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Sample records for enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs

  1. Phase I Study of Temozolomide and Irinotecan for Recurrent Malignant Gliomas in Patients Receiving Enzyme-Inducing Antiepileptic Drugs: A North American BrainTumor Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Loghin, Monica E.; Prados, Michael D.; Wen, Patrick; Junck, Larry; Lieberman, Frank; Fine, Howard; Fink, Karen L.; Metha, Minesh; Kuhn, John; Lamborn, Kathleen; Chang, Susan M.; Cloughesy, Timothy; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Robins, Ian H.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; AlfredYung, W.K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose of irinotecan when administrated with temozolomide every 28 days, in patients with recurrent malignant glioma who were also receiving CYP450 enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAED), and to characterize the pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and its metabolites. The study was also intended to assess whether temozolomide affects the conversion of irinotecan to SN-38. Design Patients with recurrent malignant glioma received a fixed dose of temozolomide (150 mg/m2) daily for 5 days from days1to 5 every 28 days, and an i.v. infusion of irinotecan on days1and15 of each cycle. The starting dose of irinotecan was 350 mg/m2, which was escalated to 550 mg/m2 in 50-mg/m2 increments. The plasma pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and its active metabolite, SN-38, were determined during the infusion of irinotecan on cycle 1, day 1. Results Thirty-three patients were enrolled into the study and treated. Thirty-one patients were evaluable for both tumor response and toxicity and two patients were evaluable for toxicity only. Common toxicities included neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 3 diarrhea and nausea/vomiting. The maximum tolerated dose for irinotecan was determined to be 500 mg/m2. Conclusions The recommended phase II dose of irinotecan in combination with temozolomide for patients receiving EIAEDs is 500 mg/m2, administrated every 15 days on a 28-day schedule. This study also confirmed that concomitant administration of EIAEDs increases irinotecan clearance and influences SN-38 disposition. No pharmacokinetic interaction was observed between temozolomide and irinotecan. PMID:18056194

  2. [Endocrine effects of antiepileptic drugs].

    PubMed

    Leśkiewicz, Monika; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Lasoń, Władysław

    2008-01-01

    Both seizures and antiepileptic drugs may induce disturbances in hormonal system. Regarding endocrine effects of anticonvulsants, an interaction of these drugs with gonadal, thyroid, and adrenal axis deserves attention. Since majority of antiepileptic drugs block voltage dependent sodium and calcium channels, enhance GABAergic transmission and/or antagonize glutamate receptors, one may expect that similar neurochemical mechanisms are engaged in the interaction of these drugs with synthesis of hypothalamic neurohormones such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH). Moreover some antiepileptic drugs may affect hormone metabolism via inhibiting or stimulating cytochrome P-450 iso-enzymes. An influence of antiepileptic drugs on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis appears to be sex-dependent. In males, valproate decreased follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) but elevated dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentrations. Carbamazepine decreased testosterone/sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) ratio, whereas its active metabolite--oxcarbazepine--had no effect on androgens. In females, valproate decreased FSH-stimulated estradiol release and enhanced testosterone level. On the other hand, carbamazepine decreased testosterone level but enhanced SHBG concentration. It has been reported that carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine or joined administration of carbamazepine and valproate decrease thyroxine (T4) level in patients with no effect on thyrotropin (TSH). While valproate itself has no effect on T4, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone, as metabolic enzyme inducers, can decrease the level of free and bound thyroxine. On the other hand, new antiepileptics such as levetiracetam, tiagabine, vigabatrine or lamotrigine had no effect on thyroid hormones. With respect to hormonal regulation of metabolic processes, valproate was

  3. Phase I trial with biomarker studies of vatalanib (PTK787) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated with enzyme inducing anti-epileptic drugs and standard radiation and temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Eichler, April F; Plotkin, Scott R; Drappatz, Jan; Doyle, Colin L; Xu, Lei; Duda, Dan G; Wen, Patrick Y; Jain, Rakesh K; Batchelor, Tracy T

    2011-06-01

    Targeting angiogenesis in glioblastoma (GBM) may improve patient outcome by normalizing tumor vasculature and improving delivery of chemotherapeutics and oxygen. Consequently, concomitant administration of small molecule inhibitors of the VEGF pathway will likely have a positive impact on chemoradiation treatment outcome. We conducted a Phase I study of vatalanib, a small molecule inhibitor of VEGFR, PDGFR, and c-kit in patients with newly diagnosed GBM receiving radiation, temozolomide, and an enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drug in order to determine the MTD of vatalanib in this patient population. We incorporated circulating biomarker and SNP analyses and pharmacokinetic studies. Nineteen patients were enrolled and the MTD was not reached at the time of study termination. Vatalanib was well tolerated with only 2 DLTs (thrombocytopenia and elevated transaminases). Other grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia, lymphopenia, neutropenia, and hand-foot syndrome. There were no wound-healing complications. Of the 13 patients evaluable for a radiographic response, 2 had a partial response and 9 had stable disease. Vatalanib significantly increased PlGF and sVEGFR1 in plasma circulation and decreased sVEGFR2 and sTie2. Plasma collagen IV increased significantly by day 50 of treatment. Vatalanib was well tolerated and this study demonstrates the safety of oral small molecule inhibitors in newly diagnosed GBM patients. Blood biomarkers may be useful as pharmacodynamic markers of response to anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:20821342

  4. Antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schlienger, R G; Shear, N H

    1998-01-01

    The antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is an adverse drug reaction associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), and primidone. The syndrome is defined by the triad of fever, skin rash, and internal organ involvement. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, terbinafine, azathioprine, and allopurinol. Diagnosis of AHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic, or collagen vascular disorders. The incidence is approximately 1 in 3,000 exposures. AHS starts with fever, rash, and lymphadenopathy, within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis, and myostitis. AHS is associated with a relative excess of reactive oxidative metabolites of the AED. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Crossreactivity among PHT, CBZ, and PB is as high as 70-80%. PMID:9798755

  5. Newer anti-epileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Aneja, S; Newton, R W

    1996-01-01

    During the past few years, a number of drugs have been added to the anti-epileptic arsenal. This review focusses on five of these drugs which have undergone extensive trials: Vigabatrin, Lamotrigine, Gabapentin, Felbamate and Oxcarbazepine. Some of these antiepileptic drugs appear to be helpful for treatment of catastrophic childhood epilepsies. Vigabatrin appears promising in children with infantile spasms who do not respond to ACTH or Prednisolone. Children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome may respond to treatment with Lamotrigine or Vigabatrin. Gabapentin and vigabatrin have proved to be effective in refractory partial seizures. Oxcarbazepine, a ketoderivative of carbamazepine, is as effective as Carbamazepine but has a better safety profile. Lesser neurotoxicity and fewer drug interactions is another advantage with these drugs. However monitoring is required to determine the long term safety with their usage. These drugs have a definite role in childhood epilepsies refractory to conventional antiepileptic drugs. PMID:10829995

  6. Interactions between antiepileptic drugs and hormones.

    PubMed

    Svalheim, Sigrid; Sveberg, Line; Mochol, Monika; Taubøll, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are known to have endocrine side effects in both men and women. These can affect fertility, sexuality, thyroid function, and bone health, all functions of major importance for well-being and quality of life. The liver enzyme inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs), like phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine, and also valproate (VPA), a non-EIAED, are most likely to cause such side effects. AED treatment can alter the levels of different sex hormones. EIAEDs increase sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations in both men and women. Over time, this elevation can lead to lower levels of bioactive testosterone and estradiol, which may cause menstrual disturbances, sexual problems, and eventually reduced fertility. VPA can cause weight gain in both men and women. In women, VPA can also lead to androgenization with increased serum testosterone concentrations, menstrual disturbances, and polycystic ovaries. Lamotrigine has not been shown to result in endocrine side effects. The newer AEDs have not yet been thoroughly studied, but case reports indicate that some of these drugs could also be suspected to cause such effects if endocrine changes commence after treatment initiation. It is important to be aware of possible endocrine side effects of AEDs as they can have a major impact on quality of life, and are, at least partly, reversible after AED discontinuation. PMID:25797888

  7. Antiepileptic drugs in migraine prevention.

    PubMed

    Mathew, N T

    2001-01-01

    Migraineurs may continue to experience attacks, despite daily use of one or more agents from a wide range of drugs, including beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, serotonin antagonists, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and antiepileptic agents. Divalproex sodium is the only antiepileptic drug approved for migraine prevention. Gabapentin, topiramate, and other antiepileptic agents are being evaluated for migraine prevention and treatment. Prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of divalproex, gabapentin, and topiramate for migraine prevention generally were composed of a prospective baseline period, a dose titration period, and a fixed-dose treatment period. The primary efficacy variable was a reduction in the 28-day frequency of migraine headache. Patients receiving divalproex for 12 weeks at doses up to 1500 mg/day achieved significant decreases in the migraine frequency (P<.05), corresponding to reductions of 30% to 40% compared with baseline. Nearly half of the divalproex-treated patients had a 50% or more reduction from baseline in headache frequencies (P< or =.05). Asthenia, vomiting, somnolence, tremor, and alopecia were common adverse events associated with divalproex. Significant reductions in migraine frequency were also observed with gabapentin (1800 to 2400 mg/day) when compared with placebo (P<.01), and nearly half of all patients treated at the highest dose experienced a reduction in headache rate of 50% or more. Somnolence was the most commonly reported adverse event among the gabapentin-treated patients. Two single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials evaluated topiramate for migraine prevention. A lower 28-day migraine frequency was seen during 18 weeks of administration at a maximum daily dose of 200 mg (P =.09). In a second study, a significantly lower mean 28-day migraine frequency was observed during 16 weeks of treatment with topiramate (P =.0015). Mean reduction in migraine

  8. Antiepileptic drugs and Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cavanna, Andrea E; Nani, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the chronic presence of multiple motor tics and at least one vocal/phonic tic for the duration of 1 year. The clinical picture of patients with Tourette syndrome is often complicated by tic-related behavioral problems and associated psychopathology. The pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome is not thoroughly understood, however converging evidence from neuroimaging studies suggests abnormalities within the frontostriatal pathways which are mediated by several neurotransmitters. The pharmacological management of the tic symptoms focuses on the dopaminergic and noradrenergic pathways and aims to improve the health-related quality of life of patients. The most common medications are neuroleptics and atypical antipsychotics, which have a strong D2 blocking action. Also, preliminary studies have documented the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in controlling tics. Thus far, two anticonvulsants (topiramate and levetiracetam) have been tested with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled procedure in the treatment of tics. A study has reported an improvement in the control of tics with topiramate. This pharmacological agent was also reported to be well tolerated by the patients. However, the most frequent observed topiramate side effects (such as somnolence, cognitive problems, and weight loss) could not have manifested because of the short trial duration. Levetiracetam has shown conflicting results. A study found significant improvements in the control of tics, also associated with improvement in school performance. These results, however, were not replicated in other studies. Further investigations are therefore needed to assess the real efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of tics. PMID:24295627

  9. Advances in anti-epileptic drug testing.

    PubMed

    Krasowski, Matthew D; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2014-09-25

    In the past twenty-one years, 17 new antiepileptic drugs have been approved for use in the United States and/or Europe. These drugs are clobazam, ezogabine (retigabine), eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, perampanel, pregabalin, rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide. Therapeutic drug monitoring is often used in the clinical dosing of the newer anti-epileptic drugs. The drugs with the best justifications for drug monitoring are lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, stiripentol, and zonisamide. Perampanel, stiripentol and tiagabine are strongly bound to serum proteins and are candidates for monitoring of the free drug fractions. Alternative specimens for therapeutic drug monitoring are saliva and dried blood spots. Therapeutic drug monitoring of the new antiepileptic drugs is discussed here for managing patients with epilepsy. PMID:24925169

  10. Interactions between antiepileptic drugs, and between antiepileptic drugs and other drugs.

    PubMed

    Zaccara, Gaetano; Perucca, Emilio

    2014-12-01

    Interactions between antiepileptic drugs, or between antiepileptic drugs and other drugs, can be pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic in nature. Pharmacokinetic interactions involve changes in absorption, distribution or elimination, whereas pharmacodynamic interactions involve synergism and antagonism at the site of action. Most clinically important interactions of antiepileptic drugs result from induction or inhibition of drug metabolism. Carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone are strong inducers of cytochrome P450 and glucuronizing enzymes (as well as P-glycoprotein) and can reduce the efficacy of co-administered medications such as oral anticoagulants, calcium antagonists, steroids, antimicrobial and antineoplastic drugs through this mechanism. Oxcarbazepine, eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, rufinamide, topiramate (at doses ≥ 200 mg/day) and perampanel (at doses ≥ 8 mg/day) have weaker inducing properties, and a lower propensity to cause interactions mediated by enzyme induction. Unlike enzyme induction, enzyme inhibition results in decreased metabolic clearance of the affected drug, the serum concentration of which may increase leading to toxic effects. Examples of important interactions mediated by enzyme inhibition include the increase in the serum concentration of phenobarbital and lamotrigine caused by valproic acid. There are also interactions whereby other drugs induce or inhibit the metabolism of antiepileptic drugs, examples being the increase in serum carbamazepine concentration by erythromycin, and the decrease in serum lamotrigine concentration by oestrogen-containing contraceptives. Pharmacodynamic interactions between antiepileptic drugs may also be clinically important. These interactions can have potentially beneficial effects, such as the therapeutic synergism of valproic acid combined with lamotrigine, or adverse effects, such as the reciprocal potentiation of neurotoxicity observed in patients treated with a combination of

  11. The new antiepileptic drugs: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    LaRoche, Suzette M; Helmers, Sandra L

    2004-02-01

    In the past decade, 8 new antiepileptic drugs have been approved for use in the United States, offering many new treatment options to patients with epilepsy. With expanding use of these newer agents, primary care clinicians are challenged with understanding the roles that each new agent plays in the treatment of patients with epilepsy as well as possible interactions with other pharmacological therapies. Each new medication provides a unique profile of pharmacokinetics, adverse effects, and mechanisms of action, making an appreciation of how these agents are best utilized even more difficult. Despite well-performed trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific antiepileptic drugs, the lack of head-to-head comparisons among them makes it difficult to endorse a single therapeutic regimen. Limited studies have compared the new antiepileptic drugs with more traditional medications and found similar efficacy but improved tolerability of the newer agents. There remains no well-established guidelines for choosing a particular antiepileptic drug or for choosing a newer agent over a traditional one. However, careful consideration of seizure type, patient comorbidities, and specific medication toxicities aids in prescribing the most appropriate medication. This article aims to familiarize the general practitioner with the appropriate roles and effective uses of the new antiepileptic drugs in specific clinical scenarios. PMID:14762041

  12. Interactions between antiepileptic and antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Besag, Frank M C; Berry, David

    2006-01-01

    Antiepileptic and antipsychotic drugs are often prescribed together. Interactions between the drugs may affect both efficacy and toxicity. This is a review of human clinical data on the interactions between the antiepileptic drugs carbamazepine, valproic acid (sodium valproate), vigabatrin, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, tiagabine, oxcarbazepine, levetiracetam, pregabalin, felbamate, zonisamide, phenobarbital and phenytoin with the antipsychotic drugs risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, clozapine, amisulpride, sulpiride, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, haloperidol and chlorpromazine; the limited information on interactions between antiepileptic drugs and zuclopenthixol, periciazine, fluphenazine, flupenthixol and pimozide is also presented. Many of the interactions depend on the induction or inhibition of the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but other important mechanisms involve the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase isoenzymes and protein binding. There is some evidence for the following effects. Carbamazepine decreases the plasma concentrations of both risperidone and its active metabolite. It also decreases concentrations of olanzapine, clozapine, ziprasidone, haloperidol, zuclopenthixol, flupenthixol and probably chlorpromazine and fluphenazine. Quetiapine increases the ratio of carbamazepine epoxide to carbamazepine and this may lead to toxicity. The data on valproic acid are conflicting; it may either increase or decrease clozapine concentrations, and it appears to decrease aripiprazole concentrations. Chlorpromazine possibly increases valproic acid concentrations. Lamotrigine possibly increases clozapine concentrations. Phenobarbital decreases clozapine, haloperidol and chlorpromazine concentrations. Phenytoin decreases quetiapine, clozapine, haloperidol and possibly chlorpromazine concentrations. There are major gaps in the data. In many cases there are no published clinical data on interactions that would be predicted on theoretical grounds. PMID

  13. Methods of assessment of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, N; Richens, A

    1981-01-01

    Epilepsy is a symptom with protean manifestations and as such it is a difficult disease in which to carry out a therapeutic trial. The methods available to research workers for the assessment of new antiepileptic drugs are hampered by the fact that epilepsy is a fluctuant condition. Although it is a chronic disorder open to study using cross-over trials and within-patient comparisons, accurate assessment cannot be easily made at any one point in time. Research workers are therefore automatically placed at a time factor disadvantage and this is especially so for those searching for quick methods of evaluating new compounds. The need for a quick and reliable method of assessing a new antiepileptic drug has long been appreciated. This article will discuss the methods currently available and we will begin by considering the most commonly used method of assessment with particular reference to some of the problems involved in conducting a controlled clinical trial in epilepsy. PMID:7272157

  14. Antiepileptic Drug Therapy in Migraine Headache.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Steve D.

    2002-09-01

    Severe migraine affects more than 28 million Americans. It is associated with episodic as well as long-term disability and suffering, yet it is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Acute treatments have advanced considerably, ignited by sumatriptan and the subsequent triptans; unfortunately migraine prevention has lagged far behind. There are no great migraine preventives! No migraine preventive agent studied in good randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trials proved to be 50% better than placebo. Migraine trials typically focus on episodic migraine, a milder, gentler type of migraine that is selected for low frequency, lack of daily headaches, no preventive need, and previous failure to no more than a few preventive agents. These features are not typical of the usual migraine patient seen in most neurologic practices, thus the results of clinical trials may not carryover to real world situations. Treatment of frequent, chronic, or pervasive migraine is inadequate, and never has been studied in randomized controlled trials. Traditional migraine preventives, eg, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and tricyclic antidepressants, are often ineffective in difficult or complicated populations. The antiepileptic drugs represent a category of pharmaceutics that target the neuronal instability and central hyperexcitability of migraine, and, through these actions, may be more effective than traditional preventives. Episodic migraine attacks are associated with peripheral and central sensitization; however, if attacks are frequent, severe, or long lasting, this sensitization may increase the risk of developing daily headaches. If antiepileptic drugs have an effect on central sensitization, perhaps mediated via glutamate inhibition or gamma-aminobutyric acid potentiation, it is appropriate to use these agents early in migraine treatment, particularly in the highly comorbid patient, possibly in conjunction with agents that antagonize the 5HT2 receptor. This report

  15. Treatment of hypopituitarism in patients receiving antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Prete, Alessandro; Kaplan, Peter W; Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Salvatori, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Evidence suggests that there may be drug interactions between antiepileptic drugs and hormonal therapies, which can present a challenge to endocrinologists dealing with patients who have both hypopituitarism and neurological diseases. Data are scarce for this subgroup of patients; however, data for the interaction of antiepileptic drugs with the pituitary axis have shown that chronic use of many antiepileptic drugs, such as carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate, enhances hepatic cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) activity, and can decrease serum concentrations of sex hormones. Other antiepileptic drugs increase sex hormone-binding globulin, which reduces the bioactivity of testosterone and estradiol. Additionally, the combined oestrogen-progestagen contraceptive pill might decrease lamotrigine concentrations, which could worsen seizure control. Moreover, sex hormones and their metabolites can directly act on neuronal excitability, acting as neurosteroids. Because carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine can enhance the sensitivity of renal tubules, a reduction in desmopressin dose might be necessary in patients with central diabetes insipidus. Although the effects of antiepileptic drugs in central hypothyroidism have not yet been studied, substantial evidence indicates that several antiepileptic drugs can increase thyroid hormone metabolism. However, although it is reasonable to expect a need for a thyroxine dose increase with some antiepileptic drugs, the effect of excessive thyroxine in lowering seizure threshold should also be considered. There are no reports of significant interactions between antiepileptic drugs and the efficacy of human growth hormone therapy, and few data are available for the effects of second-generation antiepileptic drugs on hypopituitarism treatment. PMID:24898833

  16. Emerging Antiepileptic Drugs for Severe Pediatric Epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Mudigoudar, Basanagoud; Weatherspoon, Sarah; Wheless, James W

    2016-05-01

    The medical management of the epilepsy syndromes of early childhood (eg, infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome) is challenging; and requires careful evaluation, classification, and treatment. Pharmacologic therapy continues to be the mainstay of management for these children, and as such it is important for the clinician to be familiar with the role of new antiepileptic drugs. This article reports the clinical trial data and personal experience in treating the severe epilepsies of childhood with the recently Food and Drug Administration-approved new antiepileptic drugs (vigabatrin, rufinamide, perampanel, and clobazam) and those in clinical trials (cannabidiol, stiripentol, and fenfluramine). Genetic research has also identified an increasing number of pediatric developmental and seizure disorders that are possibly treatable with targeted drug therapies, focused on correcting underlying neural dysfunction. We highlight recent genetic advances, and how they affect our treatment of some of the genetic epilepsies, and speculate on the use of targeted genetic treatment (precision medicine) in the future. PMID:27544474

  17. [New antiepileptic drugs, and therapeutic considerations].

    PubMed

    Szupera, Zoltán

    2011-09-30

    Epilepsy is not a singular disease, but a variety of disorders. It affects up to 0.5% of the population. Over the past decade, researchers have made great advances in the field of epilepsy. These have been accompanied by the licensing of a great number of antiepileptic drugs. However, despite these efforts, up to 15-20% of patients have refractory epilepsy. The novel antiepileptic drugs must suit several requirements: higher efficacy, especially in resistant cases, better tolerability, and improved pharmacokinetic properties. Recently, three new drugs have been introduced to the market. Retigabine is a carbamic derivate, and its anticonvulsive properties are largely due to its ability to prolong the opening of neuronal voltage-gated potassium Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 channels. Lacosamide is a functionalized amino acid, and selectively enhances voltage-gated sodium channel slow inactivation. Eslicarbazepine acetate is a new member of the dibenzazepine family, and blocks the fast inactivated voltage-gated sodium channel. All three of them differ from the foregoing agents in several important ways, including new mechanism of action (retigabine, lacosamide), or pharmacokinetics (eslicarbazepine acetate). These novel anticonvulsants appear to be a safe and effective addition to the armamentarium for the treatment of patients with refractory epilepsy. However, it will take the consideration of new concepts in shaping the new therapeutic algorithm. PMID:22059370

  18. Assessing suicidal risk with antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mula, Marco; Bell, Gail S; Sander, Josemir W

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration issued an alert about an increased risk for suicidality during treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for different indications, including epilepsy. We discuss the issue of suicide in epilepsy with special attention to AEDs and the assessment of suicide in people with epilepsy. It has been suggested that early medical treatment with AEDs might potentially reduce suicide risk of people with epilepsy, but it is of great importance that the choice of drug is tailored to the mental state of the patient. The issue of suicidality in epilepsy is likely to represent an example of how the underdiagnosis of psychiatric symptoms, the lack of input from professionals (eg, psychologists, social workers, and psychiatrists), and the delay in an optimized AED therapy may worsen the prognosis of the condition with the occurrence of severe complications such as suicide. PMID:20957120

  19. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication. PMID:26664952

  20. Chemical properties of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs).

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir

    2012-07-01

    Between 1990 and 2011 the following fifteen new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were approved: eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, retigabine, rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, and zonisamide. These AEDs (except felbamate) offer appreciable advantages in terms of their favorable pharmacokinetics, improved tolerability and lower potential for drug interactions. All AEDs introduced after 1990 that are not second generation drugs (with the exception of vigabatrin and tiagabine) were developed empirically (sometimes serendipitously) utilizing mechanism-unbiased anticonvulsant animal models. The empirical nature of the discovery of new AEDs in the last three decades coupled with their multiple mechanisms of action explains their diverse chemical structures. The availability of old and new AEDs with various activity spectra and different tolerability profiles enables clinicians to better tailor drug choice to the characteristics of individual patients. With fifteen new AEDs having entered the market in the past 20years the antiepileptic market is crowded. Consequently, epilepsy alone is not attractive in 2011 to the pharmaceutical industry even though the clinical need of refractory epilepsy remains unmet. Due to this situation, future design of new AEDs must also have a potential in non-epileptic CNS disorders such as neuropathic pain, migraine prophylaxis and bipolar disorder or fibromyalgia as demonstrated by the sales revenues of pregabalin, topiramate and valproic acid. This review analyzes the effect that the emerging knowledge on the chemical properties of the old AEDs starting from phenobarbital (1912) has had on the design of subsequent AEDs and new therapeutics as well as the current approach to AED discovery. PMID:22210279

  1. Antiepileptic Drug Interactions - Principles and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen, Svein I; Landmark, Cecilie Johannessen

    2010-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are widely used as long-term adjunctive therapy or as monotherapy in epilepsy and other indications and consist of a group of drugs that are highly susceptible to drug interactions. The purpose of the present review is to focus upon clinically relevant interactions where AEDs are involved and especially on pharmacokinetic interactions. The older AEDs are susceptible to cause induction (carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone) or inhibition (valproic acid), resulting in a decrease or increase, respectively, in the serum concentration of other AEDs, as well as other drug classes (anticoagulants, oral contraceptives, antidepressants, antipsychotics, antimicrobal drugs, antineoplastic drugs, and immunosupressants). Conversely, the serum concentrations of AEDs may be increased by enzyme inhibitors among antidepressants and antipsychotics, antimicrobal drugs (as macrolides or isoniazid) and decreased by other mechanisms as induction, reduced absorption or excretion (as oral contraceptives, cimetidine, probenicid and antacides). Pharmacokinetic interactions involving newer AEDs include the enzyme inhibitors felbamate, rufinamide, and stiripentol and the inducers oxcarbazepine and topiramate. Lamotrigine is affected by these drugs, older AEDs and other drug classes as oral contraceptives. Individual AED interactions may be divided into three levels depending on the clinical consequences of alterations in serum concentrations. This approach may point to interactions of specific importance, although it should be implemented with caution, as it is not meant to oversimplify fact matters. Level 1 involves serious clinical consequences, and the combination should be avoided. Level 2 usually implies cautiousness and possible dosage adjustments, as the combination may not be possible to avoid. Level 3 refers to interactions where dosage adjustments are usually not necessary. Updated knowledge regarding drug interactions is important to predict

  2. The Controversy over Generic Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Susan J.; Hartman, Adam L.

    2010-01-01

    As patent protection ends for the next generation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), a complex debate continues over generic substitution of AEDs. On one hand, generic drug formulations provide cost savings for patients and society. On the other hand, patients with epilepsy and physicians are wary about the adequacy and efficacy of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) standards for generics. This article reviews current and proposed bioequivalence test procedures, summarizes new generic AED formulations and their costs, and discusses potential pitfalls in the current standards. These shortcomings include certain pharmacokinetic factors and clinical pharmacologic factors that may affect bioequivalence of generic AEDs, and statistical limitations of the standards. While the drug concentration differences between the brand name drug and each generic formulation are unlikely to be substantial, the differences with generic-to-generic switches will be greater and potentially clinically significant. Conversely, owing to their more favorable pharmacokinetic profile, newer AEDs may be less prone to problems with generic substitution than older ones. Unfortunately, very few data are available to guide decisions regarding what is best for an individual patient. Based on new prediction methods, generic substitution should be safe for many patients but identifying them ultimately requires more rigorous study. PMID:22477799

  3. Clinical significance of pharmacokinetic interactions between antiepileptic and psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Spina, Edoardo; Perucca, Emilio

    2002-01-01

    As antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and psychotropic agents are increasingly used in combination, the possibility of pharmacokinetic interactions between these compounds is relatively common. Most pharmacokinetic interactions between AEDs and psychoactive drugs occur at a metabolic level, and usually involve changes in the activity of the cytochrome P450 mixed-function oxidases (CYP) involved in their biotransformation. As a consequence of CYP inhibition or induction, plasma concentrations of a given drug may reach toxic or subtherapeutic levels, and dosage adjustments may be required to avoid adverse effects or clinical failure. Enzyme-inducing AEDs, such as carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), and barbiturates, stimulate the oxidative biotransformation of many concurrently prescribed psychotropics. In particular, these AEDs may decrease the plasma concentrations of tricyclic antidepressants, many antipsychotics, including traditional compounds, i.e., haloperidol and chlorpromazine, and newer agents, i.e., clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, and ziprasidone, and some benzodiazepines. Conversely, new AEDs appear to have a lower potential for interactions with all psychotropic drugs. While antipsychotics and anxiolytics do not significantly influence the pharmacokinetics of most AEDs, some newer antidepressants, such as viloxazine, fluoxetine, and fluvoxamine, may lead to higher serum levels of some AEDs, namely CBZ and PHT, through inhibition of CYP enzymes. No significant pharmacokinetic interactions have been documented between AEDs and lithium. Information about CYP enzymes responsible for the biotransformation of individual agents and about the effects of these compounds on the activity of specific CYP enzymes may help in predicting and avoiding clinically significant interactions. Apart from careful clinical observation, serum level monitoring of AEDs and psychotropic drugs can be useful in determining the need for dosage adjustments, especially if

  4. The Impact of Psychoactive Drugs on Seizures and Antiepileptic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mitra; Hart, Felecia; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn

    2016-08-01

    Psychiatric comorbidities are very common in patients with epilepsy, and in fact, a bidirectional relationship between epilepsy and some psychiatric disorders have been identified. However, despite their high prevalence, these comorbidities are not routinely recognized or adequately treated causing a significant burden for these patients. Atypical presentations of some of these psychiatric comorbidities in epilepsy, the concern that some psychotropic drugs may lower seizure threshold worsening frequency of seizures, possibility of many drug-drug interactions, and the negative impact of some antiepileptic drugs on psychiatric conditions are some of the challenges faced by clinicians. Although the main focus in epilepsy has remained on treatment of seizures, acknowledgment of these comorbidities and their timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment not only can impact patients' quality of life but also may improve their response to antiepileptic therapies. PMID:27315249

  5. Antiepileptic Drug Treatment in Children with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Anna; De Masi, Salvatore; Guerrini, Renzo

    2015-10-01

    Most children with new-onset epilepsy achieve seizure freedom with appropriate antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, nearly 20 % will continue to have seizures despite AEDs, as either monotherapy or in combination. Despite the growing market of new molecules over the last 20 years, the proportion of drug-resistant epilepsies has not changed. In this review, we report the evidence of efficacy and safety based on phase III randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of AEDs currently used in the paediatric population. We conducted a literature search using the PubMed database and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. We also analysed the RCTs of newer AEDs whose efficacy in adolescents and adults might suggest possible use in children. Most of the phase III trials on AEDs in children have major methodological limitations that considerably limit meaningful conclusions about comparative efficacy between old and new molecules. Since the efficacy of new drugs has only been reported versus placebo, the commonly held opinion that new and newer AEDs have a better safety profile than old ones does not appear to be supported by evidence. Despite limited solid evidence, pharmacological management has improved over the years as a consequence of increased awareness of some degree of specificity of treatment in relation to different epilepsy syndromes and attention to adverse events. Future research should be directed taking these factors, as well as the diversity of epilepsy, into consideration. PMID:26400189

  6. Old and new anti-epileptic drugs in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Regesta, G; Tanganelli, P

    2000-01-01

    During the recent years, a significant number of anti-epileptic drugs have been approved for prescription in different countries. In addition, some other promising drugs are in various stages of development. Soon after each drug has found its place in the therapeutic arsenal, pregnancies with exposure occur, with an increased risk of birth defect and developmental disturbances. As regards the possible teratogenic effect of the new anti-epileptic drugs, apart some individual reports we have only the results of pre-clinical toxicological studies which are difficult to extrapolate to the human situation, because of the well-known interspecies differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Furthermore, combinations of anti-epileptic drugs are not tested pre-clinically while these new drugs are prescribed as add-on medication. So, metabolic interactions between individual components of such drug combinations may induce unexpected teratogenic effects. Also as for the teratogenic effects of the old drugs many questions have still to be defined. The most common and more important are which anti-epileptic drugs or combination of drugs is most safe for a particular woman with epilepsy and if there is an association between single anti-epileptic drugs and specific malformations. The reason is that none of the available reports to date have studied a sufficient number of women with epilepsy exposed to anti-epileptic drug monotherapy during pregnancy. Other questions concern dose-effect relationships, a universally accepted definition of major and minor malformations, and the lack of a thorough, exhaustive evaluation of the other risk factors, apart from the drugs. All these questions need to be ascertained for both the old and the new anti-epileptic drugs. Owing to these considerations, in 1998 an European Register of anti-epileptic drugs and pregnancy was instituted. The primary objective of the study is to evaluate and determine the degree of safety, with respect to

  7. Sodium channels, inherited epilepsy, and antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Catterall, William A

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate action potentials in brain neurons, mutations in sodium channels cause inherited forms of epilepsy, and sodium channel blockers-along with other classes of drugs-are used in therapy of epilepsy. A mammalian voltage-gated sodium channel is a complex containing a large, pore-forming α subunit and one or two smaller β subunits. Extensive structure-function studies have revealed many aspects of the molecular basis for sodium channel structure, and X-ray crystallography of ancestral bacterial sodium channels has given insight into their three-dimensional structure. Mutations in sodium channel α and β subunits are responsible for genetic epilepsy syndromes with a wide range of severity, including generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), Dravet syndrome, and benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures. These seizure syndromes are treated with antiepileptic drugs that offer differing degrees of success. The recent advances in understanding of disease mechanisms and sodium channel structure promise to yield improved therapeutic approaches. PMID:24392695

  8. Neurodevelopmental effects of fetal antiepileptic drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Velez-Ruiz, Naymee J; Meador, Kimford J

    2015-03-01

    Many studies investigating cognitive outcomes in children of women with epilepsy report an increased risk of mental impairment. Verbal scores on neuropsychometric measures may be selectively more involved. While a variety of factors contribute to the cognitive problems of children of women with epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) appear to play a major role. The mechanisms by which AEDs affect neurodevelopmental outcomes remain poorly defined. Animal models suggest that AED-induced apoptosis, altered neurotransmitter environment, and impaired synaptogenesis are some of the mechanisms responsible for cognitive and behavioral teratogenesis. AEDs that are known to induce apoptosis, such as valproate, appear to affect children's neurodevelopment in a more severe fashion. Fetal valproate exposure has dose-dependent associations with reduced cognitive abilities across a range of domains, and these appear to persist at least until the age of 6. Some studies have shown neurodevelopmental deficiencies associated with the use of phenobarbital and possibly phenytoin. So far, most of the investigations available suggest that fetal exposures to lamotrigine or levetiracetam are safer with regard to cognition when compared with other AEDs. Studies on carbamazepine show contradictory results, but most information available suggests that major poor cognitive outcomes should not be attributed to this medication. Overall, children exposed to polytherapy prenatally appear to have worse cognitive and behavioral outcomes compared with children exposed to monotherapy, and with the unexposed. There is an increase risk of neurodevelopmental deficits when polytherapy involves the use of valproate versus other agents. PMID:25693658

  9. Antiepileptic drug treatment strategies in neonatal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hernan, A E; Holmes, G L

    2016-01-01

    The highest risk of seizures across the lifespan is in the neonatal period. The enhanced excitability of the immature brain compared to the mature brain is related to the sequential development and expression of essential neurotransmitter signaling pathways. During the neonatal period there is an overabundance of excitatory receptors, and γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) is potentially depolarizing, as opposed to hyperpolarizing in the older brain. While this enhanced excitability is required for regulation of activity-dependent synapse formation and refining of synaptic connections that are necessary for normal brain development, enhanced excitability predisposes the immature brain to seizures. In addition to being common, neonatal seizures are very difficult to treat; antiepileptic drugs used in older children and adults are less efficacious, and possibly detrimental to brain development. In an effort to target the unique features of neurotransmission in the neonate, bumetanide, an NKCC1 inhibitor which reduces intraneuronal Cl(-) and induces a significant shift of EGABA toward more hyperpolarized values in vitro, has been used to treat neonatal seizures. As the understanding of the pathophysiology of genetic forms of neonatal epilepsy has evolved there have been a few successful attempts to pharmacologically target the mutated protein. This approach, while promising, is challenging due to the findings that the genetic syndromes presenting in infancy demonstrate genetic heterogeneity in regard to both the mutated gene and its function. PMID:27323943

  10. Availability of antiepileptic drugs across Europe.

    PubMed

    Baftiu, Arton; Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie; Nikaj, Valent; Neslein, Inger-Lise; Johannessen, Svein I; Perucca, Emilio

    2015-12-01

    Europe consists of 53 countries with widely different economic conditions and different political, educational, and health care systems. This study was aimed at determining the availability of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) across Europe. An electronic questionnaire was submitted to all 43 European chapters of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). Outcome measures were availability of older, newer, and newest AEDs, generic products, indications, reimbursement rules, and reasons for lack of availability of AEDs. Countries were divided according to economic status as defined by the World Bank. Thirty-four chapters (79%) provided data. There were large differences in AED availability across countries, especially between high-income countries and the other countries. The newest AEDs were not available in any of the 12 non-high-income countries. Availability was higher in countries with public reimbursement systems. Reimbursement policies ranged from full reimbursement for all AEDs to complete lack of reimbursement. Main hurdles for poor access to AEDs included lack of regulatory approval, high prices and reimbursement restrictions. The availability of AEDs differs across European countries, with many hurdles hampering access to epilepsy medicines, particularly to new medications. These findings raise major concerns on the quality of epilepsy care in many countries. PMID:26477534

  11. Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Brian S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary This review considers how recent advances in the physiology of ion channels and other potential molecular targets, in conjunction with new information on the genetics of idiopathic epilepsies, can be applied to the search for improved antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Marketed AEDs predominantly target voltage-gated cation channels (the α subunits of voltage-gated Na+ channels and also T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels) or influence GABA-mediated inhibition. Recently, α2–δ voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and the SV2A synaptic vesicle protein have been recognized as likely targets. Genetic studies of familial idiopathic epilepsies have identified numerous genes associated with diverse epilepsy syndromes, including genes encoding Na+ channels and GABAA receptors, which are known AED targets. A strategy based on genes associated with epilepsy in animal models and humans suggests other potential AED targets, including various voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and auxiliary proteins, A- or M-type voltage-gated K+ channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptors. Recent progress in ion channel research brought about by molecular cloning of the channel subunit proteins and studies in epilepsy models suggest additional targets, including G-protein-coupled receptors, such as GABAB and metabotropic glutamate receptors; hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel subunits, responsible for hyperpolarization-activated current Ih; connexins, which make up gap junctions; and neurotransmitter transporters, particularly plasma membrane and vesicular transporters for GABA and glutamate. New information from the structural characterization of ion channels, along with better understanding of ion channel function, may allow for more selective targeting. For example, Na+ channels underlying persistent Na+ currents or GABAA receptor isoforms responsible for tonic (extrasynaptic) currents represent attractive targets. The growing understanding of the

  12. New avenues for anti-epileptic drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Klitgaard, Henrik; Twyman, Roy E; Schmidt, Dieter

    2013-10-01

    Despite the introduction of over 15 third-generation anti-epileptic drugs, current medications fail to control seizures in 20-30% of patients. However, our understanding of the mechanisms mediating the development of epilepsy and the causes of drug resistance has grown substantially over the past decade, providing opportunities for the discovery and development of more efficacious anti-epileptic and anti-epileptogenic drugs. In this Review we discuss how previous preclinical models and clinical trial designs may have hampered the discovery of better treatments. We propose that future anti-epileptic drug development may be improved through a new joint endeavour between academia and the industry, through the identification and application of tools for new target-driven approaches, and through comparative preclinical proof-of-concept studies and innovative clinical trials designs. PMID:24052047

  13. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder caused by antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M.; Bathla, Manish; Martin, A.; Aneja, J.

    2015-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is common but poorly understood sexual problem in women. Sexual dysfunction in female is multi-factorial in origin and also observed with intake of drug acting on central nervous system. This case report describes a female epileptic patient who developed sexual dysfunction with intake of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:26157303

  14. The Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs on Classroom Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Jeffrey B.; Thio, Liu Lin

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in children, and it has been associated with an increased risk of cognitive, psychiatric, and learning problems. Although side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been long studied in adults, an understanding of how they manifest in children is only beginning to emerge. Careful…

  15. Idiopathic (primary) generalized epilepsy. Traditional versus new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Yadegari, Samira; Bahrami, Parviz

    2013-04-01

    Idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE) are genetic based seizures with normal neurologic exam, intelligence, and imaging studies. Based on the age of onset and prominent seizure type, different syndromes were identified. The purpose of this study is to summarize the characteristics, prognosis, and choices of antiepileptic drugs (AED) in common syndromes of IGE. In addition, we review the updated role of new AEDs in specific syndromes of IGE. The first choice AED is usually valproate. Most drug trials on the effects of new AEDs compared them with placebo and not valproate. However, some of the broad spectrum new AEDs may be considered as the first choice in specific conditions. In true refractory patients, combination therapy and vagal nerve stimulation could be the next option. In the proper management of IGE, neurologists should consider the predominant seizure type, patient gender, co-morbidities, and antiepileptic drugs that may aggravate a specific seizure type. PMID:23545607

  16. Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Dogs Treated with Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Tina; Mueller, Ralf S.; Dobenecker, Britta; Fischer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders in dogs and life-long treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AED) is frequently required. Adverse events of AED targeting the skin are only rarely reported in veterinary medicine and the true incidence and spectrum of cutaneous reactions in epileptic dogs remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that cutaneous reactions commonly occur in epileptic dogs and are related to AED treatment. A retrospective case review of 185 dogs treated for epilepsy identified 20.0% with simultaneous appearance of dermatologic signs. In a subsequent prospective case investigation (n = 137), we identified newly appearing or distinct worsening of skin lesions following initiation of AED therapy in 10.9% of dogs treated for epilepsy (95% CI 6.8–17.7%). Cutaneous lesions were classified as probably drug-induced in 40.0% of these cases. Patch testing and intradermal testing were further investigated as potential diagnostic methods to confirm AED hypersensitivity. They were of high specificity but sensitivity and positive predictive value appeared inappropriate to recommend their routine use in clinical practice. PMID:27148543

  17. Therapeutic drug monitoring of antiepileptic drugs by use of saliva.

    PubMed

    Patsalos, Philip N; Berry, Dave J

    2013-02-01

    Blood (serum/plasma) antiepileptic drug (AED) therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) has proven to be an invaluable surrogate marker for individualizing and optimizing the drug management of patients with epilepsy. Since 1989, there has been an exponential increase in AEDs with 23 currently licensed for clinical use, and recently, there has been renewed and extensive interest in the use of saliva as an alternative matrix for AED TDM. The advantages of saliva include the fact that for many AEDs it reflects the free (pharmacologically active) concentration in serum; it is readily sampled, can be sampled repetitively, and sampling is noninvasive; does not require the expertise of a phlebotomist; and is preferred by many patients, particularly children and the elderly. For each AED, this review summarizes the key pharmacokinetic characteristics relevant to the practice of TDM, discusses the use of other biological matrices with particular emphasis on saliva and the evidence that saliva concentration reflects those in serum. Also discussed are the indications for salivary AED TDM, the key factors to consider when saliva sampling is to be undertaken, and finally, a practical protocol is described so as to enable AED TDM to be applied optimally and effectively in the clinical setting. Overall, there is compelling evidence that salivary TDM can be usefully applied so as to optimize the treatment of epilepsy with carbamazepine, clobazam, ethosuximide, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone, topiramate, and zonisamide. Salivary TDM of valproic acid is probably not helpful, whereas for clonazepam, eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, pregabalin, retigabine, rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, and vigabatrin, the data are sparse or nonexistent. PMID:23288091

  18. The New Antiepileptic Drugs: Their Neuropharmacology and Clinical Indications.

    PubMed

    Hanaya, Ryosuke; Arita, Kazunori

    2016-05-15

    The administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is the first treatment of epilepsy, one of the most common neurological diseases. Therapeutic guidelines include newer AEDs as front-line drugs; monotherapy with new AEDs is delivered in Japan. While about 70% of patients obtain good seizure control by taking one to three AEDs, about 60% experience adverse effects and 33% have to change drugs. Compared to traditional AEDs, the prolonged administration of new AEDs elicits fewer adverse effects and fewer drug interactions and their teratogenicity may be lower. These characteristics increase drug compliance and allow combination therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy, although the antiepileptic effects of the new AEDs are not greater than of traditional AEDs. Comorbidities are not rare in epileptics; many adult patients present with stroke and brain tumors. In stroke patients requiring risk control and in chemotherapy-treated brain tumor patients, their fewer drug interactions render the new AEDs advantageous. Also, new AEDs offer favorable side benefits for concurrent diseases and conditions. Patients with stroke and traumatic brain injury often present with psychiatric/behavioral symptoms and cognitive impairment and some new AEDs alleviate such symptoms. This review presents an outline of the new AEDs used to treat adult patients based on the pharmacological activity of the drugs and discusses possible clinical indications from the perspective of underlying causative diseases and comorbidities. PMID:26935782

  19. The New Antiepileptic Drugs: Their Neuropharmacology and Clinical Indications

    PubMed Central

    HANAYA, Ryosuke; ARITA, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    The administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is the first treatment of epilepsy, one of the most common neurological diseases. Therapeutic guidelines include newer AEDs as front-line drugs; monotherapy with new AEDs is delivered in Japan. While about 70% of patients obtain good seizure control by taking one to three AEDs, about 60% experience adverse effects and 33% have to change drugs. Compared to traditional AEDs, the prolonged administration of new AEDs elicits fewer adverse effects and fewer drug interactions and their teratogenicity may be lower. These characteristics increase drug compliance and allow combination therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy, although the antiepileptic effects of the new AEDs are not greater than of traditional AEDs. Comorbidities are not rare in epileptics; many adult patients present with stroke and brain tumors. In stroke patients requiring risk control and in chemotherapy-treated brain tumor patients, their fewer drug interactions render the new AEDs advantageous. Also, new AEDs offer favorable side benefits for concurrent diseases and conditions. Patients with stroke and traumatic brain injury often present with psychiatric/behavioral symptoms and cognitive impairment and some new AEDs alleviate such symptoms. This review presents an outline of the new AEDs used to treat adult patients based on the pharmacological activity of the drugs and discusses possible clinical indications from the perspective of underlying causative diseases and comorbidities. PMID:26935782

  20. Access to antiepileptic drug therapy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Arencibia, Zeina Bárzaga; Leyva, Alberto López; Peña, Yordanka Mejías; Reyes, Alba Rosa González; Nápolez, Maurilys Acosta; Carbonell Perdomo, Demetrio; Manzano, Edita Fernández; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe access to antiepileptic drug therapy and estimate the prevalence of epilepsy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba. Methods All the community pharmacies in the province were visited and information collected about the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs in 2009. Availability and cost of each antiepileptic drug were determined. The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated by determining the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs. Results There were 923 children who received a total of 977 antiepileptic drugs in Camagüey Province. The estimated prevalence of epilepsy was 5.18 per thousand children which is lower than previously reported rates in other low and lower-middle income countries. Most of the children (871, 94%) received a single antiepileptic drug. Carbamazepine and valproate were the two most frequently prescribed antiepileptic drugs. Antiepileptic drugs were available from the local pharmacy on 76% of occasions. If the antiepileptic drug was not available from the local pharmacy, the parent had to travel to another pharmacy to obtain the medicine. Conclusions The estimated prevalence of epilepsy in children in Cuba is lower than that estimated in other lower-middle income countries. Access to drug therapy in children with epilepsy can be achieved in lower-middle income countries. PMID:23134098

  1. Teratogenic potential of antiepileptic drugs in the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hak; Kang, Jung Won; Lin, Tao; Lee, Jae Eun; Jin, Dong Il

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish model is an attractive candidate for screening of developmental toxicity during early drug development. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) arouse concern for the risk of teratogenicity, but the data are limited. In this study, we evaluated the teratogenic potential of seven AEDs (carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETX), valproic acid (VPN), lamotrigine (LMT), lacosamide (LCM), levetiracetam (LVT), and topiramate (TPM)) in the zebrafish model. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to AEDs from initiation of gastrula (5.25 hours post-fertilization (hpf)) to termination of hatching (72 hpf) which mimic the mammalian teratogenic experimental design. The lethality and teratogenic index (TI) of AEDs were determined and the TI values of each drug were compared with the US FDA human pregnancy categories. Zebrafish model was useful screening model for teratogenic potential of antiepilepsy drugs and was in concordance with in vivo mammalian data and human clinical data. PMID:24324971

  2. Cognitive/behavioral teratogenetic effects of antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus; Cohen, Morris J.; Gaily, Eija; Westerveld, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The majority of children of mothers with epilepsy are normal, but they are at increased risk for developmental delay. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) appear to play a role. Our current knowledge is reviewed, including research design issues and recommendations for future research. In animals, exposure of the immature brain to some AEDs can produce widespread neuronal apoptosis and behavioral deficits. The risks of AEDs in humans are less clear, but recent studies raise concerns, especially for valproate. There is a critical need for well-designed systematic research to improve our understanding of AED effects on the fetal brain. PMID:17996637

  3. Antiepileptic drug use in women of childbearing age

    PubMed Central

    Meador, Kimford J.; Penovich, Patricia; Baker, Gus A.; Pennell, Page B.; Bromfield, Edward; Pack, Alison; Liporace, Joyce D.; Sam, Maria; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Thurman, David J.; Moore, Eugene; Loring, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Research on antiepileptic drug (AED) teratogenesis has demonstrated an increased risk for valproate. The impact of these findings on current AED prescribing patterns for women of childbearing age with epilepsy is uncertain. The Neurodevelopmental Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs (NEAD) Study is an ongoing prospective multicenter observational investigation that enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy on the most common AED monotherapies from October 1999 to February 2004 (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, valproate, and phenytoin). A 2007 survey of AED use in women of childbearing age at eight NEAD centers found a total of 932 women of childbearing age with epilepsy (6% taking no AED, 53% monotherapy, 41% polytherapy). The most common monotherapies were lamotrigine or levetiracetam. Since 2004, prescriptions of carbamazepine, phenytoin, and valproate have decreased, whereas those for levetiracetam have increased. Except for the top two AED monotherapies, there were marked differences in other monotherapies and in polytherapies between U.S. and UK centers. Future investigations are needed to examine reasons for drug choice. PMID:19410654

  4. Antiepileptic drug use in women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Meador, Kimford J; Penovich, Patricia; Baker, Gus A; Pennell, Page B; Bromfield, Edward; Pack, Alison; Liporace, Joyce D; Sam, Maria; Kalayjian, Laura A; Thurman, David J; Moore, Eugene; Loring, David W

    2009-07-01

    Research on antiepileptic drug (AED) teratogenesis has demonstrated an increased risk for valproate. The impact of these findings on current AED prescribing patterns for women of childbearing age with epilepsy is uncertain. The Neurodevelopmental Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs (NEAD) Study is an ongoing prospective multicenter observational investigation that enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy on the most common AED monotherapies from October 1999 to February 2004 (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, valproate, and phenytoin). A 2007 survey of AED use in women of childbearing age at eight NEAD centers found a total of 932 women of childbearing age with epilepsy (6% taking no AED, 53% monotherapy, 41% polytherapy). The most common monotherapies were lamotrigine or levetiracetam. Since 2004, prescriptions of carbamazepine, phenytoin, and valproate have decreased, whereas those for levetiracetam have increased. Except for the top two AED monotherapies, there were marked differences in other monotherapies and in polytherapies between U.S. and UK centers. Future investigations are needed to examine reasons for drug choice. PMID:19410654

  5. Disorders of reproduction in patients with epilepsy: antiepileptic drug related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Isojärvi, Jouko

    2008-03-01

    Epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and the reproductive system have complex interactions. Fertility is lower in both men and women with epilepsy than in the general population. Moreover, reproductive endocrine disorders are more common among patients with epilepsy than among the population in general. These disorders have been attributed both to epilepsy itself and to AEDs. The use of the liver enzyme inducing AEDs phenobarbital, phenytoin and carbamazepine increases serum sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations in both men and women with epilepsy. Over time the increase in serum SHBG levels leads to diminished bioactivity of testosterone and estradiol, which may result in diminished potency in men and menstrual disorders in some women, and, thus, to reduced fertility. Valproate (VPA) medication may have effects on serum androgen concentrations and it reduces serum follicle stimulating hormone levels in men with epilepsy. However, the clinical significance of the VPA related reproductive endocrine changes in men is unknown. On the other hand, in women the use of VPA is associated with a frequent occurrence of reproductive endocrine disorders characterized by polycystic changes in the ovaries, high serum testosterone concentrations (hyperandrogenism) and menstrual disorders. Young women with epilepsy seem to be especially vulnerable to the effects of VPA on serum androgen levels. The endocrine effects of the new AEDs have not been widely studied. However, it seems they may offer an alternative if reproductive endocrine problems emerge during treatment with the older antiepileptic drugs. On the other hand, it seems that in many cases the reproductive endocrine effects of the AEDs are reversible, if the medication is discontinued. PMID:18164216

  6. [Influence of coadministered antiepileptic drugs on serum antiepileptic drug concentrations in epileptic patients -quantitative analysis based on suitable transforming factor].

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Noriyasu

    2004-07-01

    We conducted a study to clarify the most suitable transforming factor related to the daily dose of antiepileptic drugs (D) providing a steady-state serum concentration (C(t)) and analyzed the influences of the concomitant use of antiepileptic drugs on C(t) quantitatively. Data obtained by routine therapeutic drug monitoring from epileptic patients treated with the multiple oral administration of valproic acid (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), zonisamide (ZNS), phenobarbital (PB), and phenytoin (PHT) were used for the analysis. Employing the ideal body weight or the extracellular water volume as a transforming factor, allowed the level/dose (L/D) ratio to be independent of the patient's age and gender for monotherapy with VPA or CBZ, ZNS, PB, and PHT, respectively. Each C(t) was revealed to be dependent on only one variable in terms of the transformed daily dose (D'). C(t) was proportional to the power function of D' for VPA and CBZ and was linearly proportional to D' for ZNS and PB. The L/D ratio is expressed as a linear function of C(t) for PHT. For a detailed analysis of the influences of the coadministered antiepileptic drugs, we defined the parameter as an alteration ratio, representing the influence of each antiepileptic drug on the C(t) of VPA and CBZ alone, and on the L/D ratio of ZNS and PB alone, respectively. A model based on the assumption that each value of an alteration ratio was independent from one other and multiplicative for VPA, CBZ, and ZNS, and that the coadministered drug inhibited the drug-metabolizing enzyme competitively for PB, was adopted. The Michaelis-Menten kinetic model was adopted for PHT. The analysis clarified that CBZ, PB, and PHT significantly lowered (P<0.05) C(t) to 0.81, 0.88, and 0.83 compared with the value of VPA alone, that PB and PHT significantly lowered C(t) to 0.77 and 0.71 compared with the value of CBZ alone, and that VPA, CBZ, PB, and PHT significantly lowered the L/D ratio of ZNS alone to 0.87, 0.85, 0.85, and 0

  7. The challenges of treating epilepsy with 25 antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Santulli, Lia; Coppola, Antonietta; Balestrini, Simona; Striano, Salvatore

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays a substantial armamentarium of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is available, including drugs with different mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and tolerability; therefore the choice for the right treatment is often challenging. The specific characteristic of the drug, the epileptic syndrome, seizure types and the patient's features need to be taken into consideration driving the choice through available evidence-based studies, which are often lacking for older AEDs. Besides, study conditions in registered clinical trials (RCTs) are quite different from daily clinical practice, which is more complex and various. When dealing with first diagnosed epilepsy, monotherapy is widely accepted as the gold standard option. Likewise, alternative monotherapy should be considered when the first drug treatment fails. However, the association of different AEDs in polytherapy is a common practice. The choice of AEDs used in association is often based on clinical experience or anecdotal observations or small clinical studies. Polytherapy should be as "rational" as possible and consider the mechanism of action, the pharmacokinetic characteristics and the safety of each drug. When dealing with drug resistant patients, clinicians should never give up and consider the use of AEDs acting on new targets. An attempt to come back to a monotherapy or simpler therapeutic regimen should be pursued even in patients who were previously drug resistant. This review will focus on the strategies to treat epilepsy by choosing among 25 available drugs. PMID:26995307

  8. Rufinamide: A Novel Broad-Spectrum Antiepileptic Drug

    PubMed Central

    Wheless, James W; Vazquez, Blanca

    2010-01-01

    The last 20 years have witnessed a tremendous explosion in the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as well as the introduction of AEDS developed for specific epilepsy syndromes. The study of the efficacy and side effect profile of AEDs for unique epilepsy syndromes has allowed neurologists to utilize evidence-based medicine when treating patients. In late 2008, the Food and Drug Administration approved rufinamide for adjunctive use in the treatment of seizures associated with Lennox–Gastaut syndrome. This unique chemical compound is also the first new AED to reach the market in the United States having a pediatric indication prior to approval for adults. Rufinamide appears to have a broad spectrum of efficacy, is well tolerated, and may be rapidly initiated—properties that will likely extend its use outside of Lennox–Gastaut syndrome. PMID:20126329

  9. Antiepileptic drugs influences on body weight in people with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Sherifa Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Data from clinical trials, retrospective and cross-sectional studies have quantified the metabolic changes associated with long-term use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). AEDs can be associated with weight gain or weight loss, although most are weight neutral. Weight gain is not only a cosmetic problem but also a risk for obesity-related vascular disorders. Weight loss may compromise growth in children/adolescents. This review discusses the possible contribution of peripheral and central hormones/neuropeptides (as leptin, insulin, adiponectin, neuropeptide-Y, ghrelin and galanin) and pathways that influence energy balance in the pathogenesis of weight changes with AEDs. As AEDs may influence weight, physicians have to properly select and characterize the suitable AED as an initial step or modify the existing AED if it compromises patient's health. PMID:25487080

  10. Modifications of Antiepileptic Drugs for Improved Tolerability and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Landmark, Cecilie Johannessen; Johannessen, Svein I.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction A large number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are available today, but they may not be satisfactory regarding clinical efficacy, tolerance, toxicity or pharmacokinetic properties. The purpose of this review is to focus upon the rationale behind the chemical modifications of several recently marketed AEDs or drugs in development and to categorize them according to the main purposes for the improvements: better efficacy or tolerability accompanied by improved pharmacokinetic properties. Material and Method AEDs that have been chemically modified to new derivatives during the last years are reviewed based on recent publications and PubMed-searches. Results and Discussion Improvement in pharmacokinetic parameters may affect both tolerability and efficacy. Modifications to improve tolerability include various valproate analogues, divided into aliphatic amides, cyclic derivatives or amino acid conjugates. Furthermore, there are the carbamazepine analogues oxcarbazepine and eslicarbazepine, the felbamate analogues fluorofelbamate and carisbamate (RWJ 33369), and the lamotrigine analogue JZP-4. The levetiracetam analogues brivaracetam and seletracetam and the derivatives of gabapentin, pregabalin and XP13512, have improved selectivity compared to their parent compounds. Other new drugs have new mechanisms of action related to GABA and glutamate receptors; the glutamate antagonists like topiramate (talampanel and NS-1209), and GABAA receptor agonists, benzodiazepine or progesterone analogues (ELB-139 and ganaxolone). Conclusion Further challenges for development of new AEDs include investigations of target molecules affected by pathophysiological processes and detailed structure-activity relationships with focus on stereoselectivity. These potential drugs may become of importance in future drug therapy in epilepsy and other CNS disorders. PMID:19787095

  11. Challenges in the clinical development of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Franco, Valentina; French, Jacqueline A; Perucca, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Despite the current availability in the market of over two dozen antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), about one third of people with epilepsy fail to achieve complete freedom from seizures with existing medications. Moreover, currently available AEDs have significant limitations in terms of safety, tolerability and propensity to cause or be a target for clinically important adverse drug interactions. A review of the evidence shows that there are many misperceptions about the viability of investing into new therapies for epilepsy. In fact, there are clear incentives to develop newer and more efficacious medications. Developing truly innovative drugs requires a shift in the paradigms for drug discovery, which is already taking place by building on greatly expanded knowledge about the mechanisms involved in epileptogenesis, seizure generation, seizure spread and development of co-morbidities. AED development can also benefit by a review of the methodology currently applied in clinical AED development, in order to address a number of ethical and scientific concerns. As discussed in this article, many processes of clinical drug development, from proof-of-concept-studies to ambitious programs aimed at demonstrating antiepileptogenesis and disease-modification, can be facilitated by a greater integration of preclinical and clinical science, and by application of knowledge acquired during decades of controlled epilepsy trials. PMID:26611249

  12. New antiepileptic drugs: focus on ezogabine, clobazam, and perampanel.

    PubMed

    Rudzinski, Leslie A; Vélez-Ruiz, Naymeé J; Gedzelman, Evan R; Mauricio, Elizabeth A; Shih, Jerry J; Karakis, Ioannis

    2016-08-01

    Ezogabine, clobazam, and perampanel are among the newest antiseizure drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration between 2011 and 2012. Ezogabine and perampanel are approved for adjunctive treatment of partial epilepsy. Perampanel is also approved for adjunctive treatment of primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Ezogabine and perampanel have novel mechanisms of action. Ezogabine binds to voltage-gated potassium channels and increases the M-current thereby causing membrane hyperpolarization. Perampanel is a selective, non-competitive 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid receptor antagonist, which reduces neuronal excitation. Clobazam has been used worldwide since the 1970s and is approved for adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Clobazam is the only 1,5-benzodiazepine currently in clinical use, which is less sedating than the commonly used 1,4-benzodiazepines. Phase III multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated efficacy and good tolerability of these 3 new antiepileptic drugs. These drugs represent a welcome addition to the armamentarium of practitioners, but it remains to be seen how they will affect the landscape of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. PMID:27252470

  13. Diverse Mechanisms of Antiepileptic Drugs in the Development Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Rogawski, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    There is a remarkable array of new chemical entities in the current antiepileptic drug (AED) development pipeline. In some cases, the compounds were synthesized in an attempt improve upon the activity of marketed AEDs. In other cases, the discovery of antiepileptic potential was largely serendipitous. Entry into the pipeline begins with the demonstration of activity in one or more animal screening models. Results from testing in a panel of such models provide a basis to differentiate agents and may offer clues as to the mechanism. Target activity may then be defined through cell-based studies, often years after the initial identification of activity. Some pipeline compounds are believed to act through conventional targets, whereas others are structurally novel and may act by novel mechanisms. Follow-on agents include the levetiracetam analogs brivaracetam and seletracetam that act as SV2A-ligands; the valproate-like agents valrocemide, valnoctamide, propylisopropyl acetamide, and isovaleramide; the felbamate analog flurofelbamate, a dicarbamate, and the unrelated carbamate RWJ-333369; the oxcarbazepine analog licarbazepine, which probably acts as a use-dependent sodium channel blockers, and its prodrug acetate BIA 2-093; and various selective partial benzodiazepine receptor agonists, including ELB139, which is a positive allosteric modulator of α3-containing GABAA receptors. A variety of AEDs that may act through novel targets are also in clinical development: lacosamide, a functionalized amino acid; talampanel, a 2,3-benzodiazepine selective noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist; NS1209, a competitive AMPA receptor antagonist; ganaxolone, a neuroactive steroid that acts as a positive modulator of GABAA receptors; retigabine, a KCNQ potassium channel opener with activity as a GABAA receptor positive modulator; the benzanilide KCNQ potassium channel opener ICA-27243 that is more selective than retigabine; and rufinamide, a triazole of unknown mechanism. PMID

  14. Evidence for epistatic interactions in antiepileptic drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Moore, Jason H; Kim, Jong-Ki; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Cho, Yong-Won; Kim, Yo-Sik; Lee, Min-Cheol; Kim, Young-Ok; Shin, Min-Ho

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the epistatic interactions involved in antiepileptic drug (AED) resistance, 26 coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from 16 candidate genes. A total of 200 patients with drug-resistant localization-related epilepsy and 200 patients with drug-responsive localization-related epilepsy were genotyped individually for the SNPs. Rather than using the traditional parametric statistical method, a new statistical method, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), was used to determine whether gene-gene interactions increase the risk of AED resistance. The MDR method indicated that a combination of four SNPs (rs12658835 and rs35166395 from GABRA1, rs2228622 from EAAT3 and rs2304725 from GAT3) was the best model for predicting susceptibility to AED resistance with a statistically significant testing accuracy of 0.625 (P < 0.001) and cross-validation consistency of 10/10. This best model had an odds ratio of 3.68 with a significant 95% confidence interval of 2.32-5.85 (P < 0.0001). Our results may provide meaningful information on the mechanism underlying AED resistance and, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of evidence for gene-gene interactions underlying AED resistance. PMID:21124337

  15. Antiepileptic Drugs with Mood Stabilizing Properties and Their Relation with Psychotropic Drug Use in Institutionalized Epilepsy Patients with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leunissen, C. L. F.; de la Parra, N. M.; Tan, I. Y.; Rentmeester, Th. W.; Vader, C. I.; Veendrick-Meekes, M. J. B. M.; Aldenkamp, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of patients with epilepsy and intellectual disability take medication, amongst which antiepileptic and psychotropic drugs, often simultaneously. Certain antiepileptic drugs have mood-stabilizing properties, e.g. carbamazepine, valproic acid and lamotrigine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of these…

  16. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010) for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics) interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This reassessment may be particularly

  17. Polycystic ovary syndrome in patients on antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Lakshminarayanapuram G.; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Bhimani, Bipin C.; Reddy, Janardhan YC; Rama Murthy, Batchu S.; Subbakrishna, Doddaballapura K.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to discuss the prevalence of polycystic ovary (PCO) and Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women with epilepsy (WWE) on valproate (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), or phenobarbitone (PB), drug naive WWE and women with bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) on VPA. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included 190 women aged 18–45 years, who had epilepsy or BPAD (on VPA), and consented for study. Patients were grouped as Group 1 (n = 40): WWE on VPA, Group 2 (n = 50): WWE on CBZ, Group 3 (n = 50): WWE on PB, Group 4 (n = 30): drug naïve WWE, and Group 5 (n = 20): women with BPAD on VPA. All women were interviewed for medical, menstrual, drug and treatment history, nature of epilepsy, and seizure control. Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were done to compare results between the groups. Results: Fifty-two women (52/190; 27.4%) had menstrual disturbances, in which oligomenorrhea was the most common (55.8%). There was a significant difference in the occurrence of PCOS in patients on VPA versus normal population (P = 0.05) and patients on other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (P = 0.02). There was, however, no significant difference in the occurrence of PCO between patients on VPA and the untreated epileptic women. VPA group (Epilepsy + BPAD) had a significantly higher occurrence of obesity than other treatment groups (P = 0.043, OR = 2.11). Conclusions: The study observed significantly higher occurrence of PCO in patients on VPA compared to other AEDs and the normal population. The importance of proper clinical evaluation before initiating VPA is highlighted. PMID:27570385

  18. Short-term use of antiepileptic drugs is neurotoxic to the immature brain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Xue-ying; Li, Dan; Yang, Lin; Huang, Shao-ping

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the long-term use of antiepileptic drugs can cause nervous system damage. However, short-term antiepileptic drug treatment is frequently given to infants, especially neonates, to control seizure. Whether the short-term use of antiepileptic drugs is neurotoxic remains unclear. In the present study, immature rats, 3–21 days of age, were intraperitoneally injected with phenobarbital and/or topiramate for 3 consecutive days. Hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining revealed that phenobarbital and topiramate, individually or in combination, were cytotoxic to hippocampal CA1 neurons and inhibited the expression of GluR1 and NR2B, excitatory glutamate receptor subunits. Furthermore, the combination of the two drugs caused greater damage than either drug alone. The results demonstrate that the short-term use of antiepileptic drugs damages neurons in the immature brain and that the combined use of antiepileptic drugs exacerbates damage. Our findings suggest that clinicians should consider the potential neurotoxic risk associated with the combined use of antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of seizure. PMID:26170821

  19. Enhancing antiepileptic drug adherence: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian; Sheeran, Paschal; Reuber, Markus

    2009-12-01

    Suboptimal adherence to antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is commonplace, and increases the risk of status epilepticus and sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. This randomized controlled trial was designed to demonstrate whether an implementation intention intervention involving the completion of a simple self-administered questionnaire linking the intention of taking medication with a particular time, place, and other activity can improve AED treatment schedule adherence. Of the 81 patients with epilepsy who were randomized, 69 completed a 1-month monitoring period with an objective measure of tablet taking (electronic registration of pill bottle openings, Medication Event Monitoring System [MEMS]). Intervention participants showed improved adherence relative to controls on all three outcomes: doses taken in total (93.4% vs. 79.1%), days on which correct dose was taken (88.7% vs. 65.3%), and doses taken on schedule (78.8% vs. 55.3%) (P<0.01). The implementation intention intervention may be an easy-to-administer and effective means of promoting AED adherence. PMID:19864187

  20. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Martin J; Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Steinhoff, Bernhard J

    2016-07-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  1. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  2. Breastfeeding in Children of Women Taking Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Cohen, Morris J.; Bromley, Rebecca L.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Breastfeeding is known to have beneficial effects, but concern exists that breastfeeding during maternal antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy may be harmful. We previously noted no adverse effects of breastfeeding associated with AED use on IQ at age 3 years, but IQ at age 6 years is more predictive of school performance and adult abilities. OBJECTIVES To examine the effects of AED exposure via breastfeeding on cognitive functions at age 6 years. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective observational multicenter study of long-term neurodevelopmental effects of AED use. Pregnant women with epilepsy receiving monotherapy (ie, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, or valproate) were enrolled from October 14, 1999, through April 14, 2004, in the United States and the United Kingdom. At age 6 years, 181 children were assessed for whom we had both breastfeeding and IQ data. All mothers in this analysis continued taking the drug after delivery. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Differential Ability Scales IQ was the primary outcome. Secondary measures included measures of verbal, nonverbal, memory, and executive functions. For our primary analysis, we used a linear regression model with IQ at age 6 years as the dependent variable, comparing children who breastfed with those who did not. Similar secondary analyses were performed for the other cognitive measures. RESULTS In total, 42.9% of children were breastfed a mean of 7.2 months. Breastfeeding rates and duration did not differ across drug groups. The IQ at age 6 years was related to drug group (P italic> .001 [adjusted IQ worse by 7–13 IQ points for valproate compared to other drugs]), drug dosage (regression coefficient, −0.1; 95% CI, −0.2 to 0.0; P = .01 [higher dosage worse]), maternal IQ (regression coefficient, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.0 to 0.4; P = .01 [higher child IQ with higher maternal IQ]), periconception folate use (adjusted IQ 6 [95% CI, 2–10] points higher for folate, P = .005), and breastfeeding

  3. Analysis of nocebo effects of antiepileptic drugs across different conditions.

    PubMed

    Zaccara, Gaetano; Giovannelli, Fabio; Giorgi, Filippo Sean; Franco, Valentina; Gasparini, Sara

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the nocebo effect in all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in the clinical conditions in which these compounds have been studied with the exception of epilepsy. We searched for all double-blind, placebo-controlled trials performed in adult patients, testing AEDs in any clinical condition except epilepsy. The following data were extracted from the placebo arms: the number of randomized patients, the number of patients withdrawing because of adverse effects (AEs), and the number of patients with 11 predefined AEs (dizziness, ataxia/coordination abnormal, diplopia, somnolence, fatigue, headache, memory impairment, tremor, abnormal thinking, anxiety and depression). Outcome measures were the percentages of patients whithdrawing due to AEs and reporting the selected AEs. RCTs included in the analysis were grouped in six main categories of clinical conditions (pain, movement disorders, psychiatric disorders, substance abuse, obesity and binge eating disorders, and miscellanea). Proportions of patients with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) have been calculated for all reported outcome measures. Thirteen AEDs were studied and the total number of selected RCTs was 157. Significant percentages of placebo-treated patients withdrawing due to AEs and with specific AEs were observed in several cases. Significant differences emerged across different conditions. Comparisons with results of a previous meta-analysis on all RCTs in patients with drug-resistant epilepsies showed that ataxia, diplopia and fatigue were significantly more frequent, and patients withdrawing were significantly less frequent, in placebo-treated epileptic patients. Significant differences have been identified in the AEDs-induced nocebo effect across different conditions. Placebo-treated epilepsy patients have significantly more frequent neurological AEs. PMID:26810717

  4. Semi-automated continuous-flow enzyme immunoassay for antiepileptic drugs in serum.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, S; Kurooka, S; Arisue, K; Kohda, K; Hayashi, C

    1983-10-01

    We have developed a semi-automated method for measuring five kinds of antiepileptic drugs in serum by successfully adapting commercial competitive-binding enzyme immunoassay kits (MARKIT; Dainippon) for use with a continuous-flow analyzer (Technicon AutoAnalyzer II equipped with a dialyzer). The free enzyme-labeled drug is automatically separated by a microfilter from the competitive immunoreaction mixture between labeled and unlabeled drug for anti-drug immunoglobulin coupled to bacterial cell walls. The concentrations of the antiepileptic drugs in serum samples can be determined by automated measurement of enzyme activity of the enzyme-labeled drugs. Results of the semi-automated method correlated well with those obtained by manual enzyme immunoassay, gas-liquid chromatography, and "high-pressure" liquid chromatography. The correlation coefficients were all greater than 0.95, showing the practicality of this method for therapeutic monitoring of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:6352086

  5. Effect of antiepileptic drugs on reproductive endocrine function in individuals with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Isojärvi, Jouko I T; Taubøll, Erik; Herzog, Andrew G

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and the reproductive system have complex interactions. Fertility is lower in both men and women with epilepsy than in the general population. Moreover, reproductive endocrine disorders are more common among patients with epilepsy than among the population in general. These disorders have been attributed both to epilepsy itself and to use of AEDs. The use of the liver enzyme-inducing AEDs phenobarbital, phenytoin and carbamazepine increases serum sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations in both men and women with epilepsy. Over time, the increase in serum SHBG levels leads to diminished bioactivity of testosterone and estradiol, which may result in diminished potency in men and menstrual disorders in some women, and thus to reduced fertility. Liver enzyme-inducing AEDs also reduce the efficacy of oral contraceptives. Valproic acid medication may have effects on serum androgen concentrations and it reduces serum follicle stimulating hormone levels in men with epilepsy. However, the clinical significance of valproic acid-related reproductive endocrine changes in men is unknown. On the other hand, in women, use of valproic acid appears to be associated with a frequent occurrence of reproductive endocrine disorders characterised by polycystic changes in the ovaries, high serum testosterone concentrations (hyperandrogenism) and menstrual disorders. These disorders are especially common among women who have gained weight during valproic acid treatment. There are some discrepancies regarding the reported occurrence of reproductive endocrine disorders in women taking valproic acid for epilepsy. However, most studies also including patients receiving valproic acid for other reasons than epilepsy, and studies in different non-epileptic animal models, have shown an association between valproic acid medication and hyperandrogenism and related reproductive endocrine disorders. From a practical point of view

  6. Smart Nanotransformers with Unique Enzyme-Inducible Structural Changes and Drug Release Properties.

    PubMed

    Bellat, Vanessa; Lee, Hyun Hee; Vahdat, Linda; Law, Benedict

    2016-06-13

    We previously reported a high aspect ratio peptide nanofiber that could be effectively delivered to tumors with minimal nonspecific uptake by other organs. The peptidic nature offers the design flexibility of smart formulation with unique responsiveness. Two new formulations that behave congruously as nanotransformers (NTFs) are reported herein. NTF1 and NTF2 could biomechanically remodel upon enzyme activation to generate a degradable and an aggregable effect, respectively, within the lysosomal compartment. These NTFs were further evaluated as carriers of mertansine (DM1), a microtubule inhibitor. DM1-loaded NTF1 could be degraded by cathepsin B (CathB) to release the same active metabolite, as previously described in the lysosomal degradation of antibody-DM1 conjugate. In contrast, CathB only partially digested DM1-loaded NTF2 and induced aggregate formation to become a storage reservoir with slow payload release property. The DM1-loaded NTF1 exhibited a comparable cytotoxicity to the free drug and was more effective than the NTF2 formulation in eradicating triple negative breast cancer. Our data suggested that biological transformers with distinct enzyme-induced structural changes and payload release profiles could be designed for the intracellular delivery of cytotoxic and imaging agents. PMID:27180972

  7. Current Status of the New Antiepileptic Drugs in Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Harpreet S; Sadhotra, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine, and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer's Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review, we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder should be

  8. Current Status of the New Antiepileptic Drugs in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Harpreet S.; Sadhotra, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine, and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer’s Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review, we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder should be

  9. A Study into the Possible Link between Anti-Epileptic Drugs and the Risk of Fractures in Muckamore Abbey Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tohill, Carmel

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated whether the effects of anti-epileptic drugs were (carbamazepine, phenobarbitone, and phenytoin) related, to the incidence of fractures in 85 Irish patients. If patients were only on one antiepileptic drug, there appeared to be no correlation; however, if patients were taking a combination of three drugs, they were more likely…

  10. The effects of antiepileptic drugs on the growth of glioblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Yi; Lai, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Angela; Chan, She-Hung; Hsiao, Ling-Ping; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2016-05-01

    To determine the effects of antiepileptic drug compounds on glioblastoma cellular growth, we exposed glioblastoma cell lines to select antiepileptic drugs. The effects of selected antiepileptic drugs on glioblastoma cells were measured by MTT assay. For compounds showing significant inhibition, cell cycle analysis was performed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. The antiepileptic compounds selected for screening included carbamazepine, ethosuximide, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, magnesium sulfate, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, primidone, tiagabine, topiramate, valproic acid, and vigabatrin. Dexamethasone and temozolomide were used as a negative and positive control respectively. Our results showed temozolomide and oxcarbazepine significantly inhibited glioblastoma cell growth and reached IC50 at therapeutic concentrations. The other antiepileptic drugs screened were unable to reach IC50 at therapeutic concentrations. The metabolites of oxcarbazepine were also unable to reach IC50. Dexamethasone, ethosuximide, levetiracetam, and vigabatrin showed some growth enhancement though they did not reach statistical significance. The growth enhancement effects of ethosuximide, levetiracetam, and vigabatrin found in the study may indicate that these compounds should not be used for prophylaxis or short term treatment of epilepsy in glioblastoma. While valproic acid and oxcarbazepine were effective, the required dose of valproic acid was far above that used for the treatment of epilepsy and the metabolites of oxcarbazepine failed to reach significant growth inhibition ruling out the use of oral oxcarbazepine or valproic acid as monotherapy in glioblastoma. The possibility of using these compounds as local treatment is a future area of study. PMID:26758059

  11. Human placental perfusion method in the assessment of transplacental passage of antiepileptic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, Paeivi . E-mail: paivi.k.myllynen@oulu.fi; Pienimaeki, Paeivi; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi

    2005-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.5 to 1% of pregnant women. It is commonly accepted that older antiepileptic drugs bear teratogenic potential. So far, no agreement has been reached about the safest antiepileptic drug during pregnancy. It is known that nearly all drugs cross the placenta at least to some extent. Nowadays, there is very little information available of the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the feto-placental unit. Detailed information about drug transport across the placenta would be valuable for the development of safe and effective treatments. For reasons of safety, human studies on placental transfer are restricted to a limited number of drugs. Interspecies differences limit the extrapolation of animal data to humans. Several in vitro methods for the study of placental transfer have been developed over the past decades. The placental perfusion method is the only experimental method that has been used to study human placental transfer of substances in organized placental tissue. The aim of this article is to review human placental perfusion data on antiepileptic drugs. According to perfusion data, it seems that most of the antiepileptic drugs are transferred across the placenta meaning significant fetal exposure.

  12. Psychotropic and Antiepileptic Drug Treatment in Early Childhood Special Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.

    The effectiveness of psychotropic and antiepileptic drug treatment was investigated with approximately 2500 children receiving educational services in early childhood special education programs. The study consisted of three phases: phase 1 in which all teachers were surveyed to determine the prevalence of drug therapy and patterns of usage, phase…

  13. Adjusting to a seizure-free "new normal" life following discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ya-Ping; Lee, Tzu-Ying; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Laadt, Virginia L

    2014-04-01

    This qualitative study sought to understand how children in adolescence adjust to their newly acquired normal life without epilepsy, following discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs during this dynamic period of growth and development. Three major themes with subthemes were identified: 1) setting the body and mind free; 2) engaging in self-regulation; and 3) protection by significant others. A sense of relief from constraints related to treatment schedules, special diets, and avoiding seizure-provoking activities was expressed by all participants. Freedom from side effects of the antiepileptic drugs improved life at home and school. Most of the participants said that they were not worried about seizure recurrence but would use caution against a possible relapse. Family members also must adjust to a new lifestyle. Medical staff needs to provide support and adequate care to adolescents during their period of identity adjustment following antiepileptic drug discontinuation. PMID:24632354

  14. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Espinosa, Maríam L.; Sanmartí-García, Gemma; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of neuropathic pain, and they include the use of different antiepileptic drugs. However, the lack of high quality studies indicates that results on the different neuropathic disorders under study do not recommend a particular drug treatment. This study makes a systematic review of the published literature on the use of several antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain, and has the objective of considering both its clinical characteristics and pharmacological use, which will depend on their level of scientific evidence and will follow the principles of evidence-based dentistry. The articles were stratified according to their scientific evidence using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy), and it included those articles that only have level 1 or 2. Randomized clinical trials were stratified according to their level of quality using the JADAD scale, an instrument described by Jadad et al. (7). to assess the quality of clinical trials, while studies with a level below 3 were discarded. Recently, type A or B recommendations are given in favor or against the use of antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain on the basis of their scientific quality. Key words:Neuropathic pain, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, post- herpetic neuralgia, burning mouth syndrome, persistent idiopathic facial pain. PMID:22549682

  15. Hepatic adenomas associated with anti-epileptic drugs: a case series and imaging review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peter U Y; Roberts, Lewis R; Kaiya, Joseph K; Lee, Christine U

    2010-04-01

    We report four patients on long-term antiepileptic drugs, without any history of anabolic steroid or oral contraceptive use, who had path-proven hepatic adenomas at our institution. Imaging review of one case is presented here. An exhaustive literature search reveals only four other such case reports, none from the North American continent. PMID:19283429

  16. Foetal Antiepileptic Drug Exposure and Verbal versus Non-Verbal Abilities at Three Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Cohen, Morris J.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that foetal valproate exposure impairs intelligence quotient. In this follow-up investigation, we examined dose-related effects of foetal antiepileptic drug exposure on verbal and non-verbal cognitive measures. This investigation is an ongoing prospective observational multi-centre study in the USA and UK, which has enrolled…

  17. Cognitive Function at 3 Years of Age after Fetal Exposure to Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Combs-Cantrell, Deborah T.; Cohen, Morris; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fetal exposure of animals to antiepileptic drugs at doses lower than those required to produce congenital malformations can produce cognitive and behavioral abnormalities, but cognitive effects of fetal exposure of humans to antiepileptic drugs are uncertain. METHODS Between 1999 and 2004, we enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy who were taking a single antiepileptic agent (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, or valproate) in a prospective, observational, multicenter study in the United States and the United Kingdom. The primary analysis is a comparison of neurodevelopmental outcomes at the age of 6 years after exposure to different antiepileptic drugs in utero. This report focuses on a planned interim analysis of cognitive outcomes in 309 children at 3 years of age. RESULTS At 3 years of age, children who had been exposed to valproate in utero had significantly lower IQ scores than those who had been exposed to other antiepileptic drugs. After adjustment for maternal IQ, maternal age, antiepileptic-drug dose, gestational age at birth, and maternal preconception use of folate, the mean IQ was 101 for children exposed to lamotrigine, 99 for those exposed to phenytoin, 98 for those exposed to carbamazepine, and 92 for those exposed to valproate. On average, children exposed to valproate had an IQ score 9 points lower than the score of those exposed to lamotrigine (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1 to 14.6; P = 0.009), 7 points lower than the score of those exposed to phenytoin (95% CI, 0.2 to 14.0; P = 0.04), and 6 points lower than the score of those exposed to carbamazepine (95% CI, 0.6 to 12.0; P = 0.04). The association between valproate use and IQ was dose dependent. Children’s IQs were significantly related to maternal IQs among children exposed to carbamazepine, lamotrigine, or phenytoin but not among those exposed to valproate. CONCLUSIONS In utero exposure to valproate, as compared with other commonly used antiepileptic drugs, is associated

  18. The Role of Reactive Species in Epileptogenesis and Influence of Antiepileptic Drug Therapy on Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Martinc, Boštjan; Grabnar, Iztok; Vovk, Tomaž

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is considered one of the most common neurological disorders. The focus of this review is the acquired form of epilepsy, with the development process consisting of three major phases, the acute injury phase, the latency epileptogenesis phase, and the phase of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Nowadays, an increasing attention is paid to the possible interrelationship between oxidative stress resulting in disturbance of physiological signalling roles of calcium and free radicals in neuronal cells and mitochondrial dysfunction, cell damage, and epilepsy. The positive stimulation of mitochondrial calcium signals by reactive oxygen species and increased reactive oxygen species generation resulting from increased mitochondrial calcium can lead to a positive feedback loop. We propose that calcium can pose both, physiological and pathological effects of mitochondrial function, which can lead in neuronal cell death and consequent epileptic seizures. Various antiepileptic drugs may impair the endogenous antioxidative ability to prevent oxidative stress. Therefore, some antiepileptic drugs, especially from the older generation, may trigger oxygen-dependent tissue injury. The prooxidative effects of these antiepileptic drugs might lead to enhancement of seizure activity, resulting in loss of their efficacy or apparent functional tolerance and undesired adverse effects. Additionally, various reactive metabolites of antiepileptic drugs are capable of covalent binding to macromolecules which may lead to deterioration of the epileptic seizures and systemic toxicity. Since neuronal loss seems to be one of the major neurobiological abnormalities in the epileptic brain, the ability of antioxidants to attenuate seizure generation and the accompanying changes in oxidative burden, further support an important role of antioxidants as having a putative antiepileptic potential. PMID:23730257

  19. Mexiletine and its Interactions with Classical Antiepileptic Drugs: An Isobolographic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Borowicz-Reutt, Kinga K; Banach, Monika; Piskorska, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Using the mouse maximal electroshock test, the reference model of tonic-clonic seizures, the aim of the present study was to determine the type of interaction between mexiletine (a class IB antiarrhythmic drug) and classical antiepileptics: valproate, carbamazepine, phenytoin, and phenobarbital. Isobolographic analysis of obtained data indicated antagonistic interactions between mexiletine and valproate (for fixed ratio combinations of 1:1 and 3:1). Additivity was observed between mexiletine and valproate applied in proportion of 1:3 as well as between mexiletine and remaining antiepileptics for the fixed ratios of 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1. Neither motor performance nor long-term memory were impaired by mexiletine or antiepileptic drugs regardless of whether they were administered singly or in combination. Mexiletine did not significantly affected brain concentrations of carbamazepine, phenobarbital or phenytoin. In contrast, the antiarrhythmic drug decreased by 23 % the brain level of valproate. This could be, at least partially, the reason of antagonistic interaction between the two drugs. In conclusion, the observed additivity suggests that mexiletine can be safely applied in epileptic patients treated with carbamazepine, phenytoin or phenobarbital. Because of undesirable pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic interactions with valproate, mexiletine should not be used in such combinations. PMID:26738990

  20. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, Marta; Bianchi, Lucia; Lucano, Melissa; Bertù, Lorenza; Vender, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Summary The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders. PMID:27358221

  1. Fluorination of an antiepileptic drug: A self supporting transporter by oxygen enrichment mechanism.

    PubMed

    Natchimuthu, V; Amoros, J; Ravi, S

    2016-03-01

    Drug therapy of seizures involves producing high levels of antiepileptic drugs in the blood. Drug must enter the brain by crossing from the blood into the brain tissue, called a transvascular route (TVR). Even before the drug can reach the brain tissue, factors such as systemic toxicity, macrophage phagocytises and reduction in oxygen content limit the success of this TVR. Encapsulating the drug within a nano scale delivering system, synthesising drugs with low molecular weight are the best mechanisms to deliver the drug to the brain. But through this article, we have explored a possibility of attaching a molecule 4-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid (TFMBA), that possess more number of fluorine atom, to benzodiazepine (BDZ) resulting in an ionic salt (S)-(+)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine5,11(10H,11aH)-dione with 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoic acid. By this way, reducing the toxicity of BDZ than the conventional anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), increasing the solubility, reducing the melting point, enriching the TVR with excess oxygen content with the support of fluorine. With all these important prerequisites fulfilled, the drug along with the attached molecule is expected to travel more comfortably through the TVR without any external support than any other conventional AEDs. FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HRMS spectroscopy, HRTEM and In vitro cytotoxicity analysis supports this study. PMID:26708322

  2. Patterns of Nonadherence to Antiepileptic Drug Therapy in Children With Newly Diagnosed Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Avani C.; Rausch, Joseph R.; Glauser, Tracy A.

    2012-01-01

    Context Because of epilepsy’s common occurrence, the narrow therapeutic and safety margins of antiepileptic medications, and the recognized complications of medication nonadherence in adults with epilepsy, identifying the rates, patterns, and predictors of nonadherence in children with epilepsy is imperative. The onset and evolution of antiepileptic drug nonadherence in children with newly diagnosed epilepsy remains unknown. Objectives To identify and characterize trajectories of adherence in children with newly diagnosed epilepsy over the first 6 months of therapy and to determine sociodemographic and epilepsy-specific predictors of adherence trajectories. Design, Setting, and Patients Prospective, longitudinal observational study of antiepileptic drug adherence in a consecutive cohort of 124 children (2–12 years old) with newly diagnosed epilepsy at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Patients were recruited from April 2006 through March 2009, and final data collection occurred in September 2009. Main Outcome Measure Objective adherence measured using electronic monitors. Results Fifty-eight percent of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy demonstrated persistent nonadherence during the first 6 months of therapy. Group-based trajectory models identified 5 differential adherence patterns (Bayesian information criterion=−23611.8): severe early nonadherence (13%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8%–20%), severe delayed nonadherence (7%; 95% CI, 3%–12%), moderate nonadherence (13%; 95% CI, 8%–20%), mild nonadherence (26%; 95% CI, 19%–34%), and near-perfect adherence (42%; 95% CI, 33%–50%). The adherence pattern of most patients was established by the first month of therapy. Socioeconomic status was the sole predictor of adherence trajectory group status (χ42=19.3 [n = 115]; P < .001; partial r2 = 0.25), with lower socioeconomic status associated with higher nonadherence. Conclusion Five trajectory patterns were identified that captured the

  3. Clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antiepileptic drugs with new antidepressants and new antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Spina, Edoardo; Pisani, Francesco; de Leon, Jose

    2016-04-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are frequently co-prescribed with new antidepressants (ADs) or new antipsychotics (APs). A PubMed search with no time limit was used to update the review of the clinically significant pharmacokinetic (PK) drug interactions DIs (DIs) between AEDs with new ADs and APs. Our best interpretation of what to expect regarding dosing changes in the average patient after combining AEDs with new ADs or new APs is summarized on updated tables that integrate the information on in vitro metabolism studies, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) studies, case report/series and prospective studies. There will be a need to periodically update these dose correction factors as new knowledge becomes available. These tables will provide some orientation to clinicians with no TDM access and may also encourage clinicians to further study TDM. The clinical relevance of the inductive properties of carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone on new ADs and new APs and the inhibitory properties of valproic acid and some new ADs, are relatively well understood. On the other hand, PK DI studies combining new AEDs with weak inductive properties (particularly oxcarbazepine doses≥1200mg/day), topiramate doses≥400mg/day, clobazam, eslicarbazepine, and rufinamide), with new ADs and new APs are needed. Valproic acid may be 1) an inhibitor and/or inducer of clozapine and olanzapine with potential for clinically relevant DIs, 2) an inhibitor of paliperidone, and 3) a weak inducer of aripiprazole. Fluoxetine and fluvoxamine are relevant inhibitors of phenytoin and valproic acid and possibly of clobazam, lacosamide, phenobarbital, or primidone. PMID:26896788

  4. Brain Graph Topology Changes Associated with Anti-Epileptic Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Harvey S.; Chiang, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neuroimaging studies of functional connectivity using graph theory have furthered our understanding of the network structure in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Brain network effects of anti-epileptic drugs could influence such studies, but have not been systematically studied. Resting-state functional MRI was analyzed in 25 patients with TLE using graph theory analysis. Patients were divided into two groups based on anti-epileptic medication use: those taking carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine (CBZ/OXC) (n=9) and those not taking CBZ/OXC (n=16) as a part of their medication regimen. The following graph topology metrics were analyzed: global efficiency, betweenness centrality (BC), clustering coefficient, and small-world index. Multiple linear regression was used to examine the association of CBZ/OXC with graph topology. The two groups did not differ from each other based on epilepsy characteristics. Use of CBZ/OXC was associated with a lower BC. Longer epilepsy duration was also associated with a lower BC. These findings can inform graph theory-based studies in patients with TLE. The changes observed are discussed in relation to the anti-epileptic mechanism of action and adverse effects of CBZ/OXC. PMID:25492633

  5. Prenatal Exposure to Antiepileptic Drugs and Dental Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Pernille E.; Henriksen, Tine B.; Haubek, Dorte; Østergaard, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the association between prenatal exposure to AEDs and the risk of dental agenesis and to differentiate between the possible effects of the different drugs used. Methods Data on 214 exposed and 255 unexposed children, aged 12–18 years, were extracted from the Prescription Database of the Central Denmark Region and North Denmark Region and the Danish Medical Birth Registry. The children's dental charts were examined for the presence of dental agenesis. Results Overall, children exposed to AED in utero had an increased risk of developing dental agenesis, but as a group, the difference was not significant (OR = 1.7; [95% CI: 0.8–3.6]). The risk of developing dental agenesis was three-fold increased (OR = 3.1; [95% CI: 1.3–7.4]) in children exposed to valproate in mono- or in poly-therapy with other AEDs than carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine. The risk was further increased (OR = 11.2; [95% CI: 2.4–51.9]) in children exposed to valproate and carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine in combination. Conclusions The present study shows that dental agenesis is a potential congenital abnormality that is related to prenatal exposure to valproate, and dental agenesis may be considered a sensitive marker for the teratogenicity of valproate. PMID:24416231

  6. Drug interactions involving antiepileptic drugs: assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia and FDA-approved labels.

    PubMed

    Ekstein, Dana; Tirosh, Matanya; Eyal, Yonatan; Eyal, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Interactions of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with other substances may lead to adverse effects and treatment failure. To avoid such interactions, clinicians often rely on drug interaction compendia. Our objective was to compare the concordance for twenty-two AEDs among three drug interaction compendia (Micromedex, Lexi-Interact, and Clinical Pharmacology) and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved product labels. For each AED, the overall concordance among data sources regarding existence of interactions and their classification was poor, with less than twenty percent of interactions listed in all four sources. Concordance among the three drug compendia decreased with the fraction of the drug excreted unchanged and was greater for established inducers of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes than for the drugs that are not inducers (R-square=0.83, P<0.01). For interactions classified as contraindications, major, and severe, concordance among the four data sources was, in most cases, less than 30%. Prescribers should be aware of the differences between drug interaction sources of information for both older AEDs and newer AEDs, in particular for those AEDs which are not involved in hepatic enzyme-mediated interactions. PMID:25771206

  7. Targeting pharmacoresistant epilepsy and epileptogenesis with a dual-purpose antiepileptic drug.

    PubMed

    Doeser, Anna; Dickhof, Gesa; Reitze, Margit; Uebachs, Mischa; Schaub, Christina; Pires, Nuno Miguel; Bonifácio, Maria João; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Beck, Heinz

    2015-02-01

    In human epilepsy, pharmacoresistance to antiepileptic drug therapy is a major problem affecting a substantial fraction of patients. Many of the currently available antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated sodium channels, leading to a rate-dependent suppression of neuronal discharge. A loss of use-dependent block has emerged as a potential cellular mechanism of pharmacoresistance for anticonvulsants acting on voltage-gated sodium channels. There is a need both for compounds that overcome this resistance mechanism and for novel drugs that inhibit the process of epileptogenesis. We show that eslicarbazepine acetate, a once-daily antiepileptic drug, may constitute a candidate compound that addresses both issues. Eslicarbazepine acetate is converted extensively to eslicarbazepine after oral administration. We have first tested using patch-clamp recording in human and rat hippocampal slices if eslicarbazepine, the major active metabolite of eslicarbazepine acetate, shows maintained activity in chronically epileptic tissue. We show that eslicarbazepine exhibits maintained use-dependent blocking effects both in human and experimental epilepsy with significant add-on effects to carbamazepine in human epilepsy. Second, we show that eslicarbazepine acetate also inhibits Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels, which have been shown to be key mediators of epileptogenesis. We then examined if transitory administration of eslicarbazepine acetate (once daily for 6 weeks, 150 mg/kg or 300 mg/kg) after induction of epilepsy in mice has an effect on the development of chronic seizures and neuropathological correlates of chronic epilepsy. We found that eslicarbazepine acetate exhibits strong antiepileptogenic effects in experimental epilepsy. EEG monitoring showed that transitory eslicarbazepine acetate treatment resulted in a significant decrease in seizure activity at the chronic state, 8 weeks after the end of treatment. Moreover, eslicarbazepine acetate treatment resulted in a

  8. Cancer risk in people with epilepsy: the role of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gagandeep; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Sander, Josemir W

    2005-01-01

    There has been considerable debate about the relationship between epilepsy and cancer, in particular whether the incidence of cancer is increased in people with epilepsy and whether antiepileptic drugs promote or protect against cancer. We review available evidence from animal experiments, genotoxicity studies and clinico-epidemiological observations, and discuss proposed mechanisms underlying the association between epilepsy and cancer. A carcinoma-promoting effect has been seen unequivocally in rodent models for phenobarbital and phenytoin; phenobarbital promoted liver tumours and phenytoin caused lymphoid cell and liver tumours in rats. Early human epidemiological studies found an association between phenobarbital and hepatocellular carcinoma, and several subsequent studies suggested an association with lung cancer. An association with brain tumours has also been demonstrated. Phenytoin has been causally implicated in three human cancers: lymphoma, myeloma and neuroblastoma, the latter specifically in the setting of foetal hydantoin syndrome. However, despite considerable long-term pharmaco-epidemiological data being available for both antiepileptic drugs, evidence for human carcinogenicity is not consistent and both are considered only possibly carcinogenic to humans. Valproate, however, has been found to exert an antiproliferative effect on certain cancer cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. A corresponding cancer-suppressive effect has not been studied in human epidemiological studies, though there are now preliminary reports of the use of valproate in human haematological and solid tumours. The anticancer activity of valproate appears to be driven by histone deacetylase inhibition and to be independent of hormone or multidrug protein resistance dependent mechanisms. The newer antiepileptic drugs appear to be safe, as no carcinogenicity has been demonstrated either during regulatory testing or in post-marketing surveillance. Nevertheless, the subject of

  9. Economic evaluation of a behavior-modifying intervention to enhance antiepileptic drug adherence.

    PubMed

    Plumpton, Catrin O; Brown, Ian; Reuber, Markus; Marson, Anthony G; Hughes, Dyfrig A

    2015-04-01

    Between 35% and 50% of patients with epilepsy are reported to be not fully adherent to their medication schedule. We aimed to conduct an economic evaluation of strategies for improving adherence to antiepileptic drugs. Based on the findings of a systematic review, we identified an implementation intention intervention (specifying when, where, and how to act) which was tested in a trial that closely resembled current clinical management of patients with epilepsy and which measured adherence with an objective and least biased method. Using patient-level data, trial patients were matched with those recruited for the Standard and New Antiepileptic Drugs trial according to their clinical characteristics and adherence. Generalized linear models were used to adjust cost and utility in order to estimate the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained from the perspective of the National Health Service in the UK. The mean cost of the intervention group, £1340 (95% CI: £1132, £1688), was marginally lower than that of the control group representing standard care, £1352 (95% CI: £1132, £1727). Quality-adjusted life-year values in the intervention group were higher than those in the control group, i.e., 0.75 (95% CI: 0.70, 0.79) compared with 0.74 (95% CI: 0.68, 0.79), resulting in a cost saving of £12 (€15, US$19) and with the intervention being dominant. The probability that the intervention is cost-effective at a threshold of £20,000 per QALY is 94%. Our analysis lends support to the cost-effectiveness of a self-directed, implementation intention intervention for improving adherence to antiepileptic drugs. However, as with any modeling dependent on limited data on efficacy, there is considerable uncertainty surrounding the clinical effectiveness of the intervention which would require a substantive trial for a more definitive conclusion. PMID:25819948

  10. Antiepileptic Drug Discovery and Development: What Have We Learned and Where Are We Going?

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Aaron C.; Krajewski, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Current marketed antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) consist of a variety of structural classes with different mechanisms of action. These agents typically have non-overlapping efficacy and side-effect profiles presenting multiple treatment options for the patient population. However, approximately 30% of seizure sufferers fail to respond to current therapies often because poorly tolerated side-effects limit adequate dosing. The scope of this review is to summarize selected advances in 2nd and 3rd generation AEDs as well as compounds in development with novel mechanisms of action.

  11. Antiepileptic drug treatment in pregnancy: changes in drug disposition and their clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Tomson, Torbjörn; Landmark, Cecilie Johannessen; Battino, Dina

    2013-03-01

    Pregnancy is a state where pharmacokinetic changes are more pronounced and more rapid than during any other period of life. The consequences of such changes can be far reaching, not least in the management of epilepsy where the risks with uncontrolled seizures during pregnancy need to be balanced against potential teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). This article aims to review the literature on gestational effects on the pharmacokinetics of older and newer generation AEDs and discuss the implications for the treatment of epilepsy in women during pregnancy. Pregnancy can affect the pharmacokinetics of AEDs at any level from absorption, distribution, metabolism, to elimination. The effect varies depending on the type of AED. The most pronounced decline in serum concentrations is seen for AEDs that are eliminated by glucuronidation (UGT), in particular lamotrigine where the effect may be profound. Serum concentrations of AEDs that are cleared mainly through the kidneys, for example, levetiracetam, can also decline significantly. Some AEDs, such as carbamazepine seem to be affected only marginally by pregnancy. Data on pharmacokinetics during pregnancy are lacking completely for some of the newer generation AEDs: pregabalin, lacosamide, retigabine, and eslicarbazepine acetate. Where data are available, the effects of pregnancy on serum concentrations seem to vary considerably individually and are thus difficult to predict. Although large-scale systematic studies of the clinical relevance of the pharmacokinetic alterations are lacking, prospective and retrospective case series have reported an association between declining serum concentrations and deterioration in seizures control. The usefulness of routine monitoring of AED serum concentrations in pregnancy and of dose adjustments based on falling levels, are discussed in this review. We suggest that monitoring could be important, in particular when women have been titrated to the lowest effective AED

  12. Fetal antiepileptic drug exposure: Adaptive and emotional/behavioral functioning at age 6years.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Morris J; Meador, Kimford J; Browning, Nancy; May, Ryan; Baker, Gus A; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D; Pennell, Page B; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W

    2013-11-01

    The Neurodevelopmental Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs (NEAD) study is a prospective observational multicenter study in the USA and UK, which enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy on antiepileptic drug (AED) monotherapy from 1999 to 2004. The study aimed to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across four commonly used AEDs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, and valproate). In this report, we examine fetal AED exposure effects on adaptive and emotional/behavioral functioning at 6years of age in 195 children (including three sets of twins) whose parent (in most cases, the mother) completed at least one of the rating scales. Adjusted mean scores for the four AED groups were in the low average to average range for parent ratings of adaptive functioning on the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-Second Edition (ABAS-II) and for parent and teacher ratings of emotional/behavioral functioning on the Behavior Assessment System for Children (BASC). However, children whose mothers took valproate during pregnancy had significantly lower General Adaptive Composite scores than the lamotrigine and phenytoin groups. Further, a significant dose-related performance decline in parental ratings of adaptive functioning was seen for both valproate and phenytoin. Children whose mothers took valproate were also rated by their parents as exhibiting significantly more atypical behaviors and inattention than those in the lamotrigine and phenytoin groups. Based upon BASC parent and teacher ratings of attention span and hyperactivity, children of mothers who took valproate during their pregnancy were at a significantly greater risk for a diagnosis of ADHD. The increased likelihood of difficulty with adaptive functioning and ADHD with fetal valproate exposure should be communicated to women with epilepsy who require antiepileptic medication. Finally, additional research is needed to confirm these findings in larger prospective study samples, examine

  13. Foetal antiepileptic drug exposure and verbal versus non-verbal abilities at three years of age

    PubMed Central

    Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Cohen, Morris J.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that foetal valproate exposure impairs intelligence quotient. In this follow-up investigation, we examined dose-related effects of foetal antiepileptic drug exposure on verbal and non-verbal cognitive measures. This investigation is an ongoing prospective observational multi-centre study in the USA and UK, which has enrolled pregnant females with epilepsy on monotherapy from 1999 to 2004. The study seeks to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across four commonly used drugs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin and valproate). This report compares verbal versus non-verbal cognitive outcomes in 216 children who completed testing at the age of three years. Verbal and non-verbal index scores were calculated from the Differential Ability Scales, Preschool Language Scale, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test and Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration. Verbal abilities were lower than non-verbal in children exposed in utero to each drug. Preconceptional folate use was associated with higher verbal outcomes. Valproate was associated with poorer cognitive outcomes. Performance was negatively associated with valproate dose for both verbal and non-verbal domains and negatively associated with carbamazepine dose for verbal performance. No dose effects were seen for lamotrigine and phenytoin. Since foetal antiepileptic drug exposure is associated with lower verbal than non-verbal abilities, language may be particularly susceptible to foetal exposure. We hypothesize that foetal drug exposure may alter normal cerebral lateralization. Further, a dose-dependent relationship is present for both lower verbal and non-verbal abilities with valproate and for lower verbal abilities with carbamazepine. Preconceptional folate may improve cognitive outcomes. Additional research is needed to confirm these findings, extend the study to other drugs, define the risks associated with drug treatment for seizures in the neonates, and

  14. Non-adenosine nucleoside inosine, guanosine and uridine as promising antiepileptic drugs: a summary of current literature.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Zsolt; Kekesi, Katalin A; Juhasz, Gabor; Barna, Janos; Heja, Laszlo; Lakatos, Renata; Dobolyi, Arpad

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine (Ado) and some non-adenosine (non-Ado) nucleosides including inosine (Ino), guanosine (Guo) and uridine (Urd) are modulatory molecules in the central nervous system (CNS), regulating different physiological and pathophysiological processes in the brain such as sleep and epilepsy. Indeed, different drugs effective on adenosinergic system (e.g., Ado metabolism inhibitors, agonists and antagonists of Ado receptors) are being used in drug development for the treatment of epileptic disorders. Although (i) endogenous Ino, Guo and Urd showed anticonvulsant/antiepileptic effects (e.g., in quinolinic acid - induced seizures and in different epilepsy models such as hippocampal kindling models), and (ii) there is a need to generate new and more effective antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsies, our knowledge about antiepileptic influence of non-Ado nucleosides is far from complete. Thus, in this review article, we give a short summary of anticonvulsant/antiepileptic effects and mechanisms evoked by Ino, Guo, and Urd. Finally, we discuss some non-Ado nucleoside derivatives and their structures, which may be candidates as potential antiepileptic agents. PMID:25382017

  15. Patterns in spontaneous adverse event reporting among branded and generic antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bohn, J; Kortepeter, C; Muñoz, M; Simms, K; Montenegro, S; Dal Pan, G

    2015-05-01

    Spontaneous adverse event reports constitute an important source of information on previously unknown adverse reactions to marketed medicines. However, the dynamics of such reporting following generic introduction are poorly understood. Using adverse event reports on five antiepileptic drugs from the US Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System, we describe temporal trends in adverse event reporting before and after generic introduction, and survey the quality of product-identifying information contained therein. The majority of reports were sent by innovator drug manufacturers while few were sent by generic manufacturers, even when generics accounted for >90% of dispensed prescriptions. We manually reviewed narratives from 2,500 reports and found that the suspect product type (brand or generic) could not be determined in 84% of reports, while generic products (16%) were identified more often than brand-name products (<1%). These results suggest that pharmacovigilance stakeholders should act to promote more detailed reporting practices. PMID:25670505

  16. Effect of Anti-Epileptic Drugs on Serum Level of IgG Subclasses

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Mahmoud-Reza; Hosseini, Seyed-Ahmad; Biglari, Mohammad; Abolmaali, Sarah; Azizi Malamiri, Reza; Mombeini, Hoda; Pourpak, Zahra; Saladjegheh, Narges; Rezaei, Nima; Samadian, Azam; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2010-01-01

    Objective There are some controversial studies on effects of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) on serum IgG subclasses; however, the role of these medications is still unclear. The aim of this study was evaluation the effects of anti-epileptic drugs on serum concentration of IgG and its subclasses Methods Serum IgG and IgG subclasses of 61 newly diagnosed epileptic patients were measured at the beginning of monotherapy with carbamazepine, sodium valproate, and phenobarbital, and 6 months later. Measurement of IgG and its subclasses was performed using nephlometry and ELISA techniques, respectively. Findings Reduction of at least one IgG subclass was found in 6 patients 6 months after treatment with AEDs. Among 27 patients receiving carbamazepine, decrease in at least one serum IgG subclass level was found in 5 patients. Among 20 patients using sodium valproate, only one patient showed decrease in IgG2 subclass. None of the 14 patients using phenobarbital revealed significant decrease in IgG subclasses. No infection was seen in the patients with reduction of subclasses. Conclusion Although in our study, children with selective IgG subclass deficiency were asymptomatic, assessment of serum immunoglobulin levels could be recommended at starting the administration of AEDs and in serial intervals afterward in epileptic patients. PMID:23056716

  17. Antiepileptic drugs with histone deacetylase inhibition activity and prostate cancer risk: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Jukka K; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi; Murtola, Teemu J

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies suggest that antiepileptic drugs with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor properties may have prostate cancer preventive effects. We evaluated the association between antiepileptic drug use and prostate cancer risk in a population-based case-control study. The study included all new prostate cancer cases diagnosed in Finland in 1995-2002 and matched controls (24,657 case-control pairs) identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry and the Population Register Center, respectively. Information on antiepileptic drug purchases was obtained from the national prescription reimbursement database. Odds ratios and their 95 % confidence intervals were estimated using age-adjusted and multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression analysis. Compared to never-users of antiepileptic drugs, the overall prostate cancer risk was decreased among users of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproic acid (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.47, 95 % CI 0.24-0.92; OR 0.82, 95 % CI 0.71-0.94, and OR 0.62, 95 % CI 0.42-0.92, respectively), but not among users of other antiepileptic drugs. Overall prostate cancer risk decreased in a dose-dependent manner by cumulative amount, duration and yearly dosage (intensity) of HDAC inhibitors valproic acid and carbamazepine. The risk of advanced prostate cancer was decreased only among carbamazepine users (OR 0.65, 95 % CI 0.44-0.96). Our results support possible prostate cancer preventive effects of HDAC inhibitors. However, also phenobarbital use was associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, despite not having HDAC inhibiting activity. The mechanism of action for antiepileptic drugs in prostate cancer deserves further study. PMID:27038166

  18. Current status of the utilization of antiepileptic treatments in mood, anxiety and aggression: drugs and devices.

    PubMed

    Barry, John J; Lembke, Anna; Bullock, Kim D

    2004-01-01

    Interventions that have been utilized to control seizures in people with epilepsy have been employed by the psychiatric community to treat a variety of disorders. The purpose of this review will be to give an overview of the most prominent uses of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and devices like the Vagus Nerve Stimulator (VNS) and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in the treatment of psychiatric disease states. By far, the most prevalent use of these interventions is in the treatment of mood disorders. AEDs have become a mainstay in the effective treatment of Bipolar Affective Disorder (BAD). The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of valproic acid for acute mania, and lamotrigine for BAD maintenance therapy. AEDs are also effectively employed in the treatment of anxiety and aggressive disorders. Finally, VNS and TMS are emerging as possibly useful tools in the treatment of more refractory depressive illness. PMID:15112459

  19. Lamotrigine versus other antiepileptic drugs: a star rating system is born.

    PubMed

    Brodie, M J

    1994-01-01

    With the launching worldwide of a range of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the prescriber has a much wider choice than ever before. Comparative studies between new and established AEDs are few, and those between new AEDs are rarely performed. This report considers the strengths and weaknesses of nine new and established AEDs. Scores ranging from -2 to +2 are given under six headings: mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, side effects, drug interactions, and a comfort factor. Perceived advantages and disadvantages in their clinical use are summarized and a final "star rating" produced for each. This process is illustrated by a detailed critique of lamotrigine (LTG). The star system is intended to stimulate dialogue among epileptologists in reaching a consensus in the pharmacologic management of the epileptic patient. PMID:8039470

  20. Genotoxic evaluation of antiepileptic drugs by Drosophila somatic mutation and recombination test.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Muammer; Sarıkaya, Rabia; Bostanci, Neslihan

    2010-10-01

    The study examines the potential genotoxicity of three antiepileptic drugs (phenytoin sodium, pregabalin, gabapentin) using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. Trans-heterozygous (two genetic markers mwh and flr) third-instar larvae of D. melanogaster were treated with different concentrations of the test compounds. A positive correlation was observed between total mutations and the number of wings with morphologically detectable mutations. The observed mutations were classified according to size and type of mutation per wing. Phenytoin clearly increased the frequency of total spots at all concentrations above 1.25 microg/ml. Gabapentin also increased the frequency of total spots at concentrations of 40 and 80 microg/ml. This study shows that phenytoin and gabapentin have genotoxic effects according to the SMART test; however, pregabalin displays lower genotoxicity in the SMAR assay when compared with the other two antiepileptics. The results also show that all AED concentrations lower the survival rate of the flies. PMID:20600525

  1. The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale: Validation of a Brief Self-Report Measure of Antiepileptic-Drug-Related Neurotoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinsky, Martin C.; Storzbach, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale (PNS) is a brief patient-based survey of neurotoxicity complaints commonly encountered with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The authors present data on the validity of this scale, particularly when used in longitudinal studies. Participants included 55 healthy controls, 23 epilepsy patient controls, and 86…

  2. The Impact of Anti-Epileptic Drugs on Growth and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Lee, Herng-Shen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Yi-Yen; Lai, Hsin-Chuan; Hung, Pi-Lien; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Chi, Ching-Shiang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder worldwide and anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are always the first choice for treatment. However, more than 50% of patients with epilepsy who take AEDs have reported bone abnormalities. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes are induced by AEDs, especially the classical AEDs, such as benzodiazepines (BZDs), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PT), phenobarbital (PB), and valproic acid (VPA). The induction of CYP450 isoenzymes may cause vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, increased fracture risks, and altered bone turnover, leading to impaired bone mineral density (BMD). Newer AEDs, such as levetiracetam (LEV), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), gabapentin (GP), and vigabatrin (VB) have broader spectra, and are safer and better tolerated than the classical AEDs. The effects of AEDs on bone health are controversial. This review focuses on the impact of AEDs on growth and bone metabolism and emphasizes the need for caution and timely withdrawal of these medications to avoid serious disabilities. PMID:27490534

  3. The Impact of Anti-Epileptic Drugs on Growth and Bone Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Lee, Herng-Shen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Yi-Yen; Lai, Hsin-Chuan; Hung, Pi-Lien; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Chi, Ching-Shiang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder worldwide and anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are always the first choice for treatment. However, more than 50% of patients with epilepsy who take AEDs have reported bone abnormalities. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes are induced by AEDs, especially the classical AEDs, such as benzodiazepines (BZDs), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PT), phenobarbital (PB), and valproic acid (VPA). The induction of CYP450 isoenzymes may cause vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, increased fracture risks, and altered bone turnover, leading to impaired bone mineral density (BMD). Newer AEDs, such as levetiracetam (LEV), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), gabapentin (GP), and vigabatrin (VB) have broader spectra, and are safer and better tolerated than the classical AEDs. The effects of AEDs on bone health are controversial. This review focuses on the impact of AEDs on growth and bone metabolism and emphasizes the need for caution and timely withdrawal of these medications to avoid serious disabilities. PMID:27490534

  4. Parent-reported subjective complaints in children using antiepileptic drugs: what do they mean?

    PubMed

    Carpay, Johannes A.; Vermeulen, Jan; Stroink, Hans; Brouwer, Oebele F.; Boudewyn Peters, A C.; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; van Donselaar, Cees A.; Arts, Willem F.M.

    2002-08-01

    We used a parent-completed 20-item "side effect scale" quantifying complaints that parents perceive to be caused by antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in 108 children with active epilepsy. We studied the associations between parent-reported complaints, severity of seizures, and restrictions due to epilepsy, and clinical data including number and AED load. In 85% of the children at least one complaint was reported, in less than 20% complaints were perceived as a substantial problem. In a multivariate analysis, there was no significant relationship between the "side effect scale" score and AED load, or the number of AEDs. However, complaints were associated with parent-reported frequency and severity of seizures. We conclude that the adverse effects of seizures or parental concern about the severity and intractability of seizures in their children may have influenced the reported complaints. PMID:12609329

  5. Failure of antiepileptic drugs in controlling seizures in epilepsy: What do we do next?

    PubMed

    Galindo-Mendez, Brahyan; Mayor, Luis C; Velandia-Hurtado, Fernando; Calderon-Ospina, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Medically intractable epilepsy is a clinical condition of concern that arises when a patient with epilepsy suffers seizures, despite a trial of two or more antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) suitable for the type of epilepsy that are prescribed at maximum tolerated doses, does not achieve control of seizures. This diagnosis could be related to cortical dysplasias. We report the case of a 5-year-old girl with a previous normal neurological development and no family history of epilepsy who presented with focal-type seizures at age 4. She started treatment by taking different AEDs for seizure control. She continued having frequent seizures that sometimes progressed to generalized seizures and status epilepticus. After a focal cortical resection performed in the area where interictal spikes were detected, the pathology confirmed a type IIb cortical dysplasia as the cause of the epilepsy. This article discusses cortical dysplasias as a cause of pharmacoresistant epilepsy and its treatment. PMID:26101746

  6. The treatment of epilepsy in pregnancy: The neurodevelopmental risks associated with exposure to antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bromley, R

    2016-09-01

    A number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been confirmed as teratogens due to their association with an increased malformation rate. The majority of research to date does not find an association between prenatal exposure to monotherapy carbamazepine, lamotrigine or phenytoin and neurodevelopmental outcome in comparison to control children and noted higher abilities in comparison to children exposed to valproate; but further work is needed before conclusions can be drawn. Data for levetiracetam was limited to one study, as was the evidence for topiramate. Sodium valproate exposure appeared to carry a dose dependent risk to the developing brain, with evidence of reduced levels of IQ, poorer verbal abilities and increased rate of autistic spectrum disorder both in comparison to control children and children exposed to other AEDs. The severity of the neurodevelopmental deficits associated with prenatal exposure to valproate highlight the critical need to consider neurodevelopmental outcomes as a central aspect of teratological research. PMID:27312074

  7. Solid Dispersion Approach Improving Dissolution Rate of Stiripentol: a Novel Antiepileptic Drug

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Some drugs have low bioavailability due to their poor aqueous solubility and/or slow dissolution rate in biological fluids. Stiripentol (STP) is a novel anticonvulsant drug that is structurally unrelated to the currently available antiepileptics. It has poor aqueous solubility and its solubility has to be enhanced accordingly. Polyethyleneglycol 6000 (PEG-6000) is commonly utilized as a hydrophilic carrier for poorly water soluble drugs in order to improve their bioavailability. STP and PEG-6000 binary system was obtained by physical mixture, solvent evaporation, co-evaporation and melting methods using different weight ratios. The properties of the prepared binary systems were evaluated using dissolution rate, phase solubility, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. The FTIR spectroscopic studies showed the stability of STP and absence of STP-PEG-6000 interaction. The DSC and SEM studies indicated the amorphous state of STP in its binary systems with PEG-6000. Dissolution profile of STP was significantly improved via complexation with PEG-6000 as compared with the pure drug. The binary system which was prepared using melting method showed the highest dissolution rate. The promising results of the prepared binary systems open the avenue for further oral formulation of STP. PMID:26664367

  8. Local anesthetic and antiepileptic drug access and binding to a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; French, Robert J; French, Christopher; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Allen, Toby W

    2014-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are important targets in the treatment of a range of pathologies. Bacterial channels, for which crystal structures have been solved, exhibit modulation by local anesthetic and anti-epileptic agents, allowing molecular-level investigations into sodium channel-drug interactions. These structures reveal no basis for the "hinged lid"-based fast inactivation, seen in eukaryotic Nav channels. Thus, they enable examination of potential mechanisms of use- or state-dependent drug action based on activation gating, or slower pore-based inactivation processes. Multimicrosecond simulations of NavAb reveal high-affinity binding of benzocaine to F203 that is a surrogate for FS6, conserved in helix S6 of Domain IV of mammalian sodium channels, as well as low-affinity sites suggested to stabilize different states of the channel. Phenytoin exhibits a different binding distribution owing to preferential interactions at the membrane and water-protein interfaces. Two drug-access pathways into the pore are observed: via lateral fenestrations connecting to the membrane lipid phase, as well as via an aqueous pathway through the intracellular activation gate, despite being closed. These observations provide insight into drug modulation that will guide further developments of Nav inhibitors. PMID:25136136

  9. Developmental effects of antiepileptic drugs and the need for improved regulations.

    PubMed

    Meador, Kimford J; Loring, David W

    2016-01-19

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are among the most common teratogenic drugs prescribed to women of childbearing age. AEDs can induce both anatomical (malformations) and behavioral (cognitive/behavioral deficits) teratogenicity. Only in the last decade have we begun to truly discriminate differential AED developmental effects. Fetal valproate exposure carries a special risk for both anatomical and behavioral teratogenic abnormalities, but the mechanisms and reasons for individual variability are unknown. Intermediate anatomical risks exist for phenobarbital and topiramate. Several AEDs (e.g., lamotrigine and levetiracetam) appear to possess low risks for both anatomical and behavioral teratogenesis. Despite advances in the past decade, our knowledge of the teratogenic risks for most AEDs and the underlying mechanisms remain inadequate. Further, the long-term effects of AEDs in neonates and older children remain uncertain. The pace of progress is slow given the lifelong consequences of diminished developmental outcomes, exposing children unnecessarily to potential adverse effects. It is imperative that new approaches be employed to determine risks more expediently. Our recommendations include a national reporting system for congenital malformations, federal funding of the North American AED Pregnancy Registry, routine meta-analyses of cohort studies to detect teratogenic signals, monitoring of AED prescription practices for women, routine preclinical testing of all new AEDs for neurodevelopmental effects, more specific Food and Drug Administration requirements to establish differential AED cognitive effects in children, and improved funding of basic and clinical research to fully delineate risks and underlying mechanisms for AED-induced anatomical and behavioral teratogenesis. PMID:26519545

  10. Interactions between non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants and antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Finsterer, Josef

    2016-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent cause of stroke. Secondary prophylaxis by oral anticoagulants (OAC) is recommended after stroke in AF-patients. OAC can be achieved by vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs) or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) like dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban or edoxaban. Seizures are frequent after stroke, and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are indicated. The review, based on a literature research, aims to give an overview about pharmacokinetic knowledge and clinical data about drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between NOACs and AED. Carbamazepine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin and valproic acid might decrease the effect of NOACs by inducing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity. Carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and topiramate might decrease the effect of NOACs by inducing CYP3A4 activity. Controversial data - inhibition as well as induction of CYP3A4 - were found about valproic acid. The relevance of these DDIs is largely unknown since there are only sporadic case reports available. To increase the knowledge about DDIs between NOACs and AEDs we suggest subgroup analyses addressing effects and safety of VKAs versus NOACs in patients with AF on AEDs, in case they have been included in previously completed or still ongoing trials or registries. This could be easily feasible and would be desirable in view of the large data already accumulated. PMID:27450623

  11. Practical Use of Newer Antiepileptic Drugs as Adjunctive Therapy in Focal Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    This article lays the background for, and discusses the practical issues surrounding, the adjunctive use of the last four antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) to be licensed for the treatment of pharmacoresistant focal seizures in the UK and elsewhere. More than 30% of adolescent and adult patients will not be fully controlled on the currently available therapeutic armamentarium. After not responding to their first three AED schedules, only a handful of patients attained seizure freedom on subsequent regimens. To optimise the response to any new AED in this setting, it is often necessary to reduce the existing drug burden. The pharmacology, tolerability and safety, and everyday use of lacosamide, eslicarbazepine acetate, retigabine (ezogabine) and perampanel will be reviewed and discussed. This will be accompanied by data from prospective audits with each drug undertaken at the Western Infirmary in Glasgow, Scotland, and a report of their successful introduction in an illustrative case. Overall, there is a large variation in the course of refractory epilepsy and the effect of AED therapy on this process seems minimal. Nevertheless, a number of patients will benefit from the introduction of each new AED, with some becoming seizure-free. PMID:26507832

  12. Effect of antiepileptic drug therapy on thyroid hormones among adult epileptic patients: An analytical cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Adhimoolam, Mangaiarkkarasi; Arulmozhi, Ranjitha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate and compare the effect of conventional and newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on thyroid hormone levels in adult epileptic patients. Methods: A hospital-based, analytical cross-sectional study was conducted among the adult epileptic patients receiving conventional AEDs (Group 2) or newer AEDs (Group 3) for more than 6 months. Serum thyroid hormone levels including free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were analyzed and the hormonal status was compared with healthy control subjects (Group 1). Findings: Sodium valproate and phenytoin were commonly used conventional AEDs; levetiracetam and topiramate were common among the newer drugs. There was a statistically significant decrease in serum fT4 and increase in serum TSH levels (P < 0.0001) in patients on long-term therapy with conventional antiepileptic agents than in the control group. No significant change in thyroid hormone levels (fT3, fT4, and TSH; P = 0.68, 0.37, and 0.90, respectively) was observed with newer antiepileptics-treated patients when compared to control group. One-way analysis of variance followed by post hoc Dunnett's test was performed using SPSS version 17.0 software package. Conclusion: The present study showed that conventional AEDs have significant alteration in the thyroid hormone levels than the newer antiepileptics in adult epileptic patients. PMID:27512707

  13. Effects of nucleosides on glia - neuron interactions open up new vistas in the development of more effective antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Zsolt; Kardos, Julianna; Kekesi, Katalin A; Juhasz, Gabor; Lakatos, Renata; Heja, Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    One-third of epileptic patients are drug refractory due to the limited efficacy of antiepileptic therapy. Thus, there is an immense need to find more effective, safer and well-tolerated antiepileptic drugs. A great deal of results suggests that adenosine (Ado), guanosine (Guo), inosine (Ino) or uridine (Urd) are endogenous antiepileptogenic modulators. Furthermore, nucleosides and their derivatives may be safe and effective potential drugs in the treatment of epilepsy. Conversely, nucleosidergic modulatory system implying nucleoside levels, metabolism, receptors and transporters may also be involved in seizure pathomechanisms. Application of Ado receptor agonists as well as antagonists, elevation of nucleoside levels (e.g., by nucleoside metabolism inhibitors, and Adoreleasing implants) or utilization of non-Ado nucleosides may also turn to be useful approaches to decrease epileptic activity. However, all drugs exerting their effects on the nucleosidergic modulatory system may affect the fine regulation of glia-neuron interactions that are intimately governed by various nucleosidergic processes. Perturbation of the complex, bidirectional communication between neurons and astrocytes through these nucleosidergic modulatory mechanisms may lead to pathological changes in the central nervous system (CNS) and therefore may cause significant side effects. Thus, a deeper understanding of the nucleosidergic modulatory control over glia-neuron interactions is essential in order to develop more effective and safe nucleoside-based antiepileptic drugs. In this review article we focus on the role of Ado and Urd in glia-neuron interactions, placing emphasis on their implications for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:25666791

  14. Several major antiepileptic drugs are substrates for human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Fedrowitz, Maren; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    One of the current hypotheses of pharmacoresistant epilepsy proposes that transport of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) by drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) at the blood-brain barrier may play a significant role in pharmacoresistance in epilepsy by extruding AEDs from their intended site of action. However, several recent in vitro studies using cell lines that overexpress efflux transporters indicate that human Pgp may not transport AEDs to any relevant extent. In this respect it has to be considered that most AEDs are highly permeable, so that conventional bi-directional transport assays as used in these previous studies may fail to identify AEDs as Pgp substrates, particularly if these drugs are not high-affinity substrates for Pgp. In the present study, we used a modified transport assay that allows evaluating active transport independently of the passive permeability component. In this concentration equilibrium transport assay (CETA), the drug is initially added at identical concentration to both sides of a polarized, Pgp-overexpressing cell monolayer instead of applying the drug to either the apical or basolateral side for studying bi-directional transport. Direct comparison of the conventional bi-directional (concentration gradient) assay with the CETA, using MDR1-transfected LLC cells, demonstrated that CETA, but not the conventional assay, identified phenytoin and phenobarbital as substrates of human Pgp. Furthermore, directional transport was determined for lamotrigine and levetiracetam, but not carbamazepine. Transport of AEDs could be completely or partially (>50%) inhibited by the selective Pgp inhibitor, tariquidar. However, transport of phenobarbital and levetiracetam was also inhibited by MK571, which preferentially blocks transport by multidrug resistance transporters (MRPs), indicating that, in addition to Pgp, these AEDs are substrates of MRPs. The present study provides the first direct evidence that several AEDS are substrates of

  15. New generation antiepileptic drugs: what do they offer in terms of improved tolerability and safety?

    PubMed Central

    Gazzola, Deana M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last two decades a total of 11 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been introduced to the US market. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials have yielded information about each drug’s efficacy, tolerability, and safety profile; however, few studies have compared the newer generation AEDs directly with the older generation. Comparative studies are not always straightforward in their interpretation, as many characteristics of drugs, both favorable and unfavorable, may not be highlighted by such studies. In general, findings from the literature suggest that the newer generation AEDs (including vigabatrin, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, tiagabine, topiramate, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, zonisamide, pregabalin, rufinamide, and lacosamide) enjoy both improved tolerability and safety compared with older agents such as phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and valproate. This is partially supported by some of the findings of the QSS and the TTA Committee of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), whose review of four AEDs (gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, and tiagabine) is discussed. Briefly, when compared with carbamazepine, lamotrigine was better tolerated; topiramate adverse events (AEs) were fairly comparable to carbamazepine and valproate; and tiagabine compared with placebo was associated with a higher discontinuation rate due to AEs. The findings of the SANAD trial are also presented; when administered to patients with partial epilepsy, carbamazepine was most likely to fail due to AEs, and lamotrigine and gabapentin were least likely to fail due to AEs. When administered to patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, topiramate was most frequently associated with AE-related discontinuation, followed by valproate; and while valproate was the most efficacious drug in this arm of the study, lamotrigine was more tolerable. What makes the SANAD study valuable and somewhat unique is its head-to-head comparison of one drug with another. Such

  16. Relationship of Child IQ to Parental IQ and Education in Children with Fetal Antiepileptic Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Cohen, Morris J.; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trial designs need to control for genetic and environmental influences when examining cognitive outcomes in children for whom clinical considerations preclude randomization. However, the contributions of maternal and paternal IQ and education to pediatric cognitive outcomes are uncertain in disease populations. The NEAD Study is an ongoing prospective observational multicenter study in the USA and UK, which enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across four commonly used antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Here, we examined the relationship of IQ and education in both parents to child IQ at age 3 years. IQ and education for both parents were statistically correlated to child IQ. However, paternal IQ and education were not significant after accounting for maternal IQ effects. Because maternal IQ and education are independently related to child cognitive outcome, both should be assessed in studies investigating the effects of fetal drug exposures or other environmental factors that could affect the child’s cognitive outcome. PMID:21546316

  17. Evaluation of neurotoxic and neuroprotective pathways affected by antiepileptic drugs in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Morte, Maria I; Carreira, Bruno P; Falcão, Maria J; Ambrósio, António F; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Araújo, Inês M; Carvalho, Caetana M

    2013-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the neurotoxicity of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), and of its in vivo metabolites eslicarbazepine (S-Lic) and R-licarbazepine (R-Lic), as compared to the structurally-related compounds carbamazepine (CBZ) and oxcarbazepine (OXC), in an in vitro model of cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The non-related antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) lamotrigine (LTG) and sodium valproate (VPA) were also studied. We assessed whether AEDs modulate pro-survival/pro-apoptotic pathways, such as extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt and stress activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK). We found that neither ESL nor its metabolites, CBZ or LTG, up to 0.3mM, for 24h of exposure, decreased cell viability. OXC was the most toxic drug decreasing cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner, leading to activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. VPA caused the appearance of the apoptotic markers, but did not alter cell viability. ESL, S-Lic and OXC decreased the levels of phospho-ERK1/2 and of phospho-Akt, when compared to basal levels, whereas CBZ decreased phospho-SAPK/JNK and phospho-Akt levels. LTG and VPA increased the phosphorylation levels of SAPK/JNK. These results suggest that ESL and its main metabolite S-Lic, as well as CBZ, LTG and VPA, are less toxic to hippocampal neurons than OXC, which was the most toxic agent. PMID:24055897

  18. Generic products of antiepileptic drugs: a perspective on bioequivalence and interchangeability.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Midha, Kamal K

    2010-06-01

    Most antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are currently available as generic products, yet neurologists and patients are reluctant to switch to generics. Generic AEDs are regarded as bioequivalent to brand AEDs after meeting the average bioequivalence criteria; consequently, they are considered to be interchangeable with their respective brands without loss of efficacy and safety. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the present bioequivalence requirements are already so rigorous and constrained that there is little possibility that generics that meet regulatory bioequivalence criteria could lead to therapeutic problems. So is there a scientific rationale for the concerns about switching patients with epilepsy to bioequivalent generics? Herein we discuss the assessment of bioequivalence and propose a scaled-average bioequivalence approach where scaling of bioequivalence is carried out based on brand lot-to-lot variance as an alternative to the conventional bioequivalence test as a means to determine whether switching patients to generic formulations, or vice versa, is a safe and effective therapeutic option. Meeting the proposed scaled-average bioequivalence requirements will ensure that when an individual patient is switched, he or she has fluctuations in plasma levels similar to those from lot-to-lot of the brand reference levels and thus should make these generic products safely switchable without change in efficacy and safety outcomes. PMID:20384761

  19. Risk of recurrence after discontinuation of antiepileptic drug therapy in children with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Incecik, Faruk; Herguner, Ozlem M.; Altunbasak, Sakir; Mert, Gulen; Kiris, Nurcihan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The numerous antiepileptic drug (AED) withdrawal studies published in the last 40 years have relied mainly on heterogeneous study groups. There is still no general agreement on the criteria to predict safe discontinuation. The goal of this study was to assess the outcome of AED withdrawal in epileptic children. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and eight children with epilepsy were enrolled, and these patients followed at least 1 year after drug withdrawal. Time to seizure relapse and predictive factors were analyzed by survival methods. Results: Among the 308 patients, 179 (58.1%) were boys and 129 (41.9%) were girls and the mean age at the seizure onset was 60.41 ± 36.54 months (2-144 months). The recurrence occurred in 73 (23.7%) patients. Mental retardation, history of febrile seizure, etiological of epilepsy, abnormal first electroencephalogram (EEG), abnormal neuroimaging findings, and total number of AED before remission were significantly associated with relapse risk according to univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, abnormal first EEG and number of AED before remission (polytherapy) were the risk factors influencing seizure recurrence. Conclusions: In our study, recurrence rate was 23.7% in children and most occurred during the 1st year. The potential risk factors of recurrence are history of febrile seizure, mental retardation, etiological of epilepsy, abnormal first EEG, abnormal neuroimaging findings, and total number of AED before remission. However, we found abnormal first EEG and polytherapy as risk factors of recurrence in multivariate analysis. PMID:25250060

  20. Clinical pharmacokinetics of new-generation antiepileptic drugs at the extremes of age: an update.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Perucca, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    Epilepsies occur across the entire age range, and their incidence peaks in the first years of life and in the elderly. Therefore, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are commonly used at the extremes of age. Rational prescribing in these age groups requires not only an understanding of the drugs' pharmacodynamic properties, but also careful consideration of potential age-related changes in their pharmacokinetic profile. The present article, which updates a review published in 2006 in this journal, focuses on recent findings on the pharmacokinetics of new-generation AEDs in neonates, infants, children, and the elderly. Significant new information on the pharmacokinetics of new AEDs in the perinatal period has been acquired, particularly for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. As a result of slow maturation of the enzymes involved in glucuronide conjugation, lamotrigine elimination occurs at a particularly slow rate in neonates, and becomes gradually more efficient during the first months of life. In the case of levetiracetam, elimination occurs primarily by renal excretion and is also slow at birth, but drug clearance increases rapidly thereafter and can even double within 1 week. In general, infants older than 2-3 months and children show higher drug clearance (normalized for body weight) than adults. This pattern was confirmed in recent studies that investigated the pediatric pharmacokinetics of several new AEDs, including levetiracetam, rufinamide, stiripentol, and eslicarbazepine acetate. At the other extreme of age, in the elderly, drug clearance is generally reduced compared with younger adults because of less efficient drug-metabolizing activity, decreased renal function, or both. This general pattern, described previously for several AEDs, was confirmed in recent studies on the effect of old age on the clearance of felbamate, levetiracetam, pregabalin, lacosamide, and retigabine. For those drugs which are predominantly eliminated by renal excretion, aging

  1. Dried blood spots for monitoring and individualization of antiepileptic drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Milosheska, Daniela; Grabnar, Iztok; Vovk, Tomaž

    2015-07-30

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is a multi-disciplinary clinical specialty used for optimization and individualization of drug therapy in the general and special populations. Since most antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are characterized by pronounced intra- and inter-individual variability, it can be especially valuable as an aid for dosing adjustments in patients with epilepsy. Dried blood spots (DBS) sampling technique is recognized as a suitable alternative for conventional sampling methods as TDM interventions should be applied in the most cost-effective, rational and clinically useful manner. In the present review we summarize the latest trends and applications of DBS in TDM of epilepsy. Quantification of AEDs in DBS was employed in various clinical settings and has been already reported for phenobarbital, phenytoin, valproic acid, clonazepam, clobazam, carbamazepine, topiramate, rufinamide, lamotrigine, 10-hydroxycarbazepine and levetiracetam. The major limitation of the published studies are restricted evaluation of critical parameters such as the impact of spotted blood volume, spot homogeneity and haematocrit effect, limited clinical validation and non-established correlations between the DBS and plasma concentrations of AEDs. Standardization of critical technical aspects for appropriate sampling, sample preparation and validation of the analytical procedures for quantification of the drugs, as well as appropriate interpretation of the results are the fields which should get more attention in upcoming studies. Limited data on clinical validation and the fact that this technique has been used in practice only for a few AEDs makes the routine implementation of TDM of AEDs using DBS method a big challenge that should be faced by the pharmaceutical scientists in the future. PMID:25896371

  2. Atherosclerotic effects of long-term old and new antiepileptic drugs monotherapy: a cross-sectional comparative study.

    PubMed

    El-Farahaty, Reham M; El-Mitwalli, Ashraf; Azzam, Hanan; Wasel, Yasser; Elrakhawy, Mohamed M; Hasaneen, Bothina Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the metabolic and atherogenic effects of long-term antiepileptic drugs in a group of Egyptian epileptic patients. Sixty-nine epileptic patients on antiepileptic drug monotherapy for at least 2 years and 34 control subjects were recruited in this study. Patients were divided into 5 subgroups according to antiepileptic drugs used (valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, topiramate, and levetiracetam). Fasting lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, free thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and common carotid artery intima-media thickness were measured for all subjects. Significant higher mean values of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein / high-density lipoprotein ratio, lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, significantly lower mean value of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and significantly larger diameter of common carotid artery intima-media thickness were observed in each drug-treated group versus control group. Our study supports that long-term monotherapy treatment with valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, and topiramate had altered markers of vascular risk that might enhance atherosclerosis, whereas levetiracetam exerted minimal effect. PMID:25342306

  3. Modern Methods for Analysis of Antiepileptic Drugs in the Biological Fluids for Pharmacokinetics, Bioequivalence and Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoo-Sin; Kim, Shin-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Jun, Min-Young

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disease occurring in approximately 1.0% of the world's population. About 30% of the epileptic patients treated with availably antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) continue to have seizures and are considered therapy-resistant or refractory patients. The ultimate goal for the use of AEDs is complete cessation of seizures without side effects. Because of a narrow therapeutic index of AEDs, a complete understanding of its clinical pharmacokinetics is essential for understanding of the pharmacodynamics of these drugs. These drug concentrations in biological fluids serve as surrogate markers and can be used to guide or target drug dosing. Because early studies demonstrated clinical and/or electroencephalographic correlations with serum concentrations of several AEDs, It has been almost 50 years since clinicians started using plasma concentrations of AEDs to optimize pharmacotherapy in patients with epilepsy. Therefore, validated analytical method for concentrations of AEDs in biological fluids is a necessity in order to explore pharmacokinetics, bioequivalence and TDM in various clinical situations. There are hundreds of published articles on the analysis of specific AEDs by a wide variety of analytical methods in biological samples have appears over the past decade. This review intends to provide an updated, concise overview on the modern method development for monitoring AEDs for pharmacokinetic studies, bioequivalence and therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:21660146

  4. Effects of breastfeeding in children of women taking antiepileptic drugs(e–Pub ahead of print)(Patient Page)

    PubMed Central

    Meador, K.J.; Baker, G.A.; Browning, N.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Combs-Cantrell, D.T.; Cohen, M.; Kalayjian, L.A.; Kanner, A.; Liporace, J.D.; Pennell, P.B.; Privitera, M.; Loring, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Breastfeeding is known to have beneficial effects, but there is concern that breastfeeding during antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy may be harmful to cognitive development. Animal and human studies have demonstrated that some AEDs can adversely affect the immature brain. However, no investigation has examined effects of breastfeeding during AED therapy on subsequent cognitive abilities in children. Methods: The Neurodevelopmental Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs Study is an ongoing prospective multicenter observational investigation of long-term effects of in utero AED exposure on cognition. Between 1999 and 2004, we enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy who were taking a single AED (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, or valproate). We recently reported on differential AED effects on age 3 year cognitive outcomes. In this report, we focus on the effects of breastfeeding during AED therapy on age 3 cognitive outcomes in 199 children. Results: A total of 42% of children were breastfed. IQs for breastfed children did not differ from nonbreastfed children for all AEDs combined and for each of the 4 individual AED groups. Mean adjusted IQ scores (95% confidence intervals) across all AEDs were breastfed = 99 (96–103) and nonbreastfed = 98 (95–101). Power was 95% to detect a half SD IQ effect in the combined AED analysis, but was inadequate within groups. Conclusions: This preliminary analysis fails to demonstrate deleterious effects of breastfeeding during AED therapy on cognitive outcomes in children previously exposed in utero. However, caution is advised due to study limitations. Additional research is needed to confirm this observation and extend investigations to other AEDs and polytherapy. GLOSSARY AED = antiepileptic drug; NART = National Adult Reading Test; NEAD = Neurodevelopmental Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs; TONI = Test of Nonverbal Intelligence; WASI = Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. PMID:21106960

  5. [Exalief as a newer antiepileptic drug for adjunctive therapy of refractory partial-onset seizures].

    PubMed

    Ermolenko, N A; Buchneva, I A

    2014-01-01

    Results of a multicenter international study on the efficacy of exalief (eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL)), a newer blocker of voltage-gated sodium channels and T-type voltage gated calcium channels, for adjunctive therapy of refractory partial-onset seizures are presented. A clinical program included phase II (BIA-2093-201) followed by three phase Ill studies (BIA-2093-301, -302 and-303), each of which was accompanied by an additional open one-year study (301 E, 302E, 303E). In three parallel phase Ill studies patients were randomized to receive ESL in single doses 400, 800, 1200 mg or placebo together with 1 - 3 antiepileptic drugs used in stable doses, with the exception of felbamate and oxcarbazepine. The design of the study included 8-week initial period, double-blind phase (2-week titration period, 12-week maintenance period), 4-week dose reduction period. The results of clinical phase II trials demonstrated the high efficacy and best tolerability profile for single dose titration regimen. Median changes in the frequency of partial-onset seizures were greater (p<0,0001) in patients receiving 800 and 1200 mg ESL (35 and 39%)compared to placebo (15%). The proportion of treatment responders was significantly higher in the groups treated with ESL indoses 800 mg (36%) and 1200 mg (44%) compared to the placebo group (22%). The aversive effects of the drug were of mild or moderate severity. Treatment retention was higher in patients receiving ESL (84,9% of patients completed the 6-month treatment period and 76,6% completed the one-year period). The use of ESL leads to the reduction in partial seizure frequency and the increase in the proportion of treatment responders. The drug has a good tolerability profile. PMID:25629136

  6. Inhibition of the enzyme, GABA-aminotransferase in human platelets by vigabatrin, a potential antiepileptic drug.

    PubMed Central

    Rimmer, E; Kongola, G; Richens, A

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of the new antiepileptic drug, vigabatrin (gamma-vinyl GABA), on the platelet enzyme, GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T) was investigated in volunteers and patients. Platelets GABA-T activity was assayed using a radioenzymic method. 2. Three single oral doses of vigabatrin (1 g, 2 g and 4 g) were given to six healthy male volunteers in an open randomised cross over study and compared with a baseline period preceding the three treatments. 3. Significant inhibition of the platelet GABA-T was produced by treatment with all three doses and a dose-response relationship was demonstrated. The minimum enzyme activities after 1 g, 2 g and 4 g doses were 43%, 30% and 21% respectively compared with the control values. 4. A significant depression of enzyme activity occurred at 30 min after drug administration and the values remained below control values for 72 h post-dose, outlasting the presence of the drug itself in the plasma. 5. Eight patients with chronic refractory epilepsy were treated with vigabatrin for 6 weeks. After taking the 2 g daily dose for 1 week there was a marked reduction in platelet enzyme activity in all subjects but the enzyme inhibition produced by the 3 g dose was not significantly different from that produced by the 2 g dose, even after 4 weeks treatment with the larger dose. The mean enzyme activity was approximately 30% throughout the active treatment period. One week after stopping vigabatrin, the enzyme levels were not significantly different from the baseline values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3358887

  7. Transplacental genotoxicity of antiepileptic drugs: animal model and pilot study on mother/newborn cohort.

    PubMed

    Fucic, Aleksandra; Stojković, Ranko; Miškov, Snježana; Zeljezic, Davor; Markovic, Darko; Gjergja, Romana; Katic, Jelena; Jazbec, Ana Marija; Bakulic, Tomislav Ivicevic; Demarin, Vida

    2010-12-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AED) as transplacental agents are known to have adverse effects on fetal development. Genotoxicity of AEDs is still not fully understood. The aim of present study was to investigate the transplacental genotoxicity of valproate on animal model and in 21 mothers and their newborns receiving AED. In both studies, in vivo micronucleus (MN) assay was used. Pregnant dams were exposed to Na-valproate (100mg/kg) on gestational days 12-14. Dams and pups receiving Na-valproate showed a significantly increased MN frequency (5.17 ± 1.17/1000; 5.20 ± 1.48/1000) compared to the control (1.0 ± 0.58/1000; 1.67 ± 1.03/1000). In mother/newborn study a significant increase of MN frequency was detected in newborns of mothers taking AEDs (3.09 ± 0.49/10,000) compared to the referent newborns (1.56 ± 0.22/10,000). The results of this study suggest that AEDs may act as transplacental genotoxins. Launching the mother/newborn cohorts for genotoxicological monitoring may give a significant new insight in health effects of AEDs. PMID:20955786

  8. Temporal trends in new exposure to antiepileptic drug monotherapy and suicide-related behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hesdorffer, Dale; Wang, Chen-Pin; Amuan, Megan E.; Tabares, Jeffrey V.; Finley, Erin P.; Cramer, Joyce A.; Kanner, Andres M.; Bryan, Craig J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Because some recent studies suggest increased risk for suicide-related behavior (SRB; ideation, attempts) among those receiving antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), we examined the temporal relationship between new AED exposure and SRB in a cohort of older veterans. Methods: We used national Veterans Health Administration databases to identify veterans aged ≥65 years who received a new AED prescription in 2004–2006. All instances of SRB were identified using ICD-9-CM codes 1 year before and after the AED exposure (index) date. We also identified comorbid conditions and medication associated with SRB in prior research. We used generalized estimating equations with a logit link to examine the association between new AED exposure and SRB during 30-day intervals during the year before and after the index date, controlling for potential confounders. Results: In this cohort of 90,263 older veterans, the likelihood of SRB the month prior to AED exposure was significantly higher than in other time periods even after adjusting for potential confounders. Although there were 87 SRB events (74 individuals) the year before and 106 SRB events (92 individuals) after, approximately 22% (n = 16) of those also had SRB before the index date. Moreover, the rate of SRB after AED start was gradually reduced over time. Conclusions: The temporal pattern of AED exposure and SRB suggests that, in clinical practice, the peak in SRB is prior to exposure. While speculative, the rate of gradual reduction in SRB thereafter suggests that symptoms may prompt AED prescription. PMID:24174583

  9. Recent and future antiepileptic drugs and their impact on cognition: what can we expect?

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Cognitive problems are frequently observed in patients with epilepsy and the relative contribution of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in this respect is determinant. During the past few years, a number of new AEDs have been introduced, and new compounds will be probably available in the forthcoming years. The ideal AED would be the one characterized by good efficacy with no negative effects on cognitive functions, mood and behavior. This paper is aimed at discussing the potential impact on cognition of a number of new compounds, namely lacosamide, rufinamide, retigabine, eslicarbazepine acetate, brivaracetam, perampanel and ganaxolone. In almost all cases, specific data on cognitive functions are not yet available, and it is possible only to speculate on their potential impact considering the mechanism of action and the adverse event profile in placebo-controlled studies. Lacosamide, eslicarbazepine acetate and probably brivaracetam are promising and will probably exhibit very limited impact on cognition. Conversely, retigabine may be more problematic, needing low starting doses and slow titration rates to improve cognitive tolerability. Data on rufinamide are restricted to special populations such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Perampanel and ganaxolone are still in Phase III development, but the mechanism of action of these compounds is in line with a more sedative than neutral profile. PMID:22650169

  10. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: a summary of the Tenth Eilat Conference (EILAT X).

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Johannessen, Svein I; Levy, René H; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjörn; White, H Steve

    2010-12-01

    The Tenth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs)-EILAT X, took place in Eilat, Israel from the 25th to 29th of April 2010. About 200 basic scientists, clinical pharmacologists and neurologists from 25 countries attended the conference, whose main themes included learning from the past: Lessons learnt after 18 years of Eilat Conferences and Detecting assessing and preventing adverse effects of AEDs. Consistent with previous formats of this conference, a large part of the program was devoted to a review of AEDs in development, as well as updates on AEDs introduced since 1994. Like the previous EILAT (EILAT IX) manuscript, the current (EILAT X) manuscript focuses only on the preclinical and clinical pharmacology of AEDs that are currently in development. These include brivaracetam, carisbamate, 2-deoxy-glucose, ganaxolone, huperizine A, ICA-105665, NAX-5055, retigabine, perampanel, T-2007, valnoctamide and YK3089. Since the previous Eilat Conference (EILAT IX-2008) two new AEDs; eslicarbazepine acetate and lacosamide have been marketed and three new AEDs in development not included in the EILAT IX manuscript were added: ICA-105665, perampanel and valnoctamide. The CNS efficacy of these compounds in anticonvulsant animal models as well as other disease model systems are presented in Tables 1 and 2 and their proposed mechanism of action at summarized in Table 3. PMID:20970964

  11. Does in utero exposure of antiepileptic drugs lead to failure to reach full cognitive potential?

    PubMed

    McCorry, D; Bromley, R

    2015-05-01

    A clinical scenario of a young female on 800 mg of sodium valproate (VPA) who has recently failed lamotrigine (LTG) and levetiracetam (LEV) and who is currently planning a pregnancy is presented. Currently available data pertaining to the longer-term development of children exposed to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are reviewed along with considerations around the methodology and interpretation of such research. There is an accumulation of data highlighting significant risks associated with prenatal exposed to VPA, with the level of risk being mediated by dose. The majority of published evidence does not find a significant risk associated with carbamazepine (CBZ) exposure in utero for global cognitive abilities however the evidence for more specific cognitive skills are unclear. Limited data indicate that LTG may be a preferred treatment to VPA in terms of foetal outcome but further evidence is required. Too little data pertaining to LEV exposure is available and a lack of evidence regarding risk of this and other new AEDs should not be interpreted as evidence of safety. PMID:25819874

  12. A computer-based intervention for improving the appropriateness of antiepileptic drug level monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chen, Philip; Tanasijevic, Milenko J; Schoenenberger, Ronald A; Fiskio, Julie; Kuperman, Gilad J; Bates, David W

    2003-03-01

    We designed and implemented 2 automated, computerized screens for use at the time of antiepileptic drug (AED) test order entry to improve appropriateness by reminding physicians when a potentially redundant test was ordered and providing common indications for monitoring and pharmacokinetics of the specific AED. All computerized orders for inpatient serum AED levels during two 3-month periods were included in the study. During the 3-month period after implementation of the automated intervention, 13% of all AED tests ordered were canceled following computerized reminders. For orders appearing redundant, the cancellation rate was 27%. For nonredundant orders, 4% were canceled when information on specific AED monitoring and pharmacokinetics was provided. The cancellation rate was sustained after 4 years. There has been a 19.5% decrease in total AED testing volume since implementation of this intervention, despite a 19.3% increase in overall chemistry test volume. Inappropriateness owing to repeated testing before pharmacologic steady state was reached decreased from 54% of all AED orders to 14.6%. A simple, automated, activity-based intervention targeting a specific test-ordering behavior effectively reduced inappropriate laboratory testing. The sustained benefit supports the idea that computerized interventions may durably affect physician behavior. Computerized delivery of such evidence-based boundary guidelines can help narrow the gap between evidence and practice. PMID:12645347

  13. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: A summary of the Twelfth Eilat Conference (EILAT XII).

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Johannessen, Svein I; Levy, René H; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjörn; White, H Steve

    2015-03-01

    The Twelfth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) - EILAT XII, took place in Madrid, Spain from August 31st to September 3rd 2014. About 130 basic scientists, clinical pharmacologists and neurologists from 22 countries attended the conference, whose main themes included "Conquering pharmacoresistant epilepsy", "Innovative emergency treatments", "Progress report on second-generation treatment" and "New methods and formulations". Consistent with previous formats of this conference, a large part of the program was devoted to a review of AEDs in development, as well as updates on AEDs introduced since 2004. Like the EILAT X and EILAT XI reports, the current article focuses on the preclinical and clinical pharmacology of AEDs that are currently in development. These include adenosine-releasing silk, allopregnanolone (SAGE-547), AMP-X-0079, brivaracetam, bumetanide, cannabidiol, cannabidivarin, 2-deoxy-glucose, everolimus, ganaxolone, huperzine A, imepitoin, minocycline, NAX 801-2, pitolisant, PRX 0023, SAGE-217, valnoctamide and its homologue sec-butyl-propylacetamide (SPD), and VLB-01. Since the previous Eilat conference, perampanel has been introduced into the market and twelve novel potential epilepsy treatments are presented for the first time. PMID:25769377

  14. A pilot randomized controlled clinical trial to improve antiepileptic drug adherence in young children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Modi, Avani C; Guilfoyle, Shanna M; Mann, Krista A; Rausch, Joseph R

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim was to examine the preliminary efficacy of a family tailored problem-solving intervention to improve antiepileptic drug (AED) adherence in families of children with new-onset epilepsy. Secondary aims were to assess changes in targeted mechanisms and treatment feasibility and acceptability. Fifty families (Mage = 7.6 ± 3.0; 80% Caucasian; 42% idiopathic localization related) completed baseline questionnaires and were given an electronic monitor to observe daily AED adherence. If adherence was ≤ 95% in the first 7 months of the study, families were randomized (Supporting Treatment Adherence Regimens (STAR): n = 11; Treatment as Usual (TAU): n = 12). Twenty-one families were not randomized due to adherence being ≥95%. The STAR intervention included four face-to-face and two telephone problem-solving sessions over 8 weeks. Significant group differences in adherence were found during active intervention (weeks 4-6; TAU = -12.0 vs. STAR = 18.1, p < 0.01; and weeks session 6-8: TAU = -9.7 vs. STAR = 15.3, p < 0.05). Children who received the STAR intervention exhibited improved adherence compared to children in the TAU group during active treatment. Significant changes in epilepsy knowledge and management were noted for the STAR group. Families expressed benefitting from the STAR intervention. Future studies should include a larger sample size and booster intervention sessions to maintain treatment effects over time. PMID:26693964

  15. Results of barbiturate antiepileptic drug discontinuation on antipsychotic medication dose in individuals with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Hanzel, T E; Bauernfeind, J D; Kalachnik, J E; Harder, S R

    2000-04-01

    Five individuals with intellectual disability prescribed both a barbiturate antiepileptic drug (AED) and an antipsychotic medication were identified in a public residential facility. It was hypothesized that antipsychotic medication was prescribed at doses higher than necessary as a result of inadvertent barbiturate AED behavioural side-effects thought to be part of the underlying psychiatric or behavioural condition. To test this hypothesis, barbiturate AEDs were gradually reduced, and replaced with either carbamazepine or valproic acid, and antipsychotic medication was gradually reduced as well. Challenging behaviours, such as physical aggression, self-injurious behaviour and property destruction, were measured with a frequency count or partial interval recording, and retrospectively analysed for time periods of approximately 60 days before phenobarbital reduction, after phenobarbital discontinuation and after the lowest antipsychotic medication dose. Challenging behaviour collectively decreased by 81.5% after barbiturate discontinuation, mean antipsychotic medication dose significantly decreased from 146 mg day(-1) (SD = 98) to 106 mg day(-1) (SD = 88) chlorpromazine equivalence, and antipsychotic medication was discontinued in the cases of two individuals. Compared to the prebarbiturate AED reduction period, challenging behaviour collectively decreased by 96.3% after the lowest antipsychotic medication dose, which confirmed that reduced antipsychotic medication was not achieved at the expense of behaviour deterioration. The data supported the hypothesis that discontinuation of barbiturate AEDs results in decreased challenging behaviour and less antipsychotic medication. PMID:10898379

  16. Medicine possession ratio as proxy for adherence to antiepileptic drugs: prevalence, associations, and cost implications

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Karen; Julyan, Marlene; Lubbe, Martie S; Burger, Johanita R; Cockeran, Marike

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the adherence status to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) among epilepsy patients; to observe the association between adherence status and age, sex, active ingredient prescribed, treatment period, and number of comorbidities; and to determine the effect of nonadherence on direct medicine treatment cost of AEDs. Methods A retrospective study analyzing medicine claims data obtained from a South African pharmaceutical benefit management company was performed. Patients of all ages (N=19,168), who received more than one prescription for an AED, were observed from 2008 to 2013. The modified medicine possession ratio (MPRm) was used as proxy to determine the adherence status to AED treatment. The MPRm was considered acceptable (adherent) if the calculated value was ≥80%, but ≤110%, whereas an MPRm of <80% (unacceptably low) or >110% (unacceptably high) was considered nonadherent. Direct medicine treatment cost was calculated by summing the medical scheme contribution and patient co-payment associated with each AED prescription. Results Only 55% of AEDs prescribed to 19,168 patients during the study period had an acceptable MPRm. MPRm categories depended on the treatment period (P>0.0001; Cramer’s V=0.208) but were independent of sex (P<0.182; Cramer’s V=0.009). Age group (P<0.0001; Cramer’s V=0.067), active ingredient (P<0.0001; Cramer’s V=0.071), and number of comor-bidities (P<0.0001; Cramer’s V=0.050) were statistically but not practically significantly associated with MPRm categories. AEDs with an unacceptably high MPRm contributed to 3.74% (US$736,376.23) of the total direct cost of all AEDs included in the study, whereas those with an unacceptably low MPRm amounted to US$3,227,894.85 (16.38%). Conclusion Nonadherence to antiepileptic treatment is a major problem, encompassing ~20% of cost in our study. Adherence, however, is likely to improve with the treatment period. Further research is needed to determine the factors influencing

  17. Induction of nuclear receptors and drug resistance in the brain microvascular endothelial cells treated with antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Laura; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Balazy, Michael; Cardile, Venera

    2008-05-01

    Our work contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms of drug resistance in epilepsis. This study aimed to investigate i) the levels of expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP)1 and 2, ii) the activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and iii) the relationship between increased P-gp and MRPs expression and PXR and CAR activation, in immortalized rat brain microvascular endothelial cell lines, GPNT and RBE4, following treatment with the antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), topiramate, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, tiagabine, levetiracetam, and phenytoin, using Western blotting and immunocytochemistry methods. Carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin induced the highest levels of P-gp and MPRs expression that was associated with increased activation of PXR and CAR receptors as compared to levetiracetam, tiagabine and topiramate. We conclude that P-gp and MRPs are differently overexpressed in GPNT and RBE4 by various AEDs and both PXR and CAR are involved in the drug-resistant epilepsy induced by carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin. PMID:18473823

  18. Antiepileptic Drugs: A Consideration of Clinical and Biochemical Outcome in Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Tolou-Ghamari, Zahra; Zare, Mohammad; Habibabadi, Jafar Mehvari; Najafi, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: The challenge of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) management is to attain the best compromise between the desire to maximize seizure control and the need to keep side-effects within tolerable limits for the individual patient. To reduce devastation in Iranian epileptic patients, the aim of this study was to explore the overall outcome following AEDs prescription. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 36 patients located at the epilepsy ward, conducted to Isfahan Neurosciences Research Centre was carried out during the year 2011. Female (n = 17) and male subjects (n = 19) with a mean age of 27 years (range; 7-74 years) were studied. Variables including, sex, age, age of seizure onset, type, and number of AEDs, biochemical and hematological data were recorded in d-Base and statistical analyses were performed using SPSS (version 18) for windows. Results: The main drug to control seizure attack was carbamazepine and valproic-acid. The following tests were the most frequently influenced; alkaline phosphatase (AP), lymphocyte (Lymph), white blood cell (WBC) counts and hemoglobin (Hgb). There was a significant increase in (AP) (mean; 534.6 u/l↑; [P = 0.02] in three patients and (Lymph) (55%↑; [43-84] %↑; [P = 0.04] in seven patients. WBC was lower than 4400 mm3↓ (P = 0.02) in six patients. Hgb was significantly lower in 70.6% of women (11.8↓; [10-14.2] g/dl↓; [P = 0.04] and 68.4% of men population (12.3↓; [9.7-13.8] g/dl↓; [P = 0.01]. Mean age of epilepsy onset was 15.6 years (range: Birth-74 years). Analysis of drug prescriptions showed that the incidence of monotherapy and polypharmacy (2 up to six AEDs simultaneously) was 19.4% plus 80.6% respectively. Conclusions: In Iranian epileptic population, effectiveness of treatment should be attributed by the close supervising of AEDs in relation to clinical circumstance, laboratory data, and therapeutic drug monitoring. Any significant change in patients’ biochemical and hematological data may require

  19. [Use of antiepileptic drugs in schizophrenia: A review of recent evidence].

    PubMed

    Theochari, I; Boulas, C; Chaidemenos, A

    2007-07-01

    The treatment of schizophrenia has always been a challenge for clinicians. Neuroleptic monotherapy is not sufficient in all subtypes and all symptoms of schizophrenia. New treatment strategies have been developed including the combination of neuroleptics and antiepileptics. We summarize papers published on the efficacy and the action mechanism of antiepileptic agents in schizophrenia. We have searched the computer database system MEDLINE and COCHRANE for relevant articles. GABA and glutamate are involved in the symptom improvement of schizophrenia when antiepileptics are added in the main neuroleptic treatment. Augmentation treatment with valproate leads to a decrease in hostility, violent behavior, agitation and anxiety and is related to fewer days of hospitalization. Carbamazepine has been used as a calmative and is effective in controlling patients with psychomotor agitation. Whether both antiepileptics can reduce positive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia, still remains controversial. Oxcarbazepine has a very safe pharmaceutical profile in combination with neuroleptics but only a single study indicates its efficacy. Adjunctive lamotrigine appears effective when added to clozapine even in cases of treatment resistant schizophrenia. Both lamotrigine and clozapine share anti-glutamatergic actions. There have been reported few studies which support the use of topiramate in schizophrenia. Future studies on a great number of patients will provide more reliable evidence. Finally the potential role of new antiepileptics has to be evaluated using new clinical testing. PMID:22466630

  20. Use of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy and lactation: Type of information provided by searching Google.

    PubMed

    Lavi-Blau, Tal; Ekstein, Dana; Neufeld, Miri Y; Eyal, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Surveys among women with epilepsy (WWE) show that they receive their essential pregnancy-related information from many sources, including the internet. Our aim was to assess the types of websites provided by searching Google for the use of four antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy and lactation. The search was performed on 40 computers used by health-care professionals, on 40 computers used by nonhealth-care professionals, and on 5 computers used by WWE in Israel and on 8 computers used by nonhealth-care professionals in the U.S. On each computer, a Google search was conducted for term combinations that included one AED name ("carbamazepine","valproic acid", "lamotrigine", "levetiracetam", or "Keppra") and "Pregnancy", "Lactation", or "Breastfeeding". The top three and top ten websites retrieved in every search were mapped (a total of 45 and 150 websites, respectively, from each computer). Across all searches in English, on both U.S. and Israeli computers, the majority of websites listed among the first three and first ten results were those of independent health portals. The representation of the Epilepsy Foundation website was 10% or less, and only a few results were obtained from the NIH's general public-oriented MedlinePlus. In Hebrew, results included almost exclusively Israeli or Hebrew-translated websites. As in English, results from public-oriented, professionally-written websites in Hebrew accounted for less than 50% of entries. Overall, the availability of readable and high-quality information on AEDs used by pregnant and breastfeeding women is limited. Guiding patients towards accurate web resources can help them navigate among the huge amount of available online information. PMID:26773680

  1. Comparison of body composition in persons with epilepsy on conventional & new antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Sudhir Chandra; Tripathi, Manjari; Kakkar, Ashish Kumar; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) such as valproic acid (VPA) are known to affect body weight, and lipid profile. However, evidences regarding effects of AEDs on the body composition are deficient. This cross-sectional study compared the body composition and lipid profile among patients with epilepsy on newer and conventional AEDs. Methods: The patients with epilepsy (n=109) on treatment with conventional and newer AEDs (levetiracetam, lamotrigine and clobazam) for > 6 months were enrolled. Of these, 70 were on monotherapy: levetiracetam (n=12), VPA (n=16), carbamazepine (n=20) and phenytoin (n=22) and the remaining on polytherapy. Their body composition [body fat mass, lean dry mass (LDM), total body water (TBW), intracellular water (ICW), extracellular water (ECW) and basal metabolic rate (BMR) was estimated and biochemical parameters were assessed. Results: Levetiracetam group had no significant difference with VPA, carbamazepine, phenytoin and control groups, except low LDM (17.8±2.4) than VPA groups (20.2±2.7, P<0.05). In comparison with control, AEDs monotherapy groups had no significant difference, except higher LDM and ECW in VPA group. Among groups based on conventional and newer AEDs, there was no significant difference in body composition parameters except for higher LDM (as % of BW) in conventional AEDs only treated group than control (P<0.01). Interpretation & conclusions: The alterations observed in body composition with valproic acid in contrast to other AEDs like levetiracetam, carbamazepine and phenytoin could affect treatment response in epilepsy especially in subjects with already altered body composition status like obese and thin frail patients, which needs to be established by prospective studies (CTRI/2013/05/003701). PMID:27241646

  2. Apgar-score in children prenatally exposed to antiepileptic drugs: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Jakob; Pedersen, Henrik Søndergaard; Kjaersgaard, Maiken Ina Siegismund; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Vestergaard, Mogens; Sørensen, Merete Juul; Olsen, Jørn; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Pedersen, Lars Henning

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It is unknown if prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) increases the risk of low Apgar score in offspring. Setting Population-based study using health registers in Denmark. Participants We identified all 677 021 singletons born in Denmark from 1997 to 2008 and linked the Apgar score from the Medical Birth Register with information on the women's prescriptions for AEDs during pregnancy from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. We used the Danish National Hospital Registry to identify mothers diagnosed with epilepsy before birth of the child. Results were adjusted for smoking and maternal age. Results Among 2906 children exposed to AEDs, 55 (1.9%) were born with an Apgar score ≤7 as compared with 8797 (1.3%) children among 674 115 pregnancies unexposed to AEDs (adjusted relative risk (aRR)=1.41 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.85). When analyses were restricted to the 2215 children born of mothers with epilepsy, the aRR of having a low Apgar score associated with AED exposure was 1.34 (95% CI 0.90 to 2.01) When assessing individual AEDs, we found increased, unadjusted RR for exposure to carbamazepine (RR=1.86 (95% CI 1.01 to 3.42)), valproic acid (RR=1.85 (95% CI 1.04 to 3.30)) and topiramate (RR=2.97 (95% CI 1.26 to 7.01)) when compared to unexposed children. Conclusions Prenatal exposure to AEDs was associated with increased risk of being born with a low Apgar score, but the absolute risk of a low Apgar score was <2%. Risk associated with individual AEDs indicate that the increased risk is not a class effect, but that there may be particularly high risks of a low Apgar score associated with certain AEDs. PMID:26359281

  3. IQ at 6 years after in utero exposure to antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Gus A.; Briggs, Maria; Cheyne, Christopher P.; Cohen, Morris J.; García-Fiñana, Marta; Gummery, Alison; Kneen, Rachel; Loring, David W.; Mawer, George; Meador, Kimford J.; Shallcross, Rebekah; Clayton-Smith, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To delineate the risk to child IQ associated with frequently prescribed antiepileptic drugs. Methods: Children born to women with epilepsy (n = 243) and women without epilepsy (n = 287) were recruited during pregnancy and followed prospectively. Of these, 408 were blindly assessed at 6 years of age. Maternal and child demographics were collected and entered into statistical models. Results: The adjusted mean IQ was 9.7 points lower (95% confidence interval [CI] −4.9 to −14.6; p < 0.001) for children exposed to high-dose (>800 mg daily) valproate, with a similar significant effect observed for the verbal, nonverbal, and spatial subscales. Children exposed to high-dose valproate had an 8-fold increased need of educational intervention relative to control children (adjusted relative risk, 95% CI 8.0, 2.5–19.7; p < 0.001). Valproate at doses <800 mg daily was not associated with reduced IQ, but was associated with impaired verbal abilities (−5.6, 95% CI −11.1 to −0.1; p = 0.04) and a 6-fold increase in educational intervention (95% CI 1.4–18.0; p = 0.01). In utero exposure to carbamazepine or lamotrigine did not have a significant effect on IQ, but carbamazepine was associated with reduced verbal abilities (−4.2, 95% CI −0.6 to −7.8; p = 0.02) and increased frequency of IQ <85. Conclusions: Consistent with data from younger cohorts, school-aged children exposed to valproate at maternal doses more than 800 mg daily continue to experience significantly poorer cognitive development than control children or children exposed to lamotrigine and carbamazepine. PMID:25540307

  4. Comparative persistence of antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy: A STROBE-compliant retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Su, Chien-Chou; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Huang, Chin-Wei; Lin, Swu-Jane; Setoguchi, Soko

    2016-08-01

    We compared persistence of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, valproic acid, and phenytoin in an Asian population with epilepsy.A retrospective cohort study was conducted by analyzing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Adult epilepsy patients newly prescribed with AEDs between 2005 and 2009 were included. The primary outcome was persistence, defined as the treatment duration from the date of AED initiation to the date of AED discontinuation, switching, hospitalization due to seizure or disenrollment from databases, whichever came first. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk of non-persistence with AEDs.Among the 13,061 new users of AED monotherapy (mean age: 58 years; 60% men), the persistence ranged from 218.8 (gabapentin) to 275.9 (oxcarbazepine) days in the first treatment year. The risks of non-persistence in patients receiving oxcarbazepine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74-0.83), valproic acid (0.88; 0.85-0.92), lamotrigine (0.72; 0.65-0.81), and topiramate (0.90; 0.82-0.98) were significantly lower than in the carbamazepine group. Compared with carbamazepine users, the non-persistence risk was higher in phenytoin users (1.10; 1.06-1.13), while gabapentin users (1.03; 0.98-1.09) had similar risk. For risk of hospitalization due to seizure and in comparison with carbamazepine users, oxcarbazepine (0.66; 0.58-0.74) and lamotrigine (0.46; 0.35-0.62) users had lower risk, while phenytoin (1.35; 1.26-1.44) users had higher risk. The results remained consistent throughout series of sensitivity and stratification analyses.The persistence varied among AEDs and was better for oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, lamotrigine, and topiramate, but worse for phenytoin when compared with carbamazepine. PMID:27583857

  5. Heterogeneous effects of antiepileptic drugs in an in vitro epilepsy model--a functional multineuron calcium imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hongo, Yoshie; Takasu, Keiko; Ikegaya, Yuji; Hasegawa, Minoru; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Ogawa, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic brain disease characterised by recurrent seizures. Many studies of this disease have focused on local neuronal activity, such as local field potentials in the brain. In addition, several recent studies have elucidated the collective behavior of individual neurons in a neuronal network that emits epileptic activity. However, little is known about the effects of antiepileptic drugs on neuronal networks during seizure-like events (SLEs) at single-cell resolution. Using functional multineuron Ca(2+) imaging (fMCI), we monitored the activities of multiple neurons in the rat hippocampal CA1 region on treatment with the proconvulsant bicuculline under Mg(2+) -free conditions. Bicuculline induced recurrent synchronous Ca(2+) influx, and the events were correlated with SLEs. Other proconvulsants, such as 4-aminopyridine, pentetrazol, and pilocarpine, also induced synchronous Ca(2+) influx. We found that the antiepileptic drugs phenytoin, flupirtine, and ethosuximide, which have different mechanisms of action, exerted heterogeneous effects on bicuculline-induced synchronous Ca(2+) influx. Phenytoin and flupirtine significantly decreased the peak, the amount of Ca(2+) influx and the duration of synchronous events in parallel with the duration of SLEs, whereas they did not abolish the synchronous events themselves. Ethosuximide increased the duration of synchronous Ca(2+) influx and SLEs. Furthermore, the magnitude of the inhibitory effect of phenytoin on the peak synchronous Ca(2+) influx level differed according to the peak amplitude of the synchronous event in each individual cell. Evaluation of the collective behavior of individual neurons by fMCI seems to be a powerful tool for elucidating the profiles of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:25967117

  6. [Plasma levels of anti-epileptic drugs. Evaluation of determinations carried out in the years 1978-1979].

    PubMed

    Zagnoni, P; Cognazzo, A; Gerbino Promis, P C; Grasso, E

    1981-11-10

    The results of 701 determinations of antiepileptic drug plasma concentrations administered to 190 patients are described. It has been possible to reduce the number of prescribed drugs to 1.55 per patient, so that only 8.1% of subjects takes three or more drugs while 53% is on monotherapy. The use of the measurement of AEDs plasma concentrations resulted very useful: a) when Phenytoin (PHT) is prescribed; b) in epileptic children; c) when the patient takes two or more drugs; d) to evaluate the compliance. A significant increase (p less than 0.01) of the level/dose ratio of Phenobarbital (PB) when PHT is in, or over, the therapeutic range was observed, while at plasma concentrations of PHT below 10 micrograms/ml it does not influence the metabolism of PB. PMID:7301176

  7. Discovery of benzothiazine derivatives as novel, orally-active anti-epileptic drug candidates with broad anticonvulsant effect.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Yajima, Nana; Tanitame, Akihiko; Kiyoshi, Tomoko; Miura, Yoshiki

    2015-10-15

    In order to develop novel anti-epileptic drugs that are effective for both general and partial seizure, we conducted in vivo screening of our chemical library in the mice MES and sc-PTZ models and found the benzothiazine 1 as lead compound. Optimization of this compound led to the discovery of compound 7b, which showed potent anticonvulsant effect in the MES, scPTZ and rat amygdala kindling models. Since the chemical structure of 7b is different from that of any existing AED, it is suggested that 7b may have unique mechanism of action for relieving both partial and generalized epilepsy. PMID:26364945

  8. Comparative persistence of antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy: A STROBE-compliant retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Su, Chien-Chou; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Huang, Chin-Wei; Lin, Swu-Jane; Setoguchi, Soko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compared persistence of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, valproic acid, and phenytoin in an Asian population with epilepsy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by analyzing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Adult epilepsy patients newly prescribed with AEDs between 2005 and 2009 were included. The primary outcome was persistence, defined as the treatment duration from the date of AED initiation to the date of AED discontinuation, switching, hospitalization due to seizure or disenrollment from databases, whichever came first. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk of non-persistence with AEDs. Among the 13,061 new users of AED monotherapy (mean age: 58 years; 60% men), the persistence ranged from 218.8 (gabapentin) to 275.9 (oxcarbazepine) days in the first treatment year. The risks of non-persistence in patients receiving oxcarbazepine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74–0.83), valproic acid (0.88; 0.85–0.92), lamotrigine (0.72; 0.65–0.81), and topiramate (0.90; 0.82–0.98) were significantly lower than in the carbamazepine group. Compared with carbamazepine users, the non-persistence risk was higher in phenytoin users (1.10; 1.06–1.13), while gabapentin users (1.03; 0.98–1.09) had similar risk. For risk of hospitalization due to seizure and in comparison with carbamazepine users, oxcarbazepine (0.66; 0.58–0.74) and lamotrigine (0.46; 0.35–0.62) users had lower risk, while phenytoin (1.35; 1.26–1.44) users had higher risk. The results remained consistent throughout series of sensitivity and stratification analyses. The persistence varied among AEDs and was better for oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, lamotrigine, and topiramate, but worse for phenytoin when compared with carbamazepine. PMID:27583857

  9. Assessment of oral side effects of Antiepileptic drugs and traumatic oro-facial injuries encountered in Epileptic children

    PubMed Central

    Ghafoor, P A Fazal; Rafeeq, Mohammed; Dubey, Alok

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a chronic disorder with unpredictably recurring seizure. Uncontrolled attacks can put patients at risk of suffering oro-facial trauma. Antiepileptic drugs (AED) provide satisfactory control of seizures in most of the patients with epilepsy. However use of AED has been found to cause many side effects inclusive of side effects in the oral cavity also. Materials & Methods: This study was conducted on 150 epileptic children, who were on anti epileptic medication for one year. Results: Gingival over growth was seen as common side effect of the AED drugs. Lip and cheek biting were the most common soft tissue injury, while tooth fracture was the most common hard tissue dental injury. Conclusion: General physicians, physicians & dentists should be well aware of the potential side effects of AED. A Dentist should be well versed and trained to manage oro-facial injuries in the emergency department. How to cite the article: Ghafoor PA, Rafeeq M, Dubey A. Assessment of oral side effects of Antiepileptic drugs and traumaticoro-facial injuries encountered in Epileptic children. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):126-8. PMID:24876713

  10. Large-Scale Phenotype-Based Antiepileptic Drug Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Dinday, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in a voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) result in Dravet Syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy. Zebrafish with a mutation in scn1Lab recapitulate salient phenotypes associated with DS, including seizures, early fatality, and resistance to antiepileptic drugs. To discover new drug candidates for the treatment of DS, we screened a chemical library of ∼1000 compounds and identified 4 compounds that rescued the behavioral seizure component, including 1 compound (dimethadione) that suppressed associated electrographic seizure activity. Fenfluramine, but not huperzine A, also showed antiepileptic activity in our zebrafish assays. The effectiveness of compounds that block neuronal calcium current (dimethadione) or enhance serotonin signaling (fenfluramine) in our zebrafish model suggests that these may be important therapeutic targets in patients with DS. Over 150 compounds resulting in fatality were also identified. We conclude that the combination of behavioral and electrophysiological assays provide a convenient, sensitive, and rapid basis for phenotype-based drug screening in zebrafish mimicking a genetic form of epilepsy. PMID:26465006

  11. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 decreases the concentrations of antiepileptic drugs in cortical extracellular fluid in amygdale kindling rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-hui; Wang, Cui-cui; Xiao, Xia; Wei, Li; Xu, Guoxiong

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) was responsible for drug resistence in refractory epilepsy in amygdale kindling rats. Methods: Rat amygdale kindling was used as a model of refractory epilepsy. The expression of MRP1 mRNA and protein in the brains was examined using RT-PCR and Western blot. MRP1-positive cells in the cortex and hippocampus were studied with immunohistochemical staining. The rats were intraperitoneally injected with phenytoin (50 mg/kg) or carbamazepine (20 mg/kg), and their concentrations in the cortical extracellular fluid were measured using microdialysis and HPLC. Probenecid, a MRP1 inhibitor (40 mmol/L, 50 μL) was administered through an inflow tube into the cortex 30 min before injection of the antiepileptic drugs. Results: The expression of MRP1 mRNA and protein was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus in amygdale kindling rats compared with the control group. Furthermore, the number of MRP1-positive cells in the cortex and hippocampus was also significantly increased in amygdale kindling rats. Microdialysis studies showed that the concentrations of phenytoin and carbamazepine in the cortical extracellular fluid were significantly decreased in amygdale kindling rats. Pre-administration of probenecid could restore the concentrations back to their control levels. Conclusion: Up-regulation of MRP1 is responsible for the resistance of brain cells to antiepileptic drugs in the amygdale kindling rats. PMID:23474709

  12. Large-Scale Phenotype-Based Antiepileptic Drug Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Dinday, Matthew T; Baraban, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in a voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) result in Dravet Syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy. Zebrafish with a mutation in scn1Lab recapitulate salient phenotypes associated with DS, including seizures, early fatality, and resistance to antiepileptic drugs. To discover new drug candidates for the treatment of DS, we screened a chemical library of ∼1000 compounds and identified 4 compounds that rescued the behavioral seizure component, including 1 compound (dimethadione) that suppressed associated electrographic seizure activity. Fenfluramine, but not huperzine A, also showed antiepileptic activity in our zebrafish assays. The effectiveness of compounds that block neuronal calcium current (dimethadione) or enhance serotonin signaling (fenfluramine) in our zebrafish model suggests that these may be important therapeutic targets in patients with DS. Over 150 compounds resulting in fatality were also identified. We conclude that the combination of behavioral and electrophysiological assays provide a convenient, sensitive, and rapid basis for phenotype-based drug screening in zebrafish mimicking a genetic form of epilepsy. PMID:26465006

  13. Influence of coadministered antiepileptic drugs on serum phenobarbital concentrations in epileptic patients: quantitative analysis based on a suitable transforming factor.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Noriyasu; Tsukamoto, Toyohisa; Uno, Junji; Kimura, Michio; Morita, Shushi

    2004-12-01

    This study investigated most suitable transforming factor related to the daily Phenobarbital dose (D) providing a steady-state serum concentration (Ct) and analyzed the influences of concomitant antiepileptic drugs on Ct quantitatively. Data obtained by routine therapeutic drug monitoring from a total of 326 epileptic patients treated with multiple oral administrations of phenobarbital (PB) as a powder, were used for the analysis. A total of 156 patients were administered PB alone, and 92, 57, and 21 patients were coadministered one, two, and three different antiepileptic drugs, respectively. Valproic acid (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), zonisamide (ZNS), clonazepam, and ethosuximide were coadministered with PB. For administration of PB alone, four types of transforming factor corresponding to clearance, i.e., total body weight, total body water volume, body surface area and extracellular water volume (VECW) were proposed. With VECW as a transforming factor, the level/dose (L/D) ratio (:Ct/(D/VECW)) was independent of the patient's age and gender. Ct was dependent on only one variable regarding D/VECW and expressed as Ct=0.989 x (D/VECW). The coadministration of one drug caused a difference in the gradient of the regression line of PB alone, and the influence of each drug was detected by dividing each mean L/D ratio of PB plus one other drug by that of PB alone. VPA, CBZ, and PHT significantly increased (p<0.01) the L/D ratio to 1.48, 1.35, and 1.23 of the value for PB alone, respectively. With coadministration of multiple drugs, the L/D ratio rose significantly (p<0.05) as the number (< or =2) of drugs coadministered increased regardless of the type, and also increased with the concomitant use of 3 drugs compared with 2 drugs. For a more detailed analysis, we defined the parameter eta(i) (i=1, 2, ..., 6) and an alteration ratio Ri, representing the influence of each antiepileptic drug on the L/D ratio of PB alone. A model based on the assumption that

  14. Drug interactions with the newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)--part 1: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between AEDs.

    PubMed

    Patsalos, Philip N

    2013-11-01

    Since 1989 there has been an exponential introduction of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) into clinical practice and these include eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, perampanel, pregabalin, retigabine (ezogabine), rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide; 16 in total. Because often the treatment of epilepsy is lifelong, and because patients are commonly prescribed polytherapy with other AEDs, AED interactions are an important consideration in the treatment of epilepsy and indeed can be a major therapeutic challenge. For new AEDs, their propensity to interact is particularly important because inevitably they can only be prescribed, at least in the first instance, as adjunctive polytherapy. The present review details the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that have been reported to occur with the new AEDs. Interaction study details are described, as necessary, so as to allow the reader to take a view as to the possible clinical significance of particular interactions. The principal pharmacokinetic interaction relates to hepatic enzyme induction or inhibition whilst pharmacodynamic interactions principally entail adverse effect synergism, although examples of anticonvulsant synergism also exist. Overall, the new AEDs are less interacting primarily because many are renally excreted or not hepatically metabolised (e.g. gabapentin, lacosamide, levetiracetam, topiramate, vigabatrin) and most do not (or minimally) induce or inhibit hepatic metabolism. A total of 139 pharmacokinetic interactions between concurrent AEDs have been described. The least pharmacokinetic interactions (n ≤ 5) are associated with gabapentin, lacosamide, tiagabine, vigabatrin and zonisamide, whilst lamotrigine (n = 17), felbamate (n = 15), oxcarbazepine (n = 14) and rufinamide (n = 13) are associated with the most. To date, felbamate, gabapentin, oxcarbazepine, perampanel, pregabalin

  15. Intrapatient variation in antiepileptic drug plasma concentration after generic substitution vs stable brand-name drug regimens.

    PubMed

    Contin, Manuela; Alberghini, Lucia; Candela, Carmina; Benini, Giulia; Riva, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Generic substitution of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is still a matter of controversy and concern among clinicians and patients. We aimed to assess intrasubject variation in plasma concentrations of lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LEV) and topiramate (TPM) after generic substitution compared with a stable brand-name drug regimen in a population of patients with epilepsy. A retrospective analysis was performed on prospectively collected and stored data from our therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) database for the years 2009-2014. The main outcome variable was the proportion of patients who, after switching from branded to generic formulations, showed a greater than ±20% change in AED plasma concentrations compared to the proportion of control patients showing a change in AED plasma concentrations of the same extent while receiving stable branded formulations over repeated TDM tests. Fifty patients on LTG, 27 on LEV and 16 on TPM showing at least one TDM test while receiving generic products fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria for the analysis and were compared with 200 control patients for LTG, 120 for LEV and 80 for TPM. The proportion of patients showing an intrasubject change greater than ±20% in AED plasma concentrations was similar in the brand name vs generic group compared with the control one for LTG (22% vs 33%) and LEV (44% vs 38%), while it was higher in the control group for TPM (41% vs 6%, p<0.01). These are the first data in the literature about the within-patient variation in steady-state plasma concentrations of a series of stable treatments with brand-name AEDs in a real clinical setting. In conclusion, a significant interday variability in intrapatient LTG, LEV and TPM plasma concentrations can be observed even in patients stabilized with the same brand name product over time. This suggests that any change in plasma AED concentration and possible related clinical effects after generic substitution may be not necessarily related to the switch

  16. Influence of coadministered antiepileptic drugs on serum zonisamide concentrations in epileptic patients: quantitative analysis based on suitable transforming factor.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Noriyasu; Tsukamoto, Toyohisa; Uno, Junji; Kimura, Michio; Morita, Shushi

    2003-12-01

    We conducted a study to clarify the most suitable transforming factor related to the daily zonisamide dose (D) providing a steady-state serum concentration (C(t)) and analyzed the influences of the concomitant use of antiepileptic drugs on C(t) quantitatively. Data obtained by routine therapeutic drug monitoring from a total of 175 epileptic patients treated with the multiple oral administrations of zonisamide (ZNS) as a powder/tablets, were used for the analysis. Employing the extracellular water volume (V(ECW)) as a transforming factor, led the level/dose (L/D) ratio (:C(t)/(D/V(ECW))) to be independent of the patient's age and sex for the administration of ZNS alone. C(t) was revealed to be dependent on only one variable regarding D/V(ECW) and expressed as C(t)=0.604x(D/V(ECW)). Phenytoin (PHT) significantly lowered (p<0.01) the L/D ratio to 0.76 of the value for ZNS alone. For a more detailed analysis, we defined the parameter R(i) (i=1, 2, em leader, 6) as an alteration ratio, representing the influence of each antiepileptic drug on the L/D ratio of ZNS alone. A model based on the assumption that each R(i) value was independent from one another and multiplicative, was adopted. The analysis clarified that phenobarbital, valproic acid, carbamazepine, and PHT significantly lowered (p<0.05) the L/D ratio of ZNS to 0.849, 0.865, 0.846, and 0.804, respectively. In the case of the addition or discontinuance of concomitant treatment with antiepileptic drugs in the same patient, the estimated L/D ratios were calculated using the value of each R(i) and compared with the measured ones. The mean of prediction error was calculated as 22.9%. Our results appear valid and R(i) should be available for clinical use. PMID:14646181

  17. Drug interactions with the newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)--Part 2: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between AEDs and drugs used to treat non-epilepsy disorders.

    PubMed

    Patsalos, Philip N

    2013-12-01

    Since antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are prescribed to treat various non-epilepsy-related disorders in addition to the fact that patients with epilepsy may develop concurrent disorders that will need treatment, the propensity for AEDs to interact with non-AEDs is considerable and indeed can present a difficult clinical problem. The present review details the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that have been reported to occur with the new AEDs (eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, perampanel, pregabalin, retigabine (ezogabine), rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide) and drugs used to treat non-epilepsy disorders. Interaction study details are described, as necessary, so as to allow the reader to take a view as to the possible clinical significance of particular interactions. Pharmacokinetic interactions relate to hepatic enzyme induction or inhibition and involved a variety of drugs including psychoactive drugs, cardioactive drugs, oral contraceptives, antituberculous agents, analgesics and antineoplastic drugs. A total of 68 pharmacokinetic interactions have been described, with lamotrigine (n = 22), topiramate (n = 18) and oxcarbazepine (n = 7) being associated with most, whilst lacosamide, pregabalin, stiripentol and vigabatrin are associated with none. Overall, only three pharmacodynamic interactions have been described and occur with oxcarbazepine, perampanel and pregabalin. PMID:23794036

  18. Renal tubular dysfunction measured by N-acetyl-beta glucosaminidase/Creatinine activity index in children receiving antiepileptic drugs: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Mojgan; Samaie, Afshin; Semnani, Vahid

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate renal side-effects of anti-epileptic medication by valproate (VPA) and carbamazepine (CBZ), we performed a prospective study to assess renal tubular function by measuring N-acetyl-β glucosaminidase (NAG)/Cr activity index in epileptic children. The study was conducted on 112 children who were diagnosed with epilepsy (28 patients were observed before treatment with anti-epileptics, 28 children were administered VPA, 28 children were treated with CBZ, and 28 healthy children were selected age &sex matched for). An especial NAG assay kit was used for quantitative measuring of NAG in patient urine samples. The patients receiving VPA exhibited higher rate of NAG activity compared with the two groups which not receiving anti-epileptic drugs. Measurement of urinary NAG/Cr index in the children who received CBZ also, was significantly higher than those who were not administered anti-epileptic drugs. The measurement of NAG/Cr index in the VPA group was significantly higher than that in the CBZ group (NAG index: 2.75 versus 1.71). Children on anti-epileptic treatment with VPA or CBZ might demonstrate signs of renal tubular dysfunction, reflected by NAG/Cr activity index. This side effect can be potentially more occurred following VPA administration. PMID:21569539

  19. Renal tubular dysfunction measured by N-acetyl-beta glucosaminidase/Creatinine activity index in children receiving antiepileptic drugs: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate renal side-effects of anti-epileptic medication by valproate (VPA) and carbamazepine (CBZ), we performed a prospective study to assess renal tubular function by measuring N-acetyl-β glucosaminidase (NAG)/Cr activity index in epileptic children. The study was conducted on 112 children who were diagnosed with epilepsy (28 patients were observed before treatment with anti-epileptics, 28 children were administered VPA, 28 children were treated with CBZ, and 28 healthy children were selected age &sex matched for). An especial NAG assay kit was used for quantitative measuring of NAG in patient urine samples. The patients receiving VPA exhibited higher rate of NAG activity compared with the two groups which not receiving anti-epileptic drugs. Measurement of urinary NAG/Cr index in the children who received CBZ also, was significantly higher than those who were not administered anti-epileptic drugs. The measurement of NAG/Cr index in the VPA group was significantly higher than that in the CBZ group (NAG index: 2.75 versus 1.71). Children on anti-epileptic treatment with VPA or CBZ might demonstrate signs of renal tubular dysfunction, reflected by NAG/Cr activity index. This side effect can be potentially more occurred following VPA administration. PMID:21569539

  20. Efficacy and tolerability of adjunct perampanel based on number of antiepileptic drugs at baseline and baseline predictors of efficacy: A phase III post-hoc analysis.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Tracy; Laurenza, Antonio; Yang, Haichen; Williams, Betsy; Ma, Tony; Fain, Randi

    2016-01-01

    Perampanel is a selective, noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist with demonstrated efficacy and tolerability in partial seizures in patients aged ≥ 12 years in Phase III studies. Post-hoc analysis of these studies was conducted to determine the efficacy and tolerability of perampanel based on the number of concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) at baseline, as well as to examine which baseline characteristics, if any, were predictors of efficacy. Efficacy parameters were based on the number of baseline AEDs, and logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of demographic and baseline clinical factors with probability of ≥ 50% reduction in seizure frequency. Patients on 1 AED at baseline were significantly more likely to have reduced seizure frequency (P<0.02) and improved 50% responder rate (P<0.02) than patients on 3 AEDs at baseline. Secondarily generalized seizures at baseline, unknown etiology, and use of concomitant non-inducer AEDs were also established as positive predictors of efficacy (50% responder rate; P<0.01). Patients with more AEDs at baseline were associated with greater use of inducers (P<0.01), which may result in decreased exposure of perampanel in these patients and lower efficacy. Patients with 1 AED at baseline had a significantly shorter time since diagnosis compared with patients in the 3 (P<0.01) AEDs group, as well as a lower median seizure frequency at baseline compared to patients on 3 AEDs (P<0.05), suggesting that the reduced efficacy of perampanel with 3 AEDs may also be associated with the greater severity of seizures in the patient groups. The incidence of adverse events in perampanel-treated patients was similar regardless of the number of AEDs at baseline. Greater efficacy is predicted for patients receiving fewer concomitant AEDs when starting perampanel, as well as for those receiving concomitant treatment with AEDs that are not CYP3A4 enzyme-inducers, compared to patients treated with multiple

  1. The Secondary Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) in Children and Their Implications on Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Processes: A Best-Evidence Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Saranya

    2009-01-01

    This study uses a best-evidence synthesis method to investigate the secondary effects of various antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and their implications on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) processes. Epilepsy is a common serious neurological disorder, a concomitant condition in individuals with severe developmental and intellectual…

  2. The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale: validation of a brief self-report measure of antiepileptic-drug-related neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Salinsky, Martin C; Storzbach, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale (PNS) is a brief patient-based survey of neurotoxicity complaints commonly encountered with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The authors present data on the validity of this scale, particularly when used in longitudinal studies. Participants included 55 healthy controls, 23 epilepsy patient controls, and 86 healthy volunteers who took various AEDs or placebos for 12 weeks as part of randomized, double-blind studies of AED effects on cognitive abilities. Test-retest reliability in the control groups averaged .80 (total score). Test-retest changes in the PNS were sensitive to AED usage in general (p < .001) and to each of the five AEDs tested but not to placebo. Test-retest changes in the PNS were strongly correlated with several scales of the Profile of Mood States but only weakly correlated with objective cognitive test measures. The PNS has satisfactory psychometric properties and is sensitive to AED usage in test-retest studies. PMID:15695749

  3. A Review for the Analysis of Antidepressant, Antiepileptic and Quinolone Type Drugs in Pharmaceuticals and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Rani, Susheela; Malik, Ashok Kumar; Kaur, Ramandeep; Kaur, Ripneel

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of drugs in various biological fluids is an important criterion for the determination of the physiological performance of a drug. After sampling of the biological fluid, the next step in the analytical process is sample preparation. Sample preparation is essential for isolation of desired components from complex biological matrices and greatly influences their reliable and accurate determination. The complexity of biological fluids adds to the challenge of direct determination of the drug by chromatographic analysis, therefore demanding a sample preparation step that is often time consuming, tedious and frequently overlooked. However, direct online injection methods offer the advantage of reducing sample preparation steps and enabling effective pre-concentration and clean-up of biological fluids. These procedures can be automated and therefore reduce the requirements for handling potentially infectious biomaterial, improve reproducibility, and minimize sample manipulations and potential contamination. This review is focused on the discovery and development of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) with different detectors. The drugs covered in this review are antiepileptics, antidepressant (AD), and quinolones. The application of these methods for determination of these drugs in biological, environmental and pharmaceutical samples has also been discussed. PMID:26939618

  4. Common Variants of KCNJ10 Are Associated with Susceptibility and Anti-Epileptic Drug Resistance in Chinese Genetic Generalized Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yong; Yan, Kui Po; Qu, Qiang; Qu, Jian; Chen, Zi Gui; Song, Tao; Luo, Xiang-Ying; Sun, Zhong-Yi; Bi, Chang-Long; Liu, Jin-Fang

    2015-01-01

    To explore genetic mechanism of genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) is challenging because of their complex heritance pattern and genetic heterogeneity. KCNJ10 gene encodes Kir4.1 channels and plays a major role in modulating resting membrane potentials in excitable cells. It may cause GGEs if mutated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible association between KCNJ10 common variants and the susceptibility and drug resistance of GGEs in Chinese population. The allele-specific MALDI–TOF mass spectrometry method was used to assess 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of KCNJ10 in 284 healthy controls and 483 Chinese GGEs patients including 279 anti-epileptic drug responsive patients and 204 drug resistant patients. We found the rs6690889 TC+TT genotypes were lower frequency in the GGEs group than that in the healthy controls (6.7% vs 9.5%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.50[0.29–0.86]). The frequency of rs1053074 G allele was lower in the childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) group than that in the healthy controls (28.4% vs 36.2%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.70[0.53–0.93]). The frequency of rs12729701 G allele and AG+GG genotypes was lower in the CAE group than that in the healthy controls (21.2% vs 28.4%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.74[0.59–0.94] and 36.3% vs 48.1%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.83[0.72–0.96], respectively). The frequency of rs12402969 C allele and the CC+CT genotypes were higher in the GGEs drug responsive patients than that in the drug resistant patients (9.3% vs 5.6%, OR = 1.73[1.06–2.85], p = 0.026 and 36.3% vs 48.1%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.83[0.72–0.96], respectively). This study identifies potential SNPs of KCNJ10 gene that may contribute to seizure susceptibility and anti-epileptic drug resistance. PMID:25874548

  5. Gene-to-gene interaction between sodium channel-related genes in determining the risk of antiepileptic drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Lee, Kee-Ra; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Lee, Min-Cheol; Kim, Yo-Sik

    2009-02-01

    The pathogenesis of antiepileptic drug (AED) resistance is multifactorial. However, most candidate gene association studies typically assess the effects of candidate genes independently of each other, which is partly because of the limitations of the parametric-statistical methods for detecting the gene-to-gene interactions. A total of 200 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and 200 patients with drug-responsive epilepsy were genotyped for 3 representative the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the voltage-gated sodium channel genes (SCN1A, SCN1B, and SCN2A) by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing analysis. Besides the typical parametric statistical method, a new statistical method (multifactor dimensionality reduction [MDR]) was used to determine whether gene-to-gene interactions increase the risk of AED resistance. None of the individual genotypes or alleles tested in the present study showed a significant association with AED resistance, regardless of their theoretical functional value. With the MDR method, of three possible 2-locus genotype combinations, the combination of SCN2A-PM with SCN1B-PM was the best model for predicting susceptibility to AED resistance, with a p value of 0.0547. MDR, as an analysis paradigm for investigating multi-locus effects in complex disorders, may be a useful statistical method for determining the role of gene-to-gene interactions in the pathogenesis of AED resistance. PMID:19270815

  6. Genotoxicity assessment of the antiepileptic drug AMP397, an Ames-positive aromatic nitro compound.

    PubMed

    Suter, Willi; Hartmann, Andreas; Poetter, Franziska; Sagelsdorff, Peter; Hoffmann, Peter; Martus, Hans-Jörg

    2002-07-25

    AMP397 is a novel antiepileptic agent and the first competitive AMPA antagonist with high receptor affinity, good in vivo potency, and oral activity. AMP397 has a structural alert (aromatic nitro group) and was mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a, TA98 and TA100 without S9, but negative in the nitroreductase-deficient strains TA98NR and TA100NR. The amino derivative of AMP397 was negative in wild-type strains TA98 and TA100. AMP397 was negative in a mouse lymphoma tk assay, which included a 24h treatment without S9. A weak micronucleus induction in vitro was found at the highest concentrations tested in V79 cells with S9. AMP397 was negative in the following in vivo studies, which included the maximum tolerated doses of 320mg/kg in mice and 2000mg/kg in rats: MutaMouse assay in colon and liver (5x320mg/kg) at three sampling times (3, 7 and 31 days after the last administration); DNA binding study in the liver of mice and rats after a single treatment with [14C]-AMP397; comet assay (1x2000mg/kg) in jejunum and liver of rats, sampling times 3 and 24h after administration; micronucleus test (2x320mg/kg) in the bone marrow of mice, sampling 24h after the second administration. Based on these results, it was concluded that AMP397 has no genotoxic potential in vivo. In particular, no genotoxic metabolite is formed in mammalian cells, and, if formed by intestinal bacteria, is unable to exert any genotoxic activity in the adjacent intestinal tissue. These data were considered to provide sufficient safety to initiate clinical development of the compound. PMID:12113769

  7. Comparing the effects of first-line antiepileptic drugs on the gait of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Suiter, E J; Packer, R M A; Volk, H A

    2016-06-25

    Idiopathic epilepsy (IE) is a common chronic neurological disease of the dog. Previous studies of anti-epileptic drug (AED) treatment have indicated that acceptable AED adverse effects are as important to owners as reductions in seizure frequency. AEDs in both dogs and human beings are frequently associated with the adverse-effect ataxia. The aim of this study was to compare ataxia levels in dogs with IE treated chronically with phenobarbitone or imepitoin, the two currently available first-line AED treatments. The gait of 6 imepitoin-treated dogs, 8 phenobarbitone-treated dogs and 10 age-matched healthy control dogs were compared. Fifty strides from a walking gait were analysed for each dog, quantifying ataxia via the variability in six established gait parameters. Three variables differed significantly between groups: lateral distance between (i) pelvic paw placements, (ii) thoracic paw placements and (iii) stance time, which were significantly more variable in the phenobarbitone-treated dogs than imepitoin-treated or control dogs. These results indicate that dogs treated with phenobarbitone experience ataxia compared with controls and imepitoin-treated dogs. Conversely, there was no difference between imepitoin-treated dogs and controls. These results along with further research are needed to quantify AEDs adverse effects, to help vets and owners make more informed drug-choices. PMID:27302918

  8. Kinetic and chemical assessment of the UV/H2O2 treatment of antiepileptic drug carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Vogna, Davide; Marotta, Raffaele; Andreozzi, Roberto; Napolitano, Alessandra; d'Ischia, Marco

    2004-01-01

    The UV/H2O2-induced degradation of carbamazepine, a worldwide used antiepileptic drug, recently found as contaminant in many municipal sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents and other aquatic environments, is investigated. The oxidation treatment caused an effective removal of the drug. At complete abatement of the substrate after 4 min treatment, a 35% value of removed total organic carbon (TOC) was obtained. A kinetic constant of (2.05+/-0.14) x 10(9) lmol(-1)s(-1) was determined for OH radical attack to carbamazepine in the UV/H2O2 process. Preparative TLC of the reaction mixture led to the isolation of acridine-9-carboxaldehyde as a reaction intermediate. HPLC and GC/MS analysis indicated formation of small amounts of acridine, salicylic acid, catechol and anthranilic acid among the reaction products. Under the same reaction conditions, synthetically prepared 10,11-epoxycarbamazepine was easily degraded to acridine as main product, suggesting that this epoxide is a likely intermediate in the oxidative conversion of carbamazepine to acridine. Under sunlight irradiation, carbamazepine in water underwent slow degradation to afford likewise acridine as main product. In view of the mutagenic properties of acridine, these results would raise important issues concerning the possible environmental impact of carbamazepine release through domestic wastewaters and support the importance of prolonged oxidation treatments to ensure complete degradation of aromatic intermediates. PMID:14581052

  9. What clinical trial designs have been used to test antiepileptic drugs and do we need to change them?

    PubMed

    Perucca, Emilio

    2012-06-01

    Designs used to evaluate the efficacy and safety of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have evolved considerably over the years. A major impulse to develop methodologically sound randomised controlled trials dates back to the Kefauver-Harris Drug Amendment of 1962, through which the US congress introduced the requirement of substantial evidence for proof of efficacy in a new drug application. The mainstay for the initial approval of most new AEDs has been, and still is, the placebo-controlled adjunctive therapy trial, which evolved over the years from the cross-over to the parallel-group design. In the early days, when few AEDs were available, enrolment of patients into these trials was relatively easy and prolonged placebo exposure could be justified by lack of alternative treatment options. With more than 20 drugs now available to treat epilepsy, however, exposing patients to placebo or to a potentially ineffective investigational agent faces practical and ethical concerns. Recruitment difficulties have led sponsors to markedly increase the number of trial sites, but there is evidence that this may adversely affect the ability to differentiate between effective and ineffective treatments. Methodological and practical difficulties are also encountered with monotherapy trials. Because regulatory guidelines for monotherapy approval differ between Europe and the US, sponsors need to pursue separate and costly development programs on the two sides of the Atlantic. Moreover, the scientific validity of the monotherapy trial paradigms currently used in Europe (the non-inferiority design) and in the US (the conversion to monotherapy design with historical controls) has been questioned. This article will review these issues in some detail and discuss how trial designs and regulatory approval processes may evolve in the future to address these concerns. PMID:22977898

  10. Use of the Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) to Help Predict the Occurrence of Idiosyncratic Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions Associated with Antiepileptic Drug Usage.

    PubMed

    Chan, Rosa; Wei, Chun-Yu; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Benet, Leslie Z

    2016-05-01

    Cutaneous adverse reactions (CARs) from antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are common, ranging from mild to life-threatening, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). The identification of subjects carrying the HLA-B*15:02, an inherited allelic variant of the HLA-B gene, and the avoidance of carbamazepine (CBZ) therapy in these subjects are strongly associated with a decrease in the incidence of carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN. In spite of the strong genetic associations, the initiation of hypersensitivity for AEDs is still not very well characterized. Predicting the potential for other AEDs to cause adverse reactions will be undoubtedly beneficial to avoid CARs, which is the focus of this report. Here, we explore the use of the Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) to distinguish AEDs associated with and without CARs by examining the binding relationship of AEDs to HLA-B*15:02 and data from extensive reviews of medical records. We also evaluate the lack of benefit from a Hong Kong population policy on the effects of screening for HLA-B*15:02 and previous incorrect structure-activity hypotheses. Our analysis concludes that BDDCS class 2 AEDs are more prone to cause adverse cutaneous reactions than certain BDDCS class 1 AEDs and that BDDCS Class 3 drugs have the lowest levels of cutaneous adverse reactions. We propose that BDDCS Class 3 AEDs should be preferentially used for patients with Asian backgrounds (i.e., Han Chinese, Thai, and Malaysian populations) if possible and in patients predisposed to skin rashes. PMID:26951484

  11. Effect of the Anti-depressant Sertraline, the Novel Anti-seizure Drug Vinpocetine and Several Conventional Antiepileptic Drugs on the Epileptiform EEG Activity Induced by 4-Aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Sitges, Maria; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Reed, Ronald Charles

    2016-06-01

    Seizures are accompanied by an exacerbated activation of cerebral ion channels. 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) is a pro-convulsive agent which mechanism of action involves activation of Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, and several antiepileptic drugs control seizures by reducing these channels permeability. The antidepressant, sertraline, and the anti-seizure drug vinpocetine are effective inhibitors of cerebral presynaptic Na(+) channels. Here the effectiveness of these compounds to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP was compared with the effectiveness of seven conventional antiepileptic drugs. For this purpose, EEG recordings before and at three intervals within the next 30 min following 4-AP (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were taken in anesthetized animals; and the EEG-highest peak amplitude values (HPAV) calculated. In control animals, the marked increase in the EEG-HPAV observed near 20 min following 4-AP reached its maximum at 30 min. Results show that this epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP is prevented by sertraline and vinpocetine at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg, and by carbamazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine at a higher dose (25 mg/kg). In contrast, topiramate (25 mg/kg), valproate (100 mg/kg) and levetiracetam (100 mg/kg) failed to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP. It is concluded that 4-AP is a useful tool to elicit the mechanism of action of anti-seizure drugs at clinical meaningful doses. The particular efficacy of sertraline and vinpocetine to prevent seizures induced by 4-AP is explained by their high effectiveness to reduce brain presynaptic Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels permeability. PMID:26830290

  12. Perampanel: a novel antiepileptic for the adjunctive treatment of refractory partial onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Owen, R T

    2013-01-01

    Perampanel is a selective noncompetitive AMPA-type glutamate receptor antagonist which has demonstrated anticonvulsant activity in experimental seizure models and antiepileptic activity in clinical trials. Perampanel has a long mean elimination half-life of 105 hours but this may be reduced in the presence of enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs. Adjunctive use of perampanel at 4-12 mg/day in refractory partial-onset seizures reduced seizures by 23-34% in short-term, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. These reductions were maintained long-term in open-label extension studies lasting up to 4 years. Dizziness, somnolence and headache were the most common treatment-emergent adverse events; discontinuation rates due to adverse events approximated 13% in long-term studies. Perampanel's efficacy and tolerability outcomes are broadly comparable with other agents licensed for adjunctive use in refractory partial onset seizures. PMID:23362493

  13. Prevalence of Different Combinations of Antiepileptic Drugs and CNS Drugs in Elderly Home Care Service and Nursing Home Patients in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used to treat different conditions in elderly patients and are among the drug classes most susceptible to be involved in drug-drug interactions (DDI). The aim of the study was to describe and compare use of AEDs between home care service and nursing home patients, as these patients are not included in nationwide databases of drug utilization. In the combined population, we investigate DDI of AEDs with other central nervous system- (CNS-) active drugs and DDIs involving AEDs in general. Materials and Methods. Point-prevalence study of Norwegian patients in home care services and nursing homes in 2009. At the patient level, we screened for different DDIs involving AEDs. Results. In total, 882 patients (7.8%) of 11,254 patients used AEDs and number of users did not differ between home care services and nursing homes (8.2% versus 7.7%). In the combined population, we identified 436 potential DDIs in 45% of the patients. Conclusions. In a large population of elderly, home care service and nursing home patients do not differ with respect to exposure of AEDs but use more AEDs as compared to the general population of similar age. The risk of DDIs with AEDs and other CNS-active drugs should be taken into consideration and individual clinical evaluations are assessed in this population. PMID:27525114

  14. Anti-epileptic drugs and bone loss: Phenytoin reduces pro-collagen I and alters the electrophoretic mobility of osteonectin in cultured bone cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Emma L; Garton, Mark; Fuller, Heidi R

    2016-05-01

    Phenytoin is an antiepileptic drug used in the management of partial and tonic-clonic seizures. In previous studies we have shown that valproate, another antiepileptic drug, reduced the amount of two key bone proteins, pro-collagen I and osteonectin (SPARC, BM-40), in both skin fibroblasts and cultured osteoblast-like cells. Here we show that phenytoin also reduces pro-collagen I production in osteoblast-like cells, but does not appear to cause a decrease in osteonectin message or protein production. Instead, a 24h exposure to a clinically relevant concentration of phenytoin resulted in a dose-dependent change in electrophoretic mobility of osteonectin, which was suggestive of a change in post-translational modification status. The perturbation of these important bone proteins could be one of the mechanisms to explain the bone loss that has been reported following long-term treatment with phenytoin. PMID:26999801

  15. Efficacy of Anti-Epileptic Drugs in the Treatment of Tumor and Its Associated Epilepsy: An in vitro Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Taranjeet; Manchanda, Shaffi; Saini, Vedangana; Lakhman, Sukhwinder S; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2016-03-01

    The change in the therapeutic targets from neuron to glia has proved beneficial in the treatment of many psychiatric disorders. The anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) have been widely prescribed for the treatment of partial and complete seizures, bipolar disorder among others. The current study was carried out to explore the efficacy of some conventional and novel AEDs for the treatment of tumor-associated epilepsy which develops in 29-49% of the patients diagnosed with brain tumors. We used C6 glioma cell line as model system to study the effect of selected AEDs, viz., gabapentin (GBP), valproic acid (VPA) and topiramate (TPM). Morphometry, cell cycle analysis, apoptosis, expression of different protein markers, viz., GFAP, HSP70 and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) were studied in AED-treated cultures. The study was further extended to rat hypothalamic primary explant cultures, and cell migration and expression of plasticity markers - neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and polysialylation of NCAM (PSA-NCAM) - were studied in the explants. TPM was observed to show more pronounced increase in apoptosis of glioblastoma cells accompanied by significant downregulation in the expression of HSP70 and NFκB. TPM-treated explants also showed highest process ramification and cellular migration accompanied by intense expression of the plasticity markers as compared to those treated with GBP and VPA. Among the 3 AEDs tested, TPM was observed to show more promising effects on cytoprotection and plasticity of C6 glioma cells. PMID:27536020

  16. The effect of epilepsy and antiepileptic drugs on sexual, reproductive and gonadal health of adults with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Sherifa A

    2016-06-01

    Epilepsy is a common chronic medical illness. Hyposexuality is the most frequent abnormality in men and women with epilepsy. In men with epilepsy, hypoandrogenimia, hypogonadism and sperm abnormalities are common. Testicular atrophy was also infrequently reported. In women with epilepsy, hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovaries (PCOs) and PCO syndrome are frequent. Decreased serum free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone levels, free androgen index and free testosterone/leutinizing hormone (LH) ratio and increased sex hormone binding globulin, estradiol, prolactin, LH, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels and LH/FSH ratio are common with epilepsy. Disturbance of central and/or peripheral control of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and alteration of central neurotrasmitters (GABA, glutamate and serotonin) by epileptic discharges or antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), direct gonadal toxicity by AEDs and pcyshicatric/psychosocial factors are all incriminated in sexual, reproductive and gonadal abnormalities associated with epilepsy. Patients may benefit from multidisplinary evaluation, tight seizure control, change the AED, androgen therapy, genital vasodilators, L-carnitine supplementation and psychotherapy. PMID:26934627

  17. Intrinsic excitability measures track antiepileptic drug action and uncover increasing/decreasing excitability over the wake/sleep cycle

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Christian; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Freestone, Dean; Cook, Mark James; Achermann, Peter; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Pathological changes in excitability of cortical tissue commonly underlie the initiation and spread of seizure activity in patients suffering from epilepsy. Accordingly, monitoring excitability and controlling its degree using antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is of prime importance for clinical care and treatment. To date, adequate measures of excitability and action of AEDs have been difficult to identify. Recent insights into ongoing cortical activity have identified global levels of phase synchronization as measures that characterize normal levels of excitability and quantify any deviation therefrom. Here, we explore the usefulness of these intrinsic measures to quantify cortical excitability in humans. First, we observe a correlation of such markers with stimulation-evoked responses suggesting them to be viable excitability measures based on ongoing activity. Second, we report a significant covariation with the level of AED load and a wake-dependent modulation. Our results indicate that excitability in epileptic networks is effectively reduced by AEDs and suggest the proposed markers as useful candidates to quantify excitability in routine clinical conditions overcoming the limitations of electrical or magnetic stimulation. The wake-dependent time course of these metrics suggests a homeostatic role of sleep, to rebalance cortical excitability. PMID:26554021

  18. Efficacy of Anti-Epileptic Drugs in the Treatment of Tumor and Its Associated Epilepsy: An in vitro Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Taranjeet; Manchanda, Shaffi; Saini, Vedangana; Lakhman, Sukhwinder S.; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2016-01-01

    The change in the therapeutic targets from neuron to glia has proved beneficial in the treatment of many psychiatric disorders. The anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) have been widely prescribed for the treatment of partial and complete seizures, bipolar disorder among others. The current study was carried out to explore the efficacy of some conventional and novel AEDs for the treatment of tumor-associated epilepsy which develops in 29-49% of the patients diagnosed with brain tumors. We used C6 glioma cell line as model system to study the effect of selected AEDs, viz., gabapentin (GBP), valproic acid (VPA) and topiramate (TPM). Morphometry, cell cycle analysis, apoptosis, expression of different protein markers, viz., GFAP, HSP70 and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) were studied in AED-treated cultures. The study was further extended to rat hypothalamic primary explant cultures, and cell migration and expression of plasticity markers - neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and polysialylation of NCAM (PSA-NCAM) - were studied in the explants. TPM was observed to show more pronounced increase in apoptosis of glioblastoma cells accompanied by significant downregulation in the expression of HSP70 and NFκB. TPM-treated explants also showed highest process ramification and cellular migration accompanied by intense expression of the plasticity markers as compared to those treated with GBP and VPA. Among the 3 AEDs tested, TPM was observed to show more promising effects on cytoprotection and plasticity of C6 glioma cells. PMID:27536020

  19. The antiepileptic drug lamotrigine is a substrate of mouse and human breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Römermann, Kerstin; Helmer, Renate; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is the major problem in the treatment of epilepsy. One hypothesis to explain AED resistance suggests that seizure-induced overexpression of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts AEDs to reach their brain targets. Various studies examined whether AEDs are substrates of P-glycoprotein (Pgp; MDR1; ABCB1), whereas information about the potential role of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) is scanty. We used a highly sensitive in vitro assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA) with MDCKII cells transduced with murine Bcrp1 or human BCRP to evaluate whether AEDs are substrates of this major efflux transporter. Six of 7 AEDs examined, namely phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, levetiracetam, topiramate, and valproate, were not transported by Bcrp at therapeutic concentrations, whereas lamotrigine exhibited a marked asymmetric, Bcrp-mediated transport in the CETA, which could be almost completely inhibited with the Bcrp inhibitor Ko143. Significant but less marked transport of lamotrigine was determined in MDCK cells transfected with human BCRP. Lamotrigine is also a substrate of human Pgp, so that this drug is the first AED that has been identified as a dual substrate of the two major human efflux transporters at the BBB. Previous in vivo studies have demonstrated a synergistic or cooperative role of Pgp and Bcrp in the efflux of dual substrates at the BBB, so that transport of lamotrigine by Pgp and BCRP may be an important mechanism of pharmacoresistance in epilepsy patients in whom both transporters are overexpressed. PMID:25645391

  20. Low plasma antioxidant status in patients with epilepsy and the role of antiepileptic drugs on oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Bindu; Ramalingam, Krishnan; Kumar, Rajendiran Vinoth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress has been implicated in various disorders including epilepsy. We studied the antioxidant status in patients with epilepsy and aimed at determining whether there was any difference in the antioxidant levels between patients and controls, patients who are not on antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and on treatment, between individual AEDs and patients on monotherapy and polytherapy. Materials and Methods: Antioxidant levels like catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), vitamin E, glutathione (GSH), thiol group (SH), uric acid, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were compared between 100 patients with epilepsy and equal number of controls. Twenty-five patients who were not on AEDs were compared with patients on AEDs and the control group. Patients were divided into monotherapy and polytherapy group and antioxidant status was compared between the two groups and between individual drugs. Results: Catalase, SH, vitamin E, and TAC were significantly low in patients with epilepsy than those in the control group (P < 0.001). GSH and uric acid did not show any difference; GPx in patients was significantly higher than those in the control group There were no differences in the antioxidant levels between the treated and the untreated groups; however, it was lower in untreated patients than controls (P < 0.001), suggesting that AEDs do not modify the oxidative stress. Patients on Valproate (VPA) showed higher catalase and GPx levels. Catalase was higher in the monotherapy than polytherapy group (P < 0.04). Conclusion: Our study found significantly low levels of antioxidant in patients as compared to controls. AED did not influence the antioxidant status suggesting that seizures induce oxidative stress. PMID:25506160

  1. Inverse Association between Sodium Channel-Blocking Antiepileptic Drug Use and Cancer: Data Mining of Spontaneous Reporting and Claims Databases

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Mitsutaka; Fujimoto, Mai; Motomura, Haruka; Hosomi, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are drug targets for the treatment of epilepsy. Recently, a decreased risk of cancer associated with sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has become a research focus of interest. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the use of sodium channel-blocking AEDs are inversely associated with cancer, using different methodologies, algorithms, and databases. Methods: A total of 65,146,507 drug-reaction pairs from the first quarter of 2004 through the end of 2013 were downloaded from the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. The reporting odds ratio (ROR) and information component (IC) were used to detect an inverse association between AEDs and cancer. Upper limits of the 95% confidence interval (CI) of < 1 and < 0 for the ROR and IC, respectively, signified inverse associations. Furthermore, using a claims database, which contains 3 million insured persons, an event sequence symmetry analysis (ESSA) was performed to identify an inverse association between AEDs and cancer over the period of January 2005 to May 2014. The upper limit of the 95% CI of adjusted sequence ratio (ASR) < 1 signified an inverse association. Results: In the FAERS database analyses, significant inverse associations were found between sodium channel-blocking AEDs and individual cancers. In the claims database analyses, sodium channel-blocking AED use was inversely associated with diagnoses of colorectal cancer, lung cancer, gastric cancer, and hematological malignancies, with ASRs of 0.72 (95% CI: 0.60 - 0.86), 0.65 (0.51 - 0.81), 0.80 (0.65 - 0.98), and 0.50 (0.37 - 0.66), respectively. Positive associations between sodium channel-blocking AEDs and cancer were not found in the study. Conclusion: Multi-methodological approaches using different methodologies, algorithms, and databases suggest that sodium channel-blocking AED use is inversely associated with colorectal cancer, lung cancer, gastric

  2. A Clinical Evaluation of Gingival Overgrowth in Children on Antiepileptic Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Saroj; Thomas, Abi M; Pandian, Jeyraj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gingival overgrowth, a well-known side effect of chronic phenytoin therapy has also been known to be caused by other anti epileptic drugs (AED’s). Various factors like plaque, gingival inflammation, and periodontal health have been postulated to effect gingival overgrowth. Aim To identify the AED having an effect on gingival overgrowth and to study the factors affecting it. Materials and Methods Three groups of 30 children each on monotherapy of phenytoin, sodium valproate, and carbamazepine were longitudinally followed for six months. Their oral and epileptic health status was assessed and were monitored for change in plaque levels, gingival inflammation, probing depth and the status of gingival overgrowth at baseline, at the end of 3 months and finally at the end of 6 months. The data was recorded and statistically analysed. Results Phenytoin caused gingival overgrowth in a significant number of children (53.6%) within 3 months. Sodium valproate also led to gingival overgrowth, but not upto statistically significant levels. Patients on carbamazepine did not show any signs of gingival overgrowth. Gingival overgrowth is seen more on buccal side, in the anterior segment and in the lower arch. No correlation could be found between, either plaque level, or gingival inflammation with gingival overgrowth. Probing depth could be positively correlated with gingival overgrowth. Conclusion Phenytoin is the drug, which can be chiefly implicated for causing gingival overgrowth. Sodium valproate carries the potential for gingival overgrowth, although only up to clinically insignificant levels in 6 months. Carbamazepine can be considered a safe drug in children in relation to gingival overgrowth. PMID:26894172

  3. Intestinal absorption of the antiepileptic drug substance vigabatrin is altered by infant formula in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Thale, Zia I; Brodin, Birger; Hansen, Steen H; Holm, René; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd

    2014-01-01

    Vigabatrin is an antiepileptic drug substance mainly used in pediatric treatment of infantile spasms. The main source of nutrition for infants is breast milk and/or infant formula. Our hypothesis was that infant formula may affect the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The aim was therefore to investigate the potential effect of coadministration of infant formula with vigabatrin on the oral absorption in vitro and in vivo. The effect of vigabatrin given with an infant formula on the oral uptake and transepithelial transport was investigated in vitro in Caco-2 cells. In vivo effects of infant formula and selected amino acids on the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin was investigated after oral coadministration to male Sprague–Dawley rats using acetaminophen as a marker for gastric emptying. The presence of infant formula significantly reduced the uptake rate and permeability of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells. Oral coadministration of vigabatrin and infant formula significantly reduced Cmax and prolonged tmax of vigabatrin absorption. Ligands for the proton-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1, sarcosine, and proline/l-tryptophan had similar effects on the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin. The infant formula decreased the rate of gastric emptying. Here we provide experimental evidence for an in vivo role of PAT1 in the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The effect of infant formula on the oral absorption of vigabatrin was found to be due to delayed gastric emptying, however, it seems reasonable that infant formula may also directly affect the intestinal absorption rate of vigabatrin possibly via PAT1. PMID:25505585

  4. The absorptive flux of the anti-epileptic drug substance vigabatrin is carrier-mediated across Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Brodin, Birger; Holm, René; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd

    2014-01-23

    Vigabatrin is an anti-epileptic drug substance. The oral bioavailability of vigabatrin is high (60-70%), however, little is known about the mechanism(s) mediating the intestinal absorption. The aim of the present study was to identify which solute carrier(s) are involved in the absorption of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells, a cell culture model of the small intestinal epithelium. The uptake and transepithelial flux of vigabatrin was measured using an LC-MS method for quantification. Transepithelial transport of vigabatrin was shown to be proton-dependent and polarized in the apical-to-basolateral (A-B) direction. The A-B flux of vigabatrin had a saturable component and a passive component, indicating the presence of a carrier system in parallel with a passive permeability. The Michaelis constant, Km, of the transepithelial A-B flux of vigabatrin was estimated to be 32.8±7.4 mM (n=3-5), whereas the Km of the apical uptake was found to be 12.7±3.7 mM (n=3). The carrier-mediated transepithelial A-B flux of vigabatrin accounted for 80-95% (50.0-1.0mM) of the total A-B flux. The transepithelial A-B flux (as well as apical uptake) of vigabatrin was significantly decreased upon addition of substrates or inhibitors of the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter (hPAT1) to the apical solution. The present study indicates that the transepithelial A-B flux of vigabatrin is mainly mediated by hPAT1 in Caco-2 cells at dose-relevant concentrations. PMID:24008184

  5. The effect of imepitoin, a recently developed antiepileptic drug, on thyroid parameters and fat metabolism in healthy Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Bossens, K; Daminet, S; Duchateau, L; Rick, M; Van Ham, L; Bhatti, S

    2016-07-01

    Since early 2013, imepitoin has been used in most European countries for the management of recurrent single generalised epileptic seizures in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. It has been reported that imepitoin is as effective as phenobarbital (PB) in controlling seizures in dogs with newly diagnosed idiopathic epilepsy and it has a clinically superior safety profile. As the use of imepitoin gains popularity, its effect on serum thyroid parameters warrants further investigation since long-term PB administration influences thyroid parameters in dogs, which could lead to misinterpretation of laboratory results and incorrect diagnosis of thyroidal illness. A prospective study was conducted to compare the effect of orally administered PB and imepitoin on serum concentrations of total thyroxine (TT4), triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, thyroglobulin autoantibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone, cholesterol and triglycerides in healthy Beagle dogs. These parameters were determined prior to and at 6, 12 and 18 weeks after antiepileptic drug administration. The starting dose of PB (5 mg/kg PO twice daily; range, 4.4-6.0 mg/kg) was monitored and adjusted to obtain optimal therapeutic serum concentrations (30-35 g/mL). Imepitoin was administered at 30 mg/kg PO twice daily (range, 29.2-35.7 mg/kg). Imepitoin administration did not affect any of the thyroid parameters over an 18-week period. In contrast, serum TT4 concentrations decreased significantly over time in dogs receiving PB (P <0.05). Serum cholesterol concentrations increased significantly over time in dogs in the imepitoin group, but not to the same extent as commonly seen in dogs with primary hypothyroidism. PMID:27240915

  6. Associations between Fracture Incidence and Use of Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate and Anti-Epileptic Drugs in Women with Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Martha J.; Cain, Kevin C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate any association between incidence of osteoporotic fractures and use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and/or anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) among women and girls with developmental disabilities. Methods Cross-sectional population–based observational study of all non-institutionalized females with developmental disabilities age thirteen and older who received fee-for-service Medicaid in Washington State during 2002 (N=6773), using administrative data. Main Findings In a sample of 6,773 females, 140 women (2%) had an osteoporotic fracture during 2002. Among 340 users of DMPA, 13 (3.8%) had an osteoporotic fracture with an odds ratio of 2.4 (CI 95%, 1.3–4.4) for fracture compared to non-users. Among 1909 users of AEDs, 60 (3.1%) had an osteoporotic fracture with an odds ratio of 1.9 (CI 95%, 1.3–2.6) for fracture compared to non-users. We controlled for age and race (as Caucasian or non-Caucasian). Conclusions Use of either AEDs or DMPA by women with developmental disabilities is associated with significantly increased incidence of fracture. Women and girls who have developmental disabilities may be poor candidates for DMPA use due to increased risk of fractures. Further research is indicated (1) to determine the specific risks profile of DMPA for this population, (2) to explore alternative means of managing significant menstrual problems and contraceptive needs in this population and (3) to screen current and previous users of DMPA and chronic users of AEDs for osteoporosis risk, regardless of age. PMID:17188217

  7. Improvement of physicochemical properties of an antiepileptic drug by salt engineering.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ziyaur; Zidan, Ahmed S; Samy, Raghu; Sayeed, Vilayat A; Khan, Mansoor A

    2012-09-01

    The focus of the present investigation was to evaluate the feasibility of using cyclamic salt of lamotrigine in order to improve its solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR). The salt was prepared by solution crystallization method and characterized chemically by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton ((1)H) and carbon ((13)C) nuclear magnetic resonance (liquid and solid, NMR) spectroscopy, physically by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermally by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), physicochemically for solubility, IDR, solution and solid-state stability, and polymorphism by solution recrystallization and slurry conversion studies. The FTIR, NMR, PXRD, DSC, and TGA spectra and thermograms indicated the salt formation. The salt formation increased lamotrigine solubility by 19-fold and IDR by 4.9-fold in water. The solution and solid-state stability were similar to parent molecule and were resistant to polymorphic transformation. In conclusion, cyclamic salt of lamotrigine provides another potential avenue for the pharmaceutical development of lamotrigine with improved physicochemical properties especially for pediatric population. It is also possible that appropriate dosage forms can be formulated with much lower drug amount and better safety profile than existing products. PMID:22588676

  8. Identification of phototransformation products of the antiepileptic drug gabapentin: Biodegradability and initial assessment of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Manuel; Menz, Jakob; Olsson, Oliver; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2015-11-15

    The anticonvulsant drug Gabapentin (GAB) is used for the treatment of various diseases (e.g. epilepsy, bipolar disorder, neuropathic pain) and is being consumed in high amounts. As GAB is not metabolized and shows a weak elimination in sewage treatment plants (STPs), it has been detected in surface water and even in raw potable water. Moreover, the confirmed teratogenic effects of GAB indicate the need for further investigations regarding options for the elimination of GAB in the water cycle. Little is known about the behavior of GAB during treatment with UV light, which is normally used for the disinfection of potable water and discussed for advanced wastewater treatment. In this study, GAB was exposed to polychromatic UV irradiation at different initial concentrations in aqueous solution. Afterwards the structures of the resulting phototransformation products (PTPs) were identified and elucidated by means of high-resolution mass spectrometry. GAB and photolytic mixtures were submitted to the Closed Bottle Test (CBT; OECD 301 D) to assess biodegradability. Furthermore, the toxicity of GAB and its photolytic mixtures was initially addressed on screening level using a modified luminescent bacteria test (LBT) and the umu-test (ISO/FDIS 13829). Environmentally realistic concentrations of GAB were disclosed by predicting STP influent concentrations (24.3 and 23.2 μg L(-1)). GAB with initial concentration of 100 mg L(-1) was eliminated by 80% after 128 min of direct UV irradiation, but just 9% of non-purgeable organic carbon (NPOC) was removed indicating the formation of dead-end transformation products (TPs). Structures of different PTPs were elucidated and several identical PTPs could also be identified at lower initial treatment concentrations (20 mg L(-1), 5 mg L(-1), 1 mg L(-1) and 0.1 mg L(-1)). GAB was classified as not readily biodegradable. Moreover, photo treatment did not result in better biodegradable PTPs. With increasing UV treatment duration, photolytic

  9. The Brain Activity in Brodmann Area 17: A Potential Bio-Marker to Predict Patient Responses to Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Fang, Weidong; Zeng, Kebin; Yang, Mingming; Li, Chenyu; Wang, Shasha; Li, Minghui; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to predict newly diagnosed patient responses to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging tools to explore changes in spontaneous brain activity. We recruited 21 newly diagnosed epileptic patients, 8 drug-resistant (DR) patients, 11 well-healed (WH) patients, and 13 healthy controls. After a 12-month follow-up, 11 newly diagnosed epileptic patients who showed a poor response to AEDs were placed into the seizures uncontrolled (SUC) group, while 10 patients were enrolled in the seizure-controlled (SC) group. By calculating the amplitude of fractional low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) of blood oxygen level-dependent signals to measure brain activity during rest, we found that the SUC patients showed increased activity in the bilateral occipital lobe, particularly in the cuneus and lingual gyrus compared with the SC group and healthy controls. Interestingly, DR patients also showed increased activity in the identical cuneus and lingual gyrus regions, which comprise Brodmann’s area 17 (BA17), compared with the SUC patients; however, these abnormalities were not observed in SC and WH patients. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicated that the fALFF value of BA17 could differentiate SUC patients from SC patients and healthy controls with sufficient sensitivity and specificity prior to the administration of medication. Functional connectivity analysis was subsequently performed to evaluate the difference in connectivity between BA17 and other brain regions in the SUC, SC and control groups. Regions nearby the cuneus and lingual gyrus were found positive connectivity increased changes or positive connectivity changes with BA17 in the SUC patients, while remarkably negative connectivity increased changes or positive connectivity decreased changes were found in the SC patients. Additionally, default mode network (DMN) regions showed negative connectivity increased changes or negative

  10. Do ATP-binding cassette transporters cause pharmacoresistance in epilepsy? Problems and approaches in determining which antiepileptic drugs are affected.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Römermann, Kerstin; Fedrowitz, Maren

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a common problem in epilepsy, affecting at least 30% of patients. One prominent hypothesis to explain this resistance suggests an inadequate penetration or excess efflux of AEDs across the blood - brain barrier (BBB) as a result of overexpressed efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp), the encoded product of the multidrug resistance- 1 (MDR1, ABCB1) gene. Pgp and MDR1 are markedly increased in epileptogenic brain tissue of patients with AED-resistant partial epilepsy and following seizures in rodent models of partial epilepsy. In rodent models, AED-resistant rats exhibit higher Pgp levels than responsive animals; increased Pgp expression is associated with lower brain levels of AEDs; and, most importantly, co-administration of Pgp inhibitors reverses AED resistance. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that Pgp plays a significant role in mediating resistance to AEDs in rodent models of epilepsy - however, whether this phenomenon extends to at least some human refractory epilepsy remains unclear, particularly because it is still a matter of debate which AEDs, if any, are transported by human Pgp. The difficulty in determining which AEDs are substrates of human Pgp is mainly a consequence of the fact that AEDs are highly permeable compounds, which are not easily identified as Pgp substrates in in vitro models of the BBB, such as monolayer (Transwell(®)) efflux assays. By using a modified assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA), which minimizes the influence of high transcellular permeability, two groups have recently demonstrated that several major AEDs are transported by human Pgp. Importantly, it was demonstrated in these studies that Pgp-mediated transport highly depends on the AED concentration and may not be identified if concentrations below or above the therapeutic range are used. In addition to the efflux transporters, seizure-induced alterations in BBB integrity and activity of

  11. Impact of early life exposure to antiepileptic drugs on neurobehavioral outcomes based on laboratory animal and clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Bath, Kevin G.; Scharfman, Helen E.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 1% of children under the age of 15, making it a very common neurological disorder in the pediatric population (Russ et al., 2012 [1]). In addition, ∼0.4–0.8% of all pregnant women have some form of epilepsy (Hauser et al., 1996a,b; Borthen et al., 2009; Krishnamurthy, 2012 [2–5]). Despite the potential deleterious effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on the developing brain, their use is still required for seizure control in pregnant women (Krishnamurthy, 2012 [5]), and they represent the standard approach for treating children with epilepsy (Chu-Shore and Thiele, 2010; Quach et al., 2010; Verrotti et al., 2011 [6–8]). Even when AEDs are effective, there are potential side effects, including cognitive and affective changes or altered sleep and appetite. The consequences of AED exposure in development have been studied extensively (Canger et al., 1999; Modi et al., 2011a,b; Oguni, 2011 [9–12]). Despite intensive study, there is still debate about the long-term consequences of early life AED exposure. Here, we consider the evidence to date that AED exposure, either prenatally or in early postnatal life, has significant adverse effects on the developing brain and incorporate studies of laboratory animals as well as those of patients. We also note the areas of research where greater clarity seems critical in order to make significant advances. A greater understanding of the impact of AEDs on somatic, cognitive and behavioral development has substantial value because it has the potential to inform clinical practice and guide studies aimed at understanding the genetic and molecular bases of comorbid pathologies associated with common treatment regimens. Understanding these effects has the potential to lead to AEDs with fewer side effects. Such advances would expand treatment options, diminish the risk associated with AED exposure in susceptible populations, and improve the quality of life and health outcomes of children with

  12. The reasons for the epilepsy treatment gap in Kilifi, Kenya: Using formative research to identify interventions to improve adherence to antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Julie A.; Molyneux, Catherine S.; Mbuba, Caroline K.; Jenkins, Jo; Newton, Charles R.J.C.; Hartley, Sally D.

    2012-01-01

    Many people with epilepsy (PWE) in resource‐poor countries do not receive appropriate treatment, a phenomenon referred to as the epilepsy treatment gap (ETG). We conducted a qualitative study to explore the reasons for this gap and to identify possible interventions in Kilifi, Kenya. Focus group discussions (FGDs) were carried out of PWE and their caregivers. Individual interviews were conducted of PWE, their caregivers, traditional healers, community health workers and leaders, nurses and doctors. In addition, a series of workshops was conducted, and four factors contributing to the ETG were identified: 1) lack of knowledge about the causes, treatment and prognosis of epilepsy; 2) inaccessibility to antiepileptic drugs; 3) misconceptions about epilepsy derived from superstitions about its origin; 4) and dissatisfaction with the communication skills of health providers. These data indicated possible interventions: 1) education and support for PWE and their caregivers; 2) communication skills training for health providers; 3) and improved drug provision. PMID:23160097

  13. Treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in a mouse model of Rett syndrome with Na+-channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Herrera, José A; Ward, Christopher S; Pitcher, Meagan R; Percy, Alan K; Skinner, Steven; Kaufmann, Walter E; Glaze, Daniel G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2015-04-01

    One quarter of deaths associated with Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, are sudden and unexpected. RTT is associated with prolonged QTc interval (LQT), and LQT-associated cardiac arrhythmias are a potential cause of unexpected death. The standard of care for LQT in RTT is treatment with β-adrenergic antagonists; however, recent work indicates that acute treatment of mice with RTT with a β-antagonist, propranolol, does not prevent lethal arrhythmias. In contrast, acute treatment with the Na(+) channel blocker phenytoin prevented arrhythmias. Chronic dosing of propranolol may be required for efficacy; therefore, we tested the efficacy of chronic treatment with either propranolol or phenytoin on RTT mice. Phenytoin completely abolished arrhythmias, whereas propranolol showed no benefit. Surprisingly, phenytoin also normalized weight and activity, but worsened breathing patterns. To explore the role of Na(+) channel blockers on QT in people with RTT, we performed a retrospective analysis of QT status before and after Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Individuals with RTT and LQT significantly improved their QT interval status after being started on Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Thus, Na(+) channel blockers should be considered for the clinical management of LQT in individuals with RTT. PMID:25713300

  14. N-Alkylprotoporphyrin Formation and Hepatic Porphyria in Dogs After Administration of a New Antiepileptic Drug Candidate: Mechanism and Species Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Jean-Marie; Chanteux, Hugues; Mancel, Valérie; Dubin, Guy-Marie; Gerin, Brigitte; Staelens, Ludovicus; Depelchin, Olympe; Kervyn, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    A new antiepileptic synaptic vesicle 2a (SV2a) ligand drug candidate was tested in 4-week oral toxicity studies in rat and dog. Brown pigment inclusions were found in the liver of high-dose dogs. The morphology of the deposits and the accompanying liver changes (increased plasma liver enzymes, increased total hepatic porphyrin level, decreased liver ferrochelatase activity, combined induction, and inactivation of cytochrome P-450 CYP2B11) suggested disruption of the heme biosynthetic cascade. None of these changes was seen in rat although this species was exposed to higher parent drug levels. Toxicokinetic analysis and in vitro metabolism assays in hepatocytes showed that dog is more prone to oxidize the drug candidate than rat. Mass spectrometry analysis of liver samples from treated dogs revealed an N-alkylprotoporphyrin adduct. The elucidation of its chemical structure suggested that the drug transforms into a reactive metabolite which is structurally related to a known reference porphyrogenic agent allylisopropylacetamide. That particular metabolite, primarily produced in dog but neither in rat nor in human, has the potential to alkylate the prosthetic heme of CYP. Overall, the data suggested that the drug candidate should not be porphyrogenic in human. This case study further exemplifies the species variability in the susceptibility to drug-induced porphyria. PMID:24973095

  15. Targeting γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) carriers to the brain: potential relevance as antiepileptic pro-drugs.

    PubMed

    Semreen, Mohammad H; El-Shorbagi, Abdel-Nasser; Al-Tel, Taleb H; Alsalahat, Izzeddin M M

    2010-05-01

    The search for antiepileptic compounds with more selective activity continues to be an area of intensive investigation in medicinal chemistry. 3,5-Disubstituted tetrahydro-2H-1,3,5-thiadiazine-2-thione (THTT) derivatives, 3a-g, potential prodrugs incorporating the neurotransmitter GABA were synthesized and studied for crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Compounds were prepared from primary amines and carbon disulfide to give dithiocarbamates 2a-g which upon reaction in situ with formaldehyde provided the intermediates Ia-g. Addition of Ia-g onto GABA furnished the title compounds 3a-g. The structures were verified by spectral data and the amounts of the compounds in the brain were investigated by using HPLC. The concentration profiles of the tested compounds in mice brain were determined and the in vivo anticonvulsant activity was measured. PMID:20632978

  16. An ImmunoChip prototype for simultaneous detection of antiepileptic drugs using an enhanced one-step homogeneous immunoassay1 2 3 4

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyun; Janatova, Jarmila; Juenke, JoEtta M.; McMillin, Gwendolyn A.; Andrade, Joseph D.

    2007-01-01

    The development and characterization of a one-step homogeneous immunoassay-based multi-well ImmunoChip is reported for the simultaneous detection and quantitation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The assay platform utilizes a Cloned Enzyme Donor Immunoassay (CEDIA), and a Beta-Glo assay system for generation of bioluminescent signal. Results of the one-step CEDIA for three AEDs (CBZ, carbamazepine; PHT, phenytoin; VPA, valproic acid), in the presence of serum, correlate well with the values determined by Fluorescence Polarization Immunoassay. CEDIA intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation are lower than 10%. A microfabrication process, xurography, was utilized to produce the multi-well ImmunoChip. Assay reagents were dispensed, and lyophilized, in a three-layer pattern. The multi-well ImmunoChip prototype was used to detect and quantify AEDs in serum samples containing all three drugs. Luminescent signals generated from each well were recorded with a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) camera. The assays performed on an ImmunoChip were fast (5 min), requiring only small volumes of both the reagents (< 1 μl per well) and the serum sample. The ImmunoChip assay platform described herein may be well suited for therapeutic monitoring of drugs and metabolites at the point-of-care. PMID:17448436

  17. Teratogenicity of Antiepileptic Medications

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, Benzi M.; Meador, Kimford J.

    2009-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are frequently used to treat several conditions that are common in women of childbearing age, including epilepsy, headaches, and mood disorders. Moreover, as in the case of epilepsy and severe psychiatric disease, clinicians frequently do not have the option of stopping these medications or switching to another class of drugs. Overall, AEDs have been associated with an increased risk of major congenital malformations, minor anomalies, specific congenital syndromes, and developmental disorders seen in childhood. However, the differential effects of individual AEDs remain uncertain. Data are accumulating which strongly suggest that these risks are highest in patients receiving polypharmacy and valproate. There is also modest evidence to suggest an increased risk for phenobarbital. While other older AEDs appear to carry some teratogenic risk, there is not adequate evidence to further stratify their risk. Clinical and basic science research regarding newer AEDs suggests equivalent, if not safer, profiles compared with older AEDs, but these data are inconclusive. Management of women with epilepsy should include a discussion of these risks, prophylactic treatment with folic acid, and the minimal use of polypharmacy and valproate needed to maintain optimum seizure control. PMID:18777479

  18. Effect of tetrahydrocurcumin on the profiles of drug-metabolizing enzymes induced by a high fat and high fructose diet in mice.

    PubMed

    Jearapong, Nattharat; Chatuphonprasert, Waranya; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP), a superfamily of hepatic monooxygenase enzymes, catalyzes biotransformation of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. Modification of CYPs associated with metabolic diseases and continuous consumption of diet with excessive energy levels. Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) exhibited beneficial effects in metabolic syndromes such as diabetic mellitus and dyslipidemia. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of THC and vitamin E (vitE) on the expression profiles of CYPs in the livers of mice fed with the high fat and high fructose diet. In addition to ad libitum access to commercial regular diet, the high fat and high fructose diet (HFD) group of adult male ICR mice was administered a HFD, which consisted of intragastric administration of hydrogenated soybean oil (1mL/day) and the addition of 20% fructose to the drinking water for 8weeks. During the induction period, subgroups of mice (n=5) were daily intragastrically administered with THC (100 or 200mg/kg/day) or vitE (100mg/kg/day). The expressions of CYP mRNA and protein were quantified using real-time PCR and the levels of these proteins were quantified using immunoblotting. Continuous consuming of high fat and high fructose for 8weeks significantly increased the expressions of Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Cyp2c29, and Cyp3a11 while THC ultimately normalized these CYPs profiles. In the control mice, most of the investigated CYPs was unchanged by THC, with the exception that the Cyp1a1, Cyp2b9, and Cyp3a11 proteins were elevated. These findings provided additional important information on the effects of THC on diet induced-metabolic dysfunctions. However, drug interactions due to the use of THC as an alternative supplement are of concern, particularly in the combinations that include a drug that is a substrate of Cyp1a1, Cyp2b9, and Cyp3a11. PMID:26102010

  19. Simultaneous analysis of 22 antiepileptic drugs in postmortem blood, serum and plasma using LC-MS-MS with a focus on their role in forensic cases.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Shaza; McKeown, Denise A; Torrance, Hazel J; Wylie, Fiona M; Logan, Barry K; Scott, Karen S

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, there has been a growth in reports of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) being misused on their own or in combination with other drugs of abuse in a variety of toxicological case types such as drug abuse, suicide, overdose and drug facilitated crime. To our knowledge, there are no simultaneous quantification methods for the analysis of the most commonly encountered AEDs in postmortem whole blood and clinical plasma/serum samples at the same time. A simple, accurate and cost-effective liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS-MS) method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of carbamazepine (CBZ) and its metabolite CBZ-10,11-epoxide, eslicarbazepine acetate, oxcarbazepine and S-licarbazepine as a metabolite, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, pregabalin, phenobarbital, phenytoin and its metabolite 5-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin, retigabine (ezogabine) and its metabolite N-acetyl retigabine, rufinamide, stiripentol, topiramate, tiagabine, valproic acid, vigabatrin and zonisamide in postmortem whole blood, serum and plasma which would be suitable for routine forensic toxicological analysis and therapeutic drug monitoring. All AEDs were detected and quantified within 17 min without endogenous interferences. The correlation coefficient (R(2)) was >0.995 for all AEDs with accuracy ranging from 90 to 113% and precision <13% for all analytes. The recovery ranged from 70 to 98%. No carryover was observed in a blank control injected after the highest standard and the matrix effect was acceptable and ranged from 90 to 120%. The method has been successfully verified using authentic case samples that had previously been quantified using different methods. PMID:25217536

  20. Time Course of the Changes in Novel Trioxane Antimalarial 99/411 Pharmacokinetics upon Antiepileptic Drugs Co-Administration in SD Rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yeshwant; Kushwaha, Hari Narayan; Misra, Anamika; Hidau, Mahendra Kumar; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The study aimed to evaluate the influences of coadministration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on an antimalarial candidate 99/411 pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. Method. For this, single oral dose PK drug interaction studies were conducted between 99/411 and FDA approved AEDs, namely, Phenytoin (PHT), Carbamazepine (CBZ), and Gabapentin (GB) in both male and female SD rats, to assess the coadministered and intersexual influences on 99/411 PK profile. Results. Studies revealed that there were no significant alterations in the PK profile of 99/411 upon PHT and CBZ coadministration in both male and female rats, while systemic exposure of 99/411 was significantly increased by about 80% in female rats upon GB coadministration. In terms of AUC, there was an increase from 2471 ± 586 to 4560 ± 1396 ng·h/mL. Overall, it was concluded that simultaneous administration of AEDs with 99/411 excludes the requirements for dose adjustment, additional therapeutic monitoring, contraindication to concomitant use, and/or other measures to mitigate risk, except for GB coadministration in females. These findings are further helpful to predict such interactions in humans, when potentially applied through proper allometric scaling to extrapolate the data. PMID:25383231

  1. Antiepileptic drugs toxicity: A case of toxic epidermal necrolysis in patient with phenytoin prophylaxis post-cranial radiation for brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    AlQuliti, Khalid; Ratrout, Basem; AlZaki, Alaa

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of epilepsy with antiepileptic drugs (AED) is effective and remains the principal mode of management. A group of adverse effects and drug toxicity can develop immediately or later in the course of treatment. AEDs also have the potential of precipitating idiosyncratic adverse effects including serious cutaneous, hematological and hepatic events. Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are rare but severe cutaneous adverse reactions are related to or caused by a variety of medications including AEDs, they carry a high mortality and morbidity rate, accurate diagnosis and rapid treatment may improve the prognosis. Objective To characterize the clinical features and methods of differentiating Stevens–Johnson syndrome from toxic epidermal necrolysis using a case study and to identify other factors that may contribute to this critical illness. Conclusion Clinical knowledge of potential sever adverse reaction of AEDs is essential and may overcome treatment failure with major impact on health-related quality of life in people with epilepsy. PMID:25161384

  2. DETECTION OF NONLINEAR INTERACTIONS OF EEG ALPHA WAVES IN THE BRAIN BY A NEW COHERENCE MEASURE AND ITS APPLICATION TO EPILEPSY AND ANTI-EPILEPTIC DRUG THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    SHERMAN, DAVID; ZHANG, NING; GARG, SHIKHA; THAKOR, NITISH V.; MIRSKI, MAREK A.; WHITE, MIRINDA ANDERSON; HINICH, MELVIN J.

    2011-01-01

    EEG and field potential rhythms established in the cortex and thalamus may accommodate the propagation of seizures. This article describes the interaction between thalamus and cortex during pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizures in rats with and without prior treatment with ethosuximide (ESM), a well-known antiepileptic drug (AED) that raises the threshold for seizures, was given before PTZ. The AED was given before PTZ convulsant administration. We track this thalamo-cortical association with a novel measure we have called the cross-bicoherence gain, or BISCOH. This quantity allows us to measure the spectral coherence in a purely higher order spectralmethodology. BISCOH is able to track the formation of nonlinearities at specific frequencies in the recorded EEG. BISCOH showed a strong increase in low alpha wave harmonic generationat 10 and 12.5 Hz after ESM treatment (p < 0.02 and p < 0.007, respectively). Conventional coherence failed to show distinctive and significant changes in thalamo-cortical coupling after ESM treatment at those frequencies and instead showed changes at 5 Hz. This rise in cortical rhythms is evidence of harmonic generation or new frequency formation in the thalamo-cortical system with AED therapy. BISCOH could become a powerful tool in unraveling changes in coherence due to neuroelectric modulation resulting from drug treatment or electrical stimulation. PMID:21442775

  3. Modulation of Cytokine Production by Drugs with Antiepileptic or Mood Stabilizer Properties in Anti-CD3- and Anti-CD40-Stimulated Blood In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Hajo; Schönherr, Jeremias; Petersein, Charlotte; Munzer, Alexander; Kirkby, Kenneth Clifford; Bauer, Katrin; Sack, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Increased cytokine production possibly due to oxidative stress has repeatedly been shown to play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Recent in vitro and animal studies of valproic acid (VPA) report antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, and suppression of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We tested the effect of drugs with antiepileptic or mood stabilizer properties, namely, primidone (PRM), carbamazepine (CBZ), levetiracetam (LEV), lamotrigine (LTG), VPA, oxcarbazepine (OXC), topiramate (TPM), phenobarbital (PB), and lithium on the production of the following cytokines in vitro: interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, IL-22, and TNF-α. We performed a whole blood assay with stimulated blood of 14 healthy female subjects. Anti-human CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3, combined with 5C3 antibody against CD40, was used as stimulant. We found a significant reduction of IL-1 and IL-2 levels with all tested drugs other than lithium in the CD3/5C3-stimulated blood; VPA led to a decrease in IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, and TNF-α production, which substantiates and adds knowledge to current hypotheses on VPA's anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:24757498

  4. Risk factors for seizures and antiepileptic drug-associated adverse effects in high-grade glioma patients: A multicentre, retrospective study in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Peter Yat-Ming; Chan, Danny Tat-Ming; Chan, Kwong-Yau; Wong, Wai-Kei; Po, Yin-Chung; Kwok, John Ching-Kong; Poon, Wai-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this present study was to determine the frequency, as well as risk factors, for seizures and antiepileptic drug (AED)-associated adverse effects among high-grade glioma (HGG) patients. Patients and Methods A multicentre, retrospective study of adult Chinese Hong Kong patients from three neurosurgical centres diagnosed with supratentorial HGG between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010 was performed. Results A total of 198 patients, with a mean age of 55 years (range: 18–88) and a mean follow up of 15 months, was recruited. Most suffered from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) (63 per cent) followed by anaplastic astrocytoma (25 per cent). Median overall survival for patients with GBM was 8 months, and 11 months for those with grade III gliomas. Prophylactic AED was prescribed in 165 patients (83 per cent), and 64 per cent of patients were continued until end of life or last follow up. A total of 112 patients (57 per cent) experienced seizures at a mean duration of 8 months postoperatively (range: 1 day–75 months). Independent predictors for seizures were a diagnosis of GBM [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 2.33, 95 per cent confidence interval (CI): 1.21–4.52] and adjuvant radiotherapy (adjusted OR: 2.97, 95 per cent CI: 1.49–6.62). One-fifth of patients (21 per cent) experienced AED adverse effects, with idiosyncratic cutaneous reactions and hepatotoxicity most frequently observed. An independent predictor for adverse effects was exposure to aromatic AED, such as phenytoin, carbamazepine and phenobarbital (adjusted OR: 3.32, 95 per cent CI: 1.32–8.40). Conclusions Antiepileptic drug prescription for primary seizure prophylaxis is both pervasive and prolonged for HGG patients. Seizures occur frequently, but most were delayed and none were life threatening. Judicious prescription of AED is required, especially when a significant proportion of patients experience adverse effects. Patients with a diagnosis of GBM and exposure to radiotherapy

  5. Effects of WIN 55,212-2 (a non-selective cannabinoid CB1 and CB 2 receptor agonist) on the protective action of various classical antiepileptic drugs in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model.

    PubMed

    Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Wlaz, Aleksandra; Kondrat-Wrobel, Maria W; Tutka, Piotr; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of WIN 55,212-2 (WIN--a non-selective cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist) on the anticonvulsant effects of various classical antiepileptic drugs (clobazam, clonazepam, phenobarbital and valproate) in the mouse 6 Hz-induced psychomotor seizure model. Limbic (psychomotor) seizure activity was evoked in albino Swiss mice by a current (32 mA, 6 Hz, 3 s stimulus duration) delivered via ocular electrodes. Drug-related adverse effects were ascertained by use of the chimney test (evaluating motor performance), step-through passive avoidance task (assessing learning) and grip-strength test (evaluating skeletal muscular strength). Total brain concentrations of antiepileptic drugs were measured by fluorescence polarization immunoassay to ascertain any pharmacokinetic contribution to the observed antiseizure effect. Results indicate that WIN (5 mg/kg, administered intraperitoneally) significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant action of clonazepam (P < 0.001), phenobarbital (P < 0.05) and valproate (P < 0.05), but not that of clobazam in the mouse 6 Hz model. Moreover, WIN (2.5 mg/kg) significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant action of clonazepam (P < 0.01), but not that of clobazam, phenobarbital or valproate in the 6 Hz test in mice. None of the investigated combinations of WIN with antiepileptic drugs was associated with any concurrent adverse effects with regard to motor performance, learning or muscular strength. Pharmacokinetic experiments revealed that WIN had no impact on total brain concentrations of antiepileptic drugs in mice. These preclinical data would suggest that WIN in combination with clonazepam, phenobarbital and valproate is associated with beneficial anticonvulsant pharmacodynamic interactions in the mouse 6 Hz-induced psychomotor seizure test. PMID:24549572

  6. Knockout of P-glycoprotein does not alter antiepileptic drug efficacy in the intrahippocampal kainate model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in mice.

    PubMed

    Bankstahl, Marion; Klein, Sabine; Römermann, Kerstin; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    Pharmacoresistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a major challenge in epilepsy therapy, affecting at least 30% of patients. Thus, there is considerable interest in the mechanisms responsible for such pharmacoresistance, with particular attention on the specific cellular and molecular factors that lead to reduced drug sensitivity. Current hypotheses of refractory epilepsy include the multidrug transporter hypothesis, which posits that increased expression or function of drug efflux transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp), in brain capillaries reduces the local concentration of AEDs in epileptic brain regions to subtherapeutic levels. In the present study, this hypothesis was addressed by evaluating the efficacy of six AEDs in wildtype and Pgp deficient Mdr1a/b(-/-) mice in the intrahippocampal kainate model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. In this model, frequent focal electrographic seizures develop after an initial kainate-induced status epilepticus. These seizures are resistant to major AEDs, but the mechanisms of this resistance are unknown. In the present experiments, the focal nonconvulsive seizures were resistant to carbamazepine and phenytoin, whereas high doses of valproate and levetiracetam exerted moderate and phenobarbital and diazepam marked anti-seizure effects. All AEDs suppressed generalized convulsive seizures. No significant differences between wildtype and Pgp-deficient mice were observed in anti-seizure drug efficacies. Also, the individual responder and nonresponder rates in each experiment did not differ between mouse genotypes. This does not argue against the multidrug transporter hypothesis in general, but indicates that Pgp is not involved in the mechanisms explaining that focal electrographic seizures are resistant to some AEDs in the intrahippocampal mouse model of partial epilepsy. This was substantiated by the finding that epileptic wildtype mice do not exhibit increased Pgp expression in this model. PMID:27288003

  7. Comparative efficacy and tolerability of anti-epileptic drugs for refractory focal epilepsy: systematic review and network meta-analysis reveals the need for long term comparator trials

    PubMed Central

    Bodalia, Pritesh N; Grosso, Anthony M; Sofat, Reecha; MacAllister, Raymond J; Smeeth, Liam; Dhillon, Soraya; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Wonderling, David; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2013-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the comparative efficacy (50% reduction in seizure frequency) and tolerability (premature withdrawal due to adverse events) of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) for refractory epilepsy. Methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane Library 2009, issue 2) including Epilepsy Group's specialized register, MEDLINE (1950 to March 2009), EMBASE (1980 to March 2009), and Current Contents Connect (1998 to March 2009) to conduct a systematic review of published studies, developed a treatment network and undertook a network meta-analysis. Results Forty-three eligible trials with 6346 patients and 12 interventions, including placebo, contributed to the analysis. Only three direct drug comparator trials were identified, the remaining 40 trials being placebo-controlled. Conventional random-effects meta-analysis indicated all drugs were superior in efficacy to placebo (overall odds ratio (OR] 3.78, 95% CI 3.14, 4.55) but did not permit firm distinction between drugs on the basis of the efficacy or tolerability. A Bayesian network meta-analysis prioritized oxcarbazepine, topiramate and pregabalin on the basis of short term efficacy. However, sodium valproate, levetiracetam, gabapentin and vigabatrin were prioritized on the basis of short-term efficacy and tolerability, with the caveat that vigabatrin is recognized as being associated with serious visual disturbance with chronic use. Conclusion Of the wide range of AEDs licensed for the treatment of refractory epilepsy, sodium valproate, levetiracetam and gabapentin demonstrated the best balance of efficacy and tolerability. Until regulators mandate greater use of active comparator trials with longer term follow-up, network meta-analysis provides the only available means to quantify these clinically important parameters. PMID:23351090

  8. Evaluation of transport of common antiepileptic drugs by human multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, 2 and 5) that are overexpressed in pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Fedrowitz, Maren; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is one of the most serious problems in the treatment of epilepsy. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that increased expression of the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) at the blood-brain barrier may be involved in the mechanisms leading to AED resistance. In addition to Pgp, increased expression of several multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) has been determined in epileptogenic brain regions of patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. However, it is not known whether AEDs are substrates for MRPs. In the present experiments, we evaluated whether common AEDs are transported by human MRPs (MRP1, 2 and 5) that are overexpressed in AED resistant epilepsy. For this purpose, we used a highly sensitive assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA) in polarized kidney cell lines (LLC, MDCKII) transfected with human MRPs. The assay was validated by known MRP substrates, including calcein-AM (MRP1), vinblastine (MRP2) and chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA; MRP5). The directional transport determined with these drugs in MRP-transfected cell lines could be blocked with the MRP inhibitor MK571. However, in contrast to transport of known MRP substrates, none of the common AEDs (carbamazepine, valproate, levetiracetam, phenytoin, lamotrigine and phenobarbital) used in this study was transported by MRP1, MRP2 or MRP5. A basolateral-to-apical transport of valproate, which could be inhibited by MK571 and probenecid, was determined in LLC cells (both wildtype and transfected), but the specific transporter involved was not identified. The data indicate that common AEDs are not substrates for human MRP1, MRP2 or MRP5, at least in the in vitro models used in this study. PMID:20080116

  9. The Roles of Variants in Human Multidrug Resistance (MDR1) Gene and Their Haplotypes on Antiepileptic Drugs Response: A Meta-Analysis of 57 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng; Wu, Minghua; Xu, Yun; Jiang, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous studies reported the associations between the ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1, also known as MDR1) polymorphisms and their haplotypes with risk of response to antiepileptic drugs in epilepsy, however, the results were inconclusive. Methods The Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, CNKI and Chinese Biomedicine databases were searched up to July 15, 2014. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a fixed-effects or random-effects model based on heterogeneity tests. Meta-regression and Galbraith plot analysis were carried out to explore the possible heterogeneity. Results A total of 57 studies involving 12407 patients (6083 drug-resistant and 6324 drug-responsive patients with epilepsy) were included in the pooled-analysis. For all three polymorphisms (C3435T, G2677T/A, and C1236T), we observed a wide spectrum of minor allele frequencies across different ethnicities. A significantly decreased risk of AEDs resistance was observed in Caucasian patients with T allele of C3435T variant, which was still significant after adjusted by multiple testing corrections (T vs C: OR=0.83, 95%CI=0.71-0.96, p=0.01). However, no significant association was observed between the other two variants and AEDs resistance. Of their haplotypes in ABCB1 gene (all studies were in Indians and Asians), no significant association was observed with AEDs resistance. Moreover, sensitivity and Cumulative analysis showed that the results of this meta-analysis were stable. Conclusion In summary, this meta-analysis demonstrated that effect of C3435T variant on risk of AEDs resistance was ethnicity-dependent, which was significant in Caucasians. Additionally, further studies in different ethnic groups are warranted to clarify possible roles of haplotypes in ABCB1 gene in AEDs resistance, especially in Caucasians. PMID:25816099

  10. Quantum mechanical and spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 13C, 1H and UV) investigations of antiepileptic drug Ethosuximide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaya Chamundeeswari, S. P.; James Jebaseelan Samuel, E.; Sundaraganesan, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and Fourier Transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectra of antiepileptic drug Ethosuximide (ETX) have been recorded and analyzed. In addition, the IR spectra in CCl 4 at various concentrations of ETX are also recorded. The equilibrium geometry, bonding features and harmonic vibrational frequencies have been investigated with the help of Density Functional Theory (DFT) method. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by the Gauge Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The results show that charge in electron density (ED) in the σ * and π * antibonding orbitals and second order delocalization energies E(2) confirms the occurrence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. UV-vis spectrum of the compound was recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) approach. Finally the calculation results were applied to simulate infrared and Raman spectra of the title compound which showed good agreement with observed spectra.

  11. FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-visible spectral investigations and ab initio computations of anti-epileptic drug: Vigabatrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwin, Bismi; Joe, I. Hubert

    2013-10-01

    Vibrational analysis of anti-epileptic drug vigabatrin, a structural GABA analog was carried out using NIR FT-Raman and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers were studied using density functional theory method. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA.4 program. Vibrational spectra, natural bond orbital analysis and optimized molecular structure show clear evidence for the effect of electron charge transfer on the activity of the molecule. Predicted electronic absorption spectrum from TD-DFT calculation has been compared with the UV-vis spectrum. The Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges and the HOMO-LUMO energy were also calculated. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and experimental data for the electronic absorption as well as IR and Raman spectra. The blue-shifting of the Csbnd C stretching wavenumber reveals that the vinyl group is actively involved in the conjugation path. The NBO analysis confirms the occurrence of intramolecular hyperconjugative interactions resulting in ICT causing stabilization of the system.

  12. Simultaneous determination of ten antiepileptic drugs in human plasma by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry with positive/negative ion-switching electrospray ionization and its application in therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lei; Wang, Tingting; Shi, Meiyun; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Xiaojun; Yang, Yan; Gu, Jingkai

    2016-03-01

    A simple, rapid, and high-throughput liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantitation of ten antiepileptic drugs in human plasma has been developed and validated. The method required only 10 μL of plasma. After simple protein precipitation using acetonitrile, the analytes and internal standard diphenhydramine were separated on a Zorbax SB-C18 column (50 × 4.6 mm, 2.7 μm) using acetonitrile/water as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.9 mL/min. The total run time was 6 min for each sample. The validation results of specificity, matrix effects, recovery, linearity, precision, and accuracy were satisfactory. The lower limit of quantification was 0.04 μg/mL for carbamazepine, 0.02 μg/mL for lamotrigine, 0.01 μg/mL for oxcarbazepine, 0.4 μg/mL for 10-hydroxycarbazepine, 0.1 μg/mL for carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, 0.15 μg/mL for levetiracetam, 0.06 μg/mL for phenytoin, 0.3 μg/mL for valproic acid, 0.03 μg/mL for topiramate, and 0.15 μg/mL for phenobarbital. The intraday precision and interday precision were less than 7.6%, with the accuracy ranging between -8.1 and 7.9%. The method was successfully applied to therapeutic drug monitoring of 1237 patients with epilepsy after administration of standard antiepileptic drugs. The method has been proved to meet the high-throughput requirements in therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:26711223

  13. Determination of the inorganic degradation products sulfate and sulfamate in the antiepileptic drug topiramate by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Klockow-Beck, A; Nick, A; Geisshuesler, S; Schaufelberger, D

    1998-12-11

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method has been developed as an alternative method for the determination of the inorganic degradation products sulfate and sulfamate in topiramate drug product and drug substance, currently performed by ion chromatography. The anions are separated in a background electrolyte containing potassium chromate and boric acid, followed by indirect UV detection. By adding tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide to the electrolyte, analysis is performed under co-electroosmotic flow conditions. Variations in injection volumes and migration times are compensated for by use of an internal standard. The validation of the method, which was performed according to ICH guidelines (International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use) [1], comprises specificity, accuracy, linearity, precision, sensitivity and robustness. In addition, the results of an actual tablet sample analysis obtained by this CE method are statistically shown to be in close agreement with those obtained by an ion chromatographic method. PMID:9892076

  14. Determination of anti-anxiety and anti-epileptic drugs in hospital effluent and a preliminary risk assessment.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Carlos Alberto A; Brenner, Carla G B; Minetto, Luciane; Mallmann, Carlos A; Martins, Ayrton F

    2013-11-01

    In this study, an analytical methodology was developed for the determination of psycho-active drugs in the treated effluent of the University Hospital at the Federal University of Santa Maria, RS - Brazil. Samples were collected from point A (Emergency) and point B (General effluent). The adopted methodology included a pre-concentration procedure involving the use of solid phase extraction and determination by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The limit of detection for bromazepam and lorazepam was 4.9 ± 1.0 ng L(-1) and, for carbamazepine, clonazepam and diazepam was 6.1 ± 1.5 ng L(-1). The limit of quantification was 30.0 ± 1.1 ng L(-1), for bromazepam, clonazepam and lorazepam; for carbamazepine was 50.0 ± 1.8 ng L(-1) and was 40.0 ± 1.0 ng L(-1) for diazepam. The mean concentrations in the Emergency and General effluent treated currents were as follows: for bromazepam, 195 ± 6 ng L(-1) and 137 ± 7 ng L(-1); for carbamazepine, 590 ± 6 ng L(-1) and 461 ± 10 ng L(-1); for diazepam, 645 ± 1 ng L(-1) and 571 ± 10 ng L(-1); for lorazepam, 96 ± 7 ng L(-1) and 42 ± 4 ng L(-1); and for clonazepam, 134 ± 10 ng L(-1) and 57 ± 10 ng L(-1). A preliminary risk assessment was conducted: carbamazepine and diazepam require considerable attention owing to their environmental toxicity. The occurrence of these psychoactive-drugs and the environmental risks that they pose demonstrated the need for a more efficient treatment system. As far we are aware, there have been no comparable studies to this on the hazards of hospital effluents in Brazil, and very few that have carried out a risk assessment of psycho-active drugs in hospital effluent in general. PMID:24034828

  15. Evaluation of the relationship between C677T variants of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene and hyperhomocysteinemia in children receiving antiepileptic drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Vurucu, Sebahattin; Demirkaya, Erkan; Kul, Mustafa; Unay, Bulent; Gul, Davut; Akin, Ridvan; Gokçay, Erdal

    2008-04-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a sulfur-containing amino acid involved in methionine metabolism. Elevated plasma Hcy concentration is a possible risk factor for vascular disease. Folate and vitamin B-12 are vitamins that are necessary for remethylization of Hcy to methionine. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is the key enzyme in remethylation of Hcy to methionine and supplies the required 5-methyltetrahydrofolate as the methyl donor for this reaction. It is well known that some antiepileptic drugs (AED) can lead to hyperhomocysteinemia by affecting the levels of folate and vitamin B-12. The C677T variant of MTHFR gene can also lead to hyperhomocysteinemia particularly when serum folate level is decreased. In this study, we investigated the levels of serum folate, vitamin B-12 and Hcy in epileptic patients receiving carbamazepine (CBZ) or valproic acid (VPA) as monotherapy, and we also evaluated the probable contribution of the C677T variant of MTHFR gene in hyperhomocysteinemia. A total of 93 patients with idiopathic epilepsy receiving CBZ or VPA as monotherapy were included in this study. CBZ and VPA groups consisted of 29 and 64 patients, respectively. The control group comprised 62 healthy children. We measured serum folate, vitamin B-12 and Hcy levels in each group. We found that mean serum folate level was statistically lower and mean Hcy level was higher in epileptic patients receiving CBZ or VPA when compared with those of controls'. We also determined the C677T variants of MTHFR gene (as normal, heterozygote or homozygote) in epileptic patients. We compared the variant groups for serum folate, vitamin B-12 and Hcy levels and found no significant differences among them. In conclusion, C677T variants of MTHFR gene have no contribution in hyperhomocysteinemia in epileptic patients receiving CBZ or VPA. PMID:18234410

  16. The antiepileptic drug mephobarbital is not transported by P-glycoprotein or multidrug resistance protein 1 at the blood-brain barrier: a positron emission tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Mairinger, Severin; Bankstahl, Jens P.; Kuntner, Claudia; Römermann, Kerstin; Bankstahl, Marion; Wanek, Thomas; Stanek, Johann; Löscher, Wolfgang; Müller, Markus; Erker, Thomas; Langer, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim of this study was to determine whether the carbon-11-labelled antiepileptic drug [11C]mephobarbital is a substrate of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and can be used to assess Pgp function at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with positron emission tomography (PET). We performed paired PET scans in rats, wild-type (FVB) and Mdr1a/b(−/−) mice, before and after intravenous administration of the Pgp inhibitor tariquidar (15 mg/kg). Brain-to-blood AUC0-60 ratios in rats and brain AUC0-60 values of [11C]mephobarbital in wild-type and Mdr1a/b(−/−) mice were similar in scan 1 and scan 2, respectively, suggesting that in vivo brain distribution of [11C]mephobarbital is not influenced by Pgp efflux. Absence of Pgp transport was confirmed in vitro by performing concentration equilibrium transport assay in cell lines transfected with MDR1 or Mdr1a. PET experiments in wild-type mice, with and without pretreatment with the multidrug resistance protein (MRP) inhibitor MK571 (20 mg/kg), and in Mrp1(−/−) mice suggested that [11C]mephobarbital is also not transported by MRPs at the murine BBB, which was also supported by in vitro transport experiments using human MRP1-transfected cells. Our results are surprising as phenobarbital, the N-desmethyl derivative of mephobarbital, has been shown to be a substrate of Pgp, which suggests that N-methylation abolishes Pgp affinity of barbiturates. PMID:22342565

  17. Evaluation of cytochrome P450 inductions by anti-epileptic drug oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine, and carbamazepine using human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Ikuo; Murayama, Norie; Kuroki, Ayaka; Kota, Jagannath; Iwano, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Hirota, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Anti-epileptic drug oxcarbazepine is structurally related to carbamazepine, but has reportedly different metabolic pathway. Auto-induction potentials of oxcarbazepine, its pharmacologically active metabolite 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine were evaluated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 mRNA levels and primary metabolic rates using human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells. For the CYP1A2 the induction potential determined as the fold change in mRNA levels was 7.2 (range: 2.3-11.5) and 10.0 (6.2-13.7) for oxcarbazepine and carbamazepine, respectively, while 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine did not induce. The fold change in mRNA levels for CYP2B6 was 11.5 (3.2-19.3), 7.0 (2.5-10.8) and 14.8 (3.1-29.1) for oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine, respectively. The fold change for CYP3A4 induction level by oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine was 3.5 (1.2-7.4), 2.7 (0.8-5.7) and 8.3 (3.5-14.5), respectively. The data suggest lower induction potential of oxcarbazepine and 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine relative to carbamazepine. The results in HepaRG cells showed similar trend as the human hepatocytes. After incubation for 72 h in hepatocytes and HepaRG cells, auto-induction was evident for only carbamazepine metabolism. The 10-keto group instead of double bond at C10 position is evidently a determinant factor for limited auto-induction of P450 enzymes by oxcarbazepine. PMID:26711482

  18. Development and Characterization of Novel Derivatives of the Antiepileptic Drug Lacosamide That Exhibit Far Greater Enhancement in Slow Inactivation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The novel antiepileptic drug (R)-N-benzyl 2-acetamido-3-methoxypropionamide ((R)-lacosamide, Vimpat ((R)-1)) was recently approved in the United States and Europe for adjuvant treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults. (R)-1 preferentially enhances slow inactivation of voltage-gated Na+ currents, a pharmacological process relevant in the hyperexcitable neuron. We have advanced a strategy to identify lacosamide binding partners by attaching affinity bait (AB) and chemical reporter (CR) groups to (R)-1 to aid receptor detection and isolation. We showed that select lacosamide AB and AB&CR derivatives exhibited excellent activities similar to (R)-1 in the maximal electroshock seizure model in rodents. Here, we examined the effect of these lacosamide AB and AB&CR derivatives and compared them with (R)-1 on Na+ channel function in central nervous system (CNS) catecholaminergic (CAD) cells. Using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology, we demonstrated that the test compounds do not affect the Na+ channel fast inactivation process, that they were far better modulators of slow inactivation than (R)-1, and that modulation of the slow inactivation process was stereospecific. The lacosamide AB agents that contained either an electrophilic isothiocyanate ((R)-5) or a photolabile azide ((R)-8) unit upon AB activation gave modest levels of permanent Na+ channel slow inactivation, providing initial evidence that these compounds may have covalently reacted with their cognate receptor(s). Our findings support the further use of these agents to delineate the (R)-1-mediated Na+ channel slow inactivation process. PMID:21532923

  19. Quantification of new antiepileptic drugs by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and its application to cellular uptake experiment using human placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells.

    PubMed

    Furugen, Ayako; Kobayashi, Masaki; Nishimura, Ayako; Takamura, Shigeo; Narumi, Katsuya; Yamada, Takehiro; Iseki, Ken

    2015-10-01

    A method for quantification of new antiepileptic drugs, including lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LEV), gabapentin (GBP), and topiramate (TPM), in cellular samples, using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was developed to better understand the membrane transport mechanisms of these drugs. Cell lysate was deproteinized by methanol containing LEV-d3 as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column using gradient elution with methanol-water-formic acid (10:90:0.1, v/v/v) and methanol-formic acid (100:0.1, v/v). Analytes were detected in positive ion electrospray mode with selected reaction monitoring (SRM). This method was applicable for a linear range of 5 to 500pmol for LTG; 5 to 1000pmol for LEV; 10 to 10,000pmol for GBP; and 5 to 5000pmol for TPM. The intra-day precision, inter-day precision, and accuracy data were assessed and found to be acceptable. This developed and validated method was then successfully applied to the investigation of uptake of the new antiepileptic drugs in placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells. The intracellular concentration of these drugs in BeWo cells, accumulating over 30min at 37°C was in the order of GBP>LTG>LEV≈TPM. Furthermore, the uptake of GBP at 4°C was much lower than that at 37°C. The uptake of GBP was saturated at high concentrations. The kinetic parameters calculated for GBP uptake in BeWo cells were determined as Km of 105.4±6.4μM and Vmax at 8153±348pmol/mg protein/min. The novel method described here should enable investigators to elucidate the transport mechanisms of these antiepileptic drugs in BeWo cells. PMID:26343016

  20. Determination of a selection of anti-epileptic drugs and two active metabolites in whole blood by reversed phase UPLC-MS/MS and some examples of application of the method in forensic toxicology cases.

    PubMed

    Karinen, Ritva; Vindenes, Vigdis; Hasvold, Inger; Olsen, Kirsten Midtbøen; Christophersen, Asbjørg S; Øiestad, Elisabeth

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative determination of anti-epileptic drug concentrations is of great importance in forensic toxicology cases. Although the drugs are not usually abused, they are important post-mortem cases where the question of both lack of compliance and accidental or deliberate poisoning might be raised. In addition these drugs can be relevant for driving under the influence cases. A reversed phase ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method has been developed for the quantitative analysis of the anti-epileptic compounds carbamazepine, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, 10-OH-carbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, pregabalin, and topiramate in whole blood, using 0.1 mL sample volume with methaqualone as internal standard. Sample preparation was a simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile and methanol. The diluted supernatant was directly injected into the chromatographic system. Separation was performed on an Acquity UPLC® BEH Phenyl column with gradient elution and a mildly alkaline mobile phase. The mass spectrometric detection was performed in positive ion mode, except for phenobarbital, and multiple reaction monitoring was used for drug quantification. The limits of quantification for the different anti-epileptic drugs varied from 0.064 to 1.26 mg/L in blood, within-day and day-to-day relative standard deviations from 2.2 to 14.7% except for phenobarbital. Between-day variation for phenobarbital was 20.4% at the concentration level of 3.5 mg/L. The biases for all compounds were within ±17.5%. The recoveries ranged between 85 and 120%. The corrected matrix effects were 88-106% and 84-110% in ante-mortem and post-mortem whole blood samples, respectively. PMID:25331692

  1. Role of plasma homocysteine levels and MTHFR polymorphisms on IQ scores in children and young adults with epilepsy treated with antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Gabriella; Lenzo, Patrizia; Parisi, Eleonora; Neri, Milena; Guerrera, Silvia; Nicotera, Antonio; Alibrandi, Angela; Germanò, Eva; Caccamo, Daniela; Spanò, Maria; Tortorella, Gaetano

    2013-12-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a sulfur-containing amino acid involved in methionine metabolism. High plasma total Hcy (tHcy) has been quite frequently reported in patients with epilepsy treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) mainly related to plasma folate reduction induced by AEDs themselves. The role of C677T and A1298C polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) on the increase of plasma tHcy in patients with epilepsy taking AEDs is still controversial. Cognitive impairment may be associated with epilepsy either as the result of the epileptic syndrome per se or as a side effect induced by the AEDs. High plasma tHcy levels were associated with lower cognitive performances in patients affected by Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment and in healthy elderly. We searched for a correlation between plasma tHcy levels with the intelligence quotient (IQ) scores in a population of children and young adults with epilepsy treated with old and/or newer AEDs. The study group encompassed 179 patients (92 M, 51.5%) followed at our Unit of Child Neuropsychiatry and aged between 4 and 25years (mean+SD: 14.03±4.25). The inclusion criteria included the following: 1) diagnosis of epilepsy of "unknown cause" (cryptogenic) according to the ILAE classification, 2) age older than 3years, 3) stabilized antiepileptic treatment for at least 6months, and 4) clinical records of cognitive tests, plasma tHcy value, and results of MTHFR polymorphisms. Patients' mean tHcy value was 9.71±3.13μM/L (tHcy<9μM/L as our laboratory cutoff in nonepileptic controls). The mean TIQ score was 85.22 (SD±24.12); the mean VIQ score was 86.32 (SD±20.86); and the mean PIQ score was 86.94 (SD±21.51). C677T and A1298C MTHFR polymorphisms were detected in 74/92 (80%) examined patients and distributed into the following: CT (22.3%), TT (14.9%), CC (10.3%) for C677T, AC (16%), CC (1.1%), and AA (30.3%) for A1298C. Plasma tHcy levels were not significantly related to the IQ scores

  2. Comparative Long-Term Effectiveness of a Monotherapy with Five Antiepileptic Drugs for Focal Epilepsy in Adult Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pan; He, Ru-Qian; Bao, Yi-Xin; Zheng, Rong-Yuan; Xu, Hui-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare long-term effectiveness of five antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for monotherapy of adult patients with focal epilepsy in routine clinical practice. Methods Adult patients with focal epilepsy, who were prescribed with carbamazepine (CBZ), valproate (VPA), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), or oxcarbazepine (OXC) as monotherapy, during the period from January 2004 to June 2012 registered in Wenzhou Epilepsy Follow Up Registry Database (WEFURD), were included in the study. Prospective long-term follow-up was conducted until June 2013. The endpoints were time to treatment failure, time to seizure remission, and time to first seizure. Results This study included 654 patients: CBZ (n=125), VPA (n=151), LTG (n=135), TPM (n=76), and OXC (n=167). The retention rates of CBZ, VPA, LTG, TPM, and OXC at the third year were 36.1%, 32.4%, 57.6%, 37.9%, and 41.8%, respectively. For time to treatment failure, LTG was significantly better than CBZ and VPA (LTG vs. CBZ, hazard ratio, [HR] 0.80 [95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.96], LTG vs. VPA, 0.53 [0.37-0.74]); TPM was worse than LTG (TPM vs. LTG, 1.77 [1.15-2.74]), and OXC was better than VPA (0.86 [0.78-0.96]). After initial target doses, the seizure remission rates of CBZ, VPA, LTG, TPM, and OXC were 63.0%, 77.0%, 83.6%, 67.9%, and 75.3%, respectively. LTG was significantly better than CBZ (1.44 [1.15-1.82]) and OXC (LTG vs. OXC, 0.76 [0.63-0.93]); OXC was less effective than LTG in preventing the first seizure (1.20 [1.02-1.40]). Conclusion LTG was the best, OXC was better than VPA only, while VPA was the worst. The others were equivalent for comparisons between five AEDs regarding the long-term treatment outcomes of monotherapy for adult patients with focal epilepsy in a clinical practice. For selecting AEDs for these patients among the first-line drugs, LTG is an appropriate first choice; others are reservation in the first-line but VPA is not. PMID:26147937

  3. Cortico-hippocampal hyperexcitability in synapsin I/II/III knockout mice: age-dependency and response to the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Boido, D; Farisello, P; Cesca, F; Ferrea, E; Valtorta, F; Benfenati, F; Baldelli, P

    2010-11-24

    Synapsins (SynI, SynII, SynIII) are a multigene family of synaptic vesicle (SV) phosphoproteins implicated in the regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity. Synapsin I, II, I/II and I/II/III knockout mice are epileptic and SYN1/2 genes have been identified as major epilepsy susceptibility genes in humans. We analyzed cortico-hippocampal epileptiform activity induced by 4-aminopyridine (4AP) in acute slices from presymptomatic (3-weeks-old) and symptomatic (1-year-old) Syn I/II/III triple knockout (TKO) mice and aged-matched triple wild type (TWT) controls and assessed the effect of the SV-targeted antiepileptic drug (AED) levetiracetam (LEV) in reverting the epileptic phenotype. Both fast and slow interictal (I-IC) and ictal (IC) events were observed in both genotypes. The incidence of fast I-IC events was higher in presymptomatic TKO slices, while frequency and latency of I-IC events were similar in both genotypes. The major age and genotype effects were observed in IC activity, that was much more pronounced in 3-weeks-old TKO and persisted with age, while it disappeared from 1-year-old TWT slices. LEV virtually suppressed fast I-IC and IC discharges from 3-weeks-old TWT slices, while it only increased the latency of fast I-IC and IC activity in TKO slices. Analysis of I-IC events in patch-clamped CA1 pyramidal neurons revealed that LEV increased the inhibitory/excitatory ratio of I-IC activity in both genotypes. The lower LEV potency in TKO slices of both ages was associated with a decreased expression of SV2A, a SV protein acting as LEV receptor, in cortex and hippocampus. The results demonstrate that deletion of Syn genes is associated with a higher propensity to 4AP-induced epileptic paroxysms that precedes the onset of epilepsy and consolidates with age. LEV ameliorates such hyper excitability by enhancing the inhibition/excitation ratio, although the effect is hindered in TKO slices which exhibit a concomitant decrease in the levels of the LEV

  4. Congenital Anomalies in Children of Mothers Taking Antiepileptic Drugs with and without Periconceptional High Dose Folic Acid Use: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Lu; Fleming, Kate M.; Doyle, Pat; Smeeth, Liam; Hubbard, Richard B.; Fiaschi, Linda; Tata, Laila J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Antenatal antiepileptic drug (AED) use has been found to be associated with increased major congenital anomaly (CA) risks. However whether such AED-associated risks were different according to periconceptional high dose (5mg daily) folic acid supplementation is still unclear. Methods We included 258,591 singleton live-born children of mothers aged 15-44 years in 1990-2013 from The Health Improvement Network, a large UK primary care database. We identified all major CAs according to the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies classification. Absolute risks and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) were calculated comparing children of mothers prescribed AEDs to those without such prescriptions, stratified by folic acid prescriptions around the time of conception (one month before conception to two months post-conception). Results CA risk was 476/10,000 in children of mothers with first trimester AEDs compared with 269/10,000 in those without AEDs equating to an aOR of 1.82, 95% confidence interval 1.30-2.56. The highest system-specific risks were for heart anomalies (198/10,000 and 79/10,000 respectively, aOR 2.49,1.47-4.21). Sodium valproate and lamotrigine were both associated with increased risks of any CA (aOR 2.63,1.46-4.74 and aOR 2.01,1.12-3.59 respectively) and system-specific risks. Stratification by folic acid supplementation did not show marked reductions in AED-associated risks (e.g. for CAs overall aOR 1.75, 1.01-3.03 in the high dose folic acid group and 1.94, 95%CI 1.21-3.13 in the low dose or no folic acid group); however, the majority of mothers taking AEDs only initiated high dose folic acid from the second month of pregnancy. Conclusions Children of mothers with AEDs in the first trimester of pregnancy have a 2-fold increased risk of major CA compared to those unexposed. We found no evidence that prescribed high dose folic acid supplementation reduced such AED-associated risks. Although statistical power was limited, prescribing of folic

  5. Antiepileptics for aggression and associated impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Huband, Nick; Ferriter, Michael; Nathan, Rajan; Jones, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Background Aggression is a major public health issue and is integral to several mental health disorders. Antiepileptic drugs may reduce aggression by acting on the central nervous system to reduce neuronal hyper-excitability associated with aggression. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in reducing aggression and associated impulsivity. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) and ClinicalTrials.gov to April 2009. We also searched Cochrane Schizophrenia Group’s register of trials on aggression, National Research Record and handsearched for studies. Selection criteria Prospective, placebo-controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs taken regularly by individuals with recurrent aggression to reduce the frequency or intensity of aggressive outbursts. Data collection and analysis Three authors independently selected studies and two authors independently extracted data. We calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs), with odds ratios (ORs) for dichotomous data. Main results Fourteen studies with data from 672 participants met the inclusion criteria. Five different antiepileptic drugs were examined. Sodium valproate/divalproex was superior to placebo for outpatient men with recurrent impulsive aggression, for impulsively aggressive adults with cluster B personality disorders, and for youths with conduct disorder, but not for children and adolescents with pervasive developmental disorder. Carbamazepine was superior to placebo in reducing acts of self-directed aggression in women with borderline personality disorder, but not in children with conduct disorder. Oxcarbazepine was superior to placebo for verbal aggression and aggression against objects in adult outpatients. Phenytoin was superior to placebo on the frequency of aggressive acts in male prisoners and in outpatient men including those with personality disorder, but not on the frequency of ‘behavioral incidents’ in

  6. Antiepileptics and blood dyscrasias: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, S C; Oliart, A D; García Rodríguez, L A; Pérez Gutthann, S

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a cohort study to investigate the frequency of serious blood dyscrasias in patients age 10-74 years, taking antiepileptic drugs between January 1, 1990, and October 31, 1994. Main outcome measures were validated diagnoses of neutropenia, agranulocytosis, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, bicytopenia, pancytopenia, or aplastic anemia. A total of 29,357 recipients of antiepileptic therapy received 684,706 prescriptions. Among them there were 21 cases of serious blood dyscrasia of which only 18 could be considered to have a temporal relationship to drug use. Seventeen cases occurred in current users of carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin or valproate, and 7 in patients taking two or more drugs. Twenty of the 21 patients recovered. The overall rate of blood dyscrasias was 3-4/100,000 prescriptions. The rate in those age less than 60 years was 2.0 (range 0.9-3.6)/100,000 prescriptions compared with 4.0 (range 1.6-8.2) for those age 60 or older. The overall rate of neutropenia was 1.2 (0.5-2.3)/100,000 prescriptions, compared with 0.9 (0.3-1.9) for thrombocytopenia and 0.4 (0.1-1.3) for hemolytic anemia. Rates did not differ among the four drugs. Serious blood dyscrasias are rare in patients taking antiepileptic agents. PMID:9855327

  7. Valproic acid, compared to other antiepileptic drugs, is associated with improved overall and progression-free survival in glioblastoma but worse outcome in grade II/III gliomas treated with temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Redjal, Navid; Reinshagen, Clemens; Le, Andrew; Walcott, Brian P; McDonnell, Erin; Dietrich, Jorg; Nahed, Brian V

    2016-05-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is an anti-epileptic drug with properties of a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi). HDACi play a key role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and have been increasingly used as anticancer agents. Recent studies suggest that VPA is associated with improved survival in high-grade gliomas. However, effects on lower grade gliomas have not been examined. This study investigates whether use of VPA correlates with tumor grade, histological progression, progression-free and overall survival (OS) in grade II, III, and IV glioma patients. Data from 359 glioma patients (WHO II-IV) treated with temozolomide plus an antiepileptic drug (VPA or another antiepileptic drug) between January 1997 and June 2013 at the Massachusetts General Hospital was analyzed retrospectively. After confounder adjustment, VPA was associated with a 28 % decrease in hazard of death (p = 0.031) and a 28 % decrease in the hazard of progression or death (p = 0.015) in glioblastoma. Additionally, VPA dose correlated with reduced hazard of death by 7 % (p = 0.002) and reduced hazard of progression or death by 5 % (p < 0.001) with each 100 g increase in total dose. Conversely, in grade II and III gliomas VPA was associated with a 118 % increased risk of tumor progression or death (p = 0.014), and every additional 100 g of VPA raised the hazard of progression or death by 4 %, although not statistically significant (p = 0.064). Moreover, grade II and III glioma patients taking VPA had 2.17 times the risk of histological progression (p = 0.020), although this effect was no longer significant after confounder adjustment. In conclusion, VPA was associated with improved survival in glioblastoma in a dose-dependent manner. However, in grade II and III gliomas, VPA was linked to histological progression and decrease in progression-free survival. Prospective evaluation of VPA treatment for glioma patients is warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:26830093

  8. Association of non-adherence to antiepileptic drugs and seizures, quality of life, and productivity: survey of patients with epilepsy and physicians.

    PubMed

    Hovinga, Collin A; Asato, Miya R; Manjunath, Ranjani; Wheless, James W; Phelps, Stephanie J; Sheth, Raj D; Pina-Garza, Jesus E; Zingaro, Wendy M; Haskins, Lisa S

    2008-08-01

    Non-adherence to epilepsy medications can interfere with treatment and may adversely affect clinical outcomes, although few studies have examined this relationship. This study assessed barriers and drivers to adherence, its impact on quality of life, and the importance of the patient-physician relationship to adherence. Two cross-sectional online surveys were conducted among 408 adult patients with epilepsy and 175 neurologists who treat epilepsy patients. Twenty-nine percent of patients self-reported being non-adherent to antiepileptic medications in the prior month. Non-adherence was found to be associated with reduced seizure control, lowered quality of life, decreased productivity, seizure-related job loss, and seizure-related motor vehicle accidents. Patient-oriented epilepsy treatment programs and clear communication strategies to promote self-management and patients' understanding of epilepsy are essential to maximizing treatment and quality of life outcomes while also minimizing economic costs. PMID:18472303

  9. Infantile Spasms and Cytomegalovirus Infection: Antiviral and Antiepileptic Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunin-Wasowicz, Dorota; Kasprzyk-Obara, Jolanta; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Kapusta, Monika; Milewska-Bobula, Bogumila

    2007-01-01

    From 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2004, 22 patients (13 males, nine females; age range 2-12mo) with infantile spasms and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were treated with intravenous ganciclovir (GCV) and antiepileptic drugs. GCV was given for 3 to 12 weeks with a 1-month interval (one, two, or three courses). Epileptic spasms occurred before…

  10. Pharmacogenetic evaluation of ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms in teratogenicity of anti-epileptic drugs in women with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Manna; Banerjee, Moinak; Mathew, Anila; Bharadwaj, Tashi; Vijayan, Neetha; Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Pregnancy in women with epilepsy (WWE) who are on anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) has two- to three-fold increased risk of fetal malformations. AEDs are mostly metabolized by Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and Cyp3A4 and transported by ABCB1. Patients on AED therapy can have folate deficiency. We hypothesize that the polymorphisms in ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) might result in differential expression resulting in differential drug transport, drug metabolism and folate metabolism, which in turn may contribute to the teratogenic impact of AEDs. Materials and Methods: The ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and MTHFR polymorphisms were genotyped for their role in teratogenic potential and the nature of teratogenecity in response to AED treatment in WWE. The allelic, genotypic associations were tested in 266 WWE comprising of 143 WWE who had given birth to babies with WWE-malformation (WWE-M) and 123 WWE who had normal offsprings (WWE-N). Results: In WWE-M, CC genotype of Ex07 + 139C/T was overrepresented (P = 0.0032) whereas the poor metabolizer allele *2 and *2 *2 genotype of CYP2C219 was significantly higher in comparison to WWE-N group (P = 0.007 and P = 0.005, respectively). All these observations were independent of the nature of malformation (cardiac vs. non cardiac malformations). Conclusion: Our study indicates the possibility that ABCB1 and Cyp2C19 may play a pivotal role in the AED induced teratogenesis, which is independent of nature of malformation. This is one of the first reports indicating the pharmacogenetic role of Cyp2C19 and ABCB1 in teratogenesis of AED in pregnant WWE. PMID:25221392

  11. Sleep in epileptic beagles and antiepileptics.

    PubMed

    Wauquier, A; Van den Broeck, W A; Edmonds, H L

    1986-01-01

    The sleep-wakefulness (S-W) patterns in 4 genetically epileptic beagles were studied. As compared to normal beagles, there was no change in the percentage time spent in the different stages of S-W. However, epileptic dogs tended towards more and shorter S-W epochs and they had a statistically significant shortening of both REM and deep slow wave sleep (dSWS) latency. The antiepileptics diazepam, phenytoin, flunarizine and phenobarbital did not yield marked effects on S-W patterns, but the REM and dSWS latencies were affected. It is suggested that epileptic beagles may be useful in experimental analysis of epilepsy as well as in drug development. PMID:3609846

  12. New mixed ligand zinc(II) complexes based on the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate and bioactive nitrogen-donor ligands. Synthesis, structure and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Darawsheh, Mohanad; Abu Ali, Hijazi; Abuhijleh, A Latif; Rappocciolo, Emilia; Akkawi, Mutaz; Jaber, Suhair; Maloul, Salam; Hussein, Yasmeen

    2014-07-23

    Starting from the precursor [Zinc Valproate complex] (1), new mixed ligand zinc(II) complexes of valproic acid and nitrogen-based ligands, formulating as, [Zn(valp)22,9-dmphen] (2), [Zn2(valp)4(quin)2] (3), [Zn(valp)2(2-ampy)2] (4), and [Zn(valp)2(2-ampic)2] (5) (valp = valproate, 2,9-dmphen = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline, quin = quinoline, 2-ampy = 2-aminopyridine, 2-ampic = 2-amino-6-picoline) were synthesized and characterized using IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C{(1)H} NMR and UV-Vis spectrometry. The crystal structures of complexes 2, 3 and 4 were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The complexes were also evaluated for their anti-bacterial activity using in-vitro agar diffusion method against three Gram-positive (Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis) and three Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis) species. Complex 2 showed considerable activity against all tested microorganisms and the effect of complexation on the anti-bacterial activity of the parent ligand of 2 was also investigated. The anti-bacterial activity of 2,9-dmphen against Gram-negative bacteria was enhanced upon complexation with zinc valproate. On the other hand, complexes 1 and 3 showed weak inhibition activity against the tested species and complexes 4 and 5 didn't show any activity at all. Two methods were used for testing the inhibition of ferriprotoporphyrinIX bio-mineralization: a semi-quantitative micro-assay and a previously self-developed quantitative in-vitro method. Both were used to study the efficiency of these complexes in inhibiting the formation of the Malaria pigment which considered being the target of many known anti-malarial drugs such as Chloroquine and Amodiaquine. Results showed that the efficiency of complex 2 in preventing the formation of β-Hematin was 80%. The efficiency of Amodiaquine as a standard drug was reported to give 91%. PMID:24904962

  13. A method for recording effects of anti-epileptic drugs on interictal discharge in the cat's cerebral cortex. Factors determining the distribution of external carotid artery infusions.

    PubMed

    Landgren, S; Selstam, G; Aasly, J; Danielsson, E

    1986-11-01

    The method utilizes infusion via the external carotid (ECA), the internal maxillary arteries and their anastomoses to the cerebral circulation. It takes into account the ipsilateral distribution of the carotid blood supply. A regular interictal epileptiform spiking from foci on both hemispheres was provided by local application to the cortical surface of small pieces of filter paper soaked in sodium benzylpenicillin, 100,000 IE ml-1. The infused drug affects the ipsilateral foci, and the contralateral one functions as a simultaneous untreated control. The stability of the interictal frequency and the effect of non-oxygen carrying solvents are described. The effect of changes in blood pressure, temperature and PCO2 are considered as well as the coupling between activity in ipsi- and contralateral foci. Experiments with infused radioactive microspheres were performed to determine the strictness of the ipsilateral distribution and the conditions under which it was upheld. With mean arterial blood pressures between 70 mm Hg and 170 mm Hg and infusion speeds between 1.0 ml min-1 and 6.3 ml min-1 the distribution to the contralateral cerebral hemisphere was 0.3% (SD 0.2, SEM 0.1). Infusions of [125I]albumin were used to determine the blood flow in ECA. The flow varied between 20 ml min-1 and 68 ml min-1. The higher values were seen when the extracerebral shunting was high. Conditions influencing the dilution of the infusion and its distribution within the brain were investigated. Important factors were carotid and cerebral blood flow, arterial blood pressure, speed and duration of the infusion, recirculation and cerebral temperature. Arterial PCO2, pH and PO2 should be carefully controlled. Computer-supported treatment of interictal spike frequency and amplitude, as well as of circulatory and respiratory parameters, was utilized. The method was tested in experiments with infusions of 5 alpha-pregnanolone. It was shown that infusions, shorter than the estimated

  14. Differential effects of valproic acid and enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants on nimodipine pharmacokinetics in epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tartara, A.; Galimberti, C.A.; Manni, R.; Parietti, L.; Zucca, C.; Baasch, H.; Caresia, L.; Mück, W.; Barzaghi, N.; Gatti, G.; Perucca, E.

    1991-01-01

    1 The single dose pharmacokinetics of orally administered nimodipine (60 mg) were investigated in normal subjects and in two groups of epileptic patients receiving chronic treatment with hepatic microsomal enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, phenobarbitone or phenytoin) and sodium valproate, respectively. 2 Compared with the values found in the control group, mean areas under the plasma nimodipine concentration curve were lowered by about seven-fold (P < 0.01) in patients taking enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants and increased by about 50% (P < 0.05) in patients taking sodium valproate. 3 Nimodipine half-lives were shorter in enzyme-induced patients than in controls (3.9 ± 2.0 h vs 9.1 ± 3.4 h, means ± s.d., P < 0.01), but this difference could be artifactual since in the patients drug concentrations declined rapidly below the limit of assay, thus preventing identification of a possible slower terminal phase. In valproate-treated patients, half-lives (8.2 ± 1.8 h) were similar to those found in controls. PMID:1777370

  15. Antiepileptic and Antidepressive Polypharmacy in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Beiske, Georg Anton Giæver; Holmøy, Trygve; Beiske, Antonie Giæver; Johannessen, Svein I; Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are often suffering from neuropathic pain. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are commonly used and are susceptible to be involved in drug interactions. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the prevalence of use of antiepileptic and antidepressive drugs in MS patients and to discuss the theoretical potential for interactions. Methods. Review of the medical records from all patients treated at a dedicated MS rehabilitation centre in Norway between 2009 and 2012. Results. In total 1090 patients attended a rehabilitation stay during the study period. Of these, 342 (31%; 249 females) with mean age of 53 (±10) years and EDSS 4.8 (±1.7) used at least one AED (gabapentin 12.7%, pregabalin 7.7%, clonazepam 7.8%, and carbamazepine 2.6%) or amitriptyline (9.7%). Polypharmacy was widespread (mean 5.4 drugs) with 60% using additional CNS-active drugs with a propensity to be involved in interactions. Age, gender, and EDSS scores did not differ significantly between those using and not using AED/amitriptyline. Conclusion. One-third of MS patients attending a rehabilitation stay receive AED/amitriptyline treatment. The high prevalence of polypharmacy and use of CNS-active drugs calls for awareness of especially pharmacodynamic interactions and possible excessive adverse effects. PMID:26221541

  16. Antiepileptic and Antidepressive Polypharmacy in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Beiske, Georg Anton Giæver; Holmøy, Trygve; Beiske, Antonie Giæver; Johannessen, Svein I.; Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are often suffering from neuropathic pain. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are commonly used and are susceptible to be involved in drug interactions. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the prevalence of use of antiepileptic and antidepressive drugs in MS patients and to discuss the theoretical potential for interactions. Methods. Review of the medical records from all patients treated at a dedicated MS rehabilitation centre in Norway between 2009 and 2012. Results. In total 1090 patients attended a rehabilitation stay during the study period. Of these, 342 (31%; 249 females) with mean age of 53 (±10) years and EDSS 4.8 (±1.7) used at least one AED (gabapentin 12.7%, pregabalin 7.7%, clonazepam 7.8%, and carbamazepine 2.6%) or amitriptyline (9.7%). Polypharmacy was widespread (mean 5.4 drugs) with 60% using additional CNS-active drugs with a propensity to be involved in interactions. Age, gender, and EDSS scores did not differ significantly between those using and not using AED/amitriptyline. Conclusion. One-third of MS patients attending a rehabilitation stay receive AED/amitriptyline treatment. The high prevalence of polypharmacy and use of CNS-active drugs calls for awareness of especially pharmacodynamic interactions and possible excessive adverse effects. PMID:26221541

  17. The Relationship among Side Effects Associated with Anti-Epileptic Medications in Those with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipes, Megan; Matson, Johnny L.; Belva, Brian; Turygin, Nicole; Kozlowski, Alison M.; Horovitz, Max

    2011-01-01

    Seizures are fairly common in those with intellectual disabilities. In order to treat these seizures, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are often used and in many cases are effective. However, these medications often create a variety of associated side effects. In order to monitor these side effects, measures such as the SEIZES-B have been used. While…

  18. Antiepileptic Medications in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirota, Tomoya; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Hollander, Eric; Kishi, Taro

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalogram-recorded epileptiform activity is common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), even without clinical seizures. A systematic literature search identified 7 randomized, placebo-controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in ASD (total n = 171), including three of valproate, and one each of lamotrigine,…

  19. [Concentric changes in the visual field associated with GABA-mimetic antiepileptic agents].

    PubMed

    Nordmann, J P; Baulac, M; Van Egroo, C

    1999-05-01

    Bilateral visual field constriction has been recently reported in patients treated with vigabatrin. It has been considered that vigabatrin, a GABA agonist antiepileptic drug, was specifically responsible for this visual field defect. We present four observations sharing the same characteristics of chronic tunnel vision. Three patients had had vigabatrin but the fourth one received other antiepileptic drugs, progabide, an agonist of post-synaptic GABA receptors, and phenobarbital which interferes with GABA-A receptors. It is thus possible to hypothesize a retinal toxicity triggered by chronically increased GABA transmission. If this is confirmed, an accurate incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic visual field constriction with GABA-mimetic drugs should be established, as well as the patients' profiles which are more at risk. Patients currently under this type of treatment should be checked by both manual and automatic perimetry every six months to one year. PMID:10365327

  20. P-retigabine: an N-propargyled retigabine with improved brain distribution and enhanced antiepileptic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pingzheng; Zhang, Yangming; Xu, Haiyan; Chen, Fei; Chen, Xueqin; Li, Xiaoying; Pi, Xiaoping; Wang, Lipeng; Zhan, Li; Nan, Fajun; Gao, Zhaobing

    2015-01-01

    Retigabine (RTG, [ethyl N-[2-amino-4-[(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]amino] phenyl] carbamate]) is a first-in-class antiepileptic drug that acts by potentiating neuronal KCNQ potassium channels; however, it has less than optimal brain distribution. In this study, we report that P-RTG (ethyl N-[2-amino-4-((4-fluorobenzyl)(prop-2-ynyl)amino)phenyl]carbamate), an RTG derivative that incorporates a propargyl group at the N position of the RTG linker, exhibits an inverted brain distribution compared with RTG. The brain-to-plasma concentration ratio of P-RTG increased to 2.30 compared with 0.16 for RTG. However, the structural modification did not change the drug's potentiation potency, subtype selectivity, or RTG molecular determinants on KCNQ channels. In addition, in cultured hippocampal neurons, P-RTG exhibited a similar capability as RTG for suppressing both induced and spontaneous action potential firing. Notably, P-RTG antiepileptic activity in the maximal electroshock (MES)-induced mouse seizure model was significantly enhanced to a value 2.5 times greater than that of RTG. Additionally, the neurotoxicity of P-RTG in the rotarod test was comparable with that of RTG. Collectively, our results indicate that the incorporation of a propargyl group significantly improves the RTG brain distribution, supporting P-RTG as a promising antiepileptic drug candidate. The strategy for improving brain-to-plasma distribution of RTG might be applicable for the drug development of other central nervous system diseases. PMID:25319542

  1. Antiepileptic popular ketogenic diet: emerging twists in an ancient story.

    PubMed

    Vamecq, Joseph; Vallée, Louis; Lesage, Florian; Gressens, Pierre; Stables, James P

    2005-01-01

    The antiepileptic activity associated with ketogenic diets (KD) have been known for some time. First reports date back to the Middle Ages and even Biblical times where KD was achieved by fasting (i.e. "water diet") [see Swink, T.D., Vining, E.P.G., Freeman, J.M., 1997. The ketogenic diet: 1997. Adv. Pediatr. 44, 297-329, and references therein]. In the early 20th century, changes in the design of the KD were introduced, shifting the so-called "water diet" to a high-fat diet. Initial clinical evaluations undertaken between the 1920s and 1940s were enthusiastic, but the popularity of the KD was retrograded upon clinical introduction of phenytoin and subsequently other antiepileptic drugs. Today, despite a pharmacological arsenal targeting cerebral receptors and specific events in seizure initiation and development, about 30-40% patients are still refractory to available medications. Thus, the KD has been re-introduced in recent years as an alternative therapy, averring to be efficacious against some instances of resistant or intractable epilepsy. Despite a long historical background and enlarged clinical use, identification of the underlying anticonvulsant mechanisms associated with this nonpharmacological approach is still in stagnation. The present review is an attempt to encourage current research orientation through well-based and directed proposals for putative emerging candidates mediating KD anticonvulsant mechanisms. The reader is provided with a special emphasis on ATP-sensitive and recently cloned two-pore (or tandem) domain potassium channels, as well as several emerging conceptual views and advances such as nuclear receptors, uncoupling proteins and gap junctions that the authors speculate may contribute to understanding the basic mechanisms linked to the KD. PMID:15713528

  2. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutic drug monitoring of zonisamide.

    PubMed

    Mimaki, T

    1998-12-01

    Zonisamide (1,2-benzisoxazole-3-methanesulfonamide) is a new antiepileptic drug developed in Japan. This compound is insoluble in water, and it is available in tablet and powder form. In experimental animals, this compound has been found to have a strong inhibitory effect on convulsions of cortical origin because it suppresses focal spiking and the spread of secondary generalized seizures. In humans, a series of double-blind, placebo-controlled studies revealed the efficacy of zonisamide for patients with refractory partial seizures and for selected patients with infantile spasms. Its antiepileptic mechanism of action remains unclear, but it is likely to involve blockade of both sodium and T-type calcium channels. Oral bioavailability of zonisamide is excellent in healthy human volunteers. Zonisamide is slowly absorbed and has a mean tmax of 5 to 6 hours. Almost 100% of it is absorbed; there is no difference in bioavailability between tablets and powder. Zonisamide concentrations are highest in erythrocytes and then in whole blood and plasma. It is approximately 40% to 60% bound to plasma proteins, primarily albumin. Its volume distribution is 0.9 to 1.4 L/kg. In adults, the elimination half-life is between 50 and 62 hours, and it takes as long as 2 weeks to reach steady state. The dose-serum level correlation is linear up to doses of 10 to 15 mg/kg per day, and the therapeutic range is 10 to 40 microg/ml. However, the relationship between serum zonisamide levels, clinical response, and adverse effects appears weak. Concurrent enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants such as phenytoin, carbamazepine, or barbiturates stimulate zonisamide metabolism and decrease serum zonisamide levels at steady state. Although zonisamide has been reported to increase the serum levels of phenytoin and carbamazepine in some patients, the interactions of zonisamide with other antiepileptic drugs seem to be of minor clinical relevance. A pilot study of zonisamide suppositories revealed that it

  3. Antiepileptic Potential of Matrine via Regulation the Levels of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamic Acid in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-01-01

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug. PMID:24317434

  4. Design and synthesis of chroman derivatives with dual anti-breast cancer and antiepileptic activities

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Pinki; Verma, Saurabh Manaswita

    2016-01-01

    A series of chroman derivatives was designed, prepared, and examined for their anti-breast cancer and antiepileptic activities. All synthesized compounds yielded results that were in good agreement with spectral data. The bioassay showed that some of the resultant compounds exerted remarkable inhibitory effects on growth of human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. In particular, compound 6i (the concentration required for 50% inhibition of cell growth [GI50] =34.7 µM) exerted promising anticancer activity toward MCF-7 cell line. Additionally, compounds 6b, 6c, 6d, 6e, 6g, 6i, and 6l showed advanced antiepileptic activity than reference drugs. None of the compounds showed neurotoxicity, as determined by the rotarod test. The obtained results proved that these distinctive compounds could be relevant as models for future discovery and research, as well as for the production of more number of active derivatives. PMID:27621598

  5. Design and synthesis of chroman derivatives with dual anti-breast cancer and antiepileptic activities.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Pinki; Verma, Saurabh Manaswita

    2016-01-01

    A series of chroman derivatives was designed, prepared, and examined for their anti-breast cancer and antiepileptic activities. All synthesized compounds yielded results that were in good agreement with spectral data. The bioassay showed that some of the resultant compounds exerted remarkable inhibitory effects on growth of human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. In particular, compound 6i (the concentration required for 50% inhibition of cell growth [GI50] =34.7 µM) exerted promising anticancer activity toward MCF-7 cell line. Additionally, compounds 6b, 6c, 6d, 6e, 6g, 6i, and 6l showed advanced antiepileptic activity than reference drugs. None of the compounds showed neurotoxicity, as determined by the rotarod test. The obtained results proved that these distinctive compounds could be relevant as models for future discovery and research, as well as for the production of more number of active derivatives. PMID:27621598

  6. Effects of microsomal enzyme inducers on glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes in livers of rats and hamsters.

    PubMed

    Foliot, A; Beaune, P

    1994-07-19

    The effects of microsomal enzyme inducers on glutathione S-transferase (GST) isoenzymes were studied in livers of rats and hamsters using three hypolipidemic drugs of the peroxisome proliferator type and the two model substances phenobarbital (PB) and 3-methylcholanthrene (MC). The effects were investigated by immunoblot analysis of the various GST subunits using polyclonal antibodies directed to rat subunits 1-4. In untreated animals the subunit composition was different, with hamsters having a much higher content of class mu isoenzymes. Administration of all three hypolipidemic drugs reduced the protein concentration of both alpha and mu class GSTs in rats but reduced only class mu subunits in hamsters. This reduction was in good agreement with the decreased activity observed with the broad-spectrum substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) in both species. As expected, PB and MC increased GST activity together with the concentration of subunits 1 and 3 in rats. In hamsters, PB significantly increased subunit 1 and slightly reduced subunits 3 and 4, although this decrease was not significant. Total GST, measured with CDNB, was reduced by 17%. In contrast, MC slightly decreased subunit 1 and markedly raised subunits 3 and 4, resulting in a net increase in total GST activity. All drugs increased relative liver weight, microsomal protein concentration and total P450 in both species; in contrast, total cytosolic proteins were raised by all drugs in rats but not in hamsters, except for MC. The results obtained in these two species show that GST activity is not always increased by microsomal enzyme inducers. The response may depend in part on isoenzyme profile, and varies with the subunit considered. PMID:8053925

  7. The Role of Antiepileptic Treatment in the Recurrence Rate of Seizures After First Attack: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    ASSARZADEGAN, Farhad; TABESH, Hanif; HESAMI, Omid; DERAKHSHANFAR, Hojjat; BELADI MOGHADAM, Nahid; SHOGHLI, Arya; BEALE, Andrew David; HOSSEINI-ZIJOUD, Seyed-Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Epilepsy is a serious, potentially life-shortening brain disorder that occurs in patients of all ages and races. A total of 2–4% of people have experienced seizures at least once in their lifetime. Although treatment usually begins after a seizure, it is an important question whether the first cases of seizure do need to be treated by antiepileptic drugs. In this manner, we compare the recurrence rates of epilepsy in first seizure patients treated with sodium valproic acid as an antiepileptic drug versus a placebo. Material & Methods In a randomized clinical trial study, 101 first seizure patients were randomly divided into two groups: one group was treated with antiepileptic drugs (sodium valproate 200mg, three times a day) and the other group was given a placebo. The recurrence rate of seizures was evaluated and compared between the groups after 6 months of follow up. Results Eight recurrence cases were detected. All recurrence cases came from the placebo group, with four patients suffering an additional seizure after four months and between 4-6 month follow up. A comparison of recurrence rate detected a statistically significant difference between the drug group and placebo group. Conclusion Our data shows that the recurrences occurred only in the placebo group with the difference between the recurrence rates in the placebo versus drug-treated was significant. Our results suggest that drug therapy for people after their first seizure attack might reduce the probability of seizure recurrence. PMID:26221163

  8. Effects of valproate derivatives I. Antiepileptic efficacy of amides, structural analogs and esters.

    PubMed

    Redecker, C; Altrup, U; Hoppe, D; Düsing, R; Speckmann, E J

    2000-01-01

    Derivatives of the antiepileptic drug valproate (VPA, 2-propylpentanoic acid) have been synthesized and tested in order to improve the intracellular availability of VPA. The buccal ganglia of Helix pomatia were used as a test nervous system and antiepileptic efficacies were reconfirmed using rat cortex in vivo. Epileptiform activities consisted of typical paroxysmal depolarization shifts (PDS) which appeared in the identified neuron B3 with application of pentylenetetrazol. Epileptiform activities were found to be accelerated, unaffected or blocked. (i) The Amide-derivatives 2-propylpentanamide and N,N-dipropyl-2-propylpentanamide, and short chain ester derivatives 1-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-2,3-propandiol, 2,2-di(hydroxymethyl)-1-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-1,3-propanediol and 2,2-di(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-di-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-1,3-propanediol accelerated epileptiform activities. Membrane potential often shifted to a permanent depolarization which corresponded to the PDS-inactivation level. (ii) The structural analogs 1-cycloheptene-1-carboxylic acid and cyclooctanecarboxylic acid accelerated epileptiform activities only slightly or were without effects. (iii) The small VPA-ester, 2-propylpentanoic acid ethyl ester, decreased the epileptiform activities in a way that is comparable to the effects of VPA well known from previous studies. It thus could be thought as a VPA-pro-drug. (iv) The mannitol-esters 1-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-D-mannitol and 3,4;5,6-Di-O-isopropylidene-1-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-D-mannitol blocked the PDS in a way which is different from the known effects of VPA. These substances are interpreted not to exert their effects after being metabolized to VPA and thus they are thought to be new antiepileptic substances. PMID:10670421

  9. Practitioner Review: Use of Antiepileptic Drugs in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerrini, Renzo; Parmeggiani, Lucio

    2006-01-01

    Background: The aim in treating epilepsy is to minimise or control seizures with full respect of quality-of-life issues, especially of cognitive functions. Optimal treatment first demands a correct recognition of the major type of seizures, followed by a correct diagnosis of the type of epilepsy or of the specific syndrome. Methods: Review of data…

  10. The Effectiveness of Mood Stabilizers and Antiepileptic Medication for the Management of Behaviour Problems in Adults with Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deb, S.; Chaplin, R.; Sohanpal, S.; Unwin, G.; Soni, R.; Lenotre, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Psychotropic medications are used to manage behaviour problems in adults with intellectual disability (ID). One group of psychotropic medication are mood stabilizers such as lithium and some antiepileptic drugs. Method: A comprehensive systematic review was performed to determine the evidence base for the effectiveness of mood…

  11. Prenatal antiepileptic exposure associates with neonatal DNA methylation differences.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alicia K; Conneely, Karen N; Newport, D Jeffrey; Kilaru, Varun; Schroeder, James W; Pennell, Page B; Knight, Bettina T; Cubells, Joseph C; Stowe, Zachary N; Brennan, Patricia A

    2012-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used to treat a variety of neuropsychiatric illnesses commonly encountered in women during their reproductive years, including epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Despite their widespread use, the impact of prenatal exposure on fetal development remains obscure. To evaluate whether AEDs taken by pregnant mothers influence DNA methylation patterns in their neonates, DNA was extracted from the umbilical cord blood of 201 neonates whose mothers were treated for neuropsychiatric illness during pregnancy and interrogated across 27,578 CpG sites using the Illumina HumanMethylation27 BeadChip. The association of each methylation value with the cumulative duration of prenatal AED exposure was examined using a linear mixed model. The average methylation level across all CpG sites was calculated for each subject, and this global methylation measure was evaluated similarly. Neonates with a longer duration of AED exposure in pregnancy showed a decrease in average global methylation (p = 0.0045). Further, DNA methylation of CpG sites in 14 genes significantly decreased with the duration of prenatal AED exposure even after adjusting for multiple comparisons (FDR < 0.05). For a small subset (n = 19) of these neonates, a second tissue, placenta, was available in addition to cord blood. Methylation of 3 of these 14 CpG sites was also significantly decreased in placental tissue. These novel data suggest decreased DNA methylation in neonates of mothers who took AEDs during pregnancy. The long-term stability and potential impact of these changes warrant further attention, and caution may be warranted before prescribing AEDs to pregnant women. PMID:22419127

  12. Kinetics of drug interactions in the treatment of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    van der Kleijn, E; Vree, T; Guelen, P; Schobten, F; Westenberg, H; Knop, H

    1978-10-01

    The interactions of antiepileptic drugs in multiple drug treatment have been discussed. Although some combinations may lead to predictable increase or decrease of clearance of the respective drugs, most combinations will individually lead to a reduced predictability. Monitoring plasma concentrations may lead to adaptations of the choice of the drug and of the dosage regimen. Also physiological conditions control the individual clearance of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:700910

  13. Antiepileptic and Antiepileptogenic Performance of Carisbamate after Head Injury in the Rat: Blind and Randomized Studies

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, Clifford L.; Verley, Derek R.; Fender, Jason S.; Stewart, Tessandra H.; Nov, Eytan; Curia, Giulia

    2011-01-01

    Carisbamate (CRS) exhibits broad acute anticonvulsant activity in conventional anticonvulsant screens, genetic models of absence epilepsy and audiogenic seizures, and chronic spontaneous motor seizures arising after chemoconvulsant-induced status epilepticus. In add-on phase III trials with pharmacoresistant patients CRS induced <30% average decreases in partial-onset seizure frequency. We assessed the antiepileptogenic and antiepileptic performance of subchronic CRS administration on posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) induced by rostral parasaggital fluid percussion injury (rpFPI), which closely replicates human contusive closed head injury. Studies were blind and randomized, and treatment effects were assessed on the basis of sensitive electrocorticography (ECoG) recordings. Antiepileptogenic effects were assessed in independent groups of control and CRS-treated rats, at 1 and 3 months postinjury, after completion of a 2-week prophylactic treatment initiated 15 min after injury. The antiepileptic effects of 1-week CRS treatments were assessed in repeated measures experiments at 1 and 4 months postinjury. The studies were powered to detect ∼50 and ∼40% decreases in epilepsy incidence and frequency of seizures, respectively. Drug/vehicle treatment, ECoG analysis, and [CRS]plasma determination all were performed blind. We detected no antiepileptogenic and an equivocal transient antiepileptic effects of CRS despite [CRS]plasma comparable with or higher than levels attained in previous preclinical and clinical studies. These findings contrast with previous preclinical data demonstrating large efficacy of CRS, but agree with the average effect of CRS seen in clinical trials. The data support the use of rpFPI-induced PTE in the adolescent rat as a model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy for preclinical development. PMID:21123672

  14. Antiepileptic and antiepileptogenic performance of carisbamate after head injury in the rat: blind and randomized studies.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Clifford L; Verley, Derek R; Fender, Jason S; Stewart, Tessandra H; Nov, Eytan; Curia, Giulia; D'Ambrosio, Raimondo

    2011-03-01

    Carisbamate (CRS) exhibits broad acute anticonvulsant activity in conventional anticonvulsant screens, genetic models of absence epilepsy and audiogenic seizures, and chronic spontaneous motor seizures arising after chemoconvulsant-induced status epilepticus. In add-on phase III trials with pharmacoresistant patients CRS induced < 30% average decreases in partial-onset seizure frequency. We assessed the antiepileptogenic and antiepileptic performance of subchronic CRS administration on posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) induced by rostral parasaggital fluid percussion injury (rpFPI), which closely replicates human contusive closed head injury. Studies were blind and randomized, and treatment effects were assessed on the basis of sensitive electrocorticography (ECoG) recordings. Antiepileptogenic effects were assessed in independent groups of control and CRS-treated rats, at 1 and 3 months postinjury, after completion of a 2-week prophylactic treatment initiated 15 min after injury. The antiepileptic effects of 1-week CRS treatments were assessed in repeated measures experiments at 1 and 4 months postinjury. The studies were powered to detect ~50 and ~40% decreases in epilepsy incidence and frequency of seizures, respectively. Drug/vehicle treatment, ECoG analysis, and [CRS](plasma) determination all were performed blind. We detected no antiepileptogenic and an equivocal transient antiepileptic effects of CRS despite [CRS](plasma) comparable with or higher than levels attained in previous preclinical and clinical studies. These findings contrast with previous preclinical data demonstrating large efficacy of CRS, but agree with the average effect of CRS seen in clinical trials. The data support the use of rpFPI-induced PTE in the adolescent rat as a model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy for preclinical development. PMID:21123672

  15. Antiepileptic Ceramides from the Red Sea Sponge Negombata corticata

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Safwat A.; Khalifa, Sherief I.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    A new antiepileptic ceramide mixture 1 was isolated from the Red Sea sponge Negombata corticata. The structures of the metabolites were determined by extensive spectroscopic analysis. The anticonvulsant activity of 1 was measured in vivo using the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure model. This finding has important implications for biological studies with this class of compounds. PMID:18355032

  16. In silico inhibition of GABARAP activity using antiepileptic medicinal derived compounds

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shilu; Faheem, Muhammad; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Kumosani, Taha A; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder affecting more than 50 million people worldwide. It can be controlled by antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) but more than 30% patients are still resistant to AEDs. To overcome this problem, researchers are trying to develop novel approaches to treat epilepsy including the use of herbal medicines. The γ-amino butyric acid type-A receptor associated protein (GABARAP) is ubiquitin-like modifier implicated in the intracellular trafficking of GABAAR. An in silico mutation was created at 116 amino acid position G116A, and an in silico study was carried out to identify the potential binding inhibitors (with antiepileptic properties) against the active sites of GABARAP. Five different plant derived compounds namely (a) Aconitine (b) Berberine (c) Montanine (d) Raubasine (e) Safranal were selected, and their quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) have been conducted to search the inhibitory activity of the selected compounds. The results have shown maximum number of hydrogen bond (H-bond) interactions of Raubasine with highest interaction energy among all of the five compounds. So, Raubasine could be the best fit ligand of GABARAP but in vitro, and in vivo studies are necessary for further confirmation. PMID:26124559

  17. Probing collagen/enzyme mechanochemistry in native tissue with dynamic, enzyme-induced creep.

    PubMed

    Zareian, Ramin; Church, Kelli P; Saeidi, Nima; Flynn, Brendan P; Beale, John W; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2010-06-15

    Mechanical strain or stretch of collagen has been shown to be protective of fibrils against both thermal and enzymatic degradation. The details of this mechanochemical relationship could change our understanding of load-bearing tissue formation, growth, maintenance, and disease in vertebrate animals. However, extracting a quantitative relationship between strain and the rate of enzymatic degradation is extremely difficult in bulk tissue due to confounding diffusion effects. In this investigation, we develop a dynamic, enzyme-induced creep assay and diffusion/reaction rate scaling arguments to extract a lower bound on the relationship between strain and the cutting rate of bacterial collagenase (BC) at low strains. The assay method permits continuous, forced probing of enzyme-induced strain which is very sensitive to degradation rate differences between specimens at low initial strain. The results, obtained on uniaxially loaded strips of bovine corneal tissue (0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 N), demonstrate that small differences in strain alter the enzymatic cutting rate of the BC substantially. It was estimated that a change in tissue elongation of only 1.5% (at approximately 5% strain) reduces the maximum cutting rate of the enzyme by more than half. Estimation of the average load per monomer in the tissue strips indicates that this protective "cutoff" occurs when the collagen monomers are transitioning from an entropic to an energetic mechanical regime. The continuous tracking of the enzymatic cleavage rate as a function of strain during the initial creep response indicates that the decrease in the cleavage rate of the BC is nonlinear (initially steep between 4.5 and 6.5% and then flattens out from 6.5 to 9.5%). The high sensitivity to strain at low strain implies that even lightly loaded collagenous tissue may exhibit significant strain protection. The dynamic, enzyme-induced creep assay described herein has the potential to permit the rapid characterization of collagen

  18. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of the Newer Anti-Epilepsy Medications

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    In the past twenty years, 14 new antiepileptic drugs have been approved for use in the United States and/or Europe. These drugs are eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide. In general, the clinical utility of therapeutic drug monitoring has not been established in clinical trials for these new anticonvulsants, and clear guidelines for drug monitoring have yet to be defined. The antiepileptic drugs with the strongest justifications for drug monitoring are lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, stiripentol, and zonisamide. Stiripentol and tiagabine are strongly protein bound and are candidates for free drug monitoring. Therapeutic drug monitoring has lower utility for gabapentin, pregabalin, and vigabatrin. Measurement of salivary drug concentrations has potential utility for therapeutic drug monitoring of lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and topiramate. Therapeutic drug monitoring of the new antiepileptic drugs will be discussed in managing patients with epilepsy. PMID:20640233

  19. Population pharmacokinetics modeling of oxcarbazepine to characterize drug interactions in Chinese children with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Hua-nian; Niu, Chang-he; Gao, Ping; Chen, Yu-jun; Peng, Jing; Liu, Mao-chang; Xu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To develop a population pharmacokinetics model of oxcarbazepine in Chinese pediatric patients with epilepsy, and to study the interactions between oxcarbazepine and other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Methods: A total of 688 patients with epilepsy aged 2 months to 18 years were divided into model (n=573) and valid (n=115) groups. Serum concentrations of the main active metabolite of oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxycarbazepine (MHD), were determined 0.5–48 h after the last dosage. A population pharmacokinetics (PPK) model was constructed using NLME software. This model was internally evaluated using Bootstrapping and goodness-of-fit plots inspection. The data of the valid group were used to calculate the mean prediction error (MPE), mean absolute prediction error (MAE), mean squared prediction error (MSE) and the 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) to externally evaluate the model. Results: The population values of pharmacokinetic parameters estimated in the final model were as follows: Ka=0.83 h-1, Vd=0.67 L/kg, and CL=0.035 L·kg−1·h−1. The enzyme-inducing AEDs (carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital) and newer generation AEDs (levetiracetam, lamotrigine, topiramate) increased the weight-normalized CL value of MHD by 17.4% and 10.5%, respectively, whereas the enzyme-inhibiting AED valproic acid decreased it by 3%. No significant association was found between the CL value of MHD and the other covariates. For the final model, the evaluation results (95% CI) were MPE=0.01 (−0.07–0.10) mg/L, MAE=0.46 (0.40–0.51) mg/L, MSE=0.39 (0.27–0.51) (mg/L)2. Conclusion: A PPK model of OXC in Chinese pediatric patients with epilepsy is established. The enzyme-inducing AEDs and some newer generation AEDs (lamotrigine, topiramate) could slightly increase the metabolism of MHD. PMID:25220641

  20. Colorimetric Detection of Escherichia coli Based on the Enzyme-Induced Metallization of Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juhong; Jackson, Angelyca A; Rotello, Vincent M; Nugen, Sam R

    2016-05-01

    A novel enzyme-induced metallization colorimetric assay is developed to monitor and measure beta-galactosidase (β-gal) activity, and is further employed for colorimetric bacteriophage (phage)-enabled detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli). This assay relies on enzymatic reaction-induced silver deposition on the surface of gold nanorods (AuNRs). In the presence of β-gal, the substrate p-aminophenyl β-d-galactopyranoside is hydrolyzed to produce p-aminophenol (PAP). Reduction of silver ions by PAP generates a silver shell on the surface of AuNRs, resulting in the blue shift of the longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance peak and multicolor changes of the detection solution from light green to orange-red. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit for β-gal is 128 pM, which is lower than the conventional colorimetric assay. Additionally, the assay has a broader dynamic range for β-gal detection. The specificity of this assay for the detection of β-gal is demonstrated against several protein competitors. Additionally, this technique is successfully applied to detect E. coli bacteria cells in combination with bacteriophage infection. Due to the simplicity and short incubation time of this enzyme-induced metallization colorimetric method, the assay is well suited for the detection of bacteria in low-resource settings. PMID:26997252

  1. Difficulties in Treatment and Management of Epilepsy and Challenges in New Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects around 50 million people worldwide. Almost 30% of epileptic patients suffer from pharmacoresistance, which is associated with social isolation, dependent behaviour, low marriage rates, unemployment, psychological issues and reduced quality of life. Currently available antiepileptic drugs have a limited efficacy, and their negative properties limit their use and cause difficulties in patient management. Antiepileptic drugs can provide only symptomatic relief as these drugs suppress seizures but do not have ability to cure epileptogenesis. The long term use of antiepileptic drugs is limited due to their adverse effects, withdrawal symptoms, deleterious interactions with other drugs and economic burden, especially in developing countries. Furthermore, some of the available antiepileptic drugs may even potentiate certain type of seizures. Several in vivo and in vitro animal models have been proposed and many new antiepileptic drugs have been marketed recently, but large numbers of patients are still pharmacoresistant. This review will highlight the difficulties in treatment and management of epilepsy and the limitations of available antiepileptic drugs and animal seizure models.

  2. Highly sensitive DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xu; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-01-01

    A novel highly sensitive colorimetric assay for DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization was established. The DNA modified superparamagnetic beads were demonstrated to capture and enrich the target DNA in the hybridization buffer or human plasma. The hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced silver metallization on the gold nanoparticles were used as cascade signal amplification for the detection of target DNA. The metalization of silver on the gold nanoparticles induced a significant colour change from red to yellow until black depending on the concentration of the target DNA, which could be recognized by naked eyes. This method showed a good specificity for the target DNA detection, with the capabilty to discriminate single-base-pair mismatched DNA mutation (single nucleotide polymorphism). Meanwhile, this approach exhibited an excellent anti-interference capability with the convenience of the magentic seperation and washing, which enabled its usage in complex biological systems such as human blood plasma. As an added benefit, the utilization of hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization improved detection sensitivity down to 10 pM, which is about 100-fold lower than that of traditional unamplified homogeneous assays. PMID:25500528

  3. Prevalence of Side Effects Treatment with Carbamazepine and Other Antiepileptics in Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Koliqi, Rozafa; Polidori, Carlo; Islami, Hilmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This paper reveals the studies of carbamazepine monitoring in the manifestation of side effects during clinical use. It is important to realize that these ranges are derived statistically, with most patients who have high levels suffering side effects and some with poor control having low levels. Broadly, the newer agents have advantages of lower risk of side effects and less drug interaction. At the presence they are more expensive than the, than “older” agents. Current recommendations and practice are to use newer agents as second line drugs, although in some countries there are gaining favour as potential first line agents. Methods: In the study 91 patients with epilepsy were involved from which 53 or 58.2% were female and 38 or 41.8% were male with no great significant difference between two genders (X2=2.47, P=0.116). However, according to the study results female patients had slightly greater prevalence of epilepsy than man. Average age of epileptic patients was 23.2 years (SD ± 16.4 years), in the range 1–66 years. Patient distribution was present within all age-groups, but 59.4% of all patients were up to 20 years old. The highest prevalence of epilepsy was in the group age 6-15 years old: 33.0%. There were also children 1 – 5 years old with 7 or 7.7% of the patients, and the patients older than 60 years with 4 or 4.4% of the patients. Patient distribution according to the age and gender results with no female patient over 60 year old and more female patients in the age group 1-5 years. However statistically this did not produce a highly significant difference (T-test= 0.72, P=0.437) between average age according to the gender. The average age of the female gender was 22.1 year (SD ± 14.2 years), with the range 2-55 years, while the average age of the male patients was 24.6 year (SD ±19.2 years), with the range 1-66 years. Conclusion: Unwanted side effects of antiepileptic drugs analyzed in the study are frequent, but not so severe as

  4. Drug Interaction and Pharmacist

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, JA

    2010-01-01

    The topic of drug–drug interactions has received a great deal of recent attention from the regulatory, scientific, and health care communities worldwide. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. The pharmacist, along with the prescriber has a duty to ensure that patients are aware of the risk of side effects and a suitable course of action should they occur. With their detailed knowledge of medicine, pharmacists have the ability to relate unexpected symptoms experienced by patients to possible adverse effects of their drug therapy. PMID:21042495

  5. Homeostasis or channelopathy? Acquired cell type-specific ion channel changes in temporal lobe epilepsy and their antiepileptic potential

    PubMed Central

    Wolfart, Jakob; Laker, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neurons continuously adapt the expression and functionality of their ion channels. For example, exposed to chronic excitotoxicity, neurons homeostatically downscale their intrinsic excitability. In contrast, the “acquired channelopathy” hypothesis suggests that proepileptic channel characteristics develop during epilepsy. We review cell type-specific channel alterations under different epileptic conditions and discuss the potential of channels that undergo homeostatic adaptations, as targets for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Most of the relevant studies have been performed on temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), a widespread AED-refractory, focal epilepsy. The TLE patients, who undergo epilepsy surgery, frequently display hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is associated with degeneration of cornu ammonis subfield 1 pyramidal cells (CA1 PCs). Although the resected human tissue offers insights, controlled data largely stem from animal models simulating different aspects of TLE and other epilepsies. Most of the cell type-specific information is available for CA1 PCs and dentate gyrus granule cells (DG GCs). Between these two cell types, a dichotomy can be observed: while DG GCs acquire properties decreasing the intrinsic excitability (in TLE models and patients with HS), CA1 PCs develop channel characteristics increasing intrinsic excitability (in TLE models without HS only). However, thorough examination of data on these and other cell types reveals the coexistence of protective and permissive intrinsic plasticity within neurons. These mechanisms appear differentially regulated, depending on the cell type and seizure condition. Interestingly, the same channel molecules that are upregulated in DG GCs during HS-related TLE, appear as promising targets for future AEDs and gene therapies. Hence, GCs provide an example of homeostatic ion channel adaptation which can serve as a primer when designing novel anti-epileptic strategies. PMID:26124723

  6. Antiepileptic and Antioxidant Effect of Brassica nigra on Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Kindling in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kiasalari, Zahra; Khalili, Mohsen; Roghani, Mehrdad; Sadeghian, Azam

    2012-01-01

    Considering the high rate of epilepsy today, with respect to the insufficiency of the available therapies, new strategies and methods are recommended for medical treatment of epileptic patients. Therefore, the present study experimentally investigated the anticonvulsant effect of a herbal medicine candidate brassica nigra, by using kindling method. Sixty male mice were randomly selected and divided into six experimental groups (n = 10) including: 1-control, 2-pentylentetrazole (PTZ)-kindled mice, 3-positive control group received valproate (100 mg/Kg) as anti-convulsant drug, 4-5 and 6 received brassica nigra seed extract in three doses (75, 150 and 300 mg/Kg; IP). All groups except for the control ones were kindled by 11 period injections of PTZ (35 mg/Kg; IP). In the 12th injection, all groups except for the control group were tested for PTZ challenge dose (75 mg/Kg). However, the exhibited phases of seizure (0-6) were observed and noted till 30 min after the PTZ injection. At last, the brains of all the mice were removed and then malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide (NO) levels of the brain tissues were determined. Statistical analysis of the data shows that the seed extract could reduce the intensity, improvement and duration of seizure. In addition, the brassica nigra extract increased the SOD and NO levels and decreased the MDA level in the brain tissues. Attained results show that the extract of Brassica nigra seed can be used in grand mal seizure treatment. Moreover, the antiepileptic effect of this extract is probably caused by its antioxidant properties and acts via enzyme activity mechanism. PMID:24250555

  7. The effects of antiepileptic inducers in neuropsychopharmacology, a neglected issue. Part II: Pharmacological issues and further understanding.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The literature on inducers in epilepsy and bipolar disorder is seriously contaminated by false negative findings. Part II of this comprehensive review on antiepileptic drug (AED) inducers provides clinicians with further educational material about the complexity of interpreting AED drug-drug interactions. The basic pharmacology of induction is reviewed including the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, the Uridine Diphosphate Glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), and P-glycoprotein (P-gp). CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 are very sensitive to induction. CYP1A2 is moderately sensitive while CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 are only mildly sensitive. CYP2D6 cannot be induced by medications. Induction of UGT and P-gp are poorly understood. The induction of metabolic enzymes such as CYPs and UGTs, and transporters such as P-gp, implies that the amount of these proteins increases when they are induced; this is almost always explained by increasing synthesis mediated by the so-called nuclear receptors (constitutive androstane, estrogen, glucocorticoid receptors and pregnaneX receptors). Although parti provides correction factors for AEDs, extrapolation from an average to an individual patient may be influenced by administration route, absence of metabolic enzyme for genetic reasons, and presence of inhibitors or other inducers. AED pharmacodynamic DDIs may also be important. Six patients with extreme sensitivity to AED inductive effects are described. PMID:26111722

  8. Neuroactive peptides as putative mediators of antiepileptic ketogenic diets.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carmela; Marchiò, Maddalena; Timofeeva, Elena; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of KDs. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for altered regulation of the synthesis of neuropeptides and peripheral hormones in response to KDs, and we try to define a possible role for specific neuroactive peptides in mediating the antiepileptic properties of diet-induced ketogenesis. PMID:24808888

  9. Neuroactive Peptides as Putative Mediators of Antiepileptic Ketogenic Diets

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Carmela; Marchiò, Maddalena; Timofeeva, Elena; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of KDs. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for altered regulation of the synthesis of neuropeptides and peripheral hormones in response to KDs, and we try to define a possible role for specific neuroactive peptides in mediating the antiepileptic properties of diet-induced ketogenesis. PMID:24808888

  10. The Effects of Antiepileptic Medications on the Social Skills of Individuals with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Luke, Melissa A.; Mayville, Stephen B.

    2004-01-01

    Prevalence rates of epilepsy are much higher among persons with developmental disabilities compared to the general population. Anticonvulsant medication is the most common method of treating seizure disorders. Many of these antiepileptic medications (AEDs) are associated with various side effects, which may have detrimental effects on the social…

  11. New avenue in the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy by classical anti-epileptics: A hypothetical establishment of executioner Caspase 3 inactivation by molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Aanandhi, M Vijey; Bhattacherjee, Debojit; Ray, Anirban; George, P Samuel Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are prescribed first-line antiepileptic drugs and surgery to the management of this disorder. Unfortunately, the surgical treatment has been shown to be beneficial for the selected patients but fails to provide a seizure-free outcome in 20-30% of TLE patients. In our present study, we investigate the possibilities of marketed antiepileptic drugs in a different manner to improve the present situation in TLE. Molecular docking simulation study and various open source computational tools were used to perform the study. AutoDock 4.2 MGL tools, Pymol visualize tools, Patch dock server, and Swarm Dock servers (protein-protein docking) were used to perform the molecular modeling. FTsite and computed atlas of surface topography of protein open source server were used to understand the pocket and ligand binding information respectively. Toxtree application was used to determine the toxicity profile of the drug by Cramers rule. The obtained molecular docking models (Caspase 3, Procaspase 8, and Fas-associated death domain [FADD]) with selected compounds (Clonazepam, Clobazepam, and Retigabine) showed promising trio blocking event of FADD, Caspase 3, and Procaspase 8 (-6.66 kcal, -8.1 kcal, 6.46 kcal) by Clonazepam respectively. Protein-protein interaction study (Swarm Dock, Patch Dock server) indicated promising results that helped to establish our hypothesis. Toxtree showed a quantitative structure toxicity relationship report that helps to clarify the toxicity of the selected compounds. Clonazepam showed a trio inhibition property that may lead to develop a new era of the new generation benzodiazepine prototype drugs in the future. Filtered compounds will further process for higher in vitro, in vivo models for better understanding of the mechanism. PMID:25878976

  12. New avenue in the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy by classical anti-epileptics: A hypothetical establishment of executioner Caspase 3 inactivation by molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Aanandhi, M. Vijey; Bhattacherjee, Debojit; Ray, Anirban; George, P. Samuel Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are prescribed first-line antiepileptic drugs and surgery to the management of this disorder. Unfortunately, the surgical treatment has been shown to be beneficial for the selected patients but fails to provide a seizure-free outcome in 20–30% of TLE patients. In our present study, we investigate the possibilities of marketed antiepileptic drugs in a different manner to improve the present situation in TLE. Molecular docking simulation study and various open source computational tools were used to perform the study. AutoDock 4.2 MGL tools, Pymol visualize tools, Patch dock server, and Swarm Dock servers (protein-protein docking) were used to perform the molecular modeling. FTsite and computed atlas of surface topography of protein open source server were used to understand the pocket and ligand binding information respectively. Toxtree application was used to determine the toxicity profile of the drug by Cramers rule. The obtained molecular docking models (Caspase 3, Procaspase 8, and Fas-associated death domain [FADD]) with selected compounds (Clonazepam, Clobazepam, and Retigabine) showed promising trio blocking event of FADD, Caspase 3, and Procaspase 8 (−6.66 kcal, −8.1 kcal, 6.46 kcal) by Clonazepam respectively. Protein-protein interaction study (Swarm Dock, Patch Dock server) indicated promising results that helped to establish our hypothesis. Toxtree showed a quantitative structure toxicity relationship report that helps to clarify the toxicity of the selected compounds. Clonazepam showed a trio inhibition property that may lead to develop a new era of the new generation benzodiazepine prototype drugs in the future. Filtered compounds will further process for higher in vitro, in vivo models for better understanding of the mechanism. PMID:25878976

  13. Levetiracetam Induced Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptom Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Waseem Raja; Sofi, Najeebullah; Latief, Muzamil; Dar, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Kasana, Basharat Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom syndrome (DRESS) is a hypersensitivity drug reaction, most frequently associated with antiepileptic drugs, characterized by skin rash, fever, pharyngitis, lymphadenopathy, and visceral organ involvement, typically presenting within 8 weeks of initiation of therapy. Management involves prompt withdrawal of the offending drug and use of systemic corticosteroids. We here present a rare case of DRESS secondary to levetiracetam. Only few case reports of DRESS secondary to levetiracetam have been published so far. PMID:27057042

  14. Levetiracetam Induced Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptom Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dar, Waseem Raja; Sofi, Najeebullah; Latief, Muzamil; Dar, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Kasana, Basharat Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom syndrome (DRESS) is a hypersensitivity drug reaction, most frequently associated with antiepileptic drugs, characterized by skin rash, fever, pharyngitis, lymphadenopathy, and visceral organ involvement, typically presenting within 8 weeks of initiation of therapy. Management involves prompt withdrawal of the offending drug and use of systemic corticosteroids. We here present a rare case of DRESS secondary to levetiracetam. Only few case reports of DRESS secondary to levetiracetam have been published so far. PMID:27057042

  15. Identification of the antiepileptic racetam binding site in the synaptic vesicle protein 2A by molecular dynamics and docking simulations

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Basurto, José; Cuevas-Hernández, Roberto I.; Phillips-Farfán, Bryan V.; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Romo-Mancillas, Antonio; Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L.; Pérez-González, Óscar A.; Trujillo-Ferrara, José; Mendoza-Torreblanca, Julieta G.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is an integral membrane protein necessary for the proper function of the central nervous system and is associated to the physiopathology of epilepsy. SV2A is the molecular target of the anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam and its racetam analogs. The racetam binding site in SV2A and the non-covalent interactions between racetams and SV2A are currently unknown; therefore, an in silico study was performed to explore these issues. Since SV2A has not been structurally characterized with X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance, a three-dimensional (3D) model was built. The model was refined by performing a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and the interactions of SV2A with the racetams were determined by docking studies. A reliable 3D model of SV2A was obtained; it reached structural equilibrium during the last 15 ns of the MDS (50 ns) with remaining structural motions in the N-terminus and long cytoplasmic loop. The docking studies revealed that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds participate importantly in ligand recognition within the binding site. Residues T456, S665, W666, D670 and L689 were important for racetam binding within the trans-membrane hydrophilic core of SV2A. Identifying the racetam binding site within SV2A should facilitate the synthesis of suitable radio-ligands to study treatment response and possibly epilepsy progression. PMID:25914622

  16. [Drugs from the classes of tricyclic antidepressives and antiepileptics, nitrosatable under simulated human gastric conditions].

    PubMed

    Ziebarth, D; Schramm, T; Töppel, A

    1989-01-01

    The nitrosatability of Pryleugan (imipramine), Herphonal (trimipramine), and Finlepsin (carbamazepine) was investigated under simulated human gastric conditions using a colorimetric measuring method. All of them proved to be nitrosatable even at very low nitrite concentrations. In the presence of ascorbic acid, the formation of N-nitroso compounds under model conditions was inhibited markedly. N-nitroso-dihydrodibenzazepine and N-nitroso-dibenzazepine could be identified by thin layer chromatography as main products. The biological effects of these N-nitroso compounds are not known up to now. PMID:2802933

  17. Correlation between Serum Level of Antiepileptic Drugs and their Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Abbashar; Abdulgalil, Amira; Omer, Faroug; Eltoum, Hassan; Hamad, Ahmed; El-Adil, Omer; Mubarak, Bedraldin; Malkaldar, Mohmad; Idris, Iway; Alwidaa, Yasin; Mahmoud, Esam

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study is to investigate the relation between serum levels of anticonvulsants and their side effects. Methods This is a prospective cross sectional hospital based study conducted at Al Shaab Teaching Hospital. 120 patients were included in the study. The AEDs used were phenytoin, phenobarbitone, carbamazibine, and sodium valproate. Results The results showed that the side effects among the studied group were not uncommon. Conclusion There was no relationship between serum levels of AEDs and their side effects. PMID:22125692

  18. Huperzine A as a neuroprotective and antiepileptic drug: a review of preclinical research.

    PubMed

    Damar, U; Gersner, R; Johnstone, J T; Schachter, S; Rotenberg, A

    2016-06-01

    Huperzine A (HupA) is an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor extracted from Huperzia Serrata, a firmoss, which has been used for various diseases in traditional Chinese medicine for fever and inflammation. More recently, it has been used in Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia with a presumed mechanism of action via central nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. HupA is marketed as a dietary supplement in the U.S. This article reviews newly proposed neuroprotective and anticonvulsant HupA properties based on animal studies. HupA exerts its effects mainly via α7nAChRs and α4β2nAChRs, thereby producing a potent anti-inflammatory response by decreasing IL-1β, TNF-α protein expression, and suppressing transcriptional activation of NF-κB signaling. Thus, it provides protection from excitotoxicity and neuronal death as well as increase in GABAergic transmission associated with anticonvulsant activity. PMID:27086593

  19. Pharmacokinetics of the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam in healthy Japanese and Caucasian volunteers following intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Toublanc, Nathalie; Okagaki, Takuya; Boyce, Malcolm; Chan, Robert; Mugitani, Ayumi; Watanabe, Shikiko; Yamamoto, Katsumi; Yoshida, Katsumi; Andreas, Jens-Otto

    2015-12-01

    The intravenous (iv) formulation of levetiracetam has been available in clinical practice worldwide for several years, but not in Japan. Two open-label studies were conducted: Study A evaluated the bioequivalence of iv and oral tablet formulations in healthy Japanese volunteers; and Study B subsequently compared the pharmacokinetics of iv levetiracetam in healthy Japanese and Caucasian volunteers. Study A had a randomised, two-way crossover design; a single 1,500 mg levetiracetam dose was administered as a 15-min iv infusion and as 3 × 500 mg oral tablets to Japanese volunteers. In Study B, 1,500 mg levetiracetam was administered as single and repeated 15-min iv infusions to Japanese and Caucasian volunteers. Overall, 26/27 volunteers completed Study A and 32/32 (16 Japanese; 16 Caucasian) completed Study B. In Study A, the point estimate and 90 % confidence interval (CI) for the geometric least squares mean (LSM) ratio (iv vs oral) were fully included within the acceptance range for bioequivalence (0.85-1.25) for the area under plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to last quantifiable observation (AUClast 0.97 [0.95, 0.99]), but not for the maximum plasma concentration (C max 1.64 [1.47, 1.83]). In Study B, after a single iv infusion, the point estimates (90 % CI) for the geometric LSM ratio (Japanese vs Caucasian) for body weight-normalised C max and AUClast were 1.21 (1.07, 1.36) and 0.97 (0.90, 1.04), respectively. Corresponding values after repeated iv infusions were C max,ss 1.01 (0.91, 1.12) and AUCτ,ss 0.89 (0.83, 0.96). Levetiracetam was well tolerated in both studies. Study A did not demonstrate the bioequivalence of single doses of levetiracetam 1,500 mg administered as an iv infusion and as oral tablets in healthy Japanese adults. Study B, however, showed that pharmacokinetic profiles were generally similar between Japanese and Caucasian adults after single and repeated iv infusions of levetiracetam 1,500 mg. PMID:25283522

  20. Role of adenosine in the antiepileptic effects of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Maisa F.; Hamani, Clement; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G.; Amorim, Beatriz O.; Macedo, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Maria José S.; Nobrega, José N.; Aarão, Mayra C.; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M.; Andersen, Monica L.; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Luiz E.; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of epilepsy, mechanisms responsible for the antiepileptic effects of this therapy remain elusive. As adenosine modulates neuronal excitability and seizure activity in animal models, we hypothesized that this nucleoside could be one of the substrates involved in the effects of AN DBS. We applied 5 days of stimulation to rats rendered chronically epileptic by pilocarpine injections and recorded epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices. We found that slices from animals given DBS had reduced hippocampal excitability and were less susceptible to develop ictal activity. In live animals, AN DBS significantly increased adenosine levels in the hippocampus as measured by microdialysis. The reduced excitability of DBS in vitro was completely abolished in animals pre-treated with A1 receptor antagonists and was strongly potentiated by A1 receptor agonists. We conclude that some of the antiepileptic effects of DBS may be mediated by adenosine. PMID:25324724

  1. The involvement of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the anti-epileptic action of curcumin on pentylenetetrazol-kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenting; Su, Jing; Liu, Jing; Jiang, Changbin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, it was investigated whether a NO signaling pathway is involved in the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-kindled rats. PTZ-kindled rats received different doses of curcumin that were administered intraperitoneally for 24 days. Either a non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) (N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)), a selective inhibitor of neuronal NOS (7-Nitroindazole (7-NI)), a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (aminoguanidine (AG)), or a NO precursor (L-arginine (L-ARG)) was administered chronically to evaluate the role of NO in curcumin's anti-seizure effect. A chronic administration of curcumin (200 mg/kg) was most effective for decreasing the mean frequency of epileptiform discharge. Furthermore, a pretreatment with L-NAME or 7-NI augmented the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin. In contrast, AG failed to significantly alter the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin. A pretreatment with L-ARG temporally reversed the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin in the early stage, but in the late stage, it potentiated curcumin's anti-epileptic effect. These findings suggest that the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway may be involved in the anti-epileptic properties of curcumin, and that the role of nNOS (and not iNOS) is prominent in this neuroprotective feature. PMID:26406082

  2. Effects of antiepileptics on lateral geniculate nucleus-kindled seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi; Fujiwara, Akinori; Takechi, Kenshi; Kamei, Chiaki

    2009-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to clarify the characteristics of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) kindling in rats, especially the efficacies of antiepileptics, in comparison with those of amygdala (AMG) kindling. Daily electrical stimulation of the LGN led to the development of a generalized convulsion (kangaroo posture and falling back) in all subjects, similar to AMG kindling. The kindling response of the LGN differed from that of the AMG in a number of respects, that is, a high after-discharge (AD) threshold, a large number of stimulations for completion of kindling, and a different pattern of electroencephalogram (EEG) development. On the other hand, the oral administration of sodium valproate, carbamazepine, clobazam, or zonisamide caused dose-dependent inhibitions of both seizure stage and AD duration of LGN-kindled seizures, whereas ethosuximide had no significant effects. In addition, seizure stage was more potently inhibited than AD duration by these antiepileptics, particularly with clobazam. In conclusion, LGN kindling possesses characteristics that are different from AMG kindling. In addition, it was demonstrated that LGN kindling is a useful model, similar to other types of limbic system kindling, for the evaluation of antiepileptics. PMID:19346673

  3. Evaluation of antiepileptic activity of chloroform extract of Acalypha fruticosa in mice

    PubMed Central

    Govindu, Sumalatha; Adikay, Sreedevi

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the antiepileptic activity of chloroform extract of aerial parts of Acalypha fruticosa in mice. Materials and Methods: The antiepileptic activity of chloroform extract of A. fruticosa at the doses of 30, 100 and 300 mg/kg, p.o. was evaluated by maximum electroshock (MES), pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) and isoniazid (INH)-induced convulsions in mice. Statistical analysis was carried out by one-way analysis of variance followed by Dunnett's test. Results: In MES method, the chloroform extract significantly protected the mice from convulsions induced by electroshock method in a dose-dependent manner and exhibited more activity at the dose of 300 mg/kg when compared with diazepam treated animals. In PTZ method, the extract inhibited convulsions in mice potent than phenobarbitone sodium. In INH method, it delayed the latency of convulsions in mice in a dose-dependent manner but failed to protect the mice against mortality. Conclusion: The chloroform extract exhibited significant and dose-dependent antiepileptic activity, which may be due to the presence of antioxidant principles like flavanoids. PMID:24761113

  4. Highly sensitive visual detection of Avian Influenza A (H7N9) virus based on the enzyme-induced metallization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huifang; Ma, Xiaoming; Hu, Shuisheng; Lin, Yue; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guonan

    2016-05-15

    Development of convenient but sensitive method for influenza detection is highly important in immediate and effective clinical treatment. In this study, an ultrasensitive colorimetric approach combining the advantages of the convenience of the enzyme-induced metallization and the high specificity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of influenza virus A (H7N9 as model) has been developed. Two rounds of amplification are utilized to enhance the detection sensitivity. The amplification of enzymatic reaction combines with the specific optical properties of gold nanoparticles causing the enhancing of the optical signal immensely. In addition, the increased surface area and the magnetic enrichment effect also enable the magnetic bead (MB) to catch a large number of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and detection antibody (Ab2), thus very small amounts of the virus can be easily detected. Compared with conventional method, this approach exhibits outstanding sensitivity for ALP detection, 0.2U/L of ALP can be distinguished with a spectrometer and 2U/L with the naked eye. And as low as 25 pg/mL of H7N9 can be detected by the naked eye. This approach shows an extensive horizon for bioassays and is available in clinical diagnosis with the advances of simplification, effectiveness, low cost and sensitive readout. PMID:26797249

  5. Ca2+ cytochemical changes of hepatotoxicity caused by halothane and sevoflurane in enzyme-induced hypoxic rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei-Feng; Yang, Li-Qun; Zhou, Mai-Tao; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Quan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigat the relation between hepatotoxicity of halothane and sevoflurane and altered hepatic calcium homeostasis in enzyme-induced hypoxic rats. METHODS: Forty-eight rats were pretreated with phen-obarbital and randomly divided into six groups (eight in each group) and exposed to O2/ N2/1.2 MAC anesthetics for 1 h: normal control (NC), 21% O2/79% N2; hypoxic control (HC), 14% O2/86%N2; normal sevoflurane (NS), 21% O2/ N2/1.2MAC sevoflurane; hypoxic sevoflurane (HS), 14% O2/ N2/1.2MAC sevoflurane; normal halothane (NH)21%O2/79%N2/1.2MAC halothane; hypoxic halothane (HH), 14% O2/N2/1.2MAC halothane. Liver specimens and blood were taken 24 h after exposure to calcium and determined by EDX microanalysis. RESULTS: The liver of all rats given halothane (14% O2) had extensive centrilobular necrosis and denaturation. Morphologic damage was accompanied with an increase in serum glutamic pyruvic transminase. In groups NH and HH, more calcium was precipitated in cytoplasm and mitochondria. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that halothane increases cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in hepatocytes. Elevation in Ca2+ concentration is implicated in the mechanism of halothane-induced hepatotoxicity. sevoflurane is less effective in affecting hepatic calcium homeostasis than halothane. PMID:16124059

  6. Proteophosphoglycan confers resistance of Leishmania major to midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding in vector sand flies.

    PubMed

    Secundino, Nagila; Kimblin, Nicola; Peters, Nathan C; Lawyer, Phillip; Capul, Althea A; Beverley, Stephen M; Turco, Salvatore J; Sacks, David

    2010-07-01

    Leishmania synthesize abundant phosphoglycan-containing molecules made up of [Gal-Man-PO(4)] repeating units, including the surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG), and the surface and secreted proteophosphoglycan (PPG). The vector competence of Phlebotomus duboscqi and Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies was tested using L. major knockout mutants deficient in either total phosphoglycans (lpg2(-) or lpg5A(-)/5B(-)) or LPG alone (lpg1(-)) along with their respective gene add-back controls. Our results confirm that LPG, the major cell surface molecule of Leishmania promastigotes known to mediate attachment to the vector midgut, is necessary to prevent the loss of infection during excretion of the blood meal remnants from a natural vector, P. duboscqi, but not an unnatural vector, L. longipalpis. Midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding pose another potential barrier to parasite survival. Our results show that 36-72 h after the infective feed, all parasites developed well except the lpg2(-) and lpg5A(-)/5B(-) mutants, which showed significantly reduced survival and growth. Protease inhibitors promoted the early survival and growth of lpg2(-) in the blood meal. PPG was shown to be the key molecule conferring resistance to midgut digestive enzymes, as it prevented killing of lpg2(-) promastigotes exposed to midgut lysates prepared from blood-fed flies. The protection was not associated with inhibition of enzyme activities, but with cell surface acquisition of the PPG, which appears to function similar to mammalian mucins to protect the surface of developing promastigotes against proteolytic damage. PMID:20088949

  7. AEDS and Psychotropic Drugs in Children with Autism and Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuchman, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and psychotropic medications in children with autism is limited to the treatment of seizures or to specific behaviors such as irritability, impulsivity, hyperactivity, repetitive behaviors, or aggression. The reliability and value of the available data--to determine the efficacy of these medications in…

  8. Drugs that may harm bone: Mitigating the risk.

    PubMed

    Hant, Faye N; Bolster, Marcy B

    2016-04-01

    Glucocorticoids, proton pump inhibitors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), certain antiepileptic drugs, and aromatase inhibitors have significant adverse effects on bone. Healthcare providers should monitor the bone health of patients on these agents, supplement their intake of calcium and vitamin D, encourage weight-bearing exercise, and initiate osteoporosis-prevention treatment as indicated. PMID:27055202

  9. Proteophosphoglycan confers resistance of Leishmania major to midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding in vector sand flies

    PubMed Central

    Secundino, Nagila; Kimblin, Nicola; Peters, Nathan C.; Lawyer, Phillip; Capul, Althea A.; Beverley, Stephen M.; Turco, Salvatore J.; Sacks, David

    2010-01-01

    Summary Leishmania synthesize abundant phosphoglycan-containing molecules made up of [Gal-Man-PO4] repeating units, including the surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG), and the surface and secreted proteophosphoglycan (PPG). The vector competence of Phlebotomus duboscqi and Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies was tested using L. major knockout mutants deficient in either total phosphoglycans (lpg2− or lpg5A−/5B−) or LPG alone (lpg1−) along with their respective gene add-back controls. Our results confirm that LPG, the major cell surface molecule of Leishmania promastigotes known to mediate attachment to the vector midgut, is necessary to prevent the loss of infection during excretion of the blood meal remnants from a natural vector, P. duboscqi, but not an unnatural vector, L. longipalpis. Midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding pose another potential barrier to parasite survival. Our results show that 36–72 h after the infective feed, all parasites developed well except the lpg2− and lpg5A−/5B− mutants, which showed significantly reduced survival and growth. Protease inhibitors promoted the early survival and growth of lpg2− in the blood meal. PPG was shown to be the key molecule conferring resistance to midgut digestive enzymes, as it prevented killing of lpg2− promastigotes exposed to midgut lysates prepared from blood-fed flies. The protection was not associated with inhibition of enzyme activities, but with cell surface acquisition of the PPG, which appears to function similar to mammalian mucins to protect the surface of developing promastigotes against proteolytic damage. PMID:20088949

  10. [Drugs for migraine prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Takao

    2012-01-01

    Migraine is a prevalent and disabling neurologic disorder. The aims of migraine management are lifting the burden of migraine and improvement of quality of life (QOL) of the sufferers. Chronification of episodic migraine would introduce refractory chronic migraine or medication overuse headache. The prevention of chronification of migraine is one of the major roles of prophylactic medication. There are some classes of prophylactic drugs against migraine headache. The calcium blocker (lomeridine, verapamil), anti-epileptic drugs (valproate), beta-blockers (propranorol), and anti-depressant (amytriptyline) have high quality evidence in migraine prophylaxis. Migraine has varied cormorbid disorders, such as hypertension, cardiac diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, psychiatric disorders, epilepsy, and allergic disorders. Upon choosing preventive drug, neurologists should consider the comorbid disorders. Recent studies revealed possible association of migraine and cerebrovascular diseases, especially in migraine with aura and in young women. Not only headache expert but every neurologist should have broad knowledge concerning migraine management. PMID:23196487

  11. Antiepileptic and antipsychotic activities of standardized Śilājatu (Shilajit) in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Durg, Sharanbasappa; Veerapur, Veeresh P.; Thippeswamy, B. S.; Ahamed, Syed Mansoor

    2015-01-01

    Background: Śilājatu (Shilajit; SJ) is claimed in traditional Indian medical practice to be useful in the treatment of nervous disorders, epilepsy and as antistress. Aim: To investigate whether SJ possesses antiepileptic and antipsychotic activities in rodents. Materials and Methods: Isonicotinyl hydrazine (INH), pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), apomorphine, phenytoin, diazepam, haloperidol and other chemicals of analytical grade were procured from standard companies. The antiepileptic activity of SJ was assessed using maximal electro shock (MES)-induced seizures in rats, INH and PTZ-induced seizures in mice. The antipsychotic effect of SJ was evaluated using apomorphine-induced climbing and stereotyped behaviours respectively, in mice and rats. Settings and Designs: SJ (25 and 50 mg/kg, p.o.) was given orally once daily for 15 days in all the rodent models. On the test day, SJ was administered 1 h prior to electric shock or chemical inducers (INH/PTZ/apomorphine) in experimental animals; the animals were then observed for different phases of seizures and psychotic behaviours. In addition, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in the brain of rats and mice was estimated in seizure models. Statistical Analysis: The data were expressed as mean ± standard error of mean. Statistical comparisons were performed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post-test using Graph Pad Prism version 5.0, USA. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results and Conclusions: SJ pretreatment significantly inhibited the seizures induced by MES, INH and PTZ in a dose dependent manner. Further, SJ augmented brain GABA levels to normal, decreased by INH and PTZ in mice brain. SJ pretreatment also significantly inhibited the climbing and stereotyped behaviours induced by apomorphine. The present data seems to confirm the antiepileptic activity of SJ which may be because of enhancing the GABAergic system. The antipsychotic activity observed may be due to anti-dopaminergic and/or GABA

  12. Levetiracetam induced psoriasiform drug eruption: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Gencler, Onur Serdar; Gencler, Bilgen; Altunel, Cemile Tugba; Arslan, Nur

    2015-11-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV) is an established second generation anti-epileptic drug and LEV associated severe cutaneous reactions are rare. Here we report the case of psoriasiform drug eruption in a patient with newly diagnosed epilepsy who had been treated with levetiracetam. To our knowledge this is the first report of a patient with a psoriasiform eruption that appeared after the administration of LEV. PMID:26702269

  13. Adverse antibiotic drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Bint, A J; Burtt, I

    1980-07-01

    There is enormous potential for drug interactions in patients who, today, often receive many drugs. Antibiotics are prominent amongst the groups of drugs commonly prescribed. Many interactions take place at the absorption stage. Antacids and antidiarrhoeal preparations, in particular, can delay and reduce the absorption of antibiotics such as tetracyclines and clindamycin, by combining with them in the gastrointestinal tract to form chelates or complexes. Other drugs can affect gastric motility, which in turn often controls the rate at which antibiotics are absorbed. Some broad spectrum antibiotics can alter the bacterial flora of the gut which may be related to malabsorption states. The potentiation of toxic side effects of one drug by another is a common type of interaction. Antibiotics which are implicated in this type of interaction are those which themselves possess some toxicity such as aminoglycosides, some cephalosporins, tetracyclines and colistin. Some of the most important adverse interactions with antibiotics are those which involve other drugs which have a low toxicity/efficacy ratio. These include anticoagulants such as warfarin, anticonvulsants such as phenytoin and phenobarbitone and oral antidiabetic drugs like tolbutamide. Risk of interaction arises when the metabolism of these drugs is inhibited by liver microsomal enzyme inhibitors such as some sulphonamides and chloramphenicol, or is enhanced by enzyme inducers such as rifampicin. PMID:6995091

  14. Effect and Safety of Shihogyejitang for Drug Resistant Childhood Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinsoo; Son, Kwanghyun; Hwang, Gwiseo; Kim, Moonju

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Herbal medicine has been widely used to treat drug resistant epilepsy. Shihogyejitang (SGT) has been commonly used to treat epilepsy. We investigated the effect and safety of SGT in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Design. We reviewed medical records of 54 patients with epilepsy, who failed to respond to at least two antiepileptic drugs and have been treated with SGT between April 2006 and June 2014 at the Department of Pediatric Neurology, I-Tomato Hospital, Korea. Effect was measured by the response rate, seizure-free rate, and retention rate at six months. We also checked adverse events, change in antiepileptic drugs use, and the variables related to the outcome. Results. Intent-to-treat analysis showed that, after six months, 44.4% showed a >50% seizure reduction, 24.1% including seizure-free, respectively, and 53.7% remained on SGT. Two adverse events were reported, mild skin rash and fever. Focal seizure type presented significantly more positive responses when compared with other seizure types at six months (p = 0.0284, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion. SGT is an effective treatment with excellent tolerability for drug resistant epilepsy patients. Our data provide evidence that SGT may be used as alternative treatment option when antiepileptic drug does not work in epilepsy children. PMID:27047568

  15. Effect and Safety of Shihogyejitang for Drug Resistant Childhood Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinsoo; Son, Kwanghyun; Hwang, Gwiseo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Herbal medicine has been widely used to treat drug resistant epilepsy. Shihogyejitang (SGT) has been commonly used to treat epilepsy. We investigated the effect and safety of SGT in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Design. We reviewed medical records of 54 patients with epilepsy, who failed to respond to at least two antiepileptic drugs and have been treated with SGT between April 2006 and June 2014 at the Department of Pediatric Neurology, I-Tomato Hospital, Korea. Effect was measured by the response rate, seizure-free rate, and retention rate at six months. We also checked adverse events, change in antiepileptic drugs use, and the variables related to the outcome. Results. Intent-to-treat analysis showed that, after six months, 44.4% showed a >50% seizure reduction, 24.1% including seizure-free, respectively, and 53.7% remained on SGT. Two adverse events were reported, mild skin rash and fever. Focal seizure type presented significantly more positive responses when compared with other seizure types at six months (p = 0.0284, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion. SGT is an effective treatment with excellent tolerability for drug resistant epilepsy patients. Our data provide evidence that SGT may be used as alternative treatment option when antiepileptic drug does not work in epilepsy children. PMID:27047568

  16. A Survey of the Use of Antiepileptic and Muscle Relaxant Medication in a Sample of Children with Neuromotor Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Bobby G.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A longitudinal survey of 424 preschoolers and infants with neuromotor disorders served by a children's rehabilitation center was conducted to determine the number who were receiving muscle relaxant or anticonvulsant medication, as well as average daily dosages. An increase in the number of antiepileptic prescriptions was found from 1962 to 1986.…

  17. Antiarrhythmic drugs and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Banach, Monika

    2014-08-01

    For a long time it has been suspected that epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmia may have common molecular background. Furthermore, seizures can affect function of the central autonomic control centers leading to short- and long-term alterations of cardiac rhythm. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) has most likely a cardiac mechanism. Common elements of pathogenesis create a basis for the assumption that antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) may affect seizure phenomena and interact with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Numerous studies have demonstrated anticonvulsant effects of AADs. Among class I AADs (sodium channel blockers), phenytoin is an established antiepileptic drug. Propafenone exerted low anti-electroshock activity in rats. Lidocaine and mexiletine showed the anticonvulsant activity not only in animal models, but also in patients with partial seizures. Among beta-blockers (class II AADs), propranolol was anticonvulsant in models for generalized tonic-clonic and complex partial seizures, but not for myoclonic convulsions. Metoprolol and pindolol antagonized tonic-clonic seizures in DBA/2 mice. Timolol reversed the epileptiform activity of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) in the brain. Furthermore, amiodarone, the representative of class III AADs, inhibited PTZ- and caffeine-induced convulsions in mice. In the group of class IV AADs, verapamil protected mice against PTZ-induced seizures and inhibited epileptogenesis in amygdala-kindled rats. Verapamil and diltiazem showed moderate anticonvulsant activity in genetically epilepsy prone rats. Additionally, numerous AADs potentiated the anticonvulsant action of AEDs in both experimental and clinical conditions. It should be mentioned, however, that many AADs showed proconvulsant effects in overdose. Moreover, intravenous esmolol and intra-arterial verapamil induced seizures even at therapeutic dose ranges. PMID:24948053

  18. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases. PMID:26204087

  19. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rashmi; Timshina, Dependra K; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is an adverse drug reaction commonly associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), viz., phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), lamotrigine, primidone, etc. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, gold derivatives, cyclosporine, captopril, diltiazem, terbinafine, azathioprine and allopurinol. Diagnosis of DHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic or collagen vascular disorders. The risk for developing hypersensitivity within 60 days of the first or second prescription in new users of PHT or CBZ was estimated to be 2.3-4.5 per 10,000 and 1-4.1 per 10,000, respectively. The syndrome is defined by the fever, skin rash, lymphadenopathy and internal organ involvement within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis and myositis. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Cross-reactivity among PHT, CBZ and PB is as high as 70%-80%. Management mainly includes immediate withdrawal of the culprit drug, symptomatic treatment and systemic steroids or immunoglobulins. PMID:21220873

  20. Drug interactions and the statins

    PubMed Central

    Herman, R J

    1999-01-01

    Drug interactions commonly occur in patients receiving treatment with multiple medications. Most interactions remain unrecognized because drugs, in general, have a wide margin of safety or because the extent of change in drug levels is small when compared with the variation normally seen in clinical therapy. All drug interactions have a pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic basis and are predictable given an understanding of the pharmacology of the drugs involved. Drugs most liable to pose problems are those having concentration-dependent toxicity within, or close to, the therapeutic range; those with steep dose-response curves; those having high first-pass metabolism or those with a single, inhibitable route of elimination. Knowing which drugs possess these intrinsic characteristics, together with a knowledge of hepatic P-450 metabolism and common enzyme-inducing and enzyme-inhibiting drugs, can greatly assist physicians in predicting interactions that may be clinically relevant. This article reviews the pharmacology of drug interactions that can occur with hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) to illustrate the scope of the problem and the ways in which physicians may manage this important therapeutic class of drugs. PMID:10584091

  1. Research Progress on the Role of ABC Transporters in the Drug Resistance Mechanism of Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Mao, Ding-an; Liu, Li-qun

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy is not fully clear. In recent years, both animal and clinical trials have shown that the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is increased in patients with intractable epilepsy; additionally, epileptic seizures can lead to an increase in the number of sites that express ABC transporters. These findings suggest that ABC transporters play an important role in the drug resistance mechanism of epilepsy. ABC transporters can perform the funcions of a drug efflux pump, which can reduce the effective drug concentration at epilepsy lesions by reducing the permeability of the blood brain barrier to antiepileptic drugs, thus causing resistance to antiepileptic drugs. Given the important role of ABC transporters in refractory epilepsy drug resistance, antiepileptic drugs that are not substrates of ABC transporters were used to obtain ABC transporter inhibitors with strong specificity, high safety, and few side effects, making them suitable for long-term use; therefore, these drugs can be used for future clinical treatment of intractable epilepsy. PMID:26491660

  2. Emerging drugs for partial-onset epilepsy: a review of brivaracetam.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lan; Li, Shuchuen

    2016-01-01

    There are more than 12 new antiepileptic drugs approved in the last 2 decades. Even with these newer agents, seizure remission is still unachievable in around 30% of patients with partial-onset seizures (POS). Brivaracetam (BRV) is chemically related to levetiracetam (LEV) and possesses a strong binding affinity for the synaptic vesicle protein 2A tenfold above that of LEV, and other possible modes of antiepileptic actions. BRV is now under Phase III development for POS, but data from one Phase III trial also suggested its potential efficacy for primary generalized seizures. The purpose of this review is to provide updated information on the mechanisms of action of the available antiepileptic drugs, with a focus on BRV to assess its pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability in patients with uncontrolled POS. To date, six Phase IIb and III clinical trials have been performed to investigate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of BRV as an adjunctive treatment for patients with POS. Generally, BRV was well tolerated and did not show significant difference in safety profile, compared to placebo. The efficacy outcomes of BRV, although not consistent across trials, did indicate that BRV was a promising add-on therapy for patients with POS. In conclusion, the many favorable attributes of BRV, like its high oral efficacy, good tolerability, dosing regimen, and minimal drug interaction, make it a promising antiepileptic therapy for patients with uncontrolled partial-onset epilepsy. PMID:27217762

  3. Emerging drugs for partial-onset epilepsy: a review of brivaracetam

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lan; Li, Shuchuen

    2016-01-01

    There are more than 12 new antiepileptic drugs approved in the last 2 decades. Even with these newer agents, seizure remission is still unachievable in around 30% of patients with partial-onset seizures (POS). Brivaracetam (BRV) is chemically related to levetiracetam (LEV) and possesses a strong binding affinity for the synaptic vesicle protein 2A tenfold above that of LEV, and other possible modes of antiepileptic actions. BRV is now under Phase III development for POS, but data from one Phase III trial also suggested its potential efficacy for primary generalized seizures. The purpose of this review is to provide updated information on the mechanisms of action of the available antiepileptic drugs, with a focus on BRV to assess its pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability in patients with uncontrolled POS. To date, six Phase IIb and III clinical trials have been performed to investigate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of BRV as an adjunctive treatment for patients with POS. Generally, BRV was well tolerated and did not show significant difference in safety profile, compared to placebo. The efficacy outcomes of BRV, although not consistent across trials, did indicate that BRV was a promising add-on therapy for patients with POS. In conclusion, the many favorable attributes of BRV, like its high oral efficacy, good tolerability, dosing regimen, and minimal drug interaction, make it a promising antiepileptic therapy for patients with uncontrolled partial-onset epilepsy. PMID:27217762

  4. Role of cytochrome P450 in drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Zakia

    2008-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions have become an important issue in health care. It is now realized that many drug-drug interactions can be explained by alterations in the metabolic enzymes that are present in the liver and other extra-hepatic tissues. Many of the major pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs are due to hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes being affected by previous administration of other drugs. After coadministration, some drugs act as potent enzyme inducers, whereas others are inhibitors. However, reports of enzyme inhibition are very much more common. Understanding these mechanisms of enzyme inhibition or induction is extremely important in order to give appropriate multiple-drug therapies. In future, it may help to identify individuals at greatest risk of drug interactions and adverse events. PMID:18928560

  5. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions in Indian population: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Tejas K; Thakkar, Sejal H; Sharma, DC

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological data is limited for cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs) in India. Most of the Indian studies have small sample size and are of limited duration. Aims: The aim of this study is to analyze CADRs with reference to the causative drugs and their clinical characteristics in Indian population. Materials and Methods: As per selection criteria, electronic databases were searched for publications describing CADRs from January-1995 to April-2013 by two independent investigators. Data of the causative drugs and clinical characteristics were extracted and summarized by absolute numbers, percentages, ranges, and means as presented by the authors. The subgroup analysis of causative drugs was performed for causality assessment, severe or nonsevere reactions and occurrence of common CADRs. Studies showing “definite” and “probable” categories of causality analysis were labeled as “definite and probable causality (DPC) studies”. The other included studies were labeled as “non-DPC studies”. Results: Of 8337 retrieved references, 18 prospective studies were selected for analysis. The pooled incidence was 9.22/1000 total among outpatient and inpatient cases. Commonly observed reactions were maculopapular rash (32.39%), fixed drug eruptions (FDEs) (20.13%), urticaria (17.49%) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) (6.84%). The major causative drug groups were antimicrobials (45.46%), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (20.87%) and anti-epileptic drugs (14.57%). Commonly implicated drugs were sulfa (13.32%), β-lactams (8.96%) and carbamazepine (6.65%). High frequency of CADRs is observed with anti-epileptic drugs in DPC studies only. Carbamazepine, phenytoin and fluoroquinolones had higher severe to nonsevere cutaneous reaction ratio than other drugs. Antimicrobials were the main causative drugs for maculopapular rash, FDEs and SJS/TEN, and NSAIDs for the urticaria. The mortality for overall CADRs, SJS

  6. Investigation of PON1 activity and MDA levels in patients with epilepsy not receiving antiepileptic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dönmezdil, Nilüfer; Çevik, Mehmet Uğur; Özdemir, Hasan Hüseyin; Taşin, Muhterem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There are many studies dedicated to researching the etiopathogenesis of epilepsy. In such research, oxidative and antioxidant indicators of etiopathogenesis have also been examined under the scope. Drawing on a group of patients with epilepsy who were receiving no treatment, we have tried to evaluate whether or not an increase in oxidative indicators is linked directly with the disorder, independent of epileptic medicaments. Methods Thirty people in good health and 30 newly diagnosed with epilepsy and who received ambulatory treatment in the polyclinic of the Neurology Department took part in the study. The tests relating to serum malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity were carried out in the biochemistry laboratory. Results Even though the levels of MDA in the patient group (14.34±3.59 nmol/mL) were found to be high compared to those of the control group, which consisted of people in good health (13.53±3.56 nmol/mL), there was no statistically significant difference. PON1 activity in the serum taken from people in the patient group (0.65±0.17) was lower in comparison to that observed in the serum of the control group (0.71±0.17 U/L). Nonetheless, it was not so low as to have significance from a statistical point of view. Conclusion We conclude that such a high level of oxidative parameters should have been related to the disease and that statistically significant findings that emerged in some other studies could have been related to an antiepileptic treatment. PMID:27175078

  7. Chapter 30: Drug allergy.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Drug allergy describes clinical adverse reactions that are proved or presumed to be immunologically based. Allergic drug reactions do not resemble pharmacologic actions of the incriminated drug and may occur at fractions of what would be the therapeutic dosage. Allergic drug reactions are unpredictable; nevertheless, there is increased risk of drug hypersensitivity in (1) patients with cystic fibrosis who receive antibiotics; (2) patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) who receive trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole of if HLA-B*5701(+) and receive the antiretroviral agent, abacavir; (3) other genetically susceptible populations such as Han-Chinese who are HLA-B*1502(+) who develop Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis from carbamazepine or if HLA-B*5801(+) are at increased risk for such reactions from allopurinol; and (4) patients with a history of previous compatible allergic reaction to the same medication, similar class, or potentially unrelated medication. Specific patient groups at higher risk for drug allergy include those with Ebstein-Barr virus infection, chronic lymphatic leukemia, HIV/AIDS, cystic fibrosis, patients with seizures being treated with antiepileptic medications, and patients with asthma (especially severe asthma) who are at increased risk of anaphylaxis from any cause including drugs compared with patients without asthma. In patients with a history of penicillin allergy, skin testing helps clarify the current level of risk for anaphylaxis by using the major (penicilloyl-polylysine) and minor penicillin determinants where sensitivity is 99%. If penicilloyl-polylysine and penicillin G are used for skin testing, the sensitivity is ∼85%. When skin tests are negative, graded challenges are performed to administer optimal or truly essential antibiotics. PMID:22794703

  8. Uptake of three antibiotics and an anti-epileptic drug by wheat plants spray irrigated with wastewater treatment plant effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With rising demands on water supplies necessitating water reuse, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent is often used to irrigate agricultural lands. Emerging contaminants, like pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), are frequently found in effluent due to limited removal during WWT...

  9. The Anti-Epileptic Drug Valproic Acid (VPA) Inhibits Steroidogenesis in Bovine Theca and Granulosa Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Glister, Claire; Satchell, Leanne; Michael, Anthony E.; Bicknell, Andrew B.; Knight, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used widely to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Women undergoing VPA treatment reportedly have an increased incidence of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)-like symptoms including hyperandrogenism and oligo- or amenorrhoea. To investigate potential direct effects of VPA on ovarian steroidogenesis we used primary bovine theca (TC) and granulosa (GC) cells maintained under conditions that preserve their ‘follicular’ phenotype. Effects of VPA (7.8–500 µg/ml) on TC were tested with/without LH. Effects of VPA on GC were tested with/without FSH or IGF analogue. VPA reduced (P<0.0001) both basal (70% suppression; IC50 67±10 µg/ml) and LH-induced (93% suppression; IC50 58±10 µg/ml) androstenedione secretion by TC. VPA reduced CYP17A1 mRNA abundance (>99% decrease; P<0.0001) with lesser effects on LHR, STAR, CYP11A1 and HSD3B1 mRNA (<90% decrease; P<0.05). VPA only reduced TC progesterone secretion induced by the highest (luteinizing) LH dose tested; TC number was unaffected by VPA. At higher concentrations (125–500 µg/ml) VPA inhibited basal, FSH- and IGF-stimulated estradiol secretion (P<0.0001) by GC without affecting progesterone secretion or cell number. VPA reversed FSH-induced upregulation of CYP19A1 and HSD17B1 mRNA abundance (P<0.001). The potent histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors trichostatin A and scriptaid also suppressed TC androstenedione secretion and granulosal cell oestrogen secretion suggesting that the action of VPA reflects its HDAC inhibitory properties. In conclusion, these findings refute the hypothesis that VPA has a direct stimulatory action on TC androgen output. On the contrary, VPA inhibits both LH-dependent androgen production and FSH/IGF-dependent estradiol production in this in vitro bovine model, likely by inhibition of HDAC. PMID:23152920

  10. Assessment of quality of life in epilepsy patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs in a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalkhute, Sonali A.; Bajait, Chaitali S.; Dakhale, Ganesh N.; Sontakke, Smita D.; Jaiswal, Kavita M.; Kinge, Parag

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Health-related quality of life (QOL) is an important outcome in epilepsy treatment. Very few studies have been carried out on the quality of life in epilepsy (QOLIE-31) in India. The present study aimed to determine the level of health-related QOLIE-31 in patients of epilepsy. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Respondents were adults aged at least 18-year-old with a diagnosis of epilepsy. QOLIE-31 was used for collecting data on health-related QOL. The unpaired t-test or one-way analysis of variance was used to compare means of QOL scores between groups. Results: Totally, 60 patients of epilepsy were included in the study. The mean (standard deviation) total score of QOLIE-31 was 64.61. A score of cognitive and medication effect were significantly better in carbamazepine group as compared to valproate group. Conclusions: Patients on monotherapy had a better QOL as compared to patients receiving polytherapy. PMID:26600647

  11. Comparison of the amelioration effects of two enzyme inducers on the inflammatory process of experimental allergic encephalitis (EAE) using immunohistochemical technique.

    PubMed

    El-Gouhary, I; Mohamed, A; Suleiman, S; Benghuzzi, H

    2005-01-01

    Experimental Allergic Encephalitis (EAE) is a T-cell mediated autoimmune disease, which resembles the human disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in rodents. The infiltration of inflammatory cells and the induction of astrocyte proliferation correlate with EAE severity. Oxidative stress is postulated to have a role in the onset and progression of MS. Therefore, by reducing oxidative stress via phase II enzymes inducers; namely the butylhydroxyanisole (BHA) and Thymoquinone (glutathione inducer), the inflammation could be ameliorated. EAE was induced in Lewis rats using Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Animals were placed into 1. those on normal rat chow, 2. those on rat chow containing BHA, 3. those receiving concomitant five day injection of thymoquinone days 1-5 post-EAE induction, 4. those receiving five doses of thymoquinone injected at day 12-17 post-EAE induction. Twenty-nine days later, animals from each group were sacrificed and tissues collected for immunohistochemistry using the anti-glial fibrillary acid (GFAP) antibody to examine the amelioration effect these two agents have on the inflammatory process occurring in EAE by examining the astrocyte proliferation in the Central Nervous System (CNS). PMID:15850135

  12. Cost-effective and highly sensitive cholesterol microsensors with fast response based on the enzyme-induced conductivity change of polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Kuan-Chung; Chu, Chia-Ho; Hsu, Chen-Pin; Kang, Yen-Wen; Fang, Jung-Ying; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Huang, Yu-Fen; Chen, Chih-Chen; Li, Sheng-Shian; Andrew Yeh, J.; Yao, Da-Jeng; Wang, Yu-Lin

    2014-09-01

    In this study, a cost-effective and highly sensitive cholesterol microsensor, which is consisted of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx), horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and polyaniline (PANI), was developed based on the enzyme-induced conductivity change of PANI with fast response. Hydrogen peroxide is produced via the reaction between cholesterol and ChOx, which was immobilized in a dialysis membrane. The produced hydrogen peroxide can oxidize HRP, which can be reduced by oxidizing PANI, thus resulting in decreased conductivity of the polyaniline thin film. The reduced HRP can be oxidized again by hydrogen peroxide and the cycle of the oxidation/reduction continues until all hydrogen peroxide are reacted, leading to the high sensitivity of the sensor due to the signal contributed from all hydrogen peroxide molecules. Cholesterol was detected near the physiological concentrations ranging from 100 mg/dl to 400 mg/dl with the cholesterol microsensors. The results show linear relation between cholesterol concentration and the conductivity change of the PANI. The microsensor showed no response to cholesterol when the PANI was standalone without cholesterol oxidase immobilized, indicating that the enzymatic reaction is required for cholesterol detection. The simple process of the sensor fabrication allows the sensor to be cost-effective and disposable usage. This electronic cholesterol microsensor is promising for point-of-care health monitoring in cholesterol level with low cost and fast response.

  13. Cost-effective and highly sensitive cholesterol microsensors with fast response based on the enzyme-induced conductivity change of polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Kuan-Chung; Chu, Chia-Ho; Hsu, Chen-Pin; Kang, Yen-Wen; Fang, Jung-Ying; Chen, Chih-Chen; Li, Sheng-Shian; Andrew Yeh, J.; Yao, Da-Jeng; Wang, Yu-Lin; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Huang, Yu-Fen

    2014-09-15

    In this study, a cost-effective and highly sensitive cholesterol microsensor, which is consisted of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx), horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and polyaniline (PANI), was developed based on the enzyme-induced conductivity change of PANI with fast response. Hydrogen peroxide is produced via the reaction between cholesterol and ChOx, which was immobilized in a dialysis membrane. The produced hydrogen peroxide can oxidize HRP, which can be reduced by oxidizing PANI, thus resulting in decreased conductivity of the polyaniline thin film. The reduced HRP can be oxidized again by hydrogen peroxide and the cycle of the oxidation/reduction continues until all hydrogen peroxide are reacted, leading to the high sensitivity of the sensor due to the signal contributed from all hydrogen peroxide molecules. Cholesterol was detected near the physiological concentrations ranging from 100 mg/dl to 400 mg/dl with the cholesterol microsensors. The results show linear relation between cholesterol concentration and the conductivity change of the PANI. The microsensor showed no response to cholesterol when the PANI was standalone without cholesterol oxidase immobilized, indicating that the enzymatic reaction is required for cholesterol detection. The simple process of the sensor fabrication allows the sensor to be cost-effective and disposable usage. This electronic cholesterol microsensor is promising for point-of-care health monitoring in cholesterol level with low cost and fast response.

  14. Differential antiepileptic effects of the organic calcium antagonists verapamil and flunarizine in neurons of organotypic neocortical explants from newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Bingmann, D; Speckmann, E J; Baker, R E; Ruijter, J; de Jong, B M

    1988-01-01

    Effects of the organic calcium antagonists verapamil and flunarizine on pentylenetetrazol induced paroxysmal depolarizations were tested in organotypic neocortical explants taken from neonatal rats. In these in vitro experiments the papaverin derivative verapamil depressed, and finally abolished, epileptic discharges in all cases. The piperazine derivative flunarizine, however, which is known to suppress epileptic discharges in hippocampal CA3 neurons (Bingmann and Speckmann 1986), showed no significant antiepileptic effects in the explanted neocortical neurons. Thus, the present findings may indicate that the suppressive action of flunarizine on the generation of paroxysmal depolarizations is restricted to distinct populations of neurons. PMID:3224653

  15. Valproic acid pharmacokinetics in the mouse following controlled-release of pharmacologic and toxic doses via novel implantable and refillable drug reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Nau, H; Finley, P; Williams, J; Brendel, K

    1983-01-01

    Novel drug reservoirs are described which, after their implantation under mouse skin, continuously released organic liquids such as the anti-epileptic drug valproic acid at preselected rates for periods up to several weeks. The liquids, which were filled into the reservoirs, diffused through silastic membranes. The area and thickness of these membranes determined the administered dose. Administration of the anti-epileptic drug valproic acid at various selected doses resulted in persistent drug concentrations spanning from subtherapeutic to toxic levels. The drug reservoirs were easily refillable in situ which greatly extended the duration of the experiment. The dose administered could be determined within 5-15 per cent (rel. S.D.). It is suggested that the maintenance of persistent drug levels in small laboratory animals may be an appropriate model for the pharmacological and toxicological study of those compounds with short half-lives and high clearance rates in these species. PMID:6411139

  16. Challenges in diagnosing a metabolic disorder: error of pyruvate metabolism or drug induced?

    PubMed

    Mampilly, George Tomy; Mampilly, Tomy Kochuvareed; Christopher, Rita; Chandramohan, Neeradha; Janaki, Vijayalakshmy

    2014-06-01

    Certain drugs are known to cause metabolic changes resulting in altered metabolic profiles. We report here a case where a combination of antiepileptic drugs resulted in a profile that mimicked a metabolic disorder. A 16month-old female child on antiepileptic drugs (valproate and topiramate) was suspected to have the inherited metabolic disorder, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency, based on clinical symptoms and metabolic profile showing hyperalaninemia, elevated branched-chain amino acids, and lactate-pyruvate ratio. Suspecting that the observed metabolic changes could have also arised from medication, current medication was weaned off and replaced with levetiracetam, clonazepam, and levocarnitine (supportive therapy). Metabolic profiling conducted after 47 days showed normal alanine, branched-chain amino acids, ornithine, and lactate-pyruvate ratio, suggesting that the earlier abnormalities could have been medication induced. We stress that metabolic changes resulting from chronic medication should be considered while interpreting a positive result when investigating an inherited metabolic disorder. PMID:23439713

  17. Drug-metabolism mechanism: Knowledge-based population pharmacokinetic approach for characterizing clobazam drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, Dwain; Bekersky, Ihor; Chu, Hui-May; Ette, Ene I

    2016-03-01

    A metabolic mechanism-based characterization of antiepileptic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with clobazam in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) was performed using a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) approach. To characterize potential DDIs with clobazam, pharmacokinetic (PK) data from 153 patients with LGS in study OV-1012 (NCT00518713) and 18 healthy participants in bioavailability study OV-1017 were pooled. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were grouped based on their effects on the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes responsible for the metabolism of clobazam and its metabolite, N-desmethylclobazam (N-CLB): CYP3A inducers (phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine), CYP2C19 inducers (valproic acid, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine), or CYP2C19 inhibitors (felbamate, oxcarbazepine). CYP3A4 inducers-which did not affect the oral clearance of clobazam-significantly increased the formation of N-CLB by 9.4%, while CYP2C19 inducers significantly increased the apparent elimination rate of N-CLB by 10.5%, resulting in a negligible net change in the PK of the active metabolite. CYP2C19 inhibitors did not affect N-CLB elimination. Because concomitant use of AEDs that are either CYP450 inhibitors or inducers with clobazam in the treatment of LGS patients had negligible to no effect on clobazam PK in this study, dosage adjustments may not be required for clobazam in the presence of the AEDs investigated here. PMID:26224203

  18. Effects of the antiepileptics phenytoin and zonisamide on dentin formation and bone mineral density of the mandible in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, A; Saito, T; Mayanagi, H; Kamei, J; Onodera, K

    2004-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of the antiepileptics phenytoin and zonisamide on changes in the mineral density of the incisor and bone mineral density (BMD) of the mandibular head, and on the rate of dentin formation using histomorphometric measurements. After repeated administration of phenytoin or zonisamide to male growing rats, the mineral density of the lower incisors and mandibular head were determined by analyzing microradiographs and dentin formation rates were determined by histomorphometric measurements. Results showed a significant decrease in the mean values of BMD of the mandibular head and lower incisors in groups treated with phenytoin or zonisamide compared with the vehicle-treated group (p < 0.05). The percent rates of decrease in mineral density of the incisors for phenytoin and zonisamide were 6.8% and 4.0%, respectively. Phenytoin and zonisamide significantly reduced the dentin formation rate for the mesial and distal areas compared with the vehicle-treated group. Thus, epileptic children who are treated over a long period with antiepileptics, especially at primary school age, should ensure good oral hygiene so as not to suffer bone loss, edentulism or gingival overgrowth. PMID:15672119

  19. Starting, Choosing, Changing, and Discontinuing Drug Treatment for Epilepsy Patients.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Epilepsy is a serious brain disease with seizures as the main symptom, which can be successfully treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). AEDs are usually started as soon as the epilepsy diagnosis has been established. About 80% of adults with new-onset epilepsy will achieve lasting seizure remission on AEDs. However, 20% continue to have seizures despite treatment (drug-resistant epilepsy). AEDs can be safely discontinued after several years of seizure remission during early treatment. Remarkably, 60% of all treated patients remain in remission off AEDs, making epilepsy one of the best treatable among chronic brain diseases. PMID:27086984

  20. Substitution of anticonvulsant drugs

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Runge, Uwe; Witte, Otto W; Stefan, Hermann; Hufnagel, Andreas; Mayer, Thomas; Krämer, Günter

    2009-01-01

    Changing from branded drugs to generic alternatives, or between different generic formulations, is common practice aiming at reducing health care costs. It has been suggested that antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) should be exempt from substitution because of the potential negative consequences of adverse events and breakthrough seizures. Controlled data are lacking on the risk of substitution. However, retrospective data from large medical claims databases suggest that switching might be associated with increased use of AED and non-AED medications, and health care resources (including hospitalization). In addition, some anecdotal evidence from patients and health care providers’ surveys suggest a potentially negative impact of substitution. Well-controlled data are needed to assess the real risk associated with substitution, allowing health care professionals involved in the care of patients with epilepsy to make informed decisions. This paper reviews currently available literature, based on which the authors suggest that the decision to substitute should be made on an individual basis by the physician and an informed patient. Unendorsed or undisclosed substitution at the pharmacy level should be discouraged. PMID:19707254

  1. Disruption of thyroid hormone homeostasis in Ugt1a-deficient Gunn rats by microsomal enzyme inducers is not due to enhanced thyroxine glucuronidation

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Terrilyn A.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2010-10-01

    Microsomal enzyme inducers (MEI) that increase UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are thought to increase glucuronidation of thyroxine (T{sub 4}), thus reducing serum T{sub 4}, and subsequently increasing thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Ugt1a1 and Ugt1a6 mediate T{sub 4} glucuronidation. Therefore, this experiment determined the involvement of Ugt1a enzymes in increased T{sub 4} glucuronidation, decreased serum T{sub 4}, and increased TSH after MEI treatment. Male Wistar and Ugt1a-deficient Wistar (Gunn) rats were fed a control diet or diet containing pregnenolone-16{alpha}-carbonitrile (PCN; 800 ppm), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC; 200 ppm), or Aroclor 1254 (PCB; 100 ppm) for 7 days. Serum T{sub 4}, triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}), and TSH concentrations, hepatic T{sub 4}/T{sub 3} glucuronidation, and thyroid histology and follicular cell proliferation were investigated. PCN, 3-MC, and PCB treatments decreased serum T{sub 4}, whereas serum T{sub 3} was maintained in both Gunn and Wistar rats (except for PCB treatment). TSH was increased in Wistar and Gunn rats after PCN (130 and 277%) or PCB treatment (72 and 60%). T{sub 4} glucuronidation in Wistar rats was increased after PCN (298%), 3-MC (85%), and PCB (450%), but was extremely low in Gunn rats, and unchanged after MEI. T{sub 3} glucuronidation was increased after PCN (121%) or PCB (58%) in Wistar rats, but only PCN increased T{sub 3} glucuronidation in Gunn rats (43%). PCN treatment induced thyroid morphological changes and increased follicular cell proliferation in both strains. These data demonstrate that T{sub 4} glucuronidation cannot be increased in Ugt1a-deficient Gunn rats. Thus, the decrease in serum T{sub 4}, increase in TSH, and increase in thyroid cell proliferation after MEI are not dependent on increased T{sub 4} glucuronidation, and cannot be attributed to Ugt1a enzymes.

  2. Comparative efficacy and tolerability of drug treatments for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Strakowski, S M; DelBello, M P; Adler, C M

    2001-01-01

    Lithium has been the backbone of treatment for bipolar disorder for several decades, although recent advances have identified a number of other medications that have efficacy in treating various phases of the illness. These include the antiepileptic drugs valproate semisodium (divalproex sodium) and carbamazepine and some new antiepileptic drugs (e.g. lamotrigine and topiramate), and the atypical antipsychotics (e.g. olanzapine, clozapine and risperidone). Conventional antipsychotics continue to be used frequently in bipolar disorder, although they may be somewhat less effective than other treatments. Otherwise, to date, none of these treatments have been shown to be consistently more effective than any other, so that drug adverse effects and tolerability often dictate which agents are used in an individual patient. Drugs commonly used for the treatment of bipolar disorder are generally tolerated by most patients in large samples. However, the unique adverse effect signature of a drug will often suggest that it will be less tolerable in some patients than in others. Identifying a specific treatment for a specific patient requires a careful individualised assessment of the risk of adverse effects for that patient's unique circumstances. PMID:11580309

  3. Direct Determination of a Small-Molecule Drug, Valproic Acid, by an Electrically-Detected Microcantilever Biosensor for Personalized Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Long-Sun; Gunawan, Christian; Yen, Yi-Kuang; Chang, Kai-Fung

    2015-01-01

    Direct, small-molecule determination of the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid, was investigated by a label-free, nanomechanical biosensor. Valproic acid has long been used as an antiepileptic medication, which is administered through therapeutic drug monitoring and has a narrow therapeutic dosage range of 50–100 μg·mL−1 in blood or serum. Unlike labeled and clinically-used measurement techniques, the label-free, electrical detection microcantilever biosensor can be miniaturized and simplified for use in portable or hand-held point-of-care platforms or personal diagnostic tools. A micromachined microcantilever sensor was packaged into the micro-channel of a fluidic system. The measurement of the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid, in phosphate-buffered saline and serum used a single free-standing, piezoresistive microcantilever biosensor in a thermally-controlled system. The measured surface stresses showed a profile over a concentration range of 50–500 μg·mL−1, which covered the clinically therapeutic range of 50–100 μg·mL−1. The estimated limit of detection (LOD) was calculated to be 45 μg·mL−1, and the binding affinity between the drug and the antibody was measured at around 90 ± 21 μg·mL−1. Lastly, the results of the proposed device showed a similar profile in valproic acid drug detection with those of the clinically-used fluorescence polarization immunoassay. PMID:25632826

  4. Drug-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Ness-Abramof, Rosane; Apovian, Caroline M

    2005-01-01

    Drug-induced weight gain is a serious side effect of many commonly used drugs leading to noncompliance with therapy and to exacerbation of comorbid conditions related to obesity. Improved glycemic control achieved by insulin, insulin secretagogues or thiazolidinedione therapy is generally accompanied by weight gain. It is a problematic side effect of therapy due to the known deleterious effect of weight gain on glucose control, increased blood pressure and worsening lipid profile. Weight gain may be lessened or prevented by adherence to diet and exercise or combination therapy with metformin. Weight gain is also common in psychotropic therapy. The atypical antipsychotic drugs (clozapine, olanzepine, risperidone and quetiapine) are known to cause marked weight gain. Antidepressants such as amitriptyline, mirtazapine and some serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) also may promote appreciable weight gain that cannot be explained solely by improvement in depressive symptoms. The same phenomenon is observed with mood stabilizers such as lithium, valproic acid and carbamazepine. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that promote weight gain include valproate, carbamazepine and gabapentin. Lamotrigine is an AED that is weight-neutral, while topiramate and zonisamide may induce weight loss. PMID:16341287

  5. Drug-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Ness-Abramof, Rosane; Apovian, Caroline M

    2005-08-01

    Drug-induced weight gain is a serious side effect of many commonly used drugs leading to noncompliance with therapy and to exacerbation of comorbid conditions related to obesity. Improved glycemic control achieved by insulin, insulin secretagogues or thiazolidinedione therapy is generally accompanied by weight gain. It is a problematic side effect of therapy due to the known deleterious effect of weight gain on glucose control, increased blood pressure and worsening lipid profile. Weight gain may be lessened or prevented by adherence to diet and exercise or combination therapy with metformin. Weight gain is also common in psychotropic therapy. The atypical antipsychotic drugs (clozapine, olanzepine, risperidone and quetiapine) are known to cause marked weight gain. Antidepressants such as amitriptyline, mirtazapine and some serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) also may promote appreciable weight gain that cannot be explained solely by improvement in depressive symptoms. The same phenomenon is observed with mood stabilizers such as lithium, valproic acid and carbamazepine. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that promote weight gain include valproate, carbamazepine and gabapentin. Lamotrigine is an AED that is weight-neutral, while topiramate and zonisamide may induce weight loss. PMID:16234878

  6. Design, synthesis and antiepileptic properties of novel 1-(substituted benzylidene)-3-(1-(morpholino/piperidino methyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl)urea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chinnasamy Rajaram; Raja, Sundararajan

    2011-12-01

    Twenty new 1-(substituted benzylidene)-3-(1-(morpholino/piperidino methyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl) urea derivatives were designed and synthesized. Antiepileptic screening was performed using MES and scPTZ seizures tests. The neurotoxicity was determined by rotorod test. In the preliminary screening, compounds 5c, 5g, 5j and 5n were found active in MES model, while 5o showed significant antiepileptic activity in scPTZ model. Further all these five compounds were administered orally to rats, 5c, 5g and 5n showed better activity than Phenytoin in oral route. Among these compounds 5c revealed protection in MES at a dose of 30 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg 0.5 h and 4 h after i.p. administration respectively. This molecule provided also protection in the scPTZ at a dose of 300 mg/kg in both time intervals. PMID:22037252

  7. Therapeutic drug monitoring of psychoactive drugs during pregnancy in the genomic era: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    DeVane, C Lindsay; Stowe, Zachary N; Donovan, Jennifer L; Newport, D Jeffrey; Pennell, Page B; Ritchie, James C; Owens, Michael J; Wang, Jun-Sheng

    2006-07-01

    Various symptoms of mental illness occur commonly during pregnancy. It is estimated that serious mental disorders, including major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, panic and other anxiety disorders, occur with a frequency of 10 to 25% in community samples of US women in their child-bearing years. As a result, approximately a third of all women take at least one psychoactive drug during pregnancy. Fetal drug exposure has been documented for all psychoactive drugs studied to date. However, the rate and extent of placental transfer within and between psychoactive drug classes remains ill defined. The contribution of various genetic factors such as the role of polymorphic drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in controlling the variability of fetal drug exposure is also unclear. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) has traditionally played an important role in psychiatric pharmacotherapy during pregnancy to ensure an adequate drug dose to achieve desired benefits while avoiding excessive fetal accumulation for drugs. In the genomic era, individualized treatment with specific drugs tailored to the mother's and fetus's genotype should eventually become the standard of care. Several methodological problems need to be overcome for this prediction to become reality. One approach to this goal taken by the Specialized Center of Research on Sex and Gender Factors Affecting Women's Health at the Emory University Women's Mental Health Program is described. This research is grounded on TDM of pregnant women receiving antidepressants, antipsychotics, anti-epileptic drugs and mood stabilizers. The use of pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic models to predict maternal plasma drug concentrations, fetal drug exposure, and maternal and neonatal outcomes, is expected to improve our understanding of dose-response relationships of psychoactive drugs in pregnancy. PMID:16785271

  8. Lack of interaction between HEPP, a new antiepileptic agent, and carbamazepine in rabbits.

    PubMed

    García, A Luis; Medina, R Liz; Pérez, M Rodolfo; Jung, C Helgi

    2003-07-01

    The effect of the combination of a new anticonvulsant drug HEPP and carbamazepine (CBZ) on the pharmacokinetics of HEPP and CBZ was investigated using rabbits as an animal model. The study was performed in 18 male New Zealand white rabbits which were randomly divided into three groups, according to a balanced incomplete block design of three treatments and two periods. Plasma concentrations for HEPP and CBZ were assayed using HPLC methods. The results showed that the pharmacokinetic parameters C(max), AUC and t(1/2) were not statistically different when HEPP was administered alone and with CBZ, (AUC(0-alpha) 82.86+/-19.40 vs 83.24+/-12.56 microg h ml(-1); t( 1 2 beta) 3.40+/-0.29 vs 3.36+/-0.45 h; C(max) 18.93+/-2.99 vs 19.79+/-2.68 microg ml(-1) and T(max) 1.27+/-0.16 vs 1.22+/-0.11 h for HEPP alone and HEPP plus CBZ respectively. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic parameters of CBZ showed, AUC(0-inf) 61.5+/-21.7 vs 67.4+/-23.8 microg h ml(-1); t(12) 4.60+/-1.54 vs 4.41+/-1.35 h; C(max) 8.45+/-3.83 vs 8.70+/-2.59 microg ml(-1) when the drug was administered alone and CBZ plus HEPP, respectively. Our data indicate that there is no effect on the pharmacokinetics of either HEPP or CBZ, when they are administered simultaneously. PMID:12784320

  9. Adverse drug reactions and organ damage: The skin.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Angelo V; Borghi, Alessandro; Cugno, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions are frequent, affecting 2-3% of hospitalized patients and in one twentieth of them are potentially life-threatening. Almost any pharmacologic agent can induce skin reactions, and certain drug classes, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and antiepileptics, have drug eruption rates ranging from 1% to 5%. Cutaneous drug reactions recognize several different pathomechanisms: some skin manifestations are immune-mediated like allergic reactions while others are the result of non immunological causes such as cumulative toxicity, photosensitivity, interaction with other drugs or different metabolic pathways. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions can be classified into two groups: common non-severe and rare life-threatening adverse drug reactions. Non-severe reactions are often exanthematous or urticarial whereas life-threatening reactions typically present with skin detachment or necrosis of large areas of the body and mucous membrane involvement, as in the Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. Clinicians should carefully evaluate the signs and symptoms of all cutaneous adverse drug reactions thought to be due to drugs and immediately discontinue drugs that are not essential. Short cycles of systemic corticosteroids in combination with antihistamines may be necessary for widespread exanthematous rashes, while more aggressive corticosteroid regimens or intravenous immunoglobulins associated with supportive treatment should be used for patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. PMID:26674736

  10. Zonisamide: new drug. No advantage in refractory partial epilepsy.

    PubMed

    2007-06-01

    (1) The first-line treatment for patients with partial epilepsy is carbamazepine monotherapy. Second-line options include monotherapy with valproic acid, gabapentin, lamotrigine or oxcarbazepine. Other antiepileptics are also available for combination therapy of refractory partial epilepsy. (2) Zonisamide is a sulphonamide derivative that inhibits carbonic anhydrase; it resembles topiramate, a drug already approved for use for this indication in the European Union. (3) The main clinical trial, a double-blind study lasting 36 weeks, compared the addition of zonisamide or placebo to ongoing treatment in 351 patients with refractory partial epilepsy. The "response rate" (the proportion of patients with at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of seizures) was significantly higher with zonisamide plus the previous treatment than with placebo plus the previous treatment (46.6% versus 17.6%). An indirect comparison suggests that this is no better than treatment with a second-line antiepileptic drug. (4) Results of three other placebo-controlled trials of third-line combinations in a total of 499 patients treated for 12 weeks were similar. (5) The main adverse effects of zonisamide are those typically seen with topiramate: neuropsychological disorders and disorders due to carbonic anhydrase inhibition (kidney stones, reduced perspiration, and hyperthermia). There are various other adverse effects, including a risk of severe skin rash. (6) The profile of interactions is complex. There is a risk of pharmacokinetic interactions, and of pharmacodynamic interactions with other carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. (7) In France, treatment with zonisamide costs nearly 20 times more than treatment with carbamazepine or valproic acid. (8) Zonisamide has no therapeutic advantages over other antiepileptics available for combination therapy of partial epilepsy. PMID:17582922

  11. Determination of the antiepileptics vigabatrin and gabapentin in dosage forms and biological fluids using Hantzsch reaction.

    PubMed

    al-Zehouri, J; al-Madi, S; Belal, F

    2001-02-01

    A selective and sensitive method was developed for the determination of the anticonvulsants vigabatrin (I) (CAS 60643-86-9) and gabapentin (II) (CAS 60142-96-3). The method is based on the condensation of the drugs through their amino groups with acetylacetone and formaldehyde according to Hantzsch reaction yeilding the highly fluorescent dihydropyridine derivatives. The yellowish-orange color was also measured spectrophotometrically at 410 nm and 415 nm for I and II, respectively. The absorbance-concentration plots were rectilinear over the ranges 10-70 micrograms/ml and 20-140 micrograms/ml for I and II, respectively. As for the fluorescence-concentration plots, they were linear over the ranges 0.5-10 micrograms/ml and 2.5-20 micrograms/ml with minimum detection limits (S/N = 2) of 0.05 microgram/ml (approximately 2.1 x 10(-8) mol/l) and 0.1 microgram/ml (approximately 5.8 x 10(-7) mol/l) for I and II, respectively. The spectrophotometric method was applied to the determination of I and II in their tablets. The percentage recoveries +/- SD (n = 6) were 99.45 +/- 0.13 and 98.05 +/- 0.53, respectively. The spectrofluorimetric method was successfully applied to the determination of I and II in spiked human urine and plasma. The % recoveries +/- SD (n = 5) were 98.77 +/- 0.29 and 98.39 +/- 0.53 for urine and 99.32 +/- 0.74 and 98.90 +/- 0.96 for plasma, for I and II, respectively. No interference was encountered with the co-administered drugs: valproic acid (CAS 99-66-1), diphenylhydantoin (CAS 57-41-0), phenobarbital (CAS 50-06-6), carbamazepine (CAS 298-46-4), clonazepam (CAS 1622-61-3), clobazam (CAS 22316-47-8) or cimetidine (CAS 51481-61-9). A proposal of the reaction pathway is suggested. The advantages of the proposed methods over existing method are discussed. PMID:11258050

  12. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rohypnol, ketamine, as well as MDMA (ecstasy) and methamphetamine ( Drug Facts: Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug ... Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2010). Methamphetamine is a powerfully addictive stimulant associated with serious ...

  13. [Interactions between oral contraceptives and other drugs].

    PubMed

    Hansen, T H; Jensen, S B

    1991-10-28

    Failures of oral contraceptives are possible when combined with rifampicin or antiepileptics, especially phenobarbitone and phenytoin. The mode of action is shown by clinical trials to be due to induction of hepatic enzymes thus increasing the steroid metabolism. Failure or oral contraceptives has occurred with the concomitant use of antibiotics, i.e. ampicillin and sulfonamides. Clinical trials have focused upon the changes in the intestinal flora induced by antibiotics. This might influence the enterohepatic circulation of estrogen and thereby decrease reabsorption of estrogen, but this has not been definitely proved. The failures may be caused by individual pharmacokinetics of oral contraceptives. Oral contraceptives are able to influence the pharmacodynamics of various other drugs metabolized by oxidation or conjugation but besides an increased pharmacological effect of prednisolone and increased toxicity of imipramine the clinical importance is uncertain. PMID:1949335

  14. Investigational new drugs for focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco

    2016-01-01

    For more than 30 years, antiepileptic drug development has been based on specific assumptions regarding the neurobiology of epilepsy but all marketed drugs have not changed the proportion of drug refractory patients. It is, therefore, evident that new molecular targets need to be identified. Advances in neurobiology and molecular pharmacology are bringing into the epilepsy field new neurochemical functions such as those modulated by cannabinoid, serotonin, melatonin and galanin receptors. Among all the different compounds, the melatonin type 3 receptor agonist beprodone and cannabidiol are those at the more advanced stage of development. Interestingly, despite the structural analogies with tetrahydrocannabinol, the anticonvulsant activity of cannabidiol is not mediated by an interaction with cannabinoid receptors. Neurosteroids represent another remarkable class of drugs, and among them, ganaxolone is at the most advanced stage of development. Furthermore, for the first time, potential disease-modifying agents and techniques are entering the epilepsy market. Rapalogues such as everolimus and the antibiotic minocycline are currently under development for specific epileptic syndromes like tuberous sclerosis or Angelman syndrome. Finally, optogenetics, though still at an early stage of development, represents a futuristic therapeutic strategy for drug-refractory epilepsy. PMID:26535466

  15. Multi-Indication Carbamazepine and the Risk of Severe Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Korean Elderly Patients: A Korean Health Insurance Data-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Joongyub; Ko, Young-Jin; Shin, Ju-Young; Jung, Sun-Young; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Park, Byung-Joo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the risk of severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCAR) after exposure to multi-indication antiepileptic drugs for in Korean elderly patients. Methods We used a nationwide database from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service claims constructed for the monitoring of drug utilization among the entire Korean elderly population from January 2005 to June 2006. We identified cases of SCARs among inpatients aged ≥65 years and those newly diagnosed with erythema multiforme according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision code (L51). Each case was matched to four controls for gender, age, and the first hospitalization date as the index date. The use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and valproate during a 60-day period before the index date was compared. A conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of SCARs for antiepileptic drug. Results We identified 286 cases of SCAR and 1,144 matched controls. Among the 25 patients who were prescribed antiepileptic drugs within 60 days of the index date. There were 11 cases (3.8%) of severe ocular manifestations, and most elderly patients were first-time or short-term users of antiepileptic drugs. Among the 10 cases of carbamazepine use, only 2 cases were prescribed carbamazepine for seizure. All antiepileptic drugs were associated with an increased SCAR risk (adjusted OR = 3.42, 95% CI: 1.75–6.63). The SCAR risk was highest in patients treated with carbamazepine (adjusted OR = 10.39, 95% CI: 2.64–40.86, for multi-indication; adjusted OR = 6.84, 95% CI: 1.55–30.10, for neuropathic pain). Conclusion Carbamazepine use was associated with a nearly 10-fold increase in severe cutaneous drug reactions in Korean elderly patients. This association was consistently high with SCAR patients who received carbamazepine for neuropathic

  16. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  17. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Back, D J; Orme, M L

    1990-06-01

    Oral contraceptive steroids are used by an estimated 60 to 70 million women world-wide. Over the past 20 years there have been both case reports and clinical studies on the topic of drug interactions with these agents. Some of the interactions are of definite therapeutic relevance, whereas others can be discounted as being of no clinical significance. Pharmacological interactions between oral contraceptive steroids and other compounds may be of 2 kinds: (a) drugs may impair the efficacy of oral contraceptive steroids, leading to breakthrough bleeding and pregnancy (in a few cases, the activity of the contraceptive is enhanced); (b) oral contraceptive steroids may interfere with the metabolism of other drugs. A number of anticonvulsants (phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine) are enzyme-inducing agents and thereby increase the clearance of the oral contraceptive steroids. Valproic acid has no enzyme-inducing properties, and thus women on this anticonvulsant can rely on their low dose oral contraceptive steroids for contraceptive protection. Researchers are now beginning to unravel the molecular basis of this interaction, with evidence of specific forms of cytochrome P450 (P450IIC and IIIA gene families) being induced by phenobarbital. Rifampicin, the antituberculous drug, also induces a cytochrome P450 which is a product of the P450IIIA gene subfamily. This isozyme is one of the major forms involved in 2-hydroxylation of ethinylestradiol. Broad spectrum antibiotics have been implicated in causing pill failure; case reports document the interaction, and general practitioners are convinced that it is real. The problem remains that there is still no firm clinical pharmacokinetic evidence which indicates that blood concentrations of oral contraceptive steroids are altered by antibiotics. However, perhaps this should not be a surprise, given that the incidence of the interaction may be very low. It is suggested that an individual at risk will have a low bioavailability

  18. [Drug interactions with contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Simon, P; Hakkou, F; Warot, D

    1984-03-01

    3 possible types of drug interactions with contraceptives involve oral contraceptives (OCs), IUDs, and spermicides. The interaction of combined OCs with various drugs is frequently discussed in the literature, but the reported facts are sometimes contradictory. Case studies have indicated failure of OCs in patients taking ampicillin, but comparative studies using ampicillin and placebos have shown no difference in rates of estrogen, progestogens, follicle stimulating hormone, or luteinizing hormone in the 2 groups. Individual differences and predispositions among some women appear to play a role in drug interactions. The clinician should be wary of modifying accepted prescription practices too readily in the face of findings that may be explained by other as yet undisclosed factors. Interactions are difficult to establish, as are their mechanisms. They may perhaps be explained by the estrogen or progestogen components of the pills, the timing of the antibiotic dose, the duration of treatment and the dosage used, resistance of the intestinal flora, self-medication, or other factors. The drug troleandomycin is a special case; it appears to favor the already existing tendency of OCs to provoke cholestatic jaundice. A table of drug interactions with OCs can be divided into 2 parts, those that have been confirmed and whose mechanisms of action are known, including antiepileptics such as phenobarbital, butobarbital, phenytoin, and primidone, and the drug rifampicin, which are enzyme inductors; and those that are suspected but as yet unconfirmed and whose mechanism of action is not established. The unconfirmed interactions involve a variety of effects in addition to pregnancy. It is not yet established whether enzyme inductors are a greater problem for users of low-dose pills, but the probable existence of individual variations in sensitivity causes problems in setting recommendations applicable to all patients. Interactions between progestogen-only OCs and other drugs

  19. Antiepileptic potential and behavioral profile of L-pGlu-(2-propyl)-L-His-L-ProNH2, a newer thyrotropin-releasing hormone analog.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Satyendra Kumar; Krishnamoorthy, Srinivasan; Pawar, Chandrasekhar; Kaur, Navneet; Monga, Vikramdeep; Meena, Chhuttan Lal; Jain, Rahul; Sharma, Shyam S

    2009-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and its analogs have a number of neurobiological functions and therapeutic uses in disorders of the central nervous system. In this study, the newly synthesized TRH analogs were evaluated for central nervous system activity in pentobarbital-induced sleeping in mice. The most potent TRH analog (L-pGlu-(2-propyl)-L-His-L-ProNH(2) coded as NP-647) was evaluated for its antiepileptic potential in various seizure models in mice in comparison with TRH. Intravenous pretreatment with NP-647 (10 and 20 micromol/kg body wt) significantly delayed the onset and reduced the frequency of convulsions in the pentylenetetrazole model, but not in the maximum electroshock seizure model. Also, it was found to be protective against picrotoxin- and kainic acid-induced seizures. However, NP-647 did not significantly affect theophylline-induced seizures. Further study of the effect of NP-647 on locomotor activity and a functional observational battery revealed that it did not significantly exhibit any undesirable effects as compared with vehicle and TRH. NP-647 did not significantly affect cerebral blood flow, whereas the native peptide TRH markedly increased cerebral blood flow. Furthermore, NP-647 exerted antiepileptic activity without significantly altering plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone levels and mean arterial blood pressure. This suggests that NP-647 is more selective for central nervous system activity and devoid of hormonal and cerebrovascular system effects. In contrast, TRH exhibited cardiac and endocrine effects as marked by significant elevation in mean arterial blood pressure and plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. This study demonstrates that NP-647 has potential antiepileptic activity devoid of undesirable effects and, thus, can be exploited for the prevention and treatment of epilepsy. PMID:18952198

  20. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... Adverse reactions to drugs are common. (adverse means unwanted or unexpected.) Almost any drug can cause an adverse reaction. Reactions range from irritating ...

  1. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  2. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... uses. Other uses of these drugs are abuse. Club drugs are also sometimes used as "date rape" drugs, to make someone unable to say no to or fight back against sexual assault. Abusing these drugs can ...

  3. Haematological toxicity of drugs used in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Robert J; Dunk, Louisa

    2008-01-01

    Almost all classes of psychotropic agents have been reported to cause blood dyscrasias. Mechanisms include direct toxic effects upon the bone marrow, the formation of antibodies against haematopoietic precursors or involve peripheral destruction of cells. Agranulocytosis is probably the most important drug-related blood dyscrasia. The mortality from drug-induced agranulocytosis is 5-10% in Western countries. The manifestations of agranulocytosis are secondary to infection. Aggressive treatment with intravenous broad-spectrum antimicrobials and bone marrow stimulants may be required. Of drugs encountered in psychiatry, antipsychotics including clozapine (risk of agranulocytosis approximately 0.8%, predominantly in the first year of treatment) and phenothiazines (chlorpromazine agranulocytosis risk approximately 0.13%), and antiepileptics (notably carbamazepine, neutropenia risk approximately 0.5%) are the most common causes of drug-related neutropenia/agranulocytosis. Drugs known to cause neutropenia should not be used concomitantly with other drugs known to cause this problem. High temperature and other indicators of possible infection should be looked for routinely during treatment. Clozapine is well known as a drug that can cause blood dyscrasias, but olanzapine and other atypicals may also cause similar problems. In addition to genetic factors, there are likely to be dose-related and immunological components to these phenomena. Important lessons have been learnt from the haematological monitoring that is necessary with clozapine and the monitoring has been very successful in preventing deaths related to clozapine-induced agranulocytosis. Continuing research into the mechanisms of drug-induced neutropenia and agranulocytosis may serve to further enhance the safe use not only of clozapine, but also of other agents. PMID:18098216

  4. Concomitant therapy in people with epilepsy: potential drug-drug interactions and patient awareness.

    PubMed

    Eyal, Sara; Rasaby, Sivan; Ekstein, Dana

    2014-02-01

    People with epilepsy (PWE) may use prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs for the treatment of concomitant diseases. Combinations of these drugs, as well as dietary supplements, with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may lead to reduced control of seizures and of coexisting medical conditions and increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The aims of this study were to obtain comprehensive lists of medications, dietary supplements, botanicals, and specific food components used by adult PWE and to evaluate the potential for interactions involving AEDs and patients' awareness of such potential interactions. We conducted a prospective, questionnaire-based study of PWE attending the Hadassah-Hebrew University Epilepsy Clinic over a period of 7months. The questionnaire interview included the listing of medications, medicinal herbs, dietary supplements, and specific food components consumed and the knowledge of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and it was conducted by a pharmacist. Drug-drug interactions were analyzed via the Micromedex online database. Out of 179 patients who attended the clinic over the study period, we interviewed 73 PWE, of which 71 were included in our final analysis. The mean number of AEDs consumed per subject was 1.7 (SD: 0.8, range: 1-4). Forty (56%) subjects were also treated with other prescription and/or OTC medications, and thirty-four (48%) took dietary supplements. Drug families most prone to DDIs involving AEDs included antipsychotic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and statins. Two-thirds of study participants (67%) knew that DDIs may lead to ADRs, but only half (56%) were aware of the potential for reduced seizure control. Only 44% always reported treatment with AEDs to medical professionals. This study provides for the first time a comprehensive picture of prescription and OTC drugs and food supplements used by PWE. Despite a considerable potential for DDIs involving AEDs, patient awareness is limited

  5. Unintentional poisoning with drugs in a Mexican pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Olguin, Hugo Juárez; Garduño, Lina Barranco; Pérez, Janett Flores; Pérez, Carmen Flores

    2011-01-01

    In Mexico, more than 70 % of acute pediatric poisoning is caused by medicines. The age groups at greatest risk of drug poisoning are those between 2 to 5 years and 14 to 18 years; although in this last group, drug ingestion is usually intentional. The purpose of our study was to determine the frequency of unintentional drug poisoning in the pediatric population attended in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico, and to review the rescue procedures applied in specific cases. A retrospective and descriptive study was performed through revision of clinical records, obtained from patients attended at the National Pediatrics Institute from January 1995 to June 2005. One hundred and thirty nine (139) records, 62 females and 77 males, median age 2 years with clinical diagnosis of drug poisoning were reviewed. Poisoning was confirmed in 23.7% of the cases by determination of drug plasma concentration. The most frequent causes of drug poisoning were analgesics (42.3 %), from which 60 % corresponded to acetylsalicylic acid and 40 % to acetaminophen; antiepileptics (22.9 %), anxiolytics (17.9 %) and other drugs (16.3 %). From our results, we concluded that self-medication was unlikely due to the early age of patients, unless ingestion of the drug was accidental. No case needed more than 24 h of hospitalization, and no patient died due to poisoning. Specific cause of poisoning was that, at early ages, doses must be administered according to the infant's weight, which poses a risk of poisoning. PMID:21471606

  6. Drugs, drugs--who has the drugs?

    PubMed

    Blair, James

    2012-01-01

    Drug diversion, although on the increase, is not the only problem involving drugs that hospital security officials should be concerned with. Growing drug shortages, offshore production, counterfeiting, and weaknesses in the drug supply chain in case of a world-wide pandemic, are even greater causes for concern, the author claims. PMID:22423518

  7. ABHD6 blockade exerts antiepileptic activity in PTZ-induced seizures and in spontaneous seizures in R6/2 mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Christine S.; Swinney, Katie; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Cao, Jessica K.; Marrs, William; Blankman, Jacqueline L.; Tu, Sarah; Cherry, Allison E.; Fung, Susan; Wen, Andy; Li, Weiwei; Saporito, Michael S.; Selley, Dana E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Oakley, John C.; Stella, Nephi

    2014-01-01

    The serine hydrolase α/β-hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6) hydrolyzes the most abundant endocannabinoid (eCB) in the brain, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and controls its availability at cannabinoid receptors. We show that ABHD6 inhibition decreases pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized tonic-clonic and myoclonic seizure incidence, and severity. This effect is retained in cnr1−/− or cnr2−/− mice, but blocked by addition of a subconvulsive dose of picrotoxin, suggesting the involvement of GABAA receptors. ABHD6 inhibition also blocked spontaneous seizures in R6/2 mice, a genetic model of Juvenile Huntington’s disease known to exhibit dysregulated eCB signaling. ABHD6 blockade retained its antiepileptic activity over chronic dosing and was not associated with psychomotor or cognitive effects. While the etiology of seizures in R6/2 mice remains unsolved, involvement of the hippocampus is suggested by interictal epileptic discharges, increased expression of vGLUT1 but not vGAT, and reduced Neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression. We conclude that ABHD6 inhibition may represent a novel antiepileptic strategy. PMID:25033180

  8. New anticonvulsant drugs. Focus on flunarizine, fosphenytoin, midazolam and stiripentol.

    PubMed

    Bebin, M; Bleck, T P

    1994-08-01

    In the past decade, several new antiepileptic drugs have been tested. Most recently, 5 new antiepileptic drugs have been launched onto European and US markets. These include vigabatrin, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine in Europe, and felbamate and gabapentin in the US. In addition to these, 3 additional drugs are in the clinical investigational stage: flunarizine, fosphenytoin and stiripentol. A fourth agent is midazolam, which was originally introduced in 1986, but recently has shown effectiveness in the treatment of status epilepticus. Flunarizine is a selective calcium channel blocker that has shown anticonvulsant properties in both animal and human studies. It is a long-acting anticonvulsant that clinical studies have shown to have effects similar to those of phenytoin and carbamazepine in the treatment of partial, complex partial and generalised seizures. Fosphenytoin was developed to eliminate the poor aqueous solubility and irritant properties of intravenous phenytoin. It is rapidly converted to phenytoin after intravenous or intramuscular administration. In clinical studies, this prodrug showed minimal evidence of adverse events and no serious cardiovascular or respiratory adverse reactions. It may have a clear advantage over the present parenteral formulation of phenytoin. Midazolam is a benzodiazepine that is more potent than diazepam as a sedative, muscle relaxant and in its influence on electroencephalographic measures. It has been shown to be an effective treatment for refractory seizures in status epilepticus. Stiripentol has anticonvulsant properties as well as the ability to inhibit the cytochrome P450 system. There are significant metabolic drug interactions between stiripentol and phenytoin, carbamazepine and phenobarbital (phenobarbitone). Stiripentol has been studied in patients with partial seizures, refractory epilepsy and refractory absence seizures with some efficacious results. PMID:7527321

  9. Oxidative stress is increased in women with epilepsy: Is it a potential mechanism of anti-epileptic drug-induced teratogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Damayanthi; Jayakumari, Narayani; Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Oxidative stress can be a final common pathway for AED-induced teratogenesis. Aims: To compare the oxidative stress of women with epilepsy (WWE) and unfavorable pregnancy outcome (fetal malformation or spontaneous abortion - group EM) with that of WWE with normal pregnancy outcome (group ENM) and healthy women with normal pregnancy outcome (group C). Materials and Methods: We identified WWE under group EM (n = 43) and group ENM (n = 22) from the Kerala Registry of Epilepsy and Pregnancy (KREP). Group C was constituted of healthy volunteers (N = 20). Oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and isoprostane (ISP). The antioxidant profile was evaluated as activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant status (TAO), and glutathione (GSH) content. Results: The MDA and ISP levels for group EM (3.46 + 0.82 and 17.77 + 3.0) were higher than that of group ENM (3.07 + 1.02 and 14.0 + 5.3), and both were significantly higher than that of group C (2.42 + 0.51 and 10.77 + 4.1). Their levels of SOD (146.82 + 42.64 vs. 175.81 + 42.61) and GSH (0.98 + 0.98 vs. 1.55 + 1.3) were significantly lower than those of controls. No significant changes were seen in TAO and GR. WWE on polytherapy showed significant increase in MDA when compared to monotherapy group. Conclusion: WWE (group EM and ENM) had higher oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant activity. The subgroup of WWE with unfavorable pregnancy outcome (group EM) had higher oxidative stress. Excess oxidative stress can be a final common pathway, by which AEDs exert teratogenic effects. PMID:23349593

  10. Does antiepileptic drug withdrawal predispose patients undergoing temporal lobe epilepsy surgery to late onset of psychiatric morbidity? A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Garima; Agarwal, Priya; Sagar, Rajesh; Sood, Mamta; Gupta, Aditya; Suri, Ashish; Garg, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is an established and increasingly utilized treatment option in medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Many psychiatric problems are known to complicate in the postoperative period. Most studies have a follow-up period of less than 24 months. We report the cases of three patients who developed severe psychiatric problems in the late postoperative period after successful temporal lobectomy for refractory epilepsy — Psychosis, major depression with psychosis, and severe anxiety disorder, respectively. None of the patients had past or family history of psychiatric disease. All three patients had undergone anterior temporal lobectomy on the right side for intractable epilepsy. They remained absolutely seizure-free after surgery. We conclude that psychiatric morbidity may arise de novo long after temporal lobectomy. This association between temporal lobectomy for epilepsy and late onset psychiatric morbidity should be carefully studied. Mechanisms underlying this late complication require deeper understanding of the effects of epilepsy surgery. PMID:27570392

  11. Does antiepileptic drug withdrawal predispose patients undergoing temporal lobe epilepsy surgery to late onset of psychiatric morbidity? A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Garima; Agarwal, Priya; Sagar, Rajesh; Sood, Mamta; Gupta, Aditya; Suri, Ashish; Garg, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is an established and increasingly utilized treatment option in medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Many psychiatric problems are known to complicate in the postoperative period. Most studies have a follow-up period of less than 24 months. We report the cases of three patients who developed severe psychiatric problems in the late postoperative period after successful temporal lobectomy for refractory epilepsy - Psychosis, major depression with psychosis, and severe anxiety disorder, respectively. None of the patients had past or family history of psychiatric disease. All three patients had undergone anterior temporal lobectomy on the right side for intractable epilepsy. They remained absolutely seizure-free after surgery. We conclude that psychiatric morbidity may arise de novo long after temporal lobectomy. This association between temporal lobectomy for epilepsy and late onset psychiatric morbidity should be carefully studied. Mechanisms underlying this late complication require deeper understanding of the effects of epilepsy surgery. PMID:27570392

  12. Parent-completed scales for measuring seizure severity and severity of side-effects of antiepileptic drugs in childhood epilepsy: development and psychometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Carpay, H A; Arts, W F; Vermeulen, J; Stroink, H; Brouwer, O F; Peters, A C; van Donselaar, C A; Aldenkamp, A P

    1996-07-01

    We have developed two outcome measures for childhood epilepsy: a seizure severity (SS) scale and a side-effects (SE) scale. Both scales have been designed for completion by parents. The scales were tested in two pilot phases and the results of this stepwise analysis are described here. The final scales' psychometric properties were assessed in a group of 80 children with active epilepsy, representative of the population at whom the scales were aimed: children with chronic epilepsy, aged 4-16 years, including all seizure types and epilepsies, as well as children with neurological comorbidity. The SS scale and SE scale showed good internal consistency and test-retest stability. Although there was a significant positive correlation between the SS scale and the SE scale, this was low, indicating that the scales measure a different clinical trait. The SE scale consisted of two subscales: a Toxic subscale, measuring the severity of dose-related side-effects, and a Chronic subscale, measuring the severity of long-term behavioural and cognitive side-effects. These subscales for side-effects showed a high correlation and can be used as a joint scale. These scales have the potential to improve outcome assessment in childhood epilepsy and they can be used to assess important aspects of quality of life in this population. PMID:8832193

  13. Primidone - An antiepileptic drug - characterisation by quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR and UV-Visible) investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Subramanian, S.; Mohan, S.

    2013-05-01

    The solid phase FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of primidone were recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The vibrational spectra were analysed and the observed fundamentals were assigned and analysed. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the theoretical scaled vibrational wavenumbers determined by DFT methods. The Raman intensities were also determined with B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surface of the molecule were constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of primidone has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded and the chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated.

  14. Triazolines XV. Anticonvulsant profile of ADD 17014, a potentially unique 1,2,3-triazoline antiepileptic drug, in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Kadaba, P K; Slevin, J T

    1988-01-01

    ADD 17014[1-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl) delta 2-1,2,3-triazoline], is a representative member of a hitherto unknown, structurally novel family of anticonvulsant agents. The anticonvulsant profile of ADD 17014 following intraperitoneal (i.p.) and oral administration in mice and rats was evaluated using a battery of well-standardized anticonvulsant tests and compared with phenytoin (PHT), phenobarbital (PB), ethosuximide (ESM), and valproate (VPA). The results indicate that ADD 17014 is effective in nontoxic i.p. doses in mice by the maximal electroshock seizure (MES), Metrazol (subcutaneous, s.c. Met), bicuculline (s.c. Bic) and picrotoxin (s.c. Pic) tests, but ineffective against strychnine-induced seizures; it is also effective after nontoxic oral doses in both mice and rats by the MES and s.c. Met tests. Protective indices (PI = TD50/ED50), calculated from i.p. data in mice, were highest for ADD 17014 by the s.c. Met (26.02) and s.c. Bic (93.93) tests; the PIs, after oral administration in mice and rats, were equal to or higher than those of the prototype agents. In vitro receptor binding studies of ADD 17014 and potential metabolites indicated no significant inhibitory activity except for the beta-amino alcohol, which displaced almost 93% of [3H]glutamate from the glutamate receptors, suggesting that ADD 17014 may be functioning as a prodrug and an excitatory amino acid antagonist. The overall results indicate that ADD 17014 is a relatively nontoxic agent that more closely resembles PB and VPA, with a broad and unique spectrum of anticonvulsant activity. PMID:3371287

  15. The antiepileptic drug valproic acid and other medium-chain fatty acids acutely reduce phosphoinositide levels independently of inositol in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pishan; Orabi, Benoit; Deranieh, Rania M.; Dham, Manik; Hoeller, Oliver; Shimshoni, Jakob A.; Yagen, Boris; Bialer, Meir; Greenberg, Miriam L.; Walker, Matthew C.; Williams, Robin S. B.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Valproic acid (VPA) is the most widely prescribed epilepsy treatment worldwide, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. Our previous work identified a previously unknown effect of VPA in reducing phosphoinositide production in the simple model Dictyostelium followed by the transfer of data to a mammalian synaptic release model. In our current study, we show that the reduction in phosphoinositide [PtdInsP (also known as PIP) and PtdInsP2 (also known as PIP2)] production caused by VPA is acute and dose dependent, and that this effect occurs independently of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, inositol recycling and inositol synthesis. In characterising the structural requirements for this effect, we also identify a family of medium-chain fatty acids that show increased efficacy compared with VPA. Within the group of active compounds is a little-studied group previously associated with seizure control, and analysis of two of these compounds (nonanoic acid and 4-methyloctanoic acid) shows around a threefold enhanced potency compared with VPA for protection in an in vitro acute rat seizure model. Together, our data show that VPA and a newly identified group of medium-chain fatty acids reduce phosphoinositide levels independently of inositol regulation, and suggest the reinvestigation of these compounds as treatments for epilepsy. PMID:21876211

  16. Drug Facts

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Weed, Pot) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What ... About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other Drugs You can call 1-800- ...

  17. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem is interactions, which may occur between Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit Drugs and supplements, such as gingko and blood thinners ...

  18. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  19. Pharmacological Treatment of Drug-Resistant Epilepsy in Adults: a Practical Guide.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Martin J

    2016-09-01

    More than 30 % of adults with epilepsy do not fully control on the currently available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). For these and many other patients, combinations of agents, often possessing different mechanisms of actions, are employed with the aim of achieving seizure freedom or the best available prognosis in terms of reduced seizure numbers and severity. This review discusses my own approach to optimising outcomes in as many of these patients as possible by adjusting the drug burden using a combination of two, three or sometimes four or more AEDs. Modes of drug action are reviewed and practical strategies for treating different patients with drug-resistant epilepsy have been explored. Only for sodium valproate with lamotrigine is there good evidence of synergism. The final part of this practical paper consists of six individual illustrative cases with appropriate comments. PMID:27443649

  20. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  1. Controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-05-18

    Essential facts Controlled drugs are defined and governed by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and associated regulations. Examples of controlled drugs include morphine, pethidine and methadone. Since 2012, appropriately qualified nurses and midwives can prescribe controlled drugs for medical conditions within their competence. There are some exceptions when treating addiction. PMID:27191427

  2. Drug diversion

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Prescription drug diversion has significant health, legal and social implications. Deaths from misuse of prescription drugs account for a significant proportion of overdose deaths. The drugs most commonly involved are analgesics, particularly opioids, and psychoactive drugs, particularly benzodiazepines. Diverted drugs are most often sourced from a family member or friend, but are also sourced from overseas pharmacies or laboratories, or bought from drug dealers. Drug diversion can be mitigated by good prescribing practices. Systems for monitoring the prescribing and dispensing of medicines are being instituted across Australia. PMID:26648654

  3. Diterpenes: Advances in Neurobiological Drug Research.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Torequl; da Silva, Claucenira Bandeira; de Alencar, Marcus Vinícius Oliveira Barros; Paz, Márcia Fernanda Correia Jardim; Almeida, Fernanda Regina de Castro; Melo-Cavalcante, Ana Amélia de Carvalho

    2016-06-01

    A significant number of studies have been performed with diterpene effect on the brain. Our study aims to make a systematic revision on them. The initial purpose of this review was to screen diterpenes with neurological activity, in particular those that have already been studied and published in different journals (databases until August 2015). The second purpose was to make an action-wise discussion as results viewed on them by taking into drug discovery and development account. Diterpenes considered in this review were selected on the basis of updated information on them and having sufficient information on their screenings. We identified several examples of diterpenes having an interest in further study. We have included the possible sources of them as observed in evidence, their known molecular neurobiological mechanisms, and the active constituents responsible for such activities with the doses and test systems. Results suggest diterpenes to have neurobiological activities like neuro-protection, anti-epileptic, anxiolytic, anti-Alzheimer's disease, anti-Parkinson's disease, anti-cerebral ischemia, anti-neuropathic pain, anti-neuro-inflammatory, and many more. In conclusion, diterpenes may be the prominent candidates in neurobiological drug research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27020718

  4. Prophylactic Drug Treatment of Migraine in Children and Adolescents: An Update.

    PubMed

    Tajti, János; Szok, Délia; Csáti, Anett; Vécsei, László

    2016-01-01

    Migraine as a highly disabling pain condition influences the daily activities of those affected, including children and adolescents. The pathomechanism of migraine is not fully understood, and the different types of prophylactic antimigraine drugs that are applied are not specific for migraine. There is a need for preventive treatment in the event of frequent migraine attacks, an impairment of the quality of life, severe accompanying or aura symptoms, and the failure of acute drug treatment. The following pharmacological classes are recommended: antidepressants, antiepileptics, antihistamines, beta-adrenergic receptor blockers, and calcium ion channel antagonists, besides onabotulinum toxin A and nutraceuticals (butterbur). The most urgent goal as concerns pharmaceutical innovation is the development of pathomechanism-based antimigraine drugs and personalized therapy tailored to the children and adolescents. PMID:26695061

  5. [The original nootropic and neuroprotective drug noopept potentiates the anticonvulsant activity of valproate in mice].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, E V; Ponteleeva, I V; Trofimov, S S; Lapa, V I; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the original dipeptide drug noopept, known to possess nootrope, neuroprotector, and anxiolytic properties, on the anticonvulsant activity of the antiepileptic drug valproate has been studied on the model of corazole-induced convulsions in mice. Neither a single administration of noopept (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) nor its repeated introduction in 10 or 35 days enhanced the convulsant effect of corazole, which is evidence that noopept alone does not possess anticonvulsant properties. Prolonged (five weeks) preliminary administration of noopept enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of valproate. This result justifies the joint chronic administration of noopept in combination with valproate in order to potentiate the anticonvulsant effect of the latter drug. In addition, the administration of noopept favorably influences the cognitive functions and suppresses the development of neurodegenerative processes. PMID:20095393

  6. An Update on Drug-induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Devarbhavi, Harshad

    2012-09-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following drugs taken in therapeutic doses. Hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition in drug development, or withdrawal or restricted use after marketing. No age is exempt although adults and the elderly are at increased risk. DILI spans the entire spectrum ranging from asymptomatic elevation in transaminases to severe disease such as acute hepatitis leading to acute liver failure. The liver specific Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method is the most validated and extensively used for determining the likelihood that an implicated drug caused DILI. Asymptomatic elevation in liver tests must be differentiated from adaptation. Drugs producing DILI have a signature pattern although no single pattern is characteristic. Antimicrobial and central nervous system agents including antiepileptic drugs are the leading causes of DILI worldwide. In the absence of a diagnostic test or a biomarker, the diagnosis rests on the evidence of absence of competing causes such as acute viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis and others. Recent studies show that antituberculosis drugs given for active or latent disease are still a major cause of drug-induced liver injury in India and the West respectively. Presence of jaundice signifies a severe disease and entails a worse outcome. The pathogenesis is unclear and is due to a mix of host, drug metabolite and environmental factors. Research has evolved from incriminating candidate genes to genome wide analysis studies. Immediate cessation of the drug is key to prevent or minimize progressive damage. Treatment is largely supportive. N-acetylcysteine is the antidote for paracetamol toxicity. Carnitine has been tried in valproate injury whereas steroids and ursodeoxycholic acid may be used in DILI associated with hypersensitivity or cholestatic features respectively. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology, the patterns of

  7. An Update on Drug-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Devarbhavi, Harshad

    2012-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following drugs taken in therapeutic doses. Hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition in drug development, or withdrawal or restricted use after marketing. No age is exempt although adults and the elderly are at increased risk. DILI spans the entire spectrum ranging from asymptomatic elevation in transaminases to severe disease such as acute hepatitis leading to acute liver failure. The liver specific Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method is the most validated and extensively used for determining the likelihood that an implicated drug caused DILI. Asymptomatic elevation in liver tests must be differentiated from adaptation. Drugs producing DILI have a signature pattern although no single pattern is characteristic. Antimicrobial and central nervous system agents including antiepileptic drugs are the leading causes of DILI worldwide. In the absence of a diagnostic test or a biomarker, the diagnosis rests on the evidence of absence of competing causes such as acute viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis and others. Recent studies show that antituberculosis drugs given for active or latent disease are still a major cause of drug-induced liver injury in India and the West respectively. Presence of jaundice signifies a severe disease and entails a worse outcome. The pathogenesis is unclear and is due to a mix of host, drug metabolite and environmental factors. Research has evolved from incriminating candidate genes to genome wide analysis studies. Immediate cessation of the drug is key to prevent or minimize progressive damage. Treatment is largely supportive. N-acetylcysteine is the antidote for paracetamol toxicity. Carnitine has been tried in valproate injury whereas steroids and ursodeoxycholic acid may be used in DILI associated with hypersensitivity or cholestatic features respectively. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology, the patterns of

  8. Thirty Years of Orphan Drug Legislation and the Development of Drugs to Treat Rare Seizure Conditions: A Cross Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Georg F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a serious chronic health condition with a high morbidity impairing the life of patients and afflicted families. Many epileptic conditions, especially those affecting children, are rare disorders generating an urgent medical need for more efficacious therapy options. Therefore, we assessed the output of the US and European orphan drug legislations. Methods Quantitative analysis of the FDA and EMA databases for orphan drug designations according to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Results Within the US Orphan Drug Act 40 designations were granted delivering nine approvals, i.e. clobazam, diazepam viscous solution for rectal administration, felbamate, fosphenytoin, lamotrigine, repository corticotropin, rufinamide, topiramate, and vigabatrin. Since 2000 the EMA granted six orphan drug designations whereof two compounds were approved, i.e. rufinamide and stiripentol. In the US, two orphan drug designations were withdrawn. Orphan drugs were approved for conditions including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome, and status epilepticus. Comparing time to approval for rufinamide, which was approved in the US and the EU to treat rare seizure conditions, the process seems faster in the EU (2.2 years) than in the US (4.3 years). Conclusion Orphan drug development in the US and in the EU delivered only few molecular entities to treat rare seizure disorders. The development programs focused on already approved antiepileptic drugs or alternative pharmaceutical formulations. Most orphan drugs approved in the US are not approved in the EU to treat rare seizures although some were introduced after 2000 when the EU adopted the Orphan Drug Regulation. PMID:27557111

  9. Drug utilization in pediatric neurology outpatient department: A prospective study at a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krutika M.; Malhotra, Supriya D.; Patel, Kamlesh P.; Patel, Varsha J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neurological disorders are a significant cause of morbidity, mortality and adversely affect quality of life among pediatric patients. In India, more than 30% population is under 20 years of age, many of whom present late during the course of illness. Several drugs prescribed to pediatric population suffering from neurological disorders may be off label or unlicensed. Aims and Objectives: To study drug use pattern, identify off-label/unlicensed drug use and to check potential for drug-drug interactions in patients attending outpatient department of pediatric neurology at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Methodology: Prescriptions of patients attending pediatric neurology outpatient department were collected prospectively for 8 weeks. They were analyzed for prescribing pattern, WHO core prescribing indicators, off-label/unlicensed drug use and potential for drug-drug interactions. Result: A total of 140 prescriptions were collected, male female ratio being 2:1. Epilepsy was the most common diagnosis (73.57%) followed by breath holding spells, migraine and developmental disorders. Partial seizure was the most common type of epilepsy (52.42%). Average number of drugs prescribed per patient was 1.56. Most commonly prescribed drug was sodium valproate (25.11%) followed by phenytoin (11.41%). About 16% of the prescriptions contained newer antiepileptic drugs. More than 60% of the drugs were prescribed from WHO essential drug list. In 8.57% of cases drugs were prescribed in off-label/unlicensed manner. Twenty-six percent prescriptions showed potential for drug interactions. Conclusion: Epilepsy is the most common neurological disease among children and adolescents. Sodium valproate is the most commonly prescribed drug. A few prescriptions contained off-label/unlicensed drugs. PMID:25278669

  10. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  11. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  12. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs. There are a few other differences— like color, shape, size, or taste—but they do not ... different . Brand-name drugs are often advertised by color and shape. Remember the ads for the “purple ...

  13. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing. PMID:27441421

  14. Drug bioactivation, covalent binding to target proteins and toxicity relevance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shufeng; Chan, Eli; Duan, Wei; Huang, Min; Chen, Yu-Zong

    2005-01-01

    A number of therapeutic drugs with different structures and mechanisms of action have been reported to undergo metabolic activation by Phase I or Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivation gives rise to reactive metabolites/intermediates, which readily confer covalent binding to various target proteins by nucleophilic substitution and/or Schiff's base mechanism. These drugs include analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen), antibacterial agents (e.g., sulfonamides and macrolide antibiotics), anticancer drugs (e.g., irinotecan), antiepileptic drugs (e.g., carbamazepine), anti-HIV agents (e.g., ritonavir), antipsychotics (e.g., clozapine), cardiovascular drugs (e.g., procainamide and hydralazine), immunosupressants (e.g., cyclosporine A), inhalational anesthetics (e.g., halothane), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDSs) (e.g., diclofenac), and steroids and their receptor modulators (e.g., estrogens and tamoxifen). Some herbal and dietary constituents are also bioactivated to reactive metabolites capable of binding covalently and inactivating cytochrome P450s (CYPs). A number of important target proteins of drugs have been identified by mass spectrometric techniques and proteomic approaches. The covalent binding and formation of drug-protein adducts are generally considered to be related to drug toxicity, and selective protein covalent binding by drug metabolites may lead to selective organ toxicity. However, the mechanisms involved in the protein adduct-induced toxicity are largely undefined, although it has been suggested that drug-protein adducts may cause toxicity either through impairing physiological functions of the modified proteins or through immune-mediated mechanisms. In addition, mechanism-based inhibition of CYPs may result in toxic drug-drug interactions. The clinical consequences of drug bioactivation and covalent binding to proteins are unpredictable, depending on many factors that are associated with the administered drugs and patients

  15. Drug Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Wanda E.; And Others

    Results of a survey of student perceptions of drugs and drug use that was conducted at Bowie State College are presented. Studies that have been conducted on college students' use of alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine in the last five years are reviewed, along with additional studies relating to the general population and the following drugs:…

  16. Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tong Logan, Angela; Silverman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    One of the most clinically significant complications related to the use of pharmacotherapy is the potential for drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. The gastrointestinal system plays a large role in the pharmacokinetic profile of most medications, and many medications utilized in gastroenterology have clinically significant drug interactions. This review will discuss the impact of alterations of intestinal pH, interactions mediated by phase I hepatic metabolism enzymes and P-glycoprotein, the impact of liver disease on drug metabolism, and interactions seen with commonly utilized gastrointestinal medications. PMID:22933873

  17. Acute and chronic drug-induced hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Pessayre, D; Larrey, D

    1988-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions may mimic almost any kind of liver disease. Acute hepatitis is often due to the formation of reactive metabolites in the liver. Despite several protective mechanisms (epoxide hydrolases, conjugation with glutathione), this formation may lead to predictable toxic hepatitis after hugh overdoses (e.g. paracetamol), or to idiosyncratic toxic hepatitis after therapeutic doses (e.g. isoniazid). Both genetic factors (e.g. constitutive levels of cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes, or defects in protective mechanisms) and acquired factors (e.g. malnutrition, or chronic intake of alcohol or other microsomal enzyme inducers) may explain the unique susceptibility of some patients. Formation of chemically reactive metabolites may also lead to allergic hepatitis, probably through immunization against plasma membrane protein epitopes modified by the covalent binding of the reactive metabolites. This may be the mechanism for acute hepatitis produced by many drugs (e.g. amineptine, erythromycin derivatives, halothane, imipramine, isaxonine, alpha-methyldopa, tienilic acid, etc.). Genetic defects in several protective mechanisms (e.g. epoxide hydrolase, acetylation) may explain the unique susceptibility of some patients, possibly by increasing exposure to allergenic, metabolite-altered plasma membrane protein epitopes. Like toxic idiosyncratic hepatitis, allergic hepatitis occurs in a few patients only. Unlike toxic hepatitis, allergic hepatitis is frequently associated with fever, rash or other hypersensitivity manifestations; it may be hepatocellular, mixed or cholestatic; it promptly recurs after inadvertent drug rechallenge. Lysosomal phospholipidosis occurs frequently with three antianginal drugs (diethylaminoethoxyhexestrol, amiodarone and perhexiline). These cationic, amphiphilic drugs may form phospholipid-drug complexes within lysosomes. Such complexes resist phospholipases and accumulate within enlarged lysosomes, forming myeloid figures. This

  18. Pharmacological interactions between rifampicin and antiretroviral drugs: challenges and research priorities for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Semvua, Hadija H; Kibiki, Gibson S; Kisanga, Elton R; Boeree, Martin J; Burger, David M; Aarnoutse, Rob

    2015-02-01

    Coadministration of antituberculosis and antiretroviral therapy is often inevitable in high-burden countries where tuberculosis (TB) is the most common opportunistic infection associated with HIV/AIDS. Concurrent use of rifampicin and many antiretroviral drugs is complicated by pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Rifampicin is a very potent enzyme inducer, which can result in subtherapeutic antiretroviral drug concentrations. In addition, TB drugs and antiretroviral drugs have additive (pharmacodynamic) interactions as reflected in overlapping adverse effect profiles. This review provides an overview of the pharmacological interactions between rifampicin-based TB treatment and antiretroviral drugs in adults living in resource-limited settings. Major progress has been made to evaluate the interactions between TB drugs and antiretroviral therapy; however, burning questions remain concerning nevirapine and efavirenz effectiveness during rifampicin-based TB treatment, treatment options for TB-HIV-coinfected patients with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance or intolerance, and exact treatment or dosing schedules for vulnerable patients including children and pregnant women. The current research priorities can be addressed by maximizing the use of already existing data, creating new data by conducting clinical trials and prospective observational studies and to engage a lobby to make currently unavailable drugs available to those most in need. PMID:24943062

  19. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  20. Mechanisms of Action of Antiseizure Drugs and the Ketogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Rogawski, Michael A; Löscher, Wolfgang; Rho, Jong M

    2016-01-01

    Antiseizure drugs (ASDs), also termed antiepileptic drugs, are the main form of symptomatic treatment for people with epilepsy, but not all patients become free of seizures. The ketogenic diet is one treatment option for drug-resistant patients. Both types of therapy exert their clinical effects through interactions with one or more of a diverse set of molecular targets in the brain. ASDs act by modulation of voltage-gated ion channels, including sodium, calcium, and potassium channels; by enhancement of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibition through effects on GABAA receptors, the GABA transporter 1 (GAT1) GABA uptake transporter, or GABA transaminase; through interactions with elements of the synaptic release machinery, including synaptic vesicle 2A (SV2A) and α2δ; or by blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors, including α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptors. The ketogenic diet leads to increases in circulating ketones, which may contribute to the efficacy in treating pharmacoresistant seizures. Production in the brain of inhibitory mediators, such as adenosine, or ion channel modulators, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids, may also play a role. Metabolic effects, including diversion from glycolysis, are a further postulated mechanism. For some ASDs and the ketogenic diet, effects on multiple targets may contribute to activity. Better understanding of the ketogenic diet will inform the development of improved drug therapies to treat refractory seizures. PMID:26801895

  1. Drug Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NBOD2, a program developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to solve equations of motion coupled N-body systems is used by E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. to model potential drugs as a series of elements. The program analyses the vibrational and static motions of independent components in drugs. Information generated from this process is used to design specific drugs to interact with enzymes in designated ways.

  2. Drug dependence

    MedlinePlus

    ... men References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Kowalchuk A, Reed BC. Drug abuse. In: ...

  3. Drug abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Weiss RD. Drugs of abuse. In: Goldman ...

  4. Drug Resistance in Cortical and Hippocampal Slices from Resected Tissue of Epilepsy Patients: No Significant Impact of P-Glycoprotein and Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sandow, Nora; Kim, Simon; Raue, Claudia; Päsler, Dennis; Klaft, Zin-Juan; Antonio, Leandro Leite; Hollnagel, Jan Oliver; Kovacs, Richard; Kann, Oliver; Horn, Peter; Vajkoczy, Peter; Holtkamp, Martin; Meencke, Heinz-Joachim; Cavalheiro, Esper A.; Pragst, Fritz; Gabriel, Siegrun; Lehmann, Thomas-Nicolas; Heinemann, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistant patients undergoing epilepsy surgery have a good chance to become sensitive to anticonvulsant medication, suggesting that the resected brain tissue is responsible for drug resistance. Here, we address the question whether P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) expressed in the resected tissue contribute to drug resistance in vitro. Effects of anti-epileptic drugs [carbamazepine (CBZ), sodium valproate, phenytoin] and two unspecific inhibitors of Pgp and MRPs [verapamil (VPM) and probenecid (PBN)] on seizure-like events (SLEs) induced in slices from 35 hippocampal and 35 temporal cortex specimens of altogether 51 patients (161 slices) were studied. Although in slice preparations the blood brain barrier is not functional, we found that SLEs predominantly persisted in the presence of anticonvulsant drugs (90%) and also in the presence of VPM and PBN (86%). Following subsequent co-administration of anti-epileptic drugs and drug transport inhibitors, SLEs continued in 63% of 143 slices. Drug sensitivity in slices was recognized either as transition to recurrent epileptiform transients (30%) or as suppression (7%), particularly by perfusion with CBZ in PBN containing solutions (43, 9%). Summarizing responses to co-administration from more than one slice per patient revealed that suppression of seizure-like activity in all slices was only observed in 7% of patients. Patients whose tissue was completely or partially sensitive (65%) presented with higher seizure frequencies than those with resistant tissue (35%). However, corresponding subgroups of patients do not differ with respect to expression rates of drug transporters. Our results imply that parenchymal MRPs and Pgp are not responsible for drug resistance in resected tissue. PMID:25741317

  5. [Drug dependence and psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Giraud, M J; Lemonnier, E; Bigot, T

    1994-11-01

    Although the utility of psychotropic drugs has been well demonstrated, caution must still be exercised in their use. Among their potential risks, drug dependency must be kept in mind. This risk is well accepted with regard to benzodiazepines, and it appeared useful to study the potential risk for antidepressants, neuroleptics and thymoregulatory agents. Whatever the drug, the predominant factor appears to be psychological dependency. Prevention of drug dependency is most often achieved by informing the patient, limiting the length of use of the drug, making regular reevaluation of symptoms and of drug indication, and frequently be establishing a "treatment contract". The importance of the patient-physician relationship in the prescription of such treatment must be underlined. PMID:7984941

  6. Pharmacokinetics and drug interactions of eslicarbazepine acetate.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio

    2012-06-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a novel once-daily antiepileptic drug (AED) approved in Europe since 2009 that was found to be efficacious and well tolerated in a phase III clinical program in adult patients with partial onset seizures previously not controlled with treatment with one to three AEDs, including carbamazepine (CBZ). ESL shares with CBZ and oxcarbazepine (OXC) the dibenzazepine nucleus bearing the 5-carboxamide substitute, but is structurally different at the 10,11 position. This molecular variation results in differences in metabolism, preventing the formation of toxic epoxide metabolites such as carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide. Unlike OXC, which is metabolized to both eslicarbazepine and (R)-licarbazepine, ESL is extensively converted to eslicarbazepine. The systemic exposure to eslicarbazepine after ESL oral administration is approximately 94% of the parent dose, with minimal exposure to (R)-licarbazepine and OXC. After ESL oral administration, the effective half-life (t(1/2,eff) ) of eslicarbazepine was 20-24 h, which is approximately two times longer than its terminal half-life (t(1/2)). At clinically relevant doses (400-1,600 mg/day) ESL has linear pharmacokinetics (PK) with no effects of gender or moderate liver impairment. However, because eslicarbazepine is eliminated primarily (66%) by renal excretion, dose adjustment is recommended for patients with renal impairment. Eslicarbazepine clearance is induced by phenobarbital, phenytoin, and CBZ and it dose-dependently decreases plasma exposure of oral contraceptive and simvastatin. PMID:22612290

  7. Levetiracetam might act as an efficacious drug to attenuate cognitive deficits of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Levetiracetam is a homologue of piracetam with an a-ethyl side-chain substitution and it is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved antiepileptic drug. Recently, several studies have found that levetiracetam was able to reduce seizure frequency in epileptic seizures patients without affecting their cognitive functions. In the present review, the effects of levetiracetam on cognitive improvement were summarized in epileptic seizures patients with or without Alzheimer's disease (AD), high-grade glioma (HGG) patients and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients. In addition, levetiracetam was observed to improve the cognitive deficits in normal aged animals and the transgenic animal models with AD, suggesting that levetiracetam may be a better choice for the prevention or treatment of AD. PMID:26268327

  8. Drug Reaction With Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) in an Adolescent Treated With Lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Ginory, Almari; Chaney-Catchpole, Michelle; Demetree, Julie M; Mayol Sabatier, Laura M; Nguyen, Mathew

    2013-07-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a hypersensitivity syndrome most commonly associated with antiepileptic agents, allopurinol, and sulfonamides. It is a severe adverse reaction associated with fever, rash, eosinophilia, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ involvement. We present the case of a 17-year-old Caucasian female with bipolar disorder type II and posttraumatic stress disorder treated with lamotrigine for a non-Food and Drug Administration-approved indication that developed DRESS syndrome at an initial dose higher than that recommended. Her symptoms were atypical in that she developed a rash with influenza-like symptoms that resolved after discontinuation of lamotrigine and returned 8 days later. She was hospitalized because of elevated liver enzymes and treated with corticosteroids. In patients presenting with rash and systemic symptoms, DRESS syndrome should be considered and treated appropriately to reduce mortality, which can be as high as 10%. Treatment includes withdrawal of the offending agent and corticosteroids. PMID:24052787

  9. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  10. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... using any of these products. Some types of food may also cause adverse drug reactions. For example, grapefruit and grapefruit juice, as well as alcohol and caffeine, may affect how drugs work. Every time your doctor ... interactions with any foods or beverages. What about medicines I've used ...

  11. Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardana, Raj K.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of such drugs as marijuana and LSD, with emphasis on drug abuse. It is suggested that it can be used in science classes at the middle level of school. No prerequisites are suggested. The teacher's guide lists the behavioral objectives, the equipment needed to complete the experience and suggests…

  12. [Club drugs].

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Diogo Frasquilho; Carmo, Ana Lisa; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Navarro, Rita; Góis, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Club drugs are the following substances: Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA); Methamphetamine; Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD); Ketamine; Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and Flunitrazepam. These substances are mainly used by adolescents and young adults, mostly in recreational settings like dance clubs and rave parties. These drugs have diverse psychotropic effects, are associated with several degrees of toxicity, dependence and long term adverse effects. Some have been used for several decades, while others are relatively recent substances of abuse. They have distinct pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, are not easy to detect and, many times, the use of club drugs is under diagnosed. Although the use of these drugs is increasingly common, few health professionals feel comfortable with the diagnosis and treatment. The authors performed a systematic literature review, with the goal of synthesising the existing knowledge about club drugs, namely epidemiology, mechanism of action, detection, adverse reactions and treatment. The purpose of this article is creating in Portuguese language a knowledge data base on club drugs, that health professionals of various specialties can use as a reference when dealing with individual with this kind of drug abuse. PMID:22525626

  13. Cancer drug discovery by repurposing: teaching new tricks to old dogs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Subash C; Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Webb, Lauren J; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2013-09-01

    Progressively increasing failure rates, high cost, poor bioavailability, poor safety, limited efficacy, and a lengthy design and testing process associated with cancer drug development have necessitated alternative approaches to drug discovery. Exploring established non-cancer drugs for anticancer activity provides an opportunity rapidly to advance therapeutic strategies into clinical trials. The impetus for development of cancer therapeutics from non-cancer drugs stems from the fact that different diseases share common molecular pathways and targets in the cell. Common molecular origins of diverse diseases have been discovered through advancements in genomics, proteomics, and informatics technologies, as well as through the development of analytical tools that allow researchers simultaneously to screen large numbers of existing drugs against a particular disease target. Thus, drugs originally identified as antitussive, sedative, analgesic, antipyretic, antiarthritic, anesthetic, antidiabetic, muscle relaxant, immunosuppressant, antibiotic, antiepileptic, cardioprotective, antihypertensive, erectile function enhancing, or angina relieving are being repurposed for cancer. This review describes the repurposing of these drugs for cancer treatment. PMID:23928289

  14. Prescription and consumption of solid oral drugs dispensed as unitary doses in a third level hospital

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Guzmán, David; Juárez-Olguín, Hugo; Hernández-García, Ernestina; Medina-Andrade, Alejandro; Juarez Tapia, Belen

    2015-01-01

    Background: The knowledge about the pattern of prescription and consumption of solid oral drugs dispensed as unitary doses (UD) in Mexico is sparing. Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of prescription and consumption of solid oral drugs dispensed as unitary doses (UD) in a third level private hospital of Mexico. A retrospective study of a 60-month period (from 2007 to 2011) was carried out to know the pattern of drugs dispensed as UD in a third level hospital. Results: Among the principal drugs consumed were analgesic, antihypertensive, antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, antiepileptic, and diuretics. The dispensation of drugs per year was as follows: 181 drugs with 85,167 UD in 2007; 199 with 90,519 UD in 2008; 193 with 101,479 UD in 2009; 195 with 100,798 UD in 2010; and 198 with 103,913 UD in 2011. Conclusion: The findings confirmed that prescription and consumption of unitary doses in the hospitalization service increased, and revealed the extensive use of analgesics as the principal prescribed drug in this kind of hospital. PMID:27013914

  15. Street Drugs and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ...

  16. Evaluation of mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of new derivatives of pyrrolidine-2,5-dione with anti-epileptic activity, by use of the Vibrio harveyi mutagenicity test.

    PubMed

    Pękala, Elżbieta; Liana, Piotr; Kubowicz, Paulina; Powroźnik, Beata; Obniska, Jolanta; Chlebek, Iwona; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2013-12-12

    The Vibrio harveyi test was used to evaluate mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of nineteen new derivatives of pyrrolidine-2,5-dione (compounds 1-19) with antiepileptic activity. Four V. harveyi strains were used: BB7 (wild type) and the genetically modified strains BB7M, BB7X and BB7XM (i.e. strains with additional mucA and mucB genes, UV hypersensitivity, and UV hypersensitivity with plasmid pAB91273, respectively). None of the derivatives of 2-ethyl-2-methylsuccinic acid (compounds 1-7) had mutagenic activity against the tester strains of V. harveyi, but this set had strong or moderate antimutagenic activity against 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (NQNO) in the tester strains BB7, BB7X, and BB7M. This antimutagenic activity ranged from 51% to 67%, through 51-66% to 71-83% for V. harveyi BB7, BB7X and BB7M strains, respectively. Mutagenic activities in the group of 2,2-diphenyl-succinic acid derivatives (compounds 8-19) were variable and depended on the tester strain used. Compounds 8-19 were devoid of mutagenic properties against BB7 (wild-type strain). Among this group only compound 9, with the fluorine substituent in position 2 of the aromatic system, was devoid of mutagenic potential against all tester strains. The compounds in this group (8-19) demonstrated strong antimutagenic activity only against strain BB7 (inhibition ranging from 51% to 71%). We conclude that there are various mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of derivatives of pyrrolidine-2,5-dione. Moreover, our studies have proven that the V. harveyi test can be applied for primary mutagenicity and antimutagenicity assessment of these new compounds. PMID:24060509

  17. A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study to Compare Preemptive Analgesic Efficacy of Novel Antiepileptic Agent Lamotrigine in Patients Undergoing Major Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Priyank; Bhosale, Uma A; Gupta, Ankush; Yegnanarayan, Radha; Sardesai, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Background: If postoperative acute pain remains unrelieved, it may result in significant morbidity and mortality. Preemptive analgesic initiated before surgery offers premature analgesia even before exposure to an initial noxious stimulus bestowing effective postoperative analgesia. In developed countries, it is regularly practiced as a part of well-defined protocol. In our country however, only a few centers practice it and that too irregularly and with undefined protocol. Few studies support preemptive analgesic efficacy of novel antiepileptic agent gabapentin. Though lamotrigine is a proven analgesic in animal models of chronic pain and clinical studies of gabapentin-resistant neuropathic pain, a literature search revealed scarce data on its preemptive analgesic efficacy. Aims: The present study is designed to study the preemptive analgesic efficacy of lamotrigine in comparison with diclofenac sodium in postoperative pain control. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial included 90 patients of both sexes, between 18 years and 70 years undergoing major surgeries. Patients were randomly allocated into placebo, control, and test groups and received the respective treatment 30 min before the induction of anesthesia. Aldrete score and pain score were recorded using visual analog scale (VAS), facial rating scale (FRS), and behavioral rating scale (BRS) at awakening and at 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, and 24 h. Postoperative rescue analgesic consumption for 24 h was recorded. Results: Significantly higher pain scores were observed in the placebo group postoperatively for 2 h on all pain scales (P < 0.05), whereas in the control group it was significantly higher at 1 h (P < 0.05). The test group patients were more comfortable throughout the study and postoperative analgesic requirement was significantly less (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The study recommends the use of single oral dose lamotrigine as preemptive analgesic for effective postoperative pain control. PMID

  18. Expression pattern of NMDA receptors reveals antiepileptic potential of apigenin 8-C-glucoside and chlorogenic acid in pilocarpine induced epileptic mice.

    PubMed

    Aseervatham, G Smilin Bell; Suryakala, U; Doulethunisha; Sundaram, S; Bose, P Chandra; Sivasudha, T

    2016-08-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of apigenin 8-C-glucoside (Vitexin) and chlorogenic acid on epileptic mice induced by pilocarpine and explored its possible mechanisms. Intraperitonial administration of pilocarpine (85mg/kg) induced seizure in mice was assessed by behavior observations, which is significantly (p>0.05) reduced by apigenin 8-C-glucoside (AP8CG) (10mg/kg) and chlorogenic acid (CA) (5mg/kg), similar to diazepam. Seizure was accompanied by an imbalance in the levels of Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate in the pilocarpine administered group. Moreover, convulsion along with reduced acetylcholinesterase, increased monoamine oxidase and oxidative stress was observed in epileptic mice brain. AP8CG and CA significantly restored back to normal levels even at lower doses. Further, increased lipid peroxidation and nitrite content was also significantly attenuated by AP8CG and CA. However, CA was found to be more effective when compared to AP8CG. In addition, the mRNA expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), mGluR1 and mGlu5 was significantly (P≤0.05) inhibited by AP8CG and CA in a lower dose. The mRNA expression of GRIK1 did not differ significantly in any of the group and showed a similar pattern of expression. Our result shows that AP8CG and CA selectively inhibit NMDAR, mGluR1 and mGlu5 expression. Modification in the provoked NMDAR calcium response coupled with neuronal death. Hence, these findings underline that the polyphenolics, AP8CG and CA have exerted antiepileptic and neuroprotective activity by suppressing glutamate receptors. PMID:27470339

  19. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & ... Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs ...

  20. Prescription Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, especially in brain areas involved in the perception of pain and pleasure. Prescription stimulants , such as ... of drug that causes changes in your mood, perceptions, and behavior can affect judgment and willingness to ...

  1. Antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one. PMID:20471318

  2. Drug Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... not be taken at the same time as antacids. WHAT CAUSES THE MOST INTERACTIONS WITH HIV MEDICATIONS? ... azole” Some antibiotics (names end in “mycin”) The antacid cimetidine (Tagamet) Some drugs that prevent convulsions, including ...

  3. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... distance, and decrease coordination. Drivers who have used cocaine or methamphetamine can be aggressive and reckless when ...

  4. Drug allergy

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Allergic drug reactions occur when a drug, usually a low molecular weight molecule, has the ability to stimulate an immune response. This can be done in one of two ways. The first is by binding covalently to a self-protein, to produce a haptenated molecule that can be processed and presented to the adaptive immune system to induce an immune response. Sometimes the drug itself cannot do this but a reactive breakdown product of the drug is able to bind covalently to the requisite self-protein or peptide. The second way in which drugs can stimulate an immune response is by binding non-covalently to antigen presenting or antigen recognition molecules such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or the T cell receptor. This is known as the p-I or pharmacological interaction hypothesis. The drug binding in this situation is reversible and stimulation of the response may occur on first exposure, not requiring previous sensitization. There is probably a dependence on the presence of certain MHC alleles and T cell receptor structures for this type of reaction to occur. PMID:22922763

  5. Cobicistat versus ritonavir boosting and differences in the drug-drug interaction profiles with co-medications.

    PubMed

    Marzolini, Catia; Gibbons, Sara; Khoo, Saye; Back, David

    2016-07-01

    Nearly all HIV PIs and the integrase inhibitor elvitegravir require a pharmacokinetic enhancer in order to achieve therapeutic plasma concentrations at the desired dose and frequency. Whereas ritonavir has been the only available pharmacokinetic enhancer for more than a decade, cobicistat has recently emerged as an alternative boosting agent. Cobicistat and ritonavir are equally strong inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 and consequently were shown to be equivalent pharmacokinetic enhancers for elvitegravir and for the PIs atazanavir and darunavir. Since cobicistat is a more selective CYP inhibitor than ritonavir and is devoid of enzyme-inducing properties, differences are expected in their interaction profiles with some co-medications. Drugs whose exposure might be altered by ritonavir but unaltered by cobicistat are drugs primarily metabolized by CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 or drugs undergoing mainly glucuronidation. Thus, co-medications should be systematically reviewed when switching the pharmacokinetic enhancer to anticipate potential dosage adjustments. PMID:26945713

  6. Drug misuse.

    PubMed

    Waller, T

    1992-12-01

    1. Assessment by history and examination should include: a history of all drugs taken during each day for the previous 7 days (including alcohol), length of drug use and route (including the sharing of needles or syringes), the possibility of pregnancy if female, previous psychiatric history and treatment of drug misuse, social factors (including employment, family, friends, involvement in prostitution, legal problems), medical problems, including evidence of hepatitis, injection abscesses and other infections, suicide attempts, and weight loss. 2. Notification to the Chief Medical Officer of the Drug Branch of the Home Office is a legal obligation. 3. Investigations include: liver function tests (LFTs), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis C antibody, full blood count (FBC), and urine for drug screening. Consider HIV testing if at risk but it is usually better arranged at a later stage. 4. Prescribing may be considered for a variety of drugs but objectives will differ according to drug type and individual. 5. In the case of opioid users, prescribing may be useful to stabilize their lives and to promote attendance for professional help. It may reduce high risk behaviour for contracting and spreading HIV. 6. If medication is given to opioid users, methadone mixture 1 mg/ml given once a day is the prescription of choice. Dispensing should be on a daily basis and the blue prescription form FP10 (MDA) allows the chemist to dispense daily for up to 14 days. A maximum ceiling of 100 mg methadone/day should not be exceeded. The initial dose will depend on the amount of opioid consumed in the previous week.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1345155

  7. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Tobacco Products Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products FDA Home Drug Databases Drugs@FDA - FAQ | Instructions | ... 6332) Contact FDA For Government For Press Combination Products Advisory Committees Science & Research Regulatory Information Safety Emergency ...

  8. Multifocal Bullous Fixed Drug Erruption Due To Phenytoin: A Lesson Learned!

    PubMed

    Jain, Ankur; Gupta, Naresh

    2015-12-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AED) are a common culprit of cutaneous eruptions in clinical practice. Phenytoin, lamotrigine and carbamazepine are the commonest offenders. Maculopapular eruptions are the most frequently reported events. However, multifocal bullous fixed drug eruptions have rarely been described in association with AED use. The risk factors for skin rash including its association with the rate of drug administration are unclear in the literature. We report a case of a young alcoholic man, on long term phenytoin therapy since 3 years, who presented to our emergency department with a breakthrough seizure episode. Patient's routine investigations including serum biochemistry, imaging and toxicology screen were normal. Patient was found to have sub-therapeutic serum phenytoin levels and was prescribed loading with intravenous phenytoin (15mg/kg body weight), which was mistakenly infused at a rapid rate (60mg/minute). Patient developed multifocal bullous lesions over muco-cutaneous regions after 6 hours of drug administration which healed after its discontinuation leaving behind residual hyperpigmentation. Patient was managed conservatively, switched to oral levetiracetam and discharged in a stable condition after one week of hospital stay. Present case highlights a yet uncommon reaction to a commonly used drug and tries to establish the relation between rate of drug infusion and the risk of skin reaction. PMID:26816935

  9. Multifocal Bullous Fixed Drug Erruption Due To Phenytoin: A Lesson Learned!

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AED) are a common culprit of cutaneous eruptions in clinical practice. Phenytoin, lamotrigine and carbamazepine are the commonest offenders. Maculopapular eruptions are the most frequently reported events. However, multifocal bullous fixed drug eruptions have rarely been described in association with AED use. The risk factors for skin rash including its association with the rate of drug administration are unclear in the literature. We report a case of a young alcoholic man, on long term phenytoin therapy since 3 years, who presented to our emergency department with a breakthrough seizure episode. Patient’s routine investigations including serum biochemistry, imaging and toxicology screen were normal. Patient was found to have sub-therapeutic serum phenytoin levels and was prescribed loading with intravenous phenytoin (15mg/kg body weight), which was mistakenly infused at a rapid rate (60mg/minute). Patient developed multifocal bullous lesions over muco-cutaneous regions after 6 hours of drug administration which healed after its discontinuation leaving behind residual hyperpigmentation. Patient was managed conservatively, switched to oral levetiracetam and discharged in a stable condition after one week of hospital stay. Present case highlights a yet uncommon reaction to a commonly used drug and tries to establish the relation between rate of drug infusion and the risk of skin reaction. PMID:26816935

  10. The Use of Neuropathic Pain Drugs in Children with Sickle Cell Disease is Associated with Older Age, Female Gender and Longer Length of Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Brandow, Amanda M.; Farley, Rebecca A.; Dasgupta, Mahua; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Panepinto, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Although neuropathic pain is increasingly recognized in sickle cell disease (SCD), it is unknown how neuropathic pain drugs are used in children with SCD. Thus, we investigated use of these drugs and hypothesized older age and female gender are associated with increased neuropathic drug use and the use of these drugs is associated with longer length of stay. We analyzed the Pediatric Health Information System (2004-09) including all inpatient visits 0-18 years with any SCD-related (all genotypes) discharge diagnosis. To limit confounding we excluded psychiatric and seizure visits. Antiepileptics, tricyclic antidepressants, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were drugs of interest. Generalized Estimating Equations determined the impact of age and gender on neuropathic drug use and the impact of neuropathic drug use on length of stay. We analyzed 53,557 visits; 2.9% received ≥1 neuropathic drugs. The odds of receiving a neuropathic drug increased significantly with age [Reference group 0-4 yrs: 5-10, OR 5.7; 11-14, OR 12.5; 15-18, OR 22.8; all p<0.0001] and female gender [OR 1.5; p=0.001)]. Neuropathic drug use was associated with longer length of stay [RR 8.3; p<0.0001]. Neuropathic drug use in children with SCD was associated with older age, female gender, and longer length of stay. PMID:25222053

  11. Management of Psychotropic Drug-Induced DRESS Syndrome: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bommersbach, Tanner J; Lapid, Maria I; Leung, Jonathan G; Cunningham, Julie L; Rummans, Teresa A; Kung, Simon

    2016-06-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a severe cutaneous eruption that has been linked to several common drugs and drug categories, including antiepileptics, allopurinol, sulfonamides, and various antibiotics; however, because of a number of recent case reports linking psychotropic medications to this condition, DRESS is increasingly recognized among psychiatrists. We systematically reviewed all psychotropic drugs linked to DRESS syndrome, and this article summarizes the clinical management relevant to psychiatric professionals. A comprehensive search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Ovid Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Web of Science, Scopus, and Litt's Drug Eruption and Reaction Database for articles published in English during the past 20 years (1996-2015) using the search terms (1) psychotropic drugs OR serotonin uptake inhibitors AND DRESS or (2) psychotropic drugs AND drug reaction (or rash) eosinophilia systemic syndrome, and all article abstracts were screened for inclusion and exclusion criteria by 3 reviewers. Two independent reviewers examined the full text of 163 articles, of which 96 (25 original articles, 12 review articles, 55 case reports, and 4 letters to the editor) were included in the systematic review. We identified 1072 cases of psychotropic drug-induced DRESS, with carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, valproate, and phenobarbital being the most implicated drugs. Based on our review of the literature, we outline management principles that include prompt withdrawal of the causative drug, hospitalization, corticosteroid therapy, and novel treatments, including intravenous immunoglobulin, cyclophosphamide, and cyclosporine, for corticosteroid-resistant DRESS. Finally, we outline strategies for treating comorbid psychiatric illness after a DRESS reaction to the psychotropic medication. PMID:27126302

  12. Fatal toxicity index of medicinal drugs based on a comprehensive toxicology database.

    PubMed

    Ojanperä, Ilkka; Kriikku, Pirkko; Vuori, Erkki

    2016-09-01

    The fatal toxicity index (FTI) is the absolute number of fatal poisonings caused by a particular drug divided by its consumption figure. Consequently, it is a useful measure in evaluating toxicity of the drug and its relevance in fatal poisonings. In this study, we assessed the FTI of medicinal drugs in 3 years (2005, 2009, and 2013) in Finland. As the measure of drug consumption, we used the number of defined daily doses (DDD) per population in each year. There were 70 medicinal drugs in Finland for which the mean FTI expressed as the number of deaths per million DDD over the three study years was higher or equal to 0.1. The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system was used for the classification of the active ingredients of medicinal drugs according to the organ or system which they act on. Of these 70 drugs, 55 drugs (78.6 %) acted on the nervous system (denoted by ATC code N), 11 (15.7 %) on the cardiovascular system (C), three (4.3 %) on the alimentary tract and metabolism (A), and one (1.4 %) on the musculoskeletal system (M). The nervous system drugs consisted of 20 psycholeptics, (ATC code N05), 20 psychoanaleptics (N06), eight analgesics (N02), six antiepileptics (N03), and one other nervous system drug (N07). The highest individual FTIs were associated with the opioids methadone, dextropropoxyphene, oxycodone, tramadol, and morphine; the antipsychotics levomepromazine and chlorprothixene; and the antidepressants doxepin, amitriptyline, trimipramine, and bupropion. Buprenorphine was not included in the study, because most of the fatal buprenorphine poisonings were due to smuggled tablets. A clearly increasing trend in FTI was observed with pregabalin and possibly with bupropion, both drugs emerging as abused substances. PMID:26987318

  13. Drug Allergy.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul; Hill, Tiffany; Dhawan, Nidhi

    2016-09-01

    An adverse drug reaction relates to an undesired response to administration of a drug. Type A reactions are common and are predictable to administration, dose response, or interaction with other medications. Type B reactions are uncommon with occurrences that are not predictable. Appropriate diagnosis, classification, and entry into the chart are important to avoid future problems. The diagnosis is made with careful history, physical examination, and possibly allergy testing. It is recommended that help from allergy immunology specialists should be sought where necessary and that routine prescription of Epi pen should be given to patients with multiple allergy syndromes. PMID:27545730

  14. [Ureter drugs].

    PubMed

    Raynal, G; Bellan, J; Saint, F; Tillou, X; Petit, J

    2008-03-01

    Many improvements have been made recently in the field of the ureteral smooth muscle pharmacology. After a brief summary on physiological basis, we review what is known about effects on ureter of different drugs class. In a second part, we review clinical applications for renal colic analgesia, calculi expulsive medical therapy, ESWL adjuvant treatment and preoperative treatment before retrograde access. There are now sufficient data on NSAID and alpha-blockers. beta-agonists, especially for beta3 selective ones, and topical drugs before retrograde access are interesting and should be further evaluated. PMID:18472067

  15. Drug watch.

    PubMed

    Whitson, S

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments on new anti-HIV agents and drugs for opportunistic infections are highlighted. Information is provided on the infusion inhibitor T-20; DuPont's second generation non-nukes, DPC 961 and DPC 963; Papirine (PEN203) for the human papilloma virus; Sporanox for treating fungal infections; and the antiretroviral protein, lysozyme. In addition, information is given on a plant found in the Bolivian rainforest that may contain compounds to prevent HIV infection by blocking the enzyme, integrase. Other promising new drugs addressed at the 6th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections are listed in a table. Contact information for US clinical trials is provided. PMID:11366758

  16. Drug Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drug resistance refers to both intrinsic and acquired abilities of cells or organisms to become insensitive or refractory to chemotherapeutic intervention. The advent of antibiotics is considered one of the most important medicinal developments in human history, which has led to significantly reduce...

  17. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  18. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), also known as G, Liquid Ecstasy, and Soap Ketamine, also known as Special K, K, Vitamin K, and Jet Rohypnol, also known as Roofies Methamphetamine, also known as Speed, Ice, Chalk, Meth, Crystal, Crank, and Glass Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD), also ...

  19. [Flunarizine in drug-resistant epilepsies of childhood and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Curatolo, P; Bruni, O; Brindesi, I; Pruna, D; Cusmai, R

    1986-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of flunarizine have been studied on 26 patients, aged from 9 months to 17 years, suffering for epilepsies resistant to common anticonvulsant treatment, despite proper plasmatic levels of drugs. All the cases were monitored with monthly clinical and EEG controls, neuropsychological evaluations and monitoring antiepileptic drugs plasmatic levels. At first, a study was performed on an intra-patient basis: after a basal observation during two months, an open clinical trial was started, using for three months flunarizine 5 mg a day in patients weighing over 10 kg, and 5 mg every two days in children weighing less than 10 kg. Later on, a simple blind clinical trial has been performed on 16 patients, using flunarizine or placebo for three months. The results, obtained in resistant epilepsy of children and adolescent, showed that flunarizine induced in 47.6% of cases a significant reduction of critical (stroke) frequency and intensity, together with normalization of sleeping-waking rhythm, and amelioration of attention performances (vigilance, reactivity, environmental participation). The only side-effect, noticed in 23.8% of cases, was a light diurnal sleepiness, spontaneously regressing after a few days of treatment. PMID:3086959

  20. Hair testing in clinical setting: Simultaneous determination of 50 psychoactive drugs and metabolites in headache patients by LC tandem MS.

    PubMed

    Licata, Manuela; Rustichelli, Cecilia; Palazzoli, Federica; Ferrari, Anna; Baraldi, Carlo; Vandelli, Daniele; Verri, Patrizia; Marchesi, Filippo; Silingardi, Enrico

    2016-07-15

    Headache patients suffering from recurrent attacks are a population at risk of overuse and abuse of analgesic medications. Associated with triptans, the first-line drugs recommended for the acute treatment, these patients usually take other medications such as opioids analgesics for the attack treatment, antidepressants and antiepileptics for prophylaxis treatment and benzodiazepines, non-benzodiazepine hypnotics and antipsychotics for the treatment of comorbidities. Regular and frequent use of triptans, like of any other symptomatic analgesic, can cause chronic headache and medication-overuse headache (MOH). In these circumstances, a detoxification treatment is necessary and therefore the monitoring and follow-up of the patients are crucial to the success of the treatment. In the present study, a LC tandem MS method has been developed for the identification of 50 psychoactive drugs in human hair, including triptans, benzodiazepines and metabolites, analgesics, antiepileptic, antidepressants and metabolites, a non-benzodiazepine hypnotic (z-drug), antipsychotics and metabolites. Hair samples were decontaminated, pulverized and incubated overnight in methanol; the extracts were then purified by a new and rapid QuEChERS procedure and analyzed by LC-MS/MS under gradient elution with positive ionization MRM mode. The procedure was fully validated in terms of selectivity, linearity, limit of detection and lower limit of quantitation, precision and accuracy, carry-over, matrix effect, recovery and dilution integrity. The validated procedure has been applied to 234 real hair samples collected from headache patients with known type and dosage of the taken drugs; the obtained data could be of interest to evaluate the xenobiotic concentrations in patients with known therapy. PMID:27136283

  1. Therapeutic drug monitoring: antiarrhythmic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, T J; Williams, K M

    2001-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents are traditionally classified according to Vaughan Williams into four classes of action. Class I antiarrhythmic agents include most of the drugs traditionally thought of as antiarrhythmics, and have as a common action, blockade of the fast-inward sodium channel on myocardium. These agents have a very significant toxicity, and while they are being used less, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) does significantly increase the safety with which they can be administered. Class II agents are antisympathetic drugs, particularly the b-adrenoceptor blockers. These are generally safe agents which do not normally require TDM. Class III antiarrhythmic agents include sotalol and amiodarone. TDM can be useful in the case of amiodarone to monitor compliance and toxicity but is generally of little value for sotalol. Class IV antiarrhythmic drugs are the calcium channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem. These are normally monitored by haemodynamic effects, rather than using TDM. Other agents which do not fall neatly into the Vaughan Williams classification include digoxin and perhexiline. TDM is very useful for monitoring the administration (and particularly the safety) of both of these agents. PMID:11564050

  2. Are extrasynaptic GABAA receptors important targets for sedative/hypnotic drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Catriona M; McGee, Thomas P; MacKenzie, Georgina; Troyano-Cuturi, Kevin; Rodriguez, Pablo Mateos; Kutsarova, Elena; Diamanti, Efthymia; Hosie, Alastair M; Franks, Nicholas P; Brickley, Stephen G

    2012-01-01

    High-affinity extrasynaptic GABAA receptors are persistently activated by the low ambient GABA levels that are known to be present in the extracellular space. The resulting tonic conductance generates a form of shunting inhibition that is capable of altering cellular and network behaviour. It has been suggested that this tonic inhibition will be enhanced by neurosteroids, anti-epileptics, and sedative/hypnotic drugs. However, we show that the ability of sedative/hypnotic drugs to enhance tonic inhibition in the mouse cerebellum will critically depend upon ambient GABA levels. For example, we show that the intravenous anaesthetic propofol only enhances tonic inhibition when ambient GABA levels are below 100 nM. More surprisingly, the actions of the sleep promoting drug THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisothiazolo-[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) are attenuated at ambient GABA levels of just 20 nM. In contrast, our data suggests that neurosteroid enhancement of tonic inhibition will be greater at high ambient GABA concentrations. We present a model that takes into account realistic estimates of ambient GABA levels and predicted extrasynaptic GABAA numbers when considering the ability of sedative/hypnotic drugs to enhance tonic inhibition. These issues will be important when considering drug strategies designed to target extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in the treatment of sleep disorders and other neurological conditions. PMID:22423109

  3. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - inhaled corticosteroids; Asthma - long-acting beta-agonists; Asthma - leukotriene modifiers; Asthma - cromolyn; Bronchial asthma-control drugs; Wheezing - control drugs; Reactive airway disease - control drugs

  4. Drug Rash (Unclassified Drug Eruption) in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Drug Eruption, Unclassified (Pediatric) A parent's guide to condition ... lesions coming together into larger lesions typical of drug rashes (eruptions). Overview A drug eruption, also known ...

  5. [Emergent drugs (I): smart drugs].

    PubMed

    Burillo-Putze, G; Díaz, B Climent; Pazos, J L Echarte; Mas, P Munné; Miró, O; Puiguriguer, J; Dargan, P

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, a series of new drugs, known as smart drugs or legal highs, have gaining in popularity. They are easily obtainable through online shops. This is happening amongst younger segments of the population and is associated with recreational consumption, at weekends. In general, they are synthetic derivatives of natural products. There has been hardly any clinical research into them and they are not detectable in hospital laboratories. Three of these products, BZP (1- benzylpiperazine), mefedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) and Spice are probably the most widely used in Europe. The first two are consumed as an alternative to ecstasy and cocaine and are characterized by their producing a clinical profile of a sympathetic mimetic type; on occasion, they have serious consequences, with convulsions and even death. Spice (a mixture of herbs with synthetic cannabinoids such as JWH-018, JWH-073 and CP 47497-C8) is giving rise to profiles of dependence and schizophrenia. Although the emergent drugs have an aura of safety, there is an increasing amount of experience on their secondary effects. PMID:21904408

  6. Drug Plan Coverage Rules

    MedlinePlus

    ... works with other insurance Find health & drug plans Drug plan coverage rules Note Call your Medicare drug ... shingles vaccine) when medically necessary to prevent illness. Drugs you get in hospital outpatient settings In most ...

  7. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePlus

    Drug screen -- urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence indicates that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  8. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Share this page: Was this page ... Monitored Drugs | Common Questions | Related Pages What is therapeutic drug monitoring? Therapeutic drug monitoring is the measurement ...

  9. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  10. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Drug abuse first aid

    MedlinePlus

    Drug abuse is the misuse or overuse of any medication or drug, including alcohol. This article discusses first ... use of these drugs is a form of drug abuse. Legitimate medications can be abused by people who ...

  13. Drug Treated Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective and Bipolar Disorder Patients Evaluated by qEEG Absolute Spectral Power and Mean Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wix-Ramos, Richard; Moreno, Xiomara; Capote, Eduardo; González, Gilbert; Uribe, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research of electroencephalograph (EEG) power spectrum and mean frequency has shown inconsistent results in patients with schizophrenic, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders during medication when compared to normal subjects thus; the characterization of these parameters is an important task. Methods We applied quantitative EEG (qEEG) to investigate 38 control, 15 schizophrenic, 7 schizoaffective and 11 bipolar disorder subjects which remaine under the administration of psychotropic drugs (except control group). Absolute spectral power (ASP), mean frequency and hemispheric electrical asymmetry were measured by 19 derivation qEEG. Group mean values were compared with non parametrical Mann-Whitney test and spectral EEG maps with z-score method at p < 0.05. Results Most frequent drug treatments for schizophrenic patients were neuroleptic+antiepileptic (40% of cases) or 2 neuroleptics (33.3%). Schizoaffective patients received neuroleptic+benzodiazepine (71.4%) and for bipolar disorder patients neuroleptic+antiepileptic (81.8%). Schizophrenic (at all derivations except for Fp1, Fp2, F8 and T6) and schizoaffective (only at C3) show higher values of ASP (+57.7% and +86.1% respectively) compared to control group. ASP of bipolar disorder patients did not show differences against control group. The mean frequency was higher at Fp1 (+14.2%) and Fp2 (+17.4%) in bipolar disorder patients than control group, but no differences were found in frequencies between schizophrenic or schizoaffective patients against the control group. Majority of spectral differences were found at the left hemisphere in schizophrenic and schizoaffective but not in bipolar disorder subjects. Conclusion The present report contributes to characterize quantitatively the qEEG in drug treated schizophrenic, schizoaffective or bipolar disorder patients. PMID:24851121

  14. Drugs and the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet explores various aspects of drug addiction, with a special focus on drugs' effects on the brain. A brief introduction presents information on the rampant use of drugs in society and elaborates the distinction between drug abuse and drug addiction. Next, a detailed analysis of the brain and its functions is given. Drugs target the more…

  15. On the Slow Diffusion of Point-of-Care Systems in Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Sanavio, Barbara; Krol, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in point-of-care (PoC) technologies show great transformative promises for personalized preventative and predictive medicine. However, fields like therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), that first allowed for personalized treatment of patients’ disease, still lag behind in the widespread application of PoC devices for monitoring of patients. Surprisingly, very few applications in commonly monitored drugs, such as anti-epileptics, are paving the way for a PoC approach to patient therapy monitoring compared to other fields like intensive care cardiac markers monitoring, glycemic controls in diabetes, or bench-top hematological parameters analysis at the local drug store. Such delay in the development of portable fast clinically effective drug monitoring devices is in our opinion due more to an inertial drag on the pervasiveness of these new devices into the clinical field than a lack of technical capability. At the same time, some very promising technologies failed in the clinical practice for inadequate understanding of the outcome parameters necessary for a relevant technological breakthrough that has superior clinical performance. We hope, by over-viewing both TDM practice and its yet unmet needs and latest advancement in micro- and nanotechnology applications to PoC clinical devices, to help bridging the two communities, the one exploiting analytical technologies and the one mastering the most advanced techniques, into translating existing and forthcoming technologies in effective devices. PMID:25767794

  16. Finding a better drug for epilepsy: Preclinical screening strategies and experimental trial design

    PubMed Central

    Simonato, Michele; Löscher, Wolfgang; Cole, Andrew J.; Dudek, F. Edward; Engel, Jerome; Kaminski, Rafal M.; Loeb, Jeffrey A.; Scharfman, Helen; Staley, Kevin J.; Velíšek, Libor; Klitgaard, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) introduced during the past two decades have provided several benefits: they offered new treatment options for symptomatic treatment of seizures, improved ease of use and tolerability, and lowered risk for hypersensitivity reactions and detrimental drug– drug interactions. These drugs, however, neither attenuated the problem of drug-refractory epilepsy nor proved capable of preventing or curing the disease. Therefore, new preclinical screening strategies are needed to identify AEDs that target these unmet medical needs. New therapies may derive from novel targets identified on the basis of existing hypotheses for drug-refractory epilepsy and the biology of epileptogenesis; from research on genetics, transcriptomics, and epigenetics; and from mechanisms relevant for other therapy areas. Novel targets should be explored using new preclinical screening strategies, and new technologies should be used to develop medium- to high-throughput screening models. In vivo testing of novel drugs should be performed in models mimicking relevant aspects of drug refractory epilepsy and/or epileptogenesis. To minimize the high attrition rate associated with drug development, which arises mainly from a failure to demonstrate sufficient clinical efficacy of new treatments, it is important to define integrated strategies for preclinical screening and experimental trial design. An important tool will be the discovery and implementation of relevant biomarkers that will facilitate a continuum of proof-of-concept approaches during early clinical testing to rapidly confirm or reject preclinical findings, and thereby lower the risk of the overall development effort. In this review, we overview some of the issues related to these topics and provide examples of new approaches that we hope will be more successful than those used in the past. PMID:22708847

  17. Polymorphism of ABCB1/MDR1 C3435T in Children and Adolescents with Partial Epilepsy is due to Different Criteria for Drug Resistance – Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Emich-Widera, Ewa; Likus, Wirginia; Kazek, Beata; Sieroń, Aleksander L.; Urbanek, Ksymena

    2014-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of “drug resistance” in epilepsy can be defined and interpreted in various ways. This may be due to discrepant definitions of drug resistance to pharmacotherapy. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between C3435T polymorphism of the MDR1 gene and drug resistance in epilepsy with the consideration of 4 different criteria for qualification to groups sensitive and resistant to applied pharmacotherapy. Material/Methods Evaluation of C3435T polymorphism of MDR1/ABCB1 gene was conducted on a group of 82 white children and young adolescents up to 18 years old. While qualifying the patients to the group of sensitive or drug resistant, the following 4 definitions of drug resistance were applied: the ILAE’s, Appleton’s, Siddiqui’s, and Berg’s. Results A detailed analysis of genotypes of the MDR1 gene did not show any significant discrepancies between the groups of patients resistant and sensitive to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in 4 consecutive comparisons taking into consideration various criteria of sensitivity and resistance to pharmacotherapy. Conclusions The obtained results clearly confirm the lack of a connection between the occurrence of drug-resistant epilepsy and C435T polymorphism of the MDR1 gene irrespective of the definition of drug resistance applied to the patient. PMID:25223475

  18. Drug interactions with lipid-lowering drugs: mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Pertti J; Niemi, Mikko; Backman, Janne T

    2006-12-01

    Lipid-lowering drugs, especially 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A inhibitors (statins), are widely used in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic disease. The benefits of statins are well documented. However, lipid-lowering drugs may cause myopathy, even rhabdomyolysis, the risk of which is increased by certain interactions. Simvastatin, lovastatin, and atorvastatin are metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 (simvastatin acid is also metabolized by CYP2C8); their plasma concentrations and risk of myotoxicity are greatly increased by strong inhibitors of CYP3A4 (eg, itraconazole and ritonavir). Weak or moderately potent CYP3A4 inhibitors (eg, verapamil and diltiazem) can be used cautiously with small doses of CYP3A4-dependent statins. Cerivastatin is metabolized by CYP2C8 and CYP3A4, and fluvastatin is metabolized by CYP2C9. The exposure to fluvastatin is increased by less than 2-fold by inhibitors of CYP2C9. Pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and pitavastatin are excreted mainly unchanged, and their plasma concentrations are not significantly increased by pure CYP3A4 inhibitors. Cyclosporine (INN, ciclosporin) inhibits CYP3A4, P-glycoprotein (multidrug resistance protein 1), organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1), and some other hepatic uptake transporters. Gemfibrozil and its glucuronide inhibit CYP2C8 and OATP1B1. These effects of cyclosporine and gemfibrozil explain the increased plasma statin concentrations and, together with pharmacodynamic factors, the increased risk of myotoxicity when coadministered with statins. Inhibitors of OATP1B1 may decrease the benefit/risk ratio of statins by interfering with their entry into hepatocytes, the site of action. Lipid-lowering drugs can be involved also in other interactions, including those between enzyme inducers and CYP3A4 substrate statins, as well as those between gemfibrozil and CYP2C8 substrate antidiabetics. Knowledge of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of lipid

  19. The novel antiepileptic agent RWJ-333369-A, but not its analog RWJ-333369, reduces regional cerebral edema without affecting neurobehavioral outcome or cell death following experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Carrie A.; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Pitkänen, Asla; LeBold, David G.; Morales, Diego M.; Plevy, Jamie B.; Puri, Rishi; Zhao, Boyu; Dichter, Marc; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of two antiepileptic compounds, RWJ-333369 and RWJ-333369-A in a well-established experimental model of lateral fluid percussion (FP) traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the rat. Methods Anethestized Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 227) were subjected to lateral FP brain injury or sham-injury. Animals were randomized to receive treatment with RWJ-333369 (60 mg/kg, p.o.) or its analog RWJ-333369-A (60 mg/kg, p.o.), or vehicle (equal volume) at 15 minutes, 4, 8, and 24 hours post-injury. In Study I, animals were assessed at 48 hours for acute motor and cognitive function and then sacrificed to evaluate regional cerebral edema. In Study II, animals were evaluated post-injury for motor function at 48 hours and weekly thereafter from 1 to 4 weeks. Post-traumatic learning ability was assessed 4 weeks post-injury, followed by evaluation of hemispheric tissue loss. Results In Study I, no improvement in acute memory or motor function was observed following administration of either RWJ-333369 or RWJ-333369-A in brain-injured animals compared to vehicle-treated, brain-injured animals. However, brain-injured animals receiving treatment with RWJ-333369-A had a significant reduction in post-traumatic cerebral edema in both injured and contralateral hippocampus compared to brain-injured, vehicle-treated controls (p < 0.05). In Study II, treatment with either compound did not result in any improvement of neuromotor function, learning ability or change in lesion volume following brain injury. Conclusions These results indicate that the novel antiepileptic compound RWJ-333369-A reduces post-traumatic hippocampal edema without affecting neurobehavioral or histological outcome. It remains unclear whether this small effect on hippocampal edema is related to the ability of this compound to attenuate seizure activity. PMID:17726266

  20. Mozart's music in children with drug-refractory epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Toro, Annacarmela; Operto, Francesca Felicia; Ferrarioli, Giuseppe; Pisano, Simone; Viggiano, Andrea; Verrotti, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    Mozart's sonata for two pianos in D major, K448, has been shown to decrease interictal EEG discharges and recurrence of clinical seizures in both adults and young patients. In this prospective, open-label study, we evaluated the effect of listening to a set of Mozart's compositions, according to the Tomatis method, on sleep quality and behavioral disorders, including auto-/hetero-aggression, irritability, and hyperactivity, in a group of children and adolescents with drug-resistant epilepsy. The study group was composed of 11 outpatients (7 males and 4 females), between 1.5years and 21years of age (mean age: 11.9years), all suffering from drug-resistant epileptic encephalopathy (n=11). All of them had a severe/profound intellectual disability associated with cerebral palsy. During the study period, each patient had to listen to a set of Mozart's compositions 2h per day for fifteen days for a total of 30h, which could be distributed over the day depending on the habits and compliance of each patient. The music was filtered by a device preferably delivering higher sound frequencies (>3000Hz) according to the Tomatis principles. The antiepileptic drug therapy remained unchanged throughout the study period. During the 15-day music therapy, 2 out of 11 patients had a reduction of 50-75% in seizure recurrence, and 3 out of 12 patients had a reduction of 75-89%. Overall, 5 (45.4%) out of 11 patients had a ≥50% reduction in the total number of seizures, while the percentage decrease of the total seizure number (11/11) compared with baseline was -51.5% during the 15-day music therapy and -20.7% in the two weeks after the end of treatment. All responders also had an improvement in nighttime sleep and daytime behavior. PMID:26093514

  1. [Drug treatment and interventional pain therapy in back pain patients].

    PubMed

    Sprott, Haiko; Klauke, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    The treatment of chronic, non-malignant low-back pain is based on the patients' history and the clinical examination. It can be assumed that half of the cases present with a neuropathic pain component which needs to be treated with antidepressive and antiepileptic drugs instead of "pure" analgesics. Opioids should be considered with extreme caution because of their toxicity. Chronic non-malignant back pain is the prototype for interdisciplinary treatment approaches and multi-modal interdisciplinary settings, including pain programmes. However, a personalised strategy has to be preferred in most cases. A quick relief of pain is important in order to improve function as well as to re-integrate the patient into professional life. Spinal infiltrations can be of both diagnostic as well as therapeutic benefits. Their indication must be considered carefully, especially if the invasive diagnostic intervention has no therapeutic consequences. The interventional procedures should only be used as part of a multimodal approach in patients without any psychological problem. The sole use of interventions supports the purely somatic orientation of many patients and thus leads us in the wrong direction. PMID:23985154

  2. Personality, Drug Preference, Drug Use, and Drug Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V. K.; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967)…

  3. One-year clinical experience of perampanel in Spain: a multicentre study of efficacy and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Garamendi-Ruiz, Iñigo; García-García, María Eugenia; Bertol-Alegre, Vicente; Mauri-Llerda, José Ángel; García-Morales, Irene; Garayoa-Irigoyen, Vanesa; Agúndez-Sarasola, Marta; De Toledo-Heras, María; García-Morales, Vanessa; García-Gomara, María José; Arcos-Sánchez, Carolina; Gago-Veiga, Ana; Escalza-Cortina, Inés; Rueda-Mena, Eliana; Muñoz-Fargas, Elena; Santos-Lasaosa, Sonia; Oliván-Usieto, José Antonio; Julián, Leyre Díaz de Cerio-; Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos; Marinas-Alejo, Ainhoa

    2016-06-01

    Perampanel, a non-competitive antagonist of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptors, is the most recent antiepileptic drug available in Spain, marketed in January 2014. It was initially approved by the European Medicines Agency as adjunctive treatment for partial-onset seizures in patients 12 years and older, but recently also for primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Although clinical trials provide essential information about the drug, they do not reflect daily clinical practice. This retrospective study shows the initial experience with perampanel in 11 Spanish hospitals during its first year post-commercialisation. All patients who started perampanel treatment were included, but efficacy and tolerability were only assessed in those patients with a minimum follow-up period of six months. In total, 256 patients were treated with perampanel before September 2014, and 253 had an observational period of one year. After six months, 216/256 patients (84%) continued on perampanel and 180/253 (71.1%) completed one year of treatment. The mean number of previous antiepileptic drugs used was 6.83 and the median number of concomitant antiepileptic drugs was 2. The mean perampanel dose was 7.06 mg and 8.26 mg at six and 12 months, respectively. The responder rate was 39.5% and 35.9% at both follow-up points, respectively. Adverse events were experienced by 91/253 (35.5%) and resulted in withdrawal in 37 (14.6%). The most common adverse events were somnolence, dizziness, and irritability. We found no significant differences between concomitant use of enzyme-inducing and non-inducing antiepileptic drugs, regarding efficacy, adverse effects, or withdrawals. Irritability was not influenced by concomitant use of levetiracetam, relative to other drugs, but was more frequently observed in patients with a history of psychiatric problems or learning disabilities. PMID:27238234

  4. Indices of drug misuse for prescription drugs.

    PubMed

    Davis, H; Baum, C; Graham, D J

    1991-07-01

    Few studies of prescription-drug misuse have taken into account the numbers of prescriptions dispensed for specific drugs. Using data from the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) and the National Prescription Audit, we calculated indices of drug misuse for specific prescription drugs that are used mainly in outpatient settings and are either benzodiazepines, barbiturates, other sedative-hypnotics, analgesics, or CNS stimulants. In 1983-1985 the drugs associated with the highest numbers of DAWN medical examiner-reported drug-misuse deaths were codeine, diazepam, propoxyphene, phenobarbital, and secobarbital. However, the drugs with the highest indices of DAWN medical examiner-reported drug-misuse deaths/100,000 dispensed prescriptions were methamphetamine, methaqualone, amobarbital, secobarbital, and glutethimide. An index of fatality risk, calculated as 100 x DAWN medical examiner-reported drug-misuse deaths/DAWN emergency room-reported drug-misuse episodes, suggested that the risk of death from a glutethimide-associated drug-misuse episode had increased 92% from 1975-1979 to 1983-1983 and in 1983-1985 was the highest for the drugs studied. These indices might assist public health authorities attempting to design effective strategies to efficiently address the problem of prescription-drug misuse. PMID:1960000

  5. Drug-drug interaction between oxycodone and adjuvant analgesics in blood-brain barrier transport and antinociceptive effect.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yusuke; Okura, Takashi; Shimomura, Keita; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    To examine possible blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport interactions between oxycodone and adjuvant analgesics, we firstly screened various candidates in vitro using [(3)H]pyrilamine, a substrate of the oxycodone transporter, as a probe drug. The uptake of [(3)H]pyrilamine by conditionally immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (TR-BBB13) was inhibited by antidepressants (amitriptyline, imipramine, clomipramine, amoxapine, and fluvoxamine), antiarrhythmics (mexiletine, lidocaine, and flecainide), and ketamine. On the other hand, antiepileptics (carbamazepine, phenytoin, and clonazepam) and corticosteroids (dexamethasone and prednisolone) did not inhibit [(3)H]pyrilamine uptake, with the exception of sodium valproate. The uptake of oxycodone was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by amitriptyline, fluvoxamine and mexiletine with K(i) values of 13, 65, and 44 microM, respectively. These K(i) values are 5-300 times greater than the human therapeutic plasma concentrations. Finally, we evaluated in vivo interaction between oxycodone and amitriptyline in mice. Antinociceptive effects of oxycodone were increased by coadministration of amitriptyline. The oxycodone concentrations in plasma and brain were not changed by coadministration of amitriptyline. Overall, the results suggest that several adjuvant analgesics may interact with the BBB transport of oxycodone at relatively high concentrations. However, it is unlikely that there would be any significant interaction at therapeutically or pharmacologically relevant concentrations. PMID:19499573

  6. Drug combination therapy increases successful drug repositioning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Sanderson, Philip E; Zheng, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Repositioning of approved drugs has recently gained new momentum for rapid identification and development of new therapeutics for diseases that lack effective drug treatment. Reported repurposing screens have increased dramatically in number in the past five years. However, many newly identified compounds have low potency; this limits their immediate clinical applications because the known, tolerated plasma drug concentrations are lower than the required therapeutic drug concentrations. Drug combinations of two or more compounds with different mechanisms of action are an alternative approach to increase the success rate of drug repositioning. PMID:27240777

  7. [Drug-related psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    2012-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common genetic disorder that may be initiated (drug-induced psoriasis) or exacerbated (drug-triggered psoriasis) by some drug intakes. Beta-blockers, lithium, some antimelarial drugs, non steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and tetracyclines are recognized to influence the clinical course of psoriasis. Other drugs are likely or possibly involved in this process. PMID:22611830

  8. 99 Films on Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, David O., Ed.

    This catalog describes and evaluates 16-millimeter films about various aspects of drug use. Among the subjects covered by the 99 films are the composition and effects of different drugs, reasons why people use drugs, life in the drug culture, the problem of law enforcement, and various means of dealing with drug users. Each film is synopsized. Two…

  9. Hepatic drug-oxidizing enzyme systems and urinary D-glucaric acid excretion in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Tokola, O; Pelkonen, O; Karki, N T; Luoma, P

    1975-01-01

    Drug-oxidizing enzyme systems in liver biopsy samples and the urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid were studied in two different groups of patients with cardiac insufficiency. 2. In one group of six patients, the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes had decreased considerably as compared with the control values, but in four liver samples from patients treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents for their diabetes, activities were higher than in control samples from ten patients. 3. In the other group of seven patients, the urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid (isolated by ion-exchange chromatography) was 60% lower than in the control group of nine humans, whereas in four patients taking antiepileptic agents excretion rate was higher than control values. 4. Because the age distribution was markedly different between cardiac insufficiency and control groups, it is difficult to conclude, if the impairment of drug metabolism was a consequence of the old age or of the disease process. However, drug-oxidizing enzyme systems seem to be inducible also in old age. 5. The results support further the opinion that the urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid may be one useful index in assessing an individual's capacity to metabolize foreign compounds especially in the patients with lowered drug metabolizing capacity. PMID:786355

  10. [Drug-drug interactions in antirheumatic treatment].

    PubMed

    Krüger, K

    2012-04-01

    Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions contribute considerably to potentially dangerous drug side-effects and are frequently the reason for hospitalization. Nevertheless they are often overlooked in daily practice. For most antirheumatic drugs a vast number of interactions have been described but only a minority with clinical relevance. Several potentially important drug interactions exist for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate-mofetil and especially for cyclosporin A. Most importantly co-medication with methotrexate and sulfmethoxazole trimethoprim as well as azathioprine and allopurinol carries the risk of severe, sometimes life-threatening consequences. Nevertheless, besides these well-known high-risk combinations in each case of polypharmacy with antirheumatic drugs it is necessary to bear in mind the possibility of drug interactions. As polypharmacy is a common therapeutic practice in older patients with rheumatic diseases, they are at special risk. PMID:22527215

  11. [Contemporary opinions on classification, pathogenesis and treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Jóźwiak, Sergiusz

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most frequent neurological disorders, both in children and adult persons. About 0.5-1% of general population suffer from epilepsy, which means that about 50 million people in the world are affected. First years of life and very late adulthood are periods in human's life particularly predisposing to epilepsy. Repetitive epileptic seizures may cause many life-threatening situations and significantly lower patient's quality of life. To the most serious complications belong status epilepticus and sudden unexpected deaths due to epilepsy (SUDEP). Absences from work or school caused by seizures, difficulties in social life, frequent injuries and necessity of polytherapy are also important for patients. All these factors result in low self-esteem and poor quality of life. The main aim of the treatment was control of epileptic seizures. However, despite of new antiepileptic drugs developed almost every year, in one third of all patients with epilepsy seizures remain out of control. Those patients are regarded to have "drug-resistant epilepsy". Despite of significant scale of the problem, there is no one definition of the phenomenon. In the presented review the authors outline current definitions, recent opinions on pathogenesis and risk factors, and provide practical rules of pharmacotherapy of epilepsy, which should help to restrict drug-resistancy. PMID:17966891

  12. Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... D is the name of Medicare's prescription drug coverage. It's insurance that helps people pay for prescription ... monthly cost. Private companies provide Medicare prescription drug coverage. You choose the drug plan you like best. ...

  13. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  14. Access to Investigational Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... drug if the supply is limited and the demand is high. Are all investigational drugs available through ... be limited in part by drug supply, patient demand, or other factors. What is NCI’s role in ...

  15. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  16. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  17. Drug Development Process

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approvals The Drug Development Process The Drug Development Process Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... public. More Information More in The Drug Development Process Step 1: Discovery and Development Step 2: Preclinical ...

  18. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Leukemia This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... not listed here. Drugs Approved for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Arranon (Nelarabine) Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi ...

  19. [Ilicit drugs frequently used by drug addicts].

    PubMed

    Cirriez, J P

    2015-03-01

    Drugs stimulate the brain causing mental and physical effects. The effects of drugs can be stimulating, narcotic or mind-altering. This article briefly discusses some commonly used illicit drugs, namely heroin, cocaine, cannabis, ecstasy, amphetamines, LSD, psilocybin mushrooms and poppers. PMID:26571792

  20. Attitudes towards drug legalization among drug users.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Roberto A; Richard, Alan J

    2002-01-01

    Research shows that support for legalization of drugs varies significantly among different sociodemographic and political groups. Yet there is little research examining the degree of support for legalization of drugs among drug users. This paper examines how frequency and type of drug use affect the support for legalization of drugs after adjusting for the effects of political affiliation and sociodemographic characteristics. A sample of 188 drug users and non-drug users were asked whether they would support the legalization of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Respondents reported their use of marijuana, crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines during the previous 30 days. Support for legalization of drugs was analyzed by estimating three separate logistic regressions. The results showed that the support for the legalization of drugs depended on the definition of "drug user" and the type of drug. In general, however, the results showed that marijuana users were more likely to support legalizing marijuana, but they were less likely to support the legalization of cocaine and heroin. On the other hand, users of crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines were more likely to support legalizing all drugs including cocaine and heroin. PMID:11853137

  1. Nanoencapsulation for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Avnesh; Singla, Rubbel; Guliani, Anika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoencapsulation of drug/small molecules in nanocarriers (NCs) is a very promising approach for development of nanomedicine. Modern drug encapsulation methods allow efficient loading of drug molecules inside the NCs thereby reducing systemic toxicity associated with drugs. Targeting of NCs can enhance the accumulation of nanonencapsulated drug at the diseased site. This article focussed on the synthesis methods, drug loading, drug release mechanism and cellular response of nanoencapsulated drugs on liposomes, micelles, carbon nanotubes, dendrimers, and magnetic NCs. Also the uses of these various NCs have been highlighted in the field of nanotechnology. PMID:26417260

  2. Registries Help Moms Measure Medication Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the case of the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry, which studies the effects of drugs for ... is taking. For example, the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry website lists more than 30 medications being ...

  3. New mixed ligand palladium(II) complexes based on the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate and bioactive nitrogen-donor ligands: Synthesis, structural characterization, binding interactions with DNA and BSA, in vitro cytotoxicity studies and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizi, Leila; Chiniforoshan, Hossein; Tavakol, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    The complexes [Pd(valp)2(imidazole)2] (1), [Pd(valp)2(pyrazine)2] (2) (valp is sodium valproate) have been synthesized and characterized using IR, 1H NMR, 13C{1H} NMR and UV-Vis spectrometry. The interaction of complexes with CT-DNA has been investigated using spectroscopic tools and viscosity measurement. In each case, the association constant (Kb) was deduced from the absorption spectral study and the number of binding sites (n) and the binding constant (K) were calculated from relevant fluorescence quenching data. As a result, a non-covalent interaction between the metal complex and DNA was suggested, which could be assigned to an intercalative binding. In addition, the interaction of 1 and 2 was ventured with bovine serum albumin (BSA) with the help of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. Through these techniques, the apparent association constant (Kapp) and the binding constant (K) could be calculated for each complex. Evaluation of cytotoxic activity of the complexes against four different cancer cell lines proved that the complexes exhibited cytotoxic specificity and significant cancer cell inhibitory rate. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to provide more evidence about the observed data. The majority of trans isomers were supported not only by energies, but also by the similarity of its calculated IR frequencies, UV adsorptions and NMR chemical shifts to the experimental values.

  4. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug’s impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  5. Drug-induced Depression: a Case/Non Case Study in the French Pharmacovigilance Database.

    PubMed

    Lafay-Chebassier, Claire; Chavant, François; Favrelière, Sylvie; Pizzoglio, Véronique; Pérault-Pochat, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a complex disorder with heterogeneous clinical anomalies whose neurobiological understanding still remains unclear. Medications have been implicated as potential causes of depression but for many of them, data are controversial. The present study aims to investigate association bet ween drugs and reports of depression. We used the case/non case method in the French pharmacovigilance database (FPVD) to identify drugs associated with depression. Cases were reports of depression in the FPVD between January 2007 and December 2011. Non cases were all other reports during the same period. Data were expressed as reporting odds ratio (ROR) with their 95% confidence interval. Of the 114,692 reports recorded in the FPVD during the studied period, we identified 474 cases of depression. For the majority of the patients, they were considered as "non serious" (56%) and evolution was favorable (64%). Significant RORs were found for antiepileptics (topiramate, levetiracetam), anti-infective and especially anti-retroviral drugs (efavirenz, emtricitabine, tenofovir, etravirine, raltegravir), interferons and other agents including isotretinoin, methylphenidate, sodium oxybate, varenicline, montelukast, flunarizine, adalimumab, anastrozole. Taking into account the limits of the methodology, the present study described associations with mainly expected drugs belonging to various therapeutic classes but it also found a signal with some anti-retrovirals. On the contrary, we did not find some assumed associations like cardiovascular medications, antimalarial. For most of the drugs, one or more mechanisms were found to explain these depressogenic effects on the basis of animal and human literature. Even if such associations need to be confirmed by further prospective studies, cautions are necessary for many drugs to early detect depressive symptoms. PMID:26056040

  6. Young drug addicts and the drug scene.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, R

    1985-01-01

    The drug scene generally comprises the following four distinct categories of young people: neophytes, addicts who enjoy a high status vis-à-vis other addicts, multiple drug addicts, and non-addicted drug dealers. It has its own evolution, hierarchy, structure and criteria of success and failure. The members are required to conform to the established criteria. The integration of the young addict into the drug scene is not voluntary in the real sense of the word, for he is caught between the culture that he rejects and the pseudo-culture of the drug scene. To be accepted into the drug scene, the neophyte must furnish proof of his reliability, which often includes certain forms of criminal activities. The addict who has achieved a position of importance in the drug world serves as a role model for behaviour to the neophyte. In a more advanced phase of addiction, the personality of the addict and the social functions of the drug scene are overwhelmed by the psychoactive effects of the drug, and this process results in the social withdrawal of the addict. The life-style of addicts and the subculture they develop are largely influenced by the type of drug consumed. For example, it is possible to speak of a heroin subculture and a cocaine subculture. In time, every drug scene deteriorates so that it becomes fragmented into small groups, which is often caused by legal interventions or a massive influx of new addicts. The fragmentation of the drug scene is followed by an increase in multiple drug abuse, which often aggravates the medical and social problems of drug addicts. PMID:4075000

  7. Drugs and Young People

    MedlinePlus

    Drug abuse is a serious public health problem. It affects almost every community and family in some way. Drug abuse in children and teenagers may pose a ... of young people may be more susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs ...

  8. Utah Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in junior and senior high school students. The 21 multiple choice items pertain to drug use practices, use history, available of drugs, main reason for drug use, and demographic data. The questionnaire is untimed, group administered, and may be given by the classroom teacher in about 10 minutes. Item…

  9. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine. PMID:26341013

  10. Nanotransporters for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lühmann, Tessa; Meinel, Lorenz

    2016-06-01

    Soluble nanotransporters for drugs can be profiled for targeted delivery particularly to maximize the efficacy of highly potent drugs while minimizing off target effects. This article outlines on the use of biological carrier molecules with a focus on albumin, various drug linkers for site specific release of the drug payload from the nanotransporter and strategies to combine these in various ways to meet different drug delivery demands particularly the optimization of the payload per nanotransporter. PMID:26773302

  11. Practice Gaps: Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wolverton, Stephen E

    2016-07-01

    The term "drug reactions" is relevant to dermatology in three categories of reactions: cutaneous drug reactions without systemic features, cutaneous drug reactions with systemic features, and systemic drugs prescribed by the dermatologist with systematic adverse effects. This article uses examples from each of these categories to illustrate several important principles central to drug reaction diagnosis and management. The information presented will help clinicians attain the highest possible level of certainty before making clinical decisions. PMID:27363888

  12. Enzyme Induced Formation of Monodisperse Hydrogel Nanoparticles Tunable in Size

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bocharova, Vera; Sharp, Danna; Jones, Aaron; Cheng, Shiwang; Griffin, Philip J.; Agapov, Alexander L.; Voylov, Dmitry; Wang, Yangyang; Kisliuk, Alexander; Melman, Artem; et al

    2015-03-09

    Here, we report a novel approach to synthesize monodisperse hydrogel nanoparticles that are tunable in size. The distinctive feature of our approach is the use of a multicopper oxidase enzyme, laccase, as both a biocatalyst and template for nanoparticle growth. We utilize the ferroxidase activity of laccase to initiate localized production of iron(III) cations from the oxidation of iron(II) cations. We demonstrate that nanoparticles are formed in a dilute polymer solution of alginate as a result of cross-linking between alginate and enzymatically produced iron(III) cations. Exerting control over the enzymatic reaction allows for nanometer-scale tuning of the hydrogel nanoparticle radiimore » in the range of 30–100 nm. Moreover, the nanoparticles and their growth kinetics were characterized via dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and UV–vis spectroscopy. Our finding opens up a new avenue for the synthesis of tunable nanoscale hydrogel particles for biomedical applications.« less

  13. DNA glycosylase enzymes induced during chemical adaptation of M. luteus.

    PubMed Central

    Riazuddin, S; Athar, A; Ahmed, Z; Lali, S M; Sohail, A

    1987-01-01

    Five peaks of DNA glycosylase activity showing a preference for MNNG alkylated DNA have been identified from extracts of adapted M. luteus. They are numerically designated as GI to GV in order of their decreasing molecular weights. The first two of these peaks have been highly purified. GI, is a constitutive heat labile protein, 35% stimulated by the presence of 50 mM NaCl, acts exclusively on 3 MeA residues in alkylated DNA, 60-70% inhibited by the presence of 2 mM free 3MeA and has been designated as 3MeA DNA glycosylase enzyme. GII, which is an inducible protein, is heat stable, 28% inhibited by the presence of 50 mM NaCl, removes 3MeA, 3MeG, 7MeA & 7MeG with different efficiency, and has been designated as 3,7 methylpurine DNA glycosylase enzyme. The rate of release of 3 methylpurines is 30 times that of 7MeG. There is no activity of either enzyme on O2-MeC, O2-MeT, O4-MeT or O6-MeG. The apparent molecular weights of GI and GII proteins are 28 Kd and 22 Kd respectively. PMID:3628000

  14. Enzyme Induced Formation of Monodisperse Hydrogel Nanoparticles Tunable in Size

    SciTech Connect

    Bocharova, Vera; Sharp, Danna; Jones, Aaron; Cheng, Shiwang; Griffin, Philip J.; Agapov, Alexander L.; Voylov, Dmitry; Wang, Yangyang; Kisliuk, Alexander; Melman, Artem; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-03-09

    Here, we report a novel approach to synthesize monodisperse hydrogel nanoparticles that are tunable in size. The distinctive feature of our approach is the use of a multicopper oxidase enzyme, laccase, as both a biocatalyst and template for nanoparticle growth. We utilize the ferroxidase activity of laccase to initiate localized production of iron(III) cations from the oxidation of iron(II) cations. We demonstrate that nanoparticles are formed in a dilute polymer solution of alginate as a result of cross-linking between alginate and enzymatically produced iron(III) cations. Exerting control over the enzymatic reaction allows for nanometer-scale tuning of the hydrogel nanoparticle radii in the range of 30–100 nm. Moreover, the nanoparticles and their growth kinetics were characterized via dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and UV–vis spectroscopy. Our finding opens up a new avenue for the synthesis of tunable nanoscale hydrogel particles for biomedical applications.

  15. Monitoring of drug-drug and drug-food interactions.

    PubMed

    Garabedian-Ruffalo, S M; Syrja-Farber, M; Lanius, P M; Plucinski, A

    1988-07-01

    A program for detecting and preventing potentially serious drug-drug and drug-food interactions is described. Two clinical pharmacists developed drug interaction alert (DIA) cards for each potential interaction to be monitored. The cards contain information about the proposed mechanism and potential result of the interaction, as well as information about how to monitor or circumvent the interaction. Staff pharmacists check for the occurrence of potential interactions daily as they verify the filling of the patient-medication cassettes; a poster of all the interactions that are included in the program is posted in each satellite pharmacy to serve as a quick reference for the pharmacists. When a pharmacist detects a potential interaction, he or she completes a DIA card and places it in the medication cassette drawer (if the notice is directed to the nurse) or on the front of the patient's chart (if the notice is directed to the physician). The program was introduced to hospital personnel through inservice education programs and departmental newsletters. The results of a quality assurance review indicated that 95 of 279 (34%) cards dispensed to nurses and 40 of 49 (82%) cards dispensed to physicians resulted in some form of action. The program to detect and prevent potentially serious drug-drug and drug-food interactions has been successful. PMID:3414718

  16. Food-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen; Khan, Arshad Yar

    2011-01-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least food-drug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient. PMID:22043389

  17. Herb-drug, food-drug, nutrient-drug, and drug-drug interactions: mechanisms involved and their medical implications.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Janina Maria

    2002-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and iatrogenic diseases have been identified as significant factors responsible for patient morbidity and mortality. Significant studies on drug metabolism in humans have been published during the last few years, offering a deeper comprehension of the mechanisms underlying adverse drug reactions and interactions. More understanding of these mechanisms, and of recent advances in laboratory technology, can help to evaluate potential drug interactions when drugs are prescribed concurrently. Increasing knowledge of interindividual variation in drug breakdown capacity and recent findings concerning the influence of environment, diet, nutrients, and herbal products can be used to reduce ADRs and iatrogenic diseases. Reviewed data suggest that drug treatment should be increasingly custom tailored to suit the individual patient and that appropriately co-prescribed diet and herbal remedies, could increase drug efficacy and lessen drug toxicity. This review focuses mainly on recently published research material. The cytochrome p450 enzymes, their role in metabolism, and their mechanisms of action are reviewed, and their role in drug-drug interactions are discussed. Drug-food and drug-herb interactions have garnered attention. Interdisciplinary communication among medical herbalists, medical doctors, and dietetic experts needs to be improved and encouraged. Internet resources for obtaining current information regarding drug-drug, drug-herb, and drug-nutrient interactions are provided. PMID:12165187

  18. A critical test of the hippocampal theta model of anxiolytic drug action.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Michelle; Treit, Dallas; Dickson, Clayton T

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal theta rhythms have been associated with a number of behavioural processes, including learning, memory and arousal. Recently it has been argued that the suppression of hippocampal theta is a valid indicator of anxiolytic drug action. Like all such models, however, it has relied almost exclusively on the experimental effects of well-known, clinically proven anxiolytic compounds for validation. The actual predictive validity of putative models of anxiolytic drug action, however, cannot be rigorously tested with this approach alone. The present study provides a stringent test of the predictive validity of the theta suppression model, using the drug phenytoin (50 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg), and a positive comparison compound, diazepam (2 mg/kg). Phenytoin has two important properties that are advantageous for assessing the validity of the theta suppression model: 1) it is a standard antiepileptic drug with no known anxiolytic effects, and 2) its primary mechanism of action is through suppression of the persistent sodium current, an effect that should also suppress hippocampal theta. Because of the latter property, we also directly compared the effects of phenytoin in the theta suppression model with its effects in the most widely tested behavioural model of anxiolytic drug action, the elevated plus-maze. While an anxiolytic-like effect of phenytoin in the theta suppression model might be expected simply due to its suppressive effects on sodium channel currents, anxiolytic effects in both tests would provide strong support for the predictive validity of the theta suppression model. Surprisingly, phenytoin produced clear anxiolytic-like effects in both neurophysiological and behavioural models, thus providing strong evidence of the predictive validity of the theta suppression model. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'. PMID:21723303

  19. Therapy against organophosphate poisoning: The importance of anticholinergic drugs with antiglutamatergic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, Ben Avi Raveh, Lily

    2008-10-15

    Potent cholinesterase inhibitors (e.g., soman, sarin), induce a wide range of deleterious effects including convulsions, behavioral impairments and ultimately, death. Due to the likelihood of various scenarios of military or terrorist attacks by these and other chemical weapons, research has to be aimed at finding optimal therapies. Early accumulation of acetylcholine in synaptic clefts was suggested to trigger an array of toxic events including an excessive release of glutamate, culminating in the activation of its receptors. Stimulation of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) subtype of these receptors was associated with the neuronal injury that initiates organophosphate-induced brain damage. The notion of a stepwise mechanism yielded treatments based on a combination of an immediate administration of enzyme reactivators and anticholinergic drugs. This strategy dramatically increased survival rates but did not abolish convulsions and failed to prevent the ensuing cognitive dysfunction. Efforts to improve this paradigm by adding anticonvulsants or antiglutamatergic drugs with anti-epileptic characteristics produced dubious results. Under these conditions, benactyzine and caramiphen, agents with anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic properties, provided improved protection when introduced as adjunct agents to oximes, reversible cholinesterase inhibitors and/or specific antimuscarinic drugs such as atropine. In contrast, the specific antimuscarinic drug scopolamine failed to block soman-induced changes in glutamatergic and behavioral parameters even when given prophylactically. These findings along with a large number of additional reports led towards the conclusion that the therapeutic advantage of drugs such as benactyzine and caramiphen could derive from their ability to modulate central cholinergic and glutamate neurotransmission.

  20. The use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the detection of drug intoxication.

    PubMed

    Komoroski, E M; Komoroski, R A; Valentine, J L; Pearce, J M; Kearns, G L

    2000-04-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as a method for drug analysis has the advantages of reduced pre-analytical preparation time and the potential to detect and quantitate drug conjugates and metabolites simultaneously. NMR was investigated as a method to screen for organic substances (and metabolites) in 25 patients who presented to the Emergency Department with clinical indications of a drug overdose. Urine specimens were examined by 1H NMR spectroscopy at 300 MHz and the results compared with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) results. There was a 56% concordance (14 of 25 samples) between NMR and GC-MS. NMR identified acetaminophen, ibuprofen, aspirin, valproate, carbamazepine, and pseudoephedrine as parent compounds or metabolites. For a patient for whom GC-MS results were negative, NMR strongly suggested the presence of erythromycin. NMR was most successful in identifying analgesics and antiepileptic drugs (sensitivity 83-100%). In 10 patients, signals from 1,2-propanediol, a common vehicle for some pediatric medications, were observed by NMR spectroscopy. NMR had 0% sensitivity in identifying tricyclic antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs. In these samples, GC-MS detected a variety of compounds, including tricyclic antidepressants and their metabolites and chlorpromazine. In addition, other substances that had not been disclosed as having been ingested, such as caffeine, diphenhydramine, and nicotine, were detected by GC-MS. NMR spectroscopy represents an emerging supplementary analytical technique that is applicable to a wide range of possible intoxicants and to the evaluation of the intoxicated patient, particularly when larger amounts of the intoxicant (> 200 mg) are ingested. PMID:10774537

  1. A population-based study of active and drug-resistant epilepsies in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Giussani, Giorgia; Canelli, Valentina; Bianchi, Elisa; Franchi, Carlotta; Nobili, Alessandro; Erba, Giuseppe; Beghi, Ettore

    2016-02-01

    Drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) is defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as a failure of adequate trials of two tolerated, appropriately chosen, and used antiepileptic drugs to achieve sustained seizure freedom. Our aim was to calculate the following: (1) the prevalence of active epilepsy and DRE in a well-defined population of Northern Italy and (2) the proportion of incident cases developing DRE. The study population (146,506; year 2008) resided in the province of Lecco, Northern Italy. The medical records of 123 general practitioners were reviewed to identify patients with epilepsy, diagnosed by a neurologist during the period 2000-2008. The point prevalence of active epilepsy and DRE was calculated on December 31, 2008. A total of 747 prevalent patients with epilepsy, 684 patients with active epilepsy, and 342 incident cases were identified. The frequency of DRE was 15.6% (107/684) of all active epilepsies and 10.5% (36/342) of incident cases. The point prevalence was 0.73 per 1000. The standardized prevalence of DRE was 0.7 per 1000 (Italian population) and 0.8 per 1000 (world population). Our data indicate that 1/6 patients with active epilepsy in the general population has DRE, and 1/10 patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy will develop DRE within nine years from the diagnosis. PMID:26731716

  2. Modulation of Immunity and the Inflammatory Response: A New Target for Treating Drug-resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nian; Liu, Hao; Di, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, epilepsy medical therapy is usually limited to anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). However, approximately 1/3 of epilepsy patients, described as drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) patients, still suffer from continuous frequent seizures despite receiving adequate AEDs treatment of sufficient duration. More recently, with the remarkable progress of immunology, immunity and inflammation are considered to be key elements of the pathobiology of epilepsy. Activation of inflammatory processes in brain tissue has been observed in both experimental seizure animal models and epilepsy patients. Anti-inflammatory and immunotherapies also showed significant anticonvulsant properties both in clinical and in experimental settings. The above emerging evidence indicates that modulation of immunity and inflammatory processes could serve as novel specific targets to achieve potential anticonvulsant effects for the patients with epilepsy, especially DRE. Herein we review the recent evidence supporting the role of inflammation in the development and perpetuation of seizures, and also discuss the recent achievements in modulation of inflammation and immunotherapy applied to the treatment of epilepsy. Apart from medical therapy, we also discuss the influences of surgery, ketogenic diet, and electroconvulsive therapy on immunity and inflammation in DRE patients. Taken together, a promising perspective is suggested for future immunomodulatory therapies in the treatment of patients with DRE. PMID:23814544

  3. [Drug Interactions and Pharmacokinetics of Psychotropic Drugs].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the field dedicated to investigating the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of drugs. Absorption of drugs is affected when they are taken together with a meal. Depending on the drug, the area under the concentration curve is affected by whether a medication is taken before or after a meal. Combined use of drugs with a high plasma protein binding fraction may be dangerous, since drug efficacy is impacted by efficiency, which in turn is affected by the degree to which it binds to proteins. Even more significant is the issue of "drug/drug" interactions that arise due to inhibition of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) hepatic microsomal enzyme system. Some antidepressants, such as paroxetine and fluvoxamine, are strong inhibitors of the CYP system. In the case of a medication that depends on renal clearance for elimination, caution is required when taking such a drug if it influences renal function. When a medicinal effect changes, pharmacodynamic changes must also be considered. PMID:26514046

  4. Granulomatous Drug Eruptions.

    PubMed

    Dodiuk-Gad, Roni P; Shear, Neil H

    2015-07-01

    Granuloma formation is usually regarded as a means of defending the host from persistent irritants of either exogenous or endogenous origin. Noninfectious granulomatous disorders of the skin encompass a challenging group of diseases owing to their clinical and histologic overlap. Drug reactions characterized by a granulomatous reaction pattern are rare, and defined by a predominance of histiocytes in the inflammatory infiltrate. This review summarizes current knowledge on the various types of granulomatous drug eruptions, focusing on the 4 major types: interstitial granulomatous drug reaction, drug-induced accelerated rheumatoid nodulosis, drug-induced granuloma annulare, and drug-induced sarcoidosis. PMID:26143430

  5. Retigabine, a Kv7.2/Kv7.3-Channel Opener, Attenuates Drug-Induced Seizures in Knock-In Mice Harboring Kcnq2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Yukiko; Tomonoh, Yuko; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Zhang, Bo; Uchida, Taku; Ishii, Atsushi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The hetero-tetrameric voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.2/Kv7.3, which is encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, plays an important role in limiting network excitability in the neonatal brain. Kv7.2/Kv7.3 dysfunction resulting from KCNQ2 mutations predominantly causes self-limited or benign epilepsy in neonates, but also causes early onset epileptic encephalopathy. Retigabine (RTG), a Kv7.2/ Kv7.3-channel opener, seems to be a rational antiepileptic drug for epilepsies caused by KCNQ2 mutations. We therefore evaluated the effects of RTG on seizures in two strains of knock-in mice harboring different Kcnq2 mutations, in comparison to the effects of phenobarbital (PB), which is the first-line antiepileptic drug for seizures in neonates. The subjects were heterozygous knock-in mice (Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+) bearing the Y284C or A306T Kcnq2 mutation, respectively, and their wild-type (WT) littermates, at 63–100 days of age. Seizures induced by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA, 12mg/kg) were recorded using a video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring system. Effects of RTG on KA-induced seizures of both strains of knock-in mice were assessed using seizure scores from a modified Racine’s scale and compared with those of PB. The number and total duration of spike bursts on EEG and behaviors monitored by video recording were also used to evaluate the effects of RTG and PB. Both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice showed significantly more KA-induced seizures than WT mice. RTG significantly attenuated KA-induced seizure activities in both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice, and more markedly than PB. This is the first reported evidence of RTG ameliorating KA-induced seizures in knock-in mice bearing mutations of Kcnq2, with more marked effects than those observed with PB. RTG or other Kv7.2-channel openers may be considered as first-line antiepileptic treatments for epilepsies resulting from KCNQ2 mutations. PMID:26910900

  6. Spontaneous reports of drug-induced erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in Denmark 1968-1991.

    PubMed

    Gaist, D; Andersen, M; Schou, J S

    1996-03-01

    Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) have been established to monitor drug safety problems after marketing, especially rare, but serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Among these are the skin disorders erythema multiforme (EM), Stevens- Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the data on these serious skin disorders available in a SRS. All reports concerning these diseases submitted to the Danish Committee on ADRs during the period 1968 to 1991 were reviewed according to predefined criteria. Information was often scarce,and the diagnosis of the reporter had to be accepted at face value in 28% of cases. Two hundred cases of EM, 74 of SJS and 29 of TEN were identified. More than 60% of cases were hospitalized. The diseases had fatal outcome in six patients with TEN, three with SJS and a single patient suffering from EM. One hundred and twenty-eight different drugs were reported as causal agents. Major drug groups involved were antibiotics (sulphonamides and penicillins), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-epileptics and analgesics. Incidence estimates based on spontaneous reports were compared to the incidence according to the literature and data from a nationwide hospital discharge diagnosis register. The reporting fraction for EM and SJS is estimated to 10-30%, and for TEN to 25-50%, but the validity of reports is in some cases difficult to assess owing to lack of detail. PMID:15073835

  7. Adverse drug reactions in veterinary patients associated with drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L

    2013-09-01

    For many drugs used in veterinary practice, plasma and tissue concentrations are highly dependent on the activity of drug transporters. This article describes how functional changes in drug transporters, whether mediated by genetic variability or drug-drug interactions, affect drug disposition and, ultimately, drug safety and efficacy in veterinary patients. A greater understanding of species, breed, and individual (genetic) differences in drug transporter function, as well as drug-drug interactions involving drug transporters, will result in improved strategies for drug design and will enable veterinarians to incorporate individualized medicine in their practices. PMID:23890239

  8. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that ... purpose, such as getting high Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include narcotic painkillers, ...

  9. Animal Drug Safety FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... the top How do you determine if a veterinary drug is safe to market? As mandated by the ... to the top How does CVM remove unsafe veterinary drugs from the market? See Withdrawal of New Animal ...

  10. Thrombocytopenia - drug induced

    MedlinePlus

    ... and a seizure medicine called valproic acid may lead to this problem. Other medicines that cause drug-induced thrombocytopenia include: Furosemide Gold, used to treat arthritis Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( ...

  11. [Drugs and crime].

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Munehide

    2010-08-01

    In law-related problems on drugs and crime, there are two types: (1) possession/use of drugs, (2) crimes caused by mental distress after the use of drugs. In this paper, I will focus on the former type called 'drug crimes'. Since drugs cause medically negative effects on the human body, the management/use of drugs is limited by the law which prescribes penalties. At the present, the management/use of narcotics, other mentally stimulating drugs, opium and its raw material, an opium poppy, cannabis, and antihypnotics are limited by six laws, including criminal laws. In this paper, I will introduce the contents of these laws, and the current situation of 'drug crimes'. PMID:20715491

  12. The Drug Education Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, John C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Examines the problems of alcoholism, smoking and drug addiction and their influence on students. Suggests that intermediate and secondary schools can assist in alcohol and tobacco (the two legal drugs) programs through improved educational methods. (Author/RK)

  13. Alcoholism, Alcohol, and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Emanuel; Lieber, Charles S.

    1971-01-01

    Describes research on synergistic effects of alcohol and other drugs, particularly barbiturates. Proposes biochemical mechanisms to explain alcoholics' tolerance of other drugs when sober, and increased sensitivity when drunk. (AL)

  14. Drug-induced hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000310.htm Drug-induced hypoglycemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Drug-induced hypoglycemia is low blood sugar that results from medication. ...

  15. Students and Drug Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todays Educ, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Introduction to "Students and Drug Abuse, prepared by the Public Information Branch and Center for Studies of Narcotic and Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the staff of Today's Education.

  16. What Are Narcotic Drugs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todays Educ, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Part of "Students and Drug Abuse, prepared by the Public Information Branch and Center for Studies of Narcotic and Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the staff of Today's Education.

  17. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that was ... prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include narcotic painkillers, sedatives, tranquilizers, and stimulants. Every medicine has ...

  18. Drug-induced nightmares.

    PubMed

    2000-12-01

    (1) A wide variety of drugs have been implicated in nightmares, often on inadequate evidence. (2) Recurrent nightmares can be induced by many drugs, and not only agents with psychotropic or neurological effects. PMID:11475499

  19. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy secondary to drugs is a loss of sensation or movement in a part of the body ... weakness. Many medicines may affect the development of neuropathy, including: Heart or blood pressure drugs: Amiodarone Hydralazine ...

  20. Therapeutic drug levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003430.htm Therapeutic drug levels To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Therapeutic drug levels are lab tests to look for the presence ...