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Sample records for enzyme gene expression

  1. Regulation of gene expression by a metabolic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hall, David A; Zhu, Heng; Zhu, Xiaowei; Royce, Thomas; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2004-10-15

    Gene expression in eukaryotes is normally believed to be controlled by transcriptional regulators that activate genes encoding structural proteins and enzymes. To identify previously unrecognized DNA binding activities, a yeast proteome microarray was screened with DNA probes; Arg5,6, a well-characterized mitochondrial enzyme involved in arginine biosynthesis, was identified. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Arg5,6 is associated with specific nuclear and mitochondrial loci in vivo, and Arg5,6 binds to specific fragments in vitro. Deletion of Arg5,6 causes altered transcript levels of both nuclear and mitochondrial target genes. These results indicate that metabolic enzymes can directly regulate eukaryotic gene expression. PMID:15486299

  2. Regulation of prokaryotic gene expression by eukaryotic-like enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Kellie; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    Summary A growing body of evidence indicates that serine/threonine kinases (STK) and phosphatases (STP) regulate gene expression in prokaryotic organisms. As prokaryotic STKs and STPs are not DNA binding proteins, regulation of gene expression is accomplished through post-translational modification of their targets. These include two-component response regulators, DNA binding proteins and proteins that mediate transcription and translation. This review summarizes our current understanding of how STKs and STPs mediate gene expression in prokaryotes. Further studies to identify environmental signals that trigger the signaling cascade and elucidation of mechanisms that regulate cross-talk between eukaryotic-like signaling enzymes, two-component systems, and components of the transcriptional and translational machinery will facilitate a greater understanding of prokaryotic gene regulation. PMID:22221896

  3. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  4. Strategies for measurement of biotransformation enzyme gene expression.

    PubMed

    Romkes, Marjorie; Buch, Shama C

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of gene expression is an integral part of any gene function research. A wide variety of techniques have been developed for this purpose, each with its own advantages and limitations. The following chapter seeks to provide an overview of some of the most recent as well as conventional methods to study gene expression. These approaches include Northern blot analysis, ribonuclease protection assay, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, expressed tag sequencing, differential display, cDNA arrays, serial analysis of gene expression, and transcriptome sequencing. The current applications of the information derived from gene expression studies require most of the assays to be adaptable for the quantitative analysis of a large number of samples and endpoints within a short period of time coupled with cost-effectiveness. A comparison of some of these features of each analytical approach as well as their advantages and disadvantages has also been provided. PMID:24623221

  5. Gene Expression Variability in Human Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lun; Price, Elvin T.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Li, Yan; Huang, Ying; Guo, Li-Wu; Guo, Yongli; Kaput, Jim; Shi, Leming; Ning, Baitang

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs) in human liver may contribute to interindividual differences in drug efficacy and adverse reactions. Published studies that analyzed variability in the expression of DMET genes were limited by sample sizes and the number of genes profiled. We systematically analyzed the expression of 374 DMETs from a microarray data set consisting of gene expression profiles derived from 427 human liver samples. The standard deviation of interindividual expression for DMET genes was much higher than that for non-DMET genes. The 20 DMET genes with the largest variability in the expression provided examples of the interindividual variation. Gene expression data were also analyzed using network analysis methods, which delineates the similarities of biological functionalities and regulation mechanisms for these highly variable DMET genes. Expression variability of human hepatic DMET genes may affect drug-gene interactions and disease susceptibility, with concomitant clinical implications. PMID:23637747

  6. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs)

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir’ and ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless’ varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  7. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs).

    PubMed

    Tang, Yujin; Wang, Ruipu; Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the 'Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir' and 'Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless' varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  8. Coordinated Changes in Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression in Aging Male Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to gain better insight on aging and susceptibility, we characterized the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) from the livers of rats to evaluate the change in capacity to respond to xenobiotics across the adult lifespan. Gene expression profiles for XMEs...

  9. Circadian oscillation of starch branching enzyme gene expression in the sorghum endosperm

    SciTech Connect

    Mutisya, J.; Sun, C.; Jansson, C.

    2009-08-31

    Expression of the three SBE genes, encoding starch branching enzymes, in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle. Remarkably, the oscillation in SBE expression was maintained in cultured spikes after a 48-h dark treatment, also when fed a continuous solution of sucrose or abscisic acid. Our findings suggest that the rhythmicity in SBE expression in the endosperm is independent of cues from the photosynthetic source and that the oscillator resides within the endosperm itself.

  10. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  11. Nucleotide sequence and expression of the gene encoding the EcoRII modification enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Som, S; Bhagwat, A S; Friedman, S

    1987-01-01

    The gene coding for the EcoRII modification enzyme has been cloned and the nucleotide sequence of 1933 base pairs containing the gene has been determined. The gene codes for a protein of 477 amino acids. Two transcriptional start sites have been mapped by S1 mapping. One deletion that removes 34 N-terminal amino acids was found to have partial enzyme activity. Comparison of the EcoRII methylase sequence with other cytosine methylases revealed several domains of partial homology among all cytosine methylases. Cloning the gene in multicopy pUC vectors increased the expression by 6-18 fold. A 40 fold overproduction of the EcoRII methylase was obtained by cloning the gene in the expression vector carrying the lambda PL promoter. Images PMID:3029675

  12. The SNF2H Chromatin Remodeling Enzyme Has Opposing Effects on Cytokine Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Precht, Patricia; Wurster, Andrea L.; Pazin, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Cytokine gene expression is a key control point in the function of the immune system. Cytokine gene regulation is linked to changes in chromatin structure; however, little is known about the remodeling enzymes mediating these changes. Here we investigated the role of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme SNF2H in mouse T cells; to date, SNF2H has not been investigated in T cells. We found that SNF2H repressed expression of IL-2 and other cytokines in activated cells. By contrast, SNF2H activated expression of IL-3. The ISWI components SNF2H and ACF1 bound to the tested loci, suggesting the regulation was direct. SNF2H decreased accessibility at some binding sites within the IL2 locus, and increased accessibility within some IL3 binding sites. The changes in gene expression positively correlated with accessibility changes, suggesting a simple model that accessibility enables transcription. We also found that loss of the ISWI ATPase SNF2H reduced binding to target genes and protein expression of ACF1, a binding partner for SNF2H, suggesting complex formation stabilized ACF1. Together, these findings reveal a direct role for SNF2H in both repression and activation of cytokine genes. PMID:20471682

  13. Daily rhythms of digestive enzyme activity and gene expression in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Mata-Sotres, José Antonio; Moyano, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Yúfera, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    In order to identify daily changes in digestive physiology in developing gilthead seabream larvae, the enzyme activity (trypsin, lipases and α-amylase) and gene expression (trypsinogen-try, chymotrypsinogen-ctrb, bile salt-activated lipase-cel1b, phospholipase A2-pla2 and α-amylase-amy2a) were measured during a 24h cycle in larvae reared under a 12h light/12h dark photoperiod. Larvae were sampled at 10, 18, 30 and 60days post-hatch. In each sampling day, larvae were sampled every 3h during a complete 24h cycle. The enzyme activity and gene expression exhibited a marked dependent behavior to the light/darkness cycle in all tested ages. The patterns of activity and expression of all tested enzymes were compared to the feeding pattern found in the same larvae, which showed a rhythmic feeding pattern with a strong light synchronization. In the four tested ages, the activities of trypsin, and to a lesser extent lipases and amylase, were related to feeding activity. Molecular expression of the pancreatic enzymes tended to increase during the night, probably as an anticipation of the forthcoming ingestion of food that will take place during the next light period. It follows that the enzymatic activities are being regulated at translational and/or post-translational level. The potential variability of enzyme secretion along the whole day is an important factor to take into account in future studies. A particularly striking consequence of the present results is the reliability of studies based in only one daily sample taken at the same hour of the day, as those focused to assess ontogeny of digestive enzymes. PMID:26987267

  14. Gene expression for peroxisome-associated enzymes in hepatocellular carcinomas induced by ciprofibrate, a hypolipidemic compound

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.S.; Nemali, M.R.; Reddy, J.K.

    1986-03-05

    Administration of hypolipidemic compounds leads to marked proliferation of peroxisomes and peroxisome-associated enzymes (PAE) in the livers of rodents and non-rodent species. The increase peroxisome-associated enzymes such as fatty acid ..beta..-oxidation system and catalase is shown to be due to an increase in the levels of mRNA. In this experiment they have examined hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), induced in male F-344 rats by ciprofibrate (0.025%, w/w for 60 weeks), for gene expression of PAE. Total RNA was purified from HCC as well as from control and ciprofibrate (0.025% for 2 weeks) fed rat livers. Northern blot analysis was performed using (32/sub p/)cDNA probes for albumin, fatty acetyl-CoA oxidase, enoyl-CoA hydratase 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme and catalase. mRNA levels in HCC for albumin, fatty acid ..beta..-oxidation enzymes and catalase were comparable with those levels observed in the livers of rats given ciprofibrate for 2 weeks. In control livers the mRNAs for ..beta..-oxidation enzymes were low. Albumin mRNA levels in all the 3 groups were comparable. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether the increased level of mRNAs for the ..beta..-oxidation enzymes in HCC is due to the effect of ciprofibrate or to the gene amplification.

  15. Effects of overexpression of PKAc genes on expressions of lignin-modifying enzymes by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Toyokawa, Chihana; Shobu, Misaki; Tsukamoto, Rie; Okamura, Saki; Honda, Yoichi; Kamitsuji, Hisatoshi; Izumitsu, Kousuke; Suzuki, Kazumi; Irie, Toshikazu

    2016-09-01

    We studied the role of genes encoding the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A catalytic subunit (PKAc) in the ligninolytic system in Pleurotus ostreatus. The wild-type P. ostreatus strain PC9 has two PKAc-encoding genes: PKAc1 and PKAc2 (protein ID 114122 and 85056). In the current study, PKAc1 and PKAc2 were fused with a β-tubulin promoter and introduced into strain PC9 to produce the overexpression strains PKAc1-97 and PKAc2-69. These strains showed significantly higher transcription levels of isozyme genes encoding lignin-modifying enzymes than strain PC9, but the specific gene expression patterns differed between the two recombinant strains. Both recombinants showed 2.05-2.10-fold faster degradation of beechwood lignin than strain PC9. These results indicate that PKAc plays an important role in inducing the wood degradation system in P. ostreatus. PMID:26979984

  16. Cloning, expression and characterization of a gene encoding nitroalkane-oxidizing enzyme from Streptomyces ansochromogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jihui; Tan, Huarong

    2002-12-01

    A nitroalkane-oxidizing enzyme gene (naoA) was cloned from a genomic DNA library of Streptomyces ansochromogenes 7100. The deduced protein (NaoA) of this gene contains 363 amino acids and has high similarity to several nitroalkane-oxidizing enzymes from various micro-organisms. The naoA gene was subcloned into an expression vector pET23b and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The protein was then purified, and its characteristics were studied. Experimental results showed that NaoA can convert 1-nitropropane, 2-nitropropane and nitroethane into the corresponding carbonyl compounds. The optimal pH and temperature for NaoA was found to be pH 7-8 and 48-56 degrees C, respectively. The Km of NaoA for nitroethane is approximately 26.8 mm. NADH and nitro blue tetrazolium are strong inhibitors of NaoA, and thiol compounds and superoxide dismutase partially inhibit the enzyme activity. Therefore, superoxide may be an essential intermediate in the oxidation of nitroalkane by NaoA. PMID:12473127

  17. [Xenopus laevis peroxiredoxins: Gene expression during development and characterization of the enzymes].

    PubMed

    Sharapov, M G; Novoselov, V I; Ravin, V K

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced via catabolic and anabolic processes during normal embryonic development, and ROS content in the cell is maintained at a certain level. Peroxiredoxins are a family of selenium-independent peroxidases and play a key role in maintaining redox homeostasis of the cell. In addition to regulating the ROS level, peroxiredoxins are involved in intracellular and intercellular signaling, cell differentiation, and tissue development. The time course of peroxiredoxin gene (prx1-6) expression was studied in Xenopus laevis during early ontogeny (Nieuwkoop and Faber stages 10-63). The highest expression level was observed for prx1 at these developmental stages. The prx1, prx3, and prx4 expression level changed most dramatically in response to oxidative stress artificially induced in X. laevis embryos. In X. laevis adults, prx1-6 were all intensely expressed in all organs examined, the prx1 expression level being the highest. The X. laevis prx1-6 genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and physico-chemical characteristics were compared for the recombinant enzymes. The highest peroxidase activity and thermal stability were observed for Prx1 and Prx2. It was assumed that Prx1 plays a leading role in X. laevis early development. PMID:27239855

  18. Solar simulated irradiation modulates gene expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes in cultured human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Leccia, M T; Yaar, M; Allen, N; Gleason, M; Gilchrest, B A

    2001-08-01

    Exposure of skin to solar irradiation generates reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, membranes, mitochondria and proteins. To protect against such damage, skin cells have evolved antioxidant enzymes including glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), copper and zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD1), the mitochondrial manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD2), and catalase. This report examines the effect of a single low or moderate dose exposure to solar-simulating combined UVB and UVA irradiation on the gene expression and activities of these antioxidant enzymes in cultured normal human fibroblasts. We find that both doses initially decrease GSH-Px, SOD2 and catalase activities, but within 5 days after irradiation the activities of the enzymes return to pre-irradiation level (catalase) or are induced slightly (SOD1, GSH-Px) or substantially (SOD2) above the basal level. For SOD1, SOD2 and catalase, the higher dose also detectably modulates the mRNA level of these enzymes. Our results indicate that the effects of a single physiologic solar simulated irradiation dose persist for at least several days and suggest that skin cells prepare for subsequent exposure to damaging irradiation by upregulating this antioxidant defense system, in particular the mitochondrial SOD2. Our findings are consistent with the existence of a broad-based SOS-like response in irradiated human skin. PMID:11493316

  19. Inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme modulate mitosis and gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.K.; Baskaran, K.; Molteni, A.

    1995-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril inhibits mitosis in several cell types that contain ACE and renin activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the ACE inhibitors captopril and CGS 13945 (10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}2}M) on proliferation and gene expression in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells in culture. These cells lack renin and ACE activity. Both ACE inhibitors produced a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation within 24 hr. Captopril at a concentration of 0.36 mM and CGS 13945 at 150 {mu}M decreased cellular growth rate to approximately half that of the control. Neither drug influenced the viability or the cell cycle distribution of the tumor cells. Slot blot analysis of mRNA for four genes, proliferation associated cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), K-ras, protein kinase C-{Beta} (PKC-{Beta}) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) was performed. Both ACE inhibitors increased K-ras expression by a factor of 2, and had no effect on CA II mRNA levels. Captopril also lowered PCNA by 40% and CGS 13945 lowered PKC-{Beta} gene expression to 30% of the control level. The data demonstrate that ACE inhibitors exhibit antimitotic activity and differential gene modulation in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells. The absence of renin and ACE activity in these cells suggests that the antimitotic action of captopril and CGS 13945 is independent of renin-angiotensin regulation. The growth inhibition may occur through downregulation of growth-related gene expression. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Molecular characterization of tobacco sulfite reductase: enzyme purification, gene cloning, and gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Yonekura-Sakakibara, K; Ashikari, T; Tanaka, Y; Kusumi, T a; Hase, T

    1998-09-01

    A cDNA clone, NtSiR1, that encodes the precursor of ferredoxin-dependent sulfite reductase (Fd-SiR) has been isolated from a cDNA library of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. SR1). The identity of the cDNA was established by comparison of the purified protein and the predicted structure with the nucleotide sequence. The amino terminus of the purified enzyme was Thr62 of the precursor protein, and the mature region of NtSiR1 consisted of 632 amino acids. Tobacco Fd-SiR is 82, 77, and 48% identical with Fd-SiRs from Zea mays, Arabidopsis thaliana, and a cyanobacterium, respectively. Significant similarity was also found with Escherichia coli NADPH-SiR in the region involved in ligation of siroheme and the [4Fe-4S] cluster. On Northern blot analysis, a transcript of NtSiR1 was detected in leaves, stems, roots, and petals in similar amounts. We also isolated a genomic SiR clone named gNtSiR1. It consists of 8 exons and 7 introns. Genomic Southern blot analysis indicated that at least two SiR genes are present in the tobacco genome. PMID:9722674

  1. Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  2. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  3. Gene expression analysis of membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the lung of healthy and COPD subjects

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Tove; Hegelund Myrbäck, Tove; Olsson, Marita; Seidegård, Janeric; Werkström, Viktoria; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Grunewald, Johan; Gustavsson, Lena; Nord, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    This study describes for the first time the expression levels of genes encoding membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the lungs of ex-smoking patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes are key determinants of drug uptake, metabolism, and elimination for systemically administered as well as inhaled drugs, with consequent influence on clinical efficacy and patient safety. In this study, while no difference in gene expression was found between healthy and COPD subjects, we identified a significant regional difference in mRNA expression of both membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes between central and peripheral tissue in both healthy and COPD subjects. The majority of the differentially expressed genes were higher expressed in the central airways such as the transporters SLC2A1 (GLUT1), SLC28A3 (CNT3), and SLC22A4 (OCTN1) and the drug-metabolizing enzymes GSTZ1, GSTO2, and CYP2F1. Together, this increased knowledge of local pharmacokinetics in diseased and normal lung may improve modeling of clinical outcomes of new chemical entities intended for inhalation therapy delivered to COPD patients. In addition, based on the similarities between COPD and healthy subjects regarding gene expression of membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes, our results suggest that clinical pharmacological studies in healthy volunteers could be a valid model of COPD patients regarding drug disposition of inhaled drugs in terms of drug metabolism and drug transporters. PMID:25505599

  4. Expression pattern of glycoside hydrolase genes in Lutzomyia longipalpis reveals key enzymes involved in larval digestion

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Caroline da Silva; Diaz-Albiter, Hector M.; Faria, Maiara do Valle; Sant'Anna, Maurício R. V.; Dillon, Rod J.; Genta, Fernando A.

    2014-01-01

    The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis is the most important vector of American Visceral Leishmaniasis. Adults are phytophagous (males and females) or blood feeders (females only), and larvae feed on solid detritus. Digestion in sand fly larvae has scarcely been studied, but some glycosidase activities putatively involved in microorganism digestion were already described. Nevertheless, the molecular nature of these enzymes, as the corresponding genes and transcripts, were not explored yet. Catabolism of microbial carbohydrates in insects generally involves β-1,3-glucanases, chitinases, and digestive lysozymes. In this work, the transcripts of digestive β-1,3-glucanase and chitinases were identified in the L. longipalpis larvae throughout analysis of sequences and expression patterns of glycoside hydrolases families 16, 18, and 22. The activity of one i-type lysozyme was also registered. Interestingly, this lysozyme seems to play a role in immunity, rather than digestion. This is the first attempt to identify the molecular nature of sand fly larval digestive enzymes. PMID:25140153

  5. Enzyme activity and gene expression profiles of Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 during aerobic biodegradation of 1,2-dichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Pillay, Balakrishna; Olaniran, Ademola O

    2015-08-01

    Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 has been widely studied because of its ability to degrade halogenated compounds, especially 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), which is achieved through chromosomal as well as plasmid pAUX1 encoded 1,2-DCA degrading genes. This work described the gene expression and enzyme activity profiles as well as the intermediates formed during the 1,2-DCA degradation by this organism. A correlation between gene expression, enzyme activity and metabolic intermediates, after the induction of GJ10 grown culture with 1,2-DCA, was established at different time intervals. Haloalkane dehalogenase (dhlA) and haloacid dehalogenase (dhlB) were constitutively expressed while the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (max) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ald) was found to be inducible. The DhlA and DhlB activities were relatively higher compared to that of the inducible enzymes, Max and Ald. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to correlate gene expression profiles with enzyme activity and metabolite formation during 1,2-DCA degradation process in GJ10. Findings from this study may assist in fully understanding the mechanism of 1,2-DCA degradation by GJ10. It could also assist in the design and implementation of appropriate bioaugmentation strategies for complete removal of 1,2-DCA from contaminated environment. PMID:25957483

  6. Characterization and developmental expression of genes encoding the early carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes in Citrus paradisi Macf.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcio G C; Moreira, Cristina D; Melton, John R; Otoni, Wagner C; Moore, Gloria A

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, the full-length cDNA sequences of PSY, PDS, and ZDS, encoding the early carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes in the carotenoid pathway of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi), were isolated and characterized for the first time. CpPSY contained a 1311-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 436 amino acids, CpPDS contained a 1659-bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 552 amino acids, and CpZDS contained a 1713-bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 570 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CpPSY shares homology with PSYs from Citrus, tomato, pepper, Arabidopsis, and the monocot PSY1 group, while CpPDS and CpZDS are most closely related to orthologs from Citrus and tomato. Expression analysis revealed fluctuations in CpPSY, CpPDS, and CpZDS transcript abundance and a non-coordinated regulation between the former and the two latter genes during fruit development in albedo and juice vesicles of white ('Duncan') and red ('Flame') grapefruits. A 3× higher upregulation of CpPSY expression in juice vesicles of red-fleshed 'Flame' as compared to white-fruited 'Duncan' was observed in the middle stages of fruit development, which correlates with the well documented accumulation pattern of lycopene in red grapefruit. Together with previous data, our results suggest that the primary mechanism controlling lycopene accumulation in red grapefruit involves the transcriptional upregulation of CpPSY, which controls the flux into the carotenoid pathway, and the downregulated expression of CpLCYB2, which controls the step of cyclization of lycopene in chromoplasts during fruit ripening. A correlation between CpPSY expression and fruit color evolution in red grapefruit is demonstrated. PMID:21594623

  7. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression Through the Life Stages of the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been ca...

  8. Influence of energy supply on expression of genes encoding for lipogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins in growing beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forty crossbred beef steers were used to determine the effects metabolizable energy (ME) intake and of site and complexity of carbohydrate (CHO) infusion on expression of genes encoding lipogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins in subcutaneous (SC), mesenteric (MES) and omental (OM) adipose. Treatm...

  9. CHD5, a Brain-Specific Paralog of Mi2 Chromatin Remodeling Enzymes, Regulates Expression of Neuronal Genes

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Rebecca Casaday; Zhang, Peisu; Wurster, Andrea L.; Precht, Patricia; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Wood, William H.; Zhang, Yonqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Mattson, Mark P.; Pazin, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    CHD5 is frequently deleted in neuroblastoma and is a tumor suppressor gene. However, little is known about the role of CHD5 other than it is homologous to chromatin remodeling ATPases. We found CHD5 mRNA was restricted to the brain; by contrast, most remodeling ATPases were broadly expressed. CHD5 protein isolated from mouse brain was associated with HDAC2, p66ß, MTA3 and RbAp46 in a megadalton complex. CHD5 protein was detected in several rat brain regions and appeared to be enriched in neurons. CHD5 protein was predominantly nuclear in primary rat neurons and brain sections. Microarray analysis revealed genes that were upregulated and downregulated when CHD5 was depleted from primary neurons. CHD5 depletion altered expression of neuronal genes, transcription factors, and brain-specific subunits of the SWI/SNF remodeling enzyme. Expression of gene sets linked to aging and Alzheimer's disease were strongly altered by CHD5 depletion from primary neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed CHD5 bound to these genes, suggesting the regulation was direct. Together, these results indicate that CHD5 protein is found in a NuRD-like multi-protein complex. CHD5 expression is restricted to the brain, unlike the closely related family members CHD3 and CHD4. CHD5 regulates expression of neuronal genes, cell cycle genes and remodeling genes. CHD5 is linked to regulation of genes implicated in aging and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21931736

  10. Gene and protein expression of O-GlcNAc-cycling enzymes in human laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Starska, Katarzyna; Forma, Ewa; Brzezińska-Błaszczyk, Ewa; Lewy-Trenda, Iwona; Bryś, Magdalena; Jóźwiak, Paweł; Krześlak, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Aberrant protein O-GlcNAcylation may contribute to the development and malignant behavior of many cancers. This modification is controlled by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA). The aim of this study was to determine the expression of O-GlcNAc cycling enzymes mRNA/protein and to investigate their relationship with clinicopathological parameters in laryngeal cancer. The mRNA levels of OGT and MGEA5 genes were determined in 106 squamous cell laryngeal cancer (SCLC) cases and 73 non-cancerous adjacent laryngeal mucosa (NCLM) controls using quantitative real-time PCR. The level of OGT and OGA proteins was analyzed by Western blot. A positive expression of OGT and MGEA5 transcripts and OGT and OGA proteins was confirmed in 75.5 and 68.9 % and in 43.7 and 59.4 % samples of SCLC, respectively. Higher levels of mRNA/protein for both OGT and OGA as well as significant increases of 60 % in total protein O-GlcNAcylation levels were noted in SCLC compared with NCLM (p < 0.05). As a result, an increased level of OGT and MGEA5 mRNA was related to larger tumor size, nodal metastases, higher grade and tumor behavior according to TFG scale, as well as incidence of disease recurrence (p < 0.05). An inverse association between OGT and MGEA5 transcripts was determined with regard to prognosis (p < 0.05). In addition, the highest OGT and OGA protein levels were observed in poorly differentiated tumors (p < 0.05). No correlations with other parameters were noted, but the results showed a trend of more advanced tumors to be more frequently OGT and OGA positive. The results suggest that increased O-GlcNAcylation may have an effect on tumor aggressiveness and prognosis in laryngeal cancer. PMID:25315705

  11. YANA – a software tool for analyzing flux modes, gene-expression and enzyme activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland; Musch, Patrick; von Kamp, Axel; Engels, Bernd; Schirmer, Heiner; Schuster, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background A number of algorithms for steady state analysis of metabolic networks have been developed over the years. Of these, Elementary Mode Analysis (EMA) has proven especially useful. Despite its low user-friendliness, METATOOL as a reliable high-performance implementation of the algorithm has been the instrument of choice up to now. As reported here, the analysis of metabolic networks has been improved by an editor and analyzer of metabolic flux modes. Analysis routines for expression levels and the most central, well connected metabolites and their metabolic connections are of particular interest. Results YANA features a platform-independent, dedicated toolbox for metabolic networks with a graphical user interface to calculate (integrating METATOOL), edit (including support for the SBML format), visualize, centralize, and compare elementary flux modes. Further, YANA calculates expected flux distributions for a given Elementary Mode (EM) activity pattern and vice versa. Moreover, a dissection algorithm, a centralization algorithm, and an average diameter routine can be used to simplify and analyze complex networks. Proteomics or gene expression data give a rough indication of some individual enzyme activities, whereas the complete flux distribution in the network is often not known. As such data are noisy, YANA features a fast evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the prediction of EM activities with minimum error, including alerts for inconsistent experimental data. We offer the possibility to include further known constraints (e.g. growth constraints) in the EA calculation process. The redox metabolism around glutathione reductase serves as an illustration example. All software and documentation are available for download at . Conclusion A graphical toolbox and an editor for METATOOL as well as a series of additional routines for metabolic network analyses constitute a new user-friendly software for such efforts. PMID:15929789

  12. The Anopheles gambiae Oxidation Resistance 1 (OXR1) Gene Regulates Expression of Enzymes That Detoxify Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Gutierrez, Giovanna; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Kumar, Sanjeev; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Background OXR1 is an ancient gene, present in all eukaryotes examined so far that confers protection from oxidative stress by an unknown mechanism. The most highly conserved region of the gene is the carboxyl-terminal TLDc domain, which has been shown to be sufficient to prevent oxidative damage. Methodology/Principal Findings OXR1 has a complex genomic structure in the mosquito A. gambiae, and we confirm that multiple splice forms are expressed in adult females. Our studies revealed that OXR1 regulates the basal levels of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) expression, two enzymes involved in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide, giving new insight into the mechanism of action of OXR1. Gene silencing experiments indicate that the Jun Kinase (JNK) gene acts upstream of OXR1 and also regulates expression of CAT and GPx. Both OXR1 and JNK genes are required for adult female mosquitoes to survive chronic oxidative stress. OXR1 silencing decreases P. berghei oocyst formation. Unexpectedly, JNK silencing has the opposite effect and enhances Plasmodium infection in the mosquito, suggesting that JNK may also mediate some, yet to be defined, antiparasitic response. Conclusion The JNK pathway regulates OXR1 expression and OXR1, in turn, regulates expression of enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Anopheles gambiae. OXR1 silencing decreases Plasmodium infection in the mosquito, while JNK silencing has the opposite effect and enhances infection. PMID:20567517

  13. Use of a Microarray to Detect Expression of Genes for Lignin-Degrading Enzymes in Soil Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, V. L.; Smith, J. L.; Bolton, H.

    2003-12-01

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer that is degraded by fungi. Several extracellular enzymes have been implicated in degradation and include lignin peroxidases, laccases, manganese peroxidases, and glyoxal oxidases. Versions of these enzymes are produced by multiple species of fungi, and in some cases, multiple versions of a single enzyme may be produced by the same species of fungus. Previous research has indicated changes in fungal activity and diversity along a tallgrass prairie restoration chronosequence (Fermi National Lab, IL). A cDNA microarray was designed to interrogate the expression and microbial source of these lignin degrading enzymes in the chronosequence soils. We hypothesized that less diversity in gene expression would be detected in a farmed soil than in a restored prairie soil. The array had 46 oligonucleotides (15-25mer) that represent each of the enzymes listed above. Messenger RNA was extracted from 32 one-gram subsamples of the target soils then all of the extracts were pooled prior to RNA precipitation and mRNA purification. Aminoallyl modified dUTPs were incorporated during reverse transcription, after which the cDNA was labeled with Alexa-555 dye. The labeled cDNA was hybridized with the microarray for 24 hours and then imaged. Preliminary results support the hypothesis that fewer genes were expressed in the farmed soil than in the restored soil.

  14. Differential gene expression of epigenetic modifying enzymes between Tibet pig and Yorkshire in high and low altitudes.

    PubMed

    Ban, D M; Zhang, B; Wang, Z X; Zhang, H; Wu, C X

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modifying enzymes play important roles in the adaptation to hypoxia, although no studies have examined their expression levels in Tibet pigs. The lung is an important functional organ in hypoxia adaptation. In this study, we examined the mRNA expression level of 5 enzymes in the lung of Tibet pigs using real-time polymerase chain reaction to determine the epigenetic performance of hypoxia adaptation. We selected four groups of pig as the study object, which were Tibet pig in highland (TH), Yorkshire in highland (YH), Tibet pig in lowland (TL), Yorkshire in lowland (YL). Expression of Dnmt1 in Tibet pig was higher than that in Yorkshire (P < 0.01), although there was no significant difference between different altitudes within each breed. Expression of Dnmt3a was higher in Tibet pig than that in Yorkshire (P < 0.01), and higher in pigs from highland than that in lowland areas (P < 0.05). Expression of Hdac1 was higher in group TH than in Yorkshire (P < 0.01). Expression of Kdm3a was higher in group TH than in the rest of the groups (P < 0.01). Expression of Uhrf1 was higher in Tibet pig than in Yorkshire (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the expression levels of the 5 epigenetic modifying genes were higher in group TH than in group YH. Under conditions of oxygen deficiency, breed was the most important factor affecting DNA methylation and gene expression. PMID:25966093

  15. Profiling of Volatile Compounds and Associated Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity during Fruit Development in Two Cucumber Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuxia; Zhang, Ranran; Hao, Lining; Chen, Weifeng; Cheng, Siqiong

    2015-01-01

    Changes in volatile content, as well as associated gene expression and enzyme activity in developing cucumber fruits were investigated in two Cucumis sativus L. lines (No. 26 and No. 14) that differ significantly in fruit flavor. Total volatile, six-carbon (C6) aldehyde, linolenic and linoleic acid content were higher during the early stages, whereas the nine-carbon (C9) aldehyde content was higher during the latter stages in both lines. Expression of C. sativus hydroperoxide lyase (CsHPL) mirrored 13-hydroperoxide lyase (13-HPL) enzyme activity in variety No. 26, whereas CsHPL expression was correlated with 9-hydroperoxide lyase (9-HPL) enzyme activity in cultivar No. 14. 13-HPL activity decreased significantly, while LOX (lipoxygenase) and 9-HPL activity increased along with fruit ripening in both lines, which accounted for the higher C6 and C9 aldehyde content at 0-6 day post anthesis (dpa) and 9-12 dpa, respectively. Volatile compounds from fruits at five developmental stages were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA), and heatmaps of volatile content, gene expression and enzyme activity were constructed. PMID:25799542

  16. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression in primary cultures of human hepatocytes modulated by ToxCast chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rotroff, Daniel M; Beam, Andrew L; Dix, David J; Farmer, Adam; Freeman, Kimberly M; Houck, Keith A; Judson, Richard S; LeCluyse, Edward L; Martin, Matthew T; Reif, David M; Ferguson, Stephen S

    2010-02-01

    Primary human hepatocyte cultures are useful in vitro model systems of human liver because when cultured under appropriate conditions the hepatocytes retain liver-like functionality such as metabolism, transport, and cell signaling. This model system was used to characterize the concentration- and time-response of the 320 ToxCast chemicals for changes in expression of genes regulated by nuclear receptors. Fourteen gene targets were monitored in quantitative nuclease protection assays: six representative cytochromes P-450, four hepatic transporters, three Phase II conjugating enzymes, and one endogenous metabolism gene involved in cholesterol synthesis. These gene targets are sentinels of five major signaling pathways: AhR, CAR, PXR, FXR, and PPARalpha. Besides gene expression, the relative potency and efficacy for these chemicals to modulate cellular health and enzymatic activity were assessed. Results demonstrated that the culture system was an effective model of chemical-induced responses by prototypical inducers such as phenobarbital and rifampicin. Gene expression results identified various ToxCast chemicals that were potent or efficacious inducers of one or more of the 14 genes, and by inference the 5 nuclear receptor signaling pathways. Significant relative risk associations with rodent in vivo chronic toxicity effects are reported for the five major receptor pathways. These gene expression data are being incorporated into the larger ToxCast predictive modeling effort. PMID:20574906

  17. Microarray Analysis of Differentially-Expressed Genes Encoding CYP450 and Phase II Drug Metabolizing Enzymes in Psoriasis and Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sumantran, Venil N.; Mishra, Pratik; Bera, Rakesh; Sudhakar, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 drug metabolizing enzymes are implicated in personalized medicine for two main reasons. First, inter-individual variability in CYP3A4 expression is a confounding factor during cancer treatment. Second, inhibition or induction of CYP3A4 can trigger adverse drug–drug interactions. However, inflammation can downregulate CYP3A4 and other drug metabolizing enzymes and lead to altered metabolism of drugs and essential vitamins and lipids. Little is known about effects of inflammation on expression of CYP450 genes controlling drug metabolism in the skin. Therefore, we analyzed seven published microarray datasets, and identified differentially-expressed genes in two inflammatory skin diseases (melanoma and psoriasis). We observed opposite patterns of expression of genes regulating metabolism of specific vitamins and lipids in psoriasis and melanoma samples. Thus, genes controlling the turnover of vitamin D (CYP27B1, CYP24A1), vitamin A (ALDH1A3, AKR1B10), and cholesterol (CYP7B1), were up-regulated in psoriasis, whereas melanomas showed downregulation of genes regulating turnover of vitamin A (AKR1C3), and cholesterol (CYP39A1). Genes controlling abnormal keratinocyte differentiation and epidermal barrier function (CYP4F22, SULT2B1) were up-regulated in psoriasis. The up-regulated CYP24A1, CYP4F22, SULT2B1, and CYP7B1 genes are potential drug targets in psoriatic skin. Both disease samples showed diminished drug metabolizing capacity due to downregulation of the CYP1B1 and CYP3A5 genes. However, melanomas showed greater loss of drug metabolizing capacity due to downregulation of the CYP3A4 gene. PMID:26901218

  18. Composition and expression of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes in the straw-degrading mushroom Volvariella volvacea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingzhi; Gui, Fu; Xie, Baogui; Deng, Youjin; Sun, Xianyun; Lin, Mengying; Tao, Yongxin; Li, Shaojie

    2013-01-01

    Volvariella volvacea is one of a few commercial cultivated mushrooms mainly using straw as carbon source. In this study, the genome of V. volcacea was sequenced and assembled. A total of 285 genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) in V. volvacea were identified and annotated. Among 15 fungi with sequenced genomes, V. volvacea ranks seventh in the number of genes encoding CAZymes. In addition, the composition of glycoside hydrolases in V. volcacea is dramatically different from other basidiomycetes: it is particularly rich in members of the glycoside hydrolase families GH10 (hemicellulose degradation) and GH43 (hemicellulose and pectin degradation), and the lyase families PL1, PL3 and PL4 (pectin degradation) but lacks families GH5b, GH11, GH26, GH62, GH93, GH115, GH105, GH9, GH53, GH32, GH74 and CE12. Analysis of genome-wide gene expression profiles of 3 strains using 3'-tag digital gene expression (DGE) reveals that 239 CAZyme genes were expressed even in potato destrose broth medium. Our data also showed that the formation of a heterokaryotic strain could dramatically increase the expression of a number of genes which were poorly expressed in its parental homokaryotic strains. PMID:23554925

  19. Isolation of DNA encoding sucrase genes from Streptococcus salivarius and partial characterization of the enzymes expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Houck, C M; Pear, J R; Elliott, R; Perchorowicz, J T

    1987-01-01

    Restriction enzyme fragments containing two sucrase genes have been isolated from a cosmid library of Streptococcus salivarius DNA. The genes were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and the properties of both enzymes were studied in partially purified protein extracts from E. coli. One gene encoding an invertase-type sucrase was subcloned on a 2.4-kilobase-pair fragment. The sucrase enzyme had a Km for sucrose of 48 mM and a pH optimum of 6.5. The S. salivarius sucrase clone showed no detectable hybridization to a yeast invertase clone. Two overlapping subclones which had 1 kilobase pair of DNA in common were used to localize a fructosyltransferase gene. The fructosyltransferase had a Km of 93 mM and a pH optimum of 7.0. The product of the fructosyltransferase was a levan. A fructosyltransferase clone from Bacillus subtilis did not hybridize to S. salivarius DNA. The properties of the enzymes were compared with those of previously characterized sucrases. Images PMID:3112128

  20. Gene expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine during fasting

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, Heleen M; Bünger, Meike; de Groot, Philip J; van der Meijde, Jolanda; Hooiveld, Guido JEJ; Müller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background Fasting has dramatic effects on small intestinal transport function. However, little is known on expression of intestinal transport and phase I/II metabolism genes during fasting and the role the fatty acid-activated transcription factor PPARα may play herein. We therefore investigated the effects of fasting on expression of these genes using Affymetrix GeneChip MOE430A arrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Results After 24 hours of fasting, expression levels of 33 of the 253 analyzed transporter and phase I/II metabolism genes were changed. Upregulated genes were involved in transport of energy-yielding molecules in processes such as glycogenolysis (G6pt1) and mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids (Cact, Mrs3/4, Fatp2, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1). Other induced genes were responsible for the inactivation of the neurotransmitter serotonin (Sert, Sult1d1, Dtd, Papst2), formation of eicosanoids (Cyp2j6, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1), or for secretion of cholesterol (Abca1 and Abcg8). Cyp3a11, typically known because of its drug metabolizing capacity, was also increased. Fasting had no pronounced effect on expression of phase II metabolic enzymes, except for glutathione S-transferases which were down-regulated. Time course studies revealed that some genes were acutely regulated, whereas expression of other genes was only affected after prolonged fasting. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were PPARα-dependently upregulated upon fasting. Conclusion We have characterized the response to fasting on expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine. Differentially expressed genes are involved in a variety of processes, which functionally can be summarized as a) increased oxidation of fat and xenobiotics, b) increased cholesterol secretion, c) increased susceptibility to electrophilic stressors, and d) reduced intestinal motility. This knowledge increases our understanding of gut physiology, and may be of relevance for e.g. pre

  1. Dissociation between gene and protein expression of metabolic enzymes in a rodent model of heart failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies in advanced heart failure show down-regulation of fatty acid oxidation genes, possibly due to decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factors peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha). We assessed mRNA and protein expressi...

  2. METHIMZOLE, THYROID HORMONE REPLACEMENT AND LIPOGENIC ENZYME GENE EXPRESSION IN BROILERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine the possible relationship between certain indices of lipid metabolism and specific gene expression in chickens fed methimazole to produce a kind of artificial hypothyroidism. Male, broiler chickens growing from 7 to 28 days of age were fed diets contai...

  3. Phloem-specific expression of Yang cycle genes and identification of novel Yang cycle enzymes in Plantago and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Feussner, Kirstin; Zierer, Wolfgang; Rabinovych, Valentyna; Klebl, Franz; Feussner, Ivo; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA) or Yang cycle is a set of reactions that recycle MTA to Met. In plants, MTA is a byproduct of polyamine, ethylene, and nicotianamine biosynthesis. Vascular transcriptome analyses revealed phloem-specific expression of the Yang cycle gene 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE KINASE1 (MTK1) in Plantago major and Arabidopsis thaliana. As Arabidopsis has only a single MTK gene, we hypothesized that the expression of other Yang cycle genes might also be vascular specific. Reporter gene studies and quantitative analyses of mRNA levels for all Yang cycle genes confirmed this hypothesis for Arabidopsis and Plantago. This includes the Yang cycle genes 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE-1-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE1 and DEHYDRATASE-ENOLASE-PHOSPHATASE-COMPLEX1. We show that these two enzymes are sufficient for the conversion of methylthioribose-1-phosphate to 1,2-dihydroxy-3-keto-5-methylthiopentene. In bacteria, fungi, and animals, the same conversion is catalyzed in three to four separate enzymatic steps. Furthermore, comparative analyses of vascular and nonvascular metabolites identified Met, S-adenosyl Met, and MTA preferentially or almost exclusively in the vascular tissue. Our data represent a comprehensive characterization of the Yang cycle in higher plants and demonstrate that the Yang cycle works primarily in the vasculature. Finally, expression analyses of polyamine biosynthetic genes suggest that the Yang cycle in leaves recycles MTA derived primarily from polyamine biosynthesis. PMID:21540433

  4. L-malate enhances the gene expression of carried proteins and antioxidant enzymes in liver of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X; Wu, J; Wu, Q; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory reported L-malate as a free radical scavenger in aged rats. To investigate the antioxidant mechanism of L-malate in the mitochondria, we analyzed the change in gene expression of two malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS)-related carried proteins (AGC, aspartate/glutamate carrier and OMC, oxoglutarate/malate carrier) in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and three antioxidant enzymes (CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px) in the mitochondria. The changes in gene expression of these proteins and enzymes were examined by real-time RT-PCR in the heart and liver of aged rats treated with L-malate. L-malate was orally administered in rats continuously for 30 days using a feeding atraumatic needle. We found that the gene expression of OMC and GSH-Px mRNA in the liver increased by 39 % and 38 %, respectively, in the 0.630 g/kg L-malate treatment group than that in the control group. The expression levels of SOD mRNA in the liver increased by 39 %, 56 %, and 78 % in the 0.105, 0.210, and 0.630 g/kg L-malate treatment groups, respectively. No difference were observed in the expression levels of AGC, OMC, CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px mRNAs in the heart of rats between the L-malate treatment and control groups. These results predicted that L-malate may increase the antioxidant capacity of mitochondria by enhancing the expression of mRNAs involved in the MAS and the antioxidant enzymes. PMID:25194133

  5. Coal-burning endemic fluorosis is associated with reduced activity in antioxidative enzymes and Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Cui, Kang-ping; Xu, Yuan-yuan; Gao, Yan-ling; Zhao, Jing; Li, Da-sheng; Li, Xiao-lei; Huang, Hou-jin

    2014-02-01

    To study the effect of fluorine on the oxidative stress in coal-burning fluorosis, we investigated the environmental characteristics of coal-burning endemic fluorosis combined with fluorine content surveillance in air, water, food, briquette, and clay binder samples from Bijie region, Guizhou Province, southwest of China. The activities of antioxidant enzymes including copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and level of lipid peroxidation such as malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in serum samples obtained from subjects residing in the Bijie region. Expression of the Cu/Zn-SOD gene was assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results showed that people suffering from endemic fluorosis (the high and low exposure groups) had much higher MDA level. Their antioxidant enzyme activities and Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression levels were lower when compared to healthy people (the control group). Fluorosis can decrease the activities of antioxidant enzymes, which was associated with exposure level of fluorine. Down-regulation of Cu/Zn-SOD expression may play an important role in the aggravation of oxidative stress in endemic fluorosis. PMID:23567976

  6. Phylogeny and expression pattern of starch branching enzyme family genes in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) under diverse environments.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jinli; Wang, Huijun; Xia, Zhiqiang; Liu, Chen; Chen, Xin; Ma, Pingan; Lu, Cheng; Wang, Wenquan

    2015-08-01

    Starch branching enzyme (SBE) is one of the key enzymes involved in starch biosynthetic metabolism. In this study, six SBE family genes were identified from the cassava genome. Phylogenetic analysis divided the MeSBE family genes into dicot family A, B, C, and the new group. Tissue-specific analysis showed that MeSBE2.2 was strongly expressed in leaves, stems cortex, and root stele, and MeSBE3 had high expression levels in stem cortex and root stele of plants in the rapid growth stage under field condition, whereas the expression levels of MeSBE2.1, MeSBE4, and MeSBE5 were low except for in stems cortex. The transcriptional activity of MeSBE2.2 and MeSBE3 was higher compared with other members and gradually increased in the storage roots during root growth process, while the other MeSBE members normally remained low expression levels. Expression of MeSBE2.2 could be induced by salt, drought, exogenous abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid signals, while MeSBE3 had positive response to drought, salt, exogenous abscisic acid, and salicylic acid in leaves but not in storage root, indicating that they might be more important in starch biosynthesis pathway under diverse environments. PMID:25981533

  7. Gene expression in the DpnI and DpnII restriction enzyme systems of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.; Sabelnikov, A.G.; Chen, Jau-Der; Greenberg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Although a number of bacterial species are naturally transformable, that is, their cells are able to take up external DNA in substantial amounts and integrate it into the chromosome without artificial manipulation of the cell surface, Streptococcus pneumoniae, the first species in which this phenomenon was detected, remains a prototype of such transformation. Cells of S. pneumonias also contain potent restriction endonucleases able to severely restrict DNA introduced during viral infection. Our current understanding of the genetic basis of the complementary DpnI and DpnII restriction systems and of the biochemistry of their component enzymes are briefly reviewed. The manner in which these enzymes impinge on the transfer of chromosomal genes and of plasmeds will be examined in detail. It will be seen that far from acting against foreign DNA in general, the restriction systems seem to be designed to exclude only infecting viral DNA The presence of complementary restriction systems in different cells of S. pneumonias enhances their effectiveness in blocking viral infection and promoting species survival. This enhanced effectiveness requires the expression of alternative restriction systems. Therefore, the ability of the cells to transfer the restriction enzyme genes and to regulate their expression are important for survival of the species.

  8. A gene in the chromosomal region 3p21 with greatly reduced expression in lung cancer is similar to the gene for ubiquitin-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Kok, K; Hofstra, R; Pilz, A; van den Berg, A; Terpstra, P; Buys, C H; Carritt, B

    1993-01-01

    The chromosomal region 3p21 is thought to be the site of a lung tumor suppressor gene. We recently cloned a gene from this region that has greatly reduced expression in almost all lung tumor cell lines examined, in spite of being widely expressed in a variety of other tumor and nontumor cell types. We report here the sequence of this gene and show that it has significant homology to the genes encoding the ubiquitin-activating enzymes of three species, including humans. This suggests it is a second, autosomal member of this gene family in humans and may play a role in the ubiquitin conjugation pathway, which is of central importance in all eukaryotes. PMID:8327486

  9. Cloning of intron-removed enolase gene and expression, purification, kinetic characterization of the enzyme from Theileria annulata.

    PubMed

    Cayir, Ebru; Erdemir, Aysegul; Ozkan, Ebru; Topuzogullari, Murat; Bolat, Zeynep Busra; Akat, Ayberk; Turgut-Balik, Dilek

    2014-08-01

    Tropical theileriosis is a disease caused by infection with an apicomplexan parasite, Theileria annulata, and giving rise to huge economic losses. In recent years, parasite resistance has been reported against the most effective antitheilerial drug used for the treatment of this disease. This emphasizes the need for alternative methods of treatment. Enolase is a key glycolytic enzyme and can be selected as a macromolecular target of therapy of tropical theileriosis. In this study, an intron sequence present in T. annulata enolase gene was removed by PCR-directed mutagenesis, and the gene was first cloned into pGEM-T Easy vector and then subcloned into pLATE31 vector, and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography using Ni-NTA agarose column. Steady-state kinetic parameters of the enzyme were determined using GraFit 3.0. High quantities (~65 mg/l of culture) of pure recombinant T. annulata enolase have been obtained in a higly purified form (>95 %). Homodimer form of purified protein was determined from the molecular weights obtained from a single band on SDS-PAGE (48 kDa) and from size exclusion chromatography (93 kDa). Enzyme kinetic measurements using 2-PGA as substrate gave a specific activity of ~40 U/mg, K m: 106 μM, kcat: 37 s(-1), and k cat/K m: 3.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). These values have been determined for the first time from this parasite enzyme, and availability of large quantities of enolase enzyme will facilitate further kinetic and structural characterization toward design of new antitheilerial drugs. PMID:24664479

  10. PCR primers to study the diversity of expressed fungal genes encoding lignocellulolytic enzymes in soils using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Barbi, Florian; Bragalini, Claudia; Vallon, Laurent; Prudent, Elsa; Dubost, Audrey; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland; Luis, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5) and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2), active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may lead to the

  11. PCR Primers to Study the Diversity of Expressed Fungal Genes Encoding Lignocellulolytic Enzymes in Soils Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Florian; Bragalini, Claudia; Vallon, Laurent; Prudent, Elsa; Dubost, Audrey; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland; Luis, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5) and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2), active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may lead to the

  12. Changes in trehalose content, enzyme activity and gene expression related to trehalose metabolism in Flammulina velutipes under heat shock.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Hui; Shang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Jian-Yu; Tan, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Trehalose plays important roles in the protection of organisms against adverse environmental conditions. The growth and development of Flammulina velutipes is regulated and controlled under complex external conditions. This study investigated the effect of heat stress on trehalose metabolism in mycelia and fruiting bodies. The activities of enzymes involved in trehalose metabolism, the transcriptional levels of the corresponding genes and the trehalose content in the mycelia of Flammulina velutipes strain Dan3 under relatively high temperatures were investigated. The mycelia and fruiting bodies of a strain cultivated in a factory were collected at different stages to examine the trehalose content and expression levels of various genes. The results showed that intracellular trehalose significantly accumulated in the mycelia in response to 37 °C heat shock. Heat shock significantly stimulated the activities of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase and trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase, thereby promoting the accumulation of trehalose for the first 2-6 h. The activity of neutral trehalase also decreased during this period. In addition, changes in the activities of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and neutral trehalase paralleled changes in the expression levels of the regulatory genes. As for the trehalose phosphorylase, the degradation of trehalose was stronger than its synthesis under heat stress. Heat shock can induce a stress response in the mycelia through the regulation of genes related to trehalose metabolism and the subsequent promotion and control of the transcription and translation of enzymes. The analysis of the trehalose and gene expression levels in the cultivated strain suggests that a substantial amount of trehalose had accumulated in the mycelia prior to induction of the primordia, and the fruiting bodies could possibly utilize degraded trehalose that translocated from the mycelia to maintain their growth. PMID:27312340

  13. Effects of grafting on key photosynthetic enzymes and gene expression in the citrus cultivar Huangguogan.

    PubMed

    Liao, L; Cao, S Y; Rong, Y; Wang, Z H

    2016-01-01

    Grafting influences scion photosynthetic capacity and fruit quality. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), which strongly affects photosynthetic rate, and Rubisco activase (RCA), which regulates Rubisco activity, are two key photosynthetic enzymes. However, little information is available regarding the effect of grafting on the concentration and expression of Rubisco and RCA in the citrus cultivar Huangguogan. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of grafting Huangguogan plants onto trifoliate orange, tangerine, and orange on: 1) the concentration of Rubisco and RCA; 2) the mRNA levels of rbcL, rbcS, and rca; and 3) fruit quality. Overall, the results showed that when Huangguogan plants budded on tangerine and orange, they had better fruit quality, while on trifoliate orange they had higher Rubisco concentration. Tangerine and orange are probably the most suitable rootstocks for Huangguogan plants given the environmental conditions of Sichuan Province, China. PMID:26985941

  14. Effect of the combined probiotics with aflatoxin B₁-degrading enzyme on aflatoxin detoxification, broiler production performance and hepatic enzyme gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rui-yu; Chang, Juan; Yin, Qing-qiang; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu-rong; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Guo-qiang; Zheng, Qiu-hong

    2013-09-01

    In order to degrade aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁), AFB₁-degrading microbes (probiotics) such as Lactobacillus casei, Bacillus subtilis and Pichia anomala, and the AFB₁-degrading enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae were selected and combined to make feed additive. Seventy-five 43-day-old male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly divided into 5 groups, 15 broilers for each group. The broilers were given with 5 kinds of diets such as the basal diet, 400 μg/kg AFB₁ supplement without feed additive, and 200, 400, 800 μg/kg AFB₁ supplement with 0.15% feed additive. The feeding experimental period was 30 d, which was used to determine production performance of broilers. In addition, serum, liver and chest muscle were selected for measuring AFB₁ residues, gene expressions, microscopic and antioxidant analyses. The results showed that adding 0.15% feed additive in broiler diets could significantly relieve the negative effect of AFB₁ on chicken's production performance and nutrient metabolic rates (P<0.05). It could also improve AFB₁ metabolism, hepatic cell structure, antioxidant activity, and many hepatic enzyme gene expressions involved in oxidoreductase, apoptosis, cell growth, immune system and metabolic process (P<0.05). It could be concluded that the feed additive was able to degrade AFB₁ and improve animal production. PMID:23831311

  15. Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase Genes Encode Enzymes with Contrasting Substrate Specificity and Show Divergent Gene Expression Profiles in Fragaria Species

    PubMed Central

    Miosic, Silvija; Thill, Jana; Milosevic, Malvina; Gosch, Christian; Pober, Sabrina; Molitor, Christian; Ejaz, Shaghef; Rompel, Annette; Stich, Karl; Halbwirth, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    During fruit ripening, strawberries show distinct changes in the flavonoid classes that accumulate, switching from the formation of flavan 3-ols and flavonols in unripe fruits to the accumulation of anthocyanins in the ripe fruits. In the common garden strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) this is accompanied by a distinct switch in the pattern of hydroxylation demonstrated by the almost exclusive accumulation of pelargonidin based pigments. In Fragaria vesca the proportion of anthocyanins showing one (pelargonidin) and two (cyanidin) hydroxyl groups within the B-ring is almost equal. We isolated two dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) cDNA clones from strawberry fruits, which show 82% sequence similarity. The encoded enzymes revealed a high variability in substrate specificity. One enzyme variant did not accept DHK (with one hydroxyl group present in the B-ring), whereas the other strongly preferred DHK as a substrate. This appears to be an uncharacterized DFR variant with novel substrate specificity. Both DFRs were expressed in the receptacle and the achenes of both Fragaria species and the DFR2 expression profile showed a pronounced dependence on fruit development, whereas DFR1 expression remained relatively stable. There were, however, significant differences in their relative rates of expression. The DFR1/DFR2 expression ratio was much higher in the Fragaria×ananassa and enzyme preparations from F.×ananassa receptacles showed higher capability to convert DHK than preparations from F. vesca. Anthocyanin concentrations in the F.×ananassa cultivar were more than twofold higher and the cyanidin:pelargonidin ratio was only 0.05 compared to 0.51 in the F. vesca cultivar. The differences in the fruit colour of the two Fragaria species can be explained by the higher expression of DFR1 in F.×ananassa as compared to F. vesca, a higher enzyme efficiency (Kcat/Km values) of DFR1 combined with the loss of F3’H activity late in fruit development of F.×ananassa. PMID:25393679

  16. The cigarette smoke constituent benzo[a]pyrene disrupts metabolic enzyme, and apoptosis pathway member gene expression in ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Sadeu, Jean Clair; Foster, Warren G

    2013-09-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a prototypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) present in cigarette smoke. We previously showed that B[a]P adversely affects follicular development and survival. The objective of this study was to identify the key molecular pathways underlying B[a]P-induced abnormal follicular development. Isolated follicles (100-130 μm) from ovaries of F1 hybrid (C57BL/6j×CBA/Ca) mice were cultured for 8 (preantral/antral follicles) and 12 (preovulatory follicles) days in increasing concentrations of B[a]P (0 ng/mL [control] to 45 ng/mL). Expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), aryl hydroxylase steroidogenic enzyme, cell-cycle, and apoptotic genes were quantified. B[a]P exposure significantly (P<0.05) increased mRNA expression of Cyp1a1 in preantral/antral follicles and Cyp1b1, Bax and Hsp90ab1 in preovulatory follicles. No significant effect on mRNA expression of StAR, Cyp11a1, aromatase, Cdk4, Cdk2, Ccnd2, cIAP2, and survivin was observed. In conclusion, this study suggests that B[a]P exposure significantly affects the phase I enzymes and cell death genes during preantral/antral and preovulatory growth, and thus highlight the AhR signaling and apoptotis pathways in delayed follicle growth and decreased viability. PMID:23747951

  17. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  18. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males' subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  19. Gene Expression of Glutamate Metabolizing Enzymes in the Hippocampal Formation in Human Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Tore; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Wang, Yue; Peréz, Edgar; Drummond, Jana; Lauritzen, Fredrik; Bergersen, Linda H; Woodruff, James H Meador; Spencer, Dennis D; de Lanerolle, Nihal C; McCullumsmith, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Summary PURPOSE Increased interictal concentrations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate have been implicated in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in humans. Recent studies suggest that perturbations of the glutamate metabolizing enzymes glutamine synthetase (GS) and phosphate activated glutaminase (PAG) may underlie the glutamate excess in TLE. However, the molecular mechanism of the enzyme perturbations remains unclear. A better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of GS and PAG could facilitate the discovery of novel therapeutics for TLE. METHODS We used in situ hybridization on histological sections to assess the distribution and quantity of mRNA for GS and PAG in subfields of hippocampal formations from: (a) patients with TLE and concomitant hippocampal sclerosis, (b) patients with TLE and no hippocampal sclerosis, and (c) non-epilepsy autopsy subjects. KEY FINDINGS GS mRNA was increased by approximately 50% in the CA3 in TLE patients without hippocampal sclerosis vs. in TLE patients with sclerosis and in non-epilepsy subjects. PAG mRNA was increased by more than 100% in the subiculum in both TLE patient categories vs. in non-epilepsy subjects. PAG mRNA was also increased in the CA1, CA2, CA3 and dentate hilus in TLE without hippocampal sclerosis vs. in TLE with sclerosis. Finally, PAG mRNA was increased in the dentate gyrus in TLE with sclerosis vs. in non-epilepsy subjects, and also increased in the hilus in TLE without sclerosis vs. in TLE with sclerosis. SIGNIFICANCE These findings demonstrate complex changes in the expression of mRNAs for GS and PAG in the hippocampal formation in TLE, and raise the possibility that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms may underlie the regulation of GS and PAG proteins in the epileptic brain. PMID:23384343

  20. Dietary selenium and prolonged exercise alter gene expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes in equine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    White, S H; Johnson, S E; Bobel, J M; Warren, L K

    2016-07-01

    Untrained Thoroughbred horses (6 mares and 6 geldings; 11 yr [SE 1] and 565 kg [SE 11]) were used to evaluate antioxidant gene expression and enzyme activity in blood and skeletal muscle in response to prolonged exercise after receiving 2 levels of dietary selenium for 36 d: 0.1 (CON; = 6) or 0.3 mg/kg DM (SEL; = 6). Horses were individually fed 1.6% BW coastal bermudagrass hay, 0.4% BW whole oats, and a mineral/vitamin premix containing no Se. Sodium selenite was added to achieve either 0.1 or 0.3 mg Se/kg DM in the total diet. On d 35, horses underwent 2 h of submaximal exercise in a free-stall exerciser. Blood samples were obtained before (d 0) and after 34 d of Se supplementation and on d 35 to 36 immediately after exercise and at 6 and 24 h after exercise. Biopsies of the middle gluteal muscle were obtained on d 0, before exercise on d 34, and at 6 and 24 h after exercise. Supplementation with Se above the NRC requirement (SEL) increased serum Se ( = 0.011) and muscle thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity ( = 0.051) but had no effect on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in plasma, red blood cell (RBC) lysate, or muscle in horses at rest. Serum creatine kinase activity increased ( < 0.0001) in response to prolonged exercise but was not affected by dietary treatment. Serum lipid hydroperoxides were affected by treatment ( = 0.052) and were higher ( = 0.012) in horses receiving CON than SEL immediately following exercise. Muscle expression of was unchanged at 6 h but increased ( = 0.005) 2.8-fold 24 h after exercise, whereas muscle TrxR activity remained unchanged. Glutathione peroxidase activity increased in plasma (P < 0.0001) and decreased in RBC lysate ( = 0.010) after prolonged exercise. A Se treatment × time interaction was observed for RBC GPx activity (P = 0.048). Muscle and expression and GPx activity did not change during the 24-h period after exercise. Level of dietary Se had no overall effect on expression of , , , , , , or in muscle following

  1. Expression of Genes Encoding the Enzymes for Glycogen and Trehalose Metabolism in L3 and L4 Larvae of Anisakis simplex

    PubMed Central

    Łopieńska-Biernat, E.; Zaobidna, E. A.; Dmitryjuk, M.

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose and glycogen metabolism plays an important role in supporting life processes in many nematodes, including Anisakis simplex. Nematodes, cosmopolitan helminths parasitizing sea mammals and humans, cause a disease known as anisakiasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of genes encoding the enzymes involved in the metabolism of trehalose and glycogen—trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS), trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP), glycogen synthase (GS), and glycogen phosphorylase (GP)—in stage L3 and stage L4 larvae of A. simplex. The expression of mRNA all four genes, tps, tpp, gs, and gp, was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The A. simplex ribosomal gene (18S) was used as a reference gene. Enzymatic activity was determined. The expression of trehalose enzyme genes was higher in L3 than in L4 larvae, but an inverse relationship was noted for the expression of gs and gp genes. PMID:26783451

  2. Molecular cloning and heterologous expression of the gene encoding dihydrogeodin oxidase, a multicopper blue enzyme from Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Huang, K X; Fujii, I; Ebizuka, Y; Gomi, K; Sankawa, U

    1995-09-15

    Aspergillus terreus dihydrogeodin oxidase (DHGO) is an enzyme catalyzing the stereospecific phenol oxidative coupling reaction converting dihydrogeodin to (+)- geodin. We previously reported the purification of DHGO from A. terreus and raised polyclonal antibody against DHGO. From the first cDNA library constructed in lambda gt11 using mRNA from 3-day-old mycelium of A. terreus, four clones were identified using anti-DHGO antibody, but all contained partial cDNA inserts around 280 base pairs. This cDNA fragment was used as a probe to clone the genomic DNA and cDNA for dihydrogeodin oxidase from A. terreus. The sequence of the cloned DHGO genomic DNA and cDNA predicted that the DHGO polypeptide consists of 605 amino acids showing significant homology with multicopper blue proteins such as laccase and ascorbate oxidase. Four potential copper binding domains exist in DHGO polypeptide. The DHGO gene consists of seven exons separated by six short introns. Expression of the DHGO gene in Aspergillus nidulans under the starch or maltose-inducible Taka-amylase A promoter as an active enzyme established the functional identity of the gene. Also, introduction of the genomic DNA for DHGO into Penicillium frequentans led to the production of DHGO polypeptide as judged by Western blot analysis. PMID:7665560

  3. Regulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin AT1 receptor gene expression in Npr1 gene-disrupted mice

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N; Vellaichamy, Elangovan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression in the control of blood pressure and fluid volume is a key issue in cardiovascular medicine. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) signalling antagonizes the physiological and pathophysiological effects mediated by the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis.The targeted-disruption of the Npr1 gene (coding for GC-A/PRA) leads to activation of the cardiac RAAS involved in the hypertrophic remodelling process, which influences cardiac size, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes and the behaviour of various hypertrophy marker genes. The Npr1 gene-knockout (Npr1−/−) mice exhibit 35–40 mmHg higher systolic blood pressure and a significantly greater heart weight to bodyweight ratio than wild-type (Npr1+/+) mice.The expression of both angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II AT1a receptors are significantly increased in hearts from Npr1−/− mice compared with hearts from Npr1+/+ mice. In parallel, the expression of interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α is also markedly increased in hearts from Npr1−/− mice.These findings indicate that disruption of NPRA/cGMP signalling leads to augmented expression of the cardiac RAAS in conjunction with pro-inflammatory cytokines in Npr1-null mutant mice, which promotes the development of cardiac hypertrophy and remodelling. PMID:19843097

  4. Transcriptome analysis of the Tan sheep testes: Differential expression of antioxidant enzyme-related genes and proteins in response to dietary vitamin E supplementation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenchen; Zuo, Zhaoyun; Liu, Kun; Jia, Huina; Zhang, Yuwei; Luo, Hailing

    2016-03-15

    Gene-chip technology was employed to study the effect of dietary vitamin E on gene expression in sheep testes based on our previous research. Thirty-five male Tan sheep (20-30 days after weaning) with similar body weight were randomly allocated into five groups and supplemented 0, 20, 100, 200 and 2,000 IU sheep(-1)day(-1) vitamin E (treatments denoted as E0, E20, E100, E200, and E2000, respectively) for 120 days. At the end of the study the sheep were slaughtered and the testis samples were immediately collected and stored in liquid nitrogen. Differences in gene expression between different treated groups were identified. Based on GO enrichment analysis and the KEGG database to evaluate the gene expression data we found that vitamin E might affect genes in the testes by modulating the oxidation level, by affecting the expression of various receptors and transcription factors in biological pathways, and by regulating the expression of metabolism-associated genes. The effect of vitamin E supplementation on the expression of oxidative enzyme-related genes was detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. The results show that dietary vitamin E, at various doses, can significantly increase (P<0.05) the mRNA and protein expression of Glutathione peroxidase 3 and Glutathione S-transferase alpha 1. In addition, the results of qRT-PCR of the antioxidant enzyme genes were consistent with those obtained using the gene chip microarray analysis. In summary, the dietary vitamin E treatment altered the expression of a number of genes in sheep testes. The increase in the mRNA and protein levels of antioxidant enzyme genes, coupled with the elevation in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes were primarily responsible for the improved reproductive performance promoted by dietary vitamin E. PMID:26723511

  5. Phospholipase D enzymes facilitate IL-17- and TNFα-induced expression of proinflammatory genes in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASF).

    PubMed

    Friday, Sean C; Fox, David A

    2016-06-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis, the synovium exhibits fibroblast hyperplasia and dynamic infiltration of activated T cells. Interaction between rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASF) and T cell subsets such as Th17 cells can stimulate RASF to express IL-6, IL-8, CCL20, and other proinflammatory mediators of joint destruction. PLD enzymes specifically cleave phosphatidyl choline (PC) producing phosphatidic acid (PA) and choline. Agonist-induced PLD activation results in PA synthesis, which is thought to be involved in a variety of rapid cellular responses such as cytokine secretion. Furthermore, the cellular response to TNF-mediated signaling in myeloid cells is in part mediated by PLD1. However, very few studies have examined the role of PLD enzymes in pro-inflammatory responses of RASF to key pathogenic cytokines such as TNF and IL-17. Microarray analysis of RASF showed that phospholipase D1 (PLD1) is among genes significantly induced by IL-17. We therefore hypothesized that PLD1 might have a role in RASF responses to proinflammatory cytokines. We used 1-butanol, PLD1-specific siRNAs, and small molecule inhibitors specific for PLD1 or PLD2, to investigate the possible role of PLD enzymes in basal, IL-17-, and/or TNFα-evoked expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by RASF. We studied the in vitro responses of RASF to IL-17A and/or TNFα, with particular attention to effects on IL-6, IL-8 and CCL20 mRNA and secretion as determined by RT-QPCR and ELISA, respectively. Transcriptional and prominent post-transcriptional effects were demonstrated, with robust decreases in RASF secretion of IL-6, IL-8, and CCL20 when both PLD isoforms were inhibited together. Moreover, RA synovial biopsy explants cultured in media containing PLD isoform-specific inhibitors showed significantly reduced constitutive secretion of IL-6 and IL-8. PLD enzymes could be promising targets for controlling proinflammatory gene expression in the treatment of RA in view of roles for

  6. Enhanced Gastrointestinal Expression of Cytosolic Malic Enzyme (ME1) Induces Intestinal and Liver Lipogenic Gene Expression and Intestinal Cell Proliferation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dwairi, Ahmed; Brown, Adam R.; Pabona, John Mark P.; Van, Trang H.; Hamdan, Hamdan; Mercado, Charles P.; Quick, Charles M.; Wight, Patricia A.; Simmen, Rosalia C. M.; Simmen, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine participates in lipid digestion, metabolism and transport. Cytosolic malic enzyme 1 (ME1) is an enzyme that generates NADPH used in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Previous work has correlated liver and adipose ME1 expression with susceptibility to obesity and diabetes; however, the contributions of intestine-expressed ME1 to these conditions are unknown. We generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing rat ME1 in the gastrointestinal epithelium under the control of the murine villin1 promoter/enhancer. Levels of intestinal ME1 protein (endogenous plus transgene) were greater in Tg than wildtype (WT) littermates. Effects of elevated intestinal ME1 on body weight, circulating insulin, select adipocytokines, blood glucose, and metabolism-related genes were examined. Male Tg mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet gained significantly more body weight than WT male littermates and had heavier livers. ME1-Tg mice had deeper intestinal and colon crypts, a greater intestinal 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling index, and increased expression of intestinal lipogenic (Fasn, Srebf1) and cholesterol biosynthetic (Hmgcsr, Hmgcs1), genes. The livers from HF diet-fed Tg mice also exhibited an induction of cholesterol and lipogenic pathway genes and altered measures (Irs1, Irs2, Prkce) of insulin sensitivity. Results indicate that gastrointestinal ME1 via its influence on intestinal epithelial proliferation, and lipogenic and cholesterologenic genes may concomitantly impact signaling in liver to modify this tissue’s metabolic state. Our work highlights a new mouse model to address the role of intestine-expressed ME1 in whole body metabolism, hepatomegaly, and crypt cell proliferation. Intestinal ME1 may thus constitute a therapeutic target to reduce obesity-associated pathologies. PMID:25402228

  7. Differential expression of duplicated LDH-A genes during temperature acclimation of weatherfish Misgurnus fossilis. Functional consequences for the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Zakhartsev, Maxim; Lucassen, Magnus; Kulishova, Liliya; Deigweiher, Katrin; Smirnova, Yuliya A; Zinov'eva, Rina D; Mugue, Nikolay; Baklushinskaya, Irina; Pörtner, Hans O; Ozernyuk, Nikolay D

    2007-03-01

    Temperature acclimation in poikilotherms entails metabolic rearrangements provided by variations in enzyme properties. However, in most cases the underlying molecular mechanisms that result in structural changes in the enzymes are obscure. This study reports that acclimation to low (5 degrees C) and high (18 degrees C) temperatures leads to differential expression of alternative forms of the LDH-A gene in white skeletal muscle of weatherfish, Misgurnus fossilis. Two isoforms of LDH-A mRNA were isolated and characterized: a short isoform (= 1332 bp) and a long isoform ( = 1550 bp), which both have 5'-UTRs and ORFs of the same length (333 amino acid residues), but differ in the length of the 3'-UTR. In addition, these two mRNAs have 44 nucleotide point mismatches of an irregular pattern along the complete sequence, resulting in three amino acid mismatches (Gly214Val; Val304Ile and Asp312Glu) between protein products from the short and long mRNA forms, correspondingly LDH-A(alpha) and LDH-A(beta) subunits. It is expected that the beta-subunit is more aliphatic due to the properties of the mismatched amino acids and therefore sterically more restricted. According to molecular modelling of M. fossilis LDH-A, the Val304Ile mismatch is located in the subunit contact area of the tetramer, whereas the remaining two mismatches surround the contact area; this is expected to manifest in the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the assembled tetramer. In warm-acclimated fish the relative expression between alpha and beta isoforms of the LDH-A mRNA is around 5 : 1, whereas in cold-acclimated fish expression of is reduced almost to zero. This indicates that at low temperature the pool of total tetrameric LDH-A is more homogeneous in terms of alpha/beta-subunit composition. The temperature acclimation pattern of proportional pooling of subunits with different kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the tetrameric enzyme may result in fine-tuning of the properties of skeletal

  8. Effects of paraquat on photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic compared with autotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguo; Liu, Min; Zhang, Peiliang; Yu, Fugen; Lu, Shan; Li, Pengfu; Zhou, Junying

    2014-11-01

    Only limited information is available on herbicide toxicity to algae under mixotrophic conditions. In the present study, we studied the effects of the herbicide paraquat on growth, photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic compared with autotrophic conditions. The mean measured exposure concentrations of paraquat under mixotrophic and autotrophic conditions were in the range of 0.3-3.4 and 0.6-3.6 μM, respectively. Exposure to paraquat for 72 h under both autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions induced decreased growth and chlorophyll (Chl) content, increased superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities, and decreased transcript abundances of three photosynthesis-related genes (light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase subunit, photosystem II protein D1, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit [rbcL]). Compared with autotrophic conditions, the inhibition percentage of growth rate under mixotrophic conditions was lower at 0.8 μM paraquat, whereas it was greater at 1.8 and 3.4 μM paraquat. With exposure to 0.8-3.4 μM paraquat, the inhibition rates of Chl a and b content under mixotrophic conditions (43.1-52.4% and 54.6-59.7%, respectively) were greater compared with autotrophic conditions, whereas the inhibition rate of rbcL gene transcription under mixotrophic conditions (35.7-44.0%) was lower. These data showed that similar to autotrophic conditions, paraquat affected the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decreased Chl synthesis and transcription of photosynthesis-related genes in C. pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic conditions, but a differential susceptibility to paraquat toxicity occurred between autotrophically versus mixotrophically grown cells. PMID:25038722

  9. Jasmonic Acid Modulates the Physio-Biochemical Attributes, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Gene Expression in Glycine max under Nickel Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sirhindi, Geetika; Mir, Mudaser Ahmad; Abd-Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    In present study, we evaluated the effects of Jasmonic acid (JA) on physio-biochemical attributes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and gene expression in soybean (Glycine max L.) plants subjected to nickel (Ni) stress. Ni stress decreases the shoot and root length and chlorophyll content by 37.23, 38.31, and 39.21%, respectively, over the control. However, application of JA was found to improve the chlorophyll content and length of shoot and root of Ni-fed seedlings. Plants supplemented with JA restores the chlorophyll fluorescence, which was disturbed by Ni stress. The present study demonstrated increase in proline, glycinebetaine, total protein, and total soluble sugar (TSS) by 33.09, 51.26, 22.58, and 49.15%, respectively, under Ni toxicity over the control. Addition of JA to Ni stressed plants further enhanced the above parameters. Ni stress increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by 68.49%, lipid peroxidation (MDA) by 50.57% and NADPH oxidase by 50.92% over the control. Supplementation of JA minimizes the accumulation of H2O2, MDA, and NADPH oxidase, which helps in stabilization of biomolecules. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) increases by 40.04, 28.22, 48.53, and 56.79%, respectively, over the control in Ni treated seedlings and further enhancement in the antioxidant activity was observed by the application of JA. Ni treated soybean seedlings showed increase in expression of Fe-SOD by 77.62, CAT by 15.25, POD by 58.33, and APX by 80.58% over the control. Nevertheless, application of JA further enhanced the expression of the above genes in the present study. Our results signified that Ni stress caused negative impacts on soybean seedlings, but, co-application of JA facilitate the seedlings to combat the detrimental effects of Ni through enhanced osmolytes, activity of antioxidant enzymes and gene expression. PMID:27242811

  10. Jasmonic Acid Modulates the Physio-Biochemical Attributes, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Gene Expression in Glycine max under Nickel Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sirhindi, Geetika; Mir, Mudaser Ahmad; Abd-Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    In present study, we evaluated the effects of Jasmonic acid (JA) on physio-biochemical attributes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and gene expression in soybean (Glycine max L.) plants subjected to nickel (Ni) stress. Ni stress decreases the shoot and root length and chlorophyll content by 37.23, 38.31, and 39.21%, respectively, over the control. However, application of JA was found to improve the chlorophyll content and length of shoot and root of Ni-fed seedlings. Plants supplemented with JA restores the chlorophyll fluorescence, which was disturbed by Ni stress. The present study demonstrated increase in proline, glycinebetaine, total protein, and total soluble sugar (TSS) by 33.09, 51.26, 22.58, and 49.15%, respectively, under Ni toxicity over the control. Addition of JA to Ni stressed plants further enhanced the above parameters. Ni stress increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by 68.49%, lipid peroxidation (MDA) by 50.57% and NADPH oxidase by 50.92% over the control. Supplementation of JA minimizes the accumulation of H2O2, MDA, and NADPH oxidase, which helps in stabilization of biomolecules. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) increases by 40.04, 28.22, 48.53, and 56.79%, respectively, over the control in Ni treated seedlings and further enhancement in the antioxidant activity was observed by the application of JA. Ni treated soybean seedlings showed increase in expression of Fe-SOD by 77.62, CAT by 15.25, POD by 58.33, and APX by 80.58% over the control. Nevertheless, application of JA further enhanced the expression of the above genes in the present study. Our results signified that Ni stress caused negative impacts on soybean seedlings, but, co-application of JA facilitate the seedlings to combat the detrimental effects of Ni through enhanced osmolytes, activity of antioxidant enzymes and gene expression. PMID:27242811

  11. Effects of temperature - heavy metal interactions, antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ergün, N; Özçubukçu, S; Kolukirik, M; Temizkan, Ö

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the effect of heat and chromium (Cr) heavy metal interactions on wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Ç-1252 and Gun91) was investigated by measuring total chlorophyll and carotenoid levels, catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) antioxidant enzyme activities, and MYB73, ERF1 and TaSRG gene expression. Examination of pigment levels demonstrated a decrease in total chlorophyll in both species of wheat under combined heat and heavy metal stress, while the carotenoid levels showed a slight increase. APX activity increased in both species in response to heavy metal stress, but the increase in APX activity in the Gun91 seedlings was higher than that in the Ç-1252 seedlings. CAT activity increased in Gun91 seedlings but decreased in Ç-1252 seedlings. These results showed that Gun91 seedling had higher resistance to Cr and Cr + heat stresses than the Ç-1252 seedling. The quantitative molecular analyses implied that the higher resistance was related to the overexpression of TaMYB73, TaERF1 and TaSRG transcription factors. The increase in the expression levels of these transcription factors was profound under combined Cr and heat stress. This study suggests that TaMYB73, TaERF1 and TaSRG transcription factors regulate Cr and heat stress responsive genes in wheat. PMID:25475983

  12. Quantification of phase I / II metabolizing enzyme gene expression and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct levels in human prostate

    PubMed Central

    John, Kaarthik; Ragavan, Narasimhan; Pratt, M. Margaret; Singh, Paras B.; Al-Buheissi, Salah; Matanhelia, Shyam S.; Phillips, David H.; Poirier, Miriam C.; Martin, Francis L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies of migrant populations suggest that dietary and/or environmental factors play a crucial role in the aetiology of prostatic adenocarcinoma (CaP). The human prostate consists of the peripheral zone (PZ), transition zone (TZ) and central zone (CZ); CaP occurs most often in the PZ. METHODS To investigate the notion that an underlying differential expression of phase I/II genes, and/or the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts might explain the elevated PZ susceptibility, we examined prostate tissues (matched tissue sets consisting of PZ and TZ) from men undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy for CaP (n=26) or cystoprostatectomy (n=1). Quantitative gene expression analysis was employed for cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and CYP1A2, as well as N-acetyltransferase 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2) and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). RESULTS CYP1B1, NAT1 and COMT were expressed in all tissue sets; levels of CYP1B1 and NAT1 were consistently higher in the PZ compared to TZ. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of CYP1B1 (nuclear-associated and primarily in basal epithelial cells) and NAT1. Tissue sections from 23 of these aforementioned 27 matched tissue sets were analyzed for PAH-DNA adduct levels using antiserum elicited against DNA modified with r7, t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]pyrene (BPDE). PAH-DNA adduct levels were highest in glandular epithelial cells, but a comparison of PZ and TZ showed no significant differences. CONCLUSION Although expression of activating and/or detoxifying enzymes may be higher in the PZ, PAH-DNA adduct levels appear to be similar in both zones. Therefore, factors other than PAH-DNA adducts may be responsible for promotion of tumour formation in the human prostate. PMID:19143007

  13. Glycolytic enzyme activities and gene expression in Cicer arietinum exposed to water-deficit stress.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Suruchi M; Taxak, Pooja Choudhary; Jain, Pradeep K; Saini, Raman; Srinivasan, R

    2014-08-01

    The specific activities and transcript levels of glycolytic enzymes were examined in shoots of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) cultivars, Pusa362 (drought tolerant) and SBD377 (drought sensitive), subjected to water-deficit stress 30 days after sowing. Water-deficit stress resulted in decrease in relative water content, chlorophyll content, plant dry weight, and NADP/NADPH ratio and increase in NAD/NADH ratio in both the cultivars. A successive decline in the specific activities of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (aldolase), 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK), and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NADP-GAPDH) and elevation in the specific activities of phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM) and triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) was observed in both the cultivars under stress as compared to their respective control plants. The specific activities of hexokinase, fructose-6-phosphate kinase (PFK), and NAD-GAPDH were least affected. The transcript levels of PGK and NADP-GAPDH decreased and that of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), PGM, and PFK increased in response to water-deficit stress while water-deficit stress had no effect on the steady-state transcript levels of hexokinase, aldolase, TPI, and NAD-GAPDH. The results suggest that under water-deficit stress, the activities and transcript levels of most of the glycolytic enzymes are not significantly affected, except the increased activity and transcript level of PGM and decreased activities and transcript levels of PGK and NADP-GAPDH. Further, the glycolytic enzymes do not show much variation between the tolerant and sensitive cultivars under water deficit. PMID:25008554

  14. Seasonal alteration in amounts of lignans and their glucosides and gene expression of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes in the Forsythia suspense leaf.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kinuyo; Satake, Honoo

    2013-01-01

    Lignans of Forsythia spp. are essential components of various Chinese medicines and health diets. However, the seasonal alteration in lignan amounts and the gene expression profile of lignan-biosynthetic enzymes has yet to be investigated. In this study, we have assessed seasonal alteration in amounts of major lignans, such as pinoresinol, matairesinol, and arctigenin, and examined the gene expression profile of pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase (PLR), pinoresinol-glucosylating enzyme (UGT71A18), and secoisolariciresinol dehydrogenase (SIRD) in the leaf of Forsythia suspense from April to November. All of the lignans in the leaf continuously increased from April to June, reached the maximal level in June, and then decreased. Ninety percent of pinoresinol and matairesinol was converted into glucosides, while approximately 50% of arctigenin was aglycone. PLR was stably expressed from April to August, whereas the PLR expression was not detected from September to November. In contrast, the UGT71A18 expression was found from August to November, but not from April to July. The SIRD expression was prominent from April to May, not detected in June to July, and then increased again from September to November. These expression profiles of the lignan-synthetic enzymes are largely compatible with the alteration in lignan contents. Furthermore, such seasonal lignan profiles are in good agreement with the fact that the Forsythia leaves for Chinese medicinal tea are harvested in June. This is the first report on seasonal alteration in lignans and the relevant biosynthetic enzyme genes in the leaf of Forsythia species. PMID:23832493

  15. Gene expression analysis and enzyme assay reveal a potential role of the carboxylesterase gene CpCE-1 from Cydia pomonella in detoxification of insecticides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) are responsible for metabolism of xenobiotics including insecticides in insects. Understanding the expression patterns of a such detoxifying gene and effect of insecticides on its enzyme activity are important to clarify the function of this gene relevant to insecticides-detoxifying process, but little information is available in the codling moth Cydia pomonella (L.). In this study, we investigated the expression profiles of CarE gene CpCE-1 at different developmental stages and in different tissues of C. pomonella, as well as the larvae exposed to chlorpyrifos-ethyl and lambda-cyhalothrin by using absolute real-time quantitative PCR (absolute RT-qPCR). Results indicated that CpCE-1 expression was significantly altered during C. pomonella development stages, and this expression differed between sexes, with a higher transcript in females than males. Meanwhile, CpCE-1 is overexpressed in cuticle, midgut and head than silk gland, fat body and Malpighian tubules. Exposure of third instar larvae to a non-lethal dosage of chlorpyrifos-ethyl and lambda-cyhalothrin resulted in induction of CpCE-1 transcript. The total carboxylesterase enzyme activity was inhibited by chlorpyrifos-ethyl in vivo; in contrast, the activity of Escherichia coli produced recombinant CpCE-1 was significantly inhibited by both lambda-cyhalothrin and chlorpyrifos-ethyl in vitro. These results suggested that CpCE-1 in C. pomonella is potentially involved in the development and in detoxification of chlorpyrifos-ethyl and lambda-cyhalothrin. PMID:27017882

  16. Alteration of gene expression for glycolytic enzymes in aerobic and ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Liedtke, A J; Lynch, M L

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of this report was to describe mRNA abundance for the glycolytic enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), pyruvate kinase, and pyruvate dehydrogenase in ischemic and adjacent aerobic myocardium. Mechanical, metabolic, and mRNA data were acquired in a pig model of regulated coronary flow using extracorporeal perfusion. Trials of coronary hypoperfusion included sustained and intermittent exposures of acute ischemia with or without reperfusion. These were compared with a chronic 4-day model of partial coronary stenosis. In ischemic tissues, levels of mRNA, normalized by mRNA for beta-actin, were increased over control values for GAPDH (range 2.7- to 4.6-fold), pyruvate kinase (2.9-fold), and pyruvate dehydrogenase (2.1-fold). It is of interest that increases in mRNA levels over control values were also observed in adjacent aerobic heart muscle from intervention hearts, including 3.6- to 4.5-fold elevations in message for GAPDH and a 2.1-fold increase in signal for pyruvate dehydrogenase. Augmentation in mRNA abundance occurred in as short a time as 40 min of ischemia and was maintained for as long as 4 days in partial coronary stenosis. Whether the former time was of an interval sufficient to affect protein production is problematic, but the latter time was ample to influence enzyme concentration, which may in turn have regulated glycolysis in this condition. PMID:10516179

  17. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING ENZYMES (XMES) IN THE AGING MALE FISHER RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics is a major function of the liver and is important in maintaining the metabolic homeostasis of the organism. The degree to which aging affects hepatic metabolism is not known. The expression of XMEs, in part, determines the fate of the...

  18. [Effects of light intensity on associated enzyme activity and gene expression during callus formation of Vitis vinifera].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Yang, Guowei; Wu, Yueyan; Rao, Huiyun; Li, Xuefu; Li, Meiqin; Qian, Pingxian

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the best light intensity for callus induction and maintenance in Vitis vinifera and explored the mechanism of grape callus browning. Tender stem segments of grape cultivar "gold finger" were used to study the effects of different light intensities (0, 500, 1 000, 1 500, 2 000, 2 500, 3 000 and 4 000 Lx) on the induction rate, browning rate and associated enzyme activity and gene expression during Vitis vinifera callus formation. The callus induction rate under 0, 500, 1 000 and 1 500 Lx was more than 92%, significantly higher than in other treatments (P < 0.05). A lower browning rate and better callus growth were also observed during subculture under 1 000 and 1 500 Lx treatments. We found that chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and coumaric acid contents were correlated with the browning rate of callus, among which chlorogenic acid content was positively correlated with the browning rate (P < 0.05). Peroxidase (POD) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities were negatively correlated with the browning rate of callus (P < 0.01). The POD, PPO and phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL) expression levels were positively correlated with the browning rate at P < 0.05 or P < 0.01. An appropriate light intensity for the tissue culture of Vitis vinifera was 1 000-1 500 Lx, higher or lower light intensities significantly impaired normal callus growth. PMID:26762043

  19. Characterization of the Impact of Life Stage on Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Expression and Gene -Chemical Interactions in the Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). We have carried out a comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs thro...

  20. [Gene expression of the key enzymes controlling starch synthesis and metabolism in rice grain endosperm under effects of high temperature after anthesis].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lian-Jin; Dong, Hu; Cai, Xiao-Bo; Feng, Yan-Ning; Ren, Ping; Cheng, Fang-Min

    2012-03-01

    Taking an early-season indica cultivar 'Jiazao 935' whose grain quality was sensitive to temperature as test material, and by using artificial climatic chamber and real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR), this paper studied the relative expression amount and its dynamic changes of ten isoform genes of the key enzymes controlling starch synthesis and metabolism in rice grain endosperm, including sbe1, sbe3, and sbe4 of starch branching enzyme (SBE), isal, isa2, isa3, and pul of starch debranching enzyme (DBE), and Wx, sss1, and sss2a of starch synthase (SS), at the mean daily temperature 22 and 32 degrees C after anthesis. There existed obvious differences in the expression patterns of these genes under the high temperature stress, and the expression patterns were isoform-dependent. The relative expression amount of sbe1 and sbe3 under high temperature decreased significantly, and both of the genes were the sensitive isoform genes of SBE to high temperature stress. Among the DBE genes, pul was the isoform gene with high expression level, being more sensitive to high temperature stress than isa1, isa2, and isa3. Among the SS genes, sss2a had a significantly lower relative expression amount than sss1 and Wx, but sss2a and sss1 were more sensitive to high temperature than Wx, suggesting that sss2a and sss1 could be the important genes that adjusted the starch structure in rice endosperm under high temperature stress, especially at the middle and late grain filling stages. PMID:22720620

  1. Gene expression and enzyme activity of lipoprotein lipase correlate with intramuscular fat content in Guangxi san-huang and Arbor Acres chickens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y N; Wang, J; Chen, B J; Jiang, Q Y; Guo, Y F; Lan, G Q; Jiang, H S

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key enzyme in lipid metabolism. This study investigated LPL gene expression, LPL enzyme activity, and the correlation of each with intramuscular fat (IMF) in Chinese Guangxi san-huang (GXSH) and Arbor Acres (AA) chickens. The results showed that age and breed had significant effects on LPL expression and enzyme activity. Correlation analyses showed significant positive correlations between LPL expression levels and IMF contents in the breast and thigh tissues of both GXSH (r = 0.712, P = 0.001; r = 0.792, P < 0.001, respectively) and AA (r = 0.644, P < 0.001; r = 0.545, P < 0.001, respectively) chickens. The results also indicated a significant positive correlation between LPL enzyme activity and IMF contents in the breast and thigh tissues of both GXSH (r = 0.615, P = 0.001; r = 0.685, P < 0.001, respectively) and AA (r = 0.600, P = 0.001; r = 0.528, P = 0.003, respectively) chickens. The results indicated that the LPL gene was significantly correlated with IMF in these two breeds. The results presented here could contribute to knowledge of LPL mRNA developmental expression patterns and enzyme activity, and it could facilitate further research on the molecular mechanisms underlying IMF deposition in chickens. PMID:27323106

  2. Curcumin regulates gene expression of insulin like growth factor, B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 and antioxidant enzymes in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effects of curcumin on the activities and gene expression of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione-S-transferase (G-ST), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in diabetic rats were studied. Methods Twenty four rats were assigned to three groups (8 rats for each). Rats of first group were non diabetic and rats of the second group were rendered diabetic by streptozotocin (STZ). Both groups received vehicle, corn oil only (5 ml/kg body weight) and served as negative and positive controls, respectively. Rats of the third group were rendered diabetic and received oral curcumin dissolved in corn oil at a dose of 15 mg/5 ml/kg body weight for 6 weeks. Results Diabetic rats showed significant increase of blood glucose, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and activities of all antioxidant enzymes with significant reduction of reduced glutathione (GSH) compare to the control non diabetic group. Gene expression of Bcl2, SOD, CAT, GPX and GST was increased significantly in diabetic untreated rats compare to the control non diabetic group. The administration of curcumin to diabetic rats normalized significantly their blood sugar level and TBARS values and increased the activities of all antioxidant enzymes and GSH concentration. In addition, curcumin treated rats showed significant increase in gene expression of IGF-1, Bcl2, SOD and GST compare to non diabetic and diabetic untreated rats. Conclusion Curcumin was antidiabetic therapy, induced hypoglycemia by up-regulation of IGF-1 gene and ameliorate the diabetes induced oxidative stress via increasing the availability of GSH, increasing the activities and gene expression of antioxidant enzymes and Bcl2. Further studies are required to investigate the actual mechanism of action of curcumin regarding the up regulation of gene expression of examined parameters. PMID:24364912

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression by novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes targeted to cleave HIV-1 TAT/Rev RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Unwalla, H; Banerjea, A C

    2001-01-01

    Many regions of the HIV-1 genome have been targeted in earlier studies by RNA-cleaving DNA enzymes possessing the 10-23 catalytic motif, and efficient inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression was reported. All these studies employed charged synthetic lipids to introduce the catalytic DNA into the mammalian cells, which severely limits its practical application and usefulness in vivo. Taking advantage of the ability of G residues to interact directly with the scavenger receptors on the macrophages, we synthesized a DNA enzyme 5970 that contained 10 G residues at the 3' end. With the aim of improving the intracellular stability of the DNA enzyme 5970, we added two short stretches of stem-loop structures that were 12 bases long on either side of the DNA enzyme 5970. DNA enzyme 5970 without the poly-G tracts cleaved the synthetic RNA of HIV-1 TAT/Rev, two important regulatory proteins of HIV, very efficiently in a sequence-specific manner. Addition of 10 G residues at the 3' end of the DNA enzyme affected the cleavage efficiency only marginally whereas the same DNA enzyme with stem-loop structures on either end was significantly less efficient. The DNA enzyme with the poly-G tract at its 3' end was taken up specifically by a human macrophage-specific cell line directly in the absence of Lipofectin and was also able to inhibit HIV-1 gene expression in a transient-expression system as well as when challenged with the virus. The potential applications of these novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes are discussed. PMID:11415445

  4. Analysis of gene expression changes, caused by exposure to nitrite, in metabolic and antioxidant enzymes in the red claw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qichen; Zhang, Wenyi; Tan, Hongyue; Pan, Dongmei; Yang, Yuanhao; Ren, Qian; Yang, Jiaxin

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of acute exposure to nitrite on expression of antioxidant and metabolic enzyme genes in gill tissue of advanced juvenile Cherax quadricarinatus. A 48h nitrite exposure was conducted, using four test concentrations (NO2-N=0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2mg L(-1)) plus a control group. The relative mRNA expression of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (mMnSOD), cytosolic MnSOD (cMnSOD), extracellular copper/zinc SOD (exCu/ZnSOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), arginine kinase (AK), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunit and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in gill tissue was measured. Significantly increased mRNA expression was observed for all the antioxidant enzymes after 12 and 24h. After 48h, they all decreased at high nitrite concentrations. The gene expression levels of AK, GDH, mMDH and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunit showed similar trends as the antioxidant enzymes. Significant depression of gene expression levels of PEPCK occurred throughout the experimental time at high nitrite concentrations. The results indicated that nitrite could induce oxidative and metabolic stress in C. quadricarinatus, in a time dependent manner, which suggests they could be helpful in predicting sublethal nitrite toxicity and useful in environmental monitoring studies. PMID:24680578

  5. Cloning heterologous genes into E. Coli for enzyme production and crystal growth: Problems of expression and microheterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Charles W.

    1988-07-01

    Protein crystal growth is heavily dependant on provision of large amounts of very pure protein. For this reason, molecular cloning will be used increasingly to permit the study of proteins which cannot otherwise be prepared in sufficient amounts, or purity, or both. We have obtained a stable clone of the tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from Bacillus stearothermophilus that is active in enzyme production. This result entailed two unusual aspects of interest to those using molecular cloning for enzyme production and crystal growth: (1) The cloning steps required stringent selection procedures that may have selected an unspecified mutational event 5' to the structural gene, because an as yet unknown flanking element of the B. stearothermophilus DNA produces a marked instability in plasmids containing the native DNA. (2) The homologous Escherichia coli trpS enzyme apparently interferes with crystallization of B. stearothermophilus tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase purified from an E. coli strain. We have therefore deleted the E. coli chromosomal trpS gene by site-specific recombination of a recombinant lambda phage containing a marked deletion of the E. coli trpS gene. Enzyme prepared from this deletion strain crystallizes in a normal fashion, suitable for high-resolution X-ray crystallography studies. Crystallographic data sets from isomorphous crystals grown with native and cloned protein are identical to 3Åresolution to within normal scaling statistics.

  6. Melatonin biosynthesizing enzyme genes and clock genes in ovary and whole brain of zebrafish (Danio rerio): Differential expression and a possible interplay.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan Ahmad; Yumnamcha, Thangal; Rajiv, Chongtham; Devi, Haobijam Sanjita; Mondal, Gopinath; Devi, Sh Dharmajyoti; Bharali, Rupjyoti; Chattoraj, Asamanja

    2016-07-01

    The present study on zebrafish (Danio rerio) is the first attempt to demonstrate the circadian mRNA expression of melatonin biosynthesizing enzyme genes (Tph1a, Aanat1, Aanat2 and Hiomt) and clock associated genes (Bmal1a, Clock1a, Per1b, Per2 and Cry2a) in the ovary with a comparison to whole brain in normal (LD=12h L:12h D) and altered photic conditions (continuous dark, DD; continuous light, LL). Moreover, the present study also confirmed the ability of zebrafish ovary to biosynthesize melatonin both in vivo and in vitro with a significant difference at day and night. qRT-PCR analysis of genes revealed a dark acrophase of Aanat2 in both organs while Tph1 is in whole brain in LD condition. On the contrary, Bmal1a and Clock1a giving their peak in light, thereby showing a negative correlation with Tph1a and Aanat2. In LD-ovary, the acrophase of Tph1a, Bmal1a and Clock1a is in light and thus display a positive correlation. This trend of relationship in respect to Tph1a is not changing in altered photic conditions in both organs (except in DD-ovary). On the other hand this association for Aanat2 is varying in ovary under altered photic conditions but only in DD-whole brain. Both in LD and LL the expression of Aanat2 in brain presenting an opposite acrophase with both Bmal1a and Clock1a of ovary and consequently displaying a strong negative correlation among them. Interestingly, all ovarian clock associated genes become totally arrhythmic in DD, representing a loss of correlation between the melatonin synthesizing genes in brain and clock associated genes in ovary. The result is also indicating the formation of two heterodimers namely Clock1a:Bmal1a and Per2:Cry2a in the functioning of clock genes in both organs, irrespective of photic conditions, as they are exhibiting a strong significant positive correlation. Collectively, our data suggest that ovary of zebrafish is working as peripheral oscillator having its own melatonin biosynthesizing machinery and signifying a

  7. Characterization of the Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzyme Gene Family in Rice and Evaluation of Expression Profiles under Abiotic Stresses and Hormone Treatments

    PubMed Central

    E, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yuping; Li, Tingting; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Heming

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2s (UBCs), which catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin to substrate or E3 ligases, are key enzymes in ubiquitination modifications of target proteins. However, little is known about the knowledge of UBC gene family in rice. In this study, a total of 39 UBC encoding genes, which all contained an UBC domain with a cysteine active site, were identified in the rice genome. These were classified into fifteen distinct subfamilies based upon their sequence similarity and phylogenetic relationships. A subset of 19 OsUBC genes exhibited chromosomal duplication; 4 and 15 OsUBC genes were tandemly and segmentally duplicated, respectively. Comprehensive analyses were performed to investigate the expression profiles of OsUBC genes in various stages of vegetative and reproductive development using data from EST, Microarrays, MPSS, and real-time PCR. Many OsUBC genes exhibited abundant and tissue-specific expression patterns. Moreover, 14 OsUBCs were found to be differentially expressed under treatments with drought, or salt stresses. The expression analysis after treatments with IAA, 6-BA, GA and ABA indicated that almost all OsUBC genes were responsive to at least two of the four hormones. Several genes were significantly down-regulated under all of the hormone treatments, and most of the genes reduced by 6-BA were also reduced by GA. This study will facilitate further studies of the OsUBC gene family and provide useful clues for functional validation of OsUBCs in rice. PMID:25902049

  8. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Expression of Genes Encoding Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes during Infection of Lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) by Phytophthora parasitica

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, Leila M.; Cullerne, Darren P.; Torreña, Pernelyn; Taylor, Jen; Hardham, Adrienne R.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq analysis has shown that over 60% (12,962) of the predicted transcripts in the Phytophthora parasitica genome are expressed during the first 60 h of lupin root infection. The infection transcriptomes included 278 of the 431 genes encoding P. parasitica cell wall degrading enzymes. The transcriptome data provide strong evidence of global transcriptional cascades of genes whose encoded proteins target the main categories of plant cell wall components. A major cohort of pectinases is predominantly expressed early but as infection progresses, the transcriptome becomes increasingly dominated by transcripts encoding cellulases, hemicellulases, β-1,3-glucanases and glycoproteins. The most highly expressed P. parasitica carbohydrate active enzyme gene contains two CBM1 cellulose binding modules and no catalytic domains. The top 200 differentially expressed genes include β-1,4-glucosidases, β-1,4-glucanases, β-1,4-galactanases, a β-1,3-glucanase, an α-1,4-polygalacturonase, a pectin deacetylase and a pectin methylesterase. Detailed analysis of gene expression profiles provides clues as to the order in which linkages within the complex carbohydrates may come under attack. The gene expression profiles suggest that (i) demethylation of pectic homogalacturonan occurs before its deacetylation; (ii) cleavage of the backbone of pectic rhamnogalacturonan I precedes digestion of its side chains; (iii) early attack on cellulose microfibrils by non-catalytic cellulose-binding proteins and enzymes with auxiliary activities may facilitate subsequent attack by glycosyl hydrolases and enzymes containing CBM1 cellulose-binding modules; (iv) terminal hemicellulose backbone residues are targeted after extensive internal backbone cleavage has occurred; and (v) the carbohydrate chains on glycoproteins are degraded late in infection. A notable feature of the P. parasitica infection transcriptome is the high level of transcription of genes encoding enzymes that degrade β-1

  9. Systems-level studies of glycosyltransferase gene expression and enzyme activity that are associated with the selectin binding function of human leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, Dhananjay D.; Chandrasekaran, E. V.; Lau, Joseph T. Y.; Matta, Khushi L.; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2008-01-01

    The application of systems biology methods in the emerging field of glycomics requires the collection and integration of glycosyltransferase data at the gene and enzyme level for the purpose of hypothesis generation. We systematically examined the relationship between gene expression, glycosyltransferase activity, glycan expression, and selectin-binding function in different systems, including human neutrophils, undifferentiated HL-60 (human promyelocytic cells), differentiated HL-60, and HL-60 synchronized in specific growth phases. Results demonstrate that 1) the sLeX (sialyl-Lewis-X) epitope is expressed in P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) from neutrophils at higher levels compared with HL-60. This variation may be due to differences in the relative activities of α1,3-fucosyltransferases and α2,3-sialyltransferases in these two cell types. 2) HL-60 cell differentiation along granulocyte lineage increased the activity of β1,4GalT and β1,3GlcNAcT by 1.6- to 3.2-fold. This may contribute to LacNAc chain extension as evidenced by the 1.7-fold increase in DSA-lectin (lectin recognizing LacNAc) binding to cells after differentiation. 3) The activity of enzymes contributing to sLeX formation in leukocytes likely varies as ST3[Galβ1,4GlcNAc] ≤ α1,3FT[sialyl-LacNAc] < β1,3GlcNAcT. 4) O-glycan specific glycosyltransferase activity does not undergo periodic variation with cell cycle phases. Overall, gene expression and enzyme activity data combined with knowledge of biochemistry can predict the resulting glycan structures and yield viable experimentally testable hypothesis.—Marathe, D. D., Chandrasekaran, E. V., Lau, J. T. Y., Matta, K. L., Neelamegham, S. Systems-level studies of glycosyltransferase gene expression and enzyme activity that are associated with the selectin binding function of human leukocytes. PMID:18716032

  10. Vanadate treatment restores the expression of genes for key enzymes in the glucose and ketone bodies metabolism in the liver of diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Valera, A; Rodriguez-Gil, J E; Bosch, F

    1993-01-01

    Oral administration of vanadate to diabetic streptozotocin-treated rats decreased the high blood glucose and D-3-hydroxybutyrate levels related to diabetes. The increase in the expression of the P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene, the main regulatory enzyme of gluconeogenesis, was counteracted in the liver and the kidney after vanadate administration to diabetic rats. Vanadate also counteracted the induction in tyrosine aminotransferase gene expression due to diabetes and was able to increase the expression of the glucokinase gene to levels even higher than those found in healthy animals. Similarly, an induction in pyruvate kinase mRNA transcripts was observed in diabetic vanadate-treated rats. These effects were correlated with changes on glucokinase and pyruvate kinase activities. Vanadate treatment caused a decrease in the expression of the liver-specific glucose transporter, GLUT-2. Thus, vanadate was able to restore liver glucose utilization and block glucose production in diabetic rats. The increase in the expression of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCoAS) gene, the key regulatory enzyme in the ketone bodies production pathway, observed in diabetic rats was also blocked by vanadate. Furthermore, a similar pattern in the expression of PEPCK, GLUT-2, HMGCoAS, and the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha genes has been observed. All of these results suggest that the regulation of the expression of genes involved in the glucose and ketone bodies metabolism could be a key step in the normalization process induced by vanadate administration to diabetic rats. Images PMID:8100835

  11. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus woesei: characterization of the enzyme, cloning and sequencing of the gene, and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Zwickl, P; Fabry, S; Bogedain, C; Haas, A; Hensel, R

    1990-01-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus woesei (optimal growth temperature, 100 to 103 degrees C) was purified to homogeneity. This enzyme was strictly phosphate dependent, utilized either NAD+ or NADP+, and was insensitive to pentalenolactone like the enzyme from the methanogenic archaebacterium Methanothermus fervidus. The enzyme exhibited a considerable thermostability, with a 44-min half-life at 100 degrees C. The amino acid sequence of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from P. woesei was deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the coding gene. Compared with the enzyme homologs from mesophilic archaebacteria (Methanobacterium bryantii, Methanobacterium formicicum) and an extremely thermophilic archaebacterium (Methanothermus fervidus), the primary structure of the P. woesei enzyme exhibited a strikingly high proportion of aromatic amino acid residues and a low proportion of sulfur-containing residues. The coding gene of P. woesei was expressed at a high level in Escherichia coli, thus providing an ideal basis for detailed structural and functional studies of that enzyme. Images PMID:2165475

  12. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene from wild rice, OgUBC1, confers resistance against UV-B radiation and Botrytis infection in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, En Hee; Pak, Jung Hun; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Shin, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jai Heon; Kim, Doh Hoon; Oh, Ju Sung; Oh, Boung-Jun; Jung, Ho Won; Chung, Young Soo

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated a novel E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme from leaves of wild rice plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 was highly expressed in leaves treated with SA and UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recombinant OgUBC1 has an enzymatic activity of E2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 could protect disruption of plant cells by UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OgUBC1 confers disease resistance and UV-B tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. -- Abstract: A previously unidentified gene encoding ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme was isolated from leaves of wild rice plant treated with wounding and microbe-associated molecular patterns. The OgUBC1 gene was composed of 148 amino acids and contained a typical active site and 21 ubiquitin thioester intermediate interaction residues and 4 E3 interaction residues. Both exogenous application of salicylic acid and UV-B irradiation triggered expression of OgUBC1 in leaves of wild rice. Recombinant OgUBC1 proteins bound to ubiquitins in vitro, proposing that the protein might act as E2 enzyme in planta. Heterologous expression of the OgUBC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana protected plants from cellular damage caused by an excess of UV-B radiation. A stable expression of chalcone synthase gene was detected in leaves of OgUBC1-expressing Arabidopsis, resulting in producing higher amounts of anthocyanin than those in wild-type Col-0 plants. Additionally, both pathogenesis-related gene1 and 5 were transcribed in the transgenic Arabidopsis in the absence of pathogen infection. The OgUBC1-expressing plants were resistant to the infection of Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, we suggested that the OgUBC1 is involved in ubiquitination process important for cellular response against biotic and abiotic stresses in plants.

  13. Gene expression of ascorbic acid biosynthesis related enzymes of the Smirnoff-Wheeler pathway in acerola (Malpighia glabra).

    PubMed

    Badejo, Adebanjo A; Fujikawa, Yukichi; Esaka, Muneharu

    2009-04-01

    The Smirnoff-Wheeler (SW) pathway has been proven to be the only significant source of l-ascorbic acid (AsA; vitamin C) in the seedlings of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. It is yet uncertain whether the same pathway holds for all other plants and their various organs as AsA may also be synthesized through alternative pathways. In this study, we have cloned some of the genes involved in the SW-pathway from acerola (Malpighia glabra), a plant containing enormous amount of AsA, and examined the expression patterns of these genes in the plant. The AsA contents of acerola leaves were about 8-fold more than that of Arabidopsis with 5-700-fold higher mRNA abundance in AsA-biosynthesizing genes. The unripe fruits have the highest AsA content but the accumulation was substantially repressed as the fruit transitions to maturation. The mRNAs encoding these genes showed correlation in their expression with the AsA contents of the fruits. Although very little AsA was recorded in the seeds the mRNAs encoding all the genes, with the exception of the mitochondrially located L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase, were clearly detected in the seeds of the unripe fruits. In young leaves of acerola, the expression of most genes were repressed by the dark and induced by light. However, the expression of GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase similar to that encoded by A. thaliana VTC1 was induced in the dark. The expressions of all the genes surged after 24h following wounding stress on the young leaves. These findings will advance the investigation into the molecular factors regulating the biosynthesis of abundant AsA in acerola. PMID:18952318

  14. Germacrene A synthase in yarrow (Achillea millefolium) is an enzyme with mixed substrate specificity: gene cloning, functional characterization and expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pazouki, Leila; Memari, Hamid R.; Kännaste, Astrid; Bichele, Rudolf; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid synthases constitute a highly diverse gene family producing a wide range of cyclic and acyclic molecules consisting of isoprene (C5) residues. Often a single terpene synthase produces a spectrum of molecules of given chain length, but some terpene synthases can use multiple substrates, producing products of different chain length. Only a few such enzymes has been characterized, but the capacity for multiple-substrate use can be more widespread than previously thought. Here we focused on germacrene A synthase (GAS) that is a key cytosolic enzyme in the sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis pathway in the important medicinal plant Achillea millefolium (AmGAS). The full length encoding gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), functionally characterized, and its in vivo expression was analyzed. The recombinant protein catalyzed formation of germacrene A with the C15 substrate farnesyl diphosphate (FDP), while acyclic monoterpenes were formed with the C10 substrate geranyl diphosphate (GDP) and cyclic monoterpenes with the C10 substrate neryl diphosphate (NDP). Although monoterpene synthesis has been assumed to be confined exclusively to plastids, AmGAS can potentially synthesize monoterpenes in cytosol when GDP or NDP become available. AmGAS enzyme had high homology with GAS sequences from other Asteraceae species, suggesting that multi-substrate use can be more widespread among germacrene A synthases than previously thought. Expression studies indicated that AmGAS was expressed in both autotrophic and heterotrophic plant compartments with the highest expression levels in leaves and flowers. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the cloning and characterization of germacrene A synthase coding gene in A. millefolium, and multi-substrate use of GAS enzymes. PMID:25784918

  15. Increased tolerance to oxidative stress in transgenic tobacco expressing a wheat oxalate oxidase gene via induction of antioxidant enzymes is mediated by H2O2.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoqing; Tan, Jiali; Lu, Shaoyun; Lin, Chuyu; Hu, Yihong; Guo, Zhenfei

    2009-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) plays a key role in the regulation of plant responses to various environmental stresses and modulates the expression of related genes including those encoding antioxidant enzymes. A wheat oxalate oxidase (OxO) gene was transformed and expressed in tobacco for production of H(2)O(2). The transgenic plants exhibited enhanced OxO activities and H(2)O(2) concentrations, which was blocked by inhibitors of OxO. The transgenic plants showed increased tolerance to methyl viologen (MV) or high light-induced oxidative stress in both short-time and long-time tests by measuring their maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)), ion leakage and malondialdehyde. Higher activities and transcripts of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase) were observed in the transgenic plants compared to their wild-type controls under normal growth conditions. Pretreatments with inhibitors of OxO and scavenger of H(2)O(2) blocked the increase of tolerance to MV-induced or high light-induced oxidative stress, as well as the induction of antioxidant enzyme activities. Pretreatments with H(2)O(2) increased tolerance to oxidative stresses and antioxidant enzyme activities. It is suggested that H(2)O(2) produced by OxO in the transgenic tobacco plants triggers the signaling pathways to upregulate expressions of antioxidant enzyme genes, which in turn results in the increase of tolerance to MV-induced and high light-induced oxidative stresses. PMID:19508366

  16. Cloning and expression of lipoxygenase genes and enzyme activity in ripening persimmon fruit in response to GA and ABA treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two genes of the lipoxygenase (LOX) family, DkLox1 and DkLox3 (GenBank accession No. JF436951 and JF436950), were cloned from persimmon fruit (Diospyros kaki L. ‘Fuping Jianshi’). Sequence analysis indicated that they belong to the 9-LOX sub-group. Heterologous expression of DkLox1 in E. coli produc...

  17. cDNA cloning of a novel gene codifying for the enzyme lycopene β-cyclase from Ficus carica and its expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Araya-Garay, José Miguel; Feijoo-Siota, Lucía; Veiga-Crespo, Patricia; Villa, Tomás González

    2011-11-01

    Lycopene beta-cyclase (β-LCY) is the key enzyme that modifies the linear lycopene molecule into cyclic β-carotene, an indispensable carotenoid of the photosynthetic apparatus and an important source of vitamin A in human and animal nutrition. Owing to its antioxidant activity, it is commercially used in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries, as well as an additive in foodstuffs. Therefore, β-carotene has a large share of the carotenoidic market. In this study, we used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR to obtain and clone a cDNA copy of the gene Lyc-β from Ficus carica (Lyc-β Fc), which codes for the enzyme lycopene β-cyclase (β-LCY). Expression of this gene in Escherichia coli produced a single polypeptide of 56 kDa of weight, containing 496 amino acids, that was able to cycle both ends of the lycopene chain. Amino acid analysis revealed that the protein contained several conserved plant cyclase motifs. β-LCY activity was revealed by heterologous complementation analysis, with lycopene being converted to β-carotene as a result of the enzyme's action. The β-LCY activity of the expressed protein was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) identification of the β-carotene. The lycopene to β-carotene conversion rate was 90%. The experiments carried out in this work showed that β-LYC is the enzyme responsible for converting lycopene, an acyclic carotene, to β-carotene, a bicyclic carotene in F. carica. Therefore, by cloning and expressing β-LCY in E. coli, we have obtained a new gene for β-carotene production or as part of the biosynthetic pathway of astaxanthin. So far, this is the first and only gene of the carotenoid pathway identified in F. carica. PMID:21792589

  18. Identification of ten mevalonate enzyme-encoding genes and their expression in response to juvenile hormone levels in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say).

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Meng, Qing-Wei; Lü, Feng-Gong; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2016-06-15

    The mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of many essential molecules important in insect development, reproduction, chemical communication and defense. Based on Leptinotarsa decemlineata transcriptome and genome data, we identified ten genes that encoded acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (LdAACT1 and LdAACT2), hydroxymethylglutaryl (HMA)-CoA synthase (LdHMGS), HMG-CoA reductase (LdHMGR1 and LdHMGR2), mevalonate kinase (LdMevK), phospho-mevalonate kinase (LdPMK), mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (LdMDD), isopentenyl-diphosphate isomerase (LdIDI) and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase (LdFPPS). Nine of these genes (except for LdAACT1) were mainly expressed in the larval brain-corpora cardiaca-corpora allata complex, and adult ovary and testis. The 9 genes were transcribed at high levels right after each ecdysis, and at low levels in the mid instar. Therefore, the 9 genes were indicated to be involved in JH biosynthesis. Moreover, knockdown of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT to lower JH titer significantly downregulated the transcription of the 9 genes. Ingestion of JH to activate JH signaling also significantly suppressed the expression of the 9 genes. It appears that the accumulation of JH precursors in LdJHAMT RNAi larvae and a high JH titer in JH-fed specimens may cause negative feedbacks to repress the expression of the 9 mevalonate enzyme-encoding genes (excluding LdAACT1) to balance the enzyme quantity in L. decemlineata. PMID:26899871

  19. Expression of androgen-producing enzyme genes and testosterone concentration in Angus and Nellore heifers with high and low ovarian follicle count.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Bárbara; Ereno, Ronaldo L; Favoreto, Mauricio G; Barros, Ciro M

    2016-07-15

    Follicle population is important when animals are used in assisted reproductive programs. Bos indicus animals have more follicles per follicular wave than Bos taurus animals. On the other hand, B taurus animals present better fertility when compared with B indicus animals. Androgens are positively related with the number of antral follicles; moreover, they increase growth factor expression in granulose cells and oocytes. Experimentation was designed to compare testosterone concentration in plasma, and follicular fluid and androgen enzymes mRNA expression (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3BHSD, and 17BHSD) in follicles from Angus and Nellore heifers. Heifers were assigned into two groups according to the number of follicles: low and high follicle count groups. Increased testosterone concentration was measured in both plasma and follicular fluid of Angus heifers. However, there was no difference within groups. Expression of CYP11A1 gene was higher in follicles from Angus heifers; however, there was no difference within groups. Expression of CYP17A1, 3BHSD, and 17BHSD genes was higher in follicles from Nellore heifers, and expression of CYP17A1 and 3BHSD genes was also higher in HFC groups from both breeds. It was found that Nellore heifers have more antral follicles than Angus heifers. Testosterone concentration was higher in Angus heifers; this increase could be associated with the increased mRNA expression of CYP11A1. Increased expression of androgen-producing enzyme genes (CYP17A1, 3BHSD, and 17BHSD) was detected in Nellore heifers. It can be suggested that testosterone is acting through different mechanisms to increase follicle development in Nellore and improve fertility in Angus heifers. PMID:26948295

  20. Mechanical Loading of Cartilage Explants with Compression and Sliding Motion Modulates Gene Expression of Lubricin and Catabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Marková, Michala; Torzilli, Peter A.; Gallo, Luigi M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Translation of the contact zone in articulating joints is an important component of joint kinematics, yet rarely investigated in a biological context. This study was designed to investigate how sliding contact areas affect cartilage mechanobiology. We hypothesized that higher sliding speeds would lead to increased extracellular matrix mechanical stress and the expression of catabolic genes. Design A cylindrical Teflon indenter was used to apply 50 or 100 N normal forces at 10, 40, or 70 mm/s sliding speed. Mechanical parameters were correlated with gene expressions using a multiple linear regression model. Results In both loading groups there was no significant effect of sliding speed on any of the mechanical parameters (strain, stress, modulus, tangential force). However, an increase in vertical force (from 50 to 100 N) led to a significant increase in extracellular matrix strain and stress. For 100 N, significant correlations between gene expression and mechanical parameters were found for TIMP-3 (r2 = 0.89), ADAMTS-5 (r2 = 0.73), and lubricin (r2 = 0.73). Conclusions The sliding speeds applied do not have an effect on the mechanical response of the cartilage, this could be explained by a partial attainment of the “elastic limit” at and above a sliding speed of 10 mm/s. Nevertheless, we still found a relationship between sliding speed and gene expression when the tissue was loaded with 100 N normal force. Thus despite the absence of speed-dependent mechanical changes (strain, stress, modulus, tangential force), the sliding speed had an influence on gene expression. PMID:26175864

  1. Role of constitutive androstane receptor in Toll-like receptor-mediated regulation of gene expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pranav; Guo, Tao; Moore, David D; Ghose, Romi

    2014-01-01

    Impairment of drug disposition in the liver during inflammation has been attributed to downregulation of gene expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and drug transporters. Inflammatory responses in the liver are primarily mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We have recently shown that activation of TLR2 or TLR4 by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), respectively, leads to the downregulation of gene expression of DMEs/transporters. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this downregulation is not fully understood. The xenobiotic nuclear receptors, pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), regulate the expression of DMEs/transporter genes. Downregulation of DMEs/transporters by LTA or LPS was associated with reduced expression of PXR and CAR genes. To determine the role of CAR, we injected CAR(+/+) and CAR(-/-) mice with LTA or LPS, which significantly downregulated (~40%-60%) RNA levels of the DMEs, cytochrome P450 (Cyp)3a11, Cyp2a4, Cyp2b10, uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1a1, amine N-sulfotransferase, and the transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, in CAR(+/+) mice. Suppression of most of these genes was attenuated in LTA-treated CAR(-/-) mice. In contrast, LPS-mediated downregulation of these genes was not attenuated in CAR(-/-) mice. Induction of these genes by mouse CAR activator 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene was sustained in LTA- but not in LPS-treated mice. Similar observations were obtained in humanized CAR mice. We have replicated these results in primary hepatocytes as well. Thus, LPS can downregulate DME/transporter genes in the absence of CAR, whereas the effect of LTA on these genes is attenuated in the absence of CAR, indicating the potential involvement of CAR in LTA-mediated downregulation of DME/transporter genes. PMID:24194512

  2. D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase: Cloning and heterologous expression of the spinach gene, and purification and characterization of the recombinant enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.R.; Hartman, F.C.; Lu, T.Y.S.; Larimer, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The authors have achieved, to their knowledge, the first high-level heterologous expression of the gene encoding D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase from any source, thereby permitting isolation and characterization of the epimerase as found in photosynthetic organisms. The extremely labile recombinant spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) enzyme was stabilized by DL-{alpha}-glycerophosphate or ethanol and destabilized by D-ribulose-5-phosphate or 2-mercaptoethanol. Despite this lability, the unprecedentedly high specific activity of the purified material indicates that the structural integrity of the enzyme is maintained throughout isolation. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate and divalent metal cations did not affect epimerase activity, thereby excluding a requirement for the latter in catalysis. As deduced from the sequence of the cloned spinach gene and the electrophoretic mobility under denaturing conditions of the purified recombinant enzyme, its 25-kD subunit size was about the same as that of the corresponding epimerases of yeast and mammals. However, in contrast to these other species, the recombinant spinach enzyme was octameric rather than dimeric, as assessed by gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions. Western-blot analyses with antibodies to the purified recombinant enzyme confirmed that the epimerase extracted from spinach leaves is also octameric.

  3. Molecular expression of l-asparaginase gene from Nocardiopsis alba NIOT-VKMA08 in Escherichia coli: A prospective recombinant enzyme for leukaemia chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meena, Balakrishnan; Anburajan, Lawrance; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Shridhar, Divya; Raghavan, Rangamaran Vijaya; Dharani, Gopal; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2016-09-30

    l-Asparaginase is an antineoplastic agent that selectively reduces the level of l-asparagine in blood and diminishes the proliferation of cancerous cells. Studies were carried out on the cloning and heterologous expression of l-asparaginase biosynthesis gene (ansA) from Nocardiopsis alba NIOT-VKMA08 to achieve the stable inducible system that overproduces the glutaminase-free recombinant l-asparaginase. Overexpression of recombinant l-asparaginase was achieved with an optimized final concentration of 1.5mM of isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the enzyme was expressed as a soluble protein. The recombinant enzyme was purified using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) chromatography and the purified enzyme disclosed an elevated level of asparaginase activity (158.1IU/mL). Optimum pH and temperature of the purified l-asparaginase for the hydrolysis of l-asparagine were 8.0 and 37°C and it was very specific for its natural substrate, l-asparagine. Detailed studies were carried out on the kinetics of enzyme reaction, catalytic activity, temperature and ionic strength and the thermostability of the l-asparaginase enzyme. The functional characterisation of the recombinant l-asparaginase was studied through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), in silico sequence analysis and protein structural modelling. Glutaminase activity was not detected in the recombinant l-asparaginase, which could reduce the probable side effects during leukaemia therapy. PMID:27155523

  4. Wounding induces changes in tuber polyamine content, polyamine metabolic gene expression, and enzyme activity during closing layer formation and initiation of wound periderm formation.

    PubMed

    Lulai, Edward C; Neubauer, Jonathan D; Olson, Linda L; Suttle, Jeffrey C

    2015-03-15

    Tuber wound-healing processes are complex, and the associated regulation and modulation of these processes are poorly understood. Polyamines (PA) are involved in modulating a variety of responses to biotic and abiotic plant stresses and have been suggested to be involved in tuber wound responses. However, the time course of wound-induced changes in tuber PA content, activity of key biosynthetic enzymes and associated gene expression has not been determined and coordinated with major wound-healing processes. The objective of this study was to determine these wound-induced changes and their coordination with wound-healing processes. Wounding induced increases in putrescine (Put) and spermidine (Spd), but had only minor effects on spermine (Spm) content during the 168 h time course which encompassed the initiation and completion of the closing layer formation, and the initiation of cell division and wound periderm formation. As determinants of the first committed step in PA biosynthesis, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase (ADC and ODC, respectively) activities were below levels of detectability in resting tubers and expression of genes encoding these two enzymes was low. Within 6h of wounding, increases in the in vitro activities of ADC and ODC and expression of their cognate genes were observed. Expression of a gene encoding S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, required for Spd and Spm biosynthesis, was also increased 6h after wounding and remained elevated throughout the time course. Expression of a polyamine catabolic gene, encoding polyamine oxidase, was down-regulated after wounding. Results indicated a rapid wound-induced increase in PA biosynthesis during closing layer formation and the time of nuclei entry and exit from S-phase. PA content remained elevated as wound-induced cells became meristematic and initiated formation of the wound periderm suggesting sustained involvement in wound-healing. PMID:25577734

  5. Significance of Polymorphisms and Expression of Enzyme-Encoding Genes Related to Glutathione in Hematopoietic Cancers and Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zmorzyński, Szymon; Świderska-Kołacz, Grażyna; Koczkodaj, Dorota; Filip, Agata Anna

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant compounds such as glutathione and its enzymes have become the focus of attention of medical sciences. Glutathione, a specific tripeptide, is involved in many intercellular processes. The glutathione concentration is determined by the number of GAG repeats in gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase. GAG polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia, berylliosis, diabetes, lung cancer, and nasopharyngeal tumors. Cancer cells with high glutathione concentration are resistant to chemotherapy treatment. The oxidized form of glutathione is formed by glutathione peroxidases (GPXs). The changes in activity of GPX1, GPX2, and GPX3 isoforms may be associated with the development of cancers, for example, prostate cancer or even colon cancer. Detoxification of glutathione conjugates is possible due to activity of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Polymorphisms in GSTM1, GSTP1, and GSTO1 enzymes increase the risk of developing breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidases (GGTs) are responsible for glutathione degradation. Increased activity of GGT correlates with adverse prognosis in patients with breast cancer. Studies on genes encoding glutathione enzymes are continued in order to determine the correlation between DNA polymorphisms in cancer patients. PMID:26682223

  6. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D increases the gene expression of enzymes protecting from glucolipotoxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and human primary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kuricova, Katarina; Pleskacova, Anna; Pacal, Lukas; Kankova, Katerina

    2016-06-15

    Besides its classical function as an orchestrator of calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, vitamin D also affects insulin secretion and tissue efficiency. A number of studies have consistently reported the inverse relationship between vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes. Activation of certain metabolic pathways and down-stream transcription factors may protect from glucolipotoxicity and their targeted activation -e.g. by vitamin D - might explain the detrimental role of vitamin D deficiency in diabetes. The aim of the study was to quantify gene and protein expression of selected enzymes involved in the protection from glucolipotoxicity, specifically glyoxalase 1 (GLO1), and other enzymes with antioxidant activity - hemoxygenase (HMOX), thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPK1) and transketolase (TKT), under normo- and hyperglycemic conditions and upon addition of vitamin D in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The results of our study indicate that the active form of vitamin D regulates gene expression of enzymes opposing the harmful effect of glucolipotoxicity whose activities appear to be suppressed by hyperglycemia. However, we were unable to confirm this effect on protein expression. While we cannot speculate on the effect of vitamin D on diabetes itself our results support its role in the protection against existing glucolipotoxicity therefore possibly translating into the prevention of development of diabetic complications. PMID:26952188

  7. Cloning and functional expression in Escherichia coli of a cyanobacterial gene for lycopene cyclase, the enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of beta-carotene.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, F X; Chamovitz, D; Misawa, N; Gantt, E; Hirschberg, J

    1993-08-01

    Carotenoids with cyclic end groups are essential components of the photosynthetic membrane in all known oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. These yellow pigments serve the vital role of protecting against potentially lethal photo-oxidative damage. Many of the enzymes and genes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in cyanobacteria, algae and plants remain to be isolated or identified. We have cloned a cyanobacterial gene encoding lycopene cyclase, an enzyme that converts the acyclic carotenoid lycopene to the bicyclic molecule beta-carotene. The gene was identified through the use of an experimental herbicide, 2-(4-methylphenoxy)triethylamine hydrochloride (MPTA), that prevents the cyclization of lycopene in plants and cyanobacteria. Chemically-induced mutants of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 were selected for resistance to MPTA, and a mutation responsible for this resistance was mapped to a genomic DNA region of 200 bp by genetic complementation of the resistance in wild-type cells. A 1.5 kb genomic DNA fragment containing this MPTA-resistance mutation was expressed in a lycopene-accumulating strain of Escherichia coli. The conversion of lycopene to beta-carotene in these cells demonstrated that this fragment encodes the enzyme lycopene cyclase. The results indicate that a single gene product, designated lcy, catalyzes both of the cyclization reactions that are required to produce beta-carotene from lycopene, and prove that this enzyme is a target site of the herbicide MPTA. The cloned cyanobacterial lcy gene hybridized well with genomic DNA from eukaryotic algae, thus it will enable the identification and cloning of homologous genes for lycopene cyclase in algae and plants. PMID:8344419

  8. Cloning and Expression of Phytase appA Gene from Shigella sp. CD2 in Pichia pastoris and Comparison of Properties with Recombinant Enzyme Expressed in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Pal Roy, Moushree; Mazumdar, Deepika; Dutta, Subhabrata; Saha, Shyama Prasad; Ghosh, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    The phytase gene appAS was isolated from Shigella sp. CD2 genomic library. The 3.8 kb DNA fragment contained 1299 bp open reading frame encoding 432 amino acid protein (AppAS) with 22 amino acid signal peptide at N-terminal and three sites of N-glycosylation. AppAS contained the active site RHGXRXP and HDTN sequence motifs, which are conserved among histidine acid phosphatases. It showed maximum identity with phytase AppA of Escherichia coli and Citrobacter braakii. The appAS was expressed in Pichia pastoris and E. coli to produce recombinant phytase rAppAP and rAppAE, respectively. Purified glycosylated rAppAP and nonglycosylated rAppAE had specific activity of 967 and 2982 U mg-1, respectively. Both had pH optima of 5.5 and temperature optima of 60°C. Compared with rAppAE, rAppAP was 13 and 17% less active at pH 3.5 and 7.5 and 11 and 18% less active at temperature 37 and 50°C, respectively; however, it was more active at higher incubation temperatures. Thermotolerance of rAppAP was 33% greater at 60°C and 24% greater at 70°C, when compared with rAppAE. Both the recombinant enzymes showed high specificity to phytate and resistance to trypsin. To our knowledge, this is the first report on cloning and expression of phytase from Shigella sp. PMID:26808559

  9. Cloning and Expression of Phytase appA Gene from Shigella sp. CD2 in Pichia pastoris and Comparison of Properties with Recombinant Enzyme Expressed in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Pal Roy, Moushree; Mazumdar, Deepika; Dutta, Subhabrata; Saha, Shyama Prasad; Ghosh, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    The phytase gene appAS was isolated from Shigella sp. CD2 genomic library. The 3.8 kb DNA fragment contained 1299 bp open reading frame encoding 432 amino acid protein (AppAS) with 22 amino acid signal peptide at N-terminal and three sites of N-glycosylation. AppAS contained the active site RHGXRXP and HDTN sequence motifs, which are conserved among histidine acid phosphatases. It showed maximum identity with phytase AppA of Escherichia coli and Citrobacter braakii. The appAS was expressed in Pichia pastoris and E. coli to produce recombinant phytase rAppAP and rAppAE, respectively. Purified glycosylated rAppAP and nonglycosylated rAppAE had specific activity of 967 and 2982 U mg(-1), respectively. Both had pH optima of 5.5 and temperature optima of 60°C. Compared with rAppAE, rAppAP was 13 and 17% less active at pH 3.5 and 7.5 and 11 and 18% less active at temperature 37 and 50°C, respectively; however, it was more active at higher incubation temperatures. Thermotolerance of rAppAP was 33% greater at 60°C and 24% greater at 70°C, when compared with rAppAE. Both the recombinant enzymes showed high specificity to phytate and resistance to trypsin. To our knowledge, this is the first report on cloning and expression of phytase from Shigella sp. PMID:26808559

  10. Expression analysis of ROS producing and scavenging enzyme-encoding genes in rubber tree infected by Pseudocercospora ulei.

    PubMed

    Koop, Daniela Martins; Rio, Maryannick; Sabau, Xavier; Almeida Cardoso, Saulo Emilio; Cazevieille, Chantal; Leclercq, Julie; Garcia, Dominique

    2016-07-01

    South American Leaf Blight (SALB), caused by the ascomycete Pseudocercospora ulei, is responsible for the low productivity of rubber trees in Latin America and is a serious threat to rubber plantations in Asia and Africa, where the rubber trees are derived from highly susceptible clones. Three contrasted genotypes were chosen for their levels of resistance to the pathogen: FX2784 (totally resistant), MDF180 (partially resistant) and PB314 (susceptible). Array analyses were previously performed to identify genes differentially expressed in resistant and susceptible genotypes. Twenty-one genes were selected for further gene expression analysis in non-inoculated and inoculated genotypes from 24 to 216 h post infection (hpi). These genes are involved in ROS production (HbRBOHA, HbRBOHB, HbRBOHC, HbRBOHD), ROS-scavenging systems (cytoplasmic and chloroplastic HbCuZnSOD, HbMnSOD, HbCAT, HbAPX1, HbAPX2, HbMDHAR, HbGCL1, HbGCL2, HbOASTL, HbGPX, HbDHAR), and leaf senescence (HbCASP, HbPCYST, HbWRKY2, HbPLY, HbKAT2). First, a genotype-dependent level of expression was observed. The genes HbRBOHA, HbCuZnSOD cyto, HbCAT, HbGCL and HbWRKY2 were constitutively expressed at lower levels in the MDF180 genotype than in the FX2784 and PB314 genotypes. Conversely, the levels of expression of HbDHAR, HbGPX and HbPCYST were higher in the older, non-inoculated leaves of MDF180. Lower production of ROS and efficient regeneration of reduced ascorbate ensure a balanced redox intracellular state in this genotype. Second, inoculation of the leaves induced few modifications in the expression level of the studied genes. In the MDF180 partially resistant genotype, an increase in the expression level of HbRBOHB, HbRBOHD 48 hpi and a decrease in the expression level of HbDHAR 216 hpi were observed. In the FX2784 totally resistant genotype, an increase in the expression level of HbRBOHD and HbCuZnSOD cyto and a decrease in HbCAT were observed 48 hpi. This transitory variation could be associated

  11. Expression and distribution of genes encoding for polyamine-metabolizing enzymes in the different zones of male and female mouse kidneys.

    PubMed

    Levillain, Olivier; Ramos-Molina, Bruno; Forcheron, Fabien; Peñafiel, Rafael

    2012-11-01

    The role of polyamines in renal physiology is only partially understood. Moreover, most of the data on the enzymes of polyamine metabolism come from studies using whole kidneys. The aim of the present study was to analyze the mRNA abundance of the genes implicated in both the polyamine biosynthetic and catabolic pathways in different renal zones of male and female mice, by means of the quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our results indicate that there is an uneven distribution of the different mRNAs studied in the five renal zones: superficial cortex, deep cortex, outer stripe of the outer medulla (OS), inner stripe of the outer medulla (IS), and the inner medulla + papilla (IM). The biosynthetic genes, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and spermine synthase, were more expressed in the cortex, whereas the mRNAs of the catabolic genes spermine oxidase (SMO) and diamine oxidase were more abundant in IS and IM. The genes involved in the regulation of polyamine synthesis (AZ1, AZ2 and AZIN1) were expressed in all the renal zones, predominantly in the cortex, while AZIN2 gene was more abundant in the OS. ODC, SMO, spermidine synthase and spermidine/spermine acetyl transferase expression was higher in males than in females. In conclusion, the genes encoding for the polyamine metabolism were specifically and quantitatively distributed along the corticopapillary axis of male and female mouse kidneys, suggesting that their physiological role is essential in defined renal zones and/or nephron segments. PMID:22562773

  12. Colored light-quality selective plastic films affect anthocyanin content, enzyme activities, and the expression of flavonoid genes in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruit.

    PubMed

    Miao, Lixiang; Zhang, Yuchao; Yang, Xiaofang; Xiao, Jinping; Zhang, Huiqin; Zhang, Zuofa; Wang, Yuezhi; Jiang, Guihua

    2016-09-15

    The influence of colored light-quality selective plastic films (red, yellow, green, blue, and white) on the content of anthocyanin, the activities of the related enzymes and the transcripts of the flavonoid gene was studied in developing strawberry fruit. The results indicated that colored films had highly significant effects on the total anthocyanin content (TAC) and proportions of individual anthocyanins. Compared with the white control film, the red and yellow films led to the significant increase of TAC, while the green and blue films caused a decrease of TAC. Colored film treatments also significantly affected the related enzyme activity and the expression of structural genes and transcription factor genes, which suggested that the enhancement of TAC by the red and yellow films might have resulted from the activation of related enzymes and transcription factor genes in the flavonoid pathway. Treatment with red and yellow light-quality selective plastic films might be useful as a supplemental cultivation practice for enhancing the anthocyanin content in developing strawberry fruit. PMID:27080884

  13. Sequence analysis and heterologous expression of the wool cuticle-degrading enzyme encoding genes in Fusarium oxysporum 26-1.

    PubMed

    Chaya, Etsushi; Suzuki, Tohru; Karita, Shuichi; Hanya, Akira; Yoshino-Yasuda, Shoko; Kitamoto, Noriyuki

    2014-06-01

    Two protease-like proteins, KrtA and KrtC, were identified in Fusarium oxysporum 26-1. Genes coding these proteins, krtA and krtC, were isolated and characterized. Recombinant KrtA (rKrtA) and KrtC (rKrtC) were successfully expressed in Aspergillus oryzae and secreted. The combination of rKrtA and rKrtC completely removed the cuticle of wool fibers. PMID:24360406

  14. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of the D-aspartate oxidase gene from the yeast Cryptococcus humicola and characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shouji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Kera, Yoshio; Matsunaga, Ryuji; Shibuya, Hiroo; Yamada, Ryo-hei

    2004-04-01

    The D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) from the yeast Cryptococcus humicola UJ1 (ChDDO) is highly specific to D-aspartate. The gene encoding ChDDO was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequence analysis of the ChDDO gene showed that an open reading frame of 1,110 bp interrupted by two introns encodes a protein of 370 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed an FAD-binding motif and a peroxisomal targeting signal 1 in the N-terminal region and at the C-terminus, respectively, and also the presence of certain catalytically important amino acid residues corresponding to those catalytically important in D-amino acid oxidase (DAO). The sequence exhibited only a moderate identity to human (27.4%) and bovine (28.0%) DDOs, and a rather higher identity to yeast and fungal DAOs (30.4-33.2%). Similarly, phylogenetic analysis showed that ChDDO is more closely related to yeast and fungal DAOs than to mammalian DDOs. The gene expression was regulated at the transcriptional level and specifically induced by the presence of D-aspartate as the sole nitrogen source. ChDDO was expressed in an active form in E. coli to an approximately 5-fold greater extent than in yeast. The purified recombinant enzyme was identical to the native enzyme in physicochemical and catalytic properties. PMID:15115779

  15. Oral administration recombinant porcine epidermal growth factor enhances the jejunal digestive enzyme genes expression and activity of early-weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Lee, D N; Chuang, Y S; Chiou, H Y; Wu, F Y; Yen, H T; Weng, C F

    2008-08-01

    This study attempted to determine ingested porcine epidermal growth factor (pEGF) on the gastrointestinal tract development of early-weaned piglets. Thirty-two piglets (14-day weaned) were randomly allotted to supplemented with 0 (control), 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 mg pEGF/kg diet. Each treatment consisted of four replicates with two pigs per pen for a 14 days experimental period. Piglets were sacrificed and gastrointestinal tract samples were collected to measure mucosa morphology, mRNA expression and activities of digestive enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract of piglets at the end of the experiment. Diets supplemented with pEGF failed to influence growth performance but tended to increase jejunal mucosa weight (p < 0.09) and protein content (p < 0.07). Piglets supplemental pEGF induced incrementally the gastric pepsin activity (p < 0.05) and stimulated jejunal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactase activities accompanied with the increase of jejunal ALP and maltase mRNA expression. No effect of pEGF on the activities of all enzymes in ileum except the stimulation of ileal aminopeptide N mRNA expression. These results reveal that dietary pEGF supplementation might enhance gene expression and activities of digestive enzymes in the stomach and jejunum of piglets. PMID:18662356

  16. Rat peptide methionine sulphoxide reductase: cloning of the cDNA, and down-regulation of gene expression and enzyme activity during aging.

    PubMed Central

    Petropoulos, I; Mary, J; Perichon, M; Friguet, B

    2001-01-01

    Peptide methionine sulphoxide reductase (PMSR, EC 1.8.4.6), the msrA or pmsR gene product, is a ubiquitous enzyme catalysing the reduction of methionine sulphoxide to methionine in proteins. Decreased expression and/or activity of the PMSR with age could explain, at least in part, the accumulation of oxidized protein observed upon aging. To test this hypothesis, the rat pmsR cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The recombinant protein was expressed, its catalytic activity checked with a synthetic substrate and polyclonal antibodies were raised against recombinant PMSR. The expression of the pmsR gene and protein as well as its catalytic activity were then analysed as a function of age in the rat brain and in two organs that express the most PMSR, liver and kidney. It appears that pmsR gene expression decreases with age in liver and kidney as early as 18 months, whereas protein level and protein activity are reduced in the three organs at the very end of the life of the rat (26 months). These results suggest that the down-regulation of PMSR can contribute to the accumulation of oxidized protein that has been associated with the aging process. PMID:11311146

  17. Effects of different dwarfing interstocks on key enzyme activities and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism in Red Fuji apples.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Li, F F; Ma, H; Li, Z Y; Xu, J Z

    2015-01-01

    In this experiment, the test materials were 'Red Fuji' apple trees grafted onto three interstocks (No. 53, No. 111, and No. 236), which were chosen from SH40 seeding interstocks. The content of malic acid, the enzyme activities, and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism were determined during fruit development.The results showed that malic acid content in the ripe fruit on interstock No. 53 was higher than that in the interstock No. 111 fruit. The malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH) activity in apples on interstock No. 53 was highest on Day 30, Day 100, and Day 160 after bloom, and the malic enzyme (NADP-ME) activity in apples on interstock No. 111 was higher than in the interstock No. 53 fruit from Day 70 to Day 100 after bloom. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in interstock No. 53 fruit was higher than in No. 236 fruit on Day 100 after bloom, but the relative expression of NADP-ME in No. 236 interstock fruit was lower than in No. 53 fruit. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in No. 53 interstock fruit was highest on Day 160 after bloom. This might have been the main reason for the difference in the accumulation of malic acid in the ripe apples.There was a positive correlation between the relative expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the malic acid content of the fruit, and the content of malic acid in the apples was affected by the PEPC activity during the early developmental stage. PMID:26782412

  18. Impact of the Interaction between 3′-UTR SNPs and microRNA on the Expression of Human Xenobiotic Metabolism Enzyme and Transporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Rongrong; Yang, Fan; Urban, Thomas J.; Li, Lang; Chalasani, Naga; Flockhart, David A.; Liu, Wanqing

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variation in the expression of human xenobiotic metabolism enzymes and transporters (XMETs) leads to inter-individual variability in metabolism of therapeutic agents as well as differed susceptibility to various diseases. Recent expression quantitative traits loci (eQTL) mapping in a few human cells/tissues have identified a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with mRNA expression of many XMET genes. These eQTLs are therefore important candidate markers for pharmacogenetic studies. However, questions remain about whether these SNPs are causative and in what mechanism these SNPs may function. Given the important role of microRNAs (miRs) in gene transcription regulation, we hypothesize that those eQTLs or their proxies in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) altering miR targeting are likely causative SNPs affecting gene expression. The aim of this study is to identify eQTLs potentially regulating major XMETs via interference with miR targeting. To this end, we performed a genome-wide screening for eQTLs for 409 genes encoding major drug metabolism enzymes, transporters and transcription factors, in publically available eQTL datasets generated from the HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines and human liver and brain tissue. As a result, 308 eQTLs significantly (p < 10−5) associated with mRNA expression of 101 genes were identified. We further identified 7,869 SNPs in strong LD (r2 ≥ 0.8) with these eQTLs using the 1,000 Genome SNP data. Among these 8,177 SNPs, 27 are located in the 3′-UTR of 14 genes. Using two algorithms predicting miR-SNP interaction, we found that almost all these SNPs (26 out of 27) were predicted to create, abolish, or change the target site for miRs in both algorithms. Many of these miRs were also expressed in the same tissue that the eQTL were identified. Our study provides a strong rationale for continued investigation for the functions of these eQTLs in pharmacogenetic settings. PMID

  19. Intron-loss evolution of hatching enzyme genes in Teleostei

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hatching enzyme, belonging to the astacin metallo-protease family, digests egg envelope at embryo hatching. Orthologous genes of the enzyme are found in all vertebrate genomes. Recently, we found that exon-intron structures of the genes were conserved among tetrapods, while the genes of teleosts frequently lost their introns. Occurrence of such intron losses in teleostean hatching enzyme genes is an uncommon evolutionary event, as most eukaryotic genes are generally known to be interrupted by introns and the intron insertion sites are conserved from species to species. Here, we report on extensive studies of the exon-intron structures of teleostean hatching enzyme genes for insight into how and why introns were lost during evolution. Results We investigated the evolutionary pathway of intron-losses in hatching enzyme genes of 27 species of Teleostei. Hatching enzyme genes of basal teleosts are of only one type, which conserves the 9-exon-8-intron structure of an assumed ancestor. On the other hand, otocephalans and euteleosts possess two types of hatching enzyme genes, suggesting a gene duplication event in the common ancestor of otocephalans and euteleosts. The duplicated genes were classified into two clades, clades I and II, based on phylogenetic analysis. In otocephalans and euteleosts, clade I genes developed a phylogeny-specific structure, such as an 8-exon-7-intron, 5-exon-4-intron, 4-exon-3-intron or intron-less structure. In contrast to the clade I genes, the structures of clade II genes were relatively stable in their configuration, and were similar to that of the ancestral genes. Expression analyses revealed that hatching enzyme genes were high-expression genes, when compared to that of housekeeping genes. When expression levels were compared between clade I and II genes, clade I genes tends to be expressed more highly than clade II genes. Conclusions Hatching enzyme genes evolved to lose their introns, and the intron-loss events occurred at

  20. Citrate Accumulation-Related Gene Expression and/or Enzyme Activity Analysis Combined With Metabolomics Provide a Novel Insight for an Orange Mutant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling-Xia; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Ning, Dong-Yuan; Jing, Long-Fei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Yong-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    'Hong Anliu' (HAL, Citrus sinensis cv. Hong Anliu) is a bud mutant of 'Anliu' (AL), characterized by a comprehensive metabolite alteration, such as lower accumulation of citrate, high accumulation of lycopene and soluble sugars in fruit juice sacs. Due to carboxylic acid metabolism connects other metabolite biosynthesis and/or catabolism networks, we therefore focused analyzing citrate accumulation-related gene expression profiles and/or enzyme activities, along with metabolic fingerprinting between 'HAL' and 'AL'. Compared with 'AL', the transcript levels of citrate biosynthesis- and utilization-related genes and/or the activities of their respective enzymes such as citrate synthase, cytosol aconitase and ATP-citrate lyase were significantly higher in 'HAL'. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial aconitase activity, the gene transcript levels of proton pumps, including vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, vacuolar H(+)-PPase, and the juice sac-predominant p-type proton pump gene (CsPH8) were significantly lower in 'HAL'. These results implied that 'HAL' has higher abilities for citrate biosynthesis and utilization, but lower ability for the citrate uptake into vacuole compared with 'AL'. Combined with the metabolites-analyzing results, a model was then established and suggested that the reduction in proton pump activity is the key factor for the low citrate accumulation and the comprehensive metabolite alterations as well in 'HAL'. PMID:27385485

  1. Citrate Accumulation-Related Gene Expression and/or Enzyme Activity Analysis Combined With Metabolomics Provide a Novel Insight for an Orange Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ling-Xia; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Ning, Dong-Yuan; Jing, Long-Fei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Yong-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    ‘Hong Anliu’ (HAL, Citrus sinensis cv. Hong Anliu) is a bud mutant of ‘Anliu’ (AL), characterized by a comprehensive metabolite alteration, such as lower accumulation of citrate, high accumulation of lycopene and soluble sugars in fruit juice sacs. Due to carboxylic acid metabolism connects other metabolite biosynthesis and/or catabolism networks, we therefore focused analyzing citrate accumulation-related gene expression profiles and/or enzyme activities, along with metabolic fingerprinting between ‘HAL’ and ‘AL’. Compared with ‘AL’, the transcript levels of citrate biosynthesis- and utilization-related genes and/or the activities of their respective enzymes such as citrate synthase, cytosol aconitase and ATP-citrate lyase were significantly higher in ‘HAL’. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial aconitase activity, the gene transcript levels of proton pumps, including vacuolar H+-ATPase, vacuolar H+-PPase, and the juice sac-predominant p-type proton pump gene (CsPH8) were significantly lower in ‘HAL’. These results implied that ‘HAL’ has higher abilities for citrate biosynthesis and utilization, but lower ability for the citrate uptake into vacuole compared with ‘AL’. Combined with the metabolites-analyzing results, a model was then established and suggested that the reduction in proton pump activity is the key factor for the low citrate accumulation and the comprehensive metabolite alterations as well in ‘HAL’. PMID:27385485

  2. Effects of oolong tea on gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes in the mouse liver and in rat hepatoma H4IIE cells.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kensuke; Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Tababe, Hiroki; Ishigami, Yoko; Fukutomi, Ryuuta; Imai, Shinjiro; Isemura, Mamoru

    2011-09-01

    Tea has many beneficial effects. We have previously reported that green tea and a catechin-rich green tea beverage modulated the gene expression of the gluconeogenic enzymes glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in the normal murine liver. In the present study, we examined the effects of oral administration of oolong tea on the hepatic expression of gluconeogenesis-related genes in the mouse. The intake of oolong tea for 4 weeks reduced the hepatic expression of G6Pase and PEPCK together with that of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. When rat hepatoma H4IIE cells were incubated in the presence of oolong tea, the expression of these genes was repressed in accordance with the findings in vivo. The reduced protein expression of PEPCK and HNF4α was also demonstrated. We then fractionated oolong tea by sequential extraction with three organic solvents to give three fractions and the residual fraction (Fraction IV). In addition to organic fractions, Fraction IV, which was devoid of low-molecular-weight catechins such as (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), had effects similar to those of oolong tea on H4IIE cells. Fraction IV repressed the gene expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1, as insulin did. This activity was different from that of EGCG. The present findings suggest that drinking oolong tea may help to prevent diabetes and that oolong tea contains a component or components with insulin-like activity distinguishable from EGCG. Identification of such component(s) may open the way to developing a new drug for diabetes. PMID:21812644

  3. Increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal glands contributes to high circulating catecholamines in pigs with tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tomaszek, A; Kiczak, L; Bania, J; Paslawska, U; Zacharski, M; Janiszewski, A; Noszczyk-Nowak, A; Dziegiel, P; Kuropka, P; Ponikowski, P; Jankowska, E A

    2015-04-01

    High levels of circulating catecholamines have been established as fundamental pathophysiological elements of heart failure (HF). However, it is unclear whether the increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesis enzymes in the adrenal glands contributes to these hormone abnormalities in large animal HF models. We analyzed the mRNA levels of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in adrenal glands of 18 pigs with chronic systolic non-ischaemic HF (tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy due to right ventricle pacing) and 6 sham-operated controls. Pigs with severe HF demonstrated an increased expression of TH and DBH (but neither AAAD nor PNMT) as compared to animals with milder HF and controls (P<0.05 in all cases). The increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH was accompanied by a reduced left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) (P<0.001) and an elevated plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) (P<0.01), the other indices reflecting HF severity. There was a positive relationship between the increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH, and the high levels of circulating adrenaline and noradrenaline (all P<0.05). The association with noradrenaline remained significant also when adjusted for LVEF and plasma BNP, suggesting a significant contribution of adrenals to the circulating pool of catecholamines in subjects with systolic HF. PMID:25903953

  4. Comparative analysis of CsCu/ZnSOD defense role by molecular characterization: gene expression-enzyme activity-protein level.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Gnanam, Annie J; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2015-06-10

    Cu/ZnSOD (copper/zinc superoxide dismutase) primarily scavenges cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by converting ROS to hydrogen peroxide, which is then converted to water by the catalytic action of catalase, thus playing a pivotal role in the first line of defense mechanism against oxidative stress. In this study, we have reported a complete molecular characterization of cDNA sequence from striped murrel Channa striatus (Cs). Cellular location prediction reveals that CsCu/ZnSOD protein is cytosolic with an accuracy of 90%. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CsCu/ZnSOD belongs to SOD1 group and it shared a common clad with Asian seabass Lates calcarifer and then with other fishes. The highest CsCu/ZnSOD gene expression, SOD enzyme activity and total protein concentration were observed in the liver and its regulation was studied upon fungus (Aphanomyces invadans) and bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) challenges. Based on the results obtained from the above analysis, we concluded a correlation of gene expression-enzyme activity-protein concentration. Overall, the findings demonstrated that the CsCu/ZnSOD plays a critical role in the antioxidant system especially in the liver during oxidative stress caused by fungus and bacteria. PMID:25804520

  5. Starch biosynthetic genes and enzymes are expressed and active in the absence of starch accumulation in sugar beet tap-root

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Starch is the predominant storage compound in underground plant tissues like roots and tubers. An exception is sugar beet tap-root (Beta vulgaris ssp altissima) which exclusively stores sucrose. The underlying mechanism behind this divergent storage accumulation in sugar beet is currently not fully known. From the general presence of starch in roots and tubers it could be speculated that the lack in sugar beet tap-roots would originate from deficiency in pathways leading to starch. Therefore with emphasis on starch accumulation, we studied tap-roots of sugar beet using parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) as a comparator. Results Metabolic and structural analyses of sugar beet tap-root confirmed sucrose as the exclusive storage component. No starch granules could be detected in tap-roots of sugar beet or the wild ancestor sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima). Analyses of parsnip showed that the main storage component was starch but tap-root tissue was also found to contain significant levels of sugars. Surprisingly, activities of four main starch biosynthetic enzymes, phosphoglucomutase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase and starch branching enzyme, were similar in sugar beet and parsnip tap-roots. Transcriptional analysis confirmed expression of corresponding genes. Additionally, expression of genes involved in starch accumulation such as for plastidial hexose transportation and starch tuning functions could be determined in tap-roots of both plant species. Conclusion Considering underground storage organs, sugar beet tap-root upholds a unique property in exclusively storing sucrose. Lack of starch also in the ancestor sea beet indicates an evolved trait of biological importance. Our findings in this study show that gene expression and enzymatic activity of main starch biosynthetic functions are present in sugar beet tap-root during storage accumulation. In view of this, the complete lack of starch in sugar beet tap-roots is enigmatic. PMID

  6. De Novo Analysis of Wolfiporia cocos Transcriptome to Reveal the Differentially Expressed Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZymes) Genes During the Early Stage of Sclerotial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaopeng; Hu, Bingxiong; Wei, Wei; Xiong, Ying; Zhu, Wenjun; Peng, Fang; Yu, Yang; Zheng, Yonglian; Chen, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The sclerotium of Wolfiporia cocos has been used as an edible mushroom and/or a traditional herbal medicine for centuries. W. cocos sclerotial formation is dependent on parasitism of the wood of Pinus species. Currently, the sclerotial development mechanisms of W. cocos remain largely unknown and the lack of pine resources limit the commercial production. The CAZymes (carbohydrate-active enzymes) play important roles in degradation of the plant cell wall to provide carbohydrates for fungal growth, development, and reproduction. In this study, the transcript profiles from W. cocos mycelium and 2-months-old sclerotium, the early stage of sclerotial growth, were specially analyzed using de novo sequencing technology. A total of 142,428,180 high-quality reads of mycelium and 70,594,319 high-quality reads of 2-months-old sclerotium were obtained. Additionally, differentially expressed genes from the W. cocos mycelium and 2-months-old sclerotium stages were analyzed, resulting in identification of 69 CAZymes genes which were significantly up-regulated during the early stage of sclerotial growth compared to that of in mycelium stage, and more than half of them belonged to glycosyl hydrolases (GHs) family, indicating the importance of W. cocos GHs family for degrading the pine woods. And qRT-PCR was further used to confirm the expression pattern of these up-regulated CAZymes genes. Our results will provide comprehensive CAZymes genes expression information during W. cocos sclerotial growth at the transcriptional level and will lay a foundation for functional genes studies in this fungus. In addition, our study will also facilitate the efficient use of limited pine resources, which is significant for promoting steady development of Chinese W. cocos industry. PMID:26870032

  7. Sodium-pump gene-expression, protein abundance and enzyme activity in isolated nephron segments of the aging rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Pnina; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Popovtzer, Mordecai M

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with alteration in renal tubular functions, including sodium handling and concentrating ability. Na-K-ATPase plays a key role in driving tubular transport, and we hypothesized that decreased concentrating ability of the aging kidney is due in part to downregulation of Na-K-ATPase. In this study, we evaluated Na and K balance, aldosterone levels, and Na-K-ATPase gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in aging rat kidney. Na-K-ATPase activity (assayed microfluorometrically), mRNA (RT-PCR), and protein abundance (immunoblotting) were quantitated in the following isolated nephron segments: PCT, PST, MTAL, DCT, and CCD from 2, 8, 15, and 24 month-old-rats. In the course of aging, creatinine clearance decreased from 0.48 ± 0.02 mL/min/100 g BW to 0.28 ± 0.06 (P < 0.001) and aldosterone decreased from 23.6 ± 0.8 ng/dL to 13.2 ± 0.6 (P < 0.001). Serum Na+ and K+ increased by 4.0% and 22.5%, respectively. Na-K-ATPase activity, mRNA, and protein abundance of the α1 subunit displayed similar trends in all assayed segments; increasing in PCT and PST; decreasing in MTAL and DCT; increasing in CCD: in PCT they increased by 40%, 75%, and 250%, respectively; while in PST they increased by 80%, 50%, and 100%, respectively (P < 0.001). In MTAL they declined by 36%, 24%, and 34%, respectively, and in DCT by 38%, 59%, and 60%, respectively (P < 0.001). They were higher in CCD by 110%, 115%, and 246%, respectively (P < 0.001). Rats maintained Na/K balance; however with a steady state elevated serum K+. These results reveal quantitative changes in axial distribution of Na-K-ATPase at the level of gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in the nephrons of aging animals and may explain, in part, the pathophysiology of the senescent kidney. PMID:26056060

  8. Cloning and expression of the cDNA encoding human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the enzyme deficient in hereditary tyrosinemia: assignment of the gene to chromosome 15.

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, D; Labelle, Y; Bérubé, D; Arden, K; Cavenee, W; Gagné, R; Tanguay, R M

    1991-01-01

    Type 1 hereditary tyrosinemia (HT) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH; E.C.3.7.1.2). We have isolated human FAH cDNA clones by screening a liver cDNA expression library using specific antibodies and plaque hybridization with a rat FAH cDNA probe. A 1,477-bp cDNA was sequenced and shown to code for FAH by an in vitro transcription-translation assay and sequence homology with tryptic fragments of purified FAH. Transient expression of this FAH cDNA in transfected CV-1 mammalian cells resulted in the synthesis of an immunoreactive protein comigrating with purified human liver FAH on SDS-PAGE and having enzymatic activity as shown by the hydrolysis of the natural substrate fumarylacetoacetate. This indicates that the single polypeptide chain encoded by the FAH gene contains all the genetic information required for functional activity, suggesting that the dimer found in vivo is a homodimer. The human FAH cDNA was used as a probe to determine the gene's chromosomal localization using somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization. The human FAH gene maps to the long arm of chromosome 15 in the region q23-q25. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:1998338

  9. Gene cloning, functional expression and characterisation of a novel glycogen branching enzyme from Rhizomucor miehei and its application in wheat breadmaking.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shupeng; Liu, Yu; Yan, Qiaojuan; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2014-09-15

    A gene (RmGBE) encoding a glycogen branching enzyme from Rhizomucor miehei was cloned into the pET28a (+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli, and biochemically analysed. RmGBE had an open reading frame of 2097bp encoding 698 amino acid residues. The purified enzyme was a monomer of 78.1kDa. RmGBE was optimally active at 25°C and pH 7.5. It displayed excellent cold adaptation over a low temperature range of 10-30°C, retaining over 85% of its relative activity. RmGBE showed the highest specificity to amylose, about ten times higher than to amylopectin. Addition of RmGBE to wheat bread resulted in a 26% increase in specific volume and a 38% decrease in crumb firmness in comparison with the control. Besides, the retrogradation of bread was significantly retarded along with the enzyme reaction. These properties make RmGBE highly useful in the food and starch industries. PMID:24767030

  10. Threonine modulates immune response, antioxidant status and gene expressions of antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant-immune-cytokine-related signaling molecules in juvenile blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    PubMed

    Habte-Tsion, Habte-Michael; Ren, Mingchun; Liu, Bo; Ge, Xianping; Xie, Jun; Chen, Ruli

    2016-04-01

    A 9-week feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of graded dietary threonine (Thr) levels (0.58-2.58%) on the hematological parameters, immune response, antioxidant status and hepatopancreatic gene expression of antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant-immune-cytokine-related signaling molecules in juvenile blunt snout bream. For this purpose, 3 tanks were randomly arranged and assigned to each experimental diet. Fish were fed with their respective diet to apparent satiation 4 times daily. The results indicated that white blood cell, red blood cell and haemoglobin significantly responded to graded dietary Thr levels, while hematocrit didn't. Complement components (C3 and C4), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), immunoglobulin M (IgM), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) increased with increasing dietary Thr levels up to 1.58-2.08% and thereafter tended to decrease. Dietary Thr regulated the gene expressions of Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and CAT, GPx1, glutathione S-transferase mu (GST), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), heat shock protein-70 (Hsp70), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA1), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase B (ALDOB); while the gene expression of peroxiredoxin II (PrxII) was not significantly modified by graded Thr levels. These genes are involved in different functions including antioxidant, immune, and defense responses, energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Therefore, this study could provide a new molecular tool for studies in fish immunonutrition and shed light on the regulatory mechanisms that dietary Thr improved the antioxidant and immune capacities of fish. PMID:26631806

  11. Antioxidant-rich leaf extract of Barringtonia racemosa significantly alters the in vitro expression of genes encoding enzymes that are involved in methylglyoxal degradation III

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Kin Weng; Abdul Aziz, Azlina; Razali, Nurhanani; Aminuddin, Norhaniza

    2016-01-01

    Background Barringtonia racemosa is a medicinal plant belonging to the Lecythidaceae family. The water extract of B. racemosa leaf (BLE) has been shown to be rich in polyphenols. Despite the diverse medicinal properties of B. racemosa, information on its major biological effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms are still lacking. Methods In this study, the effect of the antioxidant-rich BLE on gene expression in HepG2 cells was investigated using microarray analysis in order to shed more light on the molecular mechanism associated with the medicinal properties of the plant. Results Microarray analysis showed that a total of 138 genes were significantly altered in response to BLE treatment (p < 0.05) with a fold change difference of at least 1.5. SERPINE1 was the most significantly up-regulated gene at 2.8-fold while HAMP was the most significantly down-regulated gene at 6.5-fold. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) revealed that “Cancer, cell death and survival, cellular movement” was the top network affected by the BLE with a score of 44. The top five canonical pathways associated with BLE were Methylglyoxal Degradation III followed by VDR/RXR activation, TR/RXR activation, PXR/RXR activation and gluconeogenesis. The expression of genes that encode for enzymes involved in methylglyoxal degradation (ADH4, AKR1B10 and AKR1C2) and glycolytic process (ENO3, ALDOC and SLC2A1) was significantly regulated. Owing to the Warburg effect, aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells may increase the level of methylglyoxal, a cytotoxic compound. Conclusions BLE has the potential to be developed into a novel chemopreventive agent provided that the cytotoxic effects related to methylglyoxal accumulation are minimized in normal cells that rely on aerobic glycolysis for energy supply.

  12. Differential regulation of grain sucrose accumulation and metabolism in Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta) revealed through gene expression and enzyme activity analysis.

    PubMed

    Privat, Isabelle; Foucrier, Séverine; Prins, Anneke; Epalle, Thibaut; Eychenne, Magali; Kandalaft, Laurianne; Caillet, Victoria; Lin, Chenwei; Tanksley, Steve; Foyer, Christine; McCarthy, James

    2008-01-01

    * Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta) are the two main cultivated species used for coffee bean production. Arabica genotypes generally produce a higher coffee quality than Robusta genotypes. Understanding the genetic basis for sucrose accumulation during coffee grain maturation is an important goal because sucrose is an important coffee flavor precursor. * Nine new Coffea genes encoding sucrose metabolism enzymes have been identified: sucrose phosphate synthase (CcSPS1, CcSPS2), sucrose phosphate phosphatase (CcSP1), cytoplasmic (CaInv3) and cell wall (CcInv4) invertases and four invertase inhibitors (CcInvI1, 2, 3, 4). * Activities and mRNA abundance of the sucrose metabolism enzymes were compared at different developmental stages in Arabica and Robusta grains, characterized by different sucrose contents in mature grain. * It is concluded that Robusta accumulates less sucrose than Arabica for two reasons: Robusta has higher sucrose synthase and acid invertase activities early in grain development - the expression of CcSS1 and CcInv2 appears to be crucial at this stage and Robusta has a lower SPS activity and low CcSPS1 expression at the final stages of grain development and hence has less capacity for sucrose re-synthesis. Regulation of vacuolar invertase CcInv2 activity by invertase inhibitors CcInvI2 and/or CcInvI3 during Arabica grain development is considered. PMID:18384509

  13. How to achieve high-level expression of microbial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Yang, Haiquan; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Microbial enzymes have been used in a large number of fields, such as chemical, agricultural and biopharmaceutical industries. The enzyme production rate and yield are the main factors to consider when choosing the appropriate expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Recombinant enzymes have been expressed in bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli, Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria), filamentous fungi (e.g., Aspergillus) and yeasts (e.g., Pichia pastoris). The favorable and very advantageous characteristics of these species have resulted in an increasing number of biotechnological applications. Bacterial hosts (e.g., E. coli) can be used to quickly and easily overexpress recombinant enzymes; however, bacterial systems cannot express very large proteins and proteins that require post-translational modifications. The main bacterial expression hosts, with the exception of lactic acid bacteria and filamentous fungi, can produce several toxins which are not compatible with the expression of recombinant enzymes in food and drugs. However, due to the multiplicity of the physiological impacts arising from high-level expression of genes encoding the enzymes and expression hosts, the goal of overproduction can hardly be achieved, and therefore, the yield of recombinant enzymes is limited. In this review, the recent strategies used for the high-level expression of microbial enzymes in the hosts mentioned above are summarized and the prospects are also discussed. We hope this review will contribute to the development of the enzyme-related research field. PMID:23686280

  14. Prolonged expression of the BX1 signature enzyme is associated with a recombination hotspot in the benzoxazinoid gene cluster in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Linlin; McMullen, Michael D; Bauer, Eva; Schön, Chris-Carolin; Gierl, Alfons; Frey, Monika

    2015-07-01

    Benzoxazinoids represent preformed protective and allelopathic compounds. The main benzoxazinoid in maize (Zea mays L.) is 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA). DIMBOA confers resistance to herbivores and microbes. Protective concentrations are found predominantly in young plantlets. We made use of the genetic diversity present in the maize nested association mapping (NAM) panel to identify lines with significant benzoxazinoid concentrations at later developmental stages. At 24 d after imbibition (dai), only three lines, including Mo17, showed effective DIMBOA concentrations of 1.5mM or more; B73, by contrast, had low a DIMBOA content. Mapping studies based on Mo17 and B73 were performed to reveal mechanisms that influence the DIMBOA level in 24 dai plants. A major quantitative trait locus mapped to the Bx gene cluster located on the short arm of chromosome 4, which encodes the DIMBOA biosynthetic genes. Mo17 was distinguished from all other NAM lines by high transcriptional expression of the Bx1 gene at later developmental stages. Bx1 encodes the signature enzyme of the pathway. In Mo17×B73 hybrids at 24 dai, only the Mo17 Bx1 allele transcript was detected. A 3.9kb cis-element, termed DICE (distal cis-element), that is located in the Bx gene cluster approximately 140 kb upstream of Bx1, was required for high Bx1 transcript levels during later developmental stages in Mo17. The DICE region was a hotspot of meiotic recombination. Genetic analysis revealed that high 24 dai DIMBOA concentrations were not strictly dependent on high Bx1 transcript levels. However, constitutive expression of Bx1 in transgenics increased DIMBOA levels at 24 dai, corroborating a correlation between DIMBOA content and Bx1 transcription. PMID:25969552

  15. Prolonged expression of the BX1 signature enzyme is associated with a recombination hotspot in the benzoxazinoid gene cluster in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Linlin; McMullen, Michael D.; Bauer, Eva; Schön, Chris-Carolin; Gierl, Alfons; Frey, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Benzoxazinoids represent preformed protective and allelopathic compounds. The main benzoxazinoid in maize (Zea mays L.) is 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA). DIMBOA confers resistance to herbivores and microbes. Protective concentrations are found predominantly in young plantlets. We made use of the genetic diversity present in the maize nested association mapping (NAM) panel to identify lines with significant benzoxazinoid concentrations at later developmental stages. At 24 d after imbibition (dai), only three lines, including Mo17, showed effective DIMBOA concentrations of 1.5mM or more; B73, by contrast, had low a DIMBOA content. Mapping studies based on Mo17 and B73 were performed to reveal mechanisms that influence the DIMBOA level in 24 dai plants. A major quantitative trait locus mapped to the Bx gene cluster located on the short arm of chromosome 4, which encodes the DIMBOA biosynthetic genes. Mo17 was distinguished from all other NAM lines by high transcriptional expression of the Bx1 gene at later developmental stages. Bx1 encodes the signature enzyme of the pathway. In Mo17×B73 hybrids at 24 dai, only the Mo17 Bx1 allele transcript was detected. A 3.9kb cis-element, termed DICE (distal cis-element), that is located in the Bx gene cluster approximately 140kb upstream of Bx1, was required for high Bx1 transcript levels during later developmental stages in Mo17. The DICE region was a hotspot of meiotic recombination. Genetic analysis revealed that high 24 dai DIMBOA concentrations were not strictly dependent on high Bx1 transcript levels. However, constitutive expression of Bx1 in transgenics increased DIMBOA levels at 24 dai, corroborating a correlation between DIMBOA content and Bx1 transcription. PMID:25969552

  16. Gene expression pattern of some classes of cytochrome P-450 and glutathione S-transferase enzymes in differentiated hepatocytes-like cells from menstrual blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili-Rad, Aida; Khanjani, Sayeh; Vaziri, Hamidreza; Kazemnejad, Somaieh

    2015-05-01

    Recently, valuable characteristics of menstrual blood stem cells (MenSCs) have impelled scientists to take its advantages for cell therapy of different diseases including liver disorders. In this study, we examined messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of phases I and II drug metabolizing enzymes including glutathione S-transferase (GST) and cytochrome P-450 (CYP) in differentiated hepatocyte-like cells from MenSCs. The isolated MenSCs were characterized and differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells using hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and oncostatin M (OSM) in combination with other components in serum-free culture media. After primary characterization of hepatocyte markers, mRNA expression of GSTA1, GSTA2, GSTP1, CYP3A4, and CYP7A1 was assessed in differentiated cells in reference to undifferentiated cells using real-time PCR. Based on immunofluorescent staining and real-time PCR data, the differentiated MenSCs could express functional hepatocyte markers at mRNA and/or protein levels suggesting development of hepatocyte-like cells from MenSCs. Moreover, the expression levels of GSTA1, GSTA2, and CYP3A4 mRNA were upregulated in differentiated cells compared to undifferentiated cells. The expression of CYP7A1 gene was also remarkable on the last day of differentiation process. However, the expression level of GSTP1 did not exhibit statistically significant change during differentiation (P = 0.6). Based on accumulative data, MenSCs could be viewed as an accessible population of stem cells with differentiation ability into drug-metabolizing hepatocyte-like cells. PMID:25614436

  17. Multiple mechanisms regulate circadian expression of the gene for cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a), a key enzyme in hepatic bile acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Noshiro, Mitsuhide; Usui, Emiko; Kawamoto, Takeshi; Kubo, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Katsumi; Furukawa, Masae; Honma, Sato; Makishima, Makoto; Honma, Ken-ichi; Kato, Yukio

    2007-08-01

    electrophoretic mobility shift assay, REV-ERBalpha/beta bound to the promoter of Cyp7a . These observations suggest that (1) active CLOCK is essential for the robust circadian expression of hepatic metabolic enzymes (Cyp7a, Cyp8b, and Hmgcr); (2) clock-controlled genes--DBP, DEC2, and REV-ERBalpha/beta--are direct regulators required for the robust circadian rhythm of Cyp7a; and (3) the circadian rhythm of Cyp7a is regulated by multiple transcription factors, including DBP, REV-ERBalpha/beta, LXRalpha, HNF4alpha DEC2, E4BP4, and PPARalpha. PMID:17660447

  18. Limiting Concentrate during Growing Period Affect Performance and Gene Expression of Hepatic Gluconeogenic Enzymes and Visfatin in Korean Native Beef Calves

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S. S.; Lohakare, J. D.; Singh, N. K.; Kwon, E. G.; Nejad, J. G.; Sung, K. I.; Hong, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    This study elucidated the effects of limited concentrate feeding on growth, plasma profile, and gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes and visfatin in the liver of Hanwoo beef calves. The purpose of this study was to test that reducing the amount of concentrate would partially be compensated by increasing the intake of forage and by altering the metabolic status. The study utilized 20 Korean native beef calves (Hanwoo; 60 to 70 d of age) divided into two groups of 10 calves each for 158 d. Control group calves received the amount of concentrate as per the established Korean feeding standards for Hanwoo, whereas calves in the restricted group only received half the amount of concentrate as per standard requirements. Good quality forage (Timothy hay) was available for ad libitum consumption to both groups. Since calves were with their dam until 4 months of age in breeding pens before weaning, the intake of milk before weaning was not recorded, however, the concentrate and forage intakes were recorded daily. Body weights (BW) were recorded at start and on 10 d interval. Blood samples were collected at start and at 50 d interval. On the final day of the experiment, liver biopsies were collected from all animals in each group. The BW was not different between the groups at all times, but tended to be higher (p = 0.061) only at final BW in control than restricted group. Total BW gain in the control group was 116.2 kg as opposed to 84.1 kg in restricted group that led to average BW gain of 736 g/d and 532 g/d in respective groups, and the differences were significant (p<0.01). As planned, the calves in the control group had higher concentrate and lower forage intake than the restricted group. The plasma variables like total protein and urea were higher (p<0.05) in control than restricted group. The mRNA expressions for the gluconeogenic enzymes such as cytosolic phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase (EC 4.1.1.32) and pyruvate carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.1), and visfatin measured

  19. Effect of Enzyme Inhibitors on Terpene Trilactones Biosynthesis and Gene Expression Profiling in Ginkgo biloba Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijia; Tong, Hui; Wang, Mingxuan; Zhu, Jianhua; Zi, Jiachen; Song, Liyan; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-12-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of terpene trilactones of Ginkgo biloba is unclear. In this present study, suspension cultured cells of G. biloba were used to explore the regulation of the mevalonic acid (MVA) and methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathways in response to specific enzyme inhibitors (lovastatin and clomazone). The results showed that the biosynthesis of bilobalide was more highly correlated with the MVA pathway, and the biosynthesis of ginkgolides was more highly correlated with the MEP pathway. Meanwhile, according to the results, it could be speculated that bilobalide might be a product of ginkgolide metabolism. PMID:26882658

  20. Metabolic enzyme activities, metabolism-related genes expression and bioaccumulation in juvenile white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei exposed to benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xianyun; Pan, Luqing; Wang, Lin

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) on metabolic detoxification system and bioaccumulation of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. In this study, juvenile white shrimp L. vannamei were exposed for 21 days at four different concentrations of 0, 0.03, 0.3 and 3μg/L. Detoxification enzyme activities of phase I (aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), epoxide hydrolase (EH)) and phase II (glutathione-S-transferase (GST), sulfotransferase (SULT), uridine diphosphate glucuronyl transferase (UGT)) were determined, and results showed that all the detoxification enzyme activities increased in a dose-dependent manner except for the low BaP exposure. Transcription of genes was detected and measured by real-time RT-PCR. It showed that at day six BaP increased cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, GST, SULT visa aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, which suggests that they could be potential targets of BaP that disrupt the detoxification system. The consistency of their responses to BaP exposure implies that AhR action may be involved in invertebrate CYP regulation. Additionally, BaP bioaccumulation increased rapidly first and showed an incoming plateau. Besides, the enzyme activities and bioaccumulation in the hepatopancreas were higher than those in the gills. These results will not only provide information on BaP metabolic mechanism for this species, but also scientific data for pollution monitoring. PMID:24636950

  1. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING ENZYMES (XMES) THROUGH THE LIFE STAGES OF THE MALE C57BL/6 MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the presence of foreign compounds, metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver's ability to detoxify and eliminate these xenobiotics. This is accomplished, in part, by the expression of XMEs, which metabolize xenobiotics and determine whether exposure will...

  2. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Peters, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Increased exposure to radiation is one physiological stressor associated with spaceflight and it is feasible to conduct ground experiments using known radiation exposures. The health of the liver, especially the activity rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. While radiation is known to alter normal physiological function, how radiation affects liver metabolism of administered medications is unclear. Crew health could be affected if the actions of medications used in spaceflight deviated from expectations formed during terrestrial medication use. This study is an effort to identify liver metabolic enzymes whose expression is altered by spaceflight or by radiation exposures that mimic features of the spaceflight environment. METHODS: Using procedures approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee, mice were exposed to either 137Cs (controls, 50 mGy, 6Gy, or 50 mGy + 6Gy separated by 24 hours) or 13 days of spaceflight on STS 135. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed at several time points (4 hours, 24 hours or 7 days) after their last radiation exposure, or within 6 hours of return to Earth for the STS 135 animals. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted, purified and quality-tested. Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used in RT-qPCR experiments to determine relative expression of a wide variety of genes involved in general metabolism and drug metabolism. RESULTS: Results of the ground radiation exposure experiments indicated 65 genes of the 190 tested were significantly affected by at least one of the radiation doses. Many of the affected genes are involved in the metabolism of drugs with hydrophobic or steroid-like structures, maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage. Most affected genes returned to near control expression levels by 7 days post

  3. Effects of dietary tannic acid on the growth, hepatic gene expression, and antioxidant enzyme activity in Brandt's voles (Microtus brandti).

    PubMed

    Ye, Man-Hong; Nan, Yan-Lei; Ding, Meng-Meng; Hu, Jun-Bang; Liu, Qian; Wei, Wan-Hong; Yang, Sheng-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the physiological and biochemical responses of Brandt's voles to the persistent presence of dietary tannic acid. The diet for animals in the experimental group was supplemented with 3% dietary tannic acid for 5weeks. The control group received a commercial lab chow. No significant differences were detected in body weight, organ (heart, kidney, and liver) weights, and organ parameters between animals from two groups. However, voles in the experimental group had significantly higher daily food intake, increased contents of proline and histidine in saliva and feces after protein hydrolysis, and elevated hepatic expression of transferrin than the control. Our results suggested the existence of adaptive strategies developed in Brandt's voles to overcome the adverse effects of dietary tannic acid. (1) Food consumption was increased to satisfy their nutritional demands. (2) The secretion of tannic-acid-binding salivary proteins was promoted. (3) The absorption of iron was enhanced. These alterations contributed to neutralize the negative effects of tannic acid and maintain body mass in animals supplemented with tannic acid. As the result of the consumption of tannic acid, hepatic expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase was significantly decreased, while the overall potential of the antioxidant system, characterized by increased hepatic enzymatic activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase, was enhanced. Our results also implied the involvement of tannic acid in the regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in voles. PMID:26850644

  4. Temperature- and exercise-induced gene expression and metabolic enzyme changes in skeletal muscle of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Grant B; Craig, Paul M; Dhekney, Kalindi; Dipardo, Shawn

    2006-01-01

    Both exercise training and cold acclimatization induce muscle remodelling in vertebrates, producing a more aerobic phenotype. In ectothermic species exercise training and cold-acclimatization represent distinct stimuli. It is currently unclear if these stimuli act through a common mechanism or if different mechanisms lead to a common phenotype. The goal of this study was to survey responses that represent potential mechanisms responsible for contraction- and temperature-induced muscle remodelling, using an ectothermic vertebrate. Separate groups of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) were either swim trained or cold acclimatized for 4 weeks. We found that the mitochondrial marker enzyme citrate synthase (CS) was increased by 1.5× in cold and by 1.3× with exercise (P < 0.05). Cytochrome c oxidase (COx) was increased by 1.2× following exercise training (P < 0.05) and 1.2× (P = 0.07) with cold acclimatization. However, only cold acclimatization increased β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD) compared to exercise-trained (by 1.3×) and pyruvate kinase (PK) relative to control zebrafish. We assessed the whole-animal performance outcomes of these treatments. Maximum absolute sustained swimming speed (Ucrit) was increased in the exercise trained group but not in the cold acclimatized group. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that increases in CS are primarily transcriptionally regulated with exercise but not with cold treatments. Both treatments showed increases in nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-1 mRNA which was increased by 2.3× in cold-acclimatized and 4× in exercise-trained zebrafish above controls. In contrast, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α mRNA levels were decreased in both experimental groups while PPAR-β1 declined in exercise training only. Moreover, PPAR-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α mRNA was not changed by either treatment. In zebrafish, both temperature and exercise produce a more aerobic phenotype, but there are stimulus-dependent responses

  5. Plasma Catecholamines (CA) and Gene Expression of CA Biosynthetic Enzymes in Adrenal Medulla and Sympathetic Ganglia of Rats Exposed to Single or Repeated Hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrak, J.; Jurani, M.; Baranovska, M.; Hapala, I.; Frollo, I.; Kvetnansky, R.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) levels in blood collected directly during a single or 8-times repeated centrifugation at hypergravity 4G, using remote controlled equipment. Plasma EPI levels showed a huge hypergravity-induced increase. After the last blood collection during hypergravity, the centrifuge was turned off and another blood sampling was performed immediately after the centrifuge decelerated and stopped (10 min). In these samples plasma EPI showed significantly lower levels compared to centrifugation intervals. Plasma NE levels showed none or small changes. Repeated exposure to hypergravity 4G (8 days for 60 min) eliminated the increase in plasma EPI levels at the 15 min interval but did not markedly affect plasma NE levels. To explain these findings we measured mRNA levels of CA biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in the adrenal medulla (AM) and stellate ganglia (SG) of rats exposed to continuous hypergravity (2G) up to 6 days. In AM, TH, DBH and PNMT mRNA levels were significantly increased in intervals up to 3 days, however, after 6 day hypergravity exposure, no significant elevation was found. In SG, no significant changes in gene expression of CA enzymes were seen both after a single or repeated hypergravity. Thus, our data show that hypergravity highly activates the adrenomedullary system, whereas the sympathoneural system is not significantly changed. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that during repeated or continuous exposure of the organism to hypergravity the adrenomedullary system is adapted, whereas sympathoneural system is not affected.

  6. cDNA cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the antioxidant enzyme gene, catalase, of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingli; Li, Fuhua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Dong, Bo; Zhang, Jiquan; Xie, Yusu; Xiang, Jianhai

    2008-05-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant protein that protects organisms against various oxidative stresses by eliminating hydrogen peroxide. The full-length catalase cDNA of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis was cloned from the hepatopancreas using degenerate primers by the method of 3' and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR. The cDNA sequence consists of 1892 bp with a 1560 bp open reading frame, encoding 520 amino acids with high identity to invertebrate, vertebrate and even bacterial catalases. The sequence includes the catalytic residues His71, Asn144, and Tyr354. The molecular mass of the predicted protein is 58824.04 Da with an estimated pI of 6.63. Sequence comparison showed that the deduced amino acid sequence of F. chinensis catalase shares 96%, 73%, 71% and 70% identity with that of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, Abalone Haliotis discus hannai, Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri and Human Homo sapiens, respectively. Catalase transcripts were detected in hepatopancreas, hemocytes, lymphoid organ, intestine, ovary, muscle and gill by real-time PCR. The variation of catalase mRNA transcripts in hemocytes and hepatopancreas was also quantified by real-time PCR and the result indicated that the catalase showed up-regulated expression trends in hemocytes at 14 h and in hepatopancreas at 37 h after injection with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). PMID:18353680

  7. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells.

    PubMed

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells. PMID:27512374

  8. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A.; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells. PMID:27512374

  9. GENE EXPRESSION NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Gene expression network" is the term used to describe the interplay, simple or complex, between two or more gene products in performing a specific cellular function. Although the delineation of such networks is complicated by the existence of multiple and subtle types of intera...

  10. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  11. Gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of microarrays and next-generation biotechnologies, the use of gene expression data has become ubiquitous in biological research. One potential drawback of these data is that they are very rich in features or genes though cost considerations allow for the use of only relatively small sample sizes. A useful way of getting at biologically meaningful interpretations of the environmental or toxicological condition of interest would be to make inferences at the level of a priori defined biochemical pathways or networks of interacting genes or proteins that are known to perform certain biological functions. This chapter describes approaches taken in the literature to make such inferences at the biochemical pathway level. In addition this chapter describes approaches to create hypotheses on genes playing important roles in response to a treatment, using organism level gene coexpression or protein-protein interaction networks. Also, approaches to reverse engineer gene networks or methods that seek to identify novel interactions between genes are described. Given the relatively small sample numbers typically available, these reverse engineering approaches are generally useful in inferring interactions only among a relatively small or an order 10 number of genes. Finally, given the vast amounts of publicly available gene expression data from different sources, this chapter summarizes the important sources of these data and characteristics of these sources or databases. In line with the overall aims of this book of providing practical knowledge to a researcher interested in analyzing gene expression data from a network perspective, the chapter provides convenient publicly accessible tools for performing analyses described, and in addition describe three motivating examples taken from the published literature that illustrate some of the relevant analyses. PMID:23086841

  12. Inhibition of Gene Expression of Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter and Antioxidant Enzymes in Oxazaphosphorines-Induced Acute Cardiomyopathic Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M.; Aldelemy, Meshan Lafi; Hafez, Mohamed M.; Al-Shabanah, Othman A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that high therapeutic doses of oxazaphosphorines, cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IFO), are associated with cardiomyopathy. This study investigated whether oxazaphosphorines alter the expression of organic cation/carnitine transporter (OCTN2) and antioxidant genes and if so, whether these alterations contribute to CP and IFO-induced cardiotoxicity. Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups namely, control, L carnitine, CP, IFO, CP plus L carnitine and IFO plus L carnitine. In cardiac and kidney tissues, CP and IFO significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of OCTN2. Oxazaphosphorines significantly increased serum acyl-carnitine/free carnitine ratio and urinary carnitine excretion and significantly decreased total carnitine in cardiac tissues. Interestingly, carnitine supplementation completely reversed the biochemical and gene expression changes-induced by oxazaphosphorines to the control values, except OCTN2 expression remained inhibited by IFO. Data from this study suggest that: (1) Oxazaphosphorines decreased myocardial carnitine content following the inhibition of OCTN2 mRNA and protein expression in cardiac tissues. (2) Oxazaphosphorine therapy increased urinary loss of carnitine secondary to the inhibition of OCTN2 mRNA and protein expression in proximal tubules of the kidney. (3) Carnitine supplementation attenuates CP but not IFO-induced inhibition of OCTN2 mRNA and protein expression in heart and kidney tissues. PMID:22701146

  13. Mammary gene expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative indicators in the blood, milk, mammary tissue and ruminal fluid of dairy cows fed flax meal.

    PubMed

    Schogor, Ana Luiza Bachmann; Palin, Marie-France; Santos, Geraldo Tadeu dos; Benchaar, Chaouki; Lacasse, Pierre; Petit, Hélène V

    2013-11-01

    The effects of flax meal (FM) on the activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT)) in the blood, mammary tissue and ruminal fluid, and oxidative stress indicators (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances(TBARS) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl-scavenging activity) in the milk, plasma and ruminal fluid of dairy cows were determined.The mRNA abundance of the antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress-related genes was assessed in mammary tissue. A total of eight Holstein cows were used in a double 4 x 4 Latin square design. There were four treatments in the diet: control with no FM(CON) or 5% FM (5FM), 10% FM (10FM) and 15% FM (15FM). There was an interaction between treatment and time for plasma GPx and CAT activities. Cows supplemented with FM had a linear reduction in TBARS at 2 h after feeding, and there was no treatment effect at 0, 4 and 6 h after feeding. TBARS production decreased in the milk of cows fed the 5FM and 10FM diets. There was a linear increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NFE2L2) mRNA abundance in mammary tissue with FM supplementation.A linear trend for increased mRNA abundance of the CAT gene was observed with higher concentrations of FM. The mRNA abundance of CAT, GPx1, GPx3, SOD1, SOD2, SOD3 and nuclear factor of k light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells (NFKB) genes was not affected by the treatment. These findings suggest that FM supplementation can improve the oxidative status of Holstein cows as suggested by decreased TBARS production in ruminal fluid 2 h post-feeding and increased NFE2L2/nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mRNA abundance in mammary tissue. PMID:23578516

  14. Phase variation of a Type IIG restriction-modification enzyme alters site-specific methylation patterns and gene expression in Campylobacter jejuni strain NCTC11168.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Awais; Brathwaite, Kelly J; Aidley, Jack; Connerton, Phillippa L; Cummings, Nicola J; Parkhill, Julian; Connerton, Ian; Bayliss, Christopher D

    2016-06-01

    Phase-variable restriction-modification systems are a feature of a diverse range of bacterial species. Stochastic, reversible switches in expression of the methyltransferase produces variation in methylation of specific sequences. Phase-variable methylation by both Type I and Type III methyltransferases is associated with altered gene expression and phenotypic variation. One phase-variable gene of Campylobacter jejuni encodes a homologue of an unusual Type IIG restriction-modification system in which the endonuclease and methyltransferase are encoded by a single gene. Using both inhibition of restriction and PacBio-derived methylome analyses of mutants and phase-variants, the cj0031c allele in C. jejuni strain NCTC11168 was demonstrated to specifically methylate adenine in 5'CCCGA and 5'CCTGA sequences. Alterations in the levels of specific transcripts were detected using RNA-Seq in phase-variants and mutants of cj0031c but these changes did not correlate with observed differences in phenotypic behaviour. Alterations in restriction of phage growth were also associated with phase variation (PV) of cj0031c and correlated with presence of sites in the genomes of these phages. We conclude that PV of a Type IIG restriction-modification system causes changes in site-specific methylation patterns and gene expression patterns that may indirectly change adaptive traits. PMID:26786317

  15. Phase variation of a Type IIG restriction-modification enzyme alters site-specific methylation patterns and gene expression in Campylobacter jejuni strain NCTC11168

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Awais; Brathwaite, Kelly J.; Aidley, Jack; Connerton, Phillippa L.; Cummings, Nicola J.; Parkhill, Julian; Connerton, Ian; Bayliss, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-variable restriction-modification systems are a feature of a diverse range of bacterial species. Stochastic, reversible switches in expression of the methyltransferase produces variation in methylation of specific sequences. Phase-variable methylation by both Type I and Type III methyltransferases is associated with altered gene expression and phenotypic variation. One phase-variable gene of Campylobacter jejuni encodes a homologue of an unusual Type IIG restriction-modification system in which the endonuclease and methyltransferase are encoded by a single gene. Using both inhibition of restriction and PacBio-derived methylome analyses of mutants and phase-variants, the cj0031c allele in C. jejuni strain NCTC11168 was demonstrated to specifically methylate adenine in 5′CCCGA and 5′CCTGA sequences. Alterations in the levels of specific transcripts were detected using RNA-Seq in phase-variants and mutants of cj0031c but these changes did not correlate with observed differences in phenotypic behaviour. Alterations in restriction of phage growth were also associated with phase variation (PV) of cj0031c and correlated with presence of sites in the genomes of these phages. We conclude that PV of a Type IIG restriction-modification system causes changes in site-specific methylation patterns and gene expression patterns that may indirectly change adaptive traits. PMID:26786317

  16. Ghrelin receptor agonist GHRP-2 prevents arthritis-induced increase in E3 ubiquitin-ligating enzymes MuRF1 and MAFbx gene expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Priego, Teresa; Martín, Ana I; Villanúa, Maria Angeles; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2005-12-01

    Chronic arthritis is a catabolic state associated with an inhibition of the IGF system and a decrease in body weight. Cachexia and muscular wasting is secondary to protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of adjuvant-induced arthritis on the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) as well as on IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) gene expression in the skeletal muscle. We also studied whether the synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist, growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2), was able to prevent arthritis-induced changes in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis induced an increase in MuRF1, MAFbx (P < 0.01), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA (P < 0.05) in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis decreased the serum IGF-I and its gene expression in the liver (P < 0.01), whereas it increased IGF-I and IGFBP-5 gene expression in the skeletal muscle (P < 0.01). Administration of GHRP-2 for 8 days prevented the arthritis-induced increase in muscular MuRF1, MAFbx, and TNF-alpha gene expression. GHRP-2 treatment increased the serum concentrations of IGF-I and the IGF-I mRNA in the liver and in the cardiac muscle and decreased muscular IGFBP-5 mRNA both in control and in arthritic rats (P < 0.05). GHRP-2 treatment increased muscular IGF-I mRNA in control rats (P < 0.01), but it did not modify the muscular IGF-I gene expression in arthritic rats. These data indicate that arthritis induces an increase in the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway that is prevented by GHRP-2 administration. The parallel changes in muscular IGFBP-5 and TNF-alpha gene expression with the ubiquitin ligases suggest that they can participate in skeletal muscle alterations during chronic arthritis. PMID:16030067

  17. Protopanaxatriol Ginsenoside Rh1 Upregulates Phase II Antioxidant Enzyme Gene Expression in Rat Primary Astrocytes: Involvement of MAP Kinases and Nrf2/ARE Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji-Sun; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress activates several intracellular signaling cascades that may have deleterious effects on neuronal cell survival. Thus, controlling oxidative stress has been suggested as an important strategy for prevention and/or treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we found that ginsenoside Rh1 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species generation and subsequent cell death in rat primary astrocytes. Rh1 increased the expression of phase II antioxidant enzymes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, superoxide dismutase-2, and catalase, that are under the control of Nrf2/ARE signaling pathways. Further mechanistic studies showed that Rh1 increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to the antioxidant response element (ARE), and increased the ARE-mediated transcription activities in rat primary astrocytes. Analysis of signaling pathways revealed that MAP kinases are important in HO-1 expression, and act by modulating ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. Therefore, the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes by Rh1 may provide preventive therapeutic potential for various neurodegenerative diseases that are associated with oxidative stress. PMID:26759699

  18. Effect of adiponectin on the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, P450 side chain cleavage enzyme and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression, progesterone and androstenedione production by the porcine uterus during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smolinska, N; Dobrzyn, K; Kiezun, M; Szeszko, K; Maleszka, A; Kaminski, T

    2016-06-01

    Adiponectin and its receptors are expressed in the human and porcine uterus and this endocrine system has important role in the regulation of reproductive processes. The expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B1) were observed in the human and porcine uterus during the oestrous cycle and pregnancy. The de novo synthesis of steroids in the uterus might be a crucial factor for effective implantation and maintenance of pregnancy. We hypothesized that adiponectin modulates the expression of key enzymes in the synthesis of the steroids: StAR, P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1) and HSD3B1, as well as progesterone (P4) and androstenedione (A4) secretion by the porcine uterus. Endometrial and myometrial explants harvested from gilts (n = 5) on days 10 to 11, 12 to 13, 15 to 16 and 27 to 28 of pregnancy and on days 10 to 11 of the oestrous cycle were cultured in vitro in the presence of adiponectin (1, 10 μg/ml), adiponectin with insulin (10 ng/ml) and insulin alone (10 ng/ml). Gene expression was examined by real-time PCR, and the secretion of the steroids was determined by radioimmunoassay. The content of StAR, CYP11A1 and HSD3B1 mRNAs and the secretion of P4 and A4 was modulated by adiponectin in endometrial and myometrial tissue explants during early pregnancy and the oestrous cycle. In this action adiponectin interacted with insulin. Insulin itself also regulated the steroidogenic activity of the porcine uterus. ere we reported, for the first time, the expression of CYP11A1 genes in the porcine endometrium and myometrium. Our novel findings indicate that adiponectin affects basal and insulin-stimulated expression of key steroidogenic genes and production of steroid hormones by the porcine uterus during maternal recognition of pregnancy and implantation. PMID:27512005

  19. Effects of cytochrome P450 1A substrate (difloxacin) on enzyme gene expression and pharmacokinetics in crucian carp (hybridized Prussian carp).

    PubMed

    Fu, Gui Hong; Yang, Xian Le; Zhang, Hai Xin; Yu, Wen Juan; Hu, Kun

    2011-03-01

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) play a prominent role in drug metabolism and biotransformation which are distributed in liver of aquatic animals. However, limited information is available about CYP genes involved in drug metabolism in fish. In the present study, we explore CYP1A characterization for DIF metabolism. Firstly, we cloned and characterized the full-length cDNA sequence of a CYP1A gene from crucian carp (hybridized Prussian carp), the predicted protein sequence for CYP1A comprise 496 amino acids. The heme-binding region of the CYP1A, encompassing the amino acid sequence GLGKRRCIG, which is identical to the same region of other homologues. Secondly, we studied the difloxacin (DIF) kinetics and the effects of DIF on their corresponding CYP1A mRNA levels in liver of crucian carp. CYP1A1 mRNA expression was analyzed by real-time PCR, and DIF concentration was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Results showed that the concentration of DIF in liver reached its peak (67.70 mg kg(-1)) at 0.5h, while the CYP1A1 gene expression was at the lowest point. CYP1A mRNA was down-regulated by 6.5 mg ml(-1) DIF in the liver of crucian carp. Thus, our work confirmed that DIF is both the substrate and inhibitor of CYP1A. The information provided a model for the potential utility of gene expression analysis and drug metabolization in fish. PMID:21787699

  20. Modulated expression of genes encoding estrogen metabolizing enzymes by G1-phase cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4 in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yi; Domenico, Joanne; Swasey, Christina; Wang, Meiqin; Gelfand, Erwin W; Lucas, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    G1-phase cell cycle defects, such as alterations in cyclin D1 or cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) levels, are seen in most tumors. For example, increased cyclin D1 and decreased cdk6 levels are seen in many human breast tumors. Overexpression of cdk6 in breast tumor cells in culture has been shown to suppress proliferation, unlike the growth stimulating effects of its close homolog, cdk4. In addition to directly affecting proliferation, alterations in cdk6 or cdk4 levels in breast tumor cells also differentially influence levels of numerous steroid metabolic enzymes (SMEs), including those involved in estrogen metabolism. Overexpression of cdk6 in tumor cell lines having low cdk6 resulted in decreased levels of mRNAs encoding aldo-keto reductase (AKR)1C1, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3, which are hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) involved in steroid hormone metabolism. In contrast, increasing cdk4 dramatically increased these transcript levels, especially those encoding AKR1C3, an enzyme that converts estrone to 17β-estradiol, a change that could result in a pro-estrogenic state favoring tumor growth. Effects on other estrogen metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP) 19 aromatase, 17β-HSD2, and CYP1B1 transcripts, were also observed. Interactions of cdk6 and cdk4, but not cyclin D1, with the promoter region of a cdk-regulated gene, 17β-HSD2, were detected. The results uncover a previously unsuspected link between the cell cycle and hormone metabolism and differential roles for cdk6 and cdk4 in a novel mechanism for pre-receptor control of steroid hormone action, with important implications for the origin and treatment of steroid hormone-dependent cancers. PMID:24848372

  1. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    Two Genes for DNA polymerase delta were identified from the wild type Chinese hamster ovary cells. These genes were cloned via RT-PCR from mRNA prepared the Chinese hamster ovary cells using primers specific to conserved sequences of the DNA polymerase {delta} gene. The first gene encodes a PCNA dependent DNA polymerase {delta} gene whereas the second gene encodes a PCNA independent DNA polymerase {delta} gene. Methods were developed to clone these genes in expression vector and host systems. The role of the two genes in DNA replication and repair was determined.

  2. Effect of High Dietary Carbohydrate on the Growth Performance, Blood Chemistry, Hepatic Enzyme Activities and Growth Hormone Gene Expression of Wuchang Bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) at Two Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chuanpeng; Ge, Xianping; Liu, Bo; Xie, Jun; Chen, Ruli; Ren, Mingchun

    2015-01-01

    The effects of high carbohydrate diet on growth, serum physiological response, and hepatic heat shock protein 70 expression in Wuchang bream were determined at 25°C and 30°C. At each temperature, the fish fed the control diet (31% CHO) had significantly higher weight gain, specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio and hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase activities, lower feed conversion ratio and hepatosomatic index (HSI), whole crude lipid, serum glucose, hepatic glucokinase (GK) activity than those fed the high-carbohydrate diet (47% CHO) (p<0.05). The fish reared at 25°C had significantly higher whole body crude protein and ash, serum cholesterol and triglyceride, hepatic G-6-Pase activity, lower glycogen content and relative levels of hepatic growth hormone (GH) gene expression than those reared at 30°C (p<0.05). Significant interaction between temperature and diet was found for HSI, condition factor, hepatic GK activity and the relative levels of hepatic GH gene expression (p<0.05). PMID:25557816

  3. Characterization of the gene encoding an extracellular laccase of Myceliophthora thermophila and analysis of the recombinant enzyme expressed in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed Central

    Berka, R M; Schneider, P; Golightly, E J; Brown, S H; Madden, M; Brown, K M; Halkier, T; Mondorf, K; Xu, F

    1997-01-01

    A genomic DNA segment encoding an extracellular laccase was isolated from the thermophilic fungus Myceliophthora thermophila, and the nucleotide sequence of this gene was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of M. thermophila laccase (MtL) shows homology to laccases from diverse fungal genera. A vector containing the M. thermophila laccase coding region, under transcriptional control of an Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase gene promoter and terminator, was constructed for heterologous expression in A. oryzae. The recombinant laccase expressed in A. oryzae was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography. Amino-terminal sequence data suggests that MtL is synthesized as a preproenzyme. The molecular mass was estimated to be approximately 100 to 140 kDa by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300 and to be 85 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Carbohydrate analysis revealed that MtL contains 40 to 60% glycosylation. The laccase shows an absorbance spectrum that is typical of blue copper oxidases, with maxima at 276 and 589 nm, and contains 3.9 copper atoms per subunit. With syringaldazine as a substrate, MtL has optimal activity at pH 6.5 and retains nearly 100% of its activity when incubated at 60 degrees C for 20 min. This is the first report of the cloning and heterologous expression of a thermostable laccase. PMID:9251203

  4. Expression analysis of the VTC2 and VTC5 genes encoding GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase, an enzyme involved in ascorbate biosynthesis, in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongshun; Badejo, Adebanjo Ayobamidele; Shibata, Hitoshi; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Maruta, Takanori; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Page, Mike; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ishikawa, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana contains two GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase genes, VTC2 and VTC5, which are critical for ascorbate (AsA) biosynthesis. We investigated the expression levels of both VTC2 and VTC5 genes in wild-type A. thaliana and the AsA deficient mutants during early seedling growth. Ascorbate accumulated to an equal extent in all genotypes up to 5 d post-germination (DPG). The transcript level of VTC2 was dominant, and increased in parallel with AsA accumulation in the wild type. On the other hand, the expression of VTC5 compensated for the reduced VTC2 transcription levels in the AsA deficient mutant vtc2-1 in young seedlings. A luciferase activity assay indicated that the VTC5 promoter was more active in young (2 DPG) cotyledons and that the VTC2 and VTC5 promoters drove a day-to-night variation in expression. The present work provides clues to the precise roles of VTC2 and VTC5 in AsA biosynthesis in A. thaliana at the young seedling stage. PMID:21897033

  5. Effect of prolonged intravenous glucose and essential amino acid infusion on nitrogen balance, muscle protein degradation and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene expression in calves

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Fouzia; Crompton, Leslie A; Scaife, Jes R; Lomax, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Background Intravenous infusions of glucose and amino acids increase both nitrogen balance and muscle accretion. We hypothesised that co-infusion of glucose (to stimulate insulin) and essential amino acids (EAA) would act additively to improve nitrogen balance by decreasing muscle protein degradation in association with alterations in muscle expression of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. Methods We examined the effect of a 5 day intravenous infusions of saline, glucose, EAA and glucose + EAA, on urinary nitrogen excretion and muscle protein degradation. We carried out the study in 6 restrained calves since ruminants offer the advantage that muscle protein degradation can be assessed by excretion of 3 methyl-histidine and multiple muscle biopsies can be taken from the same animal. On the final day of infusion blood samples were taken for hormone and metabolite measurement and muscle biopsies for expression of ubiquitin, the 14-kDa E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, and proteasome sub-units C2 and C8. Results On day 5 of glucose infusion, plasma glucose, insulin and IGF-1 concentrations were increased while urea nitrogen excretion and myofibrillar protein degradation was decreased. Co-infusion of glucose + EAA prevented the loss of urinary nitrogen observed with EAA infusions alone and enhanced the increase in plasma IGF-1 concentration but there was no synergistic effect of glucose + EAA on the decrease in myofibrillar protein degradation. Muscle mRNA expression of the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, 14-kDa E2 and proteasome sub-unit C2 were significantly decreased, after glucose but not amino acid infusions, and there was no further response to the combined infusions of glucose + EAA. Conclusion Prolonged glucose infusion decreases myofibrillar protein degradation, prevents the excretion of infused EAA, and acts additively with EAA to increase plasma IGF-1 and improve net nitrogen balance. There was no evidence of synergistic effects between

  6. Maternal Undernutrition Programs Offspring Adrenal Expression of Steroidogenic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Khorram, Naseem M.; Magee, Thomas R.; Wang, Chen; Desai, Mina; Ross, Michael; Khorram, Omid

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of maternal undernutrition (MUN) on maternal and offspring adrenal steoridogenic enzymes. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were 50% food-restricted from day 10 of gestation until delivery. Control animals received ad libitum food. Offspring were killed on day 1 of life (P1) and at 9 months. We determined the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of steroidogneic enzymes by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerized chain reaction (RT-PCR). Maternal undernutrition inhibited maternal adrenal expression of P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1), 11 beta-hydroxylase (CYP11B1), aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) receptor (ACTH-R; MC2 gene) compared with control offspring. There was a marked downregulation in the expression of CYP11B1, CYP11B2, 11 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and 2 (HSD1 and HSD2), CYP11A1, ACTH receptor, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), and mineralocorticoid receptor (MCR; NR3C2 gene) mRNA in P1 MUN offspring (both genders), with no changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GCR). Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the PCR data for GCR and MCR in P1 offspring and demonstrated lower expression of leptin receptor protein (Ob-Ra/Ob-Rb) and mRNA in P1 MUN offspring. In 9-month adult male MUN offspring, the expression of HSD1, CYP11A1, CYP11B2, Ob-Ra/Ob-Rb, and GCR mRNA were significantly upregulated with a trend toward an increase in ACTH-R and a decrease in 17 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP17A1) expression. In adult female MUN offspring, similar to males, the expression of CYP11A1, ACTH-R, and Ob-Rb mRNA were increased, whereas GCR and CYP17A1 mRNA were decreased. These results indicate that the adrenal gland is a target of nutritional programming. In utero undernutrition has a global suppressive effect on maternal and P1 offspring adrenal steroidogenic enzymes in association with reduced circulating corticosterone levels in P1 offspring

  7. Analysis of Antioxidant Enzyme Activity and Antioxidant Genes Expression During Germination of Two Different Genotypes of Lolium multiflorum Under Salt Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Ma, Xiao; Xinquan-Zhang; Linkai-Huang; Li, Zhou; Nie, Wenzhi-Xu Gang

    2016-01-01

    Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) is widely used as a cool-season forage grass for its luxuriant growth, palatable and high digestible. To investigate the salt tolerance mechanism in annual ryegrass under salt stress, salt-tolerant genotype 'R102-3' and salt-sensitive genotype 'Tetragold' were subject to 300mmol/L NaCl in a controlled growth chamber for 12 days. The results showed high concentrations of NaCl decreased relative water content (RWC), and increased the electrolyte leakage (EL) in both genotypes. However the 'Tetragold' had a greater increased extent of malondialdehyde (MDA) and EL than in 'R102-3', in contrast, the activities of Superoxide (SOD), Peroxidase (POD), Catalase (CAT) and Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) were higher in salt resistant compared to sensitive ones. For ensure the accurate of qRT-PCR, we used RefFinder to choose the most stably reference genes eEF1A(s) and GAPDH to normalize the antioxidant genes expression data. The results indicated that higher expression of Fe-SOD, Mn-SOD, Chl-Cu/Zn SOD, Cyt-Cu/Zn SOD, POD and CAT in 'R102-3' when compared with 'Tetragold', which may play an important role in defensed damage of Reactive oxygen species (ROS) under salt stress. Thus, the salt-tolerant genotype could effectively resist oxidative damage induced by salt tress relative to salt-sensitive genotype. PMID:26972970

  8. [Effects of exogenous GSH on photosynthetic characteristics and expression of key enzyme genes of CO2 assimilation in leaves of tomato seedlings under NaCl stress].

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    By spraying tomato leaves with reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and glutathione synthesis inhibitor (BSO), respectively, the effects of glutathion-mediated redox state on leaf photosynthesis in tomato under NaCl stress were investigated. The results showed that the application of exogenous GSH significantly induced an increase in reducing power level, in- creased the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (g(s)), transpiration rate (Tr), as well as the maximum quantum yield of PS II (Fv/Fm), actual photochemical efficiency of PS II (ΦPS II), photochemical quenching coefficient (q(P)) and non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ), and enhanced the Rubisco activity and expression levels of RbcL, RbcS and RCA genes in leaves of tomato seedlings under NaCl stress. These results suggested that GSH alleviated salt-induced oxidative stress by protecting PS II from damage caused by excess energy, and improving the photochemical efficiency of PS II and dark reaction activity of photosynthesis. Although spraying GSSG decreased the level of reducing power and further aggravated the damage and photoinhibition of the leaf photosynthetic apparatus, Pn was not affected in combined stressed (NaCl and GSSG) plants, which might be due to the up-regulation of expression levels of RbcL and RbcS genes. The application of BSO had no significant effects on redox state, CO2 conductivity capacity and PS II photochemical efficiency in tomato leaves under NaCl stress. However, compared to salt singly stressed plants, BSO application increased Pn, likely due to the up-regulation of Rubisco initial activity and RCA and RbcS expression levels. PMID:25757316

  9. Candidate reference genes for gene expression studies in water lily.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huolin; Chen, Sumei; Wan, Hongjian; Chen, Fadi; Gu, Chunsun; Liu, Zhaolei

    2010-09-01

    The selection of an appropriate reference gene(s) is a prerequisite for the proper interpretation of quantitative Real-Time polymerase chain reaction data. We report the evaluation of eight candidate reference genes across various tissues and treatments in the water lily by the two software packages geNorm and NormFinder. Across all samples, clathrin adaptor complexes medium subunit (AP47) and actin 11 (ACT11) emerged as the most suitable reference genes. Across different tissues, ACT11 and elongation factor 1-alpha (EF1alpha) exhibited a stable expression pattern. ACT11 and AP47 also stably expressed in roots subjected to various treatments, but in the leaves of the same plants the most stably expressed genes were ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 16 (UBC16) and ACT11. PMID:20452325

  10. Crocin "saffron" protects against beryllium chloride toxicity in rats through diminution of oxidative stress and enhancing gene expression of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    El-Beshbishy, Hesham A; Hassan, Memy H; Aly, Hamdy A A; Doghish, Ahmed S; Alghaithy, Abdulaziz A A

    2012-09-01

    Beryllium chloride (BeCl(2)) is a highly toxic substance that accumulates in different tissues after absorption. The purpose of this study was to investigate protective role of crocin against BeCl(2)-intoxication in rats. Male Wistar rats were used in this study and categorised into four groups (n=8). Group I served as normal control rats. Group II treated orally with BeCl(2) 86 mg/kg b.w. for five consecutive days. This dose was equivalent to experimental LD(50). Group III treated intraperitoneally with crocin 200 mg/kg b.w. for seven consecutive days. Group IV received crocin for seven consecutive days before BeCl(2) administration. Blood samples and liver and brain homogenates were obtained for haematological, biochemical and RT-PCR examinations. The haematocrit value, RBCs count and haemoglobin concentration were significantly decreased in BeCl(2)-treated rats. A significant increase was observed in rat liver and brain malondialdehyde level and protein carbonyls content in BeCl(2) exposed group compared to the control group, and these values were significantly declined upon administration of crocin. Lactate dehydrogenase levels in rat liver and brain significantly increased compared to the control group and was associated with significant decrease in catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. Reduced glutathione hepatic contents of BeCl(2)-treated rats were significantly decreased. There was significant decline in mRNA expression of catalase and superoxide dismutase genes in BeCl(2)-intoxicated rats compared to the normal rats. Crocin treatment prior to BeCl(2) intake resulted in significant increase in mRNA expressions of catalase and superoxide dismutase genes near to normalcy. The haematological and biochemical parameters were restored near to normal levels. Our results suggested that, BeCl(2) induced oxidation of cellular lipids and proteins and that administration of crocin reduced BeCl(2)-induced oxidative stress combined with initiation of m

  11. Expression of Malic Enzymes in Sebaceous Lesions.

    PubMed

    Su, Ting-Fu; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Malic enzymes (MEs) are involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and lipid accumulation, and their expression in sebocytes and sebaceous lesions has not been investigated. The aims of this study were to examine ME1 and ME2 expression in normal skin and sebaceous lesions. A total of 68 cases including 5 specimens of normal skin, 12 facial lesions showing sebaceous hyperplasia, 18 sebaceous adenomas, 10 sebaceomas, 13 steatocystomas, and 10 sebaceous carcinomas were examined for the expression of ME1 and ME2. All benign and malignant sebaceous lesions showed ME1 in clear cells and ME2 in nonclear cells, respectively. ME1/ME2 phenotype is seen in basal sebocytes, basal keratinocytes, sweat glands, and outer root sheath cells and hence not specific. This study demonstrates that ME1/ME2 expression phenotype may have a potential to be a valuable marker for sebaceous differentiation. It is necessary to perform large-scale studies including skin tumors with a clear cell morphology that may mimic sebaceous differentiation. PMID:26381116

  12. Environmental enrichment attenuates the age-related decline in the mRNA expression of steroidogenic enzymes and reduces the methylation state of the steroid 5α-reductase type 1 gene in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, María F; Varayoud, Jorgelina; Moreno-Piovano, Guillermo S; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge G

    2015-09-01

    We analyzed the effects of aging and environmental enrichment on the mRNA expression and DNA methylation state of steroidogenic enzymes in the hippocampus. The effects of aging were evaluated by comparing young adult (90-day-old) and middle-aged (450-day-old) female Wistar rats. To elucidate the effects of environmental enrichment, a subgroup of middle-aged rats exposed to sensory and social stimulation for 105 days was compared to rats housed under standard laboratory conditions. Aging decreased the transcription of neurosteroidogenic-related genes and increased the promoter methylation state of cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage, 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD) and 5α-reductase-1. Exposure of middle-aged rats to environmental enrichment increased mRNA levels of 5α-reductase-1, 3α-HSD and cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase/c17,20-lyase and decreased the methylation state of the 5α-reductase-1 gene. Thus, sensory and social stimulation attenuate the age-related decline in the mRNA expression of hippocampal steroidogenic enzymes. Epigenetic mechanisms associated with differential promoter methylation could be involved. PMID:26021641

  13. Investigation into the effects of antioxidant-rich extract of Tamarindus indica leaf on antioxidant enzyme activities, oxidative stress and gene expression profiles in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Razali, Nurhanani; Abdul Aziz, Azlina; Lim, Chor Yin

    2015-01-01

    The leaf extract of Tamarindus indica L. (T. indica) had been reported to possess high phenolic content and showed high antioxidant activities. In this study, the effects of the antioxidant-rich leaf extract of the T. indica on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, H2O2-induced ROS production and gene expression patterns were investigated in liver HepG2 cells. Lipid peroxidation and ROS production were inhibited and the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase was enhanced when the cells were treated with the antioxidant-rich leaf extract. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that 207 genes were significantly regulated by at least 1.5-fold (p < 0.05) in cells treated with the antioxidant-rich leaf extract. The expression of KNG1, SERPINC1, SERPIND1, SERPINE1, FGG, FGA, MVK, DHCR24, CYP24A1, ALDH6A1, EPHX1 and LEAP2 were amongst the highly regulated. When the significantly regulated genes were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software, “Lipid Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry, Hematological Disease” was the top biological network affected by the leaf extract, with a score of 36. The top predicted canonical pathway affected by the leaf extract was the coagulation system (P < 2.80 × 10−6) followed by the superpathway of cholesterol biosynthesis (P < 2.17 × 10−4), intrinsic prothrombin pathway (P < 2.92 × 10−4), Immune Protection/Antimicrobial Response (P < 2.28 × 10−3) and xenobiotic metabolism signaling (P < 2.41 × 10−3). The antioxidant-rich leaf extract of T. indica also altered the expression of proteins that are involved in the Coagulation System and the Intrinsic Prothrombin Activation Pathway (KNG1, SERPINE1, FGG), Superpathway of Cholesterol Biosynthesis (MVK), Immune protection/antimicrobial response (IFNGR1, LEAP2, ANXA3 and MX1) and Xenobiotic Metabolism Signaling (ALDH6A1, ADH6). In conclusion, the antioxidant-rich leaf extract of T. indica inhibited lipid

  14. Investigation into the effects of antioxidant-rich extract of Tamarindus indica leaf on antioxidant enzyme activities, oxidative stress and gene expression profiles in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Razali, Nurhanani; Abdul Aziz, Azlina; Lim, Chor Yin; Mat Junit, Sarni

    2015-01-01

    The leaf extract of Tamarindus indica L. (T. indica) had been reported to possess high phenolic content and showed high antioxidant activities. In this study, the effects of the antioxidant-rich leaf extract of the T. indica on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, H2O2-induced ROS production and gene expression patterns were investigated in liver HepG2 cells. Lipid peroxidation and ROS production were inhibited and the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase was enhanced when the cells were treated with the antioxidant-rich leaf extract. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that 207 genes were significantly regulated by at least 1.5-fold (p < 0.05) in cells treated with the antioxidant-rich leaf extract. The expression of KNG1, SERPINC1, SERPIND1, SERPINE1, FGG, FGA, MVK, DHCR24, CYP24A1, ALDH6A1, EPHX1 and LEAP2 were amongst the highly regulated. When the significantly regulated genes were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software, "Lipid Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry, Hematological Disease" was the top biological network affected by the leaf extract, with a score of 36. The top predicted canonical pathway affected by the leaf extract was the coagulation system (P < 2.80 × 10(-6)) followed by the superpathway of cholesterol biosynthesis (P < 2.17 × 10(-4)), intrinsic prothrombin pathway (P < 2.92 × 10(-4)), Immune Protection/Antimicrobial Response (P < 2.28 × 10(-3)) and xenobiotic metabolism signaling (P < 2.41 × 10(-3)). The antioxidant-rich leaf extract of T. indica also altered the expression of proteins that are involved in the Coagulation System and the Intrinsic Prothrombin Activation Pathway (KNG1, SERPINE1, FGG), Superpathway of Cholesterol Biosynthesis (MVK), Immune protection/antimicrobial response (IFNGR1, LEAP2, ANXA3 and MX1) and Xenobiotic Metabolism Signaling (ALDH6A1, ADH6). In conclusion, the antioxidant-rich leaf extract of T. indica inhibited lipid peroxidation

  15. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions. PMID:26966245

  16. Cloning, characterization, and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene encoding Listeria seeligeri catalase, a bacterial enzyme highly homologous to mammalian catalases.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, A; Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Goebel, W

    1991-01-01

    A gene coding for catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase; EC 1.11.1.6) of the gram-positive bacterium Listeria seeligeri was cloned from a plasmid library of EcoRI-digested chromosomal DNA, with Escherichia coli DH5 alpha as a host. The recombinant catalase was expressed in E. coli to an enzymatic activity approximately 50 times that of the combined E. coli catalases. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence revealed 43.2% amino acid sequence identity between bovine liver catalase and L. seeligeri catalase. Most of the amino acid residues which are involved in catalytic activity, the formation of the active center accession channel, and heme binding in bovine liver catalase were also present in L. seeligeri catalase at the corresponding positions. The recombinant protein contained 488 amino acid residues and had a calculated molecular weight of 55,869. The predicted isoelectric point was 5.0. Enzymatic and genetic analyses showed that there is most probably a single catalase of this type in L. seeligeri. A perfect 21-bp inverted repeat, which was highly homologous to previously reported binding sequences of the Fur (ferric uptake regulon) protein of E. coli, was detected next to the putative promoter region of the L. seeligeri catalase gene. Images PMID:1860824

  17. Gene Express Inc.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Colette F

    2006-07-01

    Gene Express, Inc. is a technology-licensing company and provider of Standardized Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (StaRT-PCR) services. Designed by and for clinical researchers involved in pharmaceutical, biomarker and molecular diagnostic product development, StaRT-PCR is a unique quantitative and standardized multigene expression measurement platform. StaRT-PCR meets all of the performance characteristics defined by the US FDA as required to support regulatory submissions [101,102] , and by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) as necessary to support diagnostic testing [1] . A standardized mixture of internal standards (SMIS), manufactured in bulk, provides integrated quality control wherein each native template target gene is measured relative to a competitive template internal standard. Bulk production enables the compilation of a comprehensive standardized database from across multiple experiments, across collaborating laboratories and across the entire clinical development lifecycle of a given compound or diagnostic product. For the first time, all these data are able to be directly compared. Access to such a database can dramatically shorten the time from investigational new drug (IND) to new drug application (NDA), or save time and money by hastening a substantiated 'no-go' decision. High-throughput StaRT-PCR is conducted at the company's automated Standardized Expression Measurement (SEM) Center. Currently optimized for detection on a microcapillary electrophoretic platform, StaRT-PCR products also may be analyzed on microarray, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) platforms. SEM Center services deliver standardized genomic data--data that will accelerate the application of pharmacogenomic technology to new drug and diagnostic test development and facilitate personalized medicine. PMID:16886903

  18. Genes, enzymes and regulation of arginine biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Robert D

    2005-08-01

    Arabidopsis genes encoding enzymes for each of the eight steps in L-arginine (Arg) synthesis were identified, based upon sequence homologies with orthologs from other organisms. Except for N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS; EC 2.3.1.1), which is encoded by two genes, all remaining enzymes are encoded by single genes. Targeting predictions for these enzymes, based upon their deduced sequences, and subcellular fractionation studies, suggest that most enzymes of Arg synthesis reside within the plastid. Synthesis of the L-ornthine (Orn) intermediate in this pathway from L-glutamate occurs as a series of acetylated intermediates, as in most other organisms. An N-acetylornithine:glutamate acetyltransferase (NAOGAcT; EC 2.3.1.35) facilitates recycling of the acetyl moiety during Orn formation (cyclic pathway). A putative N-acetylornithine deacetylase (NAOD; EC 3.5.1.16), which participates in the "linear" pathway for Orn synthesis in some organisms, was also identified. Previous biochemical studies have indicated that allosteric regulation of the first and, especially, the second steps in Orn synthesis (NAGS; N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK), EC 2.7.2.8) by the Arg end-product are the major sites of metabolic control of the pathway in organisms using the cyclic pathway. Gene expression profiling for pathway enzymes further suggests that NAGS, NAGK, NAOGAcT and NAOD are coordinately regulated in response to changes in Arg demand during plant growth and development. Synthesis of Arg from Orn is further coordinated with pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis, at the level of allocation of the common carbamoyl-P intermediate. PMID:16122935

  19. Genomic and proteomic analyses reveal multiple homologs of genes encoding enzymes of the methanol:coenzyme M methyltransferase system that are differentially expressed in methanol- and acetate-grown Methanosarcina thermophila.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan-Huai R; Zhang, Shi-Ping; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Ferry, James G

    2002-09-24

    Each of the genomic sequences of Methanosarcina acetivorans, Methanosarcina mazei, and Methanosarcina thermophila revealed two homologs of mtaA, three homologs of mtaB, and three homologs of mtaC encoding enzymes specific for methanogenesis from methanol. Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analyses of polypeptides from M. thermophila established that methanol induces the expression of mtaA-1, mtaB-1, mtaB-2, mtaB-3, mtaC-1, mtaC-2, and mtaC-3 whereas mtaB-3 and mtaC-3 are constitutively expressed in acetate-grown cells. The gene product of one of three mttC homologs, encoding trimethylamine-specific methyltransferase I, was detected in methanol- but not acetate-grown M. thermophila. A postulated role for the multiple homologs is discussed. PMID:12393212

  20. Correlation Index-Based Responsible-Enzyme Gene Screening (CIRES), a Novel DNA Microarray-Based Method for Enzyme Gene Involved in Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Harumi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Naito, Yuko; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Suzuki, Akemi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori

    2007-01-01

    Background Glycan biosynthesis occurs though a multi-step process that requires a variety of enzymes ranging from glycosyltransferases to those involved in cytosolic sugar metabolism. In many cases, glycan biosynthesis follows a glycan-specific, linear pathway. As glycosyltransferases are generally regulated at the level of transcription, assessing the overall transcriptional profile for glycan biosynthesis genes seems warranted. However, a systematic approach for assessing the correlation between glycan expression and glycan-related gene expression has not been reported previously. Methodology To facilitate genetic analysis of glycan biosynthesis, we sought to correlate the expression of genes involved in cell-surface glycan formation with the expression of the glycans, as detected by glycan-recognizing probes. We performed cross-sample comparisons of gene expression profiles using a newly developed, glycan-focused cDNA microarray. Cell-surface glycan expression profiles were obtained using flow cytometry of cells stained with plant lectins. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for these profiles and were used to identify enzyme genes correlated with glycan biosynthesis. Conclusions This method, designated correlation index-based responsible-enzyme gene screening (CIRES), successfully identified genes already known to be involved in the biosynthesis of certain glycans. Our evaluation of CIRES indicates that it is useful for identifying genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycan chains that can be probed with lectins using flow cytometry. PMID:18043739

  1. Effects of triclosan on the detoxification system in the yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco): expressions of CYP and GST genes and corresponding enzyme activity in phase I, II and antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Ku, Peijia; Wu, Xiaoyan; Nie, Xiangping; Ou, Ruikang; Wang, Lan; Su, Tian; Li, Yigang

    2014-11-01

    Triclosan (TCS), a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent widely used in pharmaceuticals and personal case products (PPCPs), has been universally detected in aquatic ecosystem in recent years. Unfortunately, there is limited information about its potential impacts on responses of genes and enzymes related to fish detoxification. In the present work, we cloned CYP3A and alpha-GST of yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) and tested the transcriptional expression of CYP1A, CYP3A and GST as well as the alterations of their corresponding enzymes, including ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), aminopyrine N-demethylase (APND), erythromycin N-demethylase (ERND), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT), and also the oxidative product malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the liver of P. fulvidraco exposed to TCS. Amino acids of CYP3A and GST were deduced and phylogenetic tree was constructed respectively. High identity percent was exhibited between P. fulvidraco and other species, such as other fish, birds and mammals. Results indicated that TCS significantly elevated CYP1A and GST but decreased CYP3A expression, EROD activity and MDA content at lower concentrations of TCS at 24h. Moreover, CYP3A and GST were significantly inhibited at 72 h but induced at 168 h at lower concentrations. However, CYP3A was always induced at the highest concentration during the exposure period. Furthermore, CYP3A, GST, GST enzyme and MDA content exhibited a dose-effect relationship to some extent, but no significant responses were observed in ERND, APND and CAT except for individual treatments. Taken together, EROD was the most sensitive to TCS exposure as compared to other enzymes. Meanwhile, mRNA responses were more sensitive in yellow catfish. PMID:25064140

  2. Identification of Enzyme Genes Using Chemical Structure Alignments of Substrate-Product Pairs.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Yuki; Yamada, Takuji; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakagawa, Zenichi; Kotera, Masaaki; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2016-03-28

    Although there are several databases that contain data on many metabolites and reactions in biochemical pathways, there is still a big gap in the numbers between experimentally identified enzymes and metabolites. It is supposed that many catalytic enzyme genes are still unknown. Although there are previous studies that estimate the number of candidate enzyme genes, these studies required some additional information aside from the structures of metabolites such as gene expression and order in the genome. In this study, we developed a novel method to identify a candidate enzyme gene of a reaction using the chemical structures of the substrate-product pair (reactant pair). The proposed method is based on a search for similar reactant pairs in a reference database and offers ortholog groups that possibly mediate the given reaction. We applied the proposed method to two experimentally validated reactions. As a result, we confirmed that the histidine transaminase was correctly identified. Although our method could not directly identify the asparagine oxo-acid transaminase, we successfully found the paralog gene most similar to the correct enzyme gene. We also applied our method to infer candidate enzyme genes in the mesaconate pathway. The advantage of our method lies in the prediction of possible genes for orphan enzyme reactions where any associated gene sequences are not determined yet. We believe that this approach will facilitate experimental identification of genes for orphan enzymes. PMID:26822930

  3. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  4. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  5. Serial analysis of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Velculescu, V E; Zhang, L; Vogelstein, B; Kinzler, K W

    1995-10-20

    The characteristics of an organism are determined by the genes expressed within it. A method was developed, called serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), that allows the quantitative and simultaneous analysis of a large number of transcripts. To demonstrate this strategy, short diagnostic sequence tags were isolated from pancreas, concatenated, and cloned. Manual sequencing of 1000 tags revealed a gene expression pattern characteristic of pancreatic function. New pancreatic transcripts corresponding to novel tags were identified. SAGE should provide a broadly applicable means for the quantitative cataloging and comparison of expressed genes in a variety of normal, developmental, and disease states. PMID:7570003

  6. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating

  7. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  8. Abnormally high digestive enzyme activity and gene expression explain the contemporary evolution of a Diabrotica biotype able to feed on soybeans.

    PubMed

    Curzi, Matías J; Zavala, Jorge A; Spencer, Joseph L; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2012-08-01

    Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera) (WCR) depends on the continuous availability of corn. Broad adoption of annual crop rotation between corn (Zea mays) and nonhost soybean (Glycine max) exploited WCR biology to provide excellent WCR control, but this practice dramatically reduced landscape heterogeneity in East-central Illinois and imposed intense selection pressure. This selection resulted in behavioral changes and "rotation-resistant" (RR) WCR adults. Although soybeans are well defended against Coleopteran insects by cysteine protease inhibitors, RR-WCR feed on soybean foliage and remain long enough to deposit eggs that will hatch the following spring and larvae will feed on roots of planted corn. Other than documenting changes in insect mobility and egg laying behavior, 15 years of research have failed to identify any diagnostic differences between wild-type (WT)- and RR-WCR or a mechanism that allows for prolonged RR-WCR feeding and survival in soybean fields. We documented differences in behavior, physiology, digestive protease activity (threefold to fourfold increases), and protease gene expression in the gut of RR-WCR adults. Our data suggest that higher constitutive activity levels of cathepsin L are part of the mechanism that enables populations of WCR to circumvent soybean defenses, and thus, crop rotation. These new insights into the mechanism of WCR tolerance of soybean herbivory transcend the issue of RR-WCR diagnostics and management to link changes in insect gut proteolytic activity and behavior with landscape heterogeneity. The RR-WCR illustrates how agro-ecological factors can affect the evolution of insects in human-altered ecosystems. PMID:22957201

  9. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  10. Differential effects of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and transforming growth factor-beta1 on gene expression of collagen-modifying enzymes in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, Marlene; Helder, Marco N; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Bank, Ruud A; Wuisman, Paul I J M; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2009-08-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) in combination with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) or transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) are under evaluation for bone tissue engineering. Posttranslational modification of type I collagen is essential for functional bone tissue with adequate physical and mechanical properties. We investigated whether BMP-2 (10-100 ng/mL) and/or TGF-beta1 (1-10 ng/mL) affect gene expression of alpha2(I) procollagen and collagen-modifying enzymes, that is, lysyl oxidase and lysyl hydroxylases 1, 2, and 3 (encoded by PLOD1, 2, and 3), by human AT-MSCs. BMP-2, but not TGF-beta1, increased alkaline phosphatase activity after 28 days, indicating osteogenic differentiation of AT-MSCs. At day 4, both BMP-2 and TGF-beta1 upregulated alpha2(I) procollagen and PLOD1, which was downregulated at day 28. TGF-beta1, but not BMP-2, downregulated PLOD3 at day 28. Lysyl oxidase was upregulated by TGF-beta1 at day 4 and by BMP-2 at day 7. Neither BMP-2 nor TGF-beta1 affected PLOD2. In conclusion, these results suggest that AT-MSCs differentially respond to BMP-2 and TGF-beta1 with changes in gene expression of collagen-modifying enzymes. AT-MSCs may thus be able to appropriately modify type I collagen to form a functional bone extracellular matrix for tissue engineering, dependent on the growth factor added. PMID:19231972

  11. The Marine-Derived Fungus Clonostachys rosea, Source of a Rare Conjugated 4-Me-6E,8E-hexadecadienoic Acid Reducing Viability of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells and Gene Expression of Lipogenic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ana Camila Dos Santos; Ruiz, Nicolas; Couzinet-Mossion, Aurélie; Bertrand, Samuel; Duflos, Muriel; Pouchus, Yves-François; Barnathan, Gilles; Nazih, Hassan; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaetane

    2015-08-01

    A marine-derived strain of Clonostachys rosea isolated from sediments of the river Loire estuary (France) was investigated for its high lipid production. The fungal strain was grown on six different culture media to explore lipid production changes. An original branched conjugated fatty acid, mainly present in triglycerides and mostly produced when grown on DCA (23% of total fatty acid composition). It was identified as 4-Me-6E,8E-hexadecadienoic on the basis of spectroscopic analyses. This fatty acid reduced viability of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in a dose dependent manner (up to 63%) at physiological free fatty acid human plasma concentration (100 μM). Reduction of gene expression of two lipogenic enzymes, the acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the fatty acid synthase (FAS) was evaluated to explore the mechanisms of action of 4-Me-6E,8E-16:2 acid. At 50 μM, 50% and 35% of mRNA gene expression inhibition were observed for ACC and FAS, respectively. PMID:26258780

  12. The Marine-Derived Fungus Clonostachys rosea, Source of a Rare Conjugated 4-Me-6E,8E-hexadecadienoic Acid Reducing Viability of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells and Gene Expression of Lipogenic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos Dias, Ana Camila; Ruiz, Nicolas; Couzinet-Mossion, Aurélie; Bertrand, Samuel; Duflos, Muriel; Pouchus, Yves-François; Barnathan, Gilles; Nazih, Hassan; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaetane

    2015-01-01

    A marine-derived strain of Clonostachys rosea isolated from sediments of the river Loire estuary (France) was investigated for its high lipid production. The fungal strain was grown on six different culture media to explore lipid production changes. An original branched conjugated fatty acid, mainly present in triglycerides and mostly produced when grown on DCA (23% of total fatty acid composition). It was identified as 4-Me-6E,8E-hexadecadienoic on the basis of spectroscopic analyses. This fatty acid reduced viability of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in a dose dependent manner (up to 63%) at physiological free fatty acid human plasma concentration (100 μM). Reduction of gene expression of two lipogenic enzymes, the acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the fatty acid synthase (FAS) was evaluated to explore the mechanisms of action of 4-Me-6E,8E-16:2 acid. At 50 μM, 50% and 35% of mRNA gene expression inhibition were observed for ACC and FAS, respectively. PMID:26258780

  13. Gene Expression in Oligodendroglial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Elisabeth J.; Haylock, Brian; Husband, David; du Plessis, Daniel; Sibson, D. Ross; Warnke, Peter C.; Walker, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss are more likely to be chemosensitive and have longer survival than those with intact 1p/19q, but not all respond to chemotherapy, warranting investigation of the biological basis of chemosensitivity. Methods: Gene expression profiling was performed using amplified antisense RNA from 28 oligodendroglial tumors treated with chemotherapy (26 serial stereotactic biopsy, 2 resection). Expression of differentially expressed genes was validated by real-time PCR. Results: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clustering of multiple samples from the same case in 14/17 cases and identified subgroups associated with tumor grade and 1p/19q status. 176 genes were differentially expressed, 164 being associated with 1p/19q loss (86% not on 1p or 19q). 94 genes differed between responders and non-responders to chemotherapy; 12 were not associated with 1p/19q loss. Significant differential expression was confirmed in 11/13 selected genes. Novel genes associated with response to therapy included SSBP2, GFRA1, FAP and RASD1. IQGAP1, INA, TGIF1, NR2F2 and MYCBP were differentially expressed in oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss. Conclusion: Gene expression profiling using serial stereotactic biopsies indicated greater homogeneity within tumors than between tumors. Genes associated with 1p/19q status or response were identified warranting further elucidation of their role in oligodendroglial tumors. PMID:20966545

  14. Gene expression profiles of some cytokines, growth factors, receptors, and enzymes (GM-CSF, IFNγ, MMP-2, IGF-II, EGF, TGF-β, IGF-IIR) during pregnancy in the cat uterus.

    PubMed

    Agaoglu, Ozgecan Korkmaz; Agaoglu, Ali Reha; Guzeloglu, Aydin; Aslan, Selim; Kurar, Ercan; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Schäfer-Somi, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Early pregnancy is one of the most critical periods of pregnancy, and many factors such as cytokines, enzymes, and members of the immune system have to cooperate in a balanced way. In the present study, the gene expression profiles of factors associated with pregnancy such as EGF, transforming growth factor beta, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon gamma, insulin-like growth factor 2, insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 were analyzed in uterine tissues of female cats. The cats were assigned to five groups: G1 (embryo positive, n = 7; 7th day after mating), G2 (after implantation, n = 7; 20th day after mating), G3 (midgestation, n = 7; 24-25th day after mating), G4 (late gestation, n = 7; 30-45th day after mating), G5 (oocyte group, n = 7; 7th day after estrus). Tissue samples from the uterus and placenta were collected after ovariohysterectomy. Relative messenger RNA levels were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. All the factors examined were detected in all tissue samples. In the course of pregnancy, significantly higher expression of EGF and matrix metalloproteinase 2 in G2 than in G1 was observed (P < 0.05). Insulin-like growth factor 2 expression was higher in all groups than in G1 (P < 0.05). Upregulation of EGF during implantation was detected. The expression of interferon gamma was significantly higher in G3 than in G1 (P < 0.05). Transforming growth factor beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were constantly expressed in all groups. In conclusion, the expressions of these factors in feline uterine tissue at different stages of pregnancy might indicate that these factors play roles in the development of pregnancy such as trophoblast invasion, vascularization, implantation, and placentation. PMID:26559469

  15. Gene Expression Profile Analysis of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases. PMID:23469233

  16. Coordinated changes in xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) gene expression through the life stages of the male C57BL/6 mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver's ability to detoxify and eliminate xenobiotics. This is accomplished, in part, by the expression of XMEs, which metabolize xenobiotics and determine whether exposure will result in toxicity. Some evidence indicates...

  17. Malonyl-CoA:anthocyanin 5-O-glucoside-6"'-O-malonyltransferase from scarlet sage (Salvia splendens) flowers. Enzyme purification, gene cloning, expression, and characterization.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Nakayama, T; Yonekura-Sakakibara, K; Fukui, Y; Nakamura, N; Nakao, M; Tanaka, Y; Yamaguchi, M A; Kusumi, T; Nishino, T

    2001-12-28

    The orange to blue coloration of flowers in nature is, in most cases, provided by anthocyanins, a class of plant flavonoids, many of which are modified by malonyl group(s). However, the identity of the enzyme catalyzing the malonylation reaction remains to be established. Here, we describe for the first time the purification, characterization, and cDNA cloning of an anthocyanin malonyltransferase from scarlet sage (Salvia splendens) flowers. The purified enzyme (termed Ss5MaT1) was a monomeric 50-kDa protein catalyzing the regiospecific transfer of the malonyl group from malonyl-CoA to the 6"'-hydroxyl group of the 5-glucosyl moiety of anthocyanins. Ss5MaT1 showed a k(cat) value of 7.8 s(-1) at 30 degrees C and pH 7.0 for the malonylation of bisdemalonylsalvianin (pelargonidin 3-(6"-O-caffeyl-beta-glucopyranoside)-5-beta-glucopyranoside) and K(m) values of 101 microm and 57 microm for bisdemalonylsalvianin and malonyl-CoA, respectively. p-Coumaric acid, which mimics an aromatic acyl group linked to the 3-glucosidic moiety of an anthocyanin substrate, was a competitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate. This strongly suggests that the presence of an aromatic acyl group at the 3-glucosidic moiety of anthocyanin is important for substrate recognition by the enzyme. On the basis of the partial amino acid sequences of the purified enzyme, we isolated a cDNA encoding Ss5MaT1. Ss5MaT1 consisted of 462 amino acids and shared motifs that are commonly found among members of a versatile plant acyltransferase family, which was recently shown to include numerous homologs of unknown biochemical functions. Northern blot analysis revealed that the transcripts of Ss5MaT1 were detected in petals, sepals, bracts, and red stems, in accordance with the pigment accumulation patterns. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the aliphatic and aromatic acylations of anthocyanins are generally catalyzed by subfamily members of the plant acyltransferase family. PMID:11598135

  18. SUMO-conjugating enzyme (Sce) and FK506-binding protein (FKBP) encoding rice (Oryza sativa L.) genes: genome-wide analysis, expression studies and evidence for their involvement in abiotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Neha; Singh, Amanjot; Sahi, Chandan; Chandramouli, Anupama; Grover, Anil

    2008-04-01

    We report an in-depth characterization of two major stress proteins namely SUMO-conjugating enzyme (Sce) and peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Sce mediates addition of SUMO group to various cell proteins, through process referred to as SUMOylation. Rice nuclear genome has two putative genes encoding the Sce protein (OsSce1 and OsSce2). PCR-amplified full-length OsSce1 cDNA functionally complemented the growth defect in yeast cells lacking the equivalent Ubc9 protein (ScDeltaubc9). RT-PCR analysis showed that transcript levels of OsSce1 and OsSce2 in rice seedlings were regulated by temperature stress. OsSce1 protein was localized to the nucleus in onion epidermal cells as evidenced by the transient GFP expression analysis following micro-projectile gun-based shooting of an OsSce1-GFP fusion construct. PPIase proteins assist molecular chaperones in reactions associated with protein folding and protein transport across membrane. There are 23 putative genes encoding for FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs; specific class of PPIase) in rice genome. OsFKBP20 cDNA was isolated as a stress-inducible EST clone. Largest ORF of 561 bases in OsFKBP20 showed characteristic FK506-binding domain at N-terminus and a coiled-coil motif at C-terminus. RNA expression analysis indicated that OsFKBP20 transcript is heat-inducible. OsFKBP20 over-expression in yeast endowed capacity of high temperature tolerance to yeast cells. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that OsSce1 protein physically interacts with the OsFKBP20 protein. It is thus proposed that OsSce1 and OsFKBP20 proteins in concert mediate the stress response of rice plants. PMID:18219493

  19. X-ray structure of MalY from Escherichia coli: a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme acting as a modulator in mal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Clausen, T; Schlegel, A; Peist, R; Schneider, E; Steegborn, C; Chang, Y S; Haase, A; Bourenkov, G P; Bartunik, H D; Boos, W

    2000-03-01

    MalY represents a bifunctional pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme acting as a beta-cystathionase and as a repressor of the maltose regulon. Here we present the crystal structures of wild-type and A221V mutant protein. Each subunit of the MalY dimer is composed of a large pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-binding domain and a small domain similar to aminotransferases. The structural alignment with related enzymes identifies residues that are generally responsible for beta-lyase activity and depicts a unique binding mode of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate correlated with a larger, more flexible substrate-binding pocket. In a screen for MalY mutants with reduced mal repressor properties, mutations occurred in three clusters: I, 83-84; II, 181-189 and III, 215-221, which constitute a clearly distinguished region in the MalY crystal structure far away from the cofactor. The tertiary structure of one of these mutants (A221V) demonstrates that positional rearrangements are indeed restricted to regions I, II and III. Therefore, we propose that a direct protein-protein interaction with MalT, the central transcriptional activator of the maltose system, underlies MalY-dependent repression of the maltose system. PMID:10698925

  20. EXPRESSION OF AN AT-RICH XYLANASE GENE FROM THE ANAEROBIC FUNGUS ORPINOMYCES SP. STRAIN PC-2 IN AND SECRETION OF THE HETEROLOGOUS ENZYME BY HYPOCREA JECORINA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AT-rich xylanase A gene (xynA) of the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2 codes for a polypeptide comprising a glycoside hydrolase family 11 catalytic domain linked by a hinge to two docking domains. The catalytic domain-coding region was used for the heterologous production of a xylan...

  1. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    SciTech Connect

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  2. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with the long term goal of our research to understand the nature of the key enzymes in eukaryotic DNA replication we have characterized the properties of the wild type DNA polymerases of the {alpha}-family and their mutants. We have also provided evidence for the role of aphidicolin in the elongation process of the in vivo DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. We also developed a technology for planned prep from a large numbers of clones for direct screening by size or restriction digestion in order to facilitate our goals to clone the DNA polymerase gene.

  3. Lipogenesis and stearoyl-CoA desaturase gene expression and enzyme activity in adipose tissue of short- and long-fed Angus and Wagyu steers fed corn- or hay-based diets.

    PubMed

    Chung, K Y; Lunt, D K; Kawachi, H; Yano, H; Smith, S B

    2007-02-01

    Angus and Wagyu steers consuming high-roughage diets exhibit large differences in adipose tissue fatty acid composition, but there are no differences in terminal measures of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) activity or gene expression. Also, adipose tissue lipids of cattle fed corn-based diets have greater MUFA:SFA ratios than cattle fed hay-based diets. We hypothesized that any changes in SCD gene expression and activity would precede similar changes in adipose tissue lipogenesis between short- and long-fed endpoints. Furthermore, changes in SCD activity and gene expression between production endpoints would differ between corn- and hay-fed steers and between Wagyu and Angus steers. Angus (n = 8) and Wagyu (n = 8) steers were fed a corn-based diet for 8 mo (short-fed; 16 mo of age) or 16 mo (long-fed; 24 mo of age), whereas another group of Angus (n = 8) and Wagyu (n = 8) steers was fed a hay-based diet for 12 mo (short-fed; 20 mo of age) or 20 mo (long-fed; 28 mo of age) to match the end point BW of the corn-fed steers. Acetate incorporation into lipids in vitro was greater (P < 0.01) in corn-fed steers than in hay-fed steers and tended (P = 0.06) to be greater in Wagyu than in Angus s.c. adipose tissue because the rate in Wagyu was twice that of Angus adipose tissue in the corn-fed, short-fed steers. There were diet x end point interactions for lipogenesis in i.m. and s.c. adipose tissues (both P < 0.01) because lipogenesis was 60 to 90% lower in the long-fed cattle than in short-fed cattle fed the corn-based diet. The greatest SCD enzyme activity in Angus s.c. adipose tissue was observed at 24 mo of age (corn-based diet), but activity in Wagyu adipose tissue was greatest at 28 mo of age (hay-based diet; breed x diet x end point interaction, P = 0.08). For short- vs. long-fed endpoints in Angus, s.c. adipose tissue SCD activity was less (hay diet) or the same (corn diet). Conversely, SCD gene expression was greatest in long-fed Wagyu steers fed the hay- or corn

  4. Gene Expression of Vitamin D Metabolic Enzymes at Baseline and in Response to Vitamin D Treatment in Thyroid Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Robert G.; Wakeley, Shannon E.; Hamel, Frederick G.; High, Robin R.; Korch, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The association between vitamin D and thyroid cancer is unclear. It is unknown if CYP27A1 or CYP2R1 are present in normal thyroid or cancer cells and there is limited information regarding response to treatment with vitamin D. SV40 immortalized follicular cells (n-thy) and six thyroid cancer cell lines were treated with 10μM vitamin D3, 0.1μM 1,25(OH)2D3 or vehicle x 24 hours. CYP27A1, CYP2R1, CYP27B1, and CYP24A1 mRNA were measured using quantitative RT-PCR before and after treatment. Cell proliferation was also evaluated in TPC1 and C643 cells after treatment with D3, 25(OH)D3, and 1,25(OH)2D3. Baseline CYP27A1 and CYP27B1 mRNA were present in all cells, CYP2R1 was higher, and CYP24A1 mRNA was lower in cancer cell lines versus N-thy. TPC1 cells had increased CYP24A1 mRNA levels when treated with both D3 (3.49, p< 0.001) and 1,25(OH)2D3 (5.05, p<0.001). C643 cells showed increased CYP24A1 mRNA expression when treated with 1,25(OH)2D3 (5.36, p<0.001). D3, 25(OH)D3, and 1,25(OH)2D3 all significantly decreased cell proliferation in TPC1 and C643 cells. Overall, both cancerous and N-thy cell lines express CYP27A1 and CYP2R1 in addition to CYP27B1, establishing the potential to metabolize D3 to 1,25(OH)2D3. Additionally, vitamin D3, 25(OH)D3, and 1,25(OH)2D3 all had an anti-proliferative effect on two thyroid cancer cell lines. PMID:22992568

  5. Molecular imaging of in vivo gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advances in imaging technologies have taken a prominent role in experimental and translational research and provide essential information on how changes in gene expression are related to downstream developmental and disease states. Discussion Magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents and optical probes developed to enhance signal intensity in the presence of a specific enzyme, genetic marker, second messenger or metabolite can prove a facile method of advancing the understanding of molecular events in disease progression. Conclusion The ability to detect changes in gene expression at the early stages of disease will lead to a greater understanding of disease progression, the use of early therapeutic intervention to increase patient survival, and tailored therapies to the detected genetic alterations in individual patients. PMID:21426178

  6. Antioxidant enzyme expression in rat lungs during hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Y S; Dey, M S; Crapo, J D

    1996-05-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms that upregulate the activities of pulmonary antioxidant enzymes in adult rats during exposure to 85% oxygen, the relative contents of corresponding mRNA in normal and hyperoxic lungs were determined. Hyperoxic exposure drastically induced the expression of lung manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) mRNA. Maximal induction of MnSOD mRNA occurred at days 3 and 5 of exposure to hyperoxia, reaching a 600 and a 340% increase over the levels of air-exposed rats, respectively. In addition, hyperoxia induced lung mRNA for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutathione peroxidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, alpha-tubulin, and gamma-actin to different extends at various days of exposure. Hyperoxia had little or no effect on the levels of mRNA for copper/zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), catalase, heat shock protein (HSP70), and creatine kinase. Nuclear run-on experiments showed that the transcriptional rate of the MnSOD gene is enhanced in hyperoxic rat lungs by approximately 400% at day 3 of exposure compared with that of controls. The specific activities of CuZnSOD and MnSOD in these lung samples per unit of lung protein or DNA were also determined. The activity of CuZnSOD in hyperoxic lungs was found to be unchanged compared with controls, except a 20% decrease at day 7 of exposure when standardized against protein content of lung homogenate. Changes of CuZnSOD activity were more dramatic in hyperoxic lungs (a 40% increase at days 3, 5, 7, and 14 of exposure) when enzyme activity was normalized using lung DNA content. Surprisingly, no proportional increase of lung MnSOD enzyme activity was observed at days 3 and 5 of oxygen exposure. The increase of MnSOD activity per unit of lung protein also did not parallel the increase in MnSOD protein content at days 5, 7, and 14 of exposure. These data suggest that, in addition to transcriptional activation, translational and/or posttranslational

  7. Using shotgun sequence data to find active restriction enzyme genes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Posfai, Janos; Morgan, Richard D; Vincze, Tamas; Roberts, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequence analysis has become the standard method for beginning to determine a genome sequence. The preparation of the shotgun sequence clones is, in fact, a biological experiment. It determines which segments of the genome can be cloned into Escherichia coli and which cannot. By analyzing the complete set of sequences from such an experiment, it is possible to identify genes lethal to E. coli. Among this set are genes encoding restriction enzymes which, when active in E. coli, lead to cell death by cleaving the E. coli genome at the restriction enzyme recognition sites. By analyzing shotgun sequence data sets we show that this is a reliable method to detect active restriction enzyme genes in newly sequenced genomes, thereby facilitating functional annotation. Active restriction enzyme genes have been identified, and their activity demonstrated biochemically, in the sequenced genomes of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 and Methylococcus capsulatus. PMID:18988632

  8. Nuclear Neighborhoods and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Bodnar, Megan S.; Spector, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic nucleus is a highly compartmentalized and dynamic environment. Chromosome territories are arranged non-randomly within the nucleus and numerous studies have indicated that a gene’s position in the nucleus can impact its transcriptional activity. Here, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the influence of specific nuclear neighborhoods on gene expression or repression. Nuclear neighborhoods associated with transcriptional repression include the inner nuclear membrane/nuclear lamina and peri-nucleolar chromatin, whereas neighborhoods surrounding the nuclear pore complex, PML nuclear bodies, and nuclear speckles seem to be transcriptionally permissive. While nuclear position appears to play an important role in gene expression, it is likely to be only one piece of a flexible puzzle that incorporates numerous parameters. We are still at a very early, yet exciting stage in our journey toward deciphering the mechanism(s) that govern the permissiveness of gene expression/repression within different nuclear neighborhoods. PMID:19339170

  9. Differential Gene Expression in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2014-01-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell–matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system. PMID:24985133

  10. Gene cloned for enzyme used to make cheese

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-15

    Scientists at Collaborative Research in Waltham, Mass., working under a contract with Dow Chemical, Midland, Mich. are reported to have cloned the gene rennin, an enzyme used in the production of cheese. The gene was cloned in both yeast and the bacterium Escherichia coli using standard recombinant DNA techniques. Rennin is the first enzyme of industrial importance to be cloned and it is hoped that rennin will be commercially available by the mid-1980's.

  11. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Peters, C. P.

    2012-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. Clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result if the liver is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver.

  12. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  13. Peroxisome proliferators alter the expression of estrogen-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Corton, J C; Bocos, C; Moreno, E S; Merritt, A; Cattley, R C; Gustafsson, J A

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to some peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) leads to toxic effects on sex organ function possibly by alterations of steroid hormone metabolism. A systematic search for genes whose mRNA levels are modulated by the PPC WY-14643 (WY) was carried out in rat liver, a site of steroid hormone metabolism. The sequence of one up-regulated cDNA (2480 bp) was predicted to encode a protein of 735 amino acids with 82% identity to the porcine 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type IV (HSD IV) originally isolated as a 17 beta-estradiol dehydrogenase. The rat HSD IV was localized to peroxisomes and was regulated by diverse PPC by two distinct mechanisms. Induction of HSD IV and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) proteins in rat liver at different treatment times and concentrations of gemfibrozil (GEM) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) were almost identical, suggesting that HSD IV mRNA induction involves the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, a regulator of ACO. In contrast, HSD IV protein levels were only weakly induced by WY, a strong inducer of ACO protein, even though the levels of both HSD IV and ACO mRNA were strongly stimulated by WY. Thus HSD IV protein levels were uniquely regulated pretranslationally by WY. In addition to HSD IV we also identified the male-specific alpha 2u-globulin as a PPC down-regulated gene. This prompted us to examine the expression of another male-specific gene, CYP2C11, that catalyzes the hydroxylations of estradiol at the 2 and 16 alpha positions. Cyp2C11 protein expression in rat liver was either decreased or completely abolished after a 3-week treatment by GEM or WY, respectively. Decreased expression of enzymes which inactivate estradiol including Cyp2C11, and the reported increased expression of aromatase may explain why male rats exposed to diverse PPC have higher serum estradiol levels. These higher estradiol levels in male rats have been thought to be mechanistically linked to Leydig cell hyperplasia and adenomas. Increased

  14. Formylmethanofuran:tetrahydromethanopterin formyltransferase (Ftr) from the hyperthermophilic Methanopyrus kandleri. Cloning, sequencing and functional expression of the ftr gene and one-step purification of the enzyme overproduced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shima, S; Weiss, D S; Thauer, R K

    1995-06-15

    Methanopyrus kandleri is a methanogenic Archaeon that grows on H2 and CO2 at a temperature optimum of 98 degrees C. The gene ftr encoding the formylmethanofuran:tetrahydromethanopterin formyltransferase, an enzyme involved in CO2 reduction to methane, has been cloned, sequenced, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The overproduced enzyme could be purified in yields above 90% by simply heating the cell extract to 90 degrees C in 1.5 M K2HPO4 pH 8.0 for 30 min. From 1 g wet cells (70 mg protein) approximately 14 mg formyltransferase was obtained. The purified enzyme showed essentially the same catalytic properties as that purified from M. kandleri cells. The primary structure and properties of the formyltransferase are compared with those of the enzyme from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (growth temperature optimum 65 degrees C) and Methanothermus fervidus (83 degrees C). Of the three enzymes that from M. kandleri had the lowest isoelectric point (4.2) and the lowest hydrophobicity of the amino acid composition. The enzyme from M. kandleri had the relatively highest content in alanine, glutamate and glutamine and the relatively lowest content in isoleucine, leucine and lysine. These properties, some of which are unusual for enzymes from other hyperthermophilic organisms, may reflect that the formyltransferase from M. kandleri is adapted to both hyperthermophilic and halophilic conditions. PMID:7601152

  15. Gene expression profiling analysis of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H.; Ma, J.; Wu, J.; Chen, L.; Sun, F.; Qu, C.; Zheng, D.; Xu, S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study screened potential genes related to lung adenocarcinoma, with the aim of further understanding disease pathogenesis. The GSE2514 dataset including 20 lung adenocarcinoma and 19 adjacent normal tissue samples from 10 patients with lung adenocarcinoma aged 45-73 years was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two groups were screened using the t-test. Potential gene functions were predicted using functional and pathway enrichment analysis, and protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks obtained from the STRING database were constructed with Cytoscape. Module analysis of PPI networks was performed through MCODE in Cytoscape. In total, 535 upregulated and 465 downregulated DEGs were identified. These included ATP5D, UQCRC2, UQCR11 and genes encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which are mainly associated with mitochondrial ATP synthesis coupled electron transport, and which were enriched in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Other DEGs were associated with DNA replication (PRIM1, MCM3, and RNASEH2A), cell surface receptor-linked signal transduction and the enzyme-linked receptor protein signaling pathway (MAPK1, STAT3, RAF1, and JAK1), and regulation of the cytoskeleton and phosphatidylinositol signaling system (PIP5K1B, PIP5K1C, and PIP4K2B). Our findings suggest that DEGs encoding subunits of NADH, PRIM1, MCM3, MAPK1, STAT3, RAF1, and JAK1 might be associated with the development of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26840709

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF CHANGES IN XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM ENZYME EXPRESSION DURING AGING USING COMPREHENSIVE TRANSCRIPT PROFILING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging leads to changes in the expression of enzymes and transporters important in the metabolism and fate of xenobiotics in liver, kidney and intestine. Most notable are the changes in a number of CYP and xenobiotic transporter genes regulated by the nuclear receptors PXR, CAR an...

  17. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  18. Differential expression of myrosinase gene families.

    PubMed Central

    Lenman, M; Falk, A; Rödin, J; Höglund, A S; Ek, B; Rask, L

    1993-01-01

    In mature seeds of Brassica napus three major and three minor myrosinase isoenzymes were identified earlier. These myrosinases are known to be encoded by at least two different families of myrosinase genes, denoted MA and MB. In the work described in this paper the presence of different myrosinase isoenzymes in embryos, seedlings, and vegetative mature tissues of B. napus was studied and related to the expression of myrosinase MA and MB genes in the same tissues to facilitate future functional studies of these enzymes. In developing seeds, myrosinases of 75, 73, 70, 68, 66, and 65 kD were present. During seedling development there was a turnover of the myrosinase pool such that in 5-d-old seedlings the 75-, 70-, 66-, and 65-kD myrosinases were present, with the 70- and 75-kD myrosinases predominating. In 21-d-old seedlings the same myrosinases were present, but the 66- and 65-kD myrosinase species were most abundant. At flowering the mature organs of the plant contained only a 72-kD myrosinase. MA genes were expressed only in developing seeds, whereas MB genes were most highly expressed in seeds, seedling cotyledons, young leaves, and to a lesser extent other organs of the mature plant. During embryogenesis of B. napus, myrosinase MA and MB gene transcripts started to accumulate approximately 20 d after pollination and reached their highest level approximately 15 d later. MB transcripts accumulated to about 3 times the amount of MA transcripts. In situ hybridization analysis of B. napus embryos showed that MA transcripts were present predominatly in myrosin cells in the axis, whereas MB genes were expressed in myrosin cells of the entire embryo. The embryo axiz contained 75-, 70-, and 65-kD myrosinases, whereas the cotyledons contained mainly 70- and 65-kD myrosinases. Amino acid sequencing revealed the 75-kD myrosinase to be encoded by the MA gene family. The high degree of cell and tissue specificity of the expression of myrosinase genes suggests that studies of

  19. Plant enolase: gene structure, expression, and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Straeten, D; Rodrigues-Pousada, R A; Goodman, H M; Van Montagu, M

    1991-01-01

    Enolase genes were cloned from tomato and Arabidopsis. Comparison of their primary structures with other enolases revealed a remarkable degree of conservation, except for the presence of an insertion of 5 amino acids unique to plant enolases. Expression of the enolase genes was studied under various conditions. Under normal growth conditions, steady-state messenger and enzyme activity levels were significantly higher in roots than in green tissue. Large inductions of mRNA, accompanied by a moderate increase in enzyme activity, were obtained by an artificial ripening treatment in tomato fruits. However, there was little effect of anaerobiosis on the abundance of enolase messenger. In heat shock conditions, no induction of enolase mRNA was observed. We also present evidence that, at least in Arabidopsis, the hypothesis that there exists a complete set of glycolytic enzymes in the chloroplast is not valid, and we propose instead the occurrence of a substrate shuttle in Arabidopsis chloroplasts for termination of the glycolytic cycle. PMID:1841726

  20. Structure, expression and functions of MTA genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Rui-An

    2016-05-15

    Metastatic associated proteins (MTA) are integrators of upstream regulatory signals with the ability to act as master coregulators for modifying gene transcriptional activity. The MTA family includes three genes and multiple alternatively spliced variants. The MTA proteins neither have their own enzymatic activity nor have been shown to directly interact with DNA. However, MTA proteins interact with a variety of chromatin remodeling factors and complexes with enzymatic activities for modulating the plasticity of nucleosomes, leading to the repression or derepression of target genes or other extra-nuclear and nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD)-complex independent activities. The functions of MTA family members are driven by the steady state levels and subcellular localization of MTA proteins, the dynamic nature of modifying signals and enzymes, the structural features and post-translational modification of protein domains, interactions with binding proteins, and the nature of the engaged and resulting features of nucleosomes in the proximity of target genes. In general, MTA1 and MTA2 are the most upregulated genes in human cancer and correlate well with aggressive phenotypes, therapeutic resistance, poor prognosis and ultimately, unfavorable survival of cancer patients. Here we will discuss the structure, expression and functions of the MTA family of genes in the context of cancer cells. PMID:26869315

  1. Regulation of Cellulase and Hemicellulase Gene Expression in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Amore, Antonella; Giacobbe, Simona; Faraco, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    Research on regulation of cellulases and hemicellulases gene expression may be very useful for increasing the production of these enzymes in their native producers. Mechanisms of gene regulation of cellulase and hemicellulase expression in filamentous fungi have been studied, mainly in Aspergillus and Trichoderma. The production of these extracellular enzymes is an energy-consuming process, so the enzymes are produced only under conditions in which the fungus needs to use plant polymers as an energy and carbon source. Moreover, production of many of these enzymes is coordinately regulated, and induced in the presence of the substrate polymers. In addition to induction by mono- and oligo-saccharides, genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes involved in plant cell wall deconstruction in filamentous fungi can be repressed during growth in the presence of easily metabolizable carbon sources, such as glucose. Carbon catabolite repression is an important mechanism to repress the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes during growth on preferred carbon sources. This manuscript reviews the recent advancements in elucidation of molecular mechanisms responsible for regulation of expression of cellulase and hemicellulase genes in fungi. PMID:24294104

  2. Gene expression during memory formation.

    PubMed

    Igaz, Lionel Muller; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Vianna, Monica M R; Izquierdo, Ivan; Medina, Jorge H

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, neuroscientists have provided many clues that point out the involvement of de novo gene expression during the formation of long-lasting forms of memory. However, information regarding the transcriptional response networks involved in memory formation has been scarce and fragmented. With the advent of genome-based technologies, combined with more classical approaches (i.e., pharmacology and biochemistry), it is now feasible to address those relevant questions--which gene products are modulated, and when that processes are necessary for the proper storage of memories--with unprecedented resolution and scale. Using one-trial inhibitory (passive) avoidance training of rats, one of the most studied tasks so far, we found two time windows of sensitivity to transcriptional and translational inhibitors infused into the hippocampus: around the time of training and 3-6 h after training. Remarkably, these periods perfectly overlap with the involvement of hippocampal cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) signaling pathways in memory consolidation. Given the complexity of transcriptional responses in the brain, particularly those related to processing of behavioral information, it was clearly necessary to address this issue with a multi-variable, parallel-oriented approach. We used cDNA arrays to screen for candidate inhibitory avoidance learning-related genes and analyze the dynamic pattern of gene expression that emerges during memory consolidation. These include genes involved in intracellular kinase networks, synaptic function, DNA-binding and chromatin modification, transcriptional activation and repression, translation, membrane receptors, and oncogenes, among others. Our findings suggest that differential and orchestrated hippocampal gene expression is necessary in both early and late periods of long-term memory consolidation. Additionally, this kind of studies may lead to the identification and characterization of genes that are relevant for the pathogenesis

  3. Transition Metals in Control of Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, Thomas V.

    1993-08-01

    Metalloproteins play structural and catalytic roles in gene expression. The metalloregulatory proteins are a subclass that exerts metal-responsive control of genes involved in respiration, metabolism, and metal-specific homeostasis or stress-response systems, such as iron uptake and storage, copper efflux, and mercury detoxification. Two allosteric mechanisms for control of gene expression were first discovered in metalloregulatory systems: an iron-responsive translational control mechanism for ferritin production and a mercury-responsive DNA-distortion mechanism for transcriptional control of detoxification genes. These otherwise unrelated mechanisms give rise to a rapid physiological response when metal ion concentrations exceed a dangerous threshold. Molecular recognition in these allosteric metal ion receptors is achieved through atypical coordination geometries, cluster formation, or complexes with prosthetic groups, such as sulfide and heme. Thus, many of the inorganic assemblies that otherwise buttress the structure of biopolymers or catalyze substrate transformation in active sites of enzymes have also been adapted to serve sensor functions in the metalloregulatory proteins. Mechanistic studies of these metal-sensor protein interactions are providing new insights into fundamental aspects of inorganic chemistry, molecular biology, and cellular physiology.

  4. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  5. Systems Biophysics of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Jose M.G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a process central to any form of life. It involves multiple temporal and functional scales that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the coordinated regulation of multiple genes in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. This diversity in scales poses fundamental challenges to the use of traditional approaches to fully understand even the simplest gene expression systems. Recent advances in computational systems biophysics have provided promising avenues to reliably integrate the molecular detail of biophysical process into the system behavior. Here, we review recent advances in the description of gene regulation as a system of biophysical processes that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the combinatorial assembly of nucleoprotein complexes. There is now basic mechanistic understanding on how promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including precision and flexibility of the transcriptional responses. PMID:23790365

  6. Control of Renin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Pan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Renin, as part of the renin-angiotensin system, plays a critical role in the regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte homeostasis, mammalian renal development and progression of fibrotic/hypertrophic diseases. Renin gene transcription is subject to complex developmental and tissue-specific regulation. Initial studies using the mouse As4.1 cell line, which has many characteristics of the renin-expressing juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, have identified a proximal promoter region (−197 to −50 bp) and an enhancer (−2866 to −2625 bp) upstream of the Ren-1c gene, which are critical for renin gene expression. The proximal promoter region contains several transcription factor-binding sites including a binding site for the products of the developmental control genes Hox. The enhancer consists of at least 11 transcription factor-binding sites and is responsive to various signal transduction pathways including cAMP, retinoic acid, endothelin-1, and cytokines, all of which are known to alter renin mRNA levels. Furthermore, in vivo models have validated several of these key components found within the proximal promoter region and the enhancer as well as other key sites necessary for renin gene transcription. PMID:22576577

  7. Expression analysis of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes in Petunia hybrida.

    PubMed

    Chu, Y X; Chen, H R; Wu, A Z; Cai, R; Pan, J S

    2015-01-01

    Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) genes from Rosa chinensis (Asn type) and Calibrachoa hybrida (Asp type), driven by a CaMV 35S promoter, were integrated into the petunia (Petunia hybrida) cultivar 9702. Exogenous DFR gene expression characteristics were similar to flower-color changes, and effects on anthocyanin concentration were observed in both types of DFR gene transformants. Expression analysis showed that exogenous DFR genes were expressed in all of the tissues, but the expression levels were significantly different. However, both of them exhibited a high expression level in petals that were starting to open. The introgression of DFR genes may significantly change DFR enzyme activity. Anthocyanin ultra-performance liquid chromatography results showed that anthocyanin concentrations changed according to DFR enzyme activity. Therefore, the change in flower color was probably the result of a DFR enzyme change. Pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside was found in two different transgenic petunias, indicating that both CaDFR and RoDFR could catalyze dihydrokaempferol. Our results also suggest that transgenic petunias with DFR gene of Asp type could biosynthesize pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside. PMID:25966276

  8. Microdiversity of extracellular enzyme genes among sequenced prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Amy E; Martiny, Adam C; Allison, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between prokaryotic traits and phylogeny is important for predicting and modeling ecological processes. Microbial extracellular enzymes have a pivotal role in nutrient cycling and the decomposition of organic matter, yet little is known about the phylogenetic distribution of genes encoding these enzymes. In this study, we analyzed 3058 annotated prokaryotic genomes to determine which taxa have the genetic potential to produce alkaline phosphatase, chitinase and β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase enzymes. We then evaluated the relationship between the genetic potential for enzyme production and 16S rRNA phylogeny using the consenTRAIT algorithm, which calculated the phylogenetic depth and corresponding 16S rRNA sequence identity of clades of potential enzyme producers. Nearly half (49.2%) of the genomes analyzed were found to be capable of extracellular enzyme production, and these were non-randomly distributed across most prokaryotic phyla. On average, clades of potential enzyme-producing organisms had a maximum phylogenetic depth of 0.008004–0.009780, though individual clades varied broadly in both size and depth. These values correspond to a minimum 16S rRNA sequence identity of 98.04–98.40%. The distribution pattern we found is an indication of microdiversity, the occurrence of ecologically or physiologically distinct populations within phylogenetically related groups. Additionally, we found positive correlations among the genes encoding different extracellular enzymes. Our results suggest that the capacity to produce extracellular enzymes varies at relatively fine-scale phylogenetic resolution. This variation is consistent with other traits that require a small number of genes and provides insight into the relationship between taxonomy and traits that may be useful for predicting ecological function. PMID:23303371

  9. Construction of a tunable multi-enzyme-coordinate expression system for biosynthesis of chiral drug intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Fang, Baishan

    2016-01-01

    Systems that can regulate and coordinate the expression of multiple enzymes for metabolic regulation and synthesis of important drug intermediates are poorly explored. In this work, a strategy for constructing a tunable multi-enzyme-coordinate expression system for biosynthesis of chiral drug intermediates was developed and evaluated by connecting protein-protein expressions, regulating the strength of ribosome binding sites (RBS) and detecting the system capacity for producing chiral amino acid. Results demonstrated that the dual-enzyme system had good enantioselectivity, low cost, high stability, high conversion rate and approximately 100% substrate conversion. This study has paved a new way of exploring metabolic mechanism of functional genes and engineering whole cell-catalysts for synthesis of chiral α-hydroxy acids or chiral amino acids. PMID:27456301

  10. Gene expression throughout a vertebrate's embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Describing the patterns of gene expression during embryonic development has broadened our understanding of the processes and patterns that define morphogenesis. Yet gene expression patterns have not been described throughout vertebrate embryogenesis. This study presents statistical analyses of gene expression during all 40 developmental stages in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus using four biological replicates per stage. Results Patterns of gene expression for 7,000 genes appear to be important as they recapitulate developmental timing. Among the 45% of genes with significant expression differences between pairs of temporally adjacent stages, significant differences in gene expression vary from as few as five to more than 660. Five adjacent stages have disproportionately more significant changes in gene expression (> 200 genes) relative to other stages: four to eight and eight to sixteen cell stages, onset of circulation, pre and post-hatch, and during complete yolk absorption. The fewest differences among adjacent stages occur during gastrulation. Yet, at stage 16, (pre-mid-gastrulation) the largest number of genes has peak expression. This stage has an over representation of genes in oxidative respiration and protein expression (ribosomes, translational genes and proteases). Unexpectedly, among all ribosomal genes, both strong positive and negative correlations occur. Similar correlated patterns of expression occur among all significant genes. Conclusions These data provide statistical support for the temporal dynamics of developmental gene expression during all stages of vertebrate development. PMID:21356103

  11. Transcriptional analysis of human survivin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Li, F; Altieri, D C

    1999-01-01

    The preservation of tissue and organ homoeostasis depends on the regulated expression of genes controlling apoptosis (programmed cell death). In this study, we have investigated the basal transcriptional requirements of the survivin gene, an IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) prominently up-regulated in cancer. Analysis of the 5' flanking region of the human survivin gene revealed the presence of a TATA-less promoter containing a canonical CpG island of approximately 250 nt, three cell cycle dependent elements, one cell cycle homology region and numerous Sp1 sites. PCR-based analysis of human genomic DNA, digested with methylation-sensitive and -insensitive restriction enzymes, indicated that the CpG island was unmethylated in both normal and neoplastic tissues. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping of the human survivin gene identified two main transcription start sites at position -72 and within -57/-61 from the initiating ATG. Transfection of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells with truncated or nested survivin promoter-luciferase constructs revealed the presence of both enhancer and repressor sequences and identified a minimal promoter region within the proximal -230 nt of the human survivin gene. Unbiased mutagenesis analysis of the human survivin promoter revealed that targeting the Sp1 sequences at position -171 and -151 abolished basal transcriptional activity by approximately 63-82%. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay with DNA oligonucleotides confirmed formation of a DNA-protein complex between the survivin Sp1 sequences and HeLa cell extracts in a reaction abolished by mutagenesis of the survivin Sp1 sites. These findings identify the basal transcriptional requirements of survivin gene expression. PMID:10567210

  12. Gene Expression Studies in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xlao-Guang; Mathur, Geetika; James, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on gene expression in mosquitoes is motivated by both basic and applied interests. Studies of genes involved in hematophagy, reproduction, olfaction, and immune responses reveal an exquisite confluence of biological adaptations that result in these highly-successful life forms. The requirement of female mosquitoes for a bloodmeal for propagation has been exploited by a wide diversity of viral, protozoan and metazoan pathogens as part of their life cycles. Identifying genes involved in host-seeking, blood feeding and digestion, reproduction, insecticide resistance and susceptibility/refractoriness to pathogen development is expected to provide the bases for the development of novel methods to control mosquito-borne diseases. Advances in mosquito transgenesis technologies, the availability of whole genome sequence information, mass sequencing and analyses of transcriptomes and RNAi techniques will assist development of these tools as well as deepen the understanding of the underlying genetic components for biological phenomena characteristic of these insect species. PMID:19161831

  13. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  14. The Gene Expression Omnibus Database.

    PubMed

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome-protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  15. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, M.; Myers, C.; Faith, J.

    2008-05-01

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  16. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, M. Myers, C. Faith, J.

    2008-05-15

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  17. Changes in Trichoderma asperellum enzyme expression during parasitism of the cotton root rot pathogen Phymatotrichopsis omnivora.

    PubMed

    Guigón-López, Cesar; Vargas-Albores, Francisco; Guerrero-Prieto, Víctor; Ruocco, Michelina; Lorito, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    The present study determined the activity of hydrolytic enzymes and the gene expression during direct interaction of the novelTrichoderma asperellumstrains TC74 (high antagonistic capacity) and Th1 (low antagonistic capacity) with the plant pathogenic fungusPhymatotrichopsis omnivora. TheT. asperellumstrains produced the lytic enzymes endochitinase, N-acetylglucosaminidase and β-1,3-glucanase when grown on two different carbon sources. The response of strain TC74 was more rapid than that of strain Th1. When directly exposed toP. omnivora, theT. asperellumstrains expressed one endochitinase and one N-acetylglucosaminidase, as shown by RT-PCR experiments. The strains also expressed two β-1,3-exoglucanases (designated as exg290 and exg343). TC74 and Th1 were able to express their chitinases and β-1,3-exoglucanase activities when grown on the different carbon sources tested. When theT. asperellumstrains were grown in the presence ofP. omnivora, qRT-PCR experiments revealed that mycoparasitism-related genes were first expressed prior to contact between the antagonist and the pathogen's mycelium. As a general response, the transcription level of these genes was increased at the post-contact stage. Although TC74 and Th1 both express the assayed genes when grown in direct contact withP. omnivora, significant differences in the time, intensity and kinetics of the response were observed. PMID:25813513

  18. Molecular mechanisms of curcumin action: gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shishodia, Shishir

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin derived from the tropical plant Curcuma longa has a long history of use as a dietary agent, food preservative, and in traditional Asian medicine. It has been used for centuries to treat biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. The preventive and therapeutic properties of curcumin are associated with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Extensive research over several decades has attempted to identify the molecular mechanisms of curcumin action. Curcumin modulates numerous molecular targets by altering their gene expression, signaling pathways, or through direct interaction. Curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1), growth factors (e.g., VEGF, EGF, FGF), growth factor receptors (e.g., EGFR, HER-2, AR), enzymes (e.g., COX-2, LOX, MMP9, MAPK, mTOR, Akt), adhesion molecules (e.g., ELAM-1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1), apoptosis related proteins (e.g., Bcl-2, caspases, DR, Fas), and cell cycle proteins (e.g., cyclin D1). Curcumin modulates the activity of several transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1, STAT) and their signaling pathways. Based on its ability to affect multiple targets, curcumin has the potential for the prevention and treatment of various diseases including cancers, arthritis, allergies, atherosclerosis, aging, neurodegenerative disease, hepatic disorders, obesity, diabetes, psoriasis, and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of modulation of gene expression by curcumin. PMID:22996381

  19. DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) controls the expression of the cytotoxic enterotoxin (act) gene of Aeromonas hydrophila via tRNA modifying enzyme-glucose-inhibited division protein (GidA)

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Kosykh, Valeri G.; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is both a human and animal pathogen, and the cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) is a crucial virulence factor of this bacterium because of its associated hemolytic, cytotoxic, and enterotoxic activities. Previously, to define the role of some regulatory genes in modulating Act production, we showed that deletion of a glucose-inhibited division gene (gidA) encoding tRNA methylase reduced Act levels, while overproduction of DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) led to a concomitant increase in Act-associated biological activities of a diarrheal isolate SSU of A. hydrophila. Importantly, there are multiple GATC binding sites for Dam within an upstream sequence of the gidA gene and one such target site in the act gene upstream region. We showed the dam gene to be essential for the viability of A. hydrophila SSU, and, therefore, to better understand the interaction of the encoding genes, Dam and GidA, in act gene regulation, we constructed a gidA in-frame deletion mutant of Escherichia coli GM28 (dam+) and GM33 (Δdam) strains. We then tested the expressional activity of the act and gidA genes by using a promoterless pGlow-TOPO vector containing a reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP). Our data indicated that in GidA+ strains of E. coli, constitutive methylation of the GATC site(s) by Dam negatively regulated act and gidA gene expression as measured by GFP production. However, in the ΔgidA strains, irrespective of the presence or absence of constitutively active Dam, we did not observe any alteration in the expression of the act gene signifying the role of GidA in positively regulating Act production. To determine the exact mechanism of how Dam and GidA influence Act, a real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay was performed. The analysis indicated an increase in gidA and act gene expression in the A. hydrophila Dam-overproducing strain, and these data matched with Act production in the E. coli GM28 strain. Thus, the extent of DNA methylation caused by

  20. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  1. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  2. Reptile freeze tolerance: metabolism and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-02-01

    Terrestrially hibernating reptiles that live in seasonally cold climates need effective strategies of cold hardiness to survive the winter. Use of thermally buffered hibernacula is very important but when exposure to temperatures below 0 degrees C cannot be avoided, either freeze avoidance (supercooling) or freeze tolerance strategies can be employed, sometimes by the same species depending on environmental conditions. Several reptile species display ecologically relevant freeze tolerance, surviving for extended times with 50% or more of their total body water frozen. The use of colligative cryoprotectants by reptiles is poorly developed but metabolic and enzymatic adaptations providing anoxia tolerance and antioxidant defense are important aids to freezing survival. New studies using DNA array screening are examining the role of freeze-responsive gene expression. Three categories of freeze responsive genes have been identified from recent screenings of liver and heart from freeze-exposed (5h post-nucleation at -2.5 degrees C) hatchling painted turtles, Chrysemys picta marginata. These genes encode (a) proteins involved in iron binding, (b) enzymes of antioxidant defense, and (c) serine protease inhibitors. The same genes were up-regulated by anoxia exposure (4 h of N2 gas exposure at 5 degrees C) of the hatchlings which suggests that these defenses for freeze tolerance are aimed at counteracting the injurious effects of the ischemia imposed by plasma freezing. PMID:16321368

  3. Construction of a cellulase hyper-expression system in Trichoderma reesei by promoter and enzyme engineering

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Trichoderma reesei is the preferred organism for producing industrial cellulases. However, a more efficient heterologous expression system for enzymes from different organism is needed to further improve its cellulase mixture. The strong cbh1 promoter of T. reesei is frequently used in heterologous expression, however, the carbon catabolite repressor CREI may reduce its strength by binding to the cbh1 promoter at several binding sites. Another crucial point to enhance the production of heterologous enzymes is the stability of recombinant mRNA and the prevention of protein degradation within the endoplasmic reticulum, especially for the bacteria originated enzymes. In this study, the CREI binding sites within the cbh1 promoter were replaced with the binding sites of transcription activator ACEII and the HAP2/3/5 complex to improve the promoter efficiency. To further improve heterologous expression efficiency of bacterial genes within T. reesei, a flexible polyglycine linker and a rigid α-helix linker were tested in the construction of fusion genes between cbh1 from T. reesei and e1, encoding an endoglucanase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus. Results The modified promoter resulted in an increased expression level of the green fluorescent protein reporter by 5.5-fold in inducing culture medium and 7.4-fold in repressing culture medium. The fusion genes of cbh1 and e1 were successfully expressed in T. reesei under the control of promoter pcbh1m2. The higher enzyme activities and thermostability of the fusion protein with rigid linker indicated that the rigid linker might be more suitable for the heterologous expression system in T. reesei. Compared to the parent strain RC30-8, the FPase and CMCase activities of the secreted enzyme mixture from the corresponding transformant R1 with the rigid linker increased by 39% and 30% at 60°C, respectively, and the reduced sugar concentration in the hydrolysate of pretreated corn stover (PCS) was dramatically

  4. Skeletal muscle gene expression in space-flown rats.

    PubMed

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Ishidoh, Kazumi; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Ishihara, Ibuki; Ikemoto, Madoka; Kano, Mihoko; Kominami, Eiki; Nonaka, Ikuya; Ogawa, Takayuki; Adams, Gregory R; Baldwin, Kenneth M; Yasui, Natsuo; Kishi, Kyoichi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2004-03-01

    Skeletal muscles are vulnerable to marked atrophy under microgravity. This phenomenon is due to the transcriptional alteration of skeletal muscle cells to weightlessness. To further investigate this issue at a subcellular level, we examined the expression of approximately 26,000 gastrocnemius muscle genes in space-flown rats by DNA microarray analysis. Comparison of the changes in gene expression among spaceflight, tail-suspended, and denervated rats revealed that such changes were unique after spaceflight and not just an extension of simulated weightlessness. The microarray data showed two spaceflight-specific gene expression patterns: 1) imbalanced expression of mitochondrial genes with disturbed expression of cytoskeletal molecules, including putative mitochondria-anchoring proteins, A-kinase anchoring protein, and cytoplasmic dynein, and 2) up-regulated expression of ubiquitin ligase genes, MuRF-1, Cbl-b, and Siah-1A, which are rate-limiting enzymes of muscle protein degradation. Distorted expression of cytoskeletal genes during spaceflight resulted in dislocation of the mitochondria in the cell. Several oxidative stress-inducible genes were highly expressed in the muscle of spaceflight rats. We postulate that mitochondrial dislocation during spaceflight has deleterious effects on muscle fibers, leading to atrophy in the form of insufficient energy provision for construction and leakage of reactive oxygen species from the mitochondria. PMID:14715702

  5. Gene expression profile analysis of tobacco leaf trichomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Leaf trichomes of Nicotiana tabacum are distinguished by their large size, high density, and superior secretion ability. They contribute to plant defense response against biotic and abiotic stress, and also influence leaf aroma and smoke flavor. However, there is limited genomic information about trichomes of this non-model plant species. Results We have characterized Nicotiana tabacum leaf trichome gene expression using two approaches. In the first, a trichome cDNA library was randomly sequenced, and 2831 unique genes were obtained. The most highly abundant transcript was ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO). Among the related sequences, most encoded enzymes involved in primary metabolism. Secondary metabolism related genes, such as isoprenoid and flavonoid biosynthesis-related, were also identified. In the second approach, a cDNA microarray prepared from these 2831 clones was used to compare gene expression levels in trichome and leaf. There were 438 differentially expressed genes between trichome and leaves-minus-trichomes. Of these, 207 highly expressed genes in tobacco trichomes were enriched in second metabolic processes, defense responses, and the metabolism regulation categories. The expression of selected unigenes was confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis, some of which were specifically expressed in trichomes. Conclusion The expression feature of leaf trichomes in Nicotiana tabacum indicates their metabolic activity and potential importance in stress resistance. Sequences predominantly expressed in trichomes will facilitate gene-mining and metabolism control of plant trichome. PMID:21548994

  6. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular. PMID:25232028

  7. Cloning-independent expression and screening of enzymes using cell-free protein synthesis systems.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Chan; Song, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2014-01-01

    We present a strategy for expression and screening of microbial enzymes without involving cloning procedures. Libraries of putative ω-transaminases (ω-TA) and mutated Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) are PCR-amplified from bacterial colonies and directly expressed in an Escherichia coli-based cell-free protein synthesis system. The open nature of cell-free protein synthesis system also allows streamlined analysis of the enzymatic activity of the expressed enzymes, which greatly shortens the time required for enzyme screening. We expect that the proposed strategy will provide a universal platform for bridging the information gap between nucleotide sequence and protein function, in order to accelerate the discovery of novel enzymes. The proposed strategy can also serve as a viable option for the rapid and precise tuning of enzyme molecules, not only for analytical purposes, but also for industrial applications. This is accomplished via large-scale production using microbial cells transformed with variant genes selected from the cell-free expression screening. PMID:24395411

  8. Seasonal Effects on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Anita; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Henders, Anjali K.; McRae, Allan F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Powell, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Many health conditions, ranging from psychiatric disorders to cardiovascular disease, display notable seasonal variation in severity and onset. In order to understand the molecular processes underlying this phenomenon, we have examined seasonal variation in the transcriptome of 606 healthy individuals. We show that 74 transcripts associated with a 12-month seasonal cycle were enriched for processes involved in DNA repair and binding. An additional 94 transcripts demonstrated significant seasonal variability that was largely influenced by blood cell count levels. These transcripts were enriched for immune function, protein production, and specific cellular markers for lymphocytes. Accordingly, cell counts for erythrocytes, platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, and CD19 cells demonstrated significant association with a 12-month seasonal cycle. These results demonstrate that seasonal variation is an important environmental regulator of gene expression and blood cell composition. Notable changes in leukocyte counts and genes involved in immune function indicate that immune cell physiology varies throughout the year in healthy individuals. PMID:26023781

  9. Non-Viral Gene Transfer as a Tool for Studying Transcription Regulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bonamassa, Barbara; Liu, Dexi

    2010-01-01

    Numerous xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes are regulated by nuclear receptors at transcriptional level. The challenge we currently face is to understand how a given nuclear receptor interacts with its xenobiotics, migrates into nucleus, binds to the xenobiotic response element of a target gene, and regulates transcription. Toward this end, new methods have been developed to introduce the nuclear receptor gene into appropriate cells and study its activity in activating reporter gene expression under the control of a promoter containing xenobiotic response elements. The goal of this review is to critically examine the gene transfer methods currently available. We concentrate on the gene transfer mechanism, advantages and limitations of each method when employed for nuclear receptor-mediated gene regulation studies. It is our hope that the information provided highlights the importance of gene transfer in studying the mechanisms by which our body eliminates the potentially harmful substances and maintains the homeostasis. PMID:20713102

  10. Reversible histone methylation regulates brain gene expression and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Andreassi, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic chromatin remodeling, including reversible histone methylation, regulates gene transcription in brain development and synaptic plasticity. Aberrant chromatin modifications due to mutant chromatin enzymes or chemical exposures have been associated with neurological or psychiatric disorders such as mental retardation, schizophrenia, depression, and drug addiction. Some chromatin enzymes, such as histone demethylases JARID1C and UTX, are coded by X-linked genes which are not X-inactivated in females. The higher expression of JARID1C and UTX in females could contribute to sex differences in brain development and behavior. PMID:20816965