeric and binuclear Tb(III) complexes, which emit notable luminescence only in the presence of phosphotyrosine (pTyr), have been developed. There, the benzene ring of pTyr functions as an antenna and transfers its photoexcitation energy to the Tb(III) ion as the emission center. Even in the coexistence of phosphoserine (pSer) and phosphothreonine (pThr), pTyr can be efficintly detected with high selectivity. Simply by adding these Tb(III) complexes to the solutions, phosphorylation of tyrosine in peptides by protein tyrosine kinases and dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatases can be successfully visualized in a real-time fashion. Furthermore, the activities of various inhibitors on these enzymes are quantitatively evaluated, indicating a strong potential of the method for efficient screening of eminent inhibitors from a number of candidates. PMID:27375742

  4. Selective Sensing of Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Peptides Using Terbium(III) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sumaoka, Jun; Akiba, Hiroki; Komiyama, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins, as well as their dephosphorylation, is closely related to various diseases. However, this phosphorylation is usually accompanied by more abundant phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues in the proteins and covers only 0.05% of the total phosphorylation. Accordingly, highly selective detection of phosphorylated tyrosine in proteins is an urgent subject. In this review, recent developments in this field are described. Monomeric and binuclear TbIII complexes, which emit notable luminescence only in the presence of phosphotyrosine (pTyr), have been developed. There, the benzene ring of pTyr functions as an antenna and transfers its photoexcitation energy to the TbIII ion as the emission center. Even in the coexistence of phosphoserine (pSer) and phosphothreonine (pThr), pTyr can be efficintly detected with high selectivity. Simply by adding these TbIII complexes to the solutions, phosphorylation of tyrosine in peptides by protein tyrosine kinases and dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatases can be successfully visualized in a real-time fashion. Furthermore, the activities of various inhibitors on these enzymes are quantitatively evaluated, indicating a strong potential of the method for efficient screening of eminent inhibitors from a number of candidates. PMID:27375742

  5. Multi-parametric MRI characterization of enzymatically degraded articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Nissi, Mikko J; Salo, Elli-Noora; Tiitu, Virpi; Liimatainen, Timo; Michaeli, Shalom; Mangia, Silvia; Ellermann, Jutta; Nieminen, Miika T

    2016-07-01

    Several laboratory and rotating frame quantitative MRI parameters were evaluated and compared for detection of changes in articular cartilage following selective enzymatic digestion. Bovine osteochondral specimens were subjected to 44 h incubation in control medium or in collagenase or chondroitinase ABC to induce superficial collagen or proteoglycan (glycosaminoglycan) alterations. The samples were scanned at 9.4 T for T1 , T1 Gd (dGEMRIC), T2 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , TRAFF2 , and T1 sat relaxation times and for magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). For reference, glycosaminoglycan content, collagen fibril orientation and biomechanical properties were determined. Changes primarily in the superficial cartilage were noted after enzymatic degradation. Most of the studied parameters were sensitive to the destruction of collagen network, whereas glycosaminoglycan depletion was detected only by native T1 and T1 Gd relaxation time constants throughout the tissue and by MTR superficially. T1 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat correlated significantly with the biomechanical properties while T1 Gd correlated with glycosaminoglycan staining. The findings indicated that most of the studied MRI parameters were sensitive to both glycosaminoglycan content and collagen network integrity, with changes due to enzymatic treatment detected primarily in the superficial tissue. Strong correlation of T1 , adiabatic T1ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat with the altered biomechanical properties, reflects that these parameters were sensitive to critical functional properties of cartilage. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1111-1120, 2016. PMID:26662555

  6. The Chemical Biology of Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Mary Katherine; Cole, Philip A.

    2011-01-01

    The explosion of scientific interest in protein kinase-mediated signaling networks has led to the infusion of new chemical methods and their applications related to the analysis of phosphorylation pathways. We highlight some of these chemical biology approaches across three areas. First, we discuss the development of chemical tools to modulate the activity of protein kinases to explore kinase mechanisms and their contributions to phosphorylation events and cellular processes. Second, we describe chemical techniques developed in the past few years to dissect the structural and functional effects of phosphate modifications at specific sites in proteins. Third, we cover newly developed molecular imaging approaches to elucidate the spatiotemporal aspects of phosphorylation cascades in live cells. Exciting advances in our understanding of protein phosphorylation have been obtained with these chemical biology approaches, but continuing opportunities for technological innovation remain. PMID:19489734

  7. The condensing activities of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis type II fatty acid synthase are differentially regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Molle, Virginie; Brown, Alistair K; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cozzone, Alain J; Kremer, Laurent

    2006-10-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins by Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) has recently become of major physiological importance because of its possible involvement in virulence of bacterial pathogens. Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis has eleven STPKs, the nature and function of the substrates of these enzymes remain largely unknown. In this work, we have identified for the first time STPK substrates in M. tuberculosis forming part of the type II fatty acid synthase (FAS-II) system involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis: the malonyl-CoA::AcpM transacylase mtFabD, and the beta-ketoacyl AcpM synthases KasA and KasB. All three enzymes were phosphorylated in vitro by different kinases, suggesting a complex network of interactions between STPKs and these substrates. In addition, both KasA and KasB were efficiently phosphorylated in M. bovis BCG each at different sites and could be dephosphorylated by the M. tuberculosis Ser/Thr phosphatase PstP. Enzymatic studies revealed that, whereas phosphorylation decreases the activity of KasA in the elongation process of long chain fatty acids synthesis, this modification enhances that of KasB. Such a differential effect of phosphorylation may represent an unusual mechanism of FAS-II system regulation, allowing pathogenic mycobacteria to produce full-length mycolates, which are required for adaptation and intracellular survival in macrophages. PMID:16873379

  8. Phosphoproteomic analysis of Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1(T) identified the role of protein phosphorylation in methanogenesis and osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wan-Ling; Lai, Shu-Jung; Yang, Jhih-Tian; Chern, Jeffy; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Chou, Chi-Chi; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Mei-Chin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Methanogens have gained much attention for their metabolic product, methane, which could be an energy substitute but also contributes to the greenhouse effect. One factor that controls methane emission, reversible protein phosphorylation, is a crucial signaling switch, and phosphoproteomics has become a powerful tool for large-scale surveying. Here, we conducted the first phosphorylation-mediated regulation study in halophilic Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1(T), a model strain for studying stress response mechanisms in osmoadaptation. A shotgun approach and MS-based analysis identified 149 unique phosphoproteins. Among them, 26% participated in methanogenesis and osmolytes biosynthesis pathways. Of note, we uncovered that protein phosphorylation might be a crucial factor to modulate the pyrrolysine (Pyl) incorporation and Pyl-mediated methylotrophic methanogenesis. Furthermore, heterologous expression of glycine sarcosine N-methyltransferase (GSMT) mutant derivatives in the osmosensitive Escherichia coli MKH13 revealed that the nonphosphorylated T68A mutant resulted in increased salt tolerance. In contrast, mimic phosphorylated mutant T68D proved defective in both enzymatic activity and salinity tolerance for growth. Our study provides new insights into phosphorylation modification as a crucial role of both methanogenesis and osmoadaptation in methanoarchaea, promoting biogas production or reducing future methane emission in response to global warming and climate change. PMID:27357474

  9. Phosphoproteomic analysis of Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1T identified the role of protein phosphorylation in methanogenesis and osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wan-Ling; Lai, Shu-Jung; Yang, Jhih-Tian; Chern, Jeffy; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Chou, Chi-Chi; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Mei-Chin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Methanogens have gained much attention for their metabolic product, methane, which could be an energy substitute but also contributes to the greenhouse effect. One factor that controls methane emission, reversible protein phosphorylation, is a crucial signaling switch, and phosphoproteomics has become a powerful tool for large-scale surveying. Here, we conducted the first phosphorylation-mediated regulation study in halophilic Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1T, a model strain for studying stress response mechanisms in osmoadaptation. A shotgun approach and MS-based analysis identified 149 unique phosphoproteins. Among them, 26% participated in methanogenesis and osmolytes biosynthesis pathways. Of note, we uncovered that protein phosphorylation might be a crucial factor to modulate the pyrrolysine (Pyl) incorporation and Pyl-mediated methylotrophic methanogenesis. Furthermore, heterologous expression of glycine sarcosine N-methyltransferase (GSMT) mutant derivatives in the osmosensitive Escherichia coli MKH13 revealed that the nonphosphorylated T68A mutant resulted in increased salt tolerance. In contrast, mimic phosphorylated mutant T68D proved defective in both enzymatic activity and salinity tolerance for growth. Our study provides new insights into phosphorylation modification as a crucial role of both methanogenesis and osmoadaptation in methanoarchaea, promoting biogas production or reducing future methane emission in response to global warming and climate change. PMID:27357474

  10. Protein phosphorylation in neurodegeneration: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Tenreiro, Sandra; Eckermann, Katrin; Outeiro, Tiago F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation is a common hallmark in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). In these disorders, the misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins occurs alongside neuronal degeneration in somewhat specific brain areas, depending on the disorder and the stage of the disease. However, we still do not fully understand the mechanisms governing protein aggregation, and whether this constitutes a protective or detrimental process. In PD, alpha-synuclein (aSyn) forms protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies, and is phosphorylated at serine 129. Other residues have also been shown to be phosphorylated, but the significance of phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still controversial. In AD and in FTD, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein causes its misfolding and aggregation. Again, our understanding of the precise consequences of tau phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still limited. Through the use of a variety of model organisms and technical approaches, we are now gaining stronger insight into the effects of phosphorylation in the behavior of these proteins. In this review, we cover recent findings in the field and discuss how targeting phosphorylation events might be used for therapeutic intervention in these devastating diseases of the nervous system. PMID:24860424

  11. Protein phosphorylation during Plasmodium berghei gametogenesis.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Morales, Alberto; González-López, Lorena; Cázares-Raga, Febe Elena; Cortés-Martínez, Leticia; Torres-Monzón, Jorge Aurelio; Gallegos-Pérez, José Luis; Rodríguez, Mario Henry; James, Anthony A; Hernández-Hernández, Fidel de la Cruz

    2015-09-01

    Plasmodium gametogenesis within the mosquito midgut is a complex differentiation process involving signaling mediated by phosphorylation, which modulate metabolic routes and protein synthesis required to complete this development. However, the mechanisms leading to gametogenesis activation are poorly understood. We analyzed protein phosphorylation during Plasmodium berghei gametogenesis in vitro in serum-free medium using bidimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with immunoblotting (IB) and antibodies specific to phosphorylated serine, threonine and tyrosine. Approximately 75 protein exhibited phosphorylation changes, of which 23 were identified by mass spectrometry. These included components of the cytoskeleton, heat shock proteins, and proteins involved in DNA synthesis and signaling pathways among others. Novel phosphorylation events support a role for these proteins during gametogenesis. The phosphorylation sites of six of the identified proteins, HSP70, WD40 repeat protein msi1, enolase, actin-1 and two isoforms of large subunit of ribonucleoside reductase were investigated using TiO2 phosphopeptides enrichment and tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, transient exposure to hydroxyurea, an inhibitor of ribonucleoside reductase, impaired male gametocytes exflagellation in a dose-dependent manner, and provides a resource for functional studies. PMID:26008612

  12. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    SciTech Connect

    Larrivee, D. )

    1990-09-01

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of (3H)proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the (3H)proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced (3H)proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins (3H)proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons.

  13. Phosphorylation of human skeletal muscle myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, M.E.; Lingley, M.D.; Stuart, D.S.; Hoffman-Goetz, L.

    1986-03-01

    Phosphorylation of the P-light chains (phosphorylatable light chains) in human skeletal muscle myosin was studied in vitro and in vivo under resting an d contracted conditions. biopsy samples from rested vastus lateralis muscle of male and female subjects were incubated in oxygenated physiological solution at 30/sup 0/C. Samples frozen following a quiescent period showed the presence of only unphosphorylated P-light chains designated LC2f (light chain two of fast myosin) CL2s and LC2s'(light chains two of slow myosin). Treatment with caffeine (10 mM) or direct electrical stimulation resulted in the appearance of three additional bands which were identified as the phosphorylated forms of the P-light chains i.e. LC2f-P, LC2s-P and LC2s'-P. The presence of phosphate was confirmed by prior incubation with (/sup 30/P) orthophosphate. Muscle samples rapidly frozen from resting vastus lateralis muscle revealed the presence of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P-light chains in approximately equal ratios. Muscle samples rapidly frozen following a maximal 10 second isometric contraction showed virtually only phosphorylated fast and slow P-light chains. These results reveal that the P-light chains in human fast and slow myosin may be rapidly phosphorylated, but the basal level of phosphorylation in rested human muscle considerably exceeds that observed in animal muscles studied in vitro or in situ.

  14. Fibronectin phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, Sumi; Sugiyama, Yayoi; Imada, Masaru )

    1988-12-01

    The presence of membrane-associated, extracellular protein kinase (ecto-protein kinase) and its substrate proteins was examined with serum-free cultures of Swiss 3T3 fibroblast. When cells were incubated with ({gamma}-{sup 32})ATP for 10 min at 37{degree}C, four proteins with apparent molecular weights between 150 and 220 kDa were prominently phosphorylated. These proteins were also radiolabeled by lactoperoxidase catalyzed iodination and were sensitive to mild tryptic digestion, suggesting that they localized on the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix. Phosphorylation of extracellular proteins with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in intact cell culture is consistent with the existence of ecto-protein kinase. Anti-fibronectin antibody immunoprecipitated one of the phosphoproteins which comigrated with a monomer and a dimer form of fibronectin under reducing and nonreducing conditions of electrophoresis, respectively. The protein had affinity for gelatin as demonstrated by retention with gelatin-conjugated agarose. This protein substrate of ecto-protein kinase was thus concluded to be fibronectin. The sites of phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase were compared with those of intracellularly phosphorylated fibronectin by the analysis of radiolabeled amino acids and peptides. Ecto-protein kinase phosphorylated fibronectin at serine and threonine residues which were distinct from the sites of intracellular fibronectin phosphorylation.

  15. Compartment-Specific Phosphorylation of Squid Neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the giant axon and synapse of third-order neurons in the squid stellate ganglion have provided a vast literature on neuronal physiology and axon transport. Large neuronal size also lends itself to comparative biochemical studies of cell body versus axon. These have focused on the regulation of synthesis, assembly, posttranslational modification and function of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules (MTs) and neurofilaments (NFs)), the predominant proteins in axoplasm. These contribute to axonal organization, stability, transport, and impulse transmission responsible for rapid contractions of mantle muscles underlying jet propulsion. Studies of vertebrate NFs have established an extensive literature on NF structure, organization, and function; studies of squid NFs, however, have made it possible to compare compartment-specific regulation of NF synthesis, assembly, and function in soma versus axoplasm. Since NFs contain over 100 eligible sites for phosphorylation by protein kinases, the compartment-specific patterns of phosphorylation have been a primary focus of biochemical studies. We have learned that NF phosphorylation is tightly compartmentalized; extensive phosphorylation occurs only in the axonal compartment in squid and in vertebrate neurons. This extensive phosphorylation plays a key role in organizing NFs, in association with microtubules (MTs), into a stable, dynamic functional lattice that supports axon growth, diameter, impulse transmission, and synaptic activity. To understand how cytoskeletal phosphorylation is topographically regulated, the kinases and phosphatases, bound to NFs isolated from cell bodies and axoplasm, have also been studied. PMID:26795486

  16. Phosphorylation meets nuclear import: a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most common and pleiotropic modification in biology, which plays a vital role in regulating and finely tuning a multitude of biological pathways. Transport across the nuclear envelope is also an essential cellular function and is intimately linked to many degeneration processes that lead to disease. It is therefore not surprising that phosphorylation of cargos trafficking between the cytoplasm and nucleus is emerging as an important step to regulate nuclear availability, which directly affects gene expression, cell growth and proliferation. However, the literature on phosphorylation of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking cargos is often confusing. Phosphorylation, and its mirror process dephosphorylation, has been shown to have opposite and often contradictory effects on the ability of cargos to be transported across the nuclear envelope. Without a clear connection between attachment of a phosphate moiety and biological response, it is difficult to fully understand and predict how phosphorylation regulates nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In this review, we will recapitulate clue findings in the field and provide some general rules on how reversible phosphorylation can affect the nuclear-cytoplasmic localization of substrates. This is only now beginning to emerge as a key regulatory step in biology. PMID:21182795

  17. Long-term dynamics of multisite phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Boris Y; Mattingly, Henry H; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y

    2016-07-15

    Multisite phosphorylation cycles are ubiquitous in cell regulation systems and are studied at multiple levels of complexity, from molecules to organisms, with the ultimate goal of establishing predictive understanding of the effects of genetic and pharmacological perturbations of protein phosphorylation in vivo. Achieving this goal is essentially impossible without mathematical models, which provide a systematic framework for exploring dynamic interactions of multiple network components. Most of the models studied to date do not discriminate between the distinct partially phosphorylated forms and focus on two limiting reaction regimes, distributive and processive, which differ in the number of enzyme-substrate binding events needed for complete phosphorylation or dephosphorylation. Here we use a minimal model of extracellular signal-related kinase regulation to explore the dynamics of a reaction network that includes all essential phosphorylation forms and arbitrary levels of reaction processivity. In addition to bistability, which has been studied extensively in distributive mechanisms, this network can generate periodic oscillations. Both bistability and oscillations can be realized at high levels of reaction processivity. Our work provides a general framework for systematic analysis of dynamics in multisite phosphorylation systems. PMID:27226482

  18. PKA regulates calcineurin function through the phosphorylation of RCAN1: Identification of a novel phosphorylation site

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seon Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Kooyeon; Jo, Su-Hyun; Seo, Su Ryeon

    2015-04-17

    Calcineurin is a calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase that has been implicated in T cell activation through the induction of nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT). We have previously suggested that endogenous regulator of calcineurin (RCAN1, also known as DSCR1) is targeted by protein kinase A (PKA) for the control of calcineurin activity. In the present study, we characterized the PKA-mediated phosphorylation site in RCAN1 by mass spectrometric analysis and revealed that PKA directly phosphorylated RCAN1 at the Ser 93. PKA-induced phosphorylation and the increase in the half-life of the RCAN1 protein were prevented by the substitution of Ser 93 with Ala (S93A). Furthermore, the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 potentiated the inhibition of calcineurin-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression by RCAN1. Our results suggest the presence of a novel phosphorylation site in RCAN1 and that its phosphorylation influences calcineurin-dependent inflammatory target gene expression. - Highlights: • We identify novel phosphorylation sites in RCAN1 by LC-MS/MS analysis. • PKA-dependent phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 inhibits calcineurin-mediated intracellular signaling. • We show the immunosuppressive function of RCAN1 phosphorylation at Ser 93 in suppressing cytokine expression.

  19. Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-07-16

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  20. Ex vivo Enzymatic Treatment of Aged CD4 T Cells Restores Cognate T-cell Helper Function and Enhances Antibody Production in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Perkey, Eric; Miller, Richard A.; Garcia, Gonzalo G.

    2012-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies have shown that CD4 T cells from old mice have defects in T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, immune synapse formation, activation, and proliferation. We have reported that removing a specific set of surface glycoproteins by ex vivo treatment with O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase (OSGE) can reverse many aspects of the age-related decline in CD4 T cell function. However, the specific mechanism by which this process occurs remains unclear, and it is unknown whether this enzymatic treatment can also restore important aspects of adaptive immunity in vivo. By using an in vivo model of the immune response based on adoptive transfer of CD4 T cells from pigeon cytochrome C (PCC)-specific transgenic H-2(k/k) TCR-Vα11Vβ3 CD4+ mice to syngeneic hosts, we now demonstrat that aging diminishes CD28 costimulatory signals in CD4 T cells. These age-associated defects include changes in phosphorylation of AKT and expression of glucose transporter type I, inducible T-cell costimulatory molecule, and CD40 ligand, suggesting that the lack of CD28 costimulation contributes to age-dependent loss of CD4 function. All of these deficits can be reversed by ex vivo OSGE treatment. Blocking B7-CD28 interactions on T cells prevents OSGE-mediated restoration of T cell function, suggesting that changes in surface glycosylation, including CD28, may be responsible for age-related costimulation decline. Finally, we showed that the age-related decline in CD4 cognate helper function for immunoglobin G production and long-term humoral immunity can also be restored by OSGE treatments of CD4 T cells prior to adoptive transfer. PMID:23136198

  1. Increased phospholipase A2 activity with phosphorylation of peroxiredoxin 6 requires a conformational change in the protein

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Hamidur; Zhou, Suiping; Dodia, Chandra; Feinstein, Sheldon I.; Huang, Shaohui; Speicher, David; Fisher, Aron B.

    2012-01-01

    We have shown previously and confirmed in the present study that the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) is markedly increased by phosphorylation. This report evaluated the conformation and thermodynamic stability of Prdx6 protein after phosphorylation to understand the physical basis for increased activity. Phosphorylation resulted in decreased negative far-UV CD, increased ANS binding, and lack of rigid tertiary structure, compatible with a change in conformation to that of a molten globule. The ΔGDo was 3.3 ± 0.3 kcal mol-1 for Prdx6 and 1.7 ± 0.7 kcal mol-1 for pPrdx6 suggesting that phosphorylation destabilizes the protein. Phosphorylation of Prdx6 changed the conformation of the N-terminal domain exposing Trp 33, as determined by tryptophan fluorescence and NaI fluorescence quenching. The kinetics of interaction of proteins with unilamellar liposomes (DPPC/egg PC/cholesterol/PG; 50:25:15:10, mol/mol) was evaluated with tryptophan fluorescence. pPrdx6 bound to liposomes with higher affinity (Kd, 5.6 ± 1.2 μM) in comparison to Prdx6 (Kd, 24.9 ± 4.5 μM). By isothermal titration calorimetry, pPrdx6 bound to liposomes with a large exothermic heat loss (ΔH = -31.49 ± 0.22 kcal mol-1). Correlating our conformation studies with the published crystal structure of oxidized Prdx6 suggests that phosphorylation results in exposure of hydrophobic residues, thereby providing accessibility to the sites for liposome binding. Because binding of the enzyme to the phospholipid substrate interface is a requirement for PLA2 activity, these results indicate that a change in the conformation of Prdx6 upon its phosphorylation is the basis for enhancement of PLA2 enzymatic activity. PMID:22663767

  2. Structural Perspective on Enzymatic Halogenation

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Simple halogen substituents frequently afford key structural features that account for the potency and selectivity of natural products, including antibiotics and hormones. For example, when a single chlorine atom on the antibiotic vancomycin is replaced by hydrogen, the resulting antibacterial activity decreases by up to 70% (HarrisC. M.; KannanR.; KopeckaH.; HarrisT. M.J. Am. Chem. Soc.1985, 107, 6652−6658). This Account analyzes how structure underlies mechanism in halogenases, the molecular machines designed by nature to incorporate halogens into diverse substrates. Traditional synthetic methods of integrating halogens into complex molecules are often complicated by a lack of specificity and regioselectivity. Nature, however, has developed a variety of elegant mechanisms for halogenating specific substrates with both regio- and stereoselectivity. An improved understanding of the biological routes toward halogenation could lead to the development of novel synthetic methods for the creation of new compounds with enhanced functions. Already, researchers have co-opted a fluorinase from the microorganism Streptomyces cattleya to produce 18F-labeled molecules for use in positron emission tomography (PET) (DengH.; CobbS. L.; GeeA. D.; LockhartA.; MartarelloL.; McGlincheyR. P.; O’HaganD.; OnegaM.Chem. Commun.2006, 652−654). Therefore, the discovery and characterization of naturally occurring enzymatic halogenation mechanisms has become an active area of research. The catalogue of known halogenating enzymes has expanded from the familiar haloperoxidases to include oxygen-dependent enzymes and fluorinases. Recently, the discovery of a nucleophilic halogenase that catalyzes chlorinations has expanded the repertoire of biological halogenation chemistry (DongC.; HuangF.; DengH.; SchaffrathC.; SpencerJ. B.; O’HaganD.; NaismithJ. H.Nature2004, 427, 561−56514765200). Structural characterization has provided a basis toward a mechanistic understanding of the specificity

  3. Enzymatic Enantioselective Decarboxylative Protonation of Heteroaryl Malonates

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Ross; Goodall, Mark; Thompson, Mark L; Leigh, James; Breuer, Michael; Baldenius, Kai; Micklefield, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme aryl/alkenyl malonate decarboxylase (AMDase) catalyses the enantioselective decarboxylative protonation (EDP) of a range of disubstituted malonic acids to give homochiral carboxylic acids that are valuable synthetic intermediates. AMDase exhibits a number of advantages over the non-enzymatic EDP methods developed to date including higher enantioselectivity and more environmentally benign reaction conditions. In this report, AMDase and engineered variants have been used to produce a range of enantioenriched heteroaromatic α-hydroxycarboxylic acids, including pharmaceutical precursors, from readily accessible α-hydroxymalonates. The enzymatic method described here represents an improvement upon existing synthetic chemistry methods that have been used to produce similar compounds. The relationship between the structural features of these new substrates and the kinetics associated with their enzymatic decarboxylation is explored, which offers further insight into the mechanism of AMDase. PMID:25766433

  4. An infrared radiation based thermal biosensor for enzymatic biochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Tao; Zhao, Xinyan; Yang, Zhaochu; Pires, Nuno M M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a thermal biosensor based on the infrared radiation energy is proposed for calorimetric measurement of biochemical reactions. Having a good structure design combined with MEMS technology as well as employing the Si /SiGe quantum well sensing material with a high TCR and low 1/f noise, the sensor shows potentials to be high sensitive and real-time. The urea enzymatic reaction was tested to verify the performance of sensor, which demonstrates a linear detection range from 0.5mM to 150mM and a relative standard deviation less than 1%. For the sensor fabrication, wafer-level transfer bonding is a key process, which makes the integration of quantum well material and a free standing structure possible. It reduces the heat loss from the sensor to the surrounding environment. PMID:23365944

  5. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  6. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zavada, Scott R; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes--catalytic proteins--owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol-ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  7. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal: Third quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, J.K.; Kitchell, J.P.

    1989-03-14

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes or commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of ''model'' organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix. In this quarter we obtained important results both with the development of our understanding of the enzyme reaction systems and also with the microbial work at Woods Hole. 12 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Sugar phosphorylation activity in ruminal acetogens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Pinder, R S; Patterson, J A; Ricke, S C

    2012-01-01

    Acetogenic bacteria Acetitomaculum ruminis, Acetobacterium woodii, and Eubacterium limosum were compared for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ATP-dependent phosphorylation of glucose and 2-deoxy-glucose. Rate of phosphorylation activity was measured in toluene-treated acetogenic cells using PEP and ATP and radiolabled glucose or 2-deoxy glucose. Eubacterium limosum, most likely has a glucose phosphotransferase system (PTS). In contrast, A. ruminis, and A. woodii had PEP-dependent glucose phosphorylation rates very similar to control rates, suggesting the lack of PTS activity. These results were confirmed by PEP dependent 2-deoxyglucose phosphorylation data. The rates of ATP-dependent glucose phosphorylation were higher than PEP-dependent glucose dependent in all organisms surveyed. Only E. limosum appeared to have PTS. The presence of PTS in E. limosum could explain why it is not capable of utilizing sugars and H(2)/CO(2) simultaneously and why acetogenesis is not as prominant in the rumen because of the availability of carbohydrates as alternative energy substrates. PMID:22423990

  9. Phosphorylated tau and the neurodegenerative foldopathies.

    PubMed

    Kosik, Kenneth S; Shimura, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have implicated phosphorylated tau in the Alzheimer disease process. However, the cellular fate of phosphorylated tau has only recently been described. Recent work has shown that tau phosphorylation at substrate sites for the kinases Cdk5 and GSK3-beta can trigger the binding of tau to the chaperones Hsc70 and Hsp27. The binding of phosphorylated tau to Hsc70 implied that the complex may be a substrate for the E3 ligase CHIP and this possibility was experimentally verified. The presence of this system in cells suggests that phosphorylated tau may hold toxic dangers for cell viability, and the response of the cell is to harness a variety of protective mechanisms. These include binding to chaperones, which may prevent more toxic conformations of the protein, ubiquitination which will direct the protein to the proteasome, segregation of tau aggregates from the cellular machinery, and recruitment of Hsp27 which will confer anti-apoptotic properties to the cell. PMID:15615647

  10. Protein phosphorylation systems in postmortem human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Walaas, S.I.; Perdahl-Wallace, E.; Winblad, B.; Greengard, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation systems regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP), or calcium in conjunction with calmodulin or phospholipid/diacylglycerol, have been studied by phosphorylation in vitro of particulate and soluble fractions from human postmortem brain samples. One-dimensional or two-dimensional gel electrophoretic protein separations were used for analysis. Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase was found to be highly active in both particulate and soluble preparations throughout the human CNS, with groups of both widely distributed and region-specific substrates being observed in different brain nuclei. Dopamine-innervated parts of the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex contained the phosphoproteins previously observed in rodent basal ganglia. In contrast, calcium/phospholipid-dependent and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation systems were less prominent in human postmortem brain than in rodent brain, and only a few widely distributed substrates for these protein kinases were found. Protein staining indicated that postmortem proteolysis, particularly of high-molecular-mass proteins, was prominent in deeply located, subcortical regions in the human brain. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use human postmortem brain samples, when obtained under carefully controlled conditions, for qualitative studies on brain protein phosphorylation. Such studies should be of value in studies on human neurological and/or psychiatric disorders.

  11. Extensive phosphorylation of AMPA receptors in neurons.

    PubMed

    Diering, Graham H; Heo, Seok; Hussain, Natasha K; Liu, Bian; Huganir, Richard L

    2016-08-16

    Regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) function is a fundamental mechanism controlling synaptic strength during long-term potentiation/depression and homeostatic scaling. AMPAR function and membrane trafficking is controlled by protein-protein interactions, as well as by posttranslational modifications. Phosphorylation of the GluA1 AMPAR subunit at S845 and S831 play especially important roles during synaptic plasticity. Recent controversy has emerged regarding the extent to which GluA1 phosphorylation may contribute to synaptic plasticity. Here we used a variety of methods to measure the population of phosphorylated GluA1-containing AMPARs in cultured primary neurons and mouse forebrain. Phosphorylated GluA1 represents large fractions from 12% to 50% of the total population under basal and stimulated conditions in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a large fraction of synapses are positive for phospho-GluA1-containing AMPARs. Our results support the large body of research indicating a prominent role of GluA1 phosphorylation in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27482106

  12. Presence of glycerol masks the effects of phosphorylation on the catalytic efficiency of cytosolic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Burke, J R; Guenther, M G; Witmer, M R; Tredup, J A; Hail, M E; Micanovic, R; Villafranca, J J

    1997-05-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 catalyzes the selective release of arachidonic acid from the sn-2 position of phospholipids and is believed to play a key cellular role in the generation of arachidonic acid. The enzymatic activity of cPLA2 is affected by several mechanisms, including substrate presentation and the phosphorylation state of the enzyme. Using covesicles of 1-palmitoy1-2-arachidonoyl-[arachidonoyl-1-14C]-8n-glycero-3 -phosphocholine and 1,2-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylmethanol as substrate, the effects of phosphorylation on the interfacial binding and catalytic constants were investigated. Phosphorylated and dephosphorylated enzyme forms were shown to have identical values of 2.6 microM for KMapp, an equilibrium dissociation constant which consists of the intrinsic dissociation constant from the lipid/water interface (Ks) and the dissociation constant for phospholipid from the active site (KM*). Moreover, the values of KM* for phosphorylated and dephosphorylated enzyme did not differ significantly (0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1, respectively). However, dephosphorylation of the enzyme reduced the value of kcat by 39%. The phosphorylation state of the enzyme had no effect on either the cooperativity shown by this enzyme or the thermal stability of the enzyme. Surprisingly, the presence of glycerol (4 M) masks the effect of phosphorylation on kcat. Instead, glycerol increased the value of kcat by 440% for the phosphorylated enzyme and by 760% for the dephosphorylated form. Moreover, addition of glycerol had only small effects on KMapp. the increase in the kcat upon addition of glycerol results from a substantial decrease in the activation energy from 29.4 to 14.8 kcal. mol-1. To determine whether the effects of phosphorylation of the enzyme or addition of glycerol are unique to this artificial substrate, membranes from U937 cells were isolated and used as substrate. With these membranes, the dephosphorylated enzyme was only 21% less active than the phosphorylated

  13. Phosphorylation state-dependent interaction between AKAP7δ/γ and phospholamban increases phospholamban phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Rigatti, Marc; Le, Andrew V; Gerber, Claire; Moraru, Ion I; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L

    2015-09-01

    Changes in heart rate and contractility in response to sympathetic stimulation occur via activation of cAMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA), leading to phosphorylation of numerous substrates that alter Ca(2+) cycling. Phosphorylation of these substrates is coordinated by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), which recruit PKA to specific substrates [1]. Phosphorylation of the PKA substrate phospholamban (PLB) is a critical determinant of Ca(2+) re-entry into the sarcoplasmic reticulum and is coordinated by AKAP7δ/γ [2,3]. Here, we further these findings by showing that phosphorylation of PLB requires interaction with AKAP7δ/γ and that this interaction occurs only when PLB is unphosphorylated. Additionally, we find that two mutants of PLB (R9C and Δ14), which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in humans, prevent association with AKAP7δ/γ and display reduced phosphorylation in vitro. This finding implicates the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB interaction in the pathology of the disease phenotype. Further exploration of the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB association demonstrated a phosphorylation state-dependence of the interaction. Computational modeling revealed that this mode of interaction allows for small amounts of AKAP and PKA (100-200nM) to regulate the phosphorylation of large quantities of PLB (50μM). Our results confirm that AKAP7γ/δ binding to PLB is important for phosphorylation of PLB, and describe a novel phosphorylation state-dependent binding mechanism that explains how phosphorylation of highly abundant PKA substrates can be regulated by AKAPs present at ~100-200 fold lower concentrations. PMID:26027516

  14. Myosin light chain phosphorylation during the contraction cycle of frog muscle.

    PubMed

    Bárány, K; Bárány, M; Gillis, J M; Kushmerick, M J

    1980-04-01

    Changes in the [32P]phosphate content of proteins during contraction were investigated with sartorius and semitendinosus muscles dissected from live frogs injected with [32P]orthophosphate. During a single tetanus, the only significant change was the increase in the [32P]phosphate content of the 18,000-dalton light chain of myosin. The extent of light chain phosphorylation was a function of stimulus duration and it amounted maximally to 0.35 mol of [32P]phosphate transferred per mol of light chain. The extent of phosphorylation in stimulated and stretched semitendinosus muscles, which were unable to produce active tension, was nearly identical to that in muscles stimulated at standard rest length, when the time of stimulation was over a half-second. Maximal light chain phosphorylation was also observed in muscles treated with caffein. These results provide evidence for the activation of the light chain kinase in the intact muscle through a process involving Ca2+. The phosphorylation of the light chain associated with tetanic stimulation was reversible. After short tetanuses, dephosphorylation of light chain approximately followed relaxation and after longer tetanuses, dephosphorylation lagged behind relaxation. The role of light chain phosphorylation was investigated in caffeine-treated and untreated muscles by measuring the Ca content of actin and the [32P]phosphate content of light chain. Phosphorylation of light chain protected the actin-bound Ca against removal by EDTA stoichiometrically. It is postulated that the physiological role of light chain phosphorylation is to increase the rate of combination of the cross-bridges with the actin filaments in the contracting phase of the mechanical activity. PMID:7364050

  15. Gas-Phase Acidities of Phosphorylated Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Miller, Sean R; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2015-11-19

    Gas-phase acidities and heats of formation have been predicted at the G3(MP2)/SCRF-COSMO level of theory for 10 phosphorylated amino acids and their corresponding amides, including phospho-serine (pSer), -threonine (pThr), and -tyrosine (pTyr), providing the first reliable set of these values. The gas-phase acidities (GAs) of the three named phosphorylated amino acids and their amides have been determined using proton transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental and predicted GAs. The phosphate group is the deprotonation site for pSer and pThr and deprotonation from the carboxylic acid generated the lowest energy anion for pTyr. The infrared spectra were calculated for six low energy anions of pSer, pThr, and pTyr. For deprotonated pSer and pThr, good agreement is found between the experimental IRMPD spectra and the calculated spectra for our lowest energy anion structure. For pTyr, the IR spectra for a higher energy phosphate deprotonated structure is in good agreement with experiment. Additional experiments tested electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions for pTyr and determined that variations in solvent, temperature, and voltage can result in a different experimental GA value, indicating that ESI conditions affect the conformation of the pTyr anion. PMID:26492552

  16. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from First-Principles Path Sampling Calculations.

    PubMed

    Varga, Matthew J; Schwartz, Steven D

    2016-04-12

    In this study, we develop and test a method to determine the rate of particle transfer and kinetic isotope effects in enzymatic reactions, specifically yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), from first-principles. Transition path sampling (TPS) and normal mode centroid dynamics (CMD) are used to simulate these enzymatic reactions without knowledge of their reaction coordinates and with the inclusion of quantum effects, such as zero-point energy and tunneling, on the transferring particle. Though previous studies have used TPS to calculate reaction rate constants in various model and real systems, it has not been applied to a system as large as YADH. The calculated primary H/D kinetic isotope effect agrees with previously reported experimental results, within experimental error. The kinetic isotope effects calculated with this method correspond to the kinetic isotope effect of the transfer event itself. The results reported here show that the kinetic isotope effects calculated from first-principles, purely for barrier passage, can be used to predict experimental kinetic isotope effects in enzymatic systems. PMID:26949835

  17. The construction, fouling and enzymatic cleaning of a textile dye surface.

    PubMed

    Onaizi, Sagheer A; He, Lizhong; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2010-11-01

    The enzymatic cleaning of a rubisco protein stain bound onto Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) biosensor chips having a dye-bound upper layer is investigated. This novel method allowed, for the first time, a detailed kinetic study of rubisco cleanability (defined as fraction of adsorbed protein removed from a surface) from dyed surfaces (mimicking fabrics) at different enzyme concentrations. Analysis of kinetic data using an established mathematical model able to decouple enzyme transfer and reaction processes [Onaizi, He, Middelberg, Chem. Eng. Sci. 64 (2008) 3868] revealed a striking effect of dyeing on enzymatic cleaning performance. Specifically, the absolute rate constants for enzyme transfer to and from a dye-bound rubisco stain were significantly higher than reported previously for un-dyed surfaces. These increased transfer rates resulted in higher surface cleanability. Higher enzyme mobility (i.e., higher enzyme adsorption and desorption rates) at the liquid-dye interface was observed, consistent with previous suggestions that enzyme surface mobility is likely correlated with overall enzyme cleaning performance. Our results show that reaction engineering models of enzymatic action at surfaces may provide insight able to guide the design of better stain-resistant surfaces, and may also guide efforts to improve cleaning formulations. PMID:20708195

  18. Phosphorylated silk fibroin matrix for methotrexate release.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim; Sárria, Marisa P; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Silk-based matrix was produced for delivery of a model anticancer drug, methotrexate (MTX). The calculation of net charge of silk fibroin and MTX was performed to better understand the electrostatic interactions during matrix formation upon casting. Silk fibroin films were cast at pH 7.2 and pH 3.5. Protein kinase A was used to prepare phosphorylated silk fibroin. The phosphorylation content of matrix was controlled by mixing at specific ratios the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated solutions. In vitro release profiling data suggest that the observed interactions are mainly structural and not electrostatical. The release of MTX is facilitated by use of proteolytic enzymes and higher pHs. The elevated β-sheet content and crystallinity of the acidified-cast fibroin solution seem not to favor drug retention. All the acquired data underline the prevalence of structural interactions over electrostatical interactions between methotrexate and silk fibroin. PMID:25435334

  19. Phosphorylation of RACK1 in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jay -Gui

    2015-08-31

    Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that interacts with a large, diverse group of proteins to regulate various signaling cascades. RACK1 has been shown to regulate hormonal signaling, stress responses and multiple processes of growth and development in plants. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis RACK1 is phosphorylated by an atypical serine/threonine protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE 8 (WNK8). Furthermore, RACK1 phosphorylation by WNK8 negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability. In conclusion, these findings promote a new regulatory system in which the action of RACK1 is controlled by phosphorylation and subsequent protein degradation.

  20. Phosphorylation of RACK1 in plants

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Jay -Gui

    2015-08-31

    Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that interacts with a large, diverse group of proteins to regulate various signaling cascades. RACK1 has been shown to regulate hormonal signaling, stress responses and multiple processes of growth and development in plants. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis RACK1 is phosphorylated by an atypical serine/threonine protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE 8 (WNK8). Furthermore, RACK1 phosphorylation by WNK8 negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability. In conclusion, these findings promote a new regulatory systemmore » in which the action of RACK1 is controlled by phosphorylation and subsequent protein degradation.« less

  1. Inhibition of enzymatic cellulolysis by phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Tejirian, Ani; Xu, Feng

    2011-03-01

    Phenolics derived from lignin and other plant components can pose significant inhibition on enzymatic conversion of cellulosic biomass materials to useful chemicals. Understanding the mechanism of such inhibition is of importance for the development of viable biomass conversion technologies. In native plant cell wall, most of the phenolics and derivatives are found in polymeric lignin. When biomass feedstocks are pretreated (prior to enzymatic hydrolysis), simple or oligomeric phenolics and derivatives are often generated from lignin modification/degradation, which can inhibit biomass-converting enzymes. To further understand how such phenolic substances may affect cellulase reaction, we carried out a comparative study on a series of simple and oligomeric phenolics representing or mimicking the composition of lignin or its degradation products. Consistent to previous studies, we observed that oligomeric phenolics could exert more inhibition on enzymatic cellulolysis than simple phenolics. Oligomeric phenolics could inactivate cellulases by reversibly complexing them. Simple and oligomeric phenolics could also inhibit enzymatic cellulolysis by adsorbing onto cellulose. Individual cellulases showed different susceptibility toward these inhibitions. Polyethylene glycol and tannase could respectively bind and degrade the studied oligomeric phenolics, and by doing so mitigate the oligomeric phenolic's inhibition on cellulolysis. PMID:22112906

  2. Frank Westheimer's Early Demonstration of Enzymatic Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2008-01-01

    In this article I review one of the most significant accomplishments of Frank H. Westheimer, one of the most respected chemists of the 20th century. This accomplishment was a series of stereospecific enzymatic oxidation and reduction experiments that led chemists to recognize what we now call the enantiotopic and diastereotopic relationships of…

  3. Ultrasonic acceleration of enzymatic processing of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzymatic bio-processing of cotton generates significantly less hazardous wastewater effluents, which are readily biodegradable, but it also has several critical shortcomings that impede its acceptance by industries: expensive processing costs and slow reaction rates. It has been found that the intr...

  4. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are…

  5. Starch: chemistry, microstructure, processing and enzymatic degradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is recognized as one of the most abundant and important commodities containing value added attributes for a vast number of industrial applications. Its chemistry, structure, property and susceptibility to various chemical, physical and enzymatic modifications offer a high technological value ...

  6. Src kinase regulation by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Roskoski, Robert . E-mail: biocrr@lsuhsc.edu

    2005-05-27

    Src and Src-family protein-tyrosine kinases are regulatory proteins that play key roles in cell differentiation, motility, proliferation, and survival. The initially described phosphorylation sites of Src include an activating phosphotyrosine 416 that results from autophosphorylation, and an inhibiting phosphotyrosine 527 that results from phosphorylation by C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Csk homologous kinase. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 527 increases Src kinase activity. Candidate phosphotyrosine 527 phosphatases include cytoplasmic PTP1B, Shp1 and Shp2, and transmembrane enzymes include CD45, PTP{alpha}, PTP{epsilon}, and PTP{lambda}. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 416 decreases Src kinase activity. Thus far PTP-BL, the mouse homologue of human PTP-BAS, has been shown to dephosphorylate phosphotyrosine 416 in a regulatory fashion. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase mediates the phosphorylation of Src Tyr138; this phosphorylation has no direct effect on Src kinase activity. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor and the ErbB2/HER2 growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinases mediate the phosphorylation of Src Tyr213 and activation of Src kinase activity. Src kinase is also a substrate for protein-serine/threonine kinases including protein kinase C (Ser12), protein kinase A (Ser17), and CDK1/cdc2 (Thr34, Thr46, and Ser72). Of the three protein-serine/threonine kinases, only phosphorylation by CDK1/cdc2 has been demonstrated to increase Src kinase activity. Although considerable information on the phosphoprotein phosphatases that catalyze the hydrolysis of Src phosphotyrosine 527 is at hand, the nature of the phosphatases that mediate the hydrolysis of phosphotyrosine 138 and 213, and phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues has not been determined.

  7. Comparison of enzymatic and non-enzymatic nitroethane anion formation: thermodynamics and contribution of tunneling.

    PubMed

    Valley, Michael P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2004-05-26

    In the reaction of nitroalkane oxidase (NAO), the oxidation of nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones is initiated by the deprotonation of the neutral nitroalkane. The energetics of nitroethane ionization for both the enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions have been determined by measuring rate constants as a function of temperature. At 25 degrees C, the rate constant for the acetate-catalyzed reaction is a billionfold smaller than the kcat/Km value for NAO. This corresponds to a difference of 12.3 kcal/mol in the free energy of activation that is largely due to a difference in the activation enthalpy. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the deuterium kinetic isotope effects on the reactions yields similar DeltaEa and AH/AD values for the acetate, phosphate, and NAO-catalyzed reactions that fall within the semiclassical limits, consistent with similar contributions of tunneling to the enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions. PMID:15149217

  8. Protein phosphorylation is involved in bacterial chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Hess, J F; Oosawa, K; Matsumura, P; Simon, M I

    1987-01-01

    The nature of the biochemical signal that is involved in the excitation response in bacterial chemotaxis is not known. However, ATP is required for chemotaxis. We have purified all of the proteins involved in signal transduction and show that the product of the cheA gene is rapidly autophosphorylated, while some mutant CheA proteins cannot be phosphorylated. The presence of stoichiometric levels of two other purified components in the chemotaxis system, the CheY and CheZ proteins, induces dephosphorylation. We suggest that the phosphorylation of CheA by ATP plays a central role in signal transduction in chemotaxis. Images PMID:3313398

  9. Rapid alteration of protein phosphorylation during postmortem: implication in the study of protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Yanchong; Hu, Wen; Xie, Shutao; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification of proteins. Postmortem tissues are widely being utilized in the biomedical studies, but the effects of postmortem on protein phosphorylation have not been received enough attention. In the present study, we found here that most proteins in mouse brain, heart, liver, and kidney were rapidly dephosphorylated to various degrees during 20 sec to 10 min postmortem. Phosphorylation of tau at Thr212 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 was reduced by 50% in the brain with 40 sec postmortem, a regular time for tissue processing. During postmortem, phosphorylation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and AMP activated kinase (AMPK) was increased in the brain, but not in other organs. Perfusion of the brain with cold or room temperature phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) also caused significant alteration of protein phosphorylation. Cooling down and maintaining mouse brains in the ice-cold buffer prevented the alteration effectively. This study suggests that phosphorylation of proteins is rapidly changed during postmortem. Thus, immediate processing of tissues followed by cooling down in ice-cold buffer is vitally important and perfusion has to be avoided when protein phosphorylation is to be studied. PMID:26511732

  10. Rapid alteration of protein phosphorylation during postmortem: implication in the study of protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Yanchong; Hu, Wen; Xie, Shutao; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification of proteins. Postmortem tissues are widely being utilized in the biomedical studies, but the effects of postmortem on protein phosphorylation have not been received enough attention. In the present study, we found here that most proteins in mouse brain, heart, liver, and kidney were rapidly dephosphorylated to various degrees during 20 sec to 10 min postmortem. Phosphorylation of tau at Thr212 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 was reduced by 50% in the brain with 40 sec postmortem, a regular time for tissue processing. During postmortem, phosphorylation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and AMP activated kinase (AMPK) was increased in the brain, but not in other organs. Perfusion of the brain with cold or room temperature phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) also caused significant alteration of protein phosphorylation. Cooling down and maintaining mouse brains in the ice-cold buffer prevented the alteration effectively. This study suggests that phosphorylation of proteins is rapidly changed during postmortem. Thus, immediate processing of tissues followed by cooling down in ice-cold buffer is vitally important and perfusion has to be avoided when protein phosphorylation is to be studied. PMID:26511732