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Sample records for enzyme ace gene

  1. DNA Methylation Analysis of the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Gene in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Zill, Peter; Baghai, Thomas C.; Schüle, Cornelius; Born, Christoph; Früstück, Clemens; Büttner, Andreas; Eisenmenger, Wolfgang; Varallo-Bedarida, Gabriella; Rupprecht, Rainer; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Bondy, Brigitta

    2012-01-01

    Background The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) has been repeatedly discussed as susceptibility factor for major depression (MD) and the bi-directional relation between MD and cardiovascular disorders (CVD). In this context, functional polymorphisms of the ACE gene have been linked to depression, to antidepressant treatment response, to ACE serum concentrations, as well as to hypertension, myocardial infarction and CVD risk markers. The mostly investigated ACE Ins/Del polymorphism accounts for ∼40%–50% of the ACE serum concentration variance, the remaining half is probably determined by other genetic, environmental or epigenetic factors, but these are poorly understood. Materials and Methods The main aim of the present study was the analysis of the DNA methylation pattern in the regulatory region of the ACE gene in peripheral leukocytes of 81 MD patients and 81 healthy controls. Results We detected intensive DNA methylation within a recently described, functional important region of the ACE gene promoter including hypermethylation in depressed patients (p = 0.008) and a significant inverse correlation between the ACE serum concentration and ACE promoter methylation frequency in the total sample (p = 0.02). Furthermore, a significant inverse correlation between the concentrations of the inflammatory CVD risk markers ICAM-1, E-selectin and P-selectin and the degree of ACE promoter methylation in MD patients could be demonstrated (p = 0.01 - 0.04). Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that aberrations in ACE promoter DNA methylation may be an underlying cause of MD and probably a common pathogenic factor for the bi-directional relationship between MD and cardiovascular disorders. PMID:22808171

  2. No association of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 gene (ACE2) polymorphisms with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Benjafield, Adam V; Wang, William Y S; Morris, Brian J

    2004-07-01

    Recent intriguing findings from genetic linkage, knockout, and physiologic studies in mice and rats led us to conduct the first investigation of the novel angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 gene (ACE2) in human hypertension (HT). We genotyped four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) (A-->G at nucleotide 1075 in intron 1, G-->A at nucleotide 8790 in intron 3, C-->G at nucleotide 28330 in intron 11, and G-->C at nucleotide 36787 in intron 16) in HT (n = 152) and normotensive (NT, n = 193) groups having inherently high biological power (>80%) due to our inclusion only of subjects whose parents had the same BP status as themselves. The SNPs were in linkage disequilibrium (D' = 54% to 100%, P =.05 to 0.0001). Because ACE2 is on the X chromosome, data for each sex were analyzed separately. Minor allele frequencies in HT versus NT were as follows: for the intron 1 variant 0.21 versus 0.17 in female subjects (P =.31) and 0.25 versus 0.29 in male subjects (P =.60); intron 3 variant 0.22 versus 0.18 in female subjects (P =.35) and 0.15 versus 0.20 in male subjects (P =.47); intron 11 variant 0.39 versus 0.46 in male subjects (P = 0.17) and 0.31 versus 0.30 in male subjects (P =.96); intron 16 variant 0.20 versus 0.19 in female subjects (P =.72) and 0.17 versus 0.17 in male subjects (P =.95). Haplotype analysis was also negative. These data provide little support for ACE2 in genetic predisposition to HT. PMID:15233982

  3. Fine-Mapping Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Gene: Separate QTLs Identified for Hypertension and for ACE Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chia-Min; Wang, Ruey-Yun; Fann, Cathy S. J.; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Jong, Yuh-Shiun; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Kang, Chih-Sen; Chen, Chien-Chung; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been implicated in multiple biological system, particularly cardiovascular diseases. However, findings associating ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism with hypertension or other related traits are inconsistent. Therefore, in a two-stage approach, we aimed to fine-map ACE in order to narrow-down the function-specific locations. We genotyped 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ACE from 1168 individuals from 305 young-onset (age ≤40) hypertension pedigrees, and found four linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks. A tag-SNP, rs1800764 on LD block 2, upstream of and near the ACE promoter, was significantly associated with young-onset hypertension (p = 0.04). Tag-SNPs on all LD blocks were significantly associated with ACE activity (p-value: 10–16 to <10–33). The two regions most associated with ACE activity were found between exon13 and intron18 and between intron 20 and 3′UTR, as revealed by measured haplotype analysis. These two major QTLs of ACE activity and the moderate effect variant upstream of ACE promoter for young-onset hypertension were replicated by another independent association study with 842 subjects. PMID:23469169

  4. Angiotensin I–Converting Enzyme Type 2 (ACE2) Gene Therapy Improves Glycemic Control in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bindom, Sharell M.; Hans, Chetan P.; Xia, Huijing; Boulares, A. Hamid; Lazartigues, Eric

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Several clinical studies have shown the benefits of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade in the development of diabetes, and a local RAS has been identified in pancreatic islets. Angiotensin I–converting enzyme (ACE)2, a new component of the RAS, has been identified in the pancreas, but its role in β-cell function remains unknown. Using 8- and 16-week-old obese db/db mice, we examined the ability of ACE2 to alter pancreatic β-cell function and thereby modulate hyperglycemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Both db/db and nondiabetic lean control (db/m) mice were infected with an adenovirus expressing human ACE2 (Ad-hACE2-eGFP) or the control virus (Ad-eGFP) via injection into the pancreas. Glycemia and β-cell function were assessed 1 week later at the peak of viral expression. RESULTS In 8-week-old db/db mice, Ad-hACE2-eGFP significantly improved fasting glycemia, enhanced intraperitoneal glucose tolerance, increased islet insulin content and β-cell proliferation, and reduced β-cell apoptosis compared with Ad-eGFP. ACE2 overexpression had no effect on insulin sensitivity in comparison with Ad-eGFP treatment in diabetic mice. Angiotensin-(1–7) receptor blockade by d-Ala7–Ang-(1-7) prevented the ACE2-mediated improvements in intraperitoneal glucose tolerance, glycemia, and islet function and also impaired insulin sensitivity in both Ad-hACE2-eGFP– and Ad-eGFP–treated db/db mice. d-Ala7–Ang-(1-7) had no effect on db/m mice. In 16-week-old diabetic mice, Ad-hACE2-eGFP treatment improved fasting blood glucose but had no effect on any of the other parameters. CONCLUSIONS These findings identify ACE2 as a novel target for the prevention of β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis occurring in type 2 diabetes. PMID:20660625

  5. Angiotensinogen (AGT) M235T, AGT T174M and Angiotensin-1-Converting Enzyme (ACE) I/D Gene Polymorphisms in Essential Hypertension: Effects on Ramipril Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kolovou, Vana; Lagou, Evangelia; Mihas, Constantinos; Vasiliki, Giannakopoulou; Katsiki, Niki; Kollia, Aikaterini; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Degiannis, Dimitris; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertension, one of the most important risk factors for premature cardiovascular disease, is a major worldwide public health problem. Angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensinogen (AGT) gene polymorphisms are thought to be associated with primary hypertension. In the present study, we examined the frequency of these gene polymorphisms in an adult population with and without essential hypertension. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of ACE and AGT gene polymorphisms on ramipril treatment efficacy in the hypertensive patients. Methods: A total of 166 adults (83 hypertensives and 83 normotensives) were involved in the study and genotyped for AGTM235T (rs699), AGTT174M (rs4762) and ACEI/D (rs1799752) gene polymorphisms. Results: The genotype and allele distribution of the AGTM235T variant significantly differed between hypertensives and normotensives [odds ratio (OR) = 1.57% (T vs M allele), 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.01 - 2.44; p=0.045 for hypertensives]. However, none of the 3 studied Simple Nucleotide Polymorphisms were associated with the blood pressure-lowering response to ramipril. Conclusion: These results suggest that AGTM235T gene polymorphism is associated with essential hypertension. However, none of the AGTM235T, AGTT174M and ACEI/D gene polymorphisms influenced ramipril effectiveness. PMID:27006715

  6. The influence of a polymorphism in the gene encoding angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) on treatment outcomes in late-onset Pompe patients receiving alglucosidase alfa.

    PubMed

    Baek, Rena C; Palmer, Rachel; Pomponio, Robert J; Lu, Yuefeng; Ma, Xiwen; McVie-Wylie, Alison J

    2016-09-01

    Correlations between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype (I/I, I/D, D/D), disease severity at baseline and response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) were assessed in the Pompe disease Late-Onset Treatment Study (LOTS). No correlations were observed between ACE genotype and disease severity at baseline. However, D/D patients appeared to have a reduced response to alglucosidase alfa treatment than I/I or I/D patients, suggesting that ACE polymorphisms may influence the response to alglucosidase alfa treatment and warrants further investigation. PMID:27489778

  7. Prevalence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion polymorphism in South Indian population with hypertension and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, R; Kumaresan, R; Giri, P

    2015-01-01

    Context: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is associated with a high risk of developing further severe complications such as, cardiovascular disease and eventually End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) leading to death. Hypertension plays a key role in the progression of renal failure and is also a chief risk factor for the occurrence of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). Aim: This study investigates the possible association of insertion (I) and deletion (D) polymorphism of ACE gene in patients of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) with and without hypertension (HT). Settings and Design: Total 120 participants with 30 members in each group (Control, HT, CKD and CKD-HT) were chosen followed by informed consent. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected and subjected to biochemical analyses and nested PCR amplification was performed to genotype the DNA, for ACE I/D using specific primers. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS version 13. Allele and genotypic frequency was calculated by direct gene counting method. Comparison of the different genotypes was done by using Chi square test. Odd's ratios were calculated with a 95% confidence interval limit. Results: The ACE genotype were distributed as II, 27 (90%); DD, 2 (6.67%) and ID, 1 (3.33%) in control, II, 1 (3.33%); DD, 5 (16.67%) and ID, 24 (80%) in HT, II, 4 (13.33%); DD, 24 (80%) and ID, 2 (6.67%) in CKD and II, 0 (0%); DD, 2 (6.67%) and ID, 28 (93.33%) in CKD-HT group. Conclusions: D allele of ACE gene confers a greater role in genetic variations underlying CKD and hypertension. This result suggest that CKD patients should be offered analysis for defects in ACE I/D polymorphisms, especially if they are hypertensive. PMID:26440392

  8. From gene to protein—experimental and clinical studies of ACE2 in blood pressure control and arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheila K.; Velkoska, Elena; Freeman, Melanie; Wai, Bryan; Lancefield, Terase F.; Burrell, Louise M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, coronary events, heart and renal failure, and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a major role in its pathogenesis. Within the RAS, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin (Ang) I into the vasoconstrictor Ang II. An “alternate” arm of the RAS now exists in which ACE2 counterbalances the effects of the classic RAS through degradation of Ang II, and generation of the vasodilator Ang 1-7. ACE2 is highly expressed in the heart, blood vessels, and kidney. The catalytically active ectodomain of ACE2 undergoes shedding, resulting in ACE2 in the circulation. The ACE2 gene maps to a quantitative trait locus on the X chromosome in three strains of genetically hypertensive rats, suggesting that ACE2 may be a candidate gene for hypertension. It is hypothesized that disruption of tissue ACE/ACE2 balance results in changes in blood pressure, with increased ACE2 expression protecting against increased blood pressure, and ACE2 deficiency contributing to hypertension. Experimental hypertension studies have measured ACE2 in either the heart or kidney and/or plasma, and have reported that deletion or inhibition of ACE2 leads to hypertension, whilst enhancing ACE2 protects against the development of hypertension, hence increasing ACE2 may be a therapeutic option for the management of high blood pressure in man. There have been relatively few studies of ACE2, either at the gene or the circulating level in patients with hypertension. Plasma ACE2 activity is low in healthy subjects, but elevated in patients with cardiovascular risk factors or cardiovascular disease. Genetic studies have investigated ACE2 gene polymorphisms with either hypertension or blood pressure, and have produced largely inconsistent findings. This review discusses the evidence regarding ACE2 in experimental hypertension models and the association between circulating ACE2 activity and ACE2 polymorphisms with blood pressure and arterial

  9. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabdtitis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  10. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  11. ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the progress made during the fourth year of the Center for Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE). We currently support 30 graduate students, 52 undergraduate students, 9 faculty members, and 4 staff members. Progress will be divided into two categories. The first category explores progress for ACE in general. The second describes the results of each specific project supported within ACE.

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) from raccoon dog can serve as an efficient receptor for the spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lili; Zhang, Yanfang; Liu, Yun; Chen, Zhiwei; Deng, Hongkui; Ma, Zhongbin; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong; Deng, Fei

    2009-11-01

    Raccoon dog is one of the suspected intermediate hosts of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). In this study, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) gene of raccoon dog (rdACE2) was cloned and sequenced. The amino acid sequence of rdACE2 has identities of 99.3, 89.2, 83.9 and 80.4 % to ACE2 proteins from dog, masked palm civet (pcACE2), human (huACE2) and bat, respectively. There are six amino acid changes in rdACE2 compared with huACE2, and four changes compared with pcACE2, within the 18 residues of ACE2 known to make direct contact with the SARS-CoV S protein. A HeLa cell line stably expressing rdACE2 was established; Western blot analyses and an enzyme-activity assay indicated that the cell line expressed ACE2 at a similar level to two previously established cell lines that express ACE2 from human and masked palm civet, respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus-backboned pseudoviruses expressing spike proteins derived from human SARS-CoV or SARS-CoV-like viruses of masked palm civets and raccoon dogs were tested for their entry efficiency into these cell lines. The results showed that rdACE2 is a more efficient receptor for human SARS-CoV, but not for SARS-CoV-like viruses of masked palm civets and raccoon dogs, than huACE2 or pcACE2. This study provides useful data to elucidate the role of raccoon dog in SARS outbreaks. PMID:19625462

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzyme levels and activity in Alzheimer's disease: differences in brain and CSF ACE and association with ACE1 genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Miners, Scott; Ashby, Emma; Baig, Shabnam; Harrison, Rachel; Tayler, Hannah; Speedy, Elizabeth; Prince, Jonathan A; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD): ACE1 variations influence plasma ACE and risk of AD, and ACE is increased in AD brain. We measured frontal ACE level and activity in 89 AD and 51 control brains, and post-mortem CSF from 101 cases and 19 controls. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) level and Braak stage were used to indicate neuronal preservation and disease progression. We genotyped the common ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism, rs4343, rs1800764 and rs4921. ACE activity was elevated in AD and correlated with Braak stage. Crude ACE levels were unchanged but adjustment for NSE suggested increased neuronal ACE production with Braak stage. Exposing SH-SY-5Y neurons to oligomeric Aβ1-42 increased ACE level and activity, suggesting Aβ may upregulate ACE in AD. In CSF, ACE level but not activity was reduced in AD. ACE1 genotype did not predict ACE level or activity in brain or CSF. ACE activity and neuronal production increase in AD brain, possibly in response to Aβ. Peripheral measurements do not reflect ACE activity in the brain. PMID:19956428

  14. Characterization of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the testis and assessment of the in vivo effects of the ACE inhibitor perindopril

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.; Cubela, R.B.; Sakaguchi, K.; Johnston, C.I.

    1988-07-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was characterized by radioligand studies utilizing the potent ACE inhibitor 351A, a derivative of lisinopril. Ligand binding characteristics were similar for ACE derived from testis, lung, and kidney, despite known differences in structure between ACe from these sources. This observation suggests that the ACE active enzymatic site is similar in different tissues. The effect of the orally active ACE inhibitor perindopril was studied ex vivo in tissues of the rat after oral gavage. Radioligand bound to tissue ACE was reduced after perindopril treatment, in tissue homogenates of lung and kidney, but not testis. Autoradiographs of radioligand binding to tissue sections obtained ex vivo after oral perindopril showed inhibition of ACE in the aorta, lung, and kidney, but did not reveal any inhibition of ACE in the testis. ACE in small vessels of the testis was inhibited as in the aorta, while at the same time testicular ACE was unaffected. ACE in rat testis appears to have a similar enzymatic binding site to ACE from the lung and kidney. Perindopril inhibited ACE in the lung and kidney but did not affect ACE in the testis, suggesting the drug is limited in testicular penetration by the blood-testis barrier. This may explain the lack of any reports of adverse effects of ACE inhibitors on testicular function.

  15. An angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphism may mitigate the effects of angiotensin-pathway medications on posttraumatic stress symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nylocks, K M; Michopoulos, V; Rothbaum, A O; Almli, L; Gillespie, C F; Wingo, A; Schwartz, A C; Habib, L; Gamwell, K L; Marvar, P J; Bradley, B; Ressler, K J

    2015-06-01

    Angiotensin, which regulates blood pressure may also act within the brain to mediate stress and fear responses. Common antihypertensive medication classes of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been associated with lower PTSD symptoms. Here we examine the rs4311 SNP in the ACE gene, previously implicated in panic attacks, in the relationship between ACE-I/ARB medications and PTSD symptoms. Participants were recruited from outpatient wait rooms between 2006 and March 2014 (n=  803). We examined the interaction between rs4311 genotype and the presence of blood pressure medication on PTSD symptoms and diagnosis. PTSD symptoms were lower in individuals taking ACE-Is or ARBs (N = 776). The rs4311 was associated with PTSD symptoms and diagnosis (N = 3803), as the T-carriers at the rs4311 SNP had significantly greater likelihood of a PTSD diagnosis. Lastly, the rs4311 genotype modified the effect of ACE-Is or ARBs on PTSD symptoms (N = 443; F1,443 = 4.41, P < 0.05). Individuals with the CC rs4311 genotype showed lower PTSD symptoms in the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. In contrast, T- carriers showed the opposite, such that the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs was associated with higher PTSD symptoms. These data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system may be important in PTSD, as ACE-I/ARB usage associates with lower symptoms. Furthermore, we provide genetic evidence that some individuals are comparatively more benefitted by ACE-Is/ARBs in PTSD treatment. Future research should examine the mechanisms by which ACE-Is/ARBs affect PTSD symptoms such that pharmaco-genetically informed interventions may be used to treat PTSD. PMID:25921615

  16. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity and ACE Inhibitory Peptides of Salmon (Salmo salar) Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Human and Porcine Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E.; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes. PMID:25123137

  17. Regulation of Ace2-dependent genes requires components of the PBF complex in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, M Belén; Alonso-Nuñez, María Luisa; del Rey, Francisco; McInerny, Christopher J; Vázquez de Aldana, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    The division cycle of unicellular yeasts is completed with the activation of a cell separation program that results in the dissolution of the septum assembled during cytokinesis between the 2 daughter cells, allowing them to become independent entities. Expression of the eng1+ and agn1+ genes, encoding the hydrolytic enzymes responsible for septum degradation, is activated at the end of each cell cycle by the transcription factor Ace2. Periodic ace2+ expression is regulated by the transcriptional complex PBF (PCB Binding Factor), composed of the forkhead-like proteins Sep1 and Fkh2 and the MADS box-like protein Mbx1. In this report, we show that Ace2-dependent genes contain several combinations of motifs for Ace2 and PBF binding in their promoters. Thus, Ace2, Fkh2 and Sep1 were found to bind in vivo to the eng1+ promoter. Ace2 binding was coincident with maximum level of eng1+ expression, whereas Fkh2 binding was maximal when mRNA levels were low, supporting the notion that they play opposing roles. In addition, we found that the expression of eng1+ and agn1+ was differentially affected by mutations in PBF components. Interestingly, agn1+ was a major target of Mbx1, since its ectopic expression resulted in the suppression of Mbx1 deletion phenotypes. Our results reveal a complex regulation system through which the transcription factors Ace2, Fkh2, Sep1 and Mbx1 in combination control the expression of the genes involved in separation at the end of the cell division cycle. PMID:26237280

  18. Regulation of Ace2-dependent genes requires components of the PBF complex in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Suárez, M Belén; Alonso-Nuñez, María Luisa; del Rey, Francisco; McInerny, Christopher J; Vázquez de Aldana, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    The division cycle of unicellular yeasts is completed with the activation of a cell separation program that results in the dissolution of the septum assembled during cytokinesis between the 2 daughter cells, allowing them to become independent entities. Expression of the eng1(+) and agn1(+) genes, encoding the hydrolytic enzymes responsible for septum degradation, is activated at the end of each cell cycle by the transcription factor Ace2. Periodic ace2(+) expression is regulated by the transcriptional complex PBF (PCB Binding Factor), composed of the forkhead-like proteins Sep1 and Fkh2 and the MADS box-like protein Mbx1. In this report, we show that Ace2-dependent genes contain several combinations of motifs for Ace2 and PBF binding in their promoters. Thus, Ace2, Fkh2 and Sep1 were found to bind in vivo to the eng1(+) promoter. Ace2 binding was coincident with maximum level of eng1(+) expression, whereas Fkh2 binding was maximal when mRNA levels were low, supporting the notion that they play opposing roles. In addition, we found that the expression of eng1(+) and agn1(+) was differentially affected by mutations in PBF components. Interestingly, agn1(+) was a major target of Mbx1, since its ectopic expression resulted in the suppression of Mbx1 deletion phenotypes. Our results reveal a complex regulation system through which the transcription factors Ace2, Fkh2, Sep1 and Mbx1 in combination control the expression of the genes involved in separation at the end of the cell division cycle. PMID:26237280

  19. Variation in the ACE, PPARGC1A and PPARA genes in Lithuanian football players.

    PubMed

    Gineviciene, Valentina; Jakaitiene, Audrone; Tubelis, Linas; Kucinskas, Vaidutis

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of ACE (I/D), PPARGC1A (G/A) and PPARA (G/C) polymorphisms on footballers performance among 199 Lithuanian professional footballers and 167 sedentary, healthy men (controls). Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods on DNA from leucocytes. Results revealed that the angiotensin-1-coverting enzyme gene (ACE) genotype distribution was significantly different between total football players group (II 23.6%, ID 46.7% and DD 29.6%) and the controls (II 24.6%, ID 29.9% and DD 45.5%; P=0.002). Although investigating PPARGC1A (G/A) and PPARA (G/C) polymorphisms no significant results were obtained in the total football players group, however, significant differences were determined between forwards and controls [PPARGC1A: GG 54.6%, GA 29.5%, AA 15.9% vs. GG 49.7%, GA 44.3% and AA 6.0% (P = 0.044); PPARA: GG 52.3%, GC 40.9%, CC 6.8% vs. GG 72.4%, GC 24.6% and CC 3.0% (P = 0.034)]. In the whole cohort, the odds ratio of the genotype [ACE ID + PPARA GG] being a footballer was 1.69 (95% CI 1.04-2.74), and of [ACE ID + PPARGC1A GG] 1.93 (95% CI 1.10-3.37) and of [ACE II + PPARA GC] 2.83 (95% CI 1.02-7.91) compared to controls. It was revealed that ACE ID genotype together with PPARA GG and PPARGC1A GG as well as ACE II genotype with PPARA GC is probably the 'preferable genotype' for footballers. Summing up, the present study suggests that the ACE, PPARGC1A and PPARA polymorphisms genotypes are associated, separately and in combination, with Lithuanian footballers' performance. PMID:24444220

  20. Angiotensin-I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors from Marine Resources: Prospects in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Wijesekara, Isuru; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension or high blood pressure is one of the major independent risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1; ACE) plays an important physiological role in regulation of blood pressure by converting angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor. Therefore, the inhibition of ACE activity is a major target in the prevention of hypertension. Recently, the search for natural ACE inhibitors as alternatives to synthetic drugs is of great interest to prevent several side effects and a number of novel compounds such as bioactive peptides, chitooligosaccharide derivatives (COS) and phlorotannins have been derived from marine organisms as potential ACE inhibitors. These inhibitory derivatives can be developed as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals with potential to prevent hypertension. Hence, the aim of this review is to discuss the marine-derived ACE inhibitors and their future prospects as novel therapeutic drug candidates for treat hypertension. PMID:20479968

  1. Acute stress and cardiovascular health: is there an ACE gene connection?

    PubMed

    Holman, E Alison

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular disorders (CVD) are associated with acute and posttraumatic stress responses, yet biological processes underlying this association are poorly understood. This study examined whether renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activity, as indicated by a functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene, is associated with both CVD and acute stress related to the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks. European-American respondents (N = 527) from a nationally representative longitudinal study of coping following 9/11 provided saliva for genotyping. Respondents had completed health surveys before 9/11 and annually for 3 years after, and acute stress assessments 9 to 23 days after 9/11. Respondents with rs4291 AA or TT genotypes reported high acute stress twice as often as those with the AT genotype. Individuals with the TT genotype were 43% more likely to report increased physician-diagnosed CVD over 3 years following 9/11, when the following variables were included in the model: (a) pre-9/11 CVD, mental health, and non-CVD ailments; (b) cardiac risk factors; (c) ongoing endocrine disorders; and (d) significant demographics. The ACE rs4291 TT genotype, which has been associated with HPA axis hyperactivity and higher levels of serum angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), predicted acute stress response and reports of physician-diagnosed CVD in a national sample following collective stress. ACE gene function may be associated with both mental and physical health disorders following collective stress. PMID:23055331

  2. Adipocyte-derived lipids increase angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression and modulate macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Trouvain, Caroline; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Fleming, Ingrid

    2011-03-01

    Human monocytes/macrophages express the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) but nothing is known about its role under physiological conditions. As adipose tissue contains resident macrophages that have been implicated in the generation of insulin resistance in expanding fat mass, we determined whether adipocytes release factors that affect ACE expression and function in monocytes. Incubation of human monocyte-derived macrophages with conditioned medium from freshly isolated human adipocytes (BMI = 25.4 ± 0.96) resulted in a 4-fold increase in ACE expression. The effect was insensitive to denaturation and different proteases but abolished after lipid extraction. mRNA levels of the major histocompatibility complex class II protein increased in parallel with ACE, whereas the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 decreased. As a consequence of the reduction in MCP-1, monocyte recruitment was also attenuated. Moreover, adipocyte-conditioned medium prevented the interferon (IFN)-γ induced formation of TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1, all markers of classically-activated (M1 type) macrophages. The decrease in cytokine expression in adipocyte-conditioned medium-treated macrophages was sensitive to ACE silencing by small interfering RNA (siRNA). Accordingly, ACE overexpression in THP-1 cells mimicked the effect of adipocyte-conditioned medium. In both cell types, ACE inhibition failed to affect the changes induced by adipocyte conditioned-medium treatment and ACE overexpression. Thus, the modulation of macrophage polarization by ACE appears to be mediated independently of enzyme activity, probably via intracellular signaling. Interestingly, human macrophage ACE expression was also upregulated by IL-4 and IL-13, which promote the "alternative" activation of macrophages and decreased by LPS and IFN-γ. Mechanistically, adipocyte-conditioned medium stimulated the phosphorylation of

  3. ACE and ACTN3 genes polymorphisms among female Hungarian athletes in the aspect of sport disciplines.

    PubMed

    Bosnyák, E; Trájer, E; Udvardy, A; Komka, Z; Protzner, A; Kováts, T; Györe, I; Tóth, M; Pucsok, J; Szmodis, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the importance of two sport-associated gene polymorphisms, alpha-actinin-3 R577X (ACTN3) and angiotensin-converting enzyme I/D (ACE), among Hungarian athletes in different sports. The examination was carried out only on women (n = 100). Sport-specific groups were formed in order to guarantee the most homogeneous clusters. Human genomic DNA was isolated from blood, and genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction. To measure the differences between the participating groups, Chi-squared test was performed using Statistica 9.0 for Windows® (significance level: p < 0.05). In comparing the ACE I/D allele frequencies, significant difference was detected between water polo (I = 61.11%; D = 38.89%) and combat sports (I = 35.71%, D = 64.29%) athletes (p < 0.03). There was no statistical difference when ACE I/D alleles in combat sports and kayaking/rowing (p > 0.05) were compared. A similarity was detectable in the I allele frequencies of the water polo (61.11%) and kayaking/rowing (56.67%) groups. The ACTN3 R/X polymorphism showed no differences in comparison with the sport groups. R allele frequencies were higher in every group compared to the X allele. The potential significance of the ACE I allele in sports of an aerobic nature was not clearly confirmed among Hungarian athletes. PMID:26690037

  4. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  9. Inhibition Mechanism and Model of an Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE)-Inhibitory Hexapeptide from Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)

    PubMed Central

    Ni, He; Li, Lin; Liu, Guang; Hu, Song-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) has an important function in blood pressure regulation. ACE-inhibitory peptides can lower blood pressure by inhibiting ACE activity. Based on the sequence of an ACE-inhibitory hexapeptide (TPTQQS) purified from yeast, enzyme kinetics experiments, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and a docking simulation were performed. The hexapeptide was found to inhibit ACE in a non-competitive manner, as supported by the structural model. The hexapeptide bound to ACE via interactions of the N-terminal Thr1, Thr3, and Gln4 residues with the residues on the lid structure of ACE, and the C-terminal Ser6 attracted the zinc ion, which is vital for ACE catalysis. The displacement of the zinc ion from the active site resulted in the inhibition of ACE activity. The structural model based on the docking simulation was supported by experiments in which the peptide was modified. This study provides a new inhibitory mechanism of ACE by a peptide which broads our knowledge for drug designing against enzyme targets. PMID:22606330

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I/D) polymorphism frequency in Brazilian soccer players.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Daniel Barbosa; Pimenta, Eduardo; Rosse, Izinara Cruz; Veneroso, Christiano; Pussieldi, Guilherme; Becker, Lenice Kapes; Carvalho, Maria-Raquel; Silami-Garcia, Emerson

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to analyze the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I/D) allelic and genotypic frequencies in Brazilian soccer players of different ages. The study group comprised 353 players from first-division clubs in the under (U)-14, U-15, U-17, U-20, and professional categories. The allelic and genotypic frequencies did not differ significantly in any of the categories between the group of players and the control group. This was the first study of ACE-I/D polymorphism in Brazilian soccer players. PMID:27232187

  11. Sperm-specific expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is mediated by a 91-base-pair promoter containing a CRE-like element.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, T; Balogh, R; Overbeek, P; Bernstein, K E

    1993-01-01

    The gene encoding the testis isozyme of angiotensin-converting enzyme (testis ACE) is one example of the many genes expressed uniquely during spermatogenesis. This protein is expressed by developing germ cells late in their development and results from the activation of a sperm-specific promoter that is located within intron 12 of the gene encoding the somatic isozyme of ACE. In vitro transcription, DNase footprinting, gel shift assays, and transgenic mouse studies have been used to define the minimal testes ACE promoter and to characterize DNA-protein interactions mediating germ cell-specific expression. These studies show that proper cell- and stage-specific expression of testis ACE requires only a small portion of the immediate upstream sequence extending to -91. A critical motif within this core promoter is a cyclic AMP-responsive element sequence that interacts with a testis-specific transactivating factor. Since this putative cyclic AMP-responsive element has been conserved within the testis ACE promoters of different species and is found at the same site in other genes that are expressed specifically in the testis, it may provide a common mechanism for the recognition of sperm-specific promoters. Images PMID:8380220

  12. Automated multi-step purification protocol for Angiotensin-I-Converting-Enzyme (ACE).

    PubMed

    Eisele, Thomas; Stressler, Timo; Kranz, Bertolt; Fischer, Lutz

    2012-12-12

    Highly purified proteins are essential for the investigation of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. The purification of a protein requires several steps, which are often time-consuming. In our study, the Angiotensin-I-Converting-Enzyme (ACE; EC 3.4.15.1) was solubilised from pig lung without additional detergents, which are commonly used, under mild alkaline conditions in a Tris-HCl buffer (50mM, pH 9.0) for 48h. An automation of the ACE purification was performed using a multi-step protocol in less than 8h, resulting in a purified protein with a specific activity of 37Umg(-1) (purification factor 308) and a yield of 23.6%. The automated ACE purification used an ordinary fast-protein-liquid-chromatography (FPLC) system equipped with two additional switching valves. These switching valves were needed for the buffer stream inversion and for the connection of the Superloop™ used for the protein parking. Automated ACE purification was performed using four combined chromatography steps, including two desalting procedures. The purification methods contained two hydrophobic interaction chromatography steps, a Cibacron 3FG-A chromatography step and a strong anion exchange chromatography step. The purified ACE was characterised by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and native-PAGE. The estimated monomer size of the purified glycosylated ACE was determined to be ∼175kDa by SDS-PAGE, with the dimeric form at ∼330kDa as characterised by a native PAGE using a novel activity staining protocol. For the activity staining, the tripeptide l-Phe-Gly-Gly was used as the substrate. The ACE cleaved the dipeptide Gly-Gly, releasing the l-Phe to be oxidised with l-amino acid oxidase. Combined with peroxidase and o-dianisidine, the generated H(2)O(2) stained a brown coloured band. This automated purification protocol can be easily adapted to be used with other protein purification tasks. PMID:23217308

  13. ACE1, a copper-dependent transcription factor, activates expression of the yeast copper, zinc superoxide dismutase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gralla, E B; Thiele, D J; Silar, P; Valentine, J S

    1991-01-01

    Copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 gene product) (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) is a copper-containing enzyme that functions to prevent oxygen toxicity. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, copper levels exert some control over the level of SOD1 expression. We show that the ACE1 transcriptional activator protein, which is responsible for the induction of yeast metallothionein (CUP1) in response to copper, also controls the SOD1 response to copper. A single binding site for ACE1 is present in the SOD1 promoter region, as demonstrated by DNase I protection and methylation interference experiments, and is highly homologous to a high-affinity ACE1 binding site in the CUP1 promoter. The functional importance of this DNA-protein interaction is demonstrated by the facts that (i) copper induction of SOD1 mRNA does not occur in a strain lacking ACE1 and (ii) it does not occur in a strain containing a genetically engineered SOD1 promoter that lacks a functional ACE1 binding site. Images PMID:1924315

  14. Impact of I/D polymorphism of ACE gene on risk of development and course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Homa-Mlak, Iwona; Powrózek, Tomasz; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Michnar, Marek; Krawczyk, Paweł; Dziedzic, Marcin; Rubinsztajn, Renata; Chazan, Ryszarda; Milanowski, Janusz; Małecka-Massalska, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects more than 10% of the world's population over 40 years of age. The main exogenous risk factor is cigarette smoking; however, only 20% of smokers develop COPD, indicating that some other factors, e.g. genetic, may play an important role in the disease pathogenesis. Recent research indicates that ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) may be a susceptibility gene for asthma or COPD. The aim of our study was to determine the influence of I/D (insertion/deletion) polymorphism of the ACE gene (AluYa5, rs4646994) on the risk and course of COPD. Material and methods We investigated ACE I/D polymorphism in 206 COPD and 165 healthy Caucasian subjects. Results In the generalized linear model (GLZ) analysis of the influence of selected factors on presence of COPD we found a significant independent effect for male sex (repeatedly increases the risk of COPD, OR = 7.7, p = 0.049), as well as smoking or lower body mass index, but only in combination with older age (OR = 0.96, p = 0.003 and OR = 1.005, p = 0.04 respectively). Interestingly, analysis of factors which may influence the risk of a higher number of exacerbations demonstrated that occurrence of DD genotype, but only in men, is associated with a lower risk (OR = 0.7, p = 0.03) of this complication. Conclusions We suggest that ACE may not be a susceptibility gene for the origin of COPD but a disease-modifying gene. Since the impact of I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene on COPD risk is moderate or negligible, other molecular changes, that will help predict the development of this disease, should still be sought. PMID:27186170

  15. ACE gene insertion/deletion polymorphism modulates capillary permeability in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dell'omo, Giulia; Penno, Giuseppe; Pucci, Laura; Lucchesi, Daniela; Fotino, Carmen; Del Prato, Stefano; Pedrinelli, Roberto

    2006-12-01

    A D/D (deletion/deletion) polymorphism within the ACE (angiotensin 1-converting enzyme) gene increases the risk of microalbuminuria, a predictor of atherosclerotic vascular disease, in essential hypertension. It is unknown, however, whether this genetic profile is accompanied by disturbed macromolecular permeability of systemic capillary endothelium, possibly in the context of generalized endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, the ACE gene polymorphism was determined by PCR in 79 never-treated uncomplicated hypertensive men and 16 normotensive men as controls. Evaluation variables were TERalb (transcapillary escape rate of albumin; the 1-h decline rate of intravenous (125)I-albumin, a measure of integrity of systemic capillary endothelium), albuminuria and forearm vasodilation to intra-arterial acetylcholine, an index of NO (nitric oxide)-mediated vasomotion, in addition to a series of sensitive parameters of albumin permeation (blood pressure, metabolic status and smoking habits). Analyses were done by comparing D/D homozygotes with grouped I/D (insertion/deletion) and I/I (insertion/insertion) subjects. TERalb was higher in D/D hypertensives, who had higher albuminuria, more frequent microalbuminuria and comparable forearm responsiveness to intra-arterial acetylcholine. Fasting glucose and insulin, insulin sensitivity, 24-h blood pressure, smoking habits and metabolic parameters did not differ between the two groups. TERalb and urine albumin values were positively associated in the hypertensive subjects. In conclusion, ACE D/D homozygosis, independently of several confounding factors, associates with higher TERalb in men with essential hypertension. This may reflect noxious genetic influences on systemic vascular permeability, a critical control mechanism for atherogenesis in the absence of grossly impaired NO-mediated arteriolar responsiveness. The parallel behaviour of TERalb and albuminuria suggests some shared genetically mediated determinant of renal

  16. Identification of a new angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor from Thai edible plants.

    PubMed

    Simaratanamongkol, Arunee; Umehara, Kaoru; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Panichayupakaranant, Pharkphoom

    2014-12-15

    Eight Thai edible plants were tested for their inhibitory activity against an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) using an in vitro assay. The methanol extract of Apium graveolens exhibited significant ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 1.7 mg/ml, and was then subjected to an isolation procedure that resulted in identification of a pure active constituent, junipediol A 8-O-β-d-glucoside (1-β-d-glucosyloxy-2-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-propane-1,3-diol) (1), which had good ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 76 μg/ml. Another eight known compounds, isofraxidin-β-d-glucoside (2), roseoside (3), apigenin-7-O-β-d-glucoside (4), luteolin-7-O-β-d-glucoside (5), icariside D2 (6), apiin (7), chrysoeriol-7-O-β-d-apiosylglucoside (8), and 11,21-dioxo-3 β,15 α,24-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-24-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (9) were also identified. Although each of these five constituents (2-6) isolated from the same fraction as 1 showed no activity at concentrations of 500 μM, together, when each was present at 300 μg/ml, they enhanced the inhibitory activity of 500 μM of 1 from 64% to 81%. PMID:25038653

  17. Activation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) attenuates allergic airway inflammation in rat asthma model.

    PubMed

    Dhawale, Vaibhav Shrirang; Amara, Venkateswara Rao; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Malek, Vajir; Patel, Deep; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2016-09-01

    Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) is positively correlated to asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is highly expressed in lungs. ACE2, the counteracting enzyme of ACE, was proven to be protective in pulmonary, cardiovascular diseases. In the present study we checked the effect of ACE2 activation in animal model of asthma. Asthma was induced in male wistar rats by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin and then treated with ACE2 activator, diminazene aceturate (DIZE) for 2weeks. 48h after last allergen challenge, animals were anesthetized, blood, BALF, femoral bone marrow lavage were collected for leucocyte count; trachea for measuring airway responsiveness to carbachol; lungs and heart were isolated for histological studies and western blotting. In our animal model, the characteristic features of asthma such as altered airway responsiveness to carbachol, eosinophilia and neutrophilia were observed. Western blotting revealed the increased pulmonary expression of ACE1, IL-1β, IL-4, NF-κB, BCL2, p-AKT, p-p38 and decreased expression of ACE2 and IκB. DIZE treatment prevented these alterations. Intraalveolar interstitial thickening, inflammatory cell infiltration, interstitial fibrosis, oxidative stress and right ventricular hypertrophy in asthma control animals were also reversed by DIZE treatment. Activation of ACE2 by DIZE conferred protection against asthma as evident from biochemical, functional, histological and molecular parameters. To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time that activation of ACE2 by DIZE prevents asthma progression by altering AKT, p38, NF-κB and other inflammatory markers. PMID:27343405

  18. An ace-1 gene duplication resorbs the fitness cost associated with resistance in Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Assogba, Benoît S.; Djogbénou, Luc S.; Milesi, Pascal; Berthomieu, Arnaud; Perez, Julie; Ayala, Diego; Chandre, Fabrice; Makoutodé, Michel; Labbé, Pierrick; Weill, Mylène

    2015-01-01

    Widespread resistance to pyrethroids threatens malaria control in Africa. Consequently, several countries switched to carbamates and organophophates insecticides for indoor residual spraying. However, a mutation in the ace-1 gene conferring resistance to these compounds (ace-1R allele), is already present. Furthermore, a duplicated allele (ace-1D) recently appeared; characterizing its selective advantage is mandatory to evaluate the threat. Our data revealed that a unique duplication event, pairing a susceptible and a resistant copy of the ace-1 gene spread through West Africa. Further investigations revealed that, while ace-1D confers less resistance than ace-1R, the high fitness cost associated with ace-1R is almost completely suppressed by the duplication for all traits studied. ace-1 duplication thus represents a permanent heterozygote phenotype, selected, and thus spreading, due to the mosaic nature of mosquito control. It provides malaria mosquito with a new evolutionary path that could hamper resistance management. PMID:26434951

  19. Size and sequence polymorphism in the isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase gene (aceK) and flanking regions in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nelson, K; Wang, F S; Boyd, E F; Selander, R K

    1997-12-01

    The sequence of aceK, which codes for the regulatory catalytic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase (IDH K/P), and sequences of the 5' flanking region and part or all of the 3' flanking region were determined for 32 strains of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. In E. coli, the aceK gene was 1734 bp long in 13 strains, but in three strains it was 12 bp shorter and the stop codon was TAA rather than TGA. Strains with the shorter aceK lacked an open reading frame (f728) downstream between aceK and iclR that was present, in variable length, in the other strains. Among the 72 ECOR strains, the truncated aceK gene was present in all isolates of the B2 group and half of those of the D group. Other variant conditions included the presence of IS1 elements in two strains and large deletions in two strains. The aceK-aceA intergenic region varied in length from 48 to 280 bp in E. coli, depending largely on the number of repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences present. Among the ECOR strains, the number of REP elements showed a high degree of phylogenetic association, and sequencing of the region in the ECOR strains permitted partial reconstruction of its evolutionary history. In S. entica, the normal length of aceK was 1752 bp, but three other length variants, ranging from 1746 to 1785 bp, were represented in five of the 16 strains examined. The flanking intergenic regions showed relatively minor variation in length and sequence. The occurrence of several nonrandom patterns of distribution of polymorphic synonymous nucleotide sites indicated that intragenic recombination of horizontally exchanged DNA has contributed to the generation of allelic diversity at the aceK locus in both species. PMID:9409817

  20. Synthesis and biological studies of highly concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles for CT tracking of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghann, William E.; Aras, Omer; Fleiter, Thorsten; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    For patients with a history of heart attack or stroke, the prevention of another cardiovascular or cerebrovascular event is crucial. The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis has been associated with overexpression of tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Recently, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown great potential as X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents. Since lisinopril is an ACE inhibitor, it has been used as coating on GNPs for targeted imaging of tissue ACE in prevention of fibrosis. Herein, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles (LIS-GNPs) were synthesized up to a concentration of 55 mgAu/mL. Their contrast was measured using CT and the results were compared to Omnipaque, a commonly used iodine-based contrast agent. The targeting ability of these LIS-GNPs was also assessed.

  1. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  2. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  3. Discovery of new angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors from medicinal plants to treat hypertension using an in vitro assay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors plays a critical role in treating hypertension. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate ACE inhibition activity of 50 Iranian medicinal plants using an in vitro assay. Methods The ACE activity was evaluated by determining the hydrolysis rate of substrate, hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine (HHL), using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method and DPPH radical scavenging assay respectively. Results Six extracts revealed > 50% ACE inhibition activity at 330 μg/ml concentration. They were Berberis integerrima Bunge. (Berberidaceae) (88.2 ± 1.7%), Crataegus microphylla C. Koch (Rosaceae) (80.9 ± 1.3%), Nymphaea alba L. (Nymphaeaceae) (66.3 ± 1.2%), Onopordon acanthium L. (Asteraceae) (80.2 ± 2.0%), Quercus infectoria G. Olivier. (Fagaceae) (93.9 ± 2.5%) and Rubus sp. (Rosaceae) (51.3 ± 1.0%). Q. infectoria possessed the highest total phenolic content with 7410 ± 101 mg gallic acid/100 g dry plant. Antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria (IC50 value 1.7 ± 0.03 μg/ml) was more than that of BHT (IC50 value of 10.3 ± 0.15 μg/ml) and Trolox (IC50 value of 3.2 ± 0.06 μg/ml) as the positive controls. Conclusions In this study, we introduced six medicinal plants with ACE inhibition activity. Despite the high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria, due to its tannin content (tannins interfere in ACE activity), another plant, O. acanthium, which also had high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity, but contained no tannin, could be utilized in further studies for isolation of active compounds. PMID:24359711

  4. Structural determinants for binding to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Daniel; Hanchapola, Iresha; Thomas, Walter G.; Widdop, Robert E.; Smith, Alexander I.; Perlmutter, Patrick; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a zinc carboxypeptidase involved in the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and inactivates the potent vasopressive peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) by removing the C-terminal phenylalanine residue to yield Ang1–7. This conversion inactivates the vasoconstrictive action of Ang II and yields a peptide that acts as a vasodilatory molecule at the Mas receptor and potentially other receptors. Given the growing complexity of RAS and level of cross-talk between ligands and their corresponding enzymes and receptors, the design of molecules with selectivity for the major RAS binding partners to control cardiovascular tone is an on-going challenge. In previous studies we used single β-amino acid substitutions to modulate the structure of Ang II and its selectivity for ACE2, AT1R, and angiotensin type 2 (AT2R) receptor. We showed that modification at the C-terminus of Ang II generally resulted in more pronounced changes to secondary structure and ligand binding, and here, we further explore this region for the potential to modulate ligand specificity. In this study, (1) a library of 47 peptides derived from the C-terminal tetrapeptide sequence (-IHPF) of Ang II was synthesized and assessed for ACE2 binding, (2) the terminal group requirements for high affinity ACE2 binding were explored by and N- and C-terminal modification, (3) high affinity ACE2 binding chimeric AngII analogs were then synthesized and assessed, (4) the structure of the full-length Ang II analogs were assessed by circular dichroism, and (5) the Ang II analogs were assessed for AT1R/AT2R selectivity by cell-based assays. Studies on the C-terminus of Ang II demonstrated varied specificity at different residue positions for ACE2 binding and four Ang II chimeric peptides were identified as selective ligands for the AT2 receptor. Overall, these results provide insight into the residue and structural requirements for ACE2 binding and angiotensin receptor selectivity. PMID

  5. Contemporary evolution of resistance at the major insecticide target site gene Ace-1 by mutation and copy number variation in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Weetman, David; Mitchell, Sara N; Wilding, Craig S; Birks, Daniel P; Yawson, Alexander E; Essandoh, John; Mawejje, Henry D; Djogbenou, Luc S; Steen, Keith; Rippon, Emily J; Clarkson, Christopher S; Field, Stuart G; Rigden, Daniel J; Donnelly, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Functionally constrained genes are ideal insecticide targets because disruption is often fatal, and resistance mutations are typically costly. Synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an essential neurotransmission enzyme targeted by insecticides used increasingly in malaria control. In Anopheles and Culex mosquitoes, a glycine–serine substitution at codon 119 of the Ace-1 gene confers both resistance and fitness costs, especially for 119S/S homozygotes. G119S in Anopheles gambiae from Accra (Ghana) is strongly associated with resistance, and, despite expectations of cost, resistant 119S alleles are increasing significantly in frequency. Sequencing of Accra females detected only a single Ace-1 119S haplotype, whereas 119G diversity was high overall but very low at non-synonymous sites, evidence of strong purifying selection driven by functional constraint. Flanking microsatellites showed reduced diversity, elevated linkage disequilibrium and high differentiation of 119S, relative to 119G homozygotes across up to two megabases of the genome. Yet these signals of selection were inconsistent and sometimes weak tens of kilobases from Ace-1. This unexpected finding is attributable to apparently ubiquitous amplification of 119S alleles as part of a large copy number variant (CNV) far exceeding the size of the Ace-1 gene, whereas 119G alleles were unduplicated. Ace-1 CNV was detectable in archived samples collected when the 119S allele was rare in Ghana. Multicopy amplification of resistant alleles has not been observed previously and is likely to underpin the recent increase in 119S frequency. The large CNV compromised localization of the strong selective sweep around Ace-1, emphasizing the need to integrate CNV analysis into genome scans for selection. PMID:25865270

  6. Isolation of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibiting triterpenes from Schinus molle.

    PubMed

    Olafsson, K; Jaroszewski, J W; Smitt, U W; Nyman, U

    1997-08-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of extracts of Schinus molle leaves, using an in vitro assay, led to the isolation of ACE-inhibitory steroidal triterpenes of the euphane type, identified by means of NMR spectroscopic methods. One of the triterpenes was isolated as an equilibrium mixture of epimeric aldehydes. The triterpenes showed moderate ACE-inhibitory activity (IC(50) about 250 microM). PMID:17252394

  7. Renal ACE immunohistochemical localization in NIDDM patients with nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Yoshikawa, H; Tanegashima, M; Miyagi, M; Kobayashi, M; Sakai, K; Hayashi, I; Aikawa, A; Ohara, T; Hasegawa, A

    1998-02-01

    A role of renal angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in diabetic nephropathy has been suggested. Immunohistochemical localization of ACE was studied in 20 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients with diabetic nephropathy and 17 healthy kidney transplant donors, with ACE gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism also examined in the latter. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that ACE staining was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced in glomeruli and slightly decreased in proximal tubules in diabetic patients. Glomeruli positive for ACE immunostaining were observed in 23.5% of the healthy subjects and in 80% of the diabetic patients. All patients with nodular lesions had ACE-positive glomeruli and showed significantly (P < 0.01) more intense glomerular ACE immunostaining than patients without nodular lesions. Among healthy controls, subjects with the DD genotype had ACE-positive glomeruli more frequently and tended to show slightly increased intensity on proximal tubule ACE immunostaining compared with subjects with other genotypes. These observations suggest that increased ACE localization in glomeruli is likely to be one of the factors in the increased renin-angiotensin system activity in glomeruli in patients with diabetic nephropathy. There is a possibility that ACE gene I/D polymorphism may be related to renal ACE immunohistochemical localization. PMID:9469501

  8. Lack of Association of ACE2 G8790A Gene Mutation with Essential Hypertension in the Chinese Population: A Meta-Analysis Involving 5260 Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-yan

    2012-01-01

    Background: The angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) G8790A gene polymorphism has been associated with the susceptibility to essential hypertension (EH), but the results are disputable. Objective and Methods: To investigate the relationship between the ACE2 G8790A gene polymorphism and EH, eight separate studies with 5260 subjects were meta-analyzed. The pooled odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated by a random effect model. Results: In the ACE2 G8790A gene polymorphism and EH meta-analysis in a Chinese population, no significant association was found between the ACE2 G8790A gene polymorphism and EH (OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 0.87–1.21, P = 0.76). In the stratified analysis by gender, no significant risk was found among males (OR: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.82–1.36, P = 0.66) or females (OR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.77–1.24, P = 0.85). Under a dominant model of inheritance in the female subgroup, the pooled OR for the GG/GA + AA value was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.82–1.25, P = 0.92). Under a recessive model of inheritance in the female subgroup, the pooled OR for the AA/AG + GG value was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.50–1.73, P = 0.83). Conclusion: The current meta-analysis suggested that the ACE2 G8790A gene polymorphism might not be related to the increased EH risk in the Chinese population. PMID:22988445

  9. Association of ACE Gene I/D polymorphism with migraine in Kashmiri population

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Irfan Yousuf; Sheikh, Saleem; Shah, Zafar Amin; Pandith, Arshid A.; Wani, Mushtaq; Asimi, Ravouf; Wani, Maqbool; Sheikh, Shahnawaz; Mehraj, Iqra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Migraine is a complex, recurrent headache disorder that is one of the most common complaints in neurology practice. The role of various genes in its pathogenesis is being studied. We did this study to see whether an association exists between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and migraine in our region. Materials and Methods: The study included 100 patients diagnosed with migraine and 121 healthy controls. The study subject were age and gender matched. The analysis was based on Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and included following steps: DNA extraction from blood, PCR and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP). Results: Out of 100 cases, 69 were females and 31 were males. Fifty-seven were having migraine without aura and 43 had migraine with aura. 45 of the cases had II polymorphism, 40 had ID polymorphism and 15 had DD polymorphism in ACE gene. Conclusion: We were not able to find a statistically significant association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism with migraine. The reason for difference in results between our study and other studies could be because of different ethnicity in study populations. So a continuous research is needed in this regard in order to find the genes and different polymorphism that increase the susceptibility of Kashmiri population to migraine. PMID:27011636

  10. Association of polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene with gestational diabetes mellitus in Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Parul; Agarwal, Nutan; Das, Nibhriti; Dalal, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous genes have been reported in relation with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but the findings were not consistently replicated across populations, or there have been no detailed studies on them. Previous literatures suggested that, out of all angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphisms, only ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) gene polymorphism has a strong association with GDM in Asian Indian women. Aim: This study was devoted to evaluate the association of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ACE A240T, C1237T, G2350A and I/D with GDM and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: This study recruited 105 GDM cases, 119 Type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects and 120 controls. PCR-RFLP was used for identifying genotypes of ACE A240T, C1237T and G2350A and PCR was performed in the case of ACE I/D. Results: Significant associations of ACE SNP's, C1237T, and G2350A with GDM were observed. Haplotype analysis revealed the remarkably significant evidence of association with SNP combination ACE A240T, C1237T, G2350A, and I/D with GDM patients (P = 0.024). Individuals possessing haplotype “TTAI” (frequency 30% in GDM and 0 in controls) derived from these SNPs had 185 fold increased risk of developing GDM (95% of confidence interval: 11.13–3102.15), which was highest when compared with other 15 haplotypes. Conclusion: Shorter-range haplotypes were also significant, but the only consistently associated alleles were found to be in ACE C1237T, G2350A, and I/D. These results suggested that the variant in close proximity to ACE C1237T, G2350A and/or I/D modulates susceptibility to GDM and noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus in Indian women. PMID:26958520

  11. ACE2 gene polymorphism and essential hypertension: an updated meta-analysis involving 11,051 subjects.

    PubMed

    Lu, Na; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yibo; Liu, Yan; Fu, Gang; Chen, Dongmei; Dai, Hui; Fan, Xiaohan; Hui, Rutai; Zheng, Yang

    2012-06-01

    The polymorphisms of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) gene have been suggested to be linked to increase risk of essential hypertension in multiple populations. However, the results are still debatable. To assess the association between ACE2 G8970A genetic polymorphism and essential hypertension, we conducted a meta-analysis of case-control studies across different ethnicity. PubMed, Embase, CBM, Wanfang and VIP databases were searched, and a total of 11 separate studies in females and nine separate studies in males met the inclusion criteria. Because ACE2 is on the X chromosome, data for each sex were analyzed separately. The selected studies contained 7,251 (4,472 females/2,779 males) hypertensive patients and 3,800 (2,161 females/1,639 males) normotensive controls. A statistically significant association was observed between the G8970A gene polymorphism and essential hypertension risk in female hypertensive group in the recessive genetic model (AA vs. GG+GA: P = 0.03, OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.02-1.30, P(heterogeneity) = 0.40, I(2) = 5%, fixed-effects model). Although no association was shown between the frequency of the A allele and the genetic susceptibility to essential hypertension in all male patients (A Allele: P = 0.38, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.89-1.38, P(heterogeneity) = 0.02, I(2) = 56%, random-effects model), we found that the relationship between carrier of A allele and the essential hypertension risk in Han-Chinese male patients subgroup (A Allele: P = 0.006, OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.06–1.38, P(heterogeneity) = 0.10, I(2) = 44%, fixed-effects model). The current meta-analysis provided solid evidence suggesting that ACE2 gene polymorphism G8790A was probably a genetic risk factor for essential hypertension across different ethnic populations in female subjects and in Han-Chinese male subjects. PMID:22297693

  12. Inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme modulate mitosis and gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.K.; Baskaran, K.; Molteni, A.

    1995-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril inhibits mitosis in several cell types that contain ACE and renin activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the ACE inhibitors captopril and CGS 13945 (10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}2}M) on proliferation and gene expression in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells in culture. These cells lack renin and ACE activity. Both ACE inhibitors produced a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation within 24 hr. Captopril at a concentration of 0.36 mM and CGS 13945 at 150 {mu}M decreased cellular growth rate to approximately half that of the control. Neither drug influenced the viability or the cell cycle distribution of the tumor cells. Slot blot analysis of mRNA for four genes, proliferation associated cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), K-ras, protein kinase C-{Beta} (PKC-{Beta}) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) was performed. Both ACE inhibitors increased K-ras expression by a factor of 2, and had no effect on CA II mRNA levels. Captopril also lowered PCNA by 40% and CGS 13945 lowered PKC-{Beta} gene expression to 30% of the control level. The data demonstrate that ACE inhibitors exhibit antimitotic activity and differential gene modulation in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells. The absence of renin and ACE activity in these cells suggests that the antimitotic action of captopril and CGS 13945 is independent of renin-angiotensin regulation. The growth inhibition may occur through downregulation of growth-related gene expression. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Evaluation of Association of ADRA2A rs553668 and ACE I/D Gene Polymorphisms with Obesity Traits in the Setapak Population, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Shunmugam, Vicneswari; Say, Yee-How

    2016-01-01

    Background α-adrenergic receptor 2A (ADRA2A) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genes have been variably associated with obesity and its related phenotypes in different populations worldwide. Objectives This cross-sectional study aims to investigate the association of adrenergic receptor α2A (ADRA2A) rs553668 and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with obesity traits (body mass index-BMI; waist-hip ratio-WHR; total body fat percentage - TBF) in a Malaysian population. Materials and Methods Demographic and clinical variables were initially collected from 230 subjects via convenience sampling among residents and workers in Setapak, Malaysia, but in the end only 214 multi-ethnic Malaysians (99 males; 45 Malays, 116 ethnic Chinese, and 53 ethnic Indians) were available for statistical analysis. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction using DNA extracted from mouthwash samples. Results The overall minor allele frequencies (MAFs) for ADRA2A rs553668 and ACE I/D were 0.55 and 0.56, respectively. Allele distribution of ACE I/D was significantly associated with ethnicity and WHR class. Logistic regression analysis showed that subjects with the ACE II genotype and I allele were, respectively, 2.15 and 1.55 times more likely to be centrally obese, but when adjusted for age and ethnicity, this association was abolished. Covariate analysis controlling for age, gender, and ethnicity also showed similar results, where subjects carrying the II genotype or I allele did not have significantly higher WHR. Combinatory genotype and allele analysis for ADRA2A rs553668 and ACE I/D showed that subjects with both ADRA2A rs553668 GG and ACE I/D II genotypes had significant lowest WHR compared to other genotype combinations. Conclusions The ACE II genotype might be a protective factor against central adiposity risk among the Malaysian population when in combination with the ADRA2A rs553668 GG genotype. PMID:27186390

  14. Nephroprotective effects of b-carotene on ACE gene expression, oxidative stress and antioxidant status in thioacetamide induced renal toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Fazal, Yumna; Fatima, Syeda Nuzhat; Shahid, Syed Muhammad; Mahboob, Tabassum

    2016-07-01

    β -carotene is one of carotenoid natural pigments, which are produced by plants and are accountable for the bright colors of various fruits and vegetables. These pigments have been widely studied for their ability to prevent chronic diseases and toxicities. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of β-carotene on angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene expression, oxidative stress and antioxidant status in thioacetamide induced renal toxicity. Total 24 albino wistar rats of male sex (200-250gm) were divided into 6 groups as Group-1: The control remained untreated; Group-2: Received thioacetamide (200mg/kg b.w; i.p) for 12 weeks; Group-3: Received β-carotene orally (200mg/kg b.w), for 24 weeks; and Group-4: Received thioacetamide (200mg/kg b.w; i.p) for 12 weeks + received β-carotene orally (200mg/kg b.w), for further 12 weeks. The expression of ACE gene in thioacetamide induced renal toxicity in rats as well as supplemented with β-carotene was investigated and compared their level with control groups by using the quantitative RT-PCR method. The ACE gene expression was significantly increase in TAA rats as compare to control rats specifies that TAA induced changes in ACE gene of kidney, elevated renal ACE has been correlated with increase hypertensive end organ renal damage. The quantity of ACE gene were diminish in our rats who received β-Carotene after TAA is administered, for this reason they seemed to be defended against increased ACE levels in kidney bought by TAA. In pre- and post-treatment groups, we studied the role of β-Carotene against thioacetamide in the kidney of Wistar rats. Experimental confirmation from our study illustrates that β-Carotene can certainly work as a successful radical-trapping antioxidant our results proved that TAA injury increased lipid peroxidation and diminish antioxidant GSH, SOD and CAT in renal tissue. Since β-Carotene administration recover renal lipid peroxidation and antioxidants, it give the impression that

  15. Hypotensive, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Diuretic Activities of the Aqueous-methanol Extract of Ipomoea reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Qaiser; Aslam, Naveed

    2013-01-01

    Ipomoea reniformis Roxb. (Convolvulaceae) is a small, weedy herb used for the management of cardiac problems in traditional systems of medicine in India and Pakistan. Objective of the present study was to investigate the hypotensive, diuretic and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of the aqueous-methanol (30:70) crude extract of the dried aerial parts of I. reniformis (Ir.Cr.) in rats. To record blood pressure lowering effects of the Ir.Cr, different doses of the extract were administered through jugular vein to the ketamine-diazepam anesthetized normotensive rats and blood pressure was recorded via carotid artery. ACE inhibitory activity of the extract was studied in-vitro; using hippuryl-l-histidyl-l-leucine as substrate, the product hippurate was quantified spectrophotometrically after reacting with cyanuric chloride/dioxane reagent. Effects of intraperitoneal administration of the extract on urine and urinary electrolyte excretion were also investigated in rats. The extract (Ir.Cr.) produced 21.51 ± 3.41, 28.99 ± 2.30, 53.34 ± 0.88 and 61.71 ± 3.37% fall in mean arterial blood pressure of the anesthetized rats at the doses of 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/Kg, respectively. Ir.Cr. was found to have serum ACE inhibitory activity, with IC50 value of 422 ± 21.16 μg/mL. The extract also increased urine volume and urinary Na+ excretion significantly at the doses of 30 and 50 mg/Kg in rats. The study concludes that the crude extract of Ipomoea reniformis (Ir.Cr.) has hypotensive, ACE inhibitory and diuretic activities, which provide the scientific justification for the traditional uses of the plant as cardioprotective, antihypertensive and diuretic remedy. PMID:24523757

  16. Influence of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Gene Polymorphism on Hepatocellular Carcinoma Risk in China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Lu-Shun; Li, Hong-Yu; Liao, Miao

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) genes are associated with risk in a wide range of cancers. The objective of this study was to examine whether two DNA polymorphisms at the ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) and the variable number of tandem repeats in NOS intron 4 (4a/4b) were linked to the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Chinese population. The polymorphisms at ACE I/D and eNOS 4a/4b were genotyped in 293 HCC patients and 384 healthy control subjects using polymerase chain reaction. The frequencies of the D allele (p=0.003, OR=0.72, 95% CI=0.58–0.90) in the ACE gene of HCC patients were significantly different from the healthy controls, and a significantly decreased HCC risk was associated with the DD genotype in both the recessive (p<0.001, OR=0.19, 95% CI=0.11–0.34) and codominant models (p<0.001, OR=0.26, 95% CI=0.14–0.48). This study provided evidence that the ACE I/D polymorphism is associated with HCC, indicating that the ACE I/D polymorphism contributes to HCC progression in the Chinese population. PMID:23570557

  17. ACE blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme; SACE ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) - blood. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:138-139.

  18. Renal hemodynamic changes induced by captopril and angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Hemmi, H; Inoue, A; Takano, M; Kadomatsu, S; Tanimoto, H; Tanegashima, M; Hayashi, I; Fushimi, T; Hasegawa, A

    1997-01-01

    We studied the relationship between renal hemodynamic changes induced by a single acute administration of captopril (50 mg p.o.) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in 27 healthy human volunteers, 7 with DD genotype, 10 with ID, and 10 with II genotype. The increase in effective renal plasma flow (p < 0.02) and the fall in renal vascular resistance (p < 0.01) in response to captopril were significantly less in subjects with the DD genotype than in subjects with the other genotypes. These data suggest that intrarenal ACE inhibition by captopril differs according to ACE gene ID polymorphism in healthy humans. PMID:9069453

  19. The binding of metal ions and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor by 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Sakamoto, Yuko; Ishii, Tomoko; Ohmoto, Taichi

    1991-06-01

    Enalaprilat (MK-422, 1- [ N- [1 (S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]- L-alanyl]- L-proline (1)) and Lisinopril (MK521, N- N- [ (s)-l-carboxy-3- phenylpropyl]- L-lysyl- L-proline, (2)) exhibit the capacity to act as a chelate, unidentate or bridge towards metal ions in aqueous solution, as determined by 13C NMR. By adding metal ions, in the series of Zn 2+, Ni 2+, Pb 2+, Pd 2+ and Cd 2+, the active site of the ACE inhibitor was well defined. MK-521 was more influenced by nuclei that were distant from the active site than MK-422.

  20. [Absence of an association of the D allele of the ACE gene with arterial pressure in mild-moderate essential arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Celentano, A; Mancini, F P; Crivaro, M; Palmieri, V; Tammaro, P; De Stefano, V; Oliviero, M; Di Palma Esposito, N; Pietropaolo, I; Tufano, A; Di Minno, G; de Divitiis, O

    1996-10-01

    To assess the relationship between the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene I/D polymorphism, blood pressure (BP) and family history of hypertension, 133 hypertensive subjects (mean age 50 +/- 9 years, 78 males, 55 females) were selected according to both casual supine BP > 140/90 mmHg and ambulatory BP > 134/88 mmHg. Drug treatment was discontinued 2 weeks before entering the study. Subjects with myocardial ischemia, as well as those with "white coat" hypertension, were excluded. The study population was subclassified according to age < or = 50 years. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene, and the DD genotype was analysed twice. The frequencies of the I and D allele were 42 and 58%, and the distribution of the ID+ II and DD genotypes were 69 and 31% respectively. No significant relation was found among ACE genotypes (DD vs ID+ II) and casual systolic or diastolic BP as well as ambulatory BP, both in the whole study population and in the subpopulation < 50 years old. No difference was found also in the distribution of dippers and no dippers, as well as in the distribution of subjects with a positive family history in the whole sample and hypertensives < 50 years old. PMID:8983828

  1. Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) by flavonoids isolated from Ailanthus excelsa (Roxb) (Simaroubaceae).

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Said, Ataa; Tundis, Rosa; Rashed, Khaled; Statti, Giancarlo Antonio; Hufner, Antje; Menichini, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    In our screening program for antihypertensive properties of plants, the leaves of Ailanthus excelsa (Roxb), a plant used in Egyptian traditional medicine, were analysed. Chromatographic separation of A. excelsa MeOH extract yielded six flavonoids for the first time from this species, namely apigenin, luteolin, kaempferol-3-O-alpha-arabinopyranoside, kaempferol-3-O-beta-galactopyranoside, quercetin-3-O-alpha-arabinopyranoside and luteolin-7-O-beta-glucopyranoside. The in vitro hypotensive activities of the MeOH extract and the isolated compounds were elucidated. All the flavonoids tested exhibited ACE inhibitory activity, in particular the most active compound was kaempferol-3-O-beta-galactopyranoside with an IC(50) value of 260 microm. PMID:17072829

  2. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of sardinelle (Sardinella aurita) by-products protein hydrolysates obtained by treatment with microbial and visceral fish serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Bougatef, Ali; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima; Ravallec-Plé, Rozenn; Leroy, Yves; Guillochon, Didier; Barkia, Ahmed; Nasri, Moncef

    2008-11-15

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of protein hydrolysates prepared from heads and viscera of sardinelle (Sardinella aurita) by treatment with various proteases were investigated. Protein hydrolysates were obtained by treatment with Alcalase(®), chymotrypsin, crude enzyme preparations from Bacillus licheniformis NH1 and Aspergillus clavatus ES1, and crude enzyme extract from sardine (Sardina pilchardus) viscera. All hydrolysates exhibited inhibitory activity towards ACE. The alkaline protease extract from the viscera of sardine produced hydrolysate with the highest ACE inhibitory activity (63.2±1.5% at 2mg/ml). Further, the degrees of hydrolysis and the inhibitory activities of ACE increased with increasing proteolysis time. The protein hydrolysate generated with alkaline proteases from the viscera of sardine was then fractionated by size exclusion chromatography on a Sephadex G-25 into eight major fractions (P1-P8). Biological functions of all fractions were assayed, and P4 was found to display a high ACE inhibitory activity. The IC50 values for ACE inhibitory activities of sardinelle by-products protein hydrolysates and fraction P4 were 1.2±0.09 and 0.81±0.013mg/ml, respectively. Further, P4 showed resistance to in vitro digestion by gastrointestinal proteases. The amino acid analysis by GC/MS showed that P4 was rich in phenylalanine, arginine, glycine, leucine, methionine, histidine and tyrosine. The added-value of sardinelle by-products may be improved by enzymatic treatment with visceral serine proteases from sardine. PMID:26047434

  3. Insertion/deletion polymorphism in intron 16 of ACE gene in idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion: case-control study, systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pereza, Nina; Ostojić, Saša; Zdravčević, Matea; Volk, Marija; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2016-02-01

    The insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in intron 16 of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene (ACE) has been extensively studied as a predisposing factor for idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion (IRSA). A case-control study including 149 women with ≥3 spontaneous abortions and 149 controls was performed to test the association of ACE I/D polymorphism with IRSA. A systematic review was conducted of previous case-control studies, with strict selection criteria for meta-analyses. We also aimed to evaluate the potential differences in summary estimates between studies defining IRSA as ≥2 and ≥3 spontaneous abortions. Genotyping was performed by PCR, and systematic review conducted using PubMed and Scopus. There was no association of the polymorphism with IRSA in Slovenian women. Sixteen case-control studies, showing substantial differences regarding IRSA definition and selection criteria for women were identified. Meta-analysis was performed and included four studies defining IRSA as ≥2 spontaneous abortions and the current study, which defined IRSA as ≥3 spontaneous abortions. Based on random effects model, meta-analysis conducted on 1192 patients and 736 controls showed no association with IRSA under dominant(DD+IDvsII) and recessive(DDvsID+II) genetic models. Well-designed studies are needed to evaluate the role of ACE I/D polymorphism in IRSA defined as ≥3 spontaneous abortions. PMID:26673102

  4. Diversity of ace, a gene encoding a microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules, from different strains of Enterococcus faecalis and evidence for production of ace during human infections.

    PubMed

    Nallapareddy, S R; Singh, K V; Duh, R W; Weinstock, G M; Murray, B E

    2000-09-01

    Our previous work reported that most Enterococcus faecalis strains adhered to the extracellular matrix proteins collagen types I and IV and laminin after growth at 46 degrees C, but not 37 degrees C, and we subsequently identified an E. faecalis sequence, ace, that encodes a bacterial adhesin similar to the collagen binding protein Cna of Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, we examined the diversity of E. faecalis-specific ace gene sequences among different isolates obtained from various geographic regions as well as from various clinical sources. A comparison of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of Ace from nine E. faecalis strains identified a highly conserved N-terminal A domain, followed by a variable B domain which contains two to five repeats of 47 amino acids in tandem array, preceded by a 20-amino-acid partial repeat. Using 17 other strains collected worldwide, the 5' region of ace that encodes the A domain was sequenced, and these sequences showed > or =97.5% identity. Among the previously reported five amino acids critical for collagen binding by Cna of S. aureus, four were found to be identical in Ace from all strains tested. Polyclonal immune rabbit serum prepared against recombinant Ace A derived from E. faecalis strain OG1RF detected Ace in mutanolysin extracts of seven of nine E. faecalis strains after growth at 46 degrees C; Ace was detected in four different molecular sizes that correspond to the variation in the B repeat region. To determine if there was any evidence to indicate that Ace might be produced under physiological conditions, we quantitatively assayed sera collected from patients with enterococcal infections for the presence of anti-Ace A antibodies. Ninety percent of sera (19 of 21) from patients with E. faecalis endocarditis showed reactivity with titers from 1:32 to >1:1,024; the only 2 sera which lacked antibodies to Ace A had considerably lower titers of antibodies to other E. faecalis antigens as well. Human

  5. ACE and AGTR1 polymorphisms in elite rhythmic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Alessandra; Sapere, Nadia; Piazza, Marina; Aquino, Giovanna; Iuliano, Enzo; Intrieri, Mariano; Calcagno, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    In the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, Alu deletion, in intron 16, is associated with higher concentrations of ACE serum activity and this may be associated with elite sprint and power performance. The Alu insertion is associated with lower ACE levels and this could lead to endurance performance. Moreover, recent studies have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism of the angiotensin type 1 receptor gene AGTR1, which seems to be related to ACE activity. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the ACE and the AGTR1 gene polymorphisms in 28 Italian elite rhythmic gymnasts (age range 21 ± 7.6 years), and compare them to 23 middle level rhythmic gymnasts (age range 17 ± 10.9 years). The ACE D allele was significantly more frequent in elite athletes than in the control population (χ(2)=4.07, p=0.04). Comparisons between the middle level and elite athletes revealed significant differences (p<0.0001) for the ACE DD genotype (OR=6.48, 95% confidence interval=1.48-28.34), which was more frequent in elite athletes. There were no significant differences in the AGTR1 A/C genotype or allele distributions between the middle level and elite athletes. In conclusion, the ACE D allele genotype could be a contributing factor to high-performance rhythmic gymnastics that should be considered in athlete development and could help to identify which skills should be trained for talent promotion. PMID:23145508

  6. Polymorphism of the ACE Gene in dialysis patients: overexpression of DD genotype in type 2 diabetic end-stage renal failure patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeong Cheon; Choi, So Rae; Kim, Beom Seok; Lee, Tae Hee; Kang, Byung Seung; Choi, Kyu Hyun; Lee, Ho Yung; Han, Dae Suk; Ha, Sung-Kyu

    2005-12-31

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene DD homozygote has been suggested to be a significant risk factor for the progression of diabetic nephropathy. We analyzed clinical parameters and ACE genotype distribution between type 2 diabetic patients at the extremes of renal risk, i.e. an end-stage renal failure (ESRF) group (n = 103, group 1) who were on dialysis therapy due to progression of diabetic nephropathy, and a no progression group (n = 88, group 2) who had maintained normal renal function and normoalbuminuria for more than 15 years. There were no significant differences in age, sex, body mass index, HbA1c level, or lipid profiles between the two groups (p > 0.05). Group 1 had a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension [group 1: 82.5% (85/103) vs. group 2: 50.0% (44/88), p < 0.05] and diabetic retinopathy [group 1: 103/103 (100%) vs. group 2: 28/88 (31.8%), p < 0.05] than group 2. Daily urinary albumin excretion was also higher in group 1 than in group 2 [group 1: 2873 +/- 2176 mg/day vs. 12 +/- 7 g/day, p < 0.05]. The frequencies of the DD, ID, and II genotypes of the ACE gene in group 1 and group 2 were 26.2%, 47.6%, and 26.2%, and 7.9%, 57.9%, and 34.2%, respectively. The ACE genotype frequencies between the two groups were significantly different according to a chi-square test with Bonferroni's correction (p = 0.004). The presence of the DD genotype increased the risk of ESRF 4.286-fold compared to the II genotype [odds ratio 4.286, 95% CI 1.60- 11.42, p = 0.005]. The frequency of the D-allele was higher in both male and female patients in group 1 compared to group 2, but reached statistical significance only in males [male, group 1: 50.8% vs. group 2: 35.0%, p = 0.018, female, group 1: 48.8% vs. group 2: 39.5%, p = 0.231]. This study, although limited by sample size, showed that type 2 diabetic ESRF patients more frequently expressed the DD genotype. These findings may substantiate the previously noted relationship between the ACE DD genotype

  7. T-lymphocyte induction of human monocyte angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is not dependent upon T-lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Vuk-Pavlovic, Z.; Rohrbach, M.S.

    1986-03-05

    Human peripheral blood monocytes cultured in serum free media for seven days show a basal activity of the ectoenzyme ACE which is augmented 2-3 times by the presence of autologous peripheral blood T-lymphocytes. Since these two cell types are also involved in autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction if serum is present, the authors compared the ability of T-cells to stimulate ACE activity in the presence or absence of proliferation (measured by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation). By the seventh day, cultures with 5% AB/sup +/ serum showed significant increase in proliferation but no increase in ACE activity compared to the serum free cultures. Even higher proliferation rate achieved by co-culturing T-lymphocytes with allogeneic monocytes did not increase ACE production; on the contrary, ACE activity remained at the basal level. Monocyte-T-cell co-cultures stimulated with increasing concentrations of ConA or PHA showed dose dependent increases in proliferation but parallel decreases in ACE activity. Addition of soluble antigen (Candida albicans) also enhanced proliferation but not ACE synthesis. They conclude that T-lymphocyte induction of monocyte ACE is a result of cooperation between autologous cells which is not dependent upon T-cell proliferation.

  8. Significant correlation of angiotensin converting enzyme and glycoprotein IIIa genes polymorphisms with unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss in north of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fazelnia, Shokoufeh; Farazmandfar,, Touraj; Hashemi-Soteh, Seyed Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous abortion is considered as the most complex problem during pregnancy. Thrombophilia is resumed as a cause of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). Glycoprotein IIIa (GPIIIa) gene is involved in thrombosis and abortion. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II and is involved in thrombosis. The most common polymorphism in this gene is the insertion/deletion (I/D). Objective: In this study, we analyzed the association between ACE I/D and GPIIIa c.98C >T polymorphisms in women with unexplained RPL from the north of Iran. Materials and Methods: Sample population consisted of 100 women with unexplained RPL and 100 controls. The ACE I/D and GPIIIa c.98C>T polymorphisms were genotyped by TETRA-ARMS PCR. The association between genotypes frequency and RPL were analyzed using χ2 and exact fisher tests. Associated risk with double genotype combinations was also investigated by binary logistic regression. Results: There was significant association between ACE DD genotype and RPL (OR=2.04; 95% CI=0.94-4.44; p=0.036). ACE D Allele was also significantly associated with the RPL (OR=1.59; 95% CI=1.05-2.41; p=0.013). No significant association was observed between GPIIIa c.98C>T polymorphism and RPL. Conclusion: ACE I/D polymorphism may probably be a prognostic factor in female family members of women with the history of recurrent abortion. PMID:27326417

  9. Effects of ACE2 deficiency on physical performance and physiological adaptations of cardiac and skeletal muscle to exercise.

    PubMed

    Motta-Santos, Daisy; Dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Oliveira, Marilene; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Poglitsch, Marko; Mosienko, Valentina; Kappes Becker, Lenice; Campagnole-Santos, Maria Jose; M Penninger, Joseph; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is related to physiological adaptations induced by exercise. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 2 is a major regulator of the RAS in tissues, as it metabolizes angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1-7). The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ACE2 deficiency on physical performance and physiological adaptations induced by voluntary running. Physical performance, body composition and plasma angiotensin levels, as well as tissue morphology and gene expression of RAS components in the left ventricle (LV) and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius), were evaluated in ACE2-deficient (ACE2(-/y)) and wild-type (ACE2(+/y)) mice after 6 weeks of voluntary wheel running. ACE2(-/y) mice run less than ACE2(+/y) mice (19±4.7 vs. 26±12.6 revolutions per day × 100, P<0.01). The ACE2(+/y) group presented a lower fat mass (15±1.1%) and higher muscle mass (76.6±1.6%) after 6 weeks of voluntary running compared with the sedentary control group (fat mass: 18.3±2.1%; muscle mass: 72.7±2.2). However, no change in body composition was observed in ACE2(-/y) mice after exercise. Heart and skeletal muscle hypertrophy was observed only in trained ACE2(+/y) mice. Besides a small decrease in Ang I in ACE2(-/y) mice, plasma levels of angiotensin peptides remained unchanged by exercise or ACE2 deficiency. In the LV of trained animals, AT2 gene expression was higher in ACE2(+/y) compared with ACE2(-/y) mice. ACE2 deficiency leads to an increase in AT1 gene expression in skeletal muscle. ACE expression in soleus was increased in all exercised groups. ACE2 deficiency affects physical performance and impairs cardiac and skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise. PMID:27053009

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphisms and hypertension in occupational noise exposure in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Zawilla, Nermin; Shaker, Dalia; Abdelaal, Amaal; Aref, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Background: The gene–environment interaction in the pathogenesis of hypertension has not been extensively studied in occupational noise. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between noise and hypertension in Egyptian workers, the interaction of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphisms as modifiers, and the possible relationship between noise hearing impairment and hypertension. Methods: Study subjects were divided into two groups depending on noise exposure level. The control group (n = 161) was exposed to noise intensity <85 dB and the exposed group (n = 217) was exposed to noise intensity ≧85 dB. A polymerase chain reaction was used to differentiate the various genotypes of ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) and ACE G2350A. Results: Noise significantly increased the likelihood of hypertension. Carriers of the genotypes AG, GG, and DD were vulnerable to hypertension on noise exposure. No association between hypertension and hearing impairment or noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) was found. Conclusion: Our results support the association between ACE gene polymorphisms and occurrence of hypertension in noise-exposed workers. PMID:25000107

  11. The association of ACE, ACTN3 and PPARA gene variants with strength phenotypes in middle school-age children.

    PubMed

    Ahmetov, Ildus I; Gavrilov, Dmitry N; Astratenkova, Irina V; Druzhevskaya, Anastasiya M; Malinin, Alexandr V; Romanova, Elena E; Rogozkin, Victor A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the association between ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X and PPARA intron 7 G/C gene polymorphisms and strength-related traits in 457 middle school-age children (219 boys and 238 girls; aged 11 ± 0.4 years). The assessment of different phenotypes was conducted with a number of performance tests. Gene polymorphisms were determined by PCR. The ACE D allele was associated with high results of standing long-jump test in boys [II 148.3 (16.3) cm, ID 152.6 (19.6) cm, DD 158.2 (19.1) cm; P = 0.037]. The ACTN3 R allele was associated with high results of performance tests in males only in combination with other genes (standing long-jump test: P = 0.021; handgrip strength test: P < 0.0001). Furthermore, the male carriers of the PPARA gene C allele demonstrated the best results of handgrip strength testing than GG homozygotes [GG 14.6 (4.0) kg, GC/CC 15.7 (4.3) kg; P = 0.048]. Thus, the ACE, ACTN3 and PPARA gene variants are associated with strength-related traits in physically active middle school-age boys. PMID:22983821

  12. Association of Apolipoprotein E and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Gene Polymorphisms with the Multidimensional Impairment in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matera, Maria G.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Sancarlo, Daniele; Leandro, Gioacchino; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Seripa, Davide; Addante, Filomena; Franceschi, Marilisa; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The role of the apoliprotein E (APOE) and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphisms on health and functional status deterioration in old age is still undefined. Recently, a Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) for 1-year mortality derived from a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) was developed and validated in hospitalized elderly patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association of the APOE and ACE gene polymorphisms with the multidimensional impairment, as evaluated by the MPI, in older patients. These polymorphisms were assessed in 1894 geriatric inpatients divided into three groups according to their MPI values: MPI-1 low risk (n = 988), MPI-2 moderate risk (n = 671), and MPI-3 severe risk of mortality (n = 235). A slight deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was observed for the APOE genotypes. With the increasing of the MPI grade, a significant increase in the frequencies of ɛ4 allele and the ACE D/D genotype was observed. The APOE ɛ4+ and ACE D/D genotypes were associated with severe MPI grade (APOE ɛ4+, odds ration [OR] = 1.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20–2.67; ACE D/D, OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.05–1.92). The combined APOE ɛ4+ and ACE D/D genetic status was associated with higher MPI grade (OR = 2.85, 95% CI 1.75–4.65), without interaction. No significant associations between APOE and ACE polymorphisms and 2-year mortality were found. APOE and ACE genes might predispose individuals to health and functional status deterioration in old age, and their effect is additive. PMID:19653879

  13. Association of apolipoprotein E and angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphisms with the multidimensional impairment in older patients.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Alberto; Matera, Maria G; Ferrucci, Luigi; Sancarlo, Daniele; Leandro, Gioacchino; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Seripa, Davide; Addante, Filomena; Franceschi, Marilisa; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    The role of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphisms on health and functional status deterioration in old age is still undefined. Recently, a Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) for 1-year mortality derived from a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) was developed and validated in hospitalized elderly patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association of the APOE and ACE gene polymorphisms with the multidimensional impairment, as evaluated by the MPI, in older patients. These polymorphisms were assessed in 1894 geriatric inpatients divided into three groups according to their MPI values: MPI-1 low risk (n = 988), MPI-2 moderate risk (n = 671), and MPI-3 severe risk of mortality (n = 235). A slight deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed for the APOE genotypes. With the increasing of the MPI grade, a significant increase in the frequencies of epsilon4 allele and the ACE D/D genotype was observed. The APOE epsilon4(+) and ACE D/D genotypes were associated with severe MPI grade (APOE epsilon4(+), odds ration [OR] = 1.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-2.67; ACE D/D, OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.05-1.92). The combined APOE epsilon4(+) and ACE D/D genetic status was associated with higher MPI grade (OR = 2.85, 95% CI 1.75-4.65), without interaction. No significant associations between APOE and ACE polymorphisms and 2-year mortality were found. APOE and ACE genes might predispose individuals to health and functional status deterioration in old age, and their effect is additive. PMID:19653879

  14. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven- and freeze-dried protein hydrolysate from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala).

    PubMed

    Elavarasan, K; Shamasundar, B A; Badii, Faraha; Howell, Nazlin

    2016-09-01

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven-dried (OD-FPH) and freeze-dried (FD-FPH) protein hydrolysates derived from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala) muscle, using papain, were investigated. Amino acid profiles indicated a higher proportion of hydrophobic residues in OD-FPH and hydrophilic residues in FD-FPH samples. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra revealed random coil structure in OD-FPH and β-sheet in FD-FPH samples. The approximate molecular weight of peptides in OD-FPH and FD-FPH was in the range of 7030-339Da. The IC50 values for ACE inhibition by OD-FPH and FD-FPH samples were found to be 1.15 and 1.53mg of proteinml(-1), respectively. The ACE-inhibitory activity of OD-FPH was more stable (during sequential digestion, using pepsin and pancreatin) than that of FD-FPH sample. The study suggested that the ACE inhibitory activity of protein hydrolysate was not affected by oven-drying. PMID:27041318

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene deletion polymorphism determines an increase in frequency of migraine attacks in patients suffering from migraine without aura.

    PubMed

    Paterna, S; Di Pasquale, P; D'Angelo, A; Seidita, G; Tuttolomondo, A; Cardinale, A; Maniscalchi, T; Follone, G; Giubilato, A; Tarantello, M; Licata, G

    2000-01-01

    Many authors have reported an association between the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-D allele and coronary heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases. The mechanism underlying the positive associations between the ACE-D alleles and diseases are not yet clear. Previous reports showed an association between migraine without aura and ACE-D allele polymorphism. The study is aimed to evaluate if the DD genotype could also be associated with the frequency and duration of migraine without aura. In 302 patients suffering from migraine without aura (at least for 1 year), with no history of cardiovascular diseases and major risk factors for ischemic events, the genotypes of the ACE gene, plasma ACE activity, and the frequency (weekly) and duration of migraine attacks were evaluated. No drugs were given before (4 weeks) and during the study. The same evaluations were performed in 201 subjects without migraine. The molecular biologist and the physician evaluating the patient data were blinded to the clinical history and ACE-DD gene determination. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Plasma ACE activity was performed by the HPLC method. The groups were similar for sex, age and smoking habit (migraines: 302 patients (200 F/102 M), mean age 37.8 +/- 8.2 years; control: 201 subjects (127 F/74 M), mean age 37.5 +/- 9.3 years). Patients with migraine without aura showed higher incidence of the ACE-DD gene (48.34%) than control subjects (37.32%), p < 0.05. The frequency of migraine (average attacks per week) was higher in patients with DD (2.11 +/- 1.9) than in patients with ID (1.54 +/- 1. 44), p < 0.05. No difference in duration of migraine attacks (hours per week) was observed. Plasma ACE activity was increased in patients with the ACE-DD gene. Our data suggest that ACE-DD gene polymorphism could have an important role in determining migraine attacks and the frequency of these attacks. Further data are needed through further studies

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism (insertion/deletion) and liver fibrosis in Turkish patients from the western Black Sea region, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turhan, N K; Ilikhan, S Uygun; Hamamcioglu, A C; Ustundag, Y; Dursun, A; Kokturk, F

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral hepatitis B, chronic viral hepatitis C, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and secondary biliary cirrhosis are important health issues worldwide. While an association between angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion (ACE gene I/D) polymorphism and liver fibrosis has been demonstrated in rat studies, the results of clinical studies area have been contradictory. The aim of this study was to assess the possible association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and liver fibrosis in a large group of Turkish patients from the western Black Sea region. In 418 patients with different etiologies, ACE gene I/D polymorphism and serum ACE levels were investigated. The distribution of the "DD", "ID", "II" genotypes of the ACE gene were 32.5, 48.8, and 18.7% in the mild to moderate fibrosis group (N = 246, F:1-3 according to Ishak's score) and 39.0, 44.2, and 16.9% in the advanced fibrosis group (N = 172, F:4-6 according to Ishak's score). A significant correlation between serum ACE levels and ACE gene alleles was identified (P < 0.001): serum ACE levels of patients with D alleles were higher than those of patients with I alleles [44 (min 7-max 101) versus 29 (min 7-max 96)]. Patients with advanced fibrosis were also found to be older than those with mild to moderate fibrosis (P < 0.001). No significant association was noted between the patient gender and fibrosis severity. We conclude that ACE I/D polymorphism is not associated with the degree of liver fibrosis. PMID:26681055

  17. The higher exercise intensity and the presence of allele I of ACE gene elicit a higher post-exercise blood pressure reduction and nitric oxide release in elderly women: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The absence of the I allele of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been associated with higher levels of circulating ACE, lower nitric oxide (NO) release and hypertension. The purposes of this study were to analyze the post-exercise salivary nitrite (NO2-) and blood pressure (BP) responses to different exercise intensities in elderly women divided according to their ACE genotype. Methods Participants (n = 30; II/ID = 20 and DD = 10) underwent three experimental sessions: incremental test - IT (15 watts workload increase/3 min) until exhaustion; 20 min exercise 90% anaerobic threshold (90% AT); and 20 min control session without exercise. Volunteers had their BP and NO2- measured before and after experimental sessions. Results Despite both intensities showed protective effect on preventing the increase of BP during post-exercise recovery compared to control, post-exercise hypotension and increased NO2- release was observed only for carriers of the I allele (p < 0.05). Conclusion Genotypes of the ACE gene may exert a role in post-exercise NO release and BP response. PMID:22136292

  18. Malathion Resistance Status and Mutations in Acetylcholinesterase Gene (Ace) in Japanese Encephalitis and Filariasis Vectors from Endemic Area in India.

    PubMed

    Misra, Brij Ranjan; Gore, Milind

    2015-05-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) and lymphatic filariasis (LF) are endemic in estern part of Uttar Pradesh in India and transmitted by Culex mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). JE vaccination and mass drug administration for JE and LF management is being undertaken respectively. In addition to this, indoor residual spraying and fogging are used for the control of mosquito vectors. Organophosphate resistance in mosquito is dependent on alteration in acetylcholinesterase (Ace) gene. Hence, it is important to evaluate organophosphate resistance in Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles (JE vector) and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (LF vector). The current study showed the presence of resistant populations and F331W mutation in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and G119S mutation in Cx. quinquefasciatus insensitive Ace genes. Resistant populations of these two vectors increase the chances of spreading of resistance in the natural population and may cause failure of intervention programs that include organophosphates against these two vectors in future. PMID:26334819

  19. Association of angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and familial hypercholesterolemia in the Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study of the association between genotype and phenotype is of great importance for the prediction of multiple diseases and pathophysiological conditions. The relationship between angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) Insertion/Deletion (I/D) polymorphism and Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) has been not fully investigated in all the ethnicities. In this study we sought to determine the frequency of I/D polymorphism genotypes of ACE gene in Saudi patients with FH. Results This is a case–control study carried out purely in Saudi population. Genomic DNA was isolated from 128 subjects who have participated in this study. ACE gene I/D polymorphism was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction in 64 FH cases and 64 healthy controls. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to genotype distribution. Furthermore, we did not find any significant difference in the frequency of ACE I/D polymorphism in FH subjects when stratified by gender (p = 0.43). Conclusion Our data suggest that ACE gene I/D polymorphism examined in this study has no role in predicting the occurrence and diagnosis of FH. PMID:24289455

  20. Purification and characterisation of a novel angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide derived from the enzymatic hydrolysate of Enteromorpha clathrata protein.

    PubMed

    Pan, Saikun; Wang, Shujun; Jing, Lingling; Yao, Dongrui

    2016-11-15

    Hydrolysates containing angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide were prepared from Enteromorpha clathrata protein using alcalase. The hydrolysates were fractionated into two molecular-weight ranges (below and above 10kDa) by ultrafiltration. The below-10kDa fraction showed higher ACE-inhibitory activity and was subsequently purified by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration chromatography. The structure of active peptide was identified as Pro-Ala-Phe-Gly by HPLC-Q-TOF-MS and its IC50 value was 35.9μM. The yield of this peptide from E. clathrata protein was 0.82%. Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the inhibitory kinetic mechanism of this peptide was non-competitive. Stability study revealed that the purified peptide showed resistance against gastrointestinal proteases. Thus, E. clathrata protein hydrolysate treated with alcalase is a beneficial ingredient of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals against hypertension and related diseases. PMID:27283651

  1. Therapeutic effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells modified by angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 gene on bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis injury.

    PubMed

    Min, Fang; Gao, Fengying; Li, Qian; Liu, Zhenwei

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (uMSCs) in the presence of angiotensin‑converting enzyme 2 gene (ACE2; ACE2‑uMSCs) on bleomycin (BLM)‑induced lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis in mice. A total of 100 male C57BL/6 mice were divided at random into five groups (n=20) as follows: Control group, BLM group, ACE2 group, uMSC group and ACE2‑uMSC group. At 7, 14 and 28 days post‑treatment, the following parameters were evaluated in lung tissue: Oxidation indexes [malondialedehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG)]; fibrosis factors [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, interferon (IFN)‑γ and transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β]; inflammatory cytokines [Interleukin (IL)‑1, IL‑2, IL‑6 and IL‑10]; ACE2 gene expression; hydroxyproline and collagen type 1 messenger RNA (mRNA) concentration; as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs; 2 and 9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)1‑4 expression. ACE2‑uMSC injection following bleomycin pretreatment significantly alleviated lung injury in mice. In addition, treatment with ACE2‑uMSCs demonstrated a stronger therapeutic effect than ACE2‑ or uMSC treatment alone, indicated by decreased expression of MDA, GSSG, TNF‑α, IFN‑γ, TGF‑β, IL‑1, IL‑2, IL‑6, collagen type 1 mRNA, MMPs and TIMPs as well as hydroxyproline concentration, and upregulation of SOD, GSH and ACE2 and IL‑10. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that ACE2 and uMSCs had a synergistic therapeutic effect on bleomycin‑induced acute lung injury. PMID:25435005

  2. The angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion–deletion polymorphism in a white British patient cohort with obstetric cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Müllenbach, Roman; Tetlow, Natasha; Bennett, Amanda; Pipkin, Fiona Broughton; Morgan, Linda; Williamson, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    The DD genotype of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene is over-represented in Finnish patients with obstetric cholestasis (OC). The purpose of this study was to establish whether this genotype is associated with cholestasis in UK cases. In a retrospective case-control study, we determined the ACE insertion/deletion frequencies in 166 British cases and 100 control women by polymerase chain reaction analysis. No significant difference in allele frequencies was found between these groups, but allele frequencies differed significantly between Finnish and UK OC cases (P = 0.0005). The prevalence of the DD genotype is lower in UK cases than in controls (χ2 [1 d.f.] = 4.32, P = 0.05) and the odds ratio for OC associated with the DD genotypeis 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.30–0.97. In contrast to Finnish OC cases, the DD genotype of the ACE is not increased in UK cases.

  3. Recovery of casein-derived peptides with in vitro inhibitory activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) using aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Evaldo Cardozo; Coimbra, Jane Sélia Dos Reis; de Oliveira, Eduardo Basílio; Bonomo, Renata Cristina Ferreira

    2014-10-22

    Peptides inhibiting the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) were obtained by trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of bovine milk casein, performed at 37°C, during 1, 2, 5, 8 and 24h. Results of in vitro inhibitory activity ranged between 13.4% and 78.5%. The highest ACE inhibitory activity was evidenced for hydrolysates obtained after 2h of reaction. Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) formed by polyethylene glycol of 1500gmol(-1) (PEG 1500)+sodium phosphate or potassium phosphates were produced and evaluated, in terms of partition coefficients (K) and extraction yields (y), to recovery the casein hydrolysates at room temperature. In ATPS containing sodium phosphate, the peptides showed a slightly greater affinity toward the bottom salt-rich phase (0.1≤K≤0.9; 5.7%≤y≤47%). In the case of ATPS containing potassium phosphates, these molecules showed substantially greater affinity toward the top polymer-rich phase (137≤K≤266; y≥99%). These results point out extraction using PEG 1500/potassium phosphate ATPS is an efficient technique to recover casein hydrolysates containing ACE inhibitors peptides. Outlined data will be helpful in integrating such unit operation to larger scale processes. PMID:25464099

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Assessment of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity of Fermented Soybean Milk by Lactobacillus casei Strains.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhijie; Chi, Yujie

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of fermented soybean milk (FSM) by Lactobacillus casei strains in vitro was investigated in this study. Effects of fermented soybean milk administration by gavage on systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure was also evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) rats and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Results showed that, CICC 20280 and CICC 23184 FSM showed high ACE inhibitory activity in vitro test and ACE inhibitory activity of CICC 23184 FSM was higher than CICC 20280 FSM. The bioactive substances of FSM were peptide and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Their contents in CICC 20280 FSM and CICC 23184 FSM were 3.97 ± 0.67 mg/ml (peptide), 1.71 ± 0.36 mg/ml (GABA) and 5.17 ± 0.22 mg/ml (peptide), 1.57 ± 0.21 mg/ml (GABA), respectively. Moreover, CICC 20280 and CICC 23184 FSM administration by gavage could effectively lower the blood pressure of SHR to a normal level, while there was no effect on blood pressure of WKY rats. This result indicated that the bioactive substances could play an antihypertensive role when the blood pressure was not within the normal levels (high levels). PMID:27139252

  5. Diagnostic use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibited renal scintigraphy in the identification of selective renal artery stenosis in the presence of multiple renal arteries: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, K.A.; Rose, S.C.; Haakenstad, A.O.; Handy, J.E.; Scuderi, A.J.; Datz, F.L. )

    1990-11-01

    In patients with renovascular hypertension, it is unknown whether the angiotensin converting enzyme-(ACE) inhibited renal scan will identify stenosis of a segmental branch of a single renal artery or of an accessory artery where multiple renal arteries are present. Since multiple renal arteries may be present in approximately 25% of all individuals, it will be important to establish whether the ACE-inhibited renal scan is useful in this population. We report a case of stenosis involving a renal artery in a patient with multiple renal arteries, successfully identified by ACE-inhibited renal scintigraphy.

  6. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Gene Polymophism in Adult Primary Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohd, Rozita; Wahab, Zaimi Abdul; Cader, Rizna; Gafor, Halim A.; Radzi, Azizah Md; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Tong, Norella Kong Chiew

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) accounts for a third of biopsy-proven primary glomerulonephritis in Malaysia. Pediatric studies have found the insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene to be associated with renal disease progression. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the ACE (I/D) genotypes in adult primary FSGS and its association with renal outcome on follow-up. Methods Prospective observational study involving primary FSGS patients was conducted. Biochemical and urine tests at the time of study were compared to the time of the diagnosis and disease progression analyzed. ACE gene polymorphism was identified using polymerase chain reaction amplification technique and categorized into II, ID and DD genotypes. Results Forty-five patients with a median follow-up of 3.8 years (interquartile range: 1.8 - 5.6) were recruited. The commonest genotype was II (n = 23, 51.1%) followed by ID (n = 19, 42.2%) and DD (n = 3, 6.7%). The baseline characteristics were comparable between the II and non-II groups at diagnosis and at study recruitment except that the median urine protein-creatinine index was significantly lower in the II group compared to the non-II group (0.02 vs. 0.04 g/mmol (P = 0.03). Regardless of genotypes, all parameters of renal outcome improved after treatment. Conclusion The II followed by ID genotypes were the predominant ACE gene alleles in our FSGS. Although the D allele has been reported to have a negative impact on renal outcome, treatment appeared to be more important than genotype in preserving renal function in this cohort. PMID:24883149

  7. Polymorphisms in the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene region predict coping styles in healthy adults and depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Heck, Angela; Lieb, Roselind; Ellgas, Andrea; Pfister, Hildegard; Lucae, Susanne; Erhardt, Angelika; Himmerich, Hubertus; Horstmann, Sonja; Kloiber, Stefan; Ripke, Stephan; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Bettecken, Thomas; Uhr, Manfred; Holsboer, Florian; Ising, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    Dispositional coping styles are important moderators of the stress reaction and are altered in stress-related disorders like cardiovascular diseases and affective disorders. Heritability studies suggest a considerable genetic contribution to the interindividual variability in coping styles. Since the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been described to be associated with the vulnerability for stress-related disorders and with altered stress hormone regulation, we investigated the ACE gene as potential candidate gene for coping styles. Five hundred forty one mentally healthy subjects and 194 patients suffering from depression participating in the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) project were examined. Coping styles were assessed with a self-report questionnaire (German Stress Coping Questionnaire SVF78) measuring the individual coping style pattern in response to stressful situations. We genotyped 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the insertion/Deletion (I/D)-polymorphism in the ACE gene region and investigated their associations with coping styles. In healthy subjects, the highest association was observed between rs8066276, an intronic SNP of the ACE gene, and the coping factor Distraction. A further intronic SNP rs4305, not in linkage disequilibrium with rs8066276, showed an association with Devaluation/Defense. All associated copying styles can be categorized as potentially stress reducing factors (positive coping). Both SNPs were also found to be associated with positive coping styles in the patient sample; rs8066276 was associated with Devaluation/Defense, and rs4305 showed associations with Control. These results suggest that the ACE gene is involved in the development of coping strategies. PMID:18484085

  8. Human gut endogenous proteins as a potential source of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I)-, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides.

    PubMed

    Dave, Lakshmi A; Hayes, Maria; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that endogenous bioactive proteins and peptides play a substantial role in the body's first line of immunological defence, immune-regulation and normal body functioning. Further, the peptides derived from the luminal digestion of proteins are also important for body function. For example, within the peptide database BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/en/biopep) 12 endogenous antimicrobial and 64 angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitory peptides derived from human milk and plasma proteins are listed. The antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.php) lists over 111 human host-defence peptides. Several endogenous proteins are secreted in the gut and are subject to the same gastrointestinal digestion processes as food proteins derived from the diet. The human gut endogenous proteins (GEP) include mucins, serum albumin, digestive enzymes, hormones, and proteins from sloughed off epithelial cells and gut microbiota, and numerous other secreted proteins. To date, much work has been carried out regarding the health altering effects of food-derived bioactive peptides but little attention has been paid to the possibility that GEP may also be a source of bioactive peptides. In this review, we discuss the potential of GEP to constitute a gut cryptome from which bioactive peptides such as ACE-I inhibitory, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides may be derived. PMID:26617077

  9. GENE-dosage effects on fitness in recent adaptive duplications: ace-1 in the mosquito Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Pierrick; Milesi, Pascal; Yébakima, André; Pasteur, Nicole; Weill, Mylène; Lenormand, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Gene duplications have long been advocated to contribute to the evolution of new functions. The role of selection in their early spread is more controversial. Unless duplications are favored for a direct benefit of increased expression, they are likely detrimental. In this article, we investigated the case of duplications favored because they combine already functionally divergent alleles. Their gene-dosage/fitness relations are poorly known because selection may operate on both overall expression and duplicates relative dosage. Using the well-documented case of Culex pipiens resistance to insecticides, we compared strains with various ace-1 allele combinations, including two duplicated alleles carrying both susceptible and resistant copies. The overall protein activity was nearly additive, but, surprisingly, fitness correlated better with the relative proportion of susceptible and resistant copies rather than any absolute measure of activity. Gene dosage is thus crucial, duplications stabilizing a "heterozygote" phenotype. It corroborates the view that these were favored because they fix a permanent heterosis, thereby solving the irreducible trade-off between resistance and synaptic transmission. Moreover, we showed that the contrasted successes of the two duplicated alleles in natural populations depend on genetic changes unrelated to ace-1, confirming the probable implication of recessive sublethal mutations linked to structural rearrangements in some duplications. PMID:24494966

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzymes modulate aphid-plant interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Lan; Lu, Hong; Chen, Shaoliang; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACEs) are key components of the renin-angiotensin system in mammals. However, the function of ACE homologs in insect saliva is unclear. Aphids presumably deliver effector proteins via saliva into plant cells to maintain a compatible insect-plant interaction. In this study, we showed that ACE modulates aphid-plant interactions by affecting feeding behavior and survival of aphids on host plants. Three ACE genes were identified from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum genome. ACE1 and ACE2 were highly expressed in the salivary glands and are predicted to function as secretory proteins. The ACE2 transcript level decreased in aphids fed on artificial diet compared with aphids fed on Vicia faba. The knockdown of the expression of each ACE by RNAi failed to affect aphid survival. When ACE1 and ACE2 were simultaneously knocked down, aphid feeding was enhanced. Aphids required less time to find the phloem sap and showed longer passive ingestion. However, the simultaneous knockdown of ACE1 and ACE2 resulted in a higher mortality rate than the control group when aphids were fed on plants. These results indicated that ACE1 and ACE2 function together to modulate A. pisum feeding and survival on plants. PMID:25744345

  11. Angiotensin-converting enzymes modulate aphid–plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Lan; Lu, Hong; Chen, Shaoliang; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACEs) are key components of the renin–angiotensin system in mammals. However, the function of ACE homologs in insect saliva is unclear. Aphids presumably deliver effector proteins via saliva into plant cells to maintain a compatible insect–plant interaction. In this study, we showed that ACE modulates aphid–plant interactions by affecting feeding behavior and survival of aphids on host plants. Three ACE genes were identified from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum genome. ACE1 and ACE2 were highly expressed in the salivary glands and are predicted to function as secretory proteins. The ACE2 transcript level decreased in aphids fed on artificial diet compared with aphids fed on Vicia faba. The knockdown of the expression of each ACE by RNAi failed to affect aphid survival. When ACE1 and ACE2 were simultaneously knocked down, aphid feeding was enhanced. Aphids required less time to find the phloem sap and showed longer passive ingestion. However, the simultaneous knockdown of ACE1 and ACE2 resulted in a higher mortality rate than the control group when aphids were fed on plants. These results indicated that ACE1 and ACE2 function together to modulate A. pisum feeding and survival on plants. PMID:25744345

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme/vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and bioelectrical impedance analysis in predicting athletic performances of Italian young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Matteo Levi; Gulisano, Massimo; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Ruggiero, Marco; Ceroti, Marco; Marella, Mario; Castellini, Elena; Pacini, Stefania

    2011-08-01

    We evaluated the association between 2 genetic polymorphisms known to be involved in fitness and performance, and anthropometric features, body composition, and athletic performances in young male soccer players with the goal of identifying genetic profiles that can be used to achieve maximal results from training. One hundred twenty-five medium-high-level male soccer players were genotyped for angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D, and vitamin D receptor (VDR) FokI gene polymorphisms and scored for anthropometric measurements, body composition, and athletic performance. Body mass index, fat mass, fat-free mass, resistance, reactance, impedance, phase angle (PA), and body cell mass were measured. Athletic performance was evaluated by squat jump, countermovement jump (CMJ), 2-kg medicine ball throw, 10- and 20-m sprint time. We observed that the homozygous ff genotype of the VDR gene was significantly more represented in young soccer players than in a matched sedentary population. Values of reactance and PA were differently distributed in ACE and VDR genotypes with high mean values in subjects with DD (ACE) and FF (VDR) genotypes. No correlation was observed between ACE or VDR genotypes and 2-kg medicine ball throw, 10- and 20-m sprint times. The ID genotype of ACE was associated with the best performances in squat jump and CMJ. Our results suggest that determination of ACE and VDR genotypes might help select those young athletes harboring the most favorable genetic potential to succeed in soccer. PMID:21747292

  13. Study of the association between the donors and recipients angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion gene polymorphism and the acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Azmandian, Jalal; Mohamadifar, Mohamadamir; Rahmanian-Koshkaki, Sara; Mehdipoor, Mohammad; Nematollahi, Mohamad-Hadi; Saburi, Amin; Mandegary, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is involved in various pathophysiological conditions including renal function. ACE levels are under genetic control. Objectives: This study was designed to investigate the association between the donors and recipients ACE-I/D gene polymorphism and risk of acute rejection outcome in renal allograft recipients. Patients and Methods: ACE-I/D polymorphism was determined in 200 donor-recipient pairs who had been referred to Afzalipour hospital in Kerman. ACE-I/D polymorphism was detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Acute rejection (AR) during at least six months post-transplantation was defined as a 20% increase in creatinine level from the postoperative baseline in the absence of other causes of graft dysfunction which responded to antirejection therapy. Results: The observed allele frequencies were II 9.8%, ID 35.6% and DD 44.4% in donors and II 9.8%, ID 35.1% and DD 52.7% in recipients. There were no significant association between ACE genotypes and AR episodes (ORID=0.96 [0.18-5.00] and ORDD: 1.24 [0.25-6.07] for the donors) and (ORID: 0.29 [0.06-1.45] and ORDD: 0.75 [0.19-2.90] for the recipients). Conclusions: It seems that donor and recipient ACE-I/D genotype might not be a risk factor for acute renal allograft rejection. However, due to conflicting results from this and other studies, multicenter collaborative studies with more participants and concomitant evaluation of ACE polymorphism with other polymorphisms in renin–angiotensin system (RAS) are suggested to determine whether ACE genotypes are significant predictors of renal allograft rejection. PMID:26311652

  14. Correlation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 gene polymorphisms with stage 2 hypertension in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenquan; Qi, Yue; Hou, Shuqin; Zhou, Wenyu; Qiu, Changchun

    2007-12-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homologue of human ACE, might negatively regulate the activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and might function as a protective regulator in the pathogenesis of hypertension. However, association studies regarding ACE2 are sparse in the literature, with negative results in the majority of cases. Here we conducted an association study between 2 intronic polymorphisms (A1075G and G8790A) of the ACE2 gene and stage 2 hypertension in Han Chinese. We genotyped the 2 polymorphisms in 1494 subjects (808 stage 2 hypertensives and 686 normotensives) recruited from the Fangshan district (Beijing). Data were analyzed using chi(2) test, 1-way analysis of variance, and logistic regression where appropriate. The frequency of A1075G allele distribution in males differed significantly (P < 0.0001), whereas the genotype and allele distributions of G8790A polymorphism were similar, between stage 2 hypertensives and normotensives. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) differed significantly in females across both genotypes: SBP was significantly lower in subjects with the 1075AA and 8790GG genotypes, higher in the 1075GG (+13.65 mm Hg versus AA) and 8790AA (+13.36 mm Hg versus GG) genotypes, and intermediate in the 1075AG (+5.76 mm Hg versus AA) and 8790GA (+5.65 mm Hg versus GG) genotypes. Our data suggest that the polymorphism (A1075G) might be a risk factor-at least a marker-for stage 2 hypertension in males and that the 2 studied polymorphisms might be the indicators of systolic hypertension in females. PMID:18022600

  15. ACE and UCP2 gene polymorphisms and their association with baseline and exercise-related changes in the functional performance of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Barry R.; Taylor, Denise; Kilding, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining high levels of physical function is an important aspect of successful ageing. While muscle mass and strength contribute to functional performance in older adults, little is known about the possible genetic basis for the heterogeneity of physical function in older adults and in how older adults respond to exercise. Two genes that have possible roles in determining levels of muscle mass, strength and function in young and older adults are angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). This study examined whether polymorphisms in these two individual genes were associated with baseline functional performance levels and/or the training-related changes following exercise in previously untrained older adults. Five-eight Caucasian older adults (mean age 69.8 years) with no recent history of resistance training enrolled in a 12 week program of resistance, balance and cardiovascular exercises aimed at improving functional performance. Performance in 6 functional tasks was recorded at baseline and after 12 weeks. Genomic DNA was assayed for the ACE intron 16 insertion/deletion (I/D) and the UCP2 G-866A polymorphism. Baseline differences among genotype groups were tested using analysis of variance. Genotype differences in absolute and relative changes in physical function among the exercisers were tested using a general linear model, adjusting for age and gender. The genotype frequencies for each of the studied polymorphisms conformed to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The ACE I/D genotype was significantly associated with mean baseline measures of handgrip strength (II 30.9 ± 3.01 v. ID 31.7 ± 1.48 v. DD 29.3 ± 2.18 kg, p < 0.001), 8ft Up and Go time (II 6.45 ± 0.48 v. ID/DD 4.41 ± 0.19 s, p < 0.001) and 6 min walk distance (II 458 ± 28.7 v. ID/DD 546 ± 12.1m, p = 0.008). The UCP2 G-866A genotype was also associated with baseline 8ft Up and Go time (GG 5.45 ± 0.35 v. GA 4.47 ± 0.26 v. AA 3.89 ± 0.71 s, p = 0

  16. AAV8-Mediated Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 Gene Delivery Prevents Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis by Regulating MAPK, NF-κB and STAT3 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yiguo; Tao, Lifei; Zheng, Shijie; Lin, Ru; Fu, Xinyu; Chen, Zihe; Lei, Chunyan; Wang, Jiaming; Li, Hongwei; Li, Qiuhong; Lei, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) is a key hormonal system which regulates the cardiovascular function and is implicated in several autoimmune diseases. With the discovery of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a protective axis of RAS namely ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas that counteracts the deleterious ACE/AngII/AT1R axis has been established. This axis is emerging as a novel target to attenuate ocular inflammation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the hypothesis that enhancing the activity of the protective axis of RAS by subretinal delivery of an AAV8 (Y733F)-ACE2 vector would protect against the ocular inflammation in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) mice through regulating the local immune responses. Our studies demonstrated that increased ACE2 expression exerts protective effects on inflammation in EAU mouse by modulating ocular immune responses, including the differentiation of Th1/Th17 cells and the polarization of M1/M2 macrophages; whereas the systemic immune responses appeared not affected. These effects were mediated by activating the Ang-(1–7)/Mas and inhibiting the MAPK, NF-κB and STAT3 signaling pathways. This proof-of-concept study suggests that activation of ocular ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas axis with AAV gene transfer modulates local immune responses and may be a promising, long-lasting therapeutic strategy for refractory and recurrent uveitis, as well as other inflammatory eye diseases. PMID:27558087

  17. The Pharmacogenetic Footprint of ACE Inhibition: A Population-Based Metabolomics Study.

    PubMed

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Menni, Cristina; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Thorand, Barbara; Quell, Jan; Kobl, Michael; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Valdes, Ana M; Mangino, Massimo; Waldenberger, Melanie; Strauch, Konstantin; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are an important class of antihypertensives whose action on the human organism is still not fully understood. Although it is known that ACE especially cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active polypeptides, the whole range of substrates and products is still unknown. When analyzing the action of ACE inhibitors, effects of genetic variation on metabolism need to be considered since genetic variance in the ACE gene locus was found to be associated with ACE-concentration in blood as well as with changes in the metabolic profiles of a general population. To investigate the interactions between genetic variance at the ACE-locus and the influence of ACE-therapy on the metabolic status we analyzed 517 metabolites in 1,361 participants from the KORA F4 study. We replicated our results in 1,964 individuals from TwinsUK. We observed differences in the concentration of five dipeptides and three ratios of di- and oligopeptides between ACE inhibitor users and non-users that were genotype dependent. Such changes in the concentration affected major homozygotes, and to a lesser extent heterozygotes, while minor homozygotes showed no or only small changes in the metabolite status. Two of these resulting dipeptides, namely aspartylphenylalanine and phenylalanylserine, showed significant associations with blood pressure which qualifies them-and perhaps also the other dipeptides-as readouts of ACE-activity. Since so far ACE activity measurement is substrate specific due to the usage of only one oligopeptide, taking several dipeptides as potential products of ACE into account may provide a broader picture of the ACE activity. PMID:27120469

  18. The Pharmacogenetic Footprint of ACE Inhibition: A Population-Based Metabolomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Menni, Cristina; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Thorand, Barbara; Quell, Jan; Kobl, Michael; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Valdes, Ana M.; Mangino, Massimo; Waldenberger, Melanie; Strauch, Konstantin; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are an important class of antihypertensives whose action on the human organism is still not fully understood. Although it is known that ACE especially cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active polypeptides, the whole range of substrates and products is still unknown. When analyzing the action of ACE inhibitors, effects of genetic variation on metabolism need to be considered since genetic variance in the ACE gene locus was found to be associated with ACE-concentration in blood as well as with changes in the metabolic profiles of a general population. To investigate the interactions between genetic variance at the ACE-locus and the influence of ACE-therapy on the metabolic status we analyzed 517 metabolites in 1,361 participants from the KORA F4 study. We replicated our results in 1,964 individuals from TwinsUK. We observed differences in the concentration of five dipeptides and three ratios of di- and oligopeptides between ACE inhibitor users and non-users that were genotype dependent. Such changes in the concentration affected major homozygotes, and to a lesser extent heterozygotes, while minor homozygotes showed no or only small changes in the metabolite status. Two of these resulting dipeptides, namely aspartylphenylalanine and phenylalanylserine, showed significant associations with blood pressure which qualifies them—and perhaps also the other dipeptides—as readouts of ACE-activity. Since so far ACE activity measurement is substrate specific due to the usage of only one oligopeptide, taking several dipeptides as potential products of ACE into account may provide a broader picture of the ACE activity. PMID:27120469

  19. Early genes induction in spontaneously hypertensive rats left ventricle with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but not hydralazine

    SciTech Connect

    Susic, D.; Aristizabal, D.J.; Prakash, O.; Nunez, E.; Frohlich, E.D.

    1995-12-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats were given an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (benazepril or quinapril) or hydralazine and were left for up to 6 hr. To examine whether administration of antihypertensive agents affects expression of immediate early genes in left ventricular myocardium, groups of rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, and 6 hr after dosing; total RNA was extracted from left ventricular tissue and analyzed by blot hybridization technique using labeled probes for c-myc, c-fos, and GAPDH mRNA. All three antihypertensive agents reduced pressure similarly, and treatment with the two ACE inhibitors increased c-fos and c-myc mRNA expression in left ventriculum. By contrast, hydralazine did not increase steady-state mRNA expression of either proto-oncogene. Thus, in parallel with the pressure fall, acute administration of the ACE inhibitors induced expression of c-fos and c-myc mRNAs in the left ventricle. Since the equidepressor dose of hyralazine did not affect expression of these proto-oncogenes, this effect of ACE inhibitors is independent of their hemodynamic action. 27 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. A Modern Understanding of the Traditional and Nontraditional Biological Functions of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Frank S.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Giani, Jorge F.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Fuchs, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc-dependent peptidase responsible for converting angiotensin I into the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. However, ACE is a relatively nonspecific peptidase that is capable of cleaving a wide range of substrates. Because of this, ACE and its peptide substrates and products affect many physiologic processes, including blood pressure control, hematopoiesis, reproduction, renal development, renal function, and the immune response. The defining feature of ACE is that it is composed of two homologous and independently catalytic domains, the result of an ancient gene duplication, and ACE-like genes are widely distributed in nature. The two ACE catalytic domains contribute to the wide substrate diversity of ACE and, by extension, the physiologic impact of the enzyme. Several studies suggest that the two catalytic domains have different biologic functions. Recently, the X-ray crystal structure of ACE has elucidated some of the structural differences between the two ACE domains. This is important now that ACE domain-specific inhibitors have been synthesized and characterized. Once widely available, these reagents will undoubtedly be powerful tools for probing the physiologic actions of each ACE domain. In turn, this knowledge should allow clinicians to envision new therapies for diseases not currently treated with ACE inhibitors. PMID:23257181

  1. Association analysis of ACE, ACTN3 and PPARGC1A gene polymorphisms in two cohorts of European strength and power athletes

    PubMed Central

    Jakaitiene, A; Aksenov, MO; Aksenova, AV; Druzhevskaya, AM; Astratenkova, IV; Egorova, ES; Gabdrakhmanova, LJ; Tubelis, L; Kucinskas, V; Utkus, A

    2016-01-01

    The performance of professional strength and power athletes is influenced, at least partly, by genetic components. The main aim of this study was to investigate individually and in combination the association of ACE (I/D), ACTN3 (R577X) and PPARGC1A (Gly482Ser) gene polymorphisms with strength/power-oriented athletes’ status in two cohorts of European athletes. A cohort of European Caucasians from Russia and Lithuania (161 athletes: by groups – weightlifters (87), powerlifters (60), throwers (14); by elite status – ‘elite’ (104), ‘sub-elite’ (57); and 1,202 controls) were genotyped for ACE, ACTN3 and PPARGC1A polymorphisms. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction and/or restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Statistically significant differences in ACTN3 (R577X) allele/genotype distribution were not observed in the whole cohort of athletes or between analysed groups separately when compared with controls. The odds ratio for athletes compared to controls of the ACE I/I genotype was 1.71 (95% CI 1.01-2.92) in the Russian cohort and for the ACE I/D genotype it was 2.35 (95% CI 1.10-5.06) in the Lithuanian cohort. The odds ratio of being a powerlifter in PPARGC1A Ser/Ser genotype carriers was 2.11 (95% CI: 1.09-4.09, P = 0.026). The ACTN3 (R577X) polymorphism is not associated with strength/power athletic status in two cohorts of European athletes. The ACE I/I genotype is probably the ‘preferable genotype’ for Russian athletes and the ACE I/D genotype for Lithuanian strength/power athletes. We found that the PPARGC1A (Gly482Ser) polymorphism is associated with strength/power athlete status. Specifically, the PPARGC1A Ser/Ser genotype is more favourable for powerlifters compared to controls. PMID:27601773

  2. Association analysis of ACE, ACTN3 and PPARGC1A gene polymorphisms in two cohorts of European strength and power athletes.

    PubMed

    Gineviciene, V; Jakaitiene, A; Aksenov, M O; Aksenova, A V; Druzhevskaya, A M; Astratenkova, I V; Egorova, E S; Gabdrakhmanova, L J; Tubelis, L; Kucinskas, V; Utkus, A

    2016-09-01

    The performance of professional strength and power athletes is influenced, at least partly, by genetic components. The main aim of this study was to investigate individually and in combination the association of ACE (I/D), ACTN3 (R577X) and PPARGC1A (Gly482Ser) gene polymorphisms with strength/power-oriented athletes' status in two cohorts of European athletes. A cohort of European Caucasians from Russia and Lithuania (161 athletes: by groups - weightlifters (87), powerlifters (60), throwers (14); by elite status - 'elite' (104), 'sub-elite' (57); and 1,202 controls) were genotyped for ACE, ACTN3 and PPARGC1A polymorphisms. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction and/or restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Statistically significant differences in ACTN3 (R577X) allele/genotype distribution were not observed in the whole cohort of athletes or between analysed groups separately when compared with controls. The odds ratio for athletes compared to controls of the ACE I/I genotype was 1.71 (95% CI 1.01-2.92) in the Russian cohort and for the ACE I/D genotype it was 2.35 (95% CI 1.10-5.06) in the Lithuanian cohort. The odds ratio of being a powerlifter in PPARGC1A Ser/Ser genotype carriers was 2.11 (95% CI: 1.09-4.09, P = 0.026). The ACTN3 (R577X) polymorphism is not associated with strength/power athletic status in two cohorts of European athletes. The ACE I/I genotype is probably the 'preferable genotype' for Russian athletes and the ACE I/D genotype for Lithuanian strength/power athletes. We found that the PPARGC1A (Gly482Ser) polymorphism is associated with strength/power athlete status. Specifically, the PPARGC1A Ser/Ser genotype is more favourable for powerlifters compared to controls. PMID:27601773

  3. [Polymorphism of genes coding for angiotensin I converting enzyme and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Goracy, I

    2000-01-01

    Due to its multifarious biological activity the renin-angiotensin system occupies a special position among risk factors of ischemic heart disease. The discovery of I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene led to a better understanding of genetic control of this enzyme. Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor of ischemic heart disease. Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine may be due to improper diet (e.g. shortage of folic acid) and/or genetic influence. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme in the metabolism of homocysteine. The present study was performed in 100 patients (14 women and 86 men, mean age 54.2 +/- 9.2 years) with a history of myocardial infarction. The control group included 100 patients (10 women and 90 men, mean age 52.3 +/- 10 years) without such history. PCR was used to detect I/D ACE and C677T MTHFR polymorphisms. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood nuclear cells and amplified by PCR with two pairs of primers flanking the polymorphic regions. The restriction enzyme Hinf I was used to identify genotypes of the MTHFR polymorphism. No difference between both groups was found concerning the distribution of I/D ACE genotypes (31% II, 51% ID, 18% DD in the study group; 30% II, 57% ID, 13% DD in the control group; Tab. 1) or the distribution of C677T MTHFR genotypes (46% CC, 45% CT, 9% TT in the study group; 39% CC, 50% CT, 11% TT in the control group; Tab. 2). There was a significant effect of I/D genotype on ACE activity (IU/L) in the study (II = 18.2 +/- 17.9; ID = 33.5 +/- 19.9; DD = 68.9 +/- 21.9) and in the control group (II = 24.2 +/- 18.1; ID = 31.5 +/- 20.9; DD = 51.4 +/- 19.5; Tab. 3). No correlation was confirmed between ACE or MTHFR genotypes and age at infarction or left ventricular mass (Tabs. 4, 5, 6). The results indicate that neither the I/D ACE nor the C677T MTHFR polymorphisms are associated with risk of myocardial infarction in the Polish population. PMID:11712321

  4. Evidence for co-regulation of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase and metallothionein gene expression in yeast through transcriptional control by copper via the ACE 1 factor.

    PubMed

    Carri, M T; Galiazzo, F; Ciriolo, M R; Rotilio, G

    1991-01-28

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain DTY26, lacking ACE1, the protein mediator for the induction of metallothionein gene expression, is unable to increase Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase mRNA in response to copper. In the wild-type strain DTY22 transcription of both Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase and metallothionein genes is induced by copper and silver, as expected on the basis of previous results indicating that ACE1 binds only Ag(I) besides Cu(I). We conclude that at the transcriptional level Cu,ZnSOD is co-regulated with metallothionein. Furthermore, structural similarities between the two promoters were found, which could explain the co-regulation effect and the quantitative differences in the response of the two genes to copper. PMID:1991520

  5. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Mägi, Agnes; Unt, Eve; Prans, Ele; Raus, Liina; Eha, Jaan; Veraksitš, Alar; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-06-01

    Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1) to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2) to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females) during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females). The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively) and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008) in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ) of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data) and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively) in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance. Key pointsSignificantly higher prevalence of the ACE ID and the ACTN3 RR genotypes were found among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group, which may be an advantage for the explosive speed and power

  6. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Mägi, Agnes; Unt, Eve; Prans, Ele; Raus, Liina; Eha, Jaan; Veraksitš, Alar; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-01-01

    Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1) to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2) to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females) during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females). The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively) and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008) in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ) of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data) and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively) in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance. Key points Significantly higher prevalence of the ACE ID and the ACTN3 RR genotypes were found among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group, which may be an advantage for the explosive speed and power capacity in

  7. Intron-loss evolution of hatching enzyme genes in Teleostei

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hatching enzyme, belonging to the astacin metallo-protease family, digests egg envelope at embryo hatching. Orthologous genes of the enzyme are found in all vertebrate genomes. Recently, we found that exon-intron structures of the genes were conserved among tetrapods, while the genes of teleosts frequently lost their introns. Occurrence of such intron losses in teleostean hatching enzyme genes is an uncommon evolutionary event, as most eukaryotic genes are generally known to be interrupted by introns and the intron insertion sites are conserved from species to species. Here, we report on extensive studies of the exon-intron structures of teleostean hatching enzyme genes for insight into how and why introns were lost during evolution. Results We investigated the evolutionary pathway of intron-losses in hatching enzyme genes of 27 species of Teleostei. Hatching enzyme genes of basal teleosts are of only one type, which conserves the 9-exon-8-intron structure of an assumed ancestor. On the other hand, otocephalans and euteleosts possess two types of hatching enzyme genes, suggesting a gene duplication event in the common ancestor of otocephalans and euteleosts. The duplicated genes were classified into two clades, clades I and II, based on phylogenetic analysis. In otocephalans and euteleosts, clade I genes developed a phylogeny-specific structure, such as an 8-exon-7-intron, 5-exon-4-intron, 4-exon-3-intron or intron-less structure. In contrast to the clade I genes, the structures of clade II genes were relatively stable in their configuration, and were similar to that of the ancestral genes. Expression analyses revealed that hatching enzyme genes were high-expression genes, when compared to that of housekeeping genes. When expression levels were compared between clade I and II genes, clade I genes tends to be expressed more highly than clade II genes. Conclusions Hatching enzyme genes evolved to lose their introns, and the intron-loss events occurred at

  8. [The role of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene I/D polymorphism in development of metabolic disorders in patients with cardiovascular pathology].

    PubMed

    Vynohradova, S V

    2005-01-01

    The role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene I/D polymorphism in development of cardiovascular pathology (CVP), metabolic syndrom and insulin-independent diabet associated with such metabolic disorders as glucose intolerance and hyperglicemia, intolerance to insulin and hyperinsulinemia, dyslipiproteinemia (DLP) and obesity is discussed. Most of authors consider D-allel and DD genotype to be assosiated with development of DLP and such CVP as ishemic heart disease and myocardial infarction. PMID:16018179

  9. Effect of angiotensin I-converting enzyme and α-actinin-3 gene polymorphisms on sport performance.

    PubMed

    Gunel, Tuba; Gumusoglu, Ece; Hosseini, Mohammad Kazem; Yilmazyildirim, Eda; Dolekcap, Ismail; Aydinli, Kilic

    2014-04-01

    Genetic polymorphism is considered to be associated with human physical performance. The angiotensin I-converting enzyme insertion/deletion (ACE I/D) and the α-actinin-3 gene (ACTN3) R577X polymorphisms have been widely investigated for such associations, and functional ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms have been associated with sprinter performance. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of these polymorphisms on sport performance among 37 elite athletes and 37 healthy controls. The ACE II genotype was identified in 32.43% of the control group and 8.11% of elite athletes, the DD genotype in 37.84% of the control group and 51.35% of the elite athletes, and the ID genotype in 29.73% of the control group and 40.54% of the elite athletes. With regard to the ACTN3 gene, the XX genotype, which confers an advantage for endurance activities, was identified in 10.81% of the control group and 35.14% of the elite athletes. The XX genotype was observed more frequently than the RR genotype (advantageous for sprinting), which was identified in 2.70% of the control group and 10.81% of elite athletes. The RX genotype (observed in 86.48% of the control group and in 54.05% of the elite athletes) was the most common genotype of the individuals in the present study. The study showed that ACTN3 and ACE gene polymorphisms have an effect on muscle power; however, larger studies are required. PMID:24566537

  10. High Incidence of ACE/PAI-1 in Association to a Spectrum of Other Polymorphic Cardiovascular Genes Involving PBMCs Proinflammatory Cytokines in Hypertensive Hypercholesterolemic Patients: Reversibility with a Combination of ACE Inhibitor and Statin

    PubMed Central

    Mouawad, Charbel; Haddad, Katia; Hamoui, Samar; Azar, Albert; Fajloun, Ziad; Makdissy, Nehman

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are significantly high in the Lebanese population with the two most predominant forms being atherosclerosis and venous thrombosis. The purpose of our study was to assess the association of a spectrum of CVD related genes and combined state of hypertension hypercholesterolemia (HH) in unrelated Lebanese. Twelve polymorphisms were studied by multiplex PCR and reverse hybridization of DNA from 171 healthy individuals and 144 HH subjects. Two genes were significantly associated with HH: ACE (OR: 9.20, P<0.0001) and PAI-1 (OR: 2.29, P = 0.007), respectively with the occurrence of the risky alleles “Del” and “4G”. The frequencies of the Del and 4G alleles were found to be 0.98 and 0.90 in the HH group versus 0.84 and 0.79 in the healthy group, respectively. Serum ACE activity and PAI-I increased significantly with Del/Del and 4G/5G genotypes. The co-expression of Del/4G(+/+) was detected in 113 out of 171 (66.0%) controls and 125 out of 144 (86.8%) HH subjects. Del/4G(-/-) was detected in only 6 (3.5%) controls and undetected in the HH group. Three venous thrombosis related genes [FV(Leiden), MTHFR(A1298C) and FXIII(V34L)] were significantly related to the prominence of the co-expression of Del/4G(+/+). A range of 2 to 8 combined polymorphisms co-expressed per subject where 5 mutations were the most detected. In Del/4G(+/+) subjects, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) produced significant elevated levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α contrary to IL-10, and no variations occurred for IL-4. ACE inhibitor (ramipril) in combination with statin (atorvastatin) and not alone reversed significantly the situation. This first report from Lebanon sheds light on an additional genetic predisposition of a complex spectrum of genes involved in CVD and suggests that the most requested gene FVL by physicians may not be sufficient to diagnose eventual future problems that can occur in the cardiovascular system. Subjects expressing the double mutations

  11. ACE inhibition reduces infarction in normotensive but not hypertensive rats: correlation with cortical ACE activity

    PubMed Central

    Porritt, Michelle J; Chen, Michelle; Rewell, Sarah S J; Dean, Rachael G; Burrell, Louise M; Howells, David W

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition can reduce stroke risk by up to 43% in humans and reduce the associated disability, and hence understanding the mechanism of improvement is important. In animals and humans, these effects may be independent of the blood pressure-lowering effects of ACE inhibition. Normotensive (Wistar–Kyoto (WKY)) and hypertensive (spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)) animals were treated with the ACE inhibitors ramipril or lisinopril for 7 or 42 days before 2 hours of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Blood pressure, serum ACE, and blood glucose levels were measured and stroke infarct volume was recorded 24 hours after stroke. Despite greater reductions in blood pressure, infarct size was not improved by ACE inhibition in hypertensive animals. Short-term ACE inhibition produced only a modest reduction in blood pressure, but WKY rats showed marked reductions in infarct volume. Long-term ACE inhibition had additional reductions in blood pressure; however, infarct volumes in WKY rats did not improve further but worsened. WKY rats differed from SHR in having marked cortical ACE activity that was highly sensitive to ACE inhibition. The beneficial effects of ACE inhibition on infarct volume in normotensive rats do not correlate with changes in blood pressure. However, WKY rats have ACE inhibitor-sensitive cortical ACE activity that is lacking in the SHR. PMID:20407464

  12. ACE blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help diagnose and monitor a disorder called sarcoidosis . People with sarcoidosis may have their ACE level tested regularly to ... normal ACE level may be a sign of sarcoidosis. ACE levels may rise or fall as sarcoidosis ...

  13. Developmental expression of ACE2 in the SHR kidney: a role in hypertension?

    PubMed

    Tikellis, C; Cooper, M E; Bialkowski, K; Johnston, C I; Burns, W C; Lew, R A; Smith, A I; Thomas, M C

    2006-07-01

    The abnormal development of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is thought contribute to adult-onset hypertension in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a novel enzyme with complementary actions to that of ACE. Recent studies have shown that ACE2 expression is reduced in the adult SHR. However, its regulation in pre-hypertensive animals is unknown. In this study, we examine the developmental expression of ACE2 in the rodent kidney and its temporal expression, as it relates to the development of hypertension in the SHR model. Kidneys from SHR and normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats (n=8-12/group) at birth, 6 weeks of age, and adulthood (80 days) were examined. Gene expression and activity of ACE2 were determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and quenched fluorescence assays, respectively. Renal expression was localized by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. The expression and ACE2 activity are significantly increased in the SHR kidney at birth. With the onset of hypertension, the tubular expression of ACE2 falls in SHR compared to WKY and remains reduced in the adult SHR kidney. Glomerular expression is paradoxically increased in the SHR glomerulus. The overall developmental pattern of ACE2 expression in the SHR kidney is also modified, with declining expression over the course of renal development. The developmental pattern of ACE2 expression in the SHR kidney is altered before the onset of hypertension, consistent with the key role of the RAS in the pathogenesis of adult-onset hypertension. Further research is required to distinguish the contribution of these changes to the development and progression of hypertension in this model. PMID:16710353

  14. MTHFR and ACE Gene Polymorphisms and Risk of Vascular and Degenerative Dementias in the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Pratima; Pradhan, Sunil; Modi, Dinesh Raj; Mittal, Balraj

    2009-01-01

    Focal lacunar infarctions due to cerebral small vessel atherosclerosis or single/multiple large cortical infarcts lead to vascular dementia, and different genes and environmental factors have been implicated in causation or aggravation of the disease. Previous reports suggest that some of the risk factors may be common to both vascular as well as…

  15. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with the long term goal of our research to understand the nature of the key enzymes in eukaryotic DNA replication we have characterized the properties of the wild type DNA polymerases of the {alpha}-family and their mutants. We have also provided evidence for the role of aphidicolin in the elongation process of the in vivo DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. We also developed a technology for planned prep from a large numbers of clones for direct screening by size or restriction digestion in order to facilitate our goals to clone the DNA polymerase gene.

  16. Haplotypes extending across ACE are associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Patrick G; Katzov, Hagit; Feuk, Lars; Bennet, Anna M; Johansson, Boo; Wiman, Björn; de Faire, Ulf; Cairns, Nigel J; Wilcock, Gordon K; Brookes, Anthony J; Blennow, Kaj; Prince, Jonathan A

    2003-04-15

    Numerous genes have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but, with the exception of a demonstrated association with the epsilon 4 allele of APOE, findings have not been consistently replicated across populations. One of the most widely studied is the gene for angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE ). A meta-analysis of published data on a common Alu indel polymorphism in ACE was performed which indicated highly significant association of the insertion allele with AD (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.19 - 1.41; P=4 x 10(-8)). To further explore the influence of ACE on AD, several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in five independent populations represented by over 3100 individuals. Analyses based upon single markers and haplotypes revealed strong evidence of association in case-control models and also in a model examining the influence of variation in ACE upon cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid beta42 peptide (Abeta42). The most significant evidence for association with AD was found for an SNP, A-262T, located in the ACE promoter (OR 1.64; 95% CI 1.33 -1.94; P=2 x 10(-5)). Estimates of population attributable risk for the common allele of this SNP suggest that it, or an allele in tight linkage disequilibrium (LD) with it, may contribute to as much as 35% of AD in the general population. Results support a model whereby decreased ACE activity may influence AD susceptibility by a mechanism involving beta-amyloid metabolism. PMID:12668609

  17. Association between ACE polymorphism, cognitive phenotype and APOE E4 allele in a Tunisian population with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Achouri-Rassas, Afef; Ali, Nadia Ben; Cherif, Aroua; Fray, Saloua; Siala, Hajer; Zakraoui, Nouria Oudiaa; Hadj-Fredj, Sondes; Kechaou, Mariem; Anane, Nadia; Echebi, Slim; Messaoud, Taieb; Belal, Samir

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has shown altered activity in patients with neurological diseases. An insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene encoding angiotensin-converting enzyme has been reported to be associated with the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and is generally considered to be a disorder primarily affecting memory. We conducted a case-control study in a sample composed of 85 sporadic AD patients and 90 age- and sex-matched controls to investigate the possible effect of the polymorphism and cognitive profile. Our data revealed an association between the ACE polymorphism and AD risk. There was a significant difference in the ACE allele or genotype frequencies between cases and controls. The D/D genotype showed an increased risk for AD and in the amnestic group and the effect was independent on ApoE genotypes. PMID:26456241

  18. Beneficial role of D allele in controlling ACE levels: a study among Brahmins of north India.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Shobha; Sharma, Nidhi; Thakur, Sunil; Mondal, Prakash R; Saraswathy, Kallur N

    2016-06-01

    India being a country with vast diversity is expected to have different dietary and life style patterns which in turn may lead to population-specific environmental risk factors. Further, the interaction of these risk factors with the genetic makeup of population makes it either susceptible or resistant to cardiovascular disease. One such candidate gene is angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) for various cardiovascular mechanisms. ACE is the key enzyme of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system pathway which maintains homeostasis blood pressure in the body and any variation in the levels is reported to be associated with various complex diseases. The DD genotype is found to increase ACE levels, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases and decrease in ACE levels are associated with kidney diseases. The aim of this study was to understand the distribution of ACE I/D polymorphism and ACE levels among Brahmins of National Capital Region (NCR) north India, with respect to age and sex ratio distribution. In this study, 136 subjects of which 50 males and 86 females, who were unrelated up to first cousin, aged 25 to70 years were studied. ACE gene was found to be polymorphic with high frequency of heterozygote (ID) followed by II and DD genotypes. The studied population was found to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with respect to ACE I/D polymorphism (P = 0.55). I allele frequency was found to be higher (0.560) than the D allele (0.44). The median level of ACE was found to be 65.96 ng/mL (48.12-86.24) which is towards lower side of the normal range. ACE levels were found to be increased among individual having either of the homozygotes that is II or DD and higher frequency of heterozygote (ID) is indicative of advantage in the population by maintaining lower ACE levels. The limitation of the present study is low sample size, however, the merit is that the subjects belonged to a Mendalian population with a common gene pool. PMID:27350671

  19. An SNP within the Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Distinguishes between Sprint and Distance Performing Alaskan Sled Dogs in a Candidate Gene Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huson, Heather J.; Byers, Alexandra M.; Runstadler, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The Alaskan sled dog offers a unique mechanism for studying the genetics of elite athletic performance. They are a group of mixed breed dogs, comprised of multiple common breeds, and a unique breed entity seen only as a part of the sled dog mix. Alaskan sled dogs are divided into 2 primary groups as determined by their racing skills. Distance dogs are capable of running over 1000 miles in 10 days, whereas sprint dogs run much shorter distances, approximately 30 miles, but in faster times, that is, 18–25 mph. Finding the genes that distinguish these 2 types of performers is likely to illuminate genetic contributors to human athletic performance. In this study, we tested for association between polymorphisms in 2 candidate genes; angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and myostatin (MSTN) and enhanced speed and endurance performance in 174 Alaskan sled dogs. We observed 81 novel genetic variants within the ACE gene and 4 within the MSTN gene, including a polymorphism within the ACE gene that significantly (P value 2.38 × 10−5) distinguished the sprint versus distance populations. PMID:21846742

  20. Using shotgun sequence data to find active restriction enzyme genes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Posfai, Janos; Morgan, Richard D; Vincze, Tamas; Roberts, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequence analysis has become the standard method for beginning to determine a genome sequence. The preparation of the shotgun sequence clones is, in fact, a biological experiment. It determines which segments of the genome can be cloned into Escherichia coli and which cannot. By analyzing the complete set of sequences from such an experiment, it is possible to identify genes lethal to E. coli. Among this set are genes encoding restriction enzymes which, when active in E. coli, lead to cell death by cleaving the E. coli genome at the restriction enzyme recognition sites. By analyzing shotgun sequence data sets we show that this is a reliable method to detect active restriction enzyme genes in newly sequenced genomes, thereby facilitating functional annotation. Active restriction enzyme genes have been identified, and their activity demonstrated biochemically, in the sequenced genomes of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 and Methylococcus capsulatus. PMID:18988632

  1. Gene cloned for enzyme used to make cheese

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-15

    Scientists at Collaborative Research in Waltham, Mass., working under a contract with Dow Chemical, Midland, Mich. are reported to have cloned the gene rennin, an enzyme used in the production of cheese. The gene was cloned in both yeast and the bacterium Escherichia coli using standard recombinant DNA techniques. Rennin is the first enzyme of industrial importance to be cloned and it is hoped that rennin will be commercially available by the mid-1980's.

  2. Molecular evidence for the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme in hemocytes of Locusta migratoria: stimulation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Macours, N; Hens, K; Francis, C; De Loof, A; Huybrechts, R

    2003-08-01

    The presence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in insects has been reported many times, but numerous questions about the functional role of this enzyme in insects remain. Here we show by RT-PCR experiments that ACE has a wide tissue distribution in Locusta migratoria, suggesting diverse roles for this enzyme in the locust. Immune challenge through injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides resulted in a tenfold increase of ACE gene transcripts in the hemocytes and is suggestive for a role of ACE in the cellular defense of the locust. However, phenotypic knockout experiments with the ACE inhibitor captopril showed that ACE is not essential for the efficient clearance of injected E. coli bacteria. PMID:12880654

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion, not bradykinin B2 receptor -58T/C gene polymorphism, associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-related cough in Chinese female patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y J; Tsai, J C

    2001-11-01

    To investigate the genetic susceptibility associated with cough related to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, 189 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients with proteinuria or hypertension treated with perindopril were studied. Cough was considered to be present if the patients had been bothered by a cough during treatment and if they had had related symptoms for at least 2 weeks without an identifiable cause. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) was used to detect polymorphisms of ACE and bradykinin B2-receptor genes. After 8 weeks of treatment, 49.2% (93 of 189) of our NIDDM patients were found to be suffering from ACEI-related cough. ACEI-related cough was mainly associated with female patients, with 71.7% (76 of 106) of female and only 20.5% (17 of 83) of male patients experiencing cough after ACEI treatment. There was a significant association of ACE II genotype with ACEI-related cough. The genotype frequencies were 58.2% for II, 47.8% for ID, and 16.7% for DD in patients with ACEI-associated cough and 41.8% for II, 52.2% for ID, and 83.3% for DD in subjects without ACEI-associated cough (chi(2) = 10.268; df = 2, P =.006). As female patients made up the majority of the subjects suffering from ACEI-related cough, we further analyzed the association of ACE I/D genotype with ACEI-related cough separately by sex. Male patients with ACEI-related cough were not associated with ACE I/D genotype distribution, while female patients were strongly associated with ACE I/D genotype polymorphism (chi(2) = 16.12; df = 2; P <.001). There was no association between the bradykinin B2 receptor gene -58T/C polymorphism with ACEI-related cough. In conclusion, our results indicate that Chinese diabetic female subjects are susceptible to ACEI-related cough, and this susceptibility may be genetically predetermined. PMID:11699055

  4. A novel angiotensin-І converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide from gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate of silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein: Biochemical characterization and molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiongying; Jia, Junqiang; Yan, Hui; Du, Jinjuan; Gui, Zhongzheng

    2015-06-01

    Silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein was hydrolyzed using gastrointestinal endopeptidases (pepsin, trypsin and α-chymotrypsin). Then, the hydrolysate was purified sequentially by ultrafiltration, gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. A novel ACE inhibitory peptide, Ala-Ser-Leu, with the IC50 value of 102.15μM, was identified by IT-MS/MS. This is the first report of Ala-Ser-Leu from natural protein. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that the peptide is a competitive inhibitor against ACE. The molecular docking studies revealed that the ACE inhibition of Ala-Ser-Leu is mainly attributed to forming very strong hydrogen bonds with the S1 pocket (Ala354) and the S2 pocket (Gln281 and His353). The results indicate that silkworm pupa (B. mori) protein or its gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate could be used as a functional ingredient in auxiliary therapeutic foods against hypertension. PMID:25111373

  5. Interdependent effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme and platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase gene polymorphisms on the progression of immunoglobulin A nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, H-J; Kim, H; Kim, H L; Lee, S G; Zheng, S-H; Shin, J H; Lim, C S; Kim, S; Lee, J S; Lee, D S; Kim, Y S

    2002-08-01

    In order to investigate the interdependent action of the insertion/deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene and polymorphism in exon 11 (C1136-->T; Ala379Val) of the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) gene, which encodes a functional antagonist of PAF, on the progression of immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy, we analysed both polymorphisms in patients with primary IgA nephropathy, who were followed-up for longer than 3 years. During the follow-up (87.3 +/- 50.0 months), the disease progressed in 38 of the 191 patients (19.9%). The D allele of the ACE gene in the absence of the T allele of the PAF-AH gene did not affect the prognosis [odds ratio (OR), 3.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.8-16.4] and neither did the T allele in the absence of the D allele (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 0.4-24.2). However, the presence of both was a significant prognostic factor (OR, 6.6; 95% CI, 1.4-31.3). After adjusting for other risk factors, the presence of both proved to be an independent risk factor (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.6-12.7). These results suggest that the interdependent effects of ACE and PAF-AH polymorphisms on the progression of IgA nephropathy might be more important than the effect of the individual polymorphisms. PMID:12220450

  6. Association between angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and renal scar risk in children vesicoureteral reflex: a reappraise meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ai, Jin-Wei; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Liu, Ying; Fu, Yu; Liu, Tong-Zu; Pei, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflex(VUR) is a common disease in children. Some studies indicated that the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism associated with the renal scar in VUR, but not all researchers agreed with it. To clarify the effect of ACE I/D polymorphism on renal scar risk in children with VUR, we performed the present meta-analysis. PubMed, CNKI, CBM, and Embase databases were searched for studies that examined the relationship between ACE I/D polymorphism and renal scar risk in children with VUR. The Stata 12.0 software was used for statistical analyses. 11 case-control studies with 1,032 VUR patients were analyzed. The results showed that the DD genotype and D allele were associated with renal scar risk in overall VUR patients, DD vs. DI + II: OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.04-2.49, P = 0.03; DD vs. II: OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.20-2.65, P < 0.01; D vs. I: OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.02-1.86, P = 0.04. Similar results were revealed in Turks, but not in Caucasians and Asians. Our meta-analysis indicated that the ACE DD genotype may increase the risk of renal scar in children with VUR. PMID:27506878

  7. Association between angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and renal scar risk in children vesicoureteral reflex: a reappraise meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Jin-Wei; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Liu, Ying; Fu, Yu; Liu, Tong-Zu; Pei, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflex(VUR) is a common disease in children. Some studies indicated that the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism associated with the renal scar in VUR, but not all researchers agreed with it. To clarify the effect of ACE I/D polymorphism on renal scar risk in children with VUR, we performed the present meta-analysis. PubMed, CNKI, CBM, and Embase databases were searched for studies that examined the relationship between ACE I/D polymorphism and renal scar risk in children with VUR. The Stata 12.0 software was used for statistical analyses. 11 case-control studies with 1,032 VUR patients were analyzed. The results showed that the DD genotype and D allele were associated with renal scar risk in overall VUR patients, DD vs. DI + II: OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.04–2.49, P = 0.03; DD vs. II: OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.20–2.65, P < 0.01; D vs. I: OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.02–1.86, P = 0.04. Similar results were revealed in Turks, but not in Caucasians and Asians. Our meta-analysis indicated that the ACE DD genotype may increase the risk of renal scar in children with VUR. PMID:27506878

  8. Association of ACE gene D polymorphism with left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with diastolic heart failure: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Bahramali, Ehsan; Rajabi, Mona; Mousavi, Seyyed Mohammad; Zarghami, Mehrdad; Manafi, Alireza; Firouzabadi, Negar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the association between ACE gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients with hypertension who have developed heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Being a major contributor to the development of diastolic heart dysfunction, the renin angiotensin aldosterone system and its genetic variations are thought to induce LVH in hypertensive hearts apart from haemodynamic factors. Design Case control study. Setting An Iranian referral university hospital. Participants 176 patients with hypertension and a diagnosis of HFpEF on presence of symptoms of heart failure plus Doppler echocardiographic documentation of left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction and/or elevated NT-proBNP levels. Those with significant coronary, valvular, pericardial and structural heart diseases were excluded as well as patients with atrial fibrillation, renal failure and pulmonary causes of dyspnoea. They were divided into two cohorts of 88 cases with and 88 controls without LVH, after determination of LV mass index, using two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography. The I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene was determined using the PCR method. Results The D allele was significantly more prevalent among cases with compared with controls without LVH (p=0.0007). Genotype distributions also differed significantly under additive (p=0.005, OR=0.53, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.84) and recessive (p=0.001, OR=0.29, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.66) models. Conclusions In patients with hypertension who develop HFpEF, the D allele of the ACE gene is probably associated with the development of LVH. With the detrimental effects of LVH on the heart's diastolic properties, this can signify the role of genetic contributors to the development of HFpEF in patients with hypertension and may serve as a future risk predictor for the disease. PMID:26861937

  9. Implications of the angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism in health and disease: a snapshot review

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    This review considers the 250+ papers concerning the association of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs1799752) and various disease conditions published in 2009. The deletion allele occurs in approximately 55% of the population and is associated with increased activity of the ACE enzyme. It might be predicted that the D allele, therefore, might be associated with pathologies involving increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system. The D allele was seen to be associated with an increased risk of hypertension, pre-eclampsia, heart failure, cerebral infarct, diabetic nephropathy, encephalopathy, asthma, severe hypoglycaemia in diabetes, gastric cancer (in Caucasians) and poor prognosis following kidney transplant. On the positive side, the D allele appears to offer protection against schizophrenia and chronic periodontitis and confers greater up-per-body strength in old age. The I allele, meanwhile, offers improved endurance/athletic performance and aerobic capacity as determined by lung function tests, although it does increase the risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma and obstructive sleep apnoea in hypertensives. PMID:21537387

  10. Regulation of gene expression by a metabolic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hall, David A; Zhu, Heng; Zhu, Xiaowei; Royce, Thomas; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2004-10-15

    Gene expression in eukaryotes is normally believed to be controlled by transcriptional regulators that activate genes encoding structural proteins and enzymes. To identify previously unrecognized DNA binding activities, a yeast proteome microarray was screened with DNA probes; Arg5,6, a well-characterized mitochondrial enzyme involved in arginine biosynthesis, was identified. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Arg5,6 is associated with specific nuclear and mitochondrial loci in vivo, and Arg5,6 binds to specific fragments in vitro. Deletion of Arg5,6 causes altered transcript levels of both nuclear and mitochondrial target genes. These results indicate that metabolic enzymes can directly regulate eukaryotic gene expression. PMID:15486299

  11. Microdiversity of extracellular enzyme genes among sequenced prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Amy E; Martiny, Adam C; Allison, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between prokaryotic traits and phylogeny is important for predicting and modeling ecological processes. Microbial extracellular enzymes have a pivotal role in nutrient cycling and the decomposition of organic matter, yet little is known about the phylogenetic distribution of genes encoding these enzymes. In this study, we analyzed 3058 annotated prokaryotic genomes to determine which taxa have the genetic potential to produce alkaline phosphatase, chitinase and β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase enzymes. We then evaluated the relationship between the genetic potential for enzyme production and 16S rRNA phylogeny using the consenTRAIT algorithm, which calculated the phylogenetic depth and corresponding 16S rRNA sequence identity of clades of potential enzyme producers. Nearly half (49.2%) of the genomes analyzed were found to be capable of extracellular enzyme production, and these were non-randomly distributed across most prokaryotic phyla. On average, clades of potential enzyme-producing organisms had a maximum phylogenetic depth of 0.008004–0.009780, though individual clades varied broadly in both size and depth. These values correspond to a minimum 16S rRNA sequence identity of 98.04–98.40%. The distribution pattern we found is an indication of microdiversity, the occurrence of ecologically or physiologically distinct populations within phylogenetically related groups. Additionally, we found positive correlations among the genes encoding different extracellular enzymes. Our results suggest that the capacity to produce extracellular enzymes varies at relatively fine-scale phylogenetic resolution. This variation is consistent with other traits that require a small number of genes and provides insight into the relationship between taxonomy and traits that may be useful for predicting ecological function. PMID:23303371

  12. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    Two Genes for DNA polymerase delta were identified from the wild type Chinese hamster ovary cells. These genes were cloned via RT-PCR from mRNA prepared the Chinese hamster ovary cells using primers specific to conserved sequences of the DNA polymerase {delta} gene. The first gene encodes a PCNA dependent DNA polymerase {delta} gene whereas the second gene encodes a PCNA independent DNA polymerase {delta} gene. Methods were developed to clone these genes in expression vector and host systems. The role of the two genes in DNA replication and repair was determined.

  13. The Evaluation of Dipeptidyl Peptidase (DPP)-IV, α-Glucosidase and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activities of Whey Proteins Hydrolyzed with Serine Protease Isolated from Asian Pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia).

    PubMed

    Konrad, Babij; Anna, Dąbrowska; Marek, Szołtysik; Marta, Pokora; Aleksandra, Zambrowicz; Józefa, Chrzanowska

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, whey protein concentrate (WPC-80) and β-lactoglobulin were hydrolyzed with a noncommercial serine protease isolated from Asian pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia). Hydrolysates were further fractionated by ultrafiltration using membranes with cut-offs equal 3 and 10 kDa. Peptide fractions of molecular weight lower than 3 and 3-10 kDa were further subjected to the RP-HPLC. Separated preparations were investigated for their potential as the natural inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP-IV), α-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). WPC-80 hydrolysate showed higher inhibitory activities against the three tested enzymes than β-lactoglobulin hydrolysate. Especially high biological activities were exhibited by peptide fractions of molecular weight lower than 3 kDa, with ACE IC50 <0.64 mg/mL and DPP-IV IC50 <0.55 mg/mL. This study suggests that peptides generated from whey proteins may support postprandial glycemia regulation and blood pressure maintenance, and could be used as functional food ingredients in the diet of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25364320

  14. Persistent change in cardiac fibroblast physiology after transient ACE inhibition.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, K M; Biwer, L A; Madhavpeddi, L; Ramaiah, P; Shahid, W; Hale, T M

    2015-10-01

    Transient angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition induces persistent changes that protect against future nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor-induced cardiac fibrosis and inflammation. Given the role of fibroblasts in mediating these effects, the present study investigates whether prior ACE inhibition produced persistent changes in cardiac fibroblast physiology. Adult male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were treated with vehicle (C+L) or the ACE inhibitor, enalapril (E+L) for 2 wk followed by a 2-wk washout period and a subsequent 7-day challenge with the NOS inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. A third set of untreated SHRs served as controls. At the end of the study period, cardiac fibroblasts were isolated from control, C+L, and E+L left ventricles to assess proliferation rate, collagen expression, and chemokine release in vitro. After 7 days of NOS inhibition, there were areas of myocardial injury but no significant change in collagen deposition in E+L and C+L hearts in vivo. In vitro, cardiac fibroblasts isolated from C+L but not E+L hearts were hyperproliferative, demonstrated increased collagen type I gene expression, and an elevated secretion of the macrophage-recruiting chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor. These findings demonstrate that in vivo N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester treatment produces phenotypic changes in fibroblasts that persist in vitro. Moreover, this is the first demonstration that transient ACE inhibition can produce a persistent modification of the cardiac fibroblast phenotype to one that is less inflammatory and fibrogenic. It may be that the cardioprotective effects of ACE inhibition are related in part to beneficial changes in cardiac fibroblast physiology. PMID:26371174

  15. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  16. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.; Roessler, P.G.

    1999-07-27

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities. 8 figs.

  17. Genes, enzymes and regulation of arginine biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Robert D

    2005-08-01

    Arabidopsis genes encoding enzymes for each of the eight steps in L-arginine (Arg) synthesis were identified, based upon sequence homologies with orthologs from other organisms. Except for N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS; EC 2.3.1.1), which is encoded by two genes, all remaining enzymes are encoded by single genes. Targeting predictions for these enzymes, based upon their deduced sequences, and subcellular fractionation studies, suggest that most enzymes of Arg synthesis reside within the plastid. Synthesis of the L-ornthine (Orn) intermediate in this pathway from L-glutamate occurs as a series of acetylated intermediates, as in most other organisms. An N-acetylornithine:glutamate acetyltransferase (NAOGAcT; EC 2.3.1.35) facilitates recycling of the acetyl moiety during Orn formation (cyclic pathway). A putative N-acetylornithine deacetylase (NAOD; EC 3.5.1.16), which participates in the "linear" pathway for Orn synthesis in some organisms, was also identified. Previous biochemical studies have indicated that allosteric regulation of the first and, especially, the second steps in Orn synthesis (NAGS; N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK), EC 2.7.2.8) by the Arg end-product are the major sites of metabolic control of the pathway in organisms using the cyclic pathway. Gene expression profiling for pathway enzymes further suggests that NAGS, NAGK, NAOGAcT and NAOD are coordinately regulated in response to changes in Arg demand during plant growth and development. Synthesis of Arg from Orn is further coordinated with pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis, at the level of allocation of the common carbamoyl-P intermediate. PMID:16122935

  18. Association of cardiovascular response to an acute resistance training session with the ACE gene polymorphism in sedentary women: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to verify the effects of an acute resistance training (RT) session and insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) on systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean blood pressure (MBP), and heart rate (HR). Methods The sample consisted of 27 sedentary women (33.3 ± 8.2 yrs; 69.1 ± 13.8 kg; 1.57 ± 0.05 m; 27.6 ± 5.1 kg/m2) divided into two groups according to their polymorphism I/D (DD = 9; II + ID = 18). Volunteers underwent two experimental sessions: RT – an acute session performed with three sets at 60% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) interspersed with 1 minute rest interval between exercises and sets, and a control session (CON) in which they remained seated for 30 minutes in the laboratory. SBP, DBP, MBP and HR were measured before exercise and during one hour every 10 minutes after sessions, in the seated position. A two-way ANOVA for repeated measures with Tukey’s post hoc test was used for the intra and inter-group comparisons. Results There were no statistically significant differences on SBP, DBP and MBP after the experimental protocols, and no effect of ACE polymorphism (P > 0.05). However, comparing CON versus exercise effect size values (ES), homozygotic carriers of the allele D presented a drop in SBP which was considered moderate, while in allele I carriers it was small, 30 minutes after exercise. In MBP, homozygotic D carriers exhibited a large ES 20 minutes post-exercise. HR was higher at 10, 20 and 30 minutes after exercise as compared to pre-exercise only for carriers of the I allele (P < 0.05). Conclusions Therefore, an acute RT session reduces clinical BP. In addition to this; it seems that ACE polymorphism had some influence on cardiovascular response to exercise. Trial Registration RBR-6GDYVZ PMID:23305118

  19. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1–7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1–7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2−/y) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2−/y mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1–7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what’s more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1–7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1-7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2(-/y)) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2(-/y) mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1-7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what's more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1-7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  1. Segregation and linkage analysis of serum angiotensin I-converting enzyme levels: Evidence for two quantitative-trait loci

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, C.A.; Keavney, B.; Farrall, M.

    1995-12-01

    Human serum angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) levels vary substantially between individuals and are highly heritable. Segregation analysis in European families has shown that more than half of the total variability in ACE levels is influenced by quantitative-trait loci (QTL). One of these QTLs is located within or close to the ACE locus itself. Combined segregation/linkage analysis in a series of African Caribbean families from Jamaica shows that the ACE insertion-deletion polymorphism is in moderate linkage disequilibrium with an ACE-linked QTL. Linkage analysis with a highly informative polymorphism at the neighboring growth hormone gene (GH) shows surprisingly little support for linkage (LOD score [Z] = 0.12). An extended analysis with a two-QTL model, where an ACE-linked QTL interacts additively with an unlinked QTL, significantly improves both the fit of the model (P = .002) and the support for linkage between the ACE-linked QTL and GH polymorphism (Z = 5.0). We conclude that two QTLs jointly influence serum ACE levels in this population. One QTL is located within or close to the ACE locus and explains 27% of the total variability; the second QTL is unlinked to the ACE locus and explains 52% of the variability. The identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying both QTLs is necessary in order to interpret the role of ACE in cardiovascular disease. 44 refs., 7 tabs.

  2. Overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 attenuates tonically active glutamatergic input to the rostral ventrolateral medulla in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-Kai; Shen, Du; Hao, Qiang; Yu, Qiang; Wu, Zhao-Tang; Deng, Yu; Chen, Yan-Fang; Yuan, Wen-Jun; Hu, Qi-Kuan; Su, Ding-Feng

    2014-01-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) plays a key role in cardiovascular regulation. It has been reported that tonically active glutamatergic input to the RVLM is increased in hypertensive rats, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in the brain has been suggested to be beneficial to hypertension. This study was designed to determine the effect of ACE2 gene transfer into the RVLM on tonically active glutamatergic input in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Lentiviral particles containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (lenti-GFP) or ACE2 (lenti-ACE2) were injected bilaterally into the RVLM. Both protein expression and activity of ACE2 in the RVLM were increased in SHRs after overexpression of ACE2. A significant reduction in blood pressure and heart rate in SHRs was observed 6 wk after lenti-ACE2 injected into the RVLM. The concentration of glutamate in microdialysis fluid from the RVLM was significantly reduced by an average of 61% in SHRs with lenti-ACE2 compared with lenti-GFP. ACE2 overexpression significantly attenuated the decrease in blood pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity evoked by bilateral injection of the glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (2.7 nmol in 100 nl) into the RVLM in SHRs. Therefore, we suggest that ACE2 overexpression in the RVLM attenuates the enhanced tonically active glutamatergic input in SHRs, which may be an important mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of central ACE2 to hypertension. PMID:24838502

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion-deletion polymorphism is a risk marker for Alzheimer's disease in a Chinese population: a meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Piao, Jin-hua; Ma, Ke; Lu, Na

    2015-08-01

    It has long been known that the polymorphisms of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE) are associated to increase risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Chinese population. However, consistent results were not obtained among studies. This study is aimed to clarify the association between ACE insertion (I)/deletion (D) polymorphism (rs1799752) and AD. Literatures were searched from PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, CNKI, Wanfang and VIP databases without language restrictions. Eleven separate studies were suitable for the inclusion criterion. The selected studies contained 2,763 Chinese participants, including 1,383 in AD group and 1,380 controls. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to assess the association between ACE I/D polymorphism and AD. Our case-control data indicated that ACE insertion is a risk allele in all genetic models: additive model (I vs. D: OR = 1.32, 95 % CI 1.07-1.62, P = 0.008), dominant model (II + ID vs. DD: OR = 1.61, 95 % CI 1.08-2.41, P = 0.02) and recessive model (II vs. ID + DD: OR = 1.39, 95 % CI 1.07-1.81, P = 0.01). Heterogeneity between studies was significant (P < 0.10) but not in stratification defined by the selection of controls (P > 0.10). After stratification according to the selection of controls, the carrier of ACE I allele remained a high risk for AD in population-based samples subgroup (I vs. D: P = 0.008, OR = 1.32, 95 % CI 1.07-1.61, P(heterogeneity) = 0.47, I (2) = 0 %). Our study provided solid evidence suggesting that ACE gene I/D polymorphism is a genetic risk factor for AD in Chinese population. PMID:25596842

  4. Regulation of prokaryotic gene expression by eukaryotic-like enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Kellie; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    Summary A growing body of evidence indicates that serine/threonine kinases (STK) and phosphatases (STP) regulate gene expression in prokaryotic organisms. As prokaryotic STKs and STPs are not DNA binding proteins, regulation of gene expression is accomplished through post-translational modification of their targets. These include two-component response regulators, DNA binding proteins and proteins that mediate transcription and translation. This review summarizes our current understanding of how STKs and STPs mediate gene expression in prokaryotes. Further studies to identify environmental signals that trigger the signaling cascade and elucidation of mechanisms that regulate cross-talk between eukaryotic-like signaling enzymes, two-component systems, and components of the transcriptional and translational machinery will facilitate a greater understanding of prokaryotic gene regulation. PMID:22221896

  5. Regulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin AT1 receptor gene expression in Npr1 gene-disrupted mice

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N; Vellaichamy, Elangovan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression in the control of blood pressure and fluid volume is a key issue in cardiovascular medicine. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) signalling antagonizes the physiological and pathophysiological effects mediated by the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis.The targeted-disruption of the Npr1 gene (coding for GC-A/PRA) leads to activation of the cardiac RAAS involved in the hypertrophic remodelling process, which influences cardiac size, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes and the behaviour of various hypertrophy marker genes. The Npr1 gene-knockout (Npr1−/−) mice exhibit 35–40 mmHg higher systolic blood pressure and a significantly greater heart weight to bodyweight ratio than wild-type (Npr1+/+) mice.The expression of both angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II AT1a receptors are significantly increased in hearts from Npr1−/− mice compared with hearts from Npr1+/+ mice. In parallel, the expression of interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α is also markedly increased in hearts from Npr1−/− mice.These findings indicate that disruption of NPRA/cGMP signalling leads to augmented expression of the cardiac RAAS in conjunction with pro-inflammatory cytokines in Npr1-null mutant mice, which promotes the development of cardiac hypertrophy and remodelling. PMID:19843097

  6. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  7. Marketing ACE in Victoria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This publication presents options raised through various forums for marketing adult and community education (ACE) in Victoria, Australia, and suggested strategies. After an introduction (chapter 1), chapters 2 and 3 provide a broad view of the current situation for marketing ACE. Chapter 2 discusses general issues in the current position--ACE…

  8. A single nucleotide polymorphism uncovers a novel function for the transcription factor Ace2 during Candida albicans hyphal development.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Noreña, Diana M; González-Novo, Alberto; Orellana-Muñoz, Sara; Gutiérrez-Escribano, Pilar; Arnáiz-Pita, Yolanda; Dueñas-Santero, Encarnación; Suárez, M Belén; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Del Rey, Francisco; Sherlock, Gavin; d'Enfert, Christophe; Correa-Bordes, Jaime; de Aldana, Carlos R Vázquez

    2015-04-01

    Candida albicans is a major invasive fungal pathogen in humans. An important virulence factor is its ability to switch between the yeast and hyphal forms, and these filamentous forms are important in tissue penetration and invasion. A common feature for filamentous growth is the ability to inhibit cell separation after cytokinesis, although it is poorly understood how this process is regulated developmentally. In C. albicans, the formation of filaments during hyphal growth requires changes in septin ring dynamics. In this work, we studied the functional relationship between septins and the transcription factor Ace2, which controls the expression of enzymes that catalyze septum degradation. We found that alternative translation initiation produces two Ace2 isoforms. While full-length Ace2, Ace2L, influences septin dynamics in a transcription-independent manner in hyphal cells but not in yeast cells, the use of methionine-55 as the initiation codon gives rise to Ace2S, which functions as the nuclear transcription factor required for the expression of cell separation genes. Genetic evidence indicates that Ace2L influences the incorporation of the Sep7 septin to hyphal septin rings in order to avoid inappropriate activation of cell separation during filamentous growth. Interestingly, a natural single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) present in the C. albicans WO-1 background and other C. albicans commensal and clinical isolates generates a stop codon in the ninth codon of Ace2L that mimics the phenotype of cells lacking Ace2L. Finally, we report that Ace2L and Ace2S interact with the NDR kinase Cbk1 and that impairing activity of this kinase results in a defect in septin dynamics similar to that of hyphal cells lacking Ace2L. Together, our findings identify Ace2L and the NDR kinase Cbk1 as new elements of the signaling system that modify septin ring dynamics in hyphae to allow cell-chain formation, a feature that appears to have evolved in specific C. albicans lineages

  9. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Uncovers a Novel Function for the Transcription Factor Ace2 during Candida albicans Hyphal Development

    PubMed Central

    Orellana-Muñoz, Sara; Gutiérrez-Escribano, Pilar; Arnáiz-Pita, Yolanda; Dueñas-Santero, Encarnación; Suárez, M. Belén; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; del Rey, Francisco; Sherlock, Gavin; d’Enfert, Christophe; Correa-Bordes, Jaime; de Aldana, Carlos R. Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major invasive fungal pathogen in humans. An important virulence factor is its ability to switch between the yeast and hyphal forms, and these filamentous forms are important in tissue penetration and invasion. A common feature for filamentous growth is the ability to inhibit cell separation after cytokinesis, although it is poorly understood how this process is regulated developmentally. In C. albicans, the formation of filaments during hyphal growth requires changes in septin ring dynamics. In this work, we studied the functional relationship between septins and the transcription factor Ace2, which controls the expression of enzymes that catalyze septum degradation. We found that alternative translation initiation produces two Ace2 isoforms. While full-length Ace2, Ace2L, influences septin dynamics in a transcription-independent manner in hyphal cells but not in yeast cells, the use of methionine-55 as the initiation codon gives rise to Ace2S, which functions as the nuclear transcription factor required for the expression of cell separation genes. Genetic evidence indicates that Ace2L influences the incorporation of the Sep7 septin to hyphal septin rings in order to avoid inappropriate activation of cell separation during filamentous growth. Interestingly, a natural single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) present in the C. albicans WO-1 background and other C. albicans commensal and clinical isolates generates a stop codon in the ninth codon of Ace2L that mimics the phenotype of cells lacking Ace2L. Finally, we report that Ace2L and Ace2S interact with the NDR kinase Cbk1 and that impairing activity of this kinase results in a defect in septin dynamics similar to that of hyphal cells lacking Ace2L. Together, our findings identify Ace2L and the NDR kinase Cbk1 as new elements of the signaling system that modify septin ring dynamics in hyphae to allow cell-chain formation, a feature that appears to have evolved in specific C. albicans lineages

  10. Library Screen Identifies Enterococcus faecalis CcpA, the Catabolite Control Protein A, as an Effector of Ace, a Collagen Adhesion Protein Linked to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Pinkston, Kenneth L.; Bourgogne, Agathe; Cruz, Melissa R.; Garsin, Danielle A.; Murray, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    The Enterococcus faecalis cell wall-anchored protein Ace is an important virulence factor involved in cell adhesion and infection. Expression of Ace on the cell surface is affected by many factors, including stage of growth, culture temperature, and environmental components, such as serum, urine, and collagen. However, the mechanisms that regulate or modulate Ace display are not well understood. With interest in identifying genes associated with Ace expression, we utilized a whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based screening method to identify mutants from a transposon insertion mutant library which exhibited distinct Ace surface expression profiles. We identified a ccpA insertion mutant which showed significantly decreased levels of Ace surface expression at early growth phase versus those of wild-type OG1RF. Confirmation of the observation was achieved through flow cytometry and complementation analysis. Compared to the wild type, the E. faecalis ccpA mutant had an impaired ability to adhere to collagen when grown to early exponential phase, consistent with the lack of Ace expression in the early growth phase. As a key component of carbon catabolite regulation, CcpA has been previously reported to play a critical role in regulating expression of proteins involved in E. faecalis carbohydrate uptake and utilization. Our discovery is the first to associate CcpA with the production of a major E. faecalis virulence factor, providing new insights into the regulation of E. faecalis pathogenesis. PMID:23974022

  11. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098–4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  12. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098-4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  13. Maternal smoking, xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme gene variants, and gastroschisis risk.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Mary M; Reefhuis, Jennita; Gallagher, Margaret L; Mulle, Jennifer G; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Koontz, Deborah A; Sturchio, Cynthia; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Witte, John S; Richter, Patricia; Honein, Margaret A

    2014-06-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy is one proposed risk factor for gastroschisis, but reported associations have been modest, suggesting that differences in genetic susceptibility might play a role. We included 108 non-Hispanic white and 62 Hispanic families who had infants with gastroschisis, and 1,147 non-Hispanic white and 337 Hispanic families who had liveborn infants with no major structural birth defects (controls) in these analyses. DNA was extracted from buccal cells collected from infants and mothers, and information on periconceptional smoking history was obtained from maternal interviews, as part of the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. We analyzed five polymorphisms in three genes that code for enzymes involved in metabolism of some cigarette smoke constituents (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and NAT2). Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) independently for maternal smoking and maternal and infant gene variants, and to assess joint associations of maternal smoking and maternal or infant gene variants with gastroschisis. In analyses adjusted for maternal age at delivery and stratified by maternal race-ethnicity, we identified three suggestive associations among 30 potential associations with sufficient numbers to calculate ORs: CYP1A1*2A for non-Hispanic white mothers who smoked periconceptionally (aOR = 0.38, 95% CI 0.15-0.98), and NAT2*6 for Hispanic non-smoking mothers (aOR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.12-4.19) and their infants (aOR = 2.11, 95% CI 1.00-4.48). This analysis does not support the occurrence of effect modification between periconceptional maternal smoking and most of the xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme gene variants assessed. PMID:24668907

  14. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  15. Necessity of angiotensin-converting enzyme-related gene for cardiac functions and longevity of Drosophila melanogaster assessed by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fang-Tsu; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Su, Ming-Tsan; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies have established the necessity of an angiotensin-converting enzyme-related (ACER) gene for heart morphogenesis of Drosophila. Nevertheless, the physiology of ACER has yet to be comprehensively understood. Herein, we employed RNA interference to down-regulate the expression of ACER in Drosophila's heart and swept source optical coherence tomography to assess whether ACER is required for cardiac functions in living adult flies. Several contractile parameters of Drosophila heart, including the heart rate (HR), end-diastolic diameter (EDD), end-systolic diameter (ESD), percent fractional shortening (%FS), and stress-induced cardiac performance, are shown, which are age dependent. These age-dependent cardiac functions declined significantly when ACER was down-regulated. Moreover, the lifespans of ACER knock-down flies were significantly shorter than those of wild-type control flies. Thus, we posit that ACER, the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), is essential for both heart physiology and longevity of animals. Since mammalian ACE2 controls many cardiovascular physiological features and is implicated in cardiomyopathies, our findings that ACER plays conserved roles in genetically tractable animals will pave the way for uncovering the genetic pathway that controls the renin-angiotensin system.

  16. Unraveling the Pivotal Role of Bradykinin in ACE Inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Stefano; Bortolotto, L

    2016-10-01

    Historically, the first described effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor was an increased activity of bradykinin, one of the substrates of ACE. However, in the subsequent years, molecular models describing the mechanism of action of ACE inhibitors in decreasing blood pressure and cardiovascular risk have focused mostly on the renin-angiotensin system. Nonetheless, over the last 20 years, the importance of bradykinin in regulating vasodilation, natriuresis, oxidative stress, fibrinolysis, inflammation, and apoptosis has become clearer. The affinity of ACE appears to be higher for bradykinin than for angiotensin I, thereby suggesting that ACE inhibitors may be more effective inhibitors of bradykinin degradation than of angiotensin II production. Data describing the effect of ACE inhibition on bradykinin signaling support the hypothesis that the most cardioprotective benefits attributed to ACE inhibition may be due to increased bradykinin signaling rather than to decreased angiotensin II signaling, especially when high dosages of ACE inhibitors are considered. In particular, modulation of bradykinin in the endothelium appears to be a major target of ACE inhibition. These new mechanistic concepts may lead to further development of strategies enhancing the bradykinin signaling. PMID:27260014

  17. Human Recombinant ACE2 Reduces the Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oudit, Gavin Y.; Liu, George C.; Zhong, JiuChang; Basu, Ratnadeep; Chow, Fung L.; Zhou, Joyce; Loibner, Hans; Janzek, Evelyne; Schuster, Manfred; Penninger, Josef M.; Herzenberg, Andrew M.; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Scholey, James W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic nephropathy is one of the most common causes of end-stage renal failure. Inhibition of ACE2 function accelerates diabetic kidney injury, whereas renal ACE2 is downregulated in diabetic nephropathy. We examined the ability of human recombinant ACE2 (hrACE2) to slow the progression of diabetic kidney injury. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Male 12-week-old diabetic Akita mice (Ins2WT/C96Y) and control C57BL/6J mice (Ins2WT/WT) were injected daily with placebo or with rhACE2 (2 mg/kg, i.p.) for 4 weeks. Albumin excretion, gene expression, histomorphometry, NADPH oxidase activity, and peptide levels were examined. The effect of hrACE2 on high glucose and angiotensin II (ANG II)–induced changes was also examined in cultured mesangial cells. RESULTS Treatment with hrACE2 increased plasma ACE2 activity, normalized blood pressure, and reduced the urinary albumin excretion in Akita Ins2WT/C96Y mice in association with a decreased glomerular mesangial matrix expansion and normalization of increased α-smooth muscle actin and collagen III expression. Human recombinant ACE2 increased ANG 1–7 levels, lowered ANG II levels, and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. mRNA levels for p47phox and NOX2 and protein levels for protein kinase Cα (PKCα) and PKCβ1 were also normalized by treatment with hrACE2. In vitro, hrACE2 attenuated both high glucose and ANG II–induced oxidative stress and NADPH oxidase activity. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with hrACE2 attenuates diabetic kidney injury in the Akita mouse in association with a reduction in blood pressure and a decrease in NADPH oxidase activity. In vitro studies show that the protective effect of hrACE2 is due to reduction in ANG II and an increase in ANG 1–7 signaling. PMID:19934006

  18. Association of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphisms with Crohn’s disease in a Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Sichang; Wang, Zhengting; Fan, Rong; Yuan, Jielu; Zhong, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphisms alter the susceptibility of a Chinese Han population to Crohn’s disease (CD). Methods: Blood samples were collected from patients with CD and from healthy control subjects for analyzing SNP rs4291 (promoter, A262T), SNP rs4343 (exon 16, A11860G), and rs4646994 (intron 16, Alu insertion/deletion). Allele and genotype frequencies were compared, and pairwise linkage disequilibrium and haplotypes were analyzed in patients with CD. Results: Both rs4343 A/G and rs4646994 I/D allele frequencies differed significantly between patients with CD and control subjects (rs4343: OR=1.438, 95% CI=1.099-1.882, P=0.008; rs4646994: OR=1.559, 95% CI=1.191-2.039, P=0.001). There were also significant associations between the risk of CD and both rs4343 AA/(AG+GG) and rs4646994 II/(ID+DD) genotype frequencies (P=0.039 and P=0.019). The frequency of the G-D haplotype was significantly lower in patients with CD than control subjects (31.7% vs. 40.4%, P=0.010). Conclusions: The results suggest that ACE rs4343G and rs4646994D alleles protect against CD, while rs4343AA and the I allele in the dominant genetic model are risk alleles for CD. The association between the G-D haplotype and CD was significant, suggesting a protective role in the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:26823847

  19. Functional and molecular evidence for expression of the renin angiotensin system and ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding in COS7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Grobe, Nadja; Di Fulvio, Mauricio; Kashkari, Nada; Chodavarapu, Harshita; Somineni, Hari K.; Singh, Richa

    2015-01-01

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) plays a vital role in the regulation of the cardiovascular and renal functions. COS7 is a robust and easily transfectable cell line derived from the kidney of the African green monkey, Cercopithecus aethiops. The aims of this study were to 1) demonstrate the presence of an endogenous and functional RAS in COS7, and 2) investigate the role of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17 (ADAM17) in the ectodomain shedding of angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE2). Reverse transcription coupled to gene-specific polymerase chain reaction demonstrated expression of ACE, ACE2, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), and renin at the transcript levels in total RNA cell extracts. Western blot and immunohistochemistry identified ACE (60 kDa), ACE2 (75 kDa), AT1R (43 kDa), renin (41 kDa), and ADAM17 (130 kDa) in COS7. At the functional level, a sensitive and selective mass spectrometric approach detected endogenous renin, ACE, and ACE2 activities. ANG-(1–7) formation (m/z 899) from the natural substrate ANG II (m/z 1,046) was detected in lysates and media. COS7 cells stably expressing shRNA constructs directed against endogenous ADAM17 showed reduced ACE2 shedding into the media. This is the first study demonstrating endogenous expression of the RAS and ADAM17 in the widely used COS7 cell line and its utility to study ectodomain shedding of ACE2 mediated by ADAM17 in vitro. The transfectable nature of this cell line makes it an attractive cell model for studying the molecular, functional, and pharmacological properties of the renal RAS. PMID:25740155

  20. Common variants of ACE contribute to variable age-at-onset of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Patrick G; Katzov, Hagit; Andreasen, Niels; Gatz, Maragaret; Wilcock, Gordon K; Cairns, Nigel J; Palmgren, Juni; de Faire, Ulf; Brookes, Anthony J; Pedersen, Nancy L; Blennow, Kaj; Prince, Jonathan A

    2004-04-01

    Studies on the role that genetic variation may play in a complex human disease can be empowered by an assessment of both disease risk in case-control or family models and of quantitative traits that reflect elements of disease etiology. An excellent example of this can be found for the epsilon4 allele of APOE in relation to Alzheimer's disease (AD) for which association with both risk and age-at-onset (AAO) is evident. Following a recent demonstration that variants of the gene encoding angiotensin I converting enzyme ( ACE) contribute to AD risk, we have explored the potential influence of ACE upon AAO in AD. A total of 2861 individuals from three European populations, including six independent AD samples, have been examined in this study. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously demonstrated to have maximum effects upon ACE plasma levels and that span the ACE locus were genotyped in these materials. A strong effect upon AAO was observed for marker rs4343 in exon 17 ( P<0.0001), but evidence was also obtained indicating a possible independent effect of marker rs4291 ( P=0.0095) located in the ACE promoter. Effects were consistent with data from previous studies suggesting association with AD in case-control models, whereby alleles demonstrated to confer risk to disease also appear to reduce AAO. Equivalent effects were evident regardless of APOE epsilon4 carrier status and in both males and females. These results provide an important complement to existing AD risk data, confirming that ACE harbors sequence variants that contribute to aspects of AD pathology. PMID:14986105

  1. Essential fatty acids and their metabolites could function as endogenous HMG-CoA reductase and ACE enzyme inhibitors, anti-arrhythmic, anti-hypertensive, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, and cardioprotective molecules.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2008-01-01

    Lowering plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), blood pressure, homocysteine, and preventing platelet aggregation using a combination of a statin, three blood pressure lowering drugs such as a thiazide, a beta blocker, and an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor each at half standard dose; folic acid; and aspirin-called as polypill- was estimated to reduce cardiovascular events by approximately 80%. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) and their long-chain metabolites: gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), dihomo-GLA (DGLA), arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and other products such as prostaglandins E1 (PGE1), prostacyclin (PGI2), PGI3, lipoxins (LXs), resolvins, protectins including neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) prevent platelet aggregation, lower blood pressure, have anti-arrhythmic action, reduce LDL-C, ameliorate the adverse actions of homocysteine, show anti-inflammatory actions, activate telomerase, and have cytoprotective properties. Thus, EFAs and their metabolites show all the classic actions expected of the "polypill". Unlike the proposed "polypill", EFAs are endogenous molecules present in almost all tissues, have no significant or few side effects, can be taken orally for long periods of time even by pregnant women, lactating mothers, and infants, children, and adults; and have been known to reduce the incidence cardiovascular diseases including stroke. In addition, various EFAs and their long-chain metabolites not only enhance nitric oxide generation but also react with nitric oxide to yield their respective nitroalkene derivatives that produce vascular relaxation, inhibit neutrophil degranulation and superoxide formation, inhibit platelet activation, and possess PPAR-gamma ligand activity and release NO, thus prevent platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Based on these evidences, I propose that a rational combination of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and the

  2. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  3. The individual and combined influence of ACE and ACTN3 genotypes on muscle phenotypes before and after strength training.

    PubMed

    Erskine, R M; Williams, A G; Jones, D A; Stewart, C E; Degens, H

    2014-08-01

    Alternative measures of muscle size, strength, and power to those used in previous studies could help resolve the controversy surrounding associations between polymorphisms of the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) and α-actinin-3 (ACTN3) genes and skeletal muscle phenotypes, and the responses to resistance training (RT). To this end, we measured quadriceps femoris muscle volume (Vm), physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), maximum isometric force (Ft), specific force (Ft per unit PCSA), maximum isoinertial strength (1-RM), and maximum power (Wmax ; n = 40) before and after 9-week knee extension RT in 51 previously untrained young men, who were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms. ACTN3 R-allele carriers had greater Vm, 1-RM, and Wmax than XX homozygotes at baseline (all P < 0.05), but responses to RT were independent of ACTN3 genotype (all P > 0.05). Muscle phenotypes were independent of ACE genotype before (all P > 0.05) and after RT (all P > 0.01). However, people with the "optimal" ACE+ACTN3 genotype combination had greater baseline 1-RM and Wmax compared to those with the "suboptimal" profile (both P < 0.0125). We show for the first time that the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism is associated with human Vm and (independently and in combination with the ACE I/D polymorphism) influences 1-RM and Wmax. PMID:23384112

  4. Inhibition of ACE Retards Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Signs of Neuronal Degeneration in Aged Rats Subjected to Chronic Mild Stress

    PubMed Central

    AbdAlla, Said; el Hakim, Ahmed; Abdelbaset, Ahmed; Elfaramawy, Yasser; Quitterer, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    With increasing life expectancy, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other types of age-associated dementia are on the rise worldwide. Treatment approaches for dementia are insufficient and novel therapies are not readily available. In this context repurposing of established drugs appears attractive. A well-established class of cardiovascular drugs, which targets the angiotensin II system, is such a candidate, which currently undergoes a paradigm shift with regard to the potential benefit for treatment of neurodegenerative symptoms. In search for additional evidence, we subjected aged rats to chronic unpredictable mild stress, which is known to enhance the development of AD-related neuropathological features. We report here that four weeks of chronic mild stress induced a strong upregulation of the hippocampal angiotensin-converting enzyme (Ace) at gene expression and protein level. Concomitantly, tau protein hyperphosphorylation developed. Signs of neurodegeneration were detected by the significant downregulation of neuronal structure proteins such as microtubule-associated protein 2 (Map2) and synuclein-gamma (Sncg). Ace was involved in neurodegenerative symptoms because treatment with the brain-penetrating ACE inhibitor, captopril, retarded tau hyperphosphorylation and signs of neurodegeneration. Moreover, ACE inhibitor treatment could counteract glutamate neurotoxicity by preventing the downregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 2 (Gad2). Taken together, ACE inhibition targets neurodegeneration triggered by environmental stress. PMID:26697495

  5. Molecular analysis of genetic variation in angiotensin I-converting enzyme identifies no association with sporting ability: First report from Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Sweta T.; Chheda, Pratiksha; Chatterjee, Leena; Das, Bibhu. R.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A polymorphism in the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene was the first performance enhancing polymorphisms (PEPs) to be identified and correlated with athletic abilities. This polymorphism (rs. 5186) is the absence (deletion; D allele), rather than the presence (insertion, I allele) of 287bp Alu repeat element in intron 16. However, the association of ACE I/D polymorphism in sports abilities have been contradicted and debated. No study has evaluated the ACE gene polymorphism in Indian athletes so far. Hence, the genotype distribution and allelic frequency of ACE gene in selected Indian athletic and non-athletic population was studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 147 athletes and 131 controls were genotyped for the ACE gene polymorphism using PCR. RESULTS: No significant association was observed between the allelic frequencies of ACE gene in controls and athletes on a whole, as well as after sub-categorizing the athletes based on the type of sport they played (P > 0.1). However, a higher representation of I allele was observed in the athletes. CONCLUSION: ACE genotyping studies need to focus on truly elite athletes of a single sporting discipline, to be able to find an association. The ACE I/D polymorphism may not be considered a marker for human performance, but can be further studied in combination with other potent performance enhancing polymorphisms. PMID:22754223

  6. Analysis of the apo E/apo C-I, angiotensin converting enzyme and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genes as candidates affecting human longevity.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, D; Tysoe, C; Brayne, C E; Easton, D F; Huppert, F A; Dening, T R; Paykel, E S; Rubinsztein, D C

    1997-03-21

    Genetic factors are likely to affect human survival, since twin studies have shown greater concordance for age of death in monozygotic compared to dizygotic twins. Coronary artery disease is an important contributor to premature mortality in the UK. Accordingly, we have chosen genes associated with cardiovascular risk, apo E/apo C-I, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), as candidates which may affect longevity/survival into old age. An association study was performed by comparing allele and genotype frequencies at polymorphic loci associated with these genes in 182 women and 100 men aged 84 years and older with 100 boys and 100 girls younger than 17 years. MTHFR allele and genotype frequencies were similar in the elderly and young populations. Apo C-I allele and genotype frequencies were significantly different in the elderly women compared to the younger sample (P < 0.05). No difference was observed in the elderly men. At the neighbouring apo E gene, we only observed a difference between genotypes in the elderly women and the young sample; however, this did not retain significance when the genotype frequencies of the young sample were adjusted to values expected from the allele frequencies on the basis of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and compared to observed genotypes in elderly men and women. In contrast to previous studies, apo E2 was not overrepresented in the elderly men or women. Thus, the proposition that apo E2, E3 and E4 protein isoforms are themselves functionally associated with increasing risks for early death, may be too simplistic. The I/I ACE was depleted in the elderly males but not the elderly females. Furthermore, significant differences were observed between ACE genotypes in elderly men and elderly women. These data suggest that the penetrance of loci which influence survival may vary according to sex. The depletion of the ACE I/I genotype in elderly men is generally consistent with a previous study

  7. Identification of Enzyme Genes Using Chemical Structure Alignments of Substrate-Product Pairs.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Yuki; Yamada, Takuji; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakagawa, Zenichi; Kotera, Masaaki; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2016-03-28

    Although there are several databases that contain data on many metabolites and reactions in biochemical pathways, there is still a big gap in the numbers between experimentally identified enzymes and metabolites. It is supposed that many catalytic enzyme genes are still unknown. Although there are previous studies that estimate the number of candidate enzyme genes, these studies required some additional information aside from the structures of metabolites such as gene expression and order in the genome. In this study, we developed a novel method to identify a candidate enzyme gene of a reaction using the chemical structures of the substrate-product pair (reactant pair). The proposed method is based on a search for similar reactant pairs in a reference database and offers ortholog groups that possibly mediate the given reaction. We applied the proposed method to two experimentally validated reactions. As a result, we confirmed that the histidine transaminase was correctly identified. Although our method could not directly identify the asparagine oxo-acid transaminase, we successfully found the paralog gene most similar to the correct enzyme gene. We also applied our method to infer candidate enzyme genes in the mesaconate pathway. The advantage of our method lies in the prediction of possible genes for orphan enzyme reactions where any associated gene sequences are not determined yet. We believe that this approach will facilitate experimental identification of genes for orphan enzymes. PMID:26822930

  8. Cardiac protective effects of irbesartan via the PPAR-gamma signaling pathway in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a monocarboxypeptidase which metabolizes angiotensin II (Ang II) to generate Ang-(1–7), has been shown to prevent cardiac hypertrophy and injury but the mechanism remains elusive. Irbesartan has the dual actions of angiotensin receptor blockade and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activation. We hypothesized that irbesartan would exert its protective effects on ACE2 deficiency-mediated myocardial fibrosis and cardiac injury via the PPARγ signaling. Methods 10-week-old ACE2 knockout (ACE2KO; Ace2-/y) mice received daily with irbesartan (50 mg/kg) or saline for 2 weeks. The wild-type mice (Ace2+/y) were used to the normal controls. We examined changes in myocardial ultrastructure, fibrosis-related genes and pathological signaling by real-time PCR gene array, Western blotting, Masson trichrome staining and transmission electron microscope analyses, respectively. Results Compared with the Ace2+/y mice, cardiac expression of PPARα and PPARγ were reduced in Ace2-/y mice and the myocardial collagen volume fraction (CVF) and expression of fibrosis-related genes were increased, including transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I and collagen III. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency triggered cardiac hypertrophy, increased myocardial fibrosis and adverse ultrastructure injury in ACE2KO hearts with higher levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), without affecting cardiac systolic function. Intriguingly, treatment with irbesartan significantly reversed ACE2 deficiency-mediated pathological hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis in Ace2-/y mice linked with enhancement of plasma Ang-(1–7) level and downregulation of AT1 receptor in heart. Consistent with attenuation of myocardial fibrosis and ultrastructure injury, the myocardial CVF and levels of ANF, TGFβ1, CTGF, collagen I, collagen III

  9. ACES--Today and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackney, Harold

    1991-01-01

    Presents text of Presidential Address delivered March 24, 1991, at the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) luncheon, part of the American Association for Counseling and Development Convention held in Reno, Nevada. Comments on past, present, and future of ACES, particularly on future challenges and role of ACES. (ABL)

  10. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs)

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir’ and ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless’ varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  11. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs).

    PubMed

    Tang, Yujin; Wang, Ruipu; Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the 'Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir' and 'Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless' varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  12. Segregation and linkage analysis of serum angiotensin I-converting enzyme levels: evidence for two quantitative-trait loci.

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, C A; Julier, C; Forrester, T; McFarlane-Anderson, N; Keavney, B; Lathrop, G M; Ratcliffe, P J; Farrall, M

    1995-01-01

    Human serum angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) levels vary substantially between individuals and are highly heritable. Segregation analysis in European families has shown that more than half of the total variability in ACE levels is influenced by quantitative-trait loci (QTL). One of these QTLs is located within or close to the ACE locus itself. Combined segregation/linkage analysis in a series of African Caribbean families from Jamaica shows that the ACE insertion-deletion polymorphism is in moderate linkage disequilibrium with an ACE-linked QTL. Linkage analysis with a highly informative polymorphism at the neighboring growth-hormone gene (GH) shows surprisingly little support for linkage (LOD score [Z] = 0.12). An extended analysis with a two-QTL model, where an ACE-linked QTL interacts additively with an unlinked QTL, significantly improves both the fit of the model (P = .002) and the support for linkage between the ACe-linked QTL interacts additively with an unlinked QTL, significantly improves both the fit of the model (P = .002) and the support for linkage between the ACe-linked QTL and GH polymorphism (Z = 5.0). We conclude that two QTLs jointly influence serum ACE levels in this population. One QTL is located within or close to the ACE locus and explains 27% of the total variability; the second QTL is unlinked to the ACE locus and explains 52% of the variability. The identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying both QTLs is necessary in order to interpret the role of ACE in cardiovascular disease. PMID:8533773

  13. ACE-II genotype and I allele predicts ischemic stroke among males in south India

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Murali; Chinniah, Rathika; Ravi, Padma Malini; Mosses Joseph, Arun Kumar; Vellaiappan, Neethi Arasu; Krishnan, Jeyaram Illiayaraja; Karuppiah, Balakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Two hundred ischemic stroke patients and 193 age and sex matched healthy controls were studied for the presence of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion (ACE I/D) gene polymorphism. The PCR studies revealed that ACE ‘II’ (OR = 2.055; p = 0.004) genotype and ‘I’ (OR = 1.411; p = 0.018) alleles were significantly associated with IS patients. Gender specific analysis revealed a strong association of ‘II’ (OR = 2.044; p = 0.014) genotype and ‘I’ (OR = 1.531; p = 0.011) allele with male sex. Classification of patients based on TOAST criteria, revealed a significant association for ‘II’ genotype (OR = 1.713; p = 0.043) and ‘I’ (OR = 1.382; p = 0.039) allele in LVD patients only. When the data was stratified based on age and sex, a statistically significant association was observed for ACE ‘II’ genotype (OR = 2.288; p = 0.006) and ‘I’ allele (OR = 1.395; p = 0.054) in IS male patients of > 50 years of age. The ACE ‘D’ allele was found to be increased in controls (OR = 0.709; p = 0.018) than IS patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that smoking and diabetes were the most powerful independent risk factor in LVD type of stroke. Thus, we presented here an evidence for a strong association of ACE ‘II’ genotype and ‘I’ allele compounded by factors such as smoking and diabetes among south Indian IS patients. PMID:25606450

  14. Role of the ACE ID and PPARG P12A Polymorphisms in Genetic Susceptibility of Diabetic Nephropathy in a South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Lakkakula VKS; Mahin, Sultana; Ginila, Raju Thankabai; Soundararajan, Periyasamy

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the life-threatening disorders characterized by persistent albuminuria, raised arterial blood pressure, a lowered glomerular filtration rate, and high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The vascular genes ACE (Angiotensin-converting enzyme), and PPARG (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma) are involved in alterations in vascular endothelium, and are suggested to play a role in the susceptibility of diabetic nephropathy. Objectives The aim of our study was to find out the role of ACE ID and PPARG P12A polymorphisms in genetic susceptibility of diabetic nephropathy in south Indian population. Patients and Methods A total of 54 cases with diabetic nephropathy and 67 control subjects with diabetes were enrolled for our study. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leucocytes, and genotyped using PCR-electrophoresis (ACE ID) or PCR-RFLP (PPARG P12A) methods. Results ACE ID genotypes followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both cases and controls. But P12A genotypes deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in diabetic controls. Chi2 test was applied for the analysis of genotypic distributions in genotypic and dominant models. Odds ratios were also calculated. No significant differences in genotype frequencies of ACE ID and PPARG P12A polymorphisms were found on comparing patients with diabetic nephropathy with diabetic controls. The synergistic role of ACE ID* PPARG P12A interaction, did not show any association in patients with diabetic nephropathy when compared to diabetic controls. Conclusions In conclusion, the ACE and PPARG genes do not have a key role in conferring risk for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24282791

  15. An ACE diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nasher, Omar; Gupta, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher's disease is not commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of adult patients with hepatosplenomegaly and increased serum ACE. A 19-year-old girl presented with recurrent epigastric and left hypochondrial pain over a period of 9 years, associated with episodes of nausea and diarrhoea. She was extensively investigated and found to have splenomegaly and raised serum ACE. A screen for haematological disorders was negative. She reported an insect bite during an overseas holiday preceding her symptoms. She was therefore also screened for infectious causes of hepatosplenomegaly but without success. Later on in life, she reported joint pain and discomfort. Sarcoidosis was thought to be the putative cause on more than one occasion. However, the presence of splenomegaly and her relatively young age, led the rheumatologist to the correct diagnosis. PMID:23417380

  16. An ACE diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Nasher, Omar; Gupta, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher's disease is not commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of adult patients with hepatosplenomegaly and increased serum ACE. A 19-year-old girl presented with recurrent epigastric and left hypochondrial pain over a period of 9 years, associated with episodes of nausea and diarrhoea. She was extensively investigated and found to have splenomegaly and raised serum ACE. A screen for haematological disorders was negative. She reported an insect bite during an overseas holiday preceding her symptoms. She was therefore also screened for infectious causes of hepatosplenomegaly but without success. Later on in life, she reported joint pain and discomfort. Sarcoidosis was thought to be the putative cause on more than one occasion. However, the presence of splenomegaly and her relatively young age, led the rheumatologist to the correct diagnosis. PMID:23417380

  17. ACE inhibition in the treatment of children after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arbeiter, Klaus; Pichler, Andrea; Stemberger, Regina; Mueller, Thomas; Ruffingshofer, Dagmar; Vargha, Regina; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2004-02-01

    Currently, there are no data available on long-term effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) on graft function in children after renal transplantation. We therefore analyzed all children who were transplanted at our institution between 1989 and 1998 and followed for at least 2 years. Those treated with ACE-I, mainly because of failure of other antihypertensive medications, were compared to those without ACE-I. The ACE-I-treated children ( n=19) showed significantly better blood pressure control during the 1st year of follow-up ( p<0.05). In children with chronic allograft dysfunction ( n=8), treatment with ACE-I stabilized graft function, with improvement in creatinine clearance in 50% ( p<0.01). Serum potassium and hemoglobin levels remained stable. One patient discontinued ACE-I because of renal artery stenosis. Taken together, ACE-I were effective and safe in the treatment of hypertension in children following renal transplantation. Children with chronic allograft dysfunction experienced a stabilizing effect on graft function. PMID:14673630

  18. Angiotensin II regulates ACE and ACE2 in neurons through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Liang; Haack, Karla K. V.

    2013-01-01

    Brain ANG II plays an important role in modulating sympathetic function and homeostasis. The generation and degradation of ANG II are carried out, to a large extent, through the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2, respectively. In disease states, such as hypertension and chronic heart failure, central expression of ACE is upregulated and ACE2 is decreased in central sympathoregulatory neurons. In this study, we determined the expression of ACE and ACE2 in response to ANG II in a neuronal cell culture and the subsequent signaling mechanism(s) involved. A mouse catecholaminergic neuronal cell line (CATH.a) was treated with ANG II (30, 100, and 300 nM) for 24 h, and protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. ANG II induced a significant dose-dependent increase in ACE and decrease in ACE2 mRNA and protein expression in CATH.a neurons. This effect was abolished by pretreatment of the cells with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB-203580 (10 μM) 30 min before administration of ANG II or the ERK1/2 inhibitor U-0126 (10 μM). These data suggest that ANG II increases ACE and attenuates ACE2 expression in neurons via the ANG II type 1 receptor, p38 MAPK, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. PMID:23535237

  19. Lack of Association Between ACE Indel Polymorphism and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Physically Active and Sedentary Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Verlengia, Rozangela; Rebelo, Ana C.; Crisp, Alex H.; Kunz, Vandeni C.; dos Santos Carneiro Cordeiro, Marco A.; Hirata, Mario H.; Crespo Hirata, Rosario D.; Silva, Ester

    2014-01-01

    Background: Polymorphisms at the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE), such as the indel [rs1799752] variant in intron 16, have been shown to be associated with aerobic performance of athletes and non-athletes. However, the relationship between ACE indel polymorphism and cardiorespiratory fitness has not been always demonstrated. Objectives: The relationship between ACE indel polymorphism and cardiorespiratory fitness was investigated in a sample of young Caucasian Brazilian women. Patients and Methods: This study investigated 117 healthy women (aged 18 to 30 years) who were grouped as physically active (n = 59) or sedentary (n = 58). All subjects performed an incremental exercise test (ramp protocol) on a cycle-ergometer with 20-25 W/min increments. Blood samples were obtained for DNA extraction and to analyze metabolic and hormonal profiles. ACE indel polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fragment size analysis. Results: The physically active group had higher values of peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak), carbon dioxide output (VCO2), ventilation (VE) and power output than the sedentary group (P < 0.05) at the peak of the exercise test. However, heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) did not differ between groups. There was no relationship between ACE indel polymorphism and cardiorespiratory variables during the test in both the physically active and sedentary groups, even when the dominant (DD vs. D1 + 2) and recessive (2 vs. DI + DD) models of inheritance were tested. Conclusions: These results do not support the concept that the genetic variation at the ACE locus contributes to the cardiorespiratory responses at the peak of exercise test in physically active or sedentary healthy women. This indicates that other factors might mediate these responses, including the physical training level of the women. PMID:25520764

  20. Allele, Genotype and Haplotype Structures of Functional Polymorphic Variants in Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS), Angiotensinogen (ACE) and Aldosterone Synthase (CYP11B2) Genes in Healthy Pregnant Women of Indian Ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Devendran, Anichavezhi; Nampoothiri, Sreekala; Shewade, Deepak Gopal; Chatterjee, Suvro; Jayaraman, Balachandar; Chandrasekharan, Adithan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Variants in the candidate genes eNOS, CYP11B2 and ACE have been implicated as liable biomarkers that can predict complications like hypertension and preeclampsia. Studies on the impact and distribution of these variants on healthy pregnancy have not been done so far in south Indian or in any of the native Indian population. Examining these variants could lay a strong basis in understanding the genetic aspects of preeclampsia and further offer effective means in early risk assessment in a preeclampsia. Methods: Genotyping for 303 unrelated healthy women of Tamilian origin who underwent uncomplicated term pregnancies was executed by PCR-RFLP for eNOS, CYP11B2 and ACE variants. Haplotype assessment and pairwise linkage disequilibrium (LD) investigation were performed by Haploview software. Results: The prevalence of eNOS variants (−786T>C, Glu298Asp and intron 4 VNTR) was 12%, 21.6% and 21.1%, respectively. The incidence of CYP11B2 (−344 C>T) and ACE (287 bp Alu I/D) variants was found to be 43.8% and 42.7%. The observed frequencies of the studied polymorphisms did not diverge from the HWE (p>0.05). Significant LD was observed between 3 eNOS gene polymorphisms. Six different haplotype structures with a frequency of >1% were generated from three eNOS variants. Among the haplotypes generated, the haplotype T-4b-G was the most common with the frequency of 64.4%. There was a statistically significant inconsistency in the study population in comparison to other global races. Conclusion: The outcome of this study could be used for investigating future therapeutic value of the variants in a preeclamptic set-up which could pose a credible diagnostic potential for primary risk assessment of women susceptible to preeclampsia/other pregnancy related complications. PMID:27110515

  1. Correlation Index-Based Responsible-Enzyme Gene Screening (CIRES), a Novel DNA Microarray-Based Method for Enzyme Gene Involved in Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Harumi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Naito, Yuko; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Suzuki, Akemi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori

    2007-01-01

    Background Glycan biosynthesis occurs though a multi-step process that requires a variety of enzymes ranging from glycosyltransferases to those involved in cytosolic sugar metabolism. In many cases, glycan biosynthesis follows a glycan-specific, linear pathway. As glycosyltransferases are generally regulated at the level of transcription, assessing the overall transcriptional profile for glycan biosynthesis genes seems warranted. However, a systematic approach for assessing the correlation between glycan expression and glycan-related gene expression has not been reported previously. Methodology To facilitate genetic analysis of glycan biosynthesis, we sought to correlate the expression of genes involved in cell-surface glycan formation with the expression of the glycans, as detected by glycan-recognizing probes. We performed cross-sample comparisons of gene expression profiles using a newly developed, glycan-focused cDNA microarray. Cell-surface glycan expression profiles were obtained using flow cytometry of cells stained with plant lectins. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for these profiles and were used to identify enzyme genes correlated with glycan biosynthesis. Conclusions This method, designated correlation index-based responsible-enzyme gene screening (CIRES), successfully identified genes already known to be involved in the biosynthesis of certain glycans. Our evaluation of CIRES indicates that it is useful for identifying genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycan chains that can be probed with lectins using flow cytometry. PMID:18043739

  2. Convergent evidences from human and animal studies implicate angiotensin I-converting enzyme activity in cognitive performance in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, A; Vendramini, A M; Yonamine, C M; Nering, M; Berberian, A; Suiama, M A; Oliveira, V; Lima-Landman, M T; Breen, G; Bressan, R A; Abílio, V; Hayashi, M A F

    2015-01-01

    In schizophrenia (SCZ), higher angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) levels have been reported in patient's blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Hereby, we propose to explore whether the ACE activity levels are associated to cognitive performance in SCZ. Seventy-two patients with SCZ or schizoaffective disorder diagnosis, and 69 healthy controls (HCs) underwent a cognitive battery with parallel collection of peripheral blood samples to measure ACE activity. Significant higher ACE activity levels were confirmed in the plasma of SCZ patients compared with HCs (Student's t=-5.216; P<0.001). ACE activity significantly correlated to Hopkins delayed recall measures (r=-0.247; P=0.004) and Hopkins total (r=-0.214; P=0.012). Subjects grouped as high ACE activity (above average) had worse performance compared with low ACE activity level group for Hopkins delayed recall measure, even after correction for clinical condition, age, gender and years of education (P=0.029). The adjusted R squared for this final model was 0.343. This result was evident only comparing extreme groups for ACE activity, when splitting the sample in three groups with similar number of subjects. To clarify this finding, we performed an evaluation of the cognitive performance of transgenic mice with three copies of ACE gene in novel object recognition (NOR) test, which showed that such animals presented impairment in NOR (P<0.05) compared with two copies of wild-type animals. The results observed in SCZ patients and animal model suggest both the association of ACE to cognitive deficits in SCZ. This finding may support the evaluation of novel treatment protocols and/or of innovative drugs for specific intervention of cognitive deficits in SCZ envisioning concomitant ACE activity and behavior evaluations. PMID:26645626

  3. The influence of angiotensin converting enzyme and bradykinin receptor B2 gene variants on voluntary fluid intake and fluid balance in healthy men during moderate-intensity exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Yau, Adora M W; Moss, Andrew D; James, Lewis John; Gilmore, William; Ashworth, Jason J; Evans, Gethin H

    2015-02-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and bradykinin receptor B2 (B2R) genetic variation may affect thirst because of effects on angiotensin II production and bradykinin activity, respectively. To examine this, 45 healthy Caucasian men completed 60 min of cycle exercise at 62% ± 5% peak oxygen uptake in a room heated to 30.5 ± 0.3 °C with ad libitum fluid intake. Blood samples were collected pre-, mid-, and immediately post-cycle. Fluid intake, body mass loss (BML), sweat loss (determined via changes in body mass and fluid intake), and thirst sensation were recorded. All participants were genotyped for the ACE insert fragment (I) and the B2R insert sequence (P). Participants were homozygous for the wild-type allele (WW or MM), heterozygous (WI or MP) or homozygous for the insert (II or PP). No differences between genotype groups were found in mean (±SD) voluntary fluid intake (WW: 613 ± 388, WI: 753 ± 385, II: 862 ± 421 mL, p = 0.31; MM: 599 ± 322, MP: 745 ± 374, PP: 870 ± 459 mL, p = 0.20), percentage BML or any other fluid balance variables for both the ACE and B2R genes, respectively. Mean thirst perception in the B2R PP group, however, was higher (p < 0.05) than both MM and MP at 30, 45, and 60 min. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that voluntary fluid intake and fluid balance in healthy men performing 60 min of moderate-intensity exercise in the heat are not predominantly influenced by ACE or B2R genetic variation. PMID:25641172

  4. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  5. ACE2 Decreases Formation and Severity of Angiotensin II-induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Sean E.; Zhang, Xuan; Howatt, Deborah A.; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Gurley, Susan B.; Ennis, Terri; Curci, John A.; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) cleaves angiotensin II (AngII) to form angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)), which generally opposes effects of AngII. AngII infusion into hypercholesterolemic male mice induces formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). This study tests the hypothesis that deficiency of ACE2 promotes AngII-induced AAAs, while ACE2 activation suppresses aneurysm formation. Approach and Results ACE2 protein was detectable by immunostaining in mice and human AAAs. Whole body deficiency of ACE2 significantly increased aortic lumen diameters and external diameters of suprarenal aortas from AngII-infused mice. Conversely, ACE2 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells had no effect on AngII-induced AAAs. In contrast to AngII-induced AAAs, ACE2 deficiency had no significant effect on external aortic diameters of elastase-induced AAAs. Since ACE2 deficiency promoted AAA formation in AngII-infused mice, we determined if ACE2 activation suppressed AAAs. ACE2 activation by administration of diminazine aceturate (DIZE, 30 mg/kg/day) to Ldlr−/− mice increased kidney ACE2 mRNA abundance and activity and elevated plasma Ang-(1-7) concentrations. Unexpectedly, administration of DIZE significantly reduced total sera cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol concentrations. Notably, DIZE significantly decreased aortic lumen diameters and aortic external diameters of AngII-infused mice resulting in a marked reduction in AAA incidence (from 73 to 29%). None of these effects of DIZE were observed in the Ace2−/y mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that ACE2 exerts a modulatory role in AngII-induced AAA formation, and that therapeutic stimulation of ACE2 could be a benefit to reduce AAA expansion and rupture in patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system. PMID:25301841

  6. Nine novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) muscle protein hydrolysates and antihypertensive effect of the potent active peptide in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Balti, Rafik; Bougatef, Ali; Sila, Assaâd; Guillochon, Didier; Dhulster, Pascal; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to identify novel ACE inhibitory peptides from the muscle of cuttlefish. Proteins were hydrolyzed and the hydrolysates were then subjected to various types of chromatography to isolate the active peptides. Nine ACE inhibitory peptides were isolated and their molecular masses and amino acid sequences were determined using ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS, respectively. The structures of the most potent peptides were identified as Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro, Ala-Phe-Val-Gly-Tyr-Val-Leu-Pro and Glu-Lys-Ser-Tyr-Glu-Leu-Pro. The first peptide displayed the highest ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 5.22μM. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro acts as a non-competitive inhibitor against ACE. Furthermore, antihypertensive effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) also revealed that oral administration of Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro can decrease systolic blood pressure significantly (p<0.01). These results suggest that the Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro would be a beneficial ingredient for nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals acting against hypertension and its related diseases. PMID:25306378

  7. Prodrug converting enzyme gene delivery by L. monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Stritzker, Jochen; Pilgrim, Sabine; Szalay, Aladar A; Goebel, Werner

    2008-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes is a highly versatile bacterial carrier system for introducing protein, DNA and RNA into mammalian cells. The delivery of tumor antigens with the help of this carrier into tumor-bearing animals has been successfully carried out previously and it was recently reported that L. monocytogenes is able to colonize and replicate within solid tumors after local or even systemic injection. Methods Here we report on the delivery of two prodrug converting enzymes, purine-deoxynucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and a fusion protein consisting of yeast cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (FCU1) into cancer cells in culture by L. monocytogenes. Transfer of the prodrug converting enzymes was achieved by bacterium mediated transfer of eukaryotic expression plasmids or by secretion of the proteins directly into the host cell cytosol by the infecting bacteria. Results The results indicate that conversion of appropriate prodrugs to toxic drugs in the cancer cells occured after both procedures although L. monocytogenes-mediated bactofection proved to be more efficient than enzyme secretion 4T1, B16 and COS-1 tumor cells. Exchanging the constitutively PCMV-promoter with the melanoma specific P4xTETP-promoter resulted in melanoma cell-specific expression of the prodrug converting enzymes but reduced the efficiencies. Conclusion These experiments open the way for bacterium mediated tumor specific activation of prodrugs in live animals with tumors. PMID:18402662

  8. The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism Modifies Exercise-Induced Muscle Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, David; Brogioli, Michael; Maier, Thomas; White, Andy; Waldron, Sarah; Rittweger, Jörn; Toigo, Marco; Wettstein, Jessica; Laczko, Endre; Flück, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective A silencer region (I-allele) within intron 16 of the gene for the regulator of vascular perfusion, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), is implicated in phenotypic variation of aerobic fitness and the development of type II diabetes. We hypothesised that the reportedly lower aerobic performance in non-carriers compared to carriers of the ACE I-allele, i.e. ACE-DD vs. ACE-ID/ACE-II genotype, is associated with alterations in activity-induced glucose metabolism and capillarisation in exercise muscle. Methods Fifty-three, not-specifically trained Caucasian men carried out a one-legged bout of cycling exercise to exhaustion and/or participated in a marathon, the aim being to identify and validate genotype effects on exercise metabolism. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER), serum glucose and lipid concentration, glycogen, and metabolite content in vastus lateralis muscle based on ultra-performance lipid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), were assessed before and after the cycling exercise in thirty-three participants. Serum metabolites were measured in forty subjects that completed the marathon. Genotype effects were assessed post-hoc. Results Cycling exercise reduced muscle glycogen concentration and this tended to be affected by the ACE I-allele (p = 0.09). The ACE-DD genotype showed a lower maximal RER and a selective increase in serum glucose concentration after exercise compared to ACE-ID and ACE-II genotypes (+24% vs. +2% and –3%, respectively). Major metabolites of mitochondrial metabolism (i.e. phosphoenol pyruvate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, L-Aspartic acid, glutathione) were selectively affected in vastus lateralis muscle by exercise in the ACE-DD genotype. Capillary-to-fibre ratio was 24%-lower in the ACE-DD genotype. Individuals with the ACE-DD genotype demonstrated an abnormal increase in serum glucose to 7.7 mM after the marathon. Conclusion The observations imply a genetically modulated role for ACE in control of

  9. National Survey of ACE Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantino, Ernesto A.

    In 1987-88, a national survey was conducted to determine the adult/continuing education (ACE) policies and practices of large, urban community colleges. Questionnaires were mailed to ACE deans at 74 colleges, requesting information about program characteristics, funding sources, personnel, curriculum review, and marketing and publicity. Study…

  10. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  11. Strategies for measurement of biotransformation enzyme gene expression.

    PubMed

    Romkes, Marjorie; Buch, Shama C

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of gene expression is an integral part of any gene function research. A wide variety of techniques have been developed for this purpose, each with its own advantages and limitations. The following chapter seeks to provide an overview of some of the most recent as well as conventional methods to study gene expression. These approaches include Northern blot analysis, ribonuclease protection assay, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, expressed tag sequencing, differential display, cDNA arrays, serial analysis of gene expression, and transcriptome sequencing. The current applications of the information derived from gene expression studies require most of the assays to be adaptable for the quantitative analysis of a large number of samples and endpoints within a short period of time coupled with cost-effectiveness. A comparison of some of these features of each analytical approach as well as their advantages and disadvantages has also been provided. PMID:24623221

  12. Effect of ace inhibitors and TMOF on growth, development, and trypsin activity of larval Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lemeire, Els; Borovsky, Dov; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc metallopeptidase capable of cleaving dipeptide or dipeptideamide moieties at the C-terminal end of peptides. ACE is present in the hemolymph and reproductive tissues of insects. The presence of ACE in the hemolymph and its broad substrate specificity suggests an important role in processing of bioactive peptides. This study reports the effects of ACE inhibitors on larval growth in the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis. Feeding ACE inhibitors ad lib decreased the growth rate, inhibited ACE activity in the larval hemolymph, and down-regulated trypsin activity in the larval gut. These results indicate that S. littoralis ACE may influence trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut by interacting with a trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). Injecting third instar larvae with a combination of Aea-TMOF and the ACE inhibitor captopril, down-regulated trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut indicating that an Aea-TMOF gut receptor analogue could be present. Injecting captopril and enalapril into newly molted fifth instar larvae stopped larval feeding and decreased weight gain. Together, these results indicate that ACE inhibitors are efficacious in stunting larval growth and ACE plays an important role in larval growth and development. PMID:18949805

  13. The acu-1 gene of Coprinus cinereus is a regulatory gene required for induction of acetate utilisation enzymes.

    PubMed

    Maconochie, M K; Connerton, I F; Casselton, L A

    1992-08-01

    We have isolated a gene from Coprinus cinereus which cross-hybridises to the facA and acu-5 genes of Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa, respectively. These genes encode acetyl-CoA synthetase, an enzyme which is inducible by acetate and required for growth on acetate as sole carbon source. We have designated the C. cinereus gene acs-1 and have used transformation to demonstrate its functional homology to the ascomycete genes by complementation of an N. crassa acu-5 mutation. The acs-1 gene has never been identified by mutation; mutations leading to loss of acetyl-CoA synthetase function map to another gene, acu-1. Using Northern analyses we have shown that acu-1 has a regulatory function that is required for acetate-induced transcription of acs-1 and of another acetate utilisation gene, acu-7, the isocitrate lyase structural gene. PMID:1354839

  14. Gene-targeted metagenomic analysis of glucan-branching enzyme gene profiles among human and animal fecal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunghee; Cantarel, Brandi; Henrissat, Bernard; Gevers, Dirk; Birren, Bruce W; Huttenhower, Curtis; Ko, GwangPyo

    2014-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs), the enzymes that breakdown complex carbohydrates, are a highly diversified class of key enzymes associated with the gut microbiota and its metabolic functions. To learn more about the diversity of GHs and their potential role in a variety of gut microbiomes, we used a combination of 16S, metagenomic and targeted amplicon sequencing data to study one of these enzyme families in detail. Specifically, we employed a functional gene-targeted metagenomic approach to the 1-4-α-glucan-branching enzyme (gBE) gene in the gut microbiomes of four host species (human, chicken, cow and pig). The characteristics of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and operational glucan-branching units (OGBUs) were distinctive in each of hosts. Human and pig were most similar in OTUs profiles while maintaining distinct OGBU profiles. Interestingly, the phylogenetic profiles identified from 16S and gBE gene sequences differed, suggesting the presence of different gBE genes in the same OTU across different vertebrate hosts. Our data suggest that gene-targeted metagenomic analysis is useful for an in-depth understanding of the diversity of a particular gene of interest. Specific carbohydrate metabolic genes appear to be carried by distinct OTUs in different individual hosts and among different vertebrate species' microbiomes, the characteristics of which differ according to host genetic background and/or diet. PMID:24108330

  15. Role of homocysteinylation of ACE in endothelial dysfunction of arteries

    PubMed Central

    Huang, An; Pinto, John T.; Froogh, Ghezal; Kandhi, Sharath; Qin, Jun; Wolin, Michael S.; Hintze, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The direct impact of de novo synthesis of homocysteine (Hcy) and its reactive metabolites, Hcy-S-S-Hcy and Hcy thiolactone (HCTL), on vascular function has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that Hcy synthesized within endothelial cells affects activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) by direct homocysteinylation of its amino- and/or sulfhydryl moieties. This covalent modification enhances ACE reactivity toward angiotensin II (ANG II)-NADPH oxidase-superoxide-dependent endothelial dysfunction. Mesenteric and coronary arteries isolated from normal rats were incubated for 3 days with or without exogenous methionine (Met, 0.1–0.3 mM), a precursor to Hcy. Incubation of arteries in Met-free media resulted in time-dependent decreases in vascular Hcy formation. By contrast, vessels incubated with Met produced Hcy in a dose-dependent manner. There was a notably greater de novo synthesis of Hcy from endothelial than from smooth muscle cells. Enhanced levels of Hcy production significantly impaired shear stress-induced dilation and release of nitric oxide, events that are associated with elevated production of vascular superoxide. Each of these processes was attenuated by ANG II type I receptor blocker or ACE and NADPH oxidase inhibitors. In addition, in vitro exposure of purified ACE to Hcy-S-S-Hcy/HCTL resulted in formation of homocysteinylated ACE and an enhanced ACE activity. The enhanced ACE activity was confirmed in isolated coronary and mesenteric arteries that had been exposed directly to Hcy-S-S-Hcy/HCTL or after Met incubation. In conclusion, vasculature-derived Hcy initiates endothelial dysfunction that, in part, may be mediated by ANG II-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase in association with homocysteinylation of ACE. PMID:25416191

  16. Gene Expression Variability in Human Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lun; Price, Elvin T.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Li, Yan; Huang, Ying; Guo, Li-Wu; Guo, Yongli; Kaput, Jim; Shi, Leming; Ning, Baitang

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs) in human liver may contribute to interindividual differences in drug efficacy and adverse reactions. Published studies that analyzed variability in the expression of DMET genes were limited by sample sizes and the number of genes profiled. We systematically analyzed the expression of 374 DMETs from a microarray data set consisting of gene expression profiles derived from 427 human liver samples. The standard deviation of interindividual expression for DMET genes was much higher than that for non-DMET genes. The 20 DMET genes with the largest variability in the expression provided examples of the interindividual variation. Gene expression data were also analyzed using network analysis methods, which delineates the similarities of biological functionalities and regulation mechanisms for these highly variable DMET genes. Expression variability of human hepatic DMET genes may affect drug-gene interactions and disease susceptibility, with concomitant clinical implications. PMID:23637747

  17. Gene polymorphisms of fibrinolytic enzymes in coal workers' pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Tseng, J.C.; Hua, C.C.; Liu, Y.C.; Shieh, W.B.; Wu, H.P.

    2006-03-15

    The authors assessed the gene polymorphisms of missense C/T polymorphism in exon 6 of the urokinase-plasminogen activator (PLAU) gene (PLAU P141L), A/u-repeat in intron 8 of the tissue-type plasminogen activator (PLAT) gene (PLAT TPA25 Alu insertion), and 4G/5G in the promoter region of the serine proteinase inhibitor, clade E (SERPINE) or plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene (SERPINE1 -675 4G/5G) in 153 healthy volunteers and 154 retired coal miners with coal miners' pneumoconiosis (CWP). The CWP subjects included 94 individuals with simple pneumoconiosis and 60 individuals with progressive massive fibrosis presenting with worse pulmonary function. The distributions of genotypes of these three genes did not differ between the control and CWP subjects or between subjects with simple pneumoconiosis and those with progressive massive fibrosis. However, by assessing duration of work and its interaction with genotypes by means of logistic regression, the authors found the missense C/T polymorphism in exon 6 of the PLAU gene to be an effect modifier of the association between work duration and the development of progressive massive fibrosis.

  18. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the [beta]-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novel regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. [beta]-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for [beta]-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

  19. Distribution of Angiotensin-1 Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion and α-Actinin-3 Codon 577 Polymorphisms in Turkish Male Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Ulucan, Korkut; Sercan, Canan; Biyikli, Türker

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-1 converting enzyme (ACE) gene and α-actinin-3 (ACTN3) gene polymorphisms are considered to be the most important candidate genes for genetic predisposition to human athletic performance. In the present study, we aimed to analyze the distribution of ACE and ACTN3 polymorphisms for the first time in male Turkish soccer players. In this prospective study, our cohort consisted of 25 professional players, all with Turkish ancestry. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction length polymorphism was used for the characterization of the genotype of ACTN3 and single PCR for ACE. For ACE genotype, 16%, 44%, and 40% of the players had insertion/insertion (II), insertion/deletion (ID), and deletion/deletion (DD) genotypes, respectively, whereas 20% had XX, 36% had RX, and 44% had RR genotypes for ACTN3. When we examined the allelic percentages, for ACE, D allele was recorded as 62 and I as 38, and for ACTN3, R allele was 62 and X was 38. Our results were in agreement with the previous reports, indicating the presence of ACTN3 D and ACE X allele in soccer players. We suggest that ACE and ACTN3 genotypes are important biomarkers for genetic counseling for the individuals who are prone to be successful soccer players. PMID:26448692

  20. Distribution of Angiotensin-1 Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion and α-Actinin-3 Codon 577 Polymorphisms in Turkish Male Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Ulucan, Korkut; Sercan, Canan; Biyikli, Türker

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-1 converting enzyme (ACE) gene and α-actinin-3 (ACTN3) gene polymorphisms are considered to be the most important candidate genes for genetic predisposition to human athletic performance. In the present study, we aimed to analyze the distribution of ACE and ACTN3 polymorphisms for the first time in male Turkish soccer players. In this prospective study, our cohort consisted of 25 professional players, all with Turkish ancestry. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction length polymorphism was used for the characterization of the genotype of ACTN3 and single PCR for ACE. For ACE genotype, 16%, 44%, and 40% of the players had insertion/insertion (II), insertion/deletion (ID), and deletion/deletion (DD) genotypes, respectively, whereas 20% had XX, 36% had RX, and 44% had RR genotypes for ACTN3. When we examined the allelic percentages, for ACE, D allele was recorded as 62 and I as 38, and for ACTN3, R allele was 62 and X was 38. Our results were in agreement with the previous reports, indicating the presence of ACTN3 D and ACE X allele in soccer players. We suggest that ACE and ACTN3 genotypes are important biomarkers for genetic counseling for the individuals who are prone to be successful soccer players. PMID:26448692

  1. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  2. Molecular genetics of aminoglycoside resistance genes and familial relationships of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, K J; Rather, P N; Hare, R S; Miller, G H

    1993-01-01

    The three classes of enzymes which inactivate aminoglycosides and lead to bacterial resistance are reviewed. DNA hybridization studies have shown that different genes can encode aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes with identical resistance profiles. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of 49 aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes have revealed new insights into the evolution and relatedness of these proteins. A preliminary assessment of the amino acids which may be important in binding aminoglycosides was obtained from these data and from the results of mutational analysis of several of the genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Recent studies have demonstrated that aminoglycoside resistance can emerge as a result of alterations in the regulation of normally quiescent cellular genes or as a result of acquiring genes which may have originated from aminoglycoside-producing organisms or from other resistant organisms. Dissemination of these genes is aided by a variety of genetic elements including integrons, transposons, and broad-host-range plasmids. As knowledge of the molecular structure of these enzymes increases, progress can be made in our understanding of how resistance to new aminoglycosides emerges. Images PMID:8385262

  3. Association of ACTN3 R577X but not ACE I/D gene variants with elite rugby union player status and playing position

    PubMed Central

    Kilduff, L. P.; Erskine, R. M.; Day, S. H.; McPhee, J. S.; McMahon, G. E.; Stebbings, G. K.; Neale, J. P. H.; Lockey, S. J.; Ribbans, W. J.; Cook, C. J.; Vance, B.; Raleigh, S. M.; Roberts, C.; Bennett, M. A.; Wang, G.; Collins, M.; Pitsiladis, Y. P.; Williams, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to quantify the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X (rs1815739) genetic variants in elite rugby athletes (rugby union and league) and compare genotype frequencies to controls and between playing positions. The rugby athlete cohort consisted of 507 Caucasian men, including 431 rugby union athletes that for some analyses were divided into backs and forwards and into specific positional groups: front five, back row, half backs, centers, and back three. Controls were 710 Caucasian men and women. Real-time PCR of genomic DNA was used to determine genotypes using TaqMan probes and groups were compared using χ2 and odds ratio (OR) statistics. Correction of P values for multiple comparisons was according to Benjamini-Hochberg. There was no difference in ACE I/D genotype between groups. ACTN3 XX genotype tended to be underrepresented in rugby union backs (15.7%) compared with forwards (24.8%, P = 0.06). Interestingly, the 69 back three players (wings and full backs) in rugby union included only six XX genotype individuals (8.7%), with the R allele more common in the back three (68.8%) than controls (58.0%; χ2 = 6.672, P = 0.04; OR = 1.60) and forwards (47.5%; χ2 = 11.768, P = 0.01; OR = 2.00). Association of ACTN3 R577X with playing position in elite rugby union athletes suggests inherited fatigue resistance is more prevalent in forwards, while inherited sprint ability is more prevalent in backs, especially wings and full backs. These results also demonstrate the advantage of focusing genetic studies on a large cohort within a single sport, especially when intrasport positional differences exist, instead of combining several sports with varied demands and athlete characteristics. PMID:26757799

  4. Association of ACTN3 R577X but not ACE I/D gene variants with elite rugby union player status and playing position.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, S M; Kilduff, L P; Erskine, R M; Day, S H; McPhee, J S; McMahon, G E; Stebbings, G K; Neale, J P H; Lockey, S J; Ribbans, W J; Cook, C J; Vance, B; Raleigh, S M; Roberts, C; Bennett, M A; Wang, G; Collins, M; Pitsiladis, Y P; Williams, A G

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to quantify the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X (rs1815739) genetic variants in elite rugby athletes (rugby union and league) and compare genotype frequencies to controls and between playing positions. The rugby athlete cohort consisted of 507 Caucasian men, including 431 rugby union athletes that for some analyses were divided into backs and forwards and into specific positional groups: front five, back row, half backs, centers, and back three. Controls were 710 Caucasian men and women. Real-time PCR of genomic DNA was used to determine genotypes using TaqMan probes and groups were compared using χ(2) and odds ratio (OR) statistics. Correction of P values for multiple comparisons was according to Benjamini-Hochberg. There was no difference in ACE I/D genotype between groups. ACTN3 XX genotype tended to be underrepresented in rugby union backs (15.7%) compared with forwards (24.8%, P = 0.06). Interestingly, the 69 back three players (wings and full backs) in rugby union included only six XX genotype individuals (8.7%), with the R allele more common in the back three (68.8%) than controls (58.0%; χ(2) = 6.672, P = 0.04; OR = 1.60) and forwards (47.5%; χ(2) = 11.768, P = 0.01; OR = 2.00). Association of ACTN3 R577X with playing position in elite rugby union athletes suggests inherited fatigue resistance is more prevalent in forwards, while inherited sprint ability is more prevalent in backs, especially wings and full backs. These results also demonstrate the advantage of focusing genetic studies on a large cohort within a single sport, especially when intrasport positional differences exist, instead of combining several sports with varied demands and athlete characteristics. PMID:26757799

  5. Nucleotide sequence and expression of the gene encoding the EcoRII modification enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Som, S; Bhagwat, A S; Friedman, S

    1987-01-01

    The gene coding for the EcoRII modification enzyme has been cloned and the nucleotide sequence of 1933 base pairs containing the gene has been determined. The gene codes for a protein of 477 amino acids. Two transcriptional start sites have been mapped by S1 mapping. One deletion that removes 34 N-terminal amino acids was found to have partial enzyme activity. Comparison of the EcoRII methylase sequence with other cytosine methylases revealed several domains of partial homology among all cytosine methylases. Cloning the gene in multicopy pUC vectors increased the expression by 6-18 fold. A 40 fold overproduction of the EcoRII methylase was obtained by cloning the gene in the expression vector carrying the lambda PL promoter. Images PMID:3029675

  6. Bioinformatic Analysis Reveals High Diversity of Bacterial Genes for Laccase-Like Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ausec, Luka; Zakrzewski, Martha; Goesmann, Alexander; Schlüter, Andreas; Mandic-Mulec, Ines

    2011-01-01

    Fungal laccases have been used in various fields ranging from processes in wood and paper industries to environmental applications. Although a few bacterial laccases have been characterized in recent years, prokaryotes have largely been neglected as a source of novel enzymes, in part due to the lack of knowledge about the diversity and distribution of laccases within Bacteria. In this work genes for laccase-like enzymes were searched for in over 2,200 complete and draft bacterial genomes and four metagenomic datasets, using the custom profile Hidden Markov Models for two- and three- domain laccases. More than 1,200 putative genes for laccase-like enzymes were retrieved from chromosomes and plasmids of diverse bacteria. In 76% of the genes, signal peptides were predicted, indicating that these bacterial laccases may be exported from the cytoplasm, which contrasts with the current belief. Moreover, several examples of putatively horizontally transferred bacterial laccase genes were described. Many metagenomic sequences encoding fragments of laccase-like enzymes could not be phylogenetically assigned, indicating considerable novelty. Laccase-like genes were also found in anaerobic bacteria, autotrophs and alkaliphiles, thus opening new hypotheses regarding their ecological functions. Bacteria identified as carrying laccase genes represent potential sources for future biotechnological applications. PMID:22022440

  7. Molecular characterization of tobacco sulfite reductase: enzyme purification, gene cloning, and gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Yonekura-Sakakibara, K; Ashikari, T; Tanaka, Y; Kusumi, T a; Hase, T

    1998-09-01

    A cDNA clone, NtSiR1, that encodes the precursor of ferredoxin-dependent sulfite reductase (Fd-SiR) has been isolated from a cDNA library of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. SR1). The identity of the cDNA was established by comparison of the purified protein and the predicted structure with the nucleotide sequence. The amino terminus of the purified enzyme was Thr62 of the precursor protein, and the mature region of NtSiR1 consisted of 632 amino acids. Tobacco Fd-SiR is 82, 77, and 48% identical with Fd-SiRs from Zea mays, Arabidopsis thaliana, and a cyanobacterium, respectively. Significant similarity was also found with Escherichia coli NADPH-SiR in the region involved in ligation of siroheme and the [4Fe-4S] cluster. On Northern blot analysis, a transcript of NtSiR1 was detected in leaves, stems, roots, and petals in similar amounts. We also isolated a genomic SiR clone named gNtSiR1. It consists of 8 exons and 7 introns. Genomic Southern blot analysis indicated that at least two SiR genes are present in the tobacco genome. PMID:9722674

  8. Enterococcus faecalis adhesin, ace, mediates attachment to extracellular matrix proteins collagen type IV and laminin as well as collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Nallapareddy, S R; Qin, X; Weinstock, G M; Höök, M; Murray, B E

    2000-09-01

    Adhesin-mediated binding to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins is thought to be a crucial step in the pathogenic process of many bacterial infections. We have previously reported conditional adherence of most Enterococcus faecalis isolates, after growth at 46 degrees C, to ECM proteins collagen types I and IV and laminin; identified an E. faecalis-specific gene, ace, whose encoded protein has characteristics of a bacterial adhesin; and implicated Ace in binding to collagen type I. In this study, we constructed an ace disruption mutant from E. faecalis strain OG1RF that showed marked reduction in adherence to collagen types I and IV and laminin when compared to the parental OG1RF strain after growth at 46 degrees C. Polyclonal immune serum raised against the OG1RF-derived recombinant Ace A domain reacted with a single approximately 105-kDa band of mutanolysin extracts from OG1RF grown at 46 degrees C, while no band was detected in extracts from OG1RF grown at 37 degrees C, nor from the OG1RF ace mutant grown at 37 or 46 degrees C. IgGs purified from the anti-Ace A immune serum inhibited adherence of 46 degrees C-grown E. faecalis OG1RF to immobilized collagen type IV and laminin as well as collagen type I, at a concentration as low as 1 microg/ml, and also inhibited the 46 degrees C-evoked adherence of two clinical isolates tested. We also showed in vitro interaction of collagen type IV with Ace from OG1RF mutanolysin extracts on a far-Western blot. Binding of recombinant Ace A to immobilized collagen types I and IV and laminin was demonstrated in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and was shown to be concentration dependent. These results indicate that Ace A mediates the conditional binding of E. faecalis OG1RF to collagen type IV and laminin in addition to collagen type I. PMID:10948147

  9. Non-Viral Gene Transfer as a Tool for Studying Transcription Regulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bonamassa, Barbara; Liu, Dexi

    2010-01-01

    Numerous xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes are regulated by nuclear receptors at transcriptional level. The challenge we currently face is to understand how a given nuclear receptor interacts with its xenobiotics, migrates into nucleus, binds to the xenobiotic response element of a target gene, and regulates transcription. Toward this end, new methods have been developed to introduce the nuclear receptor gene into appropriate cells and study its activity in activating reporter gene expression under the control of a promoter containing xenobiotic response elements. The goal of this review is to critically examine the gene transfer methods currently available. We concentrate on the gene transfer mechanism, advantages and limitations of each method when employed for nuclear receptor-mediated gene regulation studies. It is our hope that the information provided highlights the importance of gene transfer in studying the mechanisms by which our body eliminates the potentially harmful substances and maintains the homeostasis. PMID:20713102

  10. Enzymes and genes involved in aerobic alkane degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes, transport across cell membrane of alkanes, the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation. PMID:23755043

  11. Gene expression for peroxisome-associated enzymes in hepatocellular carcinomas induced by ciprofibrate, a hypolipidemic compound

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.S.; Nemali, M.R.; Reddy, J.K.

    1986-03-05

    Administration of hypolipidemic compounds leads to marked proliferation of peroxisomes and peroxisome-associated enzymes (PAE) in the livers of rodents and non-rodent species. The increase peroxisome-associated enzymes such as fatty acid ..beta..-oxidation system and catalase is shown to be due to an increase in the levels of mRNA. In this experiment they have examined hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), induced in male F-344 rats by ciprofibrate (0.025%, w/w for 60 weeks), for gene expression of PAE. Total RNA was purified from HCC as well as from control and ciprofibrate (0.025% for 2 weeks) fed rat livers. Northern blot analysis was performed using (32/sub p/)cDNA probes for albumin, fatty acetyl-CoA oxidase, enoyl-CoA hydratase 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme and catalase. mRNA levels in HCC for albumin, fatty acid ..beta..-oxidation enzymes and catalase were comparable with those levels observed in the livers of rats given ciprofibrate for 2 weeks. In control livers the mRNAs for ..beta..-oxidation enzymes were low. Albumin mRNA levels in all the 3 groups were comparable. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether the increased level of mRNAs for the ..beta..-oxidation enzymes in HCC is due to the effect of ciprofibrate or to the gene amplification.

  12. ACE inhibition, ACE2 and angiotensin-(1-7) axis in kidney and cardiac inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Simões E Silva, Ana Cristina; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-05-01

    The Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is a pivotal physiological regulator of heart and kidney homeostasis, but also plays an important role in the pathophysiology of heart and kidney diseases. Recently, new components of the RAS have been discovered, including angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), Angiotensin(Ang)-(1-7), Mas receptor, Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine. These new components of RAS are formed by the hydrolysis of Ang I and Ang II and, in general, counteract the effects of Ang II. In experimental models of heart and renal diseases, Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine produced vasodilation, inhibition of cell growth, anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. Recent pharmacological strategies have been proposed to potentiate the effects or to enhance the formation of Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9), including ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) in hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin, cyclized form of Ang-(1-7) and nonpeptide synthetic Mas receptor agonists. Here, we review the role and effects of ACE2, ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) and synthetic Mas receptor agonists in the control of inflammation and fibrosis in cardiovascular and renal diseases and as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II-AT1 axis. We briefly comment on the therapeutic potential of the novel members of RAS, Ang-(1-9) and alamandine, and the interactions between classical RAS inhibitors and new players in heart and kidney diseases. PMID:26995300

  13. Coordinated Changes in Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression in Aging Male Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to gain better insight on aging and susceptibility, we characterized the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) from the livers of rats to evaluate the change in capacity to respond to xenobiotics across the adult lifespan. Gene expression profiles for XMEs...

  14. Evolution of substrate specificity in a recipient's enzyme following horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Noda-García, Lianet; Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R; Medina-Ruíz, Sofía; Gaytán, Paul; Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Fülöp, Vilmos; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2013-09-01

    Despite the prominent role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in shaping bacterial metabolism, little is known about the impact of HGT on the evolution of enzyme function. Specifically, what is the influence of a recently acquired gene on the function of an existing gene? For example, certain members of the genus Corynebacterium have horizontally acquired a whole l-tryptophan biosynthetic operon, whereas in certain closely related actinobacteria, for example, Mycobacterium, the trpF gene is missing. In Mycobacterium, the function of the trpF gene is performed by a dual-substrate (βα)8 phosphoribosyl isomerase (priA gene) also involved in l-histidine (hisA gene) biosynthesis. We investigated the effect of a HGT-acquired TrpF enzyme upon PriA's substrate specificity in Corynebacterium through comparative genomics and phylogenetic reconstructions. After comprehensive in vivo and enzyme kinetic analyses of selected PriA homologs, a novel (βα)8 isomerase subfamily with a specialized function in l-histidine biosynthesis, termed subHisA, was confirmed. X-ray crystallography was used to reveal active-site mutations in subHisA important for narrowing of substrate specificity, which when mutated to the naturally occurring amino acid in PriA led to gain of function. Moreover, in silico molecular dynamic analyses demonstrated that the narrowing of substrate specificity of subHisA is concomitant with loss of ancestral protein conformational states. Our results show the importance of HGT in shaping enzyme evolution and metabolism. PMID:23800623

  15. Increased Catalytic Efficiency Following Gene Fusion of Bifunctional Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase Enzymes from Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Markillie, Lye Meng; Xiong, Yijia; Mayer, M. Uljana; Squier, Thomas C.

    2007-11-11

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase enzymes MsrA and MsrB have complementary stereospecificies that respectively reduce the S- and R-stereoisomers of methionine sulfoxide (MetSO), and together function as critical antioxidant enzymes. In some pathogenic and metal reducing bacteria these genes are fused to form a bifunctional methionine sulfoxide reductase (i.e., MsrBA) enzyme. To investigate the impact of gene fusion on the substrate specificity and catalytic activities of Msr, we have cloned and expressed the MsrBA enzyme from Shewanella oneidensis, a metal reducing bacterium and fish pathogen. For comparison, we also cloned and expressed the wild-type MsrA enzyme and a genetically engineered MsrB protein. We report that MsrBA is able to completely reduce (i.e., repair) MetSO in the calcium regulatory protein calmodulin; in comparison only partial repair is observed using both MsrA and MsrB enzymes together at 25 °C. MsrBA has a twenty-fold enhanced rate of repair for MetSO in proteins in comparison with the individual MsrA or MsrB enzymes alone and respective 14- and 50-fold increases in catalytic efficiency (i.e., kcat/KM). In comparison, MsrBA and MsrA have similar catalytic efficiencies when free MetSO is used as a substrate. These results indicate that the individual domains within bifunctional MsrBA work cooperatively to selectively recognize and reduce MetSO in highly oxidized proteins. The enhanced catalytic activity of MsrBA against oxidized proteins and its common expression in bacterial pathogens is consistent with an important role for this enzyme activity in promoting bacterial survival under highly oxidizing conditions associated with pathogenesis or bioremediation.

  16. Enzyme markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... or defects passed down through families (inherited) can affect how enzymes work. Some enzymes are affected by several genes. Test results are usually reported as a percentage of normal enzyme activity.

  17. Alternative Roles of STAT3 and MAPK Signaling Pathways in the MMPs Activation and Progression of Lung Injury Induced by Cigarette Smoke Exposure in ACE2 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yi-Han; Hsieh, Wen-Yeh; Hsieh, Jih-Sheng; Liu, Fon-Chang; Tsai, Chin-Hung; Lu, Li-Che; Huang, Chen-Yi; Wu, Chien-Liang; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-mediated abnormalities in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of lung injury. Angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2), an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) homologue that displays antagonist effects on ACE/angiotensin II (Ang II) axis, could also play a protective role against lung diseases. However, the relationship between ACE2 and MMPs activation in lung injury is still largely unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether MMPs activity could be affected by ACE2 and which ACE2 derived signaling pathways could be also involved via using a mouse model with lung injury induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure for 1 to 3 weeks. Wild-type (WT; C57BL/6) and ACE2 KO mice (ACE2(-/-)) were utilized to study CS-induced lung injury. Increases in the resting respiratory rate (RRR), pulmonary immunokines, leukocyte infiltration and bronchial hyperplasia were observed in the CS-exposed mice. Compared to WT mice, more serious physiopathological changes were found in ACE2(-/-) mice in the first week of CS exposure. CS exposure increased pulmonary ACE and ACE2 activities in WT mice, and significantly increased ACE in ACE2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, the activity of pulmonary MMPs was decreased in CS-exposed WT mice, whereas this activity was increased in ACE2(-/-) mice. CS exposure increased the pulmonary p-p38, p-JNK and p-ERK1/2 level in all mice. In ACE2(-/-) mice, a significant increase p-STAT3 signaling was detected; however, no effect was observed on the p-STAT3 level in WT mice. Our results support the hypothesis that ACE2 deficiency influences MMPs activation and STAT3 phosphorylation signaling to promote more pulmonary inflammation in the development of lung injury. PMID:27019629

  18. Alternative Roles of STAT3 and MAPK Signaling Pathways in the MMPs Activation and Progression of Lung Injury Induced by Cigarette Smoke Exposure in ACE2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yi-Han; Hsieh, Wen-Yeh; Hsieh, Jih-Sheng; Liu, Fon-Chang; Tsai, Chin-Hung; Lu, Li-Che; Huang, Chen-Yi; Wu, Chien-Liang; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-mediated abnormalities in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of lung injury. Angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2), an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) homologue that displays antagonist effects on ACE/angiotensin II (Ang II) axis, could also play a protective role against lung diseases. However, the relationship between ACE2 and MMPs activation in lung injury is still largely unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether MMPs activity could be affected by ACE2 and which ACE2 derived signaling pathways could be also involved via using a mouse model with lung injury induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure for 1 to 3 weeks. Wild-type (WT; C57BL/6) and ACE2 KO mice (ACE2-/-) were utilized to study CS-induced lung injury. Increases in the resting respiratory rate (RRR), pulmonary immunokines, leukocyte infiltration and bronchial hyperplasia were observed in the CS-exposed mice. Compared to WT mice, more serious physiopathological changes were found in ACE2-/- mice in the first week of CS exposure. CS exposure increased pulmonary ACE and ACE2 activities in WT mice, and significantly increased ACE in ACE2-/- mice. Furthermore, the activity of pulmonary MMPs was decreased in CS-exposed WT mice, whereas this activity was increased in ACE2-/- mice. CS exposure increased the pulmonary p-p38, p-JNK and p-ERK1/2 level in all mice. In ACE2-/- mice, a significant increase p-STAT3 signaling was detected; however, no effect was observed on the p-STAT3 level in WT mice. Our results support the hypothesis that ACE2 deficiency influences MMPs activation and STAT3 phosphorylation signaling to promote more pulmonary inflammation in the development of lung injury. PMID:27019629

  19. ACE inhibitor potentiation of bradykinin-induced venoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Markus; Blaukat, Andree; Bara, Agnieszka T; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Busse, Rudi

    1997-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors exert their cardiovascular effects not only by preventing the formation of angiotensin II (AII), but also by promoting the accumulation of bradykinin in or at the vessel wall. In addition, certain ACE inhibitors have been shown to augment the vasodilator response to bradykinin, presumably by an interaction at the level of the B2 receptor. We have investigated whether this is a specific effect of the ACE inhibitor class of compounds in isolated endothelium-denuded segments of the rabbit jugular vein where bradykinin elicits a constrictor response which is exclusively mediated by activation of the B2 receptor. Moexiprilat and ramiprilat (⩽ 3 nM) enhanced the constrictor response to bradykinin three to four fold. Captopril and enalaprilat were less active by approximately one and quinaprilat by two orders of magnitude. Moexiprilat and ramiprilat, on the other hand, had no effect on the constrictor response to AII or the dilator response to acetylcholine. The bradykinin-potentiating effect of the ACE inhibitors was not mimicked by inhibitors of amino-, carboxy-, metallo- or serine peptidases or the synthetic ACE substrate, hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine, at a concentration which almost abolished the residual ACE activity in the vessel wall. In contrast, angiotensin-(1–7) (10 μM), an angiotensin I metabolite, significantly enhanced the constrictor response to bradykinin. Ramiprilat did not alter the binding of [3H]-bradykinin to a membrane fraction prepared from endothelium-denuded rabbit jugular veins or to cultured fibroblasts, and there was no ACE inhibitor-sensitive, bradykinin-induced cleavage of the B2 receptor in cultured endothelial cells. These findings demonstrate that ACE inhibitors selectively potentiate the B2 receptor-mediated vascular effects of bradykinin. Their relative efficacy appears to be independent of their ACE-inhibiting properties and might be related to differences in molecule structure

  20. ACE to Ulysses Coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2006-12-01

    The EPAM charged particle instrument on ACE is the backup for the HISCALE instrument on Ulysses making the two ideally suited for spatial coherence studies over large heliosphere distances. Fluxes of low-energy ( ~50 - 200 keV) electrons are detected in eight spatial sectors on both spacecraft. A spherical harmonic description of the particle flux as a function of time using only the l=0 and l=1 degree coefficients describes most of the observed flux. Here we concentrate on the three l=1 coefficients for the 60--100 kev electrons.Between the two spacecraft these result in nine coherence estimates that are all typically moderately coherent, but the fact that the different coefficients at each spacecraft are also coherent with each other makes interpretation difficult. To avoid this difficulty we estimated the canonical coherences between the two groups of three series. This, in effect, chooses an optimum coordinate system at each spacecraft and for each frequency and estimates the coherence in this frame. Using one--minute data, we find that the canonical coherences are generally larger at high frequencies (3 mHz and above) than they are at low frequencies. This appears to be generally true and does not depend particularly on time, range, etc. However, if the data segment is chosen too long, say > 30 days with 1--minute sampling, the coherence at high frequencies drops. This may be because the spatial and temporal features of the mode are confounded, or possibly because the solar modes p--modes are known to change frequency with solar activity, so do not appear coherent on long blocks.The coherences are not smooth functions of frequency, but have a bimodal distribution particularly in the 100 μHz to 5 mHz range. Classifying the data at frequencies where the canonical coherences are high in terms of apparent polarization and orientation, we note two major families of modes that appear to be organized by the Parker spiral. The magnetic field data on the two

  1. ACE2 overexpression inhibits acquired platinum resistance-induced tumor angiogenesis in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qijian; Zhou, Ling; Zhou, Jianping; Wan, Huanying; Li, Qingyun; Feng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is a multifunctional bioactive peptide in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a newly identified component of RAS. We previously reported that ACE2 overexpression may inhibit cell growth and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ACE2 on tumor-associated angiogen-esis after the development of acquired platinum resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Four NSCLC cell lines, A549, LLC, A549-DDP and LLC-DDP, were used in vitro, while A549 and A549-DDP cells were used in vivo. A549-DDP and LLC-DDP cells were newly established at our institution as acquired platinum-resistant sublines by culturing the former parent cells in cisplatin (CDDP)-containing conditioned medium for 6 months. These platinum-resistant cells showed significantly higher angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), ACE and VEGF production and lower ACE2 expression than their corresponding parent cells. We showed that ACE2 overexpression inhibited the production of VEGF in vitro and in vivo compared to their corresponding parent cells. We also found that ACE2 overexpression reduced the expression of AT1R and ACE. Additionally, we confirmed that ACE2 overexpres-sion inhibited cell growth and VEGF production while simultaneously suppressing ACE and AT1R expression in human lung cancer xenografts. Our findings indicate that ACE2 overexpression may potentially suppress angiogenesis in NSCLC after the development of acquired platinum resistance. PMID:27460845

  2. Diversity of beetle genes encoding novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pauchet, Yannick; Wilkinson, Paul; Chauhan, Ritika; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H

    2010-01-01

    Plant cell walls are a heterogeneous mixture of polysaccharides and proteins that require a range of different enzymes to degrade them. Plant cell walls are also the primary source of cellulose, the most abundant and useful biopolymer on the planet. Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are therefore important in a wide range of biotechnological processes from the production of biofuels and food to waste processing. However, despite the fact that the last common ancestor of all deuterostomes was inferred to be able to digest, or even synthesize, cellulose using endogenous genes, all model insects whose complete genomes have been sequenced lack genes encoding such enzymes. To establish if the apparent "disappearance" of PCWDEs from insects is simply a sampling problem, we used 454 mediated pyrosequencing to scan the gut transcriptomes of beetles that feed on a variety of plant derived diets. By sequencing the transcriptome of five beetles, and surveying publicly available ESTs, we describe 167 new beetle PCWDEs belonging to eight different enzyme families. This survey proves that these enzymes are not only present in non-model insects but that the multigene families that encode them are apparently undergoing complex birth-death dynamics. This reinforces the observation that insects themselves, and not just their microbial symbionts, are a rich source of PCWDEs. Further it emphasises that the apparent absence of genes encoding PCWDEs from model organisms is indeed simply a sampling artefact. Given the huge diversity of beetles alive today, and the diversity of their lifestyles and diets, we predict that beetle guts will emerge as an important new source of enzymes for use in biotechnology. PMID:21179425

  3. Distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Perumal, N; Murugesan, S; Krishnan, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS). Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The presence of SCCmec types and AME genes, namely, aac (6')-Ie-aph (2''), aph (3')-IIIa and ant (4')-Ia was determined using two different multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The most encountered AME genes were aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') (55.4%) followed by aph (3')-IIIa (32.3%) and ant (4')-Ia gene (9%). SCCmec type I (34%) was predominant in this study. In conclusion, the aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') was the most common AME gene and SCCmec type I was most predominant among the MRS isolates. PMID:27514959

  4. ACE expression in monocytes is induced by cytokines, phorbol ester and steroid

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, D.; Lanzillo, J.; Fanburg, B. )

    1991-03-15

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) levels are elevated in the serum and peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) of patients with granulomatous diseases. However, the role of ACE in (Mo) physiology and the regulation of the inflammatory response is not well understood. Since Mo can be stimulated to form giant cells using phorbol esters, glucocorticoids or certain inflammatory cytokines, the authors examined production of ACE protein by normal PBM, a Mo-like cell line, THP-1, and a macrophage-like cell line, U937 following stimulation with these agents. Using a sensitive ELISA assay, they found that in U937 cells, expression of ACE protein increased by 3.4 fold with dexamethasone, 3.7. fold with phorbol 12-myristate acetate (PMA), and 5.8 fold with the two agents combined. The cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF substantially increased ACE expression, by 7.6 and 7.7 fold respectively, with maximal effect at 0.01 U/ml, while IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} had little effect. Similar results were found with PBM and THP-1 cells. The combination of dexamethasone and PMA also induced homotypic cluster formation in PBM, suggesting a correlation between cell adhesion and ACE production. The authors conclude that ACE expression in monocytes and macrophages is stimulated by low concentration of glucocorticoids and certain inflammatory cytokines. ACE may participate in the initiation and propagation of granulomatous inflammatory processes.

  5. Key enzymes and proteins of crop insects as candidate for RNAi based gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P.; Madhav, Maganti Sheshu; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of homology dependent gene silencing present in plants and animals. It operates through 21–24 nucleotides small RNAs which are processed through a set of core enzymatic machinery that involves Dicer and Argonaute proteins. In recent past, the technology has been well appreciated toward the control of plant pathogens and insects through suppression of key genes/proteins of infecting organisms. The genes encoding key enzymes/proteins with the great potential for developing an effective insect control by RNAi approach are actylcholinesterase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, amino peptidase N, allatostatin, allatotropin, tryptophan oxygenase, arginine kinase, vacuolar ATPase, chitin synthase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, trehalose phosphate synthase, vitellogenin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and hormone receptor genes. Through various studies, it is demonstrated that RNAi is a reliable molecular tool which offers great promises in meeting the challenges imposed by crop insects with careful selection of key enzymes/proteins. Utilization of RNAi tool to target some of these key proteins of crop insects through various approaches is described here. The major challenges of RNAi based insect control such as identifying potential targets, delivery methods of silencing trigger, off target effects, and complexity of insect biology are very well illustrated. Further, required efforts to address these challenges are also discussed. PMID:25954206

  6. Phage-mediated transfer of a dextranase gene in Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis and characterization of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Picozzi, Claudia; Meissner, Daniel; Chierici, Margherita; Ehrmann, Matthias A; Vigentini, Ileana; Foschino, Roberto; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-06-01

    While phages of lactobacilli are extensively studied with respect to their structure and role in the dairy environment, knowledge about phages in bacteria residing in sourdough fermentation is limited. Based on the previous finding that the Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis phage EV3 carries a putative dextranase gene (dex), we have investigated the distribution of similar dex(+) phages in L. sanfranciscensis, the chance of gene transfer and the properties of the dextranase encoded by phage EV3. L. sanfranciscensis H2A (dex(-)), originally isolated from a wheat sourdough, expressed a Dex(+) phenotype upon infection with EV3. The dextranase gene was isolated from the transductant and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene encoded a protein of 801 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight (Mw) of 89.09 kDa and a calculated pI of 5.62. Upon purification aided by a 6-His tag, enzyme kinetic parameters were determined. The Km value was 370 mM, and the Vmax was calculated in about 16 μmol of glucose released from dextran by 1 mg of enzyme in 1 min in a buffer solution at pH 5.0. The optimum conditions were 60 °C and pH 4.5. The enzyme retained its activity for >3h at 60 °C and exhibited only 40% activity at 30 °C; the highest homology of 72% was found to a dextranase gene from Lactobacillus fermentum phage φPYB5. Within 25 L. sanfransiscensis isolates tested, the strain 4B5 carried a similar prophage encoding a dextranase gene. Our data suggest a phage-mediated transfer of dextranase genes in the sourdough environment resulting in superinfection-resistant L. sanfranciscensis Dex(+) strains with a possible ecological advantage in dextran-containing sourdoughs. PMID:25771219

  7. ACE2: Angiotensin II/Angiotensin-(1-7) balance in cardiorenal injury

    PubMed Central

    Varagic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Nagata, Sayaka; Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Our current recognition of the renin-angiotensin system is more convoluted than originally thought due to the discovery of multiple novel enzymes, peptides, and receptors inherent to this interactive biochemical cascade. Over the last decade angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has emerged as a key player in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular and renal disease due to its pivotal role in metabolizing vasoconstrictive/hypertrophic/proliferative angiotensin II into favorable angiotensin-(1-7). This review addresses a considerable advancement in research on the role of tissue ACE2 in development and progression of hypertension and cardiorenal injury. We also summarize the results from recent clinical and experimental studies suggesting that serum or urine soluble ACE2 may serve as a novel biomarker or independent risk factor relevant for diagnosis and prognosis of cardiorenal disease. Recent proceedings on novel therapeutic approaches to enhance ACE2/angiotensin-(1-7) axis are also reviewed. PMID:24510672

  8. Oral Delivery of ACE2/Ang-(1–7) Bioencapsulated in Plant Cells Protects against Experimental Uveitis and Autoimmune Uveoretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Shil, Pollob K; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Zhu, Ping; Verma, Amrisha; Daniell, Henry; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Hyperactivity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) resulting in elevated Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to all stages of inflammatory responses including ocular inflammation. The discovery of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has established a protective axis of RAS involving ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas that counteracts the proinflammatory and hypertrophic effects of the deleterious ACE/AngII/AT1R axis. Here we investigated the hypothesis that enhancing the systemic and local activity of the protective axis of the RAS by oral delivery of ACE2 and Ang-(1–7) bioencapsulated in plant cells would confer protection against ocular inflammation. Both ACE2 and Ang-(1–7), fused with the non-toxic cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) were expressed in plant chloroplasts. Increased levels of ACE2 and Ang-(1–7) were observed in circulation and retina after oral administration of CTB-ACE2 and Ang-(1–7) expressing plant cells. Oral feeding of mice with bioencapsulated ACE2/Ang-(1–7) significantly reduced endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in mice. Treatment with bioencapsulated ACE2/Ang-(1–7) also dramatically decreased cellular infiltration, retinal vasculitis, damage and folding in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Thus, enhancing the protective axis of RAS by oral delivery of ACE2/Ang-(1–7) bioencapsulated in plant cells provide an innovative, highly efficient and cost-effective therapeutic strategy for ocular inflammatory diseases. PMID:25228068

  9. Reporter enzyme inhibitor study to aid assembly of orthogonal reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pei-i; Yue, Kimberley; Pandey, Pramod; Breault, Lyne; Harbinski, Fred; McBride, Aaron J; Webb, Brian; Narahari, Janaki; Karassina, Natasha; Wood, Keith V; Hill, Adam; Auld, Douglas S

    2013-05-17

    Reporter gene assays (RGAs) are commonly used to measure biological pathway modulation by small molecules. Understanding how such compounds interact with the reporter enzyme is critical to accurately interpret RGA results. To improve our understanding of reporter enzymes and to develop optimal RGA systems, we investigated eight reporter enzymes differing in brightness, emission spectrum, stability, and substrate requirements. These included common reporter enzymes such as firefly luciferase (Photinus pyralis), Renilla reniformis luciferase, and β-lactamase, as well as mutated forms of R. reniformis luciferase emitting either blue- or green-shifted luminescence, a red-light emitting form of Luciola cruciata firefly luciferase, a mutated form of Gaussia princeps luciferase, and a proprietary luciferase termed "NanoLuc" derived from the luminescent sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris. To determine hit rates and structure-activity relationships, we screened a collection of 42,460 PubChem compounds at 10 μM using purified enzyme preparations. We then compared hit rates and chemotypes of actives for each enzyme. The hit rates ranged from <0.1% for β-lactamase to as high as 10% for mutated forms of Renilla luciferase. Related luciferases such as Renilla luciferase mutants showed high degrees of inhibitor overlap (40-70%), while unrelated luciferases such as firefly luciferases, Gaussia luciferase, and NanoLuc showed <10% overlap. Examination of representative inhibitors in cell-based assays revealed that inhibitor-based enzyme stabilization can lead to increases in bioluminescent signal for firefly luciferase, Renilla luciferase, and NanoLuc, with shorter half-life reporters showing increased activation responses. From this study we suggest strategies to improve the construction and interpretation of assays employing these reporter enzymes. PMID:23485150

  10. Daily rhythms of digestive enzyme activity and gene expression in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Mata-Sotres, José Antonio; Moyano, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Yúfera, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    In order to identify daily changes in digestive physiology in developing gilthead seabream larvae, the enzyme activity (trypsin, lipases and α-amylase) and gene expression (trypsinogen-try, chymotrypsinogen-ctrb, bile salt-activated lipase-cel1b, phospholipase A2-pla2 and α-amylase-amy2a) were measured during a 24h cycle in larvae reared under a 12h light/12h dark photoperiod. Larvae were sampled at 10, 18, 30 and 60days post-hatch. In each sampling day, larvae were sampled every 3h during a complete 24h cycle. The enzyme activity and gene expression exhibited a marked dependent behavior to the light/darkness cycle in all tested ages. The patterns of activity and expression of all tested enzymes were compared to the feeding pattern found in the same larvae, which showed a rhythmic feeding pattern with a strong light synchronization. In the four tested ages, the activities of trypsin, and to a lesser extent lipases and amylase, were related to feeding activity. Molecular expression of the pancreatic enzymes tended to increase during the night, probably as an anticipation of the forthcoming ingestion of food that will take place during the next light period. It follows that the enzymatic activities are being regulated at translational and/or post-translational level. The potential variability of enzyme secretion along the whole day is an important factor to take into account in future studies. A particularly striking consequence of the present results is the reliability of studies based in only one daily sample taken at the same hour of the day, as those focused to assess ontogeny of digestive enzymes. PMID:26987267

  11. Characterization of angiotensin I-converting enzyme from anterior gills of the mangrove crab Ucides cordatus.

    PubMed

    Bersanetti, Patrícia A; Nogueira, Regina F; Marcondes, Marcelo F; Paiva, Paulo B; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Carmona, Adriana K; Zanotto, Flavia P

    2015-03-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) is a well-known metallopeptidase that is found in vertebrates, invertebrates and bacteria. We isolated from the anterior gill of the crab Ucides cordatus an isoform of ACE, here named crab-ACE, which presented catalytic properties closely resembling to those of mammalian ACE. The enzyme was purified on Sepharose-lisinopril affinity chromatography to apparent homogeneity and a band of about 72 kDa could be visualized after silver staining and Western blotting. Assays performed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) selective ACE substrates Abz-FRK(Dnp)P-OH, Abz-SDK(Dnp)P-OH and Abz-LFK(Dnp)-OH, allowed us to verify that crab-ACE has hydrolytic profile very similar to that of the ACE C-domain. In addition, we observed that crab-ACE can hydrolyze the ACE substrates, angiotensin I and bradykinin. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by the specific ACE inhibitor lisinopril (Ki of 1.26 nM). However, in contrast to other ACE isoforms, crab-ACE presented a very particular optimum pH, being the substrate Abz-FRK(Dnp)-P-OH hydrolyzed efficiently at pH 9.5. Other interesting characteristic of crab-ACE was that the maximum hydrolytic activity was reached at around 45°C. The description of an ACE isoform in Ucides cordatus is challenging and may contribute to a better understanding of the biochemical function of this enzyme in invertebrates. PMID:25544039

  12. Nucleotide sequence of a gene encoding an organophosphorus nerve agent degrading enzyme from Alteromonas haloplanktis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T; Liu, L; Wang, B; Wu, J; DeFrank, J J; Anderson, D M; Rastogi, V K; Hamilton, A B

    1997-01-01

    Organophosphorus acid anhydrolases (OPAA) catalyzing the hydrolysis of a variety of toxic organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitors offer potential for decontamination of G-type nerve agents and pesticides. The gene (opa) encoding an OPAA was cloned from the chromosomal DNA of Alteromonas haloplanktis ATCC 23821. The nucleotide sequence of the 1.7 -kb DNA fragment contained the opa gene (1.3 kb) and its flanking region. We report structural and functional similarity of OPAAs from A. haloplanktis and Alteromonas sp JD6.5 with the enzyme prolidase that hydrolyzes dipeptides with a prolyl residue in the carboxyl-terminal position. These results corroborate the earlier conclusion that the OPAA is a type of X-Pro dipeptidase, and that X-Pro could be the native substrate for such an enzyme in Alteromonas cells. PMID:9079288

  13. Nitroreductase gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy: insights and advances toward clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elsie M; Little, Rory F; Mowday, Alexandra M; Rich, Michelle H; Chan-Hyams, Jasmine V E; Copp, Janine N; Smaill, Jeff B; Patterson, Adam V; Ackerley, David F

    2015-10-15

    This review examines the vast catalytic and therapeutic potential offered by type I (i.e. oxygen-insensitive) nitroreductase enzymes in partnership with nitroaromatic prodrugs, with particular focus on gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT; a form of cancer gene therapy). Important first indications of this potential were demonstrated over 20 years ago, for the enzyme-prodrug pairing of Escherichia coli NfsB and CB1954 [5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide]. However, it has become apparent that both the enzyme and the prodrug in this prototypical pairing have limitations that have impeded their clinical progression. Recently, substantial advances have been made in the biodiscovery and engineering of superior nitroreductase variants, in particular development of elegant high-throughput screening capabilities to enable optimization of desirable activities via directed evolution. These advances in enzymology have been paralleled by advances in medicinal chemistry, leading to the development of second- and third-generation nitroaromatic prodrugs that offer substantial advantages over CB1954 for nitroreductase GDEPT, including greater dose-potency and enhanced ability of the activated metabolite(s) to exhibit a local bystander effect. In addition to forging substantial progress towards future clinical trials, this research is supporting other fields, most notably the development and improvement of targeted cellular ablation capabilities in small animal models, such as zebrafish, to enable cell-specific physiology or regeneration studies. PMID:26431849

  14. Identification of Missing Genes and Enzymes for Autotrophic Carbon Fixation in Crenarchaeota▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Vera, W. Hugo; Weiss, Michael; Strittmatter, Eric; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Fuchs, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Two autotrophic carbon fixation cycles have been identified in Crenarchaeota. The dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle functions in anaerobic or microaerobic autotrophic members of the Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales. The 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle occurs in aerobic autotrophic Sulfolobales; a similar cycle may operate in autotrophic aerobic marine Crenarchaeota. Both cycles form succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA) from acetyl-CoA and two molecules of inorganic carbon, but they use different means. Both cycles have in common the (re)generation of acetyl-CoA from succinyl-CoA via identical intermediates. Here, we identified several missing enzymes/genes involved in the seven-step conversion of succinyl-CoA to two molecules of acetyl-CoA in Thermoproteus neutrophilus (Thermoproteales), Ignicoccus hospitalis (Desulfurococcales), and Metallosphaera sedula (Sulfolobales). The identified enzymes/genes include succinyl-CoA reductase, succinic semialdehyde reductase, 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA ligase, bifunctional crotonyl-CoA hydratase/(S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, and beta-ketothiolase. 4-Hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase, which catalyzes a mechanistically intriguing elimination of water, is well conserved and rightly can be considered the key enzyme of these two cycles. In contrast, several of the other enzymes evolved from quite different sources, making functional predictions based solely on genome interpretation difficult, if not questionable. PMID:21169482

  15. Enhanced removal of PAHs by Peniophora incarnata and ascertainment of its novel ligninolytic enzyme genes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwanhwi; Jang, Yeongseon; Lee, Young Min; Lee, Hanbyul; Kim, Gyu-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2015-12-01

    The hazardous effects of the PAHs should be managed by removal using white rot fungal ligninolytic enzymes. The white rot fungus Peniophora incarnataKUC8836 was stimulated to produce ligninolytic enzymes in a liquid medium by the addition of four substances: 0.5 g L(-1) Tween 80, 70 mg L(-1) CuSO4·5H2O, 10 mg L(-1) MnSO4·H2O, and 0.3 g L(-1) veratryl alcohol. The experiments were carried out in two different media: basal salt and 2% malt extract (ME) liquid medium. Under the experimental conditions, both laccase and manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) demonstrated with the highest activities in 2% ME liquid medium following the addition of Tween 80. The biodegradation of anthracene and pyrene was significantly enhanced by the induced ligninolytic enzymes when Tween 80 was added. Tween 80 is a viable co-substrate for P. incarnata, as it enhances the ability of P. incarnata to manage effective biodegradation of PAHs. Most of all, the novel laccase and MnP genes ascertained in this study, showed that the genes were involved in the production of ligninolytic enzymes from P. incarnataKUC8836. PMID:26342262

  16. Steroid degradation gene cluster of Comamonas testosteroni consisting of 18 putative genes from meta-cleavage enzyme gene tesB to regulator gene tesR.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Masae; Kurita, Tomokazu; Yamamoto, Takako; Hatori, Emi; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2004-11-12

    Steroid degradation genes of Comamonas testosteroni TA441 are encoded in at least two gene clusters: one containing the meta-cleavage enzyme gene tesB and ORF1, 2, 3; and another consisting of ORF18, 17, tesI, H, A2, and tesA1, D, E, F, G (tesA2 to ORF18 and tesA1 to tesG are encoded in opposite directions). Analysis of transposon mutants with low steroid degradation revealed 13 ORFs and a gene (ORF4, 5, 21, 22, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 31, 32, 33, and tesR) involved in steroid degradation in the downstream region of ORF3. TesR, which is almost identical to that of TeiR, a positive regulator of Delta1-dehydrogenase (corresponds to TesH in TA441) and 3alpha-dehydrogenase (currently not identified in TA441), in C. testosteroni ATCC11996 (Pruneda-Paz, 2004), was shown to be necessary for induction of the steroid degradation gene clusters identified in TA441, tesB to tesR, tesA1 to tesG, and tesA2 to ORF18. At least some of the ORFs from ORF3 to ORF33 were suggested to be involved in 9,17-dioxo-1,2,3,4,10,19-hexanorandrostan-5-oic acid degradation. PMID:15474469

  17. Effects of overexpression of PKAc genes on expressions of lignin-modifying enzymes by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Toyokawa, Chihana; Shobu, Misaki; Tsukamoto, Rie; Okamura, Saki; Honda, Yoichi; Kamitsuji, Hisatoshi; Izumitsu, Kousuke; Suzuki, Kazumi; Irie, Toshikazu

    2016-09-01

    We studied the role of genes encoding the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A catalytic subunit (PKAc) in the ligninolytic system in Pleurotus ostreatus. The wild-type P. ostreatus strain PC9 has two PKAc-encoding genes: PKAc1 and PKAc2 (protein ID 114122 and 85056). In the current study, PKAc1 and PKAc2 were fused with a β-tubulin promoter and introduced into strain PC9 to produce the overexpression strains PKAc1-97 and PKAc2-69. These strains showed significantly higher transcription levels of isozyme genes encoding lignin-modifying enzymes than strain PC9, but the specific gene expression patterns differed between the two recombinant strains. Both recombinants showed 2.05-2.10-fold faster degradation of beechwood lignin than strain PC9. These results indicate that PKAc plays an important role in inducing the wood degradation system in P. ostreatus. PMID:26979984

  18. Circadian oscillation of starch branching enzyme gene expression in the sorghum endosperm

    SciTech Connect

    Mutisya, J.; Sun, C.; Jansson, C.

    2009-08-31

    Expression of the three SBE genes, encoding starch branching enzymes, in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle. Remarkably, the oscillation in SBE expression was maintained in cultured spikes after a 48-h dark treatment, also when fed a continuous solution of sucrose or abscisic acid. Our findings suggest that the rhythmicity in SBE expression in the endosperm is independent of cues from the photosynthetic source and that the oscillator resides within the endosperm itself.

  19. The SNF2H Chromatin Remodeling Enzyme Has Opposing Effects on Cytokine Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Precht, Patricia; Wurster, Andrea L.; Pazin, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Cytokine gene expression is a key control point in the function of the immune system. Cytokine gene regulation is linked to changes in chromatin structure; however, little is known about the remodeling enzymes mediating these changes. Here we investigated the role of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme SNF2H in mouse T cells; to date, SNF2H has not been investigated in T cells. We found that SNF2H repressed expression of IL-2 and other cytokines in activated cells. By contrast, SNF2H activated expression of IL-3. The ISWI components SNF2H and ACF1 bound to the tested loci, suggesting the regulation was direct. SNF2H decreased accessibility at some binding sites within the IL2 locus, and increased accessibility within some IL3 binding sites. The changes in gene expression positively correlated with accessibility changes, suggesting a simple model that accessibility enables transcription. We also found that loss of the ISWI ATPase SNF2H reduced binding to target genes and protein expression of ACF1, a binding partner for SNF2H, suggesting complex formation stabilized ACF1. Together, these findings reveal a direct role for SNF2H in both repression and activation of cytokine genes. PMID:20471682

  20. Chimeric phage-bacterial enzymes: a clue to the modular evolution of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, E; López, R; García, J L

    1990-01-01

    Pneumococcal peptidoglycan amidase (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, EC 3.5.1.28) and phage CPL1 lysozyme degrade a common substrate (choline-containing pneumococcal cell walls); the former hydrolyzes the bond between muramic acid and alanine, whereas the latter breaks down the linkage between muramic acid and glucosamine. The amino acid sequences of their C-terminal domains are homologous. Chimeric genes were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis: a unique SnaBI restriction site in the cpl1 gene, coding for the phage lysozyme, was introduced at a location equivalent to the SnaBI site present in the lytA gene, which codes for the pneumococcal amidase. The resulting genes expressed lytic activities at levels similar to those of the parental genes. The gene products, which have been purified to electrophoretical homogeneity, exhibited unusual combined biochemical properties--e.g., by exchange of protein domains, we have switched the regulatory properties of these enzymes without altering their catalytic activities. Chimeric gene construction in Streptococcus pneumoniae and its bacteriophages is an excellent model to study the modular organization of genes and proteins and to help to establish evolutionary relationships between phage and bacteria. These constructions provide an experimental approach to the molecular processes involved in cassette recruitment during evolution and contribute support to the concept of bacteria as adaptable chimeras. Images PMID:1978320

  1. Inhibition of tissue angiotensin converting enzyme. Quantitation by autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, K.; Chai, S.Y.; Jackson, B.; Johnston, C.I.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1988-03-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in serum and tissues of rats was studied after administration of lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor. Tissue ACE was assessed by quantitative in vitro autoradiography using the ACE inhibitor (/sup 125/I)351A, as a ligand, and serum ACE was measured by a fluorimetric method. Following oral administration of lisinopril (10 mg/kg), serum ACE activity was acutely reduced but recovered gradually over 24 hours. Four hours after lisinopril administration, ACE activity was markedly inhibited in kidney (11% of control level), adrenal (8%), duodenum (8%), and lung (33%; p less than 0.05). In contrast, ACE in testis was little altered by lisinopril (96%). In brain, ACE activity was markedly reduced 4 hours after lisinopril administration in the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ (16-22%) and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (7%; p less than 0.05). In other areas of the brain, including the choroid plexus and caudate putamen, ACE activity was unchanged. Twenty-four hours after administration, ACE activity in peripheral tissues and the circumventricular organs of the brain had only partially recovered toward control levels, as it was still below 50% of control activity levels. These results establish that lisinopril has differential effects on inhibiting ACE in different tissues and suggest that the prolonged tissue ACE inhibition after a single oral dose of lisinopril may reflect targets involved in the hypotensive action of ACE inhibitors.

  2. Cloning, expression and characterization of a gene encoding nitroalkane-oxidizing enzyme from Streptomyces ansochromogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jihui; Tan, Huarong

    2002-12-01

    A nitroalkane-oxidizing enzyme gene (naoA) was cloned from a genomic DNA library of Streptomyces ansochromogenes 7100. The deduced protein (NaoA) of this gene contains 363 amino acids and has high similarity to several nitroalkane-oxidizing enzymes from various micro-organisms. The naoA gene was subcloned into an expression vector pET23b and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The protein was then purified, and its characteristics were studied. Experimental results showed that NaoA can convert 1-nitropropane, 2-nitropropane and nitroethane into the corresponding carbonyl compounds. The optimal pH and temperature for NaoA was found to be pH 7-8 and 48-56 degrees C, respectively. The Km of NaoA for nitroethane is approximately 26.8 mm. NADH and nitro blue tetrazolium are strong inhibitors of NaoA, and thiol compounds and superoxide dismutase partially inhibit the enzyme activity. Therefore, superoxide may be an essential intermediate in the oxidation of nitroalkane by NaoA. PMID:12473127

  3. ACE2 deficiency reduces β-cell mass and impairs β-cell proliferation in obese C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Robin; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Thatcher, Sean; Cassis, Lisa

    2015-10-01

    Drugs that inhibit the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) decrease the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Pancreatic islets express RAS components, including angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which cleaves angiotensin II (Ang II) to angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]. Overexpression of ACE2 in pancreas of diabetic mice improved glucose homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to determine if deficiency of endogenous ACE2 contributes to islet dysfunction and T2D. We hypothesized that ACE2 deficiency potentiates the decline in β-cell function and augments the development of diet-induced T2D. Male Ace2(+/y) or Ace2(-/y) mice were fed a low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) diet for 1 or 4 mo. A subset of 1-mo HF-fed mice were infused with Sal (Sal), losartan (Los), or Ang-(1-7). At 4 mo, while both genotypes of HF-fed mice developed a similar level of insulin resistance, adaptive hyperinsulinemia was reduced in Ace2(-/y) vs. Ace2(+/y) mice. Similarly, in vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was reduced in 1-mo HF-fed Ace2(-/y) compared with Ace2(+/y) mice, resulting in augmented hyperglycemia. The average islet area was significantly smaller in both LF- and HF-fed Ace2(-/y) vs. Ace2(+/y) mice. Additionally, β-cell mass and proliferation were reduced significantly in HF-fed Ace2(-/y) vs. Ace2(+/y) mice. Neither infusion of Los nor Ang-(1-7) was able to correct impaired in vivo GSIS of HF-fed ACE2-deficient mice. These results demonstrate a critical role for endogenous ACE2 in the adaptive β-cell hyperinsulinemic response to HF feeding through regulation of β-cell proliferation and growth. PMID:26389599

  4. Cell cycle dependence of ACE-2 explains downregulation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Uhal, Bruce D; Dang, MyTrang; Dang, Vinh; Llatos, Roger; Cano, Esteban; Abdul-Hafez, Amal; Markey, Jonathan; Piasecki, Christopher C; Molina-Molina, Maria

    2013-07-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II cells, a major source of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-2 in the adult lung, are normally quiescent but actively proliferate in lung fibrosis and downregulate this protective enzyme. It was, therefore, hypothesised that ACE-2 expression might be related to cell cycle progression. To test this hypothesis, ACE-2 mRNA levels, protein levels and enzymatic activity were examined in fibrotic human lungs and in the alveolar epithelial cell lines A549 and MLE-12 studied at postconfluent (quiescent) versus subconfluent (proliferating) densities. ACE-2 mRNA, immunoreactive protein and enzymatic activity were all high in quiescent cells, but were severely downregulated or absent in actively proliferating cells. Upregulation of the enzyme in cells that were progressing to quiescence was completely inhibited by the transcription blocker actinomycin D or by SP600125, an inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In lung biopsy specimens obtained from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, immunoreactive enzyme was absent in alveolar epithelia that were positive for proliferation markers, but was robustly expressed in alveolar epithelia devoid of proliferation markers. These data explain the loss of ACE-2 in lung fibrosis and demonstrate cell cycle-dependent regulation of this protective enzyme by a JNK-mediated transcriptional mechanism. PMID:23100504

  5. Isolation, Purification and Molecular Mechanism of a Peanut Protein-Derived ACE-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Liu, Hongzhi; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of bioactive peptides are capable of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effects, little is known regarding the mechanism of peanut peptides using molecular simulation. The aim of this study was to obtain ACE inhibiting peptide from peanut protein and provide insight on the molecular mechanism of its ACE inhibiting action. Peanut peptides having ACE inhibitory activity were isolated through enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration. Further chromatographic fractionation was conducted to isolate a more potent peanut peptide and its antihypertensive activity was analyzed through in vitro ACE inhibitory tests and in vivo animal experiments. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was used to identify its amino acid sequence. Mechanism of ACE inhibition of P8 was analyzed using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A peanut peptide (P8) having Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence was obtained which had the highest ACE inhibiting activity of 85.77% (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): 0.0052 mg/ml). This peanut peptide is a competitive inhibitor and show significant short term (12 h) and long term (28 days) antihypertensive activity. Dynamic tests illustrated that P8 can be successfully docked into the active pocket of ACE and can be combined with several amino acid residues. Hydrogen bond, electrostatic bond and Pi-bond were found to be the three main interaction contributing to the structural stability of ACE-peptide complex. In addition, zinc atom could form metal-carboxylic coordination bond with Tyr, Met residues of P8, resulting into its high ACE inhibiting activity. Our finding indicated that the peanut peptide (P8) having a Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence can be a promising candidate for functional foods and prescription drug aimed at control of hypertension. PMID:25347076

  6. Increased Catalytic Efficiency Following Gene Fusion of Bifunctional Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase Enzymes from Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baowei; Markillie, Lye Meng; Xiong, Yijia; Mayer, M. Uljana; Squier, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase enzymes MsrA and MsrB have complementary stereospecificies that respectively reduce the S- and R-stereoisomers of methionine sulfoxide (MetSO), and together function as critical antioxidant enzymes. In some pathogenic and metal -reducing bacteria these genes are fused to form a bifunctional methionine sulfoxide reductase (i.e., MsrBA) enzyme. To investigate how gene fusion affects the substrate specificity and catalytic activities of Msr, we have cloned and expressed the MsrBA enzyme from Shewanella oneidensis, a metal-reducing bacterium and fish pathogen. For comparison, we also cloned and expressed the wild-type MsrA enzyme from Shewanella oneidensis and a genetically engineered MsrB protein. MsrBA is able to completely reduce (i.e., repair) MetSO in the calcium regulatory protein calmodulin (CaM); while only partial repair is observed using both MsrA and MsrB enzymes together at 25 °C. A restoration of the normal protein fold is observed coincident with the repair of MetSO in oxidized CaM by MsrBA, as monitored by the time-dependent increases in the anisotropy associated with the rigidly bound multiuse affinity probe 4′5′-bis(1,3,2-dithoarsolan-2yl)fluorescein (FlAsH). Underlying the efficient repair of MetSO in oxidized CaM is the coordinate activity of the two catalytic domains in the MsrBA fusion protein, which results in an order of magnitude rate enhancement in comparison to the individual MsrA or MsrB enzymes alone. The coordinate binding of both domains of MsrBA permits the full repair of all MetSO in CaMox. The common expression of Msr fusion proteins in bacterial pathogens is consistent with an important role for this enzyme activity in the maintenance of protein function necessary for bacterial survival under highly oxidizing conditions associated with pathogenesis or bioremediation. PMID:17997579

  7. Intrarenal alterations of the angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2/angiotensin 1-7 complex of the renin-angiotensin system do not alter the course of malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Husková, Zuzana; Kopkan, Libor; Červenková, Lenka; Doleželová, Šárka; Vaňourková, Zdeňka; Škaroupková, Petra; Nishiyama, Akira; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Janusz; Kramer, Herbert J; Červenka, Luděk

    2016-04-01

    The role of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pathophysiology of malignant hypertension is not fully understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that the recently discovered vasodilator axis of the RAS, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) type 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin 1-7 (ANG 1-7), constitutes an endogenous system counterbalancing the hypertensiogenic axis, ACE/angiotensin II (ANG II)/AT1 receptor. This study aimed to evaluate the role of the intrarenal vasodilator RAS axis in the pathophysiology of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension was induced by 13 days' dietary administration of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural xenobiotic that activates the mouse renin gene in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. It was hypothesized that pharmacologically-induced inhibition of the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex should aggravate, and activation of this axis should attenuate, the course of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension. Blood pressure (BP) was monitored by radiotelemetry. ACE2 inhibitor (DX 600, 0.2 μg/day) and ACE2 activator (DIZE, 1 mg/day) were administrated via osmotic minipumps. Even though ACE2 inhibitor significantly decreased and ACE2 activator increased intrarenal ANG 1-7 concentrations, the course of BP, as well as of albuminuria, cardiac hypertrophy and renal glomerular damage, were not altered. It was shown that intrarenal alterations in the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex did not significantly modify the course of malignant hypertension in I3C-induced Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. Thus, in our experimental setting alterations of this intrarenal vasodilator complex of the RAS do not significantly modify the form of malignant hypertension that clearly depends on the inappropriately increased activity of the ACE/ANG II/AT1 receptor axis. PMID:26833491

  8. Cloning of a fibrinolytic enzyme (subtilisin) gene from Bacillus subtilis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Younes; Dabbagh, Fatemeh; Ghasemian, Abdollah

    2012-09-01

    Several investigations are being pursued to enhance the efficacy and specificity of fibrinolytic therapy. In this regard, microbial fibrinolytic enzymes attracted much more medical interests during these decades. Subtilisin, a member of subtilases (the superfamily of subtilisin-like serine proteases) and also a fibrinolytic enzyme is quite common in Gram-positive bacteria, and Bacillus species stand out in particular, as many extracellular and even intracellular variants have been identified. In the present work, the subtilisin gene from Bacillus subtilis PTCC 1023 was cloned into the vector pET-15b and expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Total genomic DNA were isolated and used for PCR amplification of the subtilisin gene by means of the specific primers. SDS-PAGE and enzyme assay were done for characterizing the expressed protein. A ~1,100 bp of the structural subtilisin gene was amplified. The DNA and amino acid sequence alignments resulting from the BLAST search of subtilisin showed high sequence identity with the other strains of B. subtilis, whereas significantly lower identity was observed with other bacterial subtilisins. The recombinant enzyme had the same molecular weight as other reported subtilisins and the E. coli transformants showed high subtilisin activity. This study provides evidence that subtilisin can be actively expressed in E. coli. The commercial availability of subtilisin is of great importance for industrial applications and also pharmaceutical purposes as thrombolytic agent. Thus, the characterization of new recombinant subtilisin and the development of rapid, simple, and effective production methods are not only of academic interest, but also of practical importance. PMID:22069026

  9. Regulation of genes encoding cellulolytic enzymes by Pal-PacC signaling in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Kunitake, Emi; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Kanamaru, Kyoko; Kimura, Makoto; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Cellulosic biomass represents a valuable potential substitute for fossil-based fuels. As such, there is a strong need to develop efficient biotechnological processes for the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass via the optimization of cellulase production by fungi. Ambient pH is an important factor affecting the industrial production of cellulase. In the present study, we demonstrate that several Aspergillus nidulans genes encoding cellulolytic enzymes are regulated by Pal-PacC-mediated pH signaling, as evidenced by the decreased cellulase productivity of the palC mutant and pacC deletants of A. nidulans. The deletion of pacC was observed to result in delayed induction and decreased expression of the cellulase genes based on time course expression analysis. The genome-wide identification of PacC-regulated genes under cellobiose-induced conditions demonstrated that genes expressed in a PacC-dependent manner included 82 % of ClrB (a transcriptional activator of the cellulase genes)-regulated genes, including orthologs of various transporter and β-glucosidase genes considered to be involved in cellobiose uptake or production of stronger inducer molecules. Together with the significant overlap between ClrB- and PacC-regulated genes, the results suggest that PacC-mediated regulation of the cellulase genes involves not only direct regulation by binding to their promoter regions but also indirect regulation via modulation of the expression of genes involved in ClrB-dependent transcriptional activation. Our findings are expected to contribute to the development of more efficient industrial cellulase production methods. PMID:26946171

  10. DNA shuffling method for generating highly recombined genes and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Coco, W M; Levinson, W E; Crist, M J; Hektor, H J; Darzins, A; Pienkos, P T; Squires, C H; Monticello, D J

    2001-04-01

    We introduce a method of in vitro recombination or "DNA shuffling" to generate libraries of evolved enzymes. The approach relies on the ordering, trimming, and joining of randomly cleaved parental DNA fragments annealed to a transient polynucleotide scaffold. We generated chimeric libraries averaging 14.0 crossovers per gene, a several-fold higher level of recombination than observed for other methods. We also observed an unprecedented four crossovers per gene in regions of 10 or fewer bases of sequence identity. These properties allow generation of chimeras unavailable by other methods. We detected no unshuffled parental clones or duplicated "sibling" chimeras, and relatively few inactive clones. We demonstrated the method by molecular breeding of a monooxygenase for increased rate and extent of biodesulfurization on complex substrates, as well as for 20-fold faster conversion of a nonnatural substrate. This method represents a conceptually distinct and improved alternative to sexual PCR for gene family shuffling. PMID:11283594