Science.gov

Sample records for eocene equatorial rain

  1. Equatorial Pacific productivity changes near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. C.; Wade, Bridget S.; Westerhold, Thomas; Erhardt, Andrea M.; Coxall, Helen K.; Baldauf, Jack; Wagner, Meghan

    2014-09-01

    There is general agreement that productivity in high latitudes increased in the late Eocene and remained high in the early Oligocene. Evidence for both increased and decreased productivity across the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT) in the tropics has been presented, usually based on only one paleoproductivity proxy and often in sites with incomplete recovery of the EOT itself. A complete record of the Eocene-Oligocene transition was obtained at three drill sites in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean (ODP Site 1218 and IODP Sites U1333 and U1334). Four paleoproductivity proxies that have been examined at these sites, together with carbon and oxygen isotope measurements on early Oligocene planktonic foraminifera, give evidence of ecologic and oceanographic change across this climatically important boundary. Export productivity dropped sharply in the basal Oligocene (~33.7 Ma) and only recovered several hundred thousand years later; however, overall paleoproductivity in the early Oligocene never reached the average levels found in the late Eocene and in more modern times. Changes in the isotopic gradients between deep- and shallow-living planktonic foraminifera suggest a gradual shoaling of the thermocline through the early Oligocene that, on average, affected accumulation rates of barite, benthic foraminifera, and opal, as well as diatom abundance near 33.5 Ma. An interval with abundant large diatoms beginning at 33.3 Ma suggests an intermediate thermocline depth, which was followed by further shoaling, a dominance of smaller diatoms, and an increase in average primary productivity as estimated from accumulation rates of benthic foraminifera.

  2. Survival probability of precipitations and rain attenuation in tropical and equatorial regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohebbi Nia, Masoud; Din, Jafri; Panagopoulos, Athanasios D.; Lam, Hong Yin

    2015-08-01

    This contribution presents a stochastic model useful for the generation of a long-term tropospheric rain attenuation time series for Earth space or a terrestrial radio link in tropical and equatorial heavy rain regions based on the well-known Cox-Ingersoll-Ross model previously employed in research in the fields of finance and economics. This model assumes typical gamma distribution for rain attenuation in heavy rain climatic regions and utilises the temporal dynamic of precipitation collected in equatorial Johor, Malaysia. Different formations of survival probability are also discussed. Furthermore, the correlation between these probabilities and the Markov process is determined, and information on the variance and autocorrelation function of rain events with respect to the particular characteristics of precipitation in this area is presented. The proposed technique proved to preserve the peculiarities of precipitation for an equatorial region and reproduce fairly good statistics of the rain attenuation correlation function that could help to improve the prediction of dynamic characteristics of rain fade events.

  3. Evidence for Atlantic thermal differentiation in the late middle Eocene to early Oligocene, eastern equatorial Atlantic DSDP Site 366

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabideaux, N. M.; Cramer, B. S.; Katz, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene climate transition marked a pronounced shift in global climate from greenhouse to icehouse conditions. We present new late middle to late Eocene (~33-39 Ma) benthic foraminiferal stable isotope records (δ18O, δ13C), including Oi-1, from DSDP Site 366 on the Sierra Leone Rise (04°40.70'N, 19°51.10'W) that extend published latest Eocene-early Oligocene Site 366 records (Miller et al. 1989), in an attempt to identify the influence Northern Component Water (NCW) and Southern Component Water (SCW), and possibly Tethyan Outflow Water (TOW), had on deepwater circulation in the Atlantic at this time. Site 366 provides constraints on eastern equatorial Atlantic deepwaters (~2700m paleodepth) during this time. Comparisons with published isotope records (Cramer et al., 2009) indicate a distinct δ18O offset between ODP Site 689 (Deister-Haass and Zahn, 1996) and Site 366 indicating cooler waters in the Southern Ocean than in the eastern equatorial Atlantic. South Atlantic δ18O records generally fall between the Site 689 and Site 366 values throughout the late middle Eocene-early Oligocene, and may indicate relative contributions of northern- and southern-sourced deepwater.

  4. Characteristics of rainfall queues for rain attenuation studies over radio links at subtropical and equatorial Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonge, Akintunde A.; Afullo, Thomas J.

    2014-08-01

    Attenuation due to precipitation remains an important design factor in the future deployment of terrestrial and earth-space communication radio links. Largely, there are concerted efforts to understand the dynamics of precipitation in attenuation occurrence at subtropical, tropical, and equatorial region of Africa. In this deliberate approach, rainfall spikes pertaining to rain cells are conceptualized as distinct rain spike traffic over radio links, by applying queueing theory concepts. The queue distributions at Durban (29°52'S, 30°58'E) and Butare (2°36'S, 29°44'E)—respectively, of subtropical and equatorial climates—are investigated from distrometer measurements. The data sets at both sites are observed over four rain regimes: drizzle, widespread, shower, and thunderstorm. The queue parameters of service time and inter-arrival of rain spikes traffic at both regions are found to be Erlang-k distributed (Ek) and exponentially distributed (M), respectively. It is established that the appearance of rain rates over radio links invariably follows a First Come, First Served (FCFS), multi-server (s), infinite queue, and semi-Markovian process, designated as M/Ek/s/∞/FCFS discipline. Modeled queue parameters at both regions are found to vary significantly over different regimes. However, these queue parameters over the entire data set suggest similar queue patterns at both sites. More importantly, power law relationships describing other queue-related parameters are formulated. The paper concludes by demonstrating an application of queueing theory for rainfall synthesis. The proposed technique will provide an alternative method of estimating rain cell sizes and rain attenuation over satellite and terrestrial links.

  5. Neotropical eocene coastal floras and [sup 18]O/[sup 16]O-estimated warmer vs. cooler equatorial waters

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, A. )

    1994-03-01

    The history of the earth's sea-surface temperature (SST) in equatorial regions during the Tertiary is unsettled because of uncertainty as to the presence and extent of glaciers during the Paleogene. The [sup 16]O trapped in glaciers and subsequently released back to the ocean basins as meltwater during interglacials affects the [sup 18]O/[sup 16]O ratio of sea water, one of the variables that must be known for oxygen isotope paleotemperature analysis of calcareous fossils. Estimates of SST range from [approximately]18 to 20 C, assuming an ice-free earth, to [approximately]28 C assuming glaciers were present in the Paleogene. Low latitude SST presently averages 28C, so the former estimate gives a value 8 to 10 C cooler than present, while the latter gives a value as warm or slightly warmer than present. The figures are important for interpreting terrestrial vegetational history because the temperature differential between low and high latitudes is a major factor in determining global climates through the control of poleward transfer of heat. The middle( ) to late Eocene Gatuncillo Formation palynoflora of Panama was deposited at the ocean-continental interface at [approximately]9[degrees]N latitude. The individual components and paleocommunities are distinctly tropical and similar to the present vegetation along the Atlantic coast of southern Central America. This is consistent with data emerging from other recently studied tropical coastal biotas and represents a contribution from paleobiology toward eventually resolving the problem of Eocene equatorial marine environments. Collectively, the evidence is beginning to favor a model of Eocene SST near present values. 50 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Evidence for changes in subsurface circulation in the late Eocene equatorial Pacific from radiolarian-bound nitrogen isotope values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Rebecca S.; Moore, Theodore C.; Erhardt, Andrea M.; Scher, Howie D.

    2015-07-01

    Microfossil-bound organic matter represents an important archive of surface ocean environmental information. Sedimentary nitrogen (N) isotope reconstructions of surface nitrate consumption and nitrogen source changes are made using fossil diatom (autotrophs) and planktic foraminiferal (heterotrophs)-bound organic matter with success. However, because diatoms and planktic foraminifera are poorly preserved and sedimentary organic matter content is near zero during the late Eocene, our ability to examine nutrient dynamics across this important climate transition is limited. Here we present new data exploring the use of N isotope records from radiolarian tests. A comparison of surface ocean nitrate and core top bulk and radiolarian N isotope values (as δ15N) from the equatorial Pacific indicates that radiolarian-N records δ15N variability with fidelity but that a significant offset exists between bulk sedimentary and diatom δ15N values and those measured from radiolarians (~7.1 ± 1.1‰). A downcore profile of radiolarian δ15N values is compared to siliceous microfossil assemblage changes across the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Average of radiolarian-bound δ15N values is 0.5 ± 2.0‰, which, when corrected using the offset derived from the modern surface samples, suggests that the mean nitrogen isotopic composition of the early Cenozoic eastern Pacific was not significantly different from today. The overall trend, of decreasing δ15N values with decreasing export productivity, is consistent with either a regional decline in pelagic denitrification or a large-scale change in nutrient sources to the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP), both linked to the cooling climate and changing intermediate water circulation. Decreasing/low δ15N values cooccur with high radiolarian species turnover at ~35.5 and 34 Ma, suggestive of a significant ecological change in the EEP, consistent with cooling and water mass distribution changes. The preliminary results suggest that

  7. Assessment of prediction and predictability of short rains over equatorial East Africa using a multi-model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahaga, T. K.; Kucharski, F.; Tsidu, G. Mengistu; Yang, Hongwei

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the performance of dynamical seasonal forecast systems is evaluated for the prediction of short rain anomalies over equatorial East Africa. The evaluation is based on observational datasets and the Asia-Pacific Climate Center (APCC) Ocean-Atmosphere coupled multi-model ensemble (MME) retrospective forecasts (hindcasts). These forecast systems have different hindcast periods; here, we have selected common years from 1982 to 2005. The ensembles of individual models and their MME mean are evaluated. Hindcasts initialized on the 1st of August from each year alone are considered, as these are the most relevant to short rain predictions. The coupled climate model ensemble reproduces the spatial distribution of mean September-October-November (SON) rainfall and seasonal climate variations over equatorial East Africa with further improvement in MME mean. Individual coupled models and MME mean also show statistically significant skill in forecasting sea surface temperatures anomalies (SSTAs) over the western and eastern parts of the equatorial Indian Ocean, giving significant correlation at 99 % confidence level for Indian Ocean dipole (IOD). Moreover, five out of ten coupled models and MME mean show statistically significant skill in predicting equatorial East Africa short rains. The fidelity of hindcasts is further measured by anomaly correlation coefficient (ACC) and four models as well as MME mean show significant skill over East Africa. It is shown that the reproduction of the observed variability in the East African region is mainly due to a realistic relationship of East African rainfall with the Indian Ocean dipole. Overall, the skill of the dynamical models is attributed to the fact that slowly evolving SSTs are the primary source of predictability and to the fact that coupled climate models produce skillful predictions of SON SST anomalies over the tropical Indian Ocean. This information opens the possibility of using readily available seasonal

  8. Palaeomagnetic study of IODP Sites U1331 and U1332 in the equatorial Pacific—extending relative geomagnetic palaeointensity observations through the Oligocene and into the Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yuhji; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Acton, Gary D.; Richter, Carl; Guidry, Emily P.; Ohneiser, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Palaeomagnetic and rock magnetic measurements on sediment cores from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Sites U1331 and U1332 in the equatorial Pacific are used to examine changes in the relative palaeointensity (RPI) of the geomagnetic field during the Oligocene and Eocene. The main magnetic carrier of these sediments is interpreted to be partially oxidized magnetite, which varies in concentration by less than about a factor of six along the stratigraphic section. In some cases, these variations occur as abrupt changes or fluctuations. The largest change in lithology and rock magnetic properties occurs across the Eocene/Oligocene (E/O) boundary, with the radiolarian-rich late Eocene sediments having higher magnetic concentration than the nannofossil-rich early Oligocene sediments. RPI estimates computed from ratios of the natural remanent magnetization to anhysteretic remanent magnetization and isothermal remanent magnetization appear to be insignificantly influenced by the lithologic differences within either the Oligocene or Eocene but are significantly influenced by the differences between the Eocene and Oligocene sediments. We thus estimate the RPI separately for the Oligocene and Eocene intervals. For both sites, the RPI records always have minima at chron boundaries. The records also show large fluctuations between highs and lows even during stable polarity periods. These features are similar to what has been observed for RPI records spanning the past 3 Myr, suggesting persistent geomagnetic field behaviour since the Eocene. The two new records show consistent variation with the RPI reported from Site U1333, which is in the vicinity of Sites U1331 and U1332. The RPI variations during the Oligocene at Site U1332 are also generally consistent with those reported from the South Atlantic. One interesting feature is that the RPI is consistently high throughout most of Chron C12r (31.021-33.232 Ma). In addition, Cryptochron C18n.1n-1, which is characterized

  9. Dynamics above a dense equatorial rain forest from the surface boundary layer to the free atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyra, R.; Druilhet, A.; Benech, B.; Biona, C. Bouka

    1992-08-01

    During the Dynamique et Chimie de l'Atmosphère en Forêt Equatoriale (DECAFE) campaign, dynamical and thermodynamical measurements were made at Impfondo (1°37'N, 18°04'W), over the dense rain forest of northern Congo during the dry season (February 1988). During the measurement period the experimental site was located south of the intertropical convergence zone ground track which manages the dynamics of the large scale. Above the experimental site, the atmospheric low layers are supplied by monsoon air coming from the Guinean gulf; the upper layers (>1500 m) are supplied by warm and dry air (trade winds) coming from the northern desert region and the savanna. Our experimental approach consists of analyzing the heat and moisture content in the low troposphere from vertical soundings made by a tethered balloon (0-400 m) and an aircraft (0-4000 m). The analysis of the evolution of the observed planetary boundary layer (PBL) is made with a mixed layer one-dimensional model which is forced to represent correctly the observed PBL height growth. The simulated and observed budgets of the heat and moisture in the PBL are balanced by adding dry air to the simulated PBL in the afternoon. This drying out can be maintained only by high levels of entrainment flux at the PBL top. An entrainment velocity of 3 cm s-1 enables the balancing of the moisture budget. This entrainment velocity seems compatible with physicochemical transfers as those of methane and ozone.

  10. Emissions of nitrogen oxides from equatorial rain forest in central Africa:. origin and regulation of NO emission from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serca, D.; Delmas, R.; Jambert, C.; Labroue, L.

    1994-09-01

    Emissions of nitric oxide from soils of equatorial rain forest were measured in the Dimonika Natural Park (4°30'S, 12°30'E) in the Mayombe Forest in Congo. Three research campaigns were carried out in June and July 1991 and in February 1992. Fluxes were measured by dynamic chamber techniques using a chemiluminescence instrument Scintrex LMA3. NO fluxes measured on natural soils are in between 5 and 17×109 molecules cm-2 s-1; they are of the same order of magnitude as those observed in similar tropical forest media. Soil treatment experiments show that the auto-decomposition of HNO2 in these acid soils (pH# 4) (chemodenitrification) is a potentially important cause of nitric oxide production in this type of ecosystem. Nitrous acid comes from autotrophic nitrification all the year round, and also from biological denitrification, shown by N20 emissions, during the rainy season. The regulation of NO release from soils is linked to ammonia production from litter mineralisation and to direct NH4 input by throughfall.

  11. Carbonate Fluxes to the Eastern Equatorial Pacific during the Eocene: using the GENIE Earth System Model to investigate carbonate accumulation event mechanisms and dynamics revealed by the Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pälike, H.; Lyle, M. W.; Ridgwell, A. J.; Edgar, K. M.; Science Party, I.; Iodp Expeditions 320/321 Science Party

    2010-12-01

    The Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT) recovered sediments and data from a set of Sites that form a palaeo-depth transect for most of Cenozoic time. We are using the data from IODP Expedition 320 and ODP Leg 199 sites to refine the dynamics of the carbonate compensation depth (CCD) during the Eocene. We are able to use the PEAT depth transect approach to determine the intensity of carbonate fluxes at the seafloor for the previously identified carbonate accumulation events (CAEs) of Lyle et al (ODP Leg 199 SR, 2005). Using the reconstructed depths for the drilled sites we are able to determine the amplitude of the CCD fluctuations to be about 500m in depth, and carbonate accumulation rates fluctuate between near zero and ~1.5 g/cm2/kyr. Each event lasts for a time period of around 1 Myr, with sharp transitions into and out of these cycles of enhanced carbonate accumulation. To investigate the potential mechanisms for these events we use an Earth System Model of Intermediate complexity (GENIE), as previously employed to study the carbon cycle during the PETM (Panchuk et al., Geology 2008). Using estimated values for ocean water Ca and Mg concentrations, we ran ensemble simulations for different pCO2 concentrations, different Alkalinity and different CaCO3:POC scenarios. We find that different CaCO3:POC ratios are able to explain many of the observed dissolution/preservation events, and are able to use these to constrain other parameters in the Earth System.

  12. Potential Predictability of the Sea-Surface Temperature Forced Equatorial East Africa Short Rains Interannual Variability in the 20th Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahaga, T. K.; Gizaw, G.; Kucharski, F.; Diro, G. T.

    2014-12-01

    In this article, the predictability of the 20th century sea-surface temperature (SST) forced East African short rains variability is analyzed using observational data and ensembles of long atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations. To our knowledge, such an analysis for the whole 20th century using a series of AGCM ensemble simulations is carried out here for the first time. The physical mechanisms that govern the influence of SST on East African short rains in the model are also investigated. It is found that there is substantial skill in reproducing the East African short rains variability, given that the SSTs are known. Consistent with previous recent studies, it is found that the Indian Ocean and in particular the western pole of the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) play a dominant role for the prediction skill, whereas SSTs outside the Indian Ocean play a minor role. The physical mechanism for the influence of the western Indian Ocean on East African rainfall in the model is consistent with previous findings and consists of a gill-type response to a warm (cold) anomaly that induces a westerly(easterly) low-level flow anomaly over equatorial Africa and leads to moisture flux convergence (divergence) over East Africa. On the other hand, a positive El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) anomaly leads to a spatially non-coherent reducing effect over parts of East Africa, but the relationship is not strong enough to provide any predictive skill in our model. The East African short rains prediction skill is also analyzed within a model-derived potential predictability framework and it is shown that the actual prediction skill is broadly consistent with the model potential prediction skill. Low-frequency variations of the prediction skill are mostly related to SSTs outside the Indian Ocean region and are likely due to an increased interference of ENSO with the Indian Ocean influence on East African short rains after the mid-1970s climate shift.

  13. Eocene precipitation: a global monsoon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, D. R.; Huber, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Eocene was the warmest part of the Cenozoic, with warm climates extending across all continents including Antarctica, and extending into the Arctic. Substantive paleobotanical evidence (leaf floras and palynofloras) has demonstrated the existence of broadleaf and coniferous polar forests - a circumpolar rain forest - at both poles. North and South America, Australia, and China in the Eocene were well-forested and humid continents, in contrast to today where 2/3 of these continental areas are arid or semi-arid and lack forests. Each of these regions reflect past climate states - mesothermal moist climates with low thermal seasonality at high latitudes - that have no analog in the modern world. Recent modelling and paleontological proxy data, however, is revealing a high degree of seasonality to precipitation for these continental areas, indicating a monsoon-type precipitation regime may have characterized Eocene 'greenhouse climates'. Paleobotanical proxies offer 2 methods for estimated paleo-precipitation; leaf physiognomy (including both CLAMP and leaf area analysis), and quantitative analysis of nearest living relatives ('NLRs') of macrofloras. Presented here are 1) an updated leaf area analysis calibration with smaller errors of the estimate than previously provided, and 2) analyses of fossil floras from North America, Canada, the Arctic, and Australia. Analysis of the Canadian floras indicate moist climates (MAP >100cm/a) in the early and middle Eocene at middle and high paleolatitudes. Precipitation for western North America at mid-latitudes is also estimated as high, but a seasonally dry interior and south-east is indicated. For Australia, precipitation in the south-east is estimated >120 cm/a, but the macrofloras indicate a drier interior (MAP ~60 cm/a) and seasonal drought, contradicting estimates of ~120 cm/a based on NLR analysis of pollen floras. Recently published data show that north-eastern China in the Eocene had a monsoonal-type seasonality for

  14. Response of CO2 and H2O fluxes of a mountainous tropical rain forest in equatorial Indonesia to El Niño events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, A.; Ibrom, A.; Panferov, O.; Gushchina, D.; Propastin, P.; Kreilein, H.; June, T.; Rauf, A.; Gravenhorst, G.; Knohl, A.

    2015-03-01

    The possible impact of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events on the main components of CO2 and H2O fluxes in a pristine mountainous tropical rainforest growing in Central Sulawesi in Indonesia is described. The fluxes were continuously measured using the eddy covariance method for the period from January 2004 to June 2008. During this period, two episodes of El Niño and one episode of La Niña were observed. All these ENSO episodes had moderate intensity and were of Central Pacific type. The temporal variability analysis of the main meteorological parameters and components of CO2 and H2O exchange showed a very high sensitivity of Evapotranspiration (ET) and Gross Primary Production (GPP) of the tropical rain forest to meteorological variations caused by both El Niño and La Niña episodes. Incoming solar radiation is the main governing factor that is responsible for ET and GPP variability. Ecosystem Respiration (RE) dynamics depend mainly on the air temperature changes and are almost insensitive to ENSO. Changes of precipitation due to moderate ENSO events did not cause any notable effect on ET and GPP, mainly because of sufficient soil moisture conditions even in periods of anomalous reduction of precipitation in the region.

  15. Equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    1984-06-01

    Attention in this discussion of Equatorial Guinea is directed to the following: the people, history, geography, government, political conditions, the economy, foreign relations, and relations between the US and Equatorial Guinea. The population was estimated at 304,000 in 1983 and the annual growth rate was estimated in the range of 1.7-2.5. The infant mortality rate is 142.9/1000 with a life expectancy of 44.4 years for males and 47.6 years for females. The majority of the Equatoguinean people are of Bantu origin. The largest tribe, the Fang, is indigenous to the mainland, although many now also live on Bioko Island. Portuguese explorers found the island of Bioko in 1471, and the Portuguese retained control until 1778, when the island, adjacent islets, and the commercial rights to the mainland between the Niger and Ogooue Rivers were ceded to Spain. Spain lacked the wealth and the interest to develop an extensive economic infrastructure in Equatorial Guinea during the 1st half of this century, but the Spanish did help Equatorial Guinea achieve 1 of the highest literacy rates in Africa. They also founded a good network of health care facilities. In March 1968, under pressure from Guinean nationalists, Spain announced that it would grant independence to Equatorial Guinea as rapidly as possible. A referendum was held on August 11, 1968, and 63% of the electorate voted in favor of the constitution, which provided for a government with a general assembly and presidentially appointed judges in the Supreme Court. After the coup in August 1979, power was placed in the hands of a Supreme Military Council. A new constitution came into effect after a popular vote in August 1982, abolishing the Supreme Military Council. Under the terms of the constitution, the president was given extensive powers. By the end of 1983, a 60-member Chamber of Representatives of the people had been formed. The government, which is credited with restoring greater personal freedom, is regarded

  16. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  17. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  18. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  19. Age of Eocene/Oligocene boundary based on extrapolation from North American microtektite layer

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, B.P.; Crosbie, J.R.

    1982-04-01

    Microtektites believed to belong to the North American tektite strewn field have been found in upper Eocene sediments in cores from nine Deep Sea Drilling Project sites in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, equatorial Pacific, and eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. The microtektite layer has an age of 34.2 +- 0.6 m.y. based on fission-track dating of the microtektites and K-Ar and fission-track dating of the North American tektites. Extrapolation from the microtektite layer to the overlying Eocene/Oligocene boundary indicates an age of 32.3 +- 0.9 m.y. for the Eocene/Oligocene boundary as defined at each site in the Initial Reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. This age is approximately 5 m.y. younger than the age of 37.5 m.y. that is generally assigned to the boundary based on recently published Cenozoic time scales. 3 figures, 5 tables.

  20. Southern Rains

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ...   View Larger image Vigorous vegetation growth in the Southern United States after heavy rains fell during April and ... for atmospheric scattering and absorption effects, and use plant canopy structural models to determine the partitioning of solar ...

  1. Eocene cooling linked to early flow across the Tasmanian Gateway.

    PubMed

    Bijl, Peter K; Bendle, James A P; Bohaty, Steven M; Pross, Jörg; Schouten, Stefan; Tauxe, Lisa; Stickley, Catherine E; McKay, Robert M; Röhl, Ursula; Olney, Matthew; Sluijs, Appy; Escutia, Carlota; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2013-06-11

    The warmest global temperatures of the past 85 million years occurred during a prolonged greenhouse episode known as the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (52-50 Ma). The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum terminated with a long-term cooling trend that culminated in continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica from 34 Ma onward. Whereas early studies attributed the Eocene transition from greenhouse to icehouse climates to the tectonic opening of Southern Ocean gateways, more recent investigations invoked a dominant role of declining atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations (e.g., CO2). However, the scarcity of field data has prevented empirical evaluation of these hypotheses. We present marine microfossil and organic geochemical records spanning the early-to-middle Eocene transition from the Wilkes Land Margin, East Antarctica. Dinoflagellate biogeography and sea surface temperature paleothermometry reveal that the earliest throughflow of a westbound Antarctic Counter Current began ~49-50 Ma through a southern opening of the Tasmanian Gateway. This early opening occurs in conjunction with the simultaneous onset of regional surface water and continental cooling (2-4 °C), evidenced by biomarker- and pollen-based paleothermometry. We interpret that the westbound flowing current flow across the Tasmanian Gateway resulted in cooling of Antarctic surface waters and coasts, which was conveyed to global intermediate waters through invigorated deep convection in southern high latitudes. Although atmospheric CO2 forcing alone would provide a more uniform middle Eocene cooling, the opening of the Tasmanian Gateway better explains Southern Ocean surface water and global deep ocean cooling in the apparent absence of (sub-) equatorial cooling. PMID:23720311

  2. Eocene cooling linked to early flow across the Tasmanian Gateway

    PubMed Central

    Bijl, Peter K.; Bendle, James A. P.; Bohaty, Steven M.; Pross, Jörg; Schouten, Stefan; Tauxe, Lisa; Stickley, Catherine E.; McKay, Robert M.; Röhl, Ursula; Olney, Matthew; Sluijs, Appy; Escutia, Carlota; Brinkhuis, Henk; Klaus, Adam; Fehr, Annick; Williams, Trevor; Carr, Stephanie A.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Gonzàlez, Jhon J.; Hayden, Travis G.; Iwai, Masao; Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Katsuki, Kota; Kong, Gee Soo; Nakai, Mutsumi; Passchier, Sandra; Pekar, Stephen F.; Riesselman, Christina; Sakai, Toyosaburo; Shrivastava, Prakash K.; Sugisaki, Saiko; Tuo, Shouting; van de Flierdt, Tina; Welsh, Kevin; Yamane, Masako

    2013-01-01

    The warmest global temperatures of the past 85 million years occurred during a prolonged greenhouse episode known as the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (52–50 Ma). The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum terminated with a long-term cooling trend that culminated in continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica from 34 Ma onward. Whereas early studies attributed the Eocene transition from greenhouse to icehouse climates to the tectonic opening of Southern Ocean gateways, more recent investigations invoked a dominant role of declining atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations (e.g., CO2). However, the scarcity of field data has prevented empirical evaluation of these hypotheses. We present marine microfossil and organic geochemical records spanning the early-to-middle Eocene transition from the Wilkes Land Margin, East Antarctica. Dinoflagellate biogeography and sea surface temperature paleothermometry reveal that the earliest throughflow of a westbound Antarctic Counter Current began ∼49–50 Ma through a southern opening of the Tasmanian Gateway. This early opening occurs in conjunction with the simultaneous onset of regional surface water and continental cooling (2–4 °C), evidenced by biomarker- and pollen-based paleothermometry. We interpret that the westbound flowing current flow across the Tasmanian Gateway resulted in cooling of Antarctic surface waters and coasts, which was conveyed to global intermediate waters through invigorated deep convection in southern high latitudes. Although atmospheric CO2 forcing alone would provide a more uniform middle Eocene cooling, the opening of the Tasmanian Gateway better explains Southern Ocean surface water and global deep ocean cooling in the apparent absence of (sub-) equatorial cooling. PMID:23720311

  3. Aerosol Transport Over Equatorial Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Tyson, P. D.; Annegarn, H. J.; Kinyua, A. M.; Piketh, S.; King, M.; Helas, G.

    1999-01-01

    Long-range and inter-hemispheric transport of atmospheric aerosols over equatorial Africa has received little attention so far. Most aerosol studies in the region have focussed on emissions from rain forest and savanna (both natural and biomass burning) and were carried out in the framework of programs such as DECAFE (Dynamique et Chimie Atmospherique en Foret Equatoriale) and FOS (Fires of Savanna). Considering the importance of this topic, aerosols samples were measured in different seasons at 4420 meters on Mt Kenya and on the equator. The study is based on continuous aerosol sampling on a two stage (fine and coarse) streaker sampler and elemental analysis by Particle Induced X-ray Emission. Continuous samples were collected for two seasons coinciding with late austral winter and early austral spring of 1997 and austral summer of 1998. Source area identification is by trajectory analysis and sources types by statistical techniques. Major meridional transports of material are observed with fine-fraction silicon (31 to 68 %) in aeolian dust and anthropogenic sulfur (9 to 18 %) being the major constituents of the total aerosol loading for the two seasons. Marine aerosol chlorine (4 to 6 %), potassium (3 to 5 %) and iron (1 to 2 %) make up the important components of the total material transport over Kenya. Minimum sulfur fluxes are associated with recirculation of sulfur-free air over equatorial Africa, while maximum sulfur concentrations are observed following passage over the industrial heartland of South Africa or transport over the Zambian/Congo Copperbelt. Chlorine is advected from the ocean and is accompanied by aeolian dust recirculating back to land from mid-oceanic regions. Biomass burning products are transported from the horn of Africa. Mineral dust from the Sahara is transported towards the Far East and then transported back within equatorial easterlies to Mt Kenya. This was observed during austral summer and coincided with the dying phase of 1997/98 El

  4. Rain height statistics for satellite communication in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeep, J. S.

    2008-09-01

    The calculation of fade margin required for 99.99% of the time availability of satellite link requires the knowledge of rain height. There is a shortage of results on rain height over Malaysian equatorial stations. The results on rain height in relation to 0 °C isotherm height (Hi) over four stations are presented. The variations of 0 °C isotherm heights for two monsoon seasons have been studied based on an analysis of radiosonde. The exceedence probability statistics of rain height are compared between the two seasons.

  5. Estimating rainfall in the tropics using the fractional time raining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, Mark L.; Krajewski, Witold F.; Mcphaden, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between the fractional time raining and tropical rainfall amount is investigated using raingage data and a point process model of tropical rainfall. Both the strength and the nature of the relationship are dependent upon the resolution of the data used to estimate the fractional time raining. It is found that highly accurate estimates of rainfall amounts over periods of one month or greater can be obtained from the fractional time raining so long as high-time-resolution data are used. It is demonstrated that the relationship between the fractional time raining and monthly atoll rainfall is quasi-homogeneous within the monsoon trough region of the equatorial western Pacific.

  6. Eocene precipitation: How wet do greenhouse climates get? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, D. R.; Smith, R. Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Eocene was the warmest part of the Cenozoic due to CO2 being at 2x - 4x Holocene levels, with warm climates extending across North America into the Arctic. Substantive paleobotanical evidence for this greenhouse time shows the existence of extensive broadleaf and coniferous polar forests - a circumpolar rain forest. Similarly, Australia in the Eocene - while 25° south of its present position - was a well-forested and humid continent, in contrast to today where 2/3 of the continent is arid or semi-arid and lacks forest. Both of these regions reflect past climate states - mesothermal moist climates with low thermal seasonality at high latitudes - that have no analog in the modern world; undiscovered earth climates. Paleontological temperature proxies provide a basis for understanding early Paleogene climates; however, there is a lack of corresponding proxy data on precipitation. Paleobotanical proxies offer 2 methods for estimated paleo-precipitation; leaf physiognomy (including leaf area analysis), and quantitative analysis of nearest living relatives (‘NLRs’) of macrofloras. Presented here is an exploration of this former greenhouse world, through analyses of macrofloras from mid-latitude North America and the Canadian Arctic, as well as from Australia. Analysis of the Canadian Arctic floras indicate upper microthermal to lower mesothermal moist climates (MAT ~13-15 °C, CMMT ~4 °C, MAP >100cm/a) in the early and middle Eocene. Leaf-area analysis of Paleocene and Eocene Arctic floras demonstrates precipitation for the Paleogene western and eastern Arctic estimated as >100 cm/yr. Sites from the Okanagan Highlands early Eocene lake macrofloras of British Columbia and northern Washington indicate comparable conditions in the early Eocene to those reconstructed for the Arctic in the middle Eocene, with MAP ~100cm/a for most sites along a 1000km North-South transect from Republic in Washington State to Driftwood Canyon near Smithers in northern British

  7. Extreme Seasonality During Early Eocene Hyperthermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plink-Bjorklund, P.; Birgenheier, L.

    2012-12-01

    intensification is seen as short intense rain seasons alternating with prolonged droughts. Such seasonality intensification had a profound effect on landscape morphology as well as on vegetation. River systems changed from braided streams to highly seasonal fluvial megafans with tens of meters deep channels. River channels staid dry through most of the prolonged droughts, as witnessed by intra-channel insect burrows and paleosols. The intense wet seasons caused extremely high water discharge in channels, resulting in high rates of erosion, sediment transport and deposition. As a result, the channels were filled locally by up to 10s of meters of sediment, causing rapid river course changes and terrestrial flooding. Particulate organic matter content is extremely low in these sediments. This is in contrast to river sediments that were deposited during less intense seasonality. The dataset was compared to other datasets from intermontane basins in the Western Interior and also Europe (Spain), where similar seasonality changes are indicated to have occurred during the PETM. This is in great contrast to intermontane Early Eocene river systems documented in Norwegian Arctic (e.g. Spitsbergen) and in tropics (e.g. Venezuela), where no seasonality intensification has been documented. Thus the seasonality intensification seems to have been confined to (northern) mid-latitudes and subtropics.

  8. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  9. Equatorial convergence of India and early Cenozoic climate trends

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Dennis V.; Muttoni, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    India's northward flight and collision with Asia was a major driver of global tectonics in the Cenozoic and, we argue, of atmospheric CO2 concentration (pCO2) and thus global climate. Subduction of Tethyan oceanic crust with a carpet of carbonate-rich pelagic sediments deposited during transit beneath the high-productivity equatorial belt resulted in a component flux of CO2 delivery to the atmosphere capable to maintain high pCO2 levels and warm climate conditions until the decarbonation factory shut down with the collision of Greater India with Asia at the Early Eocene climatic optimum at ≈50 Ma. At about this time, the India continent and the highly weatherable Deccan Traps drifted into the equatorial humid belt where uptake of CO2 by efficient silicate weathering further perturbed the delicate equilibrium between CO2 input to and removal from the atmosphere toward progressively lower pCO2 levels, thus marking the onset of a cooling trend over the Middle and Late Eocene that some suggest triggered the rapid expansion of Antarctic ice sheets at around the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. PMID:18809910

  10. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  11. Arctic Climate during Eocene Hyperthermals: Wet Summers on Ellesmere Island?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, D. R.; West, C. K.; Basinger, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Previous work has shown that during the late Paleocene to middle Eocene, mesothermal conditions (i.e., MAT ~12-15° C) and high precipitation (MAP > 150cm/yr) characterized Arctic climates - an Arctic rain forest. Recent analyses of Arctic Eocene wood stable isotope chemistry are consistent with the annual and seasonal temperature estimates from leaf physiognomy and nearest living relative analogy from fossil plants, including the lack of freezing winters, but is interpreted as showing that there was a summer peak in precipitation - modern analogs are best sought on the summer-wet east coasts (e.g., China, Japan, South Korea) not the winter-wet west coasts of present-day northern temperate continents (e.g., Pacific northwest of North America). Highly seasonal 'monsoon-type' summer-wet precipitation regimes (i.e., summer precip./winter precip. > 3.0) seem to characterize Eocene hyperthermal conditions in several regions of the earth, including the Arctic and Antarctic, based on both climate model sensitivity experiments and the paleoclimate proxy evidence. The leaf physiognomy proxy previously applied to estimate Arctic Paleogene precipitation was leaf area analysis (LAA), a correlation between mean leaf size in woody dicot vegetation and annual precipitation. New data from modern monsoonal sites, however demonstrates that for deciduous-dicot dominated vegetation, summer precipitation determines mean leaf size, not annual totals, and therefore that under markedly seasonal precipitation and/or light regimes that summer precipitation is being estimated using LAA. Presented here is a new analysis of a leaf macrofloras from 3 separate florules of the Margaret Formation (Split Lake, Stenkul Fiord and Strathcona Fiord) from Ellesmere Island that are placed stratigraphically as early Eocene, and likely fall within Eocene thermal maximum 1 (ETM1; = the 'PETM') or ETM2. These floras are each characterized by a mix of large-leafed and small-leafed dicot taxa, with overall

  12. Optical Rain Gauge Performance: Second Workshop on Optical Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A. (Editor); Thiele, Otto W. (Editor); Mcphaden, Michael J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The primary focus of the workshop was on the performance and reliability of STi mini-Optical Rain Gauges in a number of environments, including deployments on ships and buoys in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean during the TOGA/COARE field experiment, deployments on buoys in U.S. coastal waters, and comparisons with other types of rain gauges on the Virginia coast and in Florida. The workshop was attended by 20 investigators, representing 10 different institutions, who gathered to present new results obtained since the first workshop (April 1993), to discuss problems, to consider solutions, and to chart future directions. Post-TOGA/COARE calibration studies were also presented.

  13. Heavy rain field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, ED

    1991-01-01

    A weight-measuring rain gauge was developed to collect rain data and configured to operate at a high sample rate (one sample pre second). Instead of averaging the rain rate in minutes, hours, and sometime days as normally performed, the rain data collected are examined in seconds. The results of six field sites are compiled. Rain rate levels, duration of downpours, and frequency of heavy rainfall events are presented.

  14. Quasar Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Velocity resolved reverberation mapping (VRRM) has shown clear evidence for inflows in the broad emission line (BEL) region of active galactic nuclei: redshifted BELs at zero lag (AGNs, e.g. Arp 151, Bentz et al. 2010; Grier et al. 2013). While radiative transfer in rotating disks can give shorter red side lags than blue, a zero lag has to be along our line of sight, so it is hard to escape infall. The BEL region is normally considered to be rotating or in outflow so this result is a surprise. Infalling BEL gas cannot fall far without the need to lose angular momentum for accreting gas producing an accretion disk.I suggest that quasar continuum irradiation induced cooling instabilities (Chakravorty et al 2009; Krolik, McKee & Tarter 1981) lead to dense BEL clouds condensing out of the semi-ubiquitous warm absorber (WA) outflows found in AGNs and that these clouds may produce a VRRM inflow signature.Unlike WA gas, dense high column density BEL clouds are hard to accelerate with radiation pressure (Risaliti & Elvis 2010; Mushotzky, Solomon & Strittmatter 1972). BEL clouds will thus stall in the outflow and begin to fall back toward the central black hole after a dynamical time, 'raining out' of the WA medium. If these BEL clouds condense out before these outflows reach escape velocity [v(esc)] then this inflow can potentially produce the observed VRRM signature. As the clouds fall back in they will be moving on elliptical orbits supersonically through the WA gas with Mach number ~(2000 km/s)/(100km/s) ~20. This will produce comet-like structures with narrow opening angles, as seen in asymmetric X-ray absorbing 'eclipses' (Maiolino et al. 2010). They will survive only a few months, as required to avoid forming a disk. For this picture to work the condensation time must be less than the acceleration time to v(esc) and the destruction time must be longer than the dynamical time.

  15. Silica burp in the Eocene ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowran, Brian

    1989-09-01

    The Eocene was a time of greatly increased silica accumulation in the ocean, and the peak was in the early middle Eocene at about 50 Ma. The responsible geohistorical configuration included the following elements: extensive volcanism about 4 m.y. earlier, as part of the Chron 24 plate reorganization; early Eocene warming, with deep weathering to high latitudes and accumulation of the released silica in a sluggish ocean; and sharp cooling in the earliest middle Eocene, stimulating oceanic upwelling and biosilicification. It is possible, on the evidence of carbon and oxygen isotopic patterns, that the trigger for the exhalation of silica was a reverse greenhouse effect.

  16. Equatorial MST radars: Further consideration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagos, P.

    1983-01-01

    The results presented give additional support to the need of equatorial MST radars in order to obtain more information on the nature of equatorial waves in the MST region. Radar deduced winds such as obtained at Jicamarca for periods of months indicate that with these data the full range of equatorial waves, with time scales of seconds to years, can be studied.

  17. Reconnaissance paleomagnetic study of the Eocene Admiralty Island volcanics, southeast Alaska: evidence for pre-late Eocene accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Panuska, B.C.; Decker, J.

    1985-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data have shown that many of the terranes in southern and southeastern Alaska originated in equatorial paleolatitudes. The ages(s) of accretion of these terranes is much debated and paleomagnetic studies constraining this age are limited. As part of a larger study, reconnaissance samples of the Admiralty Island Volcanics (Eocene) were collected at Deepwater Point and Little Pybus Bay on the southern coast of Admiralty Island. Thermal or AF cleaning effectively isolated stable magnetic components in most specimens. Homoclinal dip of the flows precludes a fold test and reversals were not observed. However, 3 penecontemporaneous feeder dikes have magnetic directions which are statistically different from the magnetic directions of the flows they intrude (baked contact test). In addition, the flows have not been affected by a regional overprinting observed in most pre-Tertiary rocks. Thus, these magnetic directions are provisionally interpreted as primary. Assuming a reversed geomagnetic polarity during the eruption of the flows, the mean direction is not significantly different than the expected North American direction. Although more data are necessary to prove a primary remanence and to insure that secular variation has been averaged out, the preliminary evidence suggests that the Southern Alaska superterrane had accreted to North American by Eocene time. These results are similar to findings in south central Alaska, which also suggest that the major terrane translation and had been completed by the early Tertiary.

  18. Orbitally tuned timescale and astronomical forcing in the middle Eocene to early Oligocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhold, T.; Röhl, U.; Pälike, H.; Wilkens, R.; Wilson, P. A.; Acton, G.

    2014-05-01

    Deciphering the driving mechanisms of Earth system processes, including the climate dynamics expressed as paleoceanographic events, requires a complete, continuous, and high-resolution stratigraphy that is very accurately dated. In this study, a robust astronomically calibrated age model was constructed for the middle Eocene to early Oligocene interval (31-43 Ma) in order to permit more detailed study of the exceptional climatic events that occurred during this time, including the middle Eocene climate optimum and the Eocene-Oligocene transition. A goal of this effort is to accurately date the middle Eocene to early Oligocene composite section cored during the Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT, IODP Exp. 320/321). The stratigraphic framework for the new timescale is based on the identification of the stable long eccentricity cycle in published and new high-resolution records encompassing bulk and benthic stable isotope, calibrated XRF core scanning, and magnetostratigraphic data from ODP Sites 171B-1052, 189-1172, 199-1218, and 207-1260 as well as IODP Sites 320-U1333, and 320-U1334 spanning magnetic polarity Chrons C12n to C20n. Subsequently orbital tuning of the records to the La2011 orbital solution was conducted. The resulting new timescale revises and refines the existing orbitally tuned age model and the geomagnetic polarity timescale from 31 to 43 Ma. The newly defined absolute age for the Eocene-Oligocene boundary validates the astronomical tuned age of 33.89 Ma identified at the Massignano, Italy, global stratotype section and point. The compilation of geochemical records of climate-controlled variability in sedimentation through the middle-to-late Eocene and early Oligocene demonstrates strong power in the eccentricity band that is readily tuned to the latest astronomical solution. Obliquity driven cyclicity is only apparent during 2.4 myr eccentricity cycle minima around 35.5, 38.3, and 40.1 Ma.

  19. Orbitally tuned time scale and astronomical forcing in the middle Eocene to early Oligocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhold, T.; Röhl, U.; Pälike, H.; Wilkens, R.; Wilson, P. A.; Acton, G.

    2013-12-01

    Deciphering the driving mechanisms of Earth system processes, including the climate dynamics expressed as paleoceanographic events, requires a complete, continuous, and high-resolution stratigraphy that is very accurately dated. In this study, we construct a robust astronomically calibrated age model for the middle Eocene to early Oligocene interval (31-43 Ma) in order to permit more detailed study of the exceptional climatic events that occurred during this time, including the Middle Eocene Climate Optimum and the Eocene/Oligocene transition. A goal of this effort is to accurately date the middle Eocene to early Oligocene composite section cored during the Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT, IODP Exp. 320/321). The stratigraphic framework for the new time scale is based on the identification of the stable long eccentricity cycle in published and new high-resolution records encompassing bulk and benthic stable isotope, calibrated XRF core scanning, and magnetostratigraphic data from ODP Sites 171B-1052, 189-1172, 199-1218, and 207-1260 as well as IODP Sites 320-U1333, and -U1334 spanning magnetic polarity Chrons C12n to C20n. Subsequently we applied orbital tuning of the records to the La2011 orbital solution. The resulting new time scale revises and refines the existing orbitally tuned age model and the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale from 31 to 43 Ma. Our newly defined absolute age for the Eocene/Oligocene boundary validates the astronomical tuned age of 33.89 Ma identified at the Massignano (Italy) global stratotype section and point. Our compilation of geochemical records of climate-controlled variability in sedimentation through the middle-to-late Eocene and early Oligocene demonstrates strong power in the eccentricity band that is readily tuned to the latest astronomical solution. Obliquity driven cyclicity is only apparent during very long eccentricity cycle minima around 35.5, 38.3 and 40.1 Ma.

  20. Calcareous phytoplankton perturbations through the Eocene/Oligocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bown, P. R.; Dunkley Jones, T.; Expedition 320/321 Shipboard Party

    2010-12-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene transition (E/OT) witnessed the most significant climatic change in the Cenozoic with a fundamental reordering of the planet’s oceanic and atmospheric circulation, the cooling of deep and high-latitude waters and the formation of continental scale ice sheets on Antarctica. Records from the equatorial Pacific show rapid and highly correlated increases in deep-ocean oxygen and carbon isotopes and a drop in the Calcium Carbonate Compensation Depth (CCD) of over a kilometre (Coxall et al. 2005). The role of surface ocean productivity changes, especially at low latitudes, within this carbon cycle perturbation remains open to question. Detailed micropalaeontological analyses from shelf-slope sections of Tanzania, which host exceptionally well preserved calcareous microfossils, indicate a significant reorganization of planktonic niches coincident with the E/OT (Pearson et al. 2008). These include major assemblage shifts within the calcareous phytoplankton closely coupled to the isotopic excursions (Dunkley Jones et al. 2008). Here, we integrate the Tanzanian records with patterns of calcareous nannofossil turnover observed in historic DSDP Site 242 (Davie Ridge, Indian Ocean), the US Gulf Coast and preliminary data from new E/OT successions recovered during the recent IODP Expedition 320 in the eastern equatorial Pacific and discuss their implications for nutrient cycling and surface ocean productivity across the E/OT. Coxall, H. K., Wilson, P. A., Palike, H., Lear, C. H. & Backman, J. 2005. Rapid stepwise onset of Antarctic glaciation and deeper calcite compensation in the Pacific Ocean. Nature 433: 53-57. Dunkley Jones, T., Bown, P. R., Pearson, P. N., Wade, B. S., Coxall, H. K. & Lear, C. H. 2008. Major shifts in calcareous phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production, Paleoceanography, 23, PA4204, doi:10.1029/2008PA001640. Pearson, P.N, McMillan, I. K

  1. Listening To Rain Sticks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Linda; Pinson, Harlow; Kokoski, Teresa

    1998-01-01

    Contains information on rain sticks and other similar musical instruments. Describes procedures for making rain sticks and using them in the study of sound. Discusses the physics of sound and how to utilize computers to study sound with rain sticks. (DDR)

  2. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  3. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  4. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  5. Rain Gauges Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deployed rain gauges located near disdrometers (DISD and VDIS data streams). This handbook deals specifically with the rain gauges that make the observations for the RAIN data stream. Other precipitation observations are made by the surface meteorology instrument suite (i.e., MET data stream).

  6. The Children's Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Carol A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a unit on rain forests in which first graders studied about rain forests, built a classroom rain forest, and created a bulletin board. They also graphed rainfall, estimated body water, and estimated the number of newspapers that could be produced from one canopy tree. (MKR)

  7. No Rain, No Gain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Marketing is like the rain. Some people are quickly aware of it, while others take repeated and consistent drops for quite an extended period of time before they take action. Building on the marketing principles discussed in previous issues, the next key principle to smart marketing is the "Rain Effect." The Rain Effect is the use of consistent…

  8. Integrated bio-magnetostratigraphy of ODP Site 709 (equatorial Indian Ocean).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Giuliana; Fioroni, Chiara; Florindo, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade, calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy of the lower Eocene-Oligocene sediments has shown great potential, through identification of several new nannofossil species and bioevents (e.g. Fornaciari et al., 2010; Bown and Dunkley Jones, 2012; Toffanin et al., 2013). These studies formed the basis for higher biostratigraphic resolution leading to definition of a new nannofossil biozonation (Agnini et al., 2014). In this study, we investigate the middle Eocene-lower Oligocene sediments from ODP Hole 709C (ODP Leg 115) by means of calcareous nannofossils and magnetostratigraphy. Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 709 was located in the equatorial Indian Ocean and biostratigraphy has been investigated in the nineties (Okada, 1990; Fornaciari et al., 1990) while paleomagnetic data from the Initial Report provided only a poorly constrained magnetostratigraphic interpretation, thus the cored succession was dated only by means of biostratigraphy. Our goal is to test the reliability in the Indian Ocean of the biohorizons recently identified at Site 711 (Fioroni et al., in press), by means of high resolution sampling, new taxonomic updates, quantitative analyses on calcareous nannofossils allowed to increase the number of useful bioevents and to compare their reliability and synchroneity. The new magnetostratigraphic analyses and integrated stratigraphy allow also to achieve an accurate biochronology of the time interval spanning Chrons C20 (middle Eocene) and C12 (early Oligocene). In addition, this equatorial site represents an opportunity to study the carbonate accumulation history and the large fluctuations of the carbonate compensation depth (CCD) during the Eocene (e.g. Pälike et al., 2012). The investigated interval encompasses the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO), and the long cooling trend that leads to the Oligocene glacial state. By means of our new bio-magnetostratigraphic data and paleoecological results we provide further insights on

  9. Study of equatorial scintillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomalaza, J.; Woodman, R.; Tisnado, G.; Nakasone, E.

    1972-01-01

    Observations of the amplitude scintillations produced by the F-region in equatorial areas are presented. The equipment used for conducting the observations is described. The use of transmissions from the ATS-1, ATS-3, and ATS-5 for obtaining data is described. The two principal subjects discussed are: (1) correlation between satellite and incoherent radar observations of scintillations and (2) simultaneous observations of scintillations at 136 MHz and 1550 MHz.

  10. No extreme bipolar glaciation during the main Eocene calcite compensation shift.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Kirsty M; Wilson, Paul A; Sexton, Philip F; Suganuma, Yusuke

    2007-08-23

    Major ice sheets were permanently established on Antarctica approximately 34 million years ago, close to the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, at the same time as a permanent deepening of the calcite compensation depth in the world's oceans. Until recently, it was thought that Northern Hemisphere glaciation began much later, between 11 and 5 million years ago. This view has been challenged, however, by records of ice rafting at high northern latitudes during the Eocene epoch and by estimates of global ice volume that exceed the storage capacity of Antarctica at the same time as a temporary deepening of the calcite compensation depth approximately 41.6 million years ago. Here we test the hypothesis that large ice sheets were present in both hemispheres approximately 41.6 million years ago using marine sediment records of oxygen and carbon isotope values and of calcium carbonate content from the equatorial Atlantic Ocean. These records allow, at most, an ice budget that can easily be accommodated on Antarctica, indicating that large ice sheets were not present in the Northern Hemisphere. The records also reveal a brief interval shortly before the temporary deepening of the calcite compensation depth during which the calcite compensation depth shoaled, ocean temperatures increased and carbon isotope values decreased in the equatorial Atlantic. The nature of these changes around 41.6 million years ago implies common links, in terms of carbon cycling, with events at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary and with the 'hyperthermals' of the Early Eocene climate optimum. Our findings help to resolve the apparent discrepancy between the geological records of Northern Hemisphere glaciation and model results that indicate that the threshold for continental glaciation was crossed earlier in the Southern Hemisphere than in the Northern Hemisphere. PMID:17713530

  11. Eocene prevalence of monsoon-like climate over eastern China reflected by hydrological dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dehai; Lu, Shicong; Han, Shuang; Sun, Xiaoyan; Quan, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Hydrological dynamics of sedimentary basins are essential for understanding regional climatic pattern in the geological past. In previous qualitative studies lithologically depending on the occurrence of featured sedimentary rocks, the Eocene climate of China had been subdivided into three latitudinal zones, with one subtropical high-controlled arid zone throughout middle China, and two humid zones respectively in the north and south. However, recent advances on mammalian fauna distribution, plant fossil-based quantitative paleoclimatic reconstruction, and modeling experiment jointly suggest that the relatively humid monsoonal climate might have prevailed over the territory. Here we examine and compare sedimentary sequences of 10 Eocene sections across eastern China, and hence the lake level fluctuations, to discuss the nature of climate type. Our results show that, instead of the categorically zonal pattern, the hydroclimate dynamics is intensified landward. This is demonstrated by the fact that, in contrast to the wide developed coal layers around the periphery, evaporites are growingly occurred endocentrically to the central part of middle China. However, although we have had assumed that all evaporites are indicator of extreme aridity, the highly oscillated climate in the central part of middle China was humid in the majority of the Eocene, distinct from permanent arid as seen in deserts or steppe along modern horse latitude. From the upcountry distribution pattern of the Eocene hydrological dynamics, it appears that the relatively dry climate in central China was caused by the impact of continentality or rain shadow effect under monsoonal, or monsoon-like climate.

  12. Equatorial oceanography. [review of research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, M. A.; Sarachik, E. S.

    1983-01-01

    United States progress in equatorial oceanography is reviewed, focusing on the low frequency response of upper equatorial oceans to forcing by the wind. Variations of thermocline depth, midocean currents, and boundary currents are discussed. The factors which determine sea surface temperature (SST) variability in equatorial oceans are reviewed, and the status of understanding of the most spectacular manifestation of SST variability, the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phenomenon, is discussed. The problem of observing surface winds, regarded as a fundamental factor limiting understanding of the equatorial oceans, is addressed. Finally, an attempt is made to identify those current trends which are expected to bear fruit in the near and distant future.

  13. ACTS Rain Fade Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coney, Thom A.

    1996-01-01

    Performance status of the Adaptive Rain Fade Compensation includes: (1) The rain fade protocol is functional detecting fades, providing an additional 10 dB of margin and seamless transitions to and from coded operation; (2) The stabilization of the link margins and the optimization of rain fade decision thresholds has resulted in improved BER performance; (3) Characterization of the fade compensation algorithm is ongoing.

  14. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  15. Equatorial MU Radar project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Hashiguchi, H.; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University (RISH) has been studying the atmosphere by using radars. The first big facility was the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar installed in Shiga, Japan in 1984. This is one of the most powerful and multi-functional radar, and is successful of revealing importance of atmospheric waves for the dynamical vertical coupling processes. The next big radar was the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) installed at Kototabang, West Sumatra, Indonesia in 2001. The EAR was operated under close collaboration with LAPAN (Indonesia National Institute for Aeronautics and Space), and conducted the long-term continuous observations of the equatorial atmosphere/ionosphere for more than 10 years. The MU radar and the EAR are both utilized for inter-university and international collaborative research program for long time. National Institute for Polar Research (NIPR) joined EISCAT Scientific Association together with Nagoya University, and developed the PANSY radar at Syowa base in Antarctica as a joint project with University of Tokyo. These are the efforts of radar study of the atmosphere/ionosphere in the polar region. Now we can find that Japan holds a global network of big atmospheric/ionospheric radars. The EAR has the limitation of lower sensitivity compared with the other big radars shown above. RISH now proposes a plan of Equatorial MU Radar (EMU) that is to establish the MU-radar class radar next to the EAR. The EMU will have an active phased array antenna with the 163m diameter and 1055 cross-element Yagis. Total output power of the EMU will be more than 500kW. The EMU can detect turbulent echoes from the mesosphere (60-80km). In the ionosphere incoherent-scatter observations of plasma density, drift, and temperature would be possible. Multi-channel receivers will realize radar-imaging observations. The EMU is one of the key facilities in the project "Study of coupling processes in the solar-terrestrial system

  16. Lightning over Equatorial Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These two images were taken 9 seconds apart as the STS-97 Space Shuttle flew over equatorial Africa east of Lake Volta on December 11, 2000. The top of the large thunderstorm, roughly 20 km across, is illuminated by a full moon and frequent bursts of lightning. Because the Space Shuttle travels at about 7 km/sec, the astronaut perspectives on this storm system becomes more oblique over the 9-second interval between photographs. The images were taken with a Nikon 35 mm camera equipped with a 400 mm lens and high-speed (800 ISO) color negative film. Images are STS097-351-9 and STS097-351-12, provided and archived by the Earth Science and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts can be viewed at NASA-JSC's Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth at http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/

  17. Equatorially trapped plasma populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The SCATHA observations of the equatorially trapped plasmas are presented in order to emphasize the importance of making measurements at the equator. The UCSD plasma detector and the GSFC electric field experiment are described, as are the pertinent characteristics of the magnetometer and mass spectrometers. The electron distribution reveals a width of 20 deg to 60 deg, narrowing with increasing energy. The 20- to 100-eV ion fluxes typically exhibit temperatures in the 20to 50-eV range and densities of 1-10 per cu cm. The electron population typically ranges from 50 to 500 eV, with temperatures of 100-200 eV and densities also in the 1-10 per cu cm range. Field-aligned populations of lower energy are occasionally found in both ions and electrons at the same location.

  18. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  19. Rain Forest Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiner, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The rain forest murals in the author's school began as a request from her principal to have students decorate the cafeteria with their own paintings. She decided to brainstorm ideas with her eighth-grade students. Taking into consideration the architectural space and the environmental concerns they wanted to convey, students chose the rain forest…

  20. An Early Cenozoic Ichthyolith Record from Demerara Rise (ODP Site 1258: Equatorial Atlantic Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, R. M.; Sibert, E. C.; Norris, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Peak global warmth during the early Eocene is a partial analog to the future structure of marine ecosystems in a high pCO2 world. Early Eocene oceans are generally regarded as supporting warmer oceans with lower overall productivity than today owing to the low concentrations of preserved organic matter in pelagic sediments. It has also been proposed that Eocene oceans were about as productive as now, but higher respiration rates in a warmer-than-modern ocean more efficiently recycled organic matter and nutrients. We investigated Eocene export productivity and its link to taxonomic diversity using the pelagic ichthyolith record. Ichthyoliths are calcium phosphate microfossils including fish teeth and shark denticles and their fragments, and are a unique paleoceanographic proxy because they represent a fossil record for marine vertebrates, a charismatic and tangible part of the ecosystem that generally goes unrepresented in the fossil record. Analysis of the ichthyolith record in Ocean Drilling Program Site 1258 (NE South America) shows a remarkable increase in accumulation rate of ichthyoliths from the Paleocene into the Eocene, suggesting that onset of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum in the equatorial Atlantic was favorable to fish production. Our results suggest that, if anything, the early Eocene maintained higher productivity than in the late Paleocene. These results compare favorably with a record of ichthyolith accumulation in the South Pacific (DSDP 596), which also indicates unusually high rates of fish productivity in the peak of Eocene warm climates. Low resolution data sets from the Pacific suggest an explosion of morphotypes during the warm period associated with an increase in ichthyolith mass accumulation rates. Peak global warmth, therefore, appears to be associated with both higher fish production and higher taxonomic diversity than suggested by previous reconstructions of Eocene primary production. Increasing the amount of continuous records of

  1. Geologic mapping of Indonesian rain forest with analysis of multiple SIR-B incidence angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.; Sabins, F. F., Jr.; Asmoro, P., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The discrimination and mapping capabilities are to be evaluated for shuttle imaging radar-B (SIR-B) images of geologic features in Indonesia that are covered by equatorial rain forest canopy. The SIR-B backscatter from the rain forest at L-band is to be compared to backscatter acquired by the SEASAT scatterometer system at Ku-band ever corresponding areas. The approach for data acquisition, handling, and analysis and the expected results of the investigation are discussed.

  2. Atmospheric versus vegetation controls of Amazonian tropical rain forest evapotranspiration: Are the wet and seasonally dry rain forests any different?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Marcos H.; Biajoli, MáRcia C.; Sanches, Luciana; Malhado, Ana C. M.; Hutyra, Lucy R.; Da Rocha, Humberto R.; Aguiar, Renata G.; de Araújo, Alessandro C.

    2010-12-01

    This study analyzes evapotranspiration data for three wet and two seasonally dry rain forest sites in Amazonia. The main environmental (net radiation, vapor pressure deficit, and aerodynamic conductance) and vegetation (surface conductance) controls of evapotranspiration are also assessed. Our research supports earlier studies that demonstrate that evapotranspiration in the dry season is higher than that in the wet season and that surface net radiation is the main controller of evapotranspiration in wet equatorial sites. However, our analyses also indicate that there are different factors controlling the seasonality of evapotranspiration in wet equatorial rain forest sites and southern seasonally dry rain forests. While the seasonality of evapotranspiration in wet equatorial forests is driven solely by environmental factors, in seasonally dry forests, it is also biotically controlled with the surface conductance varying between seasons by a factor of approximately 2. The identification of these different drivers of evapotranspiration is a major step forward in our understanding of the water dynamics of tropical forests and has significant implications for the future development of vegetation-atmosphere models and land use and conservation planning in the region.

  3. Low-Latitude Ethane Rain on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years. These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally. Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the "methanological" cycle on Titan. I use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a spectroscopic investigation of multiple rain-wetted areas. I compute "before-and-after" spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane, I find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. I show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, I show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form.

  4. A Cenozoic record of the equatorial Pacific carbonate compensation depth.

    PubMed

    Pälike, Heiko; Lyle, Mitchell W; Nishi, Hiroshi; Raffi, Isabella; Ridgwell, Andy; Gamage, Kusali; Klaus, Adam; Acton, Gary; Anderson, Louise; Backman, Jan; Baldauf, Jack; Beltran, Catherine; Bohaty, Steven M; Bown, Paul; Busch, William; Channell, Jim E T; Chun, Cecily O J; Delaney, Margaret; Dewangan, Pawan; Dunkley Jones, Tom; Edgar, Kirsty M; Evans, Helen; Fitch, Peter; Foster, Gavin L; Gussone, Nikolaus; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Hathorne, Ed C; Hayashi, Hiroki; Herrle, Jens O; Holbourn, Ann; Hovan, Steve; Hyeong, Kiseong; Iijima, Koichi; Ito, Takashi; Kamikuri, Shin-ichi; Kimoto, Katsunori; Kuroda, Junichiro; Leon-Rodriguez, Lizette; Malinverno, Alberto; Moore, Ted C; Murphy, Brandon H; Murphy, Daniel P; Nakamura, Hideto; Ogane, Kaoru; Ohneiser, Christian; Richter, Carl; Robinson, Rebecca; Rohling, Eelco J; Romero, Oscar; Sawada, Ken; Scher, Howie; Schneider, Leah; Sluijs, Appy; Takata, Hiroyuki; Tian, Jun; Tsujimoto, Akira; Wade, Bridget S; Westerhold, Thomas; Wilkens, Roy; Williams, Trevor; Wilson, Paul A; Yamamoto, Yuhji; Yamamoto, Shinya; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Zeebe, Richard E

    2012-08-30

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate are regulated on geological timescales by the balance between carbon input from volcanic and metamorphic outgassing and its removal by weathering feedbacks; these feedbacks involve the erosion of silicate rocks and organic-carbon-bearing rocks. The integrated effect of these processes is reflected in the calcium carbonate compensation depth, which is the oceanic depth at which calcium carbonate is dissolved. Here we present a carbonate accumulation record that covers the past 53 million years from a depth transect in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. The carbonate compensation depth tracks long-term ocean cooling, deepening from 3.0-3.5 kilometres during the early Cenozoic (approximately 55 million years ago) to 4.6 kilometres at present, consistent with an overall Cenozoic increase in weathering. We find large superimposed fluctuations in carbonate compensation depth during the middle and late Eocene. Using Earth system models, we identify changes in weathering and the mode of organic-carbon delivery as two key processes to explain these large-scale Eocene fluctuations of the carbonate compensation depth. PMID:22932385

  5. Understanding acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Budiansky, S.

    1981-06-01

    The complexities of the phenomenon of acid rain are described. Many factors, including meteorology, geology, chemistry, and biology, all play parts. Varying weather, varying soils, the presence of other pollutants and species differences all act to blur the connections between industrial emissions, acid rain, and environmental damage. Some experts believe that the greatest pH shock to lakes occurs during snow melt and runoff in the spring; others believe that much of the plant damage ascribed to acid rain is actually due to the effects of ozone. Much work needs to be done in the area of sampling. Historical data are lacking and sampling methods are not sufficiently accurate. (JMT)

  6. The emergence of modern type rain forests and mangroves and their traces in the palaeobotanical record during the Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Barbara; Coiffard, Clément

    2014-05-01

    The origin of modern rain forests is still very poorly known. This ecosystem could have potentially fully evolved only after the development of relatively high numbers of flowering plant families adapted to rain forest conditions. During the early phase of angiosperm evolution in the early Cretaceous the palaeo-equatorial region was located in a seasonally dry climatic belt, so that during this phase, flowering plants often show adaptations to drought, rather than to continuously wet climate conditions. Therefore it is not surprising that except for the Nymphaeales, the most basal members of extant angiosperm families have members that do not necessarily occur in the continuously wet tropics today. However, during the late Early Cretaceous several clades emerged that later would give rise to families that are typically found today mostly in (shady) moist places in warmer regions. This is especially seen among the monocotyledons, a group of the mesangiosperms, that developed in many cases large leaves often with very specific venation patterns that make these leaves very unique and well recognizable. Especially members of three groups are here of interest: the arum family (Araceae), the palms (Arecaceae) and the Ginger and allies (Zingiberales). The earliest fossil of Araceae are restricted to low latitudes during the lower Cretaceous. Arecaceae and Zingiberales do not appear in the fossil record before the early late Cretaceous and occur at mid latitudes. During the Late Cretaceous, Araceae are represented at mid latitudes by non-tropical early diverging members and at low latitudes by derived rainforest members. Palms became widespread during the Late Cretataceous and also Nypa, a typical element of tropical to subtropical mangrove environments evolved during this time period. During the Paleocene Arecaceae appear to be restricted to lower latitudes as well as Zingiberales. All three groups are again widespread during the Eocene, reaching higher latitudes and

  7. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  8. (Acid rain workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.

    1990-12-05

    The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

  9. Thinking in the Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Albert A.

    1989-01-01

    Four questions related to rain concerning aerodynamic drag force, pressure from the impact of raindrops, impact of wind on the pressure, and stopping force extended on the car by the water are proposed. (YP)

  10. Waving in the rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaleri, Luigi; Bertotti, Luciana; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

    2015-05-01

    We consider the effect of rain on wind wave generation and dissipation. Rain falling on a wavy surface may have a marked tendency to dampen the shorter waves in the tail of the spectrum, the related range increasing with the rain rate. Historical and sailors' reports suggest that this leads to calmer wave conditions, certainly so for the action of breakers. We have explored this situation using a fully coupled meteorological-wave model system, adding an artificial rain rate-dependent damping of the tail. Contrarily to direct marine experience, the experimental results show higher wind speeds and wave heights. A solid indication of the truth is achieved with the direct comparison between operational model (where rain effect is ignored) and measured data. These strongly support the sailors' claims of less severe wave conditions under heavy rain. This leads to a keen analysis of the overall process, in particular on the role of the tail of the spectrum in modulating the wind input and the white-capping, and how this is presently modeled in operational activity. We suggest that some revision is due and that the relationship between white-capping and generation by wind is deeper and more implicative than presently generally assumed.

  11. Components of rainy seasons' variability in Equatorial East Africa: onset, cessation, rainfall frequency and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camberlin, Pierre; Moron, Vincent; Okoola, Raphael; Philippon, Nathalie; Gitau, Wilson

    2009-10-01

    The inter-annual and spatial variability of different rainfall variables is analysed over Equatorial East Africa (Kenya and northeastern Tanzania). At the station level, three variables are considered: the total precipitation amount (P), the number of rain days (NRD) and the daily rainfall intensity (INT). Using a network of 34 stations, inter-station correlations (1958-1987) are computed for each of these variables. The spatial coherence of monthly or seasonal P and NRD is always much higher than that of rainfall intensity. However, large variations in spatial coherence are found in the course of the seasonal cycle. Coherence is highest at the peak of the short rains (October-December) and low during the long rains (March-May), except at its beginning. The inter-annual variability of the onset and cessation of the rains is next considered, at the regional scale, and the study extended to 2001. In the long rains, the onset and cessation dates are independent of NRD and INT during the rainy season. Hence, the long rains seasonal rainfall total depends on a combination of virtually unrelated factors, which may account for the difficulty in its prediction. However, the onset, which exhibits a large inter-annual variability and a strong spatial coherence, has a prime role. Conversely, in the short rains, though the onset is again more decisive than the cessation, the different intra-seasonal descriptors of the rains are more strongly inter-related.

  12. The Eocene/Oligocene boundary event in the deep sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corliss, B.H.; Aubry, M.-P.; Berggren, W.A.; Fenner, J.M.; Keigwin, L.D., Jr.; Keller, G.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of middle Eocene to early Oligocene calcareous and siliceous microfossils shows gradual biotic changes with no massive extinction event across the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. Biotic changes in the late Paleogene appear to reflect changing paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic conditions and do not support suggestions of a catastrophic biotic event caused by a bolide impact at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary.

  13. Callisto's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This mosaic covers part of the equatorial region of Jupiter's moon, Callisto. The mosaic combines six separate image frames obtained by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft during its ninth orbit around Jupiter. North is to the top of the picture. The mosaic shows several new features and characteristics of the surface revealed by Galileo. These include deposits that may represent landslides in the southern and southwestern floors of many craters. Two such deposits are seen in a 12 kilometer (7.3 mile) crater in the west-central part of the image, and in a 23 kilometer (14 mile) crater just north of the center of the image. Also notable are several sinuous valleys emanating from the southern rims of 10 to 15 kilometer (6.2 to 9.3 mile) irregular craters in the west-central part of the image. The pervasive local smoothing of Callisto's surface is well represented in the plains between the craters in the southeastern part of the image. Possible oblique impacts are suggested by the elongated craters in the northeastern and southeastern parts of the image.

    The mosaic, centered at 7.4 degrees south latitude and 6.6 degrees west longitude, covers an area of approximately 315 by 215 kilometers (192 by 131 miles). The sun illuminates the scene from the west (left). The smallest features that can be seen are about 300 meters (993 feet) across. The images were obtained on June 25, 1997, when the spacecraft was at a range of 15,200 kilometers (8,207 miles) from Callisto.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  14. Remote Sensing of Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Ziad S.

    1999-01-01

    The first problem addressed concerns passive-microwave rain retrievals. Most current approaches start by building off-line a cloud-model-derived database. Given data, the retrieval algorithms search the database for the microwave temperatures "closest" to the observed data, then after some fine-tuning (performed in different ways by different implementations) the rain is estimated to be that which corresponds to the selected (and fine-tuned) set of database temperatures. These approaches have three drawbacks: they cannot properly take into account the ambiguities which arise from the fact that several rain scenarios can produce the same observed temperatures; they are quite inefficient since they require manipulating a large database along with often complex "fine-tuning" procedures; and they cannot refine their estimates if additional data is available. This past year we have derived closed formulae relating observed microwave brightness temperatures, T(sub b), and the underlying rain rates, R: average T(sub b) =f (rain) and average rain = g (T(sub b)), along with the corresponding covariance matrices. These results are sufficient to describe the conditional probabilities p(R/T(sub b)) and p(T(sub b)/R) to second order. Progress has also been made towards deriving a robust description of the rain drop size distribution (DSD). The widespread approach consisting in parameterizing the DSD as a gamma-distribution in terms of the drop diameter D suffers from the facts that, in reality, the DSD is not a smooth function of D and that the largely arbitrary Gamma model imposes unintended behavior, which has implications on any quantities derived from the DSD model. We have therefore developed a non-parametric yet practical description of the DSD, which is particularly well-suited for use in remote-sensing applications. The diagram on the left shows a comparison between an actual DSD sample and the truncated non-parametric representation. One figure shows the relation

  15. Rain radar instrument definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Nicolas; Chenebault, J.; Suinot, Noel; Mancini, Paolo L.

    1996-12-01

    As a result of a pre-phase a study, founded by ESA, this paper presents the definition of a spaceborne Rain Radar, candidate instrument for earth explorer precipitation mission. Based upon the description of user requirements for such a dedicated mission, a mission analysis defines the most suitable space segment. At system level, a parametric analysis compares pros and cons of instrument concepts associated with rain rate retrieval algorithms in order to select the most performing one. Several trade-off analysis at subsystem level leads then to the definition of the proposed design. In particular, as pulse compression is implemented in order to increase the radar sensitivity, the selected method to achieve a pulse response with a side-lobe level below--60 dB is presented. Antenna is another critical rain radar subsystem and several designs are com pared: direct radiating array, single or dual reflector illuminated by single or dual feed arrays. At least, feasibility of centralized amplification using TWTA is compared with criticality of Tx/Rx modules for distributed amplification. Mass and power budgets of the designed instrument are summarized as well as standard deviations and bias of simulated rain rate retrieval profiles. The feasibility of a compliant rain radar instrument is therefore demonstrated.

  16. Complete Primate Skeleton from the Middle Eocene of Messel in Germany: Morphology and Paleobiology

    PubMed Central

    Franzen, Jens L.; Gingerich, Philip D.; Habersetzer, Jörg; Hurum, Jørn H.; von Koenigswald, Wighart; Smith, B. Holly

    2009-01-01

    Background The best European locality for complete Eocene mammal skeletons is Grube Messel, near Darmstadt, Germany. Although the site was surrounded by a para-tropical rain forest in the Eocene, primates are remarkably rare there, and only eight fragmentary specimens were known until now. Messel has now yielded a full primate skeleton. The specimen has an unusual history: it was privately collected and sold in two parts, with only the lesser part previously known. The second part, which has just come to light, shows the skeleton to be the most complete primate known in the fossil record. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe the morphology and investigate the paleobiology of the skeleton. The specimen is described as Darwinius masillae n.gen. n.sp. belonging to the Cercamoniinae. Because the skeleton is lightly crushed and bones cannot be handled individually, imaging studies are of particular importance. Skull radiography shows a host of teeth developing within the juvenile face. Investigation of growth and proportion suggest that the individual was a weaned and independent-feeding female that died in her first year of life, and might have attained a body weight of 650–900 g had she lived to adulthood. She was an agile, nail-bearing, generalized arboreal quadruped living above the floor of the Messel rain forest. Conclusions/Significance Darwinius masillae represents the most complete fossil primate ever found, including both skeleton, soft body outline and contents of the digestive tract. Study of all these features allows a fairly complete reconstruction of life history, locomotion, and diet. Any future study of Eocene-Oligocene primates should benefit from information preserved in the Darwinius holotype. Of particular importance to phylogenetic studies, the absence of a toilet claw and a toothcomb demonstrates that Darwinius masillae is not simply a fossil lemur, but part of a larger group of primates, Adapoidea, representative of the early haplorhine

  17. Rain attenuation prediction during rain events in different climatic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Dalia; Maitra, Animesh

    2015-06-01

    A rain attenuation prediction method has been applied to different climatic regions to test the validity of the model. The significant difference in rain rate and attenuation statistics for the tropical and temperate region needs to be considered in developing channel model to predict time series of rain attenuation for earth space communication links. Model parameters obtained for a tropical location has been successfully applied to predict time series of rain attenuation at other tropical locations. Separate model parameters are derived from the experimental data obtained at a temperate location and these are used to predict rain attenuation during rain events for other temperate locations showing the effectiveness of the technique.

  18. Acid rain: Controllable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Lester

    Acid rain is one of a growing number of environmental issues in which impacts are far removed from the source o f the irritants. Those who suffer may differ in geographical area from those who benefit from the activity which releases pollution to the atmosphere. Like the issue concerning the depletion of ozone by manufactured chemicals, the acid rain issue further emphasizes the need for continuing atmospheric chemistry research, a science whose history dates back but a few decades. Examination of the acid rain issue also calls for intimate collaboration of atmospheric scientists with ecologists, biologists, and other scientists, who must advise the geophysicists regarding what chemicals in the environment produce damage, their mode of entry into an ecosystem, and the need to understand acute or chronic impacts.

  19. Estimating Rain Rates from Tipping-Bucket Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Fisher, Brad L.; Wolff, David B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the cubic spline based operational system for the generation of the TRMM one-minute rain rate product 2A-56 from Tipping Bucket (TB) gauge measurements. Methodological issues associated with applying the cubic spline to the TB gauge rain rate estimation are closely examined. A simulated TB gauge from a Joss-Waldvogel (JW) disdrometer is employed to evaluate effects of time scales and rain event definitions on errors of the rain rate estimation. The comparison between rain rates measured from the JW disdrometer and those estimated from the simulated TB gauge shows good overall agreement; however, the TB gauge suffers sampling problems, resulting in errors in the rain rate estimation. These errors are very sensitive to the time scale of rain rates. One-minute rain rates suffer substantial errors, especially at low rain rates. When one minute rain rates are averaged to 4-7 minute or longer time scales, the errors dramatically reduce. The rain event duration is very sensitive to the event definition but the event rain total is rather insensitive, provided that the events with less than 1 millimeter rain totals are excluded. Estimated lower rain rates are sensitive to the event definition whereas the higher rates are not. The median relative absolute errors are about 22% and 32% for 1-minute TB rain rates higher and lower than 3 mm per hour, respectively. These errors decrease to 5% and 14% when TB rain rates are used at 7-minute scale. The radar reflectivity-rainrate (Ze-R) distributions drawn from large amount of 7-minute TB rain rates and radar reflectivity data are mostly insensitive to the event definition.

  20. Using the GENIE Earth System Model to investigate steady-state behavior of the CCD in the Greenhouse and Icehouse equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pälike, H.

    2012-12-01

    We previously used data from IODP Expedition 320 and ODP Leg 199 sites to refine the dynamics of the carbonate compensation depth (CCD) in the equatorial Pacific during the Eocene and the Greenhouse-to-Icehouse transition, and were able to determine that the CCD fluctuated about 500m in depth, and that carbonate accumulation rates varied between near zero and ~1.5 g/cm2/kyr. "Carbonate accumulation events" lasted for a time period of around 1 Myr, with sharp transitions into and out of these cycles of enhanced carbonate accumulation. We now present new results investigating CCD behavior in an Earth System Model (GENIE) in steady-state conditions in response to variations in atmospheric CO2, coupled in turn to changes in the net deep-sea weathering supply of alkalinity, to variations in labile vs. refractory organic carbon supply to the sea-floor, to the rain-ratio hypothesis, and to changes in the Mg and Ca seawater composition. We also use a simpler box model (LOSCAR) to evaluate the non-steady-state behavior of the CCD in response to changes in shelf-basin partitioning, and simple changes in ocean circulation patterns. Our modelling reveals that increasing atmospheric CO2 with fixed weathering results in a shallower CCD. This is a consequence of non-linearities in the carbonate system and reflects a deepening of the lysocline at the expense of the CCD and contraction of the lysocline transition zone. When this is combined with the response of increased weathering by activating the full silicate weathering feedback, we find an unexpected result: when progressively increasing the rate of prescribed CO2 outgassing in a series of GENIE experiments, atmospheric CO2 and weathering flux happen to co-vary in such a way that they result in a largely invariant CCD depth. We also investigate the viability of a 'sediment labile organic matter' hypothesis to help explain the CCD fluctuations. We repeat the GENIE net-weathering supply analysis but now change the partitioning

  1. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  2. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  3. Eocene-Oligocene proto-Cascades topography revealed by clumped (Δ47) and oxygen isotope (δ18O) geochemistry (Chumstick Basin, WA, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methner, Katharina; Fiebig, Jens; Wacker, Ulrike; Umhoefer, Paul; Chamberlain, C. Page; Mulch, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The topography of the present-day Washington Cascades impacts atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns in the Pacific Northwest, introducing a pronounced orographic rain shadow in the lee of the mountain range. The temporal development of Cascade topography, however, remains largely unconstrained for the early Cenozoic. Based on coupled carbonate clumped isotope (Δ47) and oxygen isotope (δ18O) measurements we reconstruct δ18O values of Eocene groundwater (δ18Owater) in the Chumstick basin (central Washington), today located in the Cascade rain shadow. Δ47 (paleo)thermometry indicates a systematic change in basin burial temperatures from 110°C to 70°C depending on burial depth in the basin. These data are in good agreement with low-T thermochronological and vitrinite reflectance data, and further constrain the basin burial and exhumation history. In concert with field observations, microstructural analysis, and δ18O values of the analyzed carbonates, we suggest that the Δ47 temperatures and δ18O values reflect open-system carbonate cement recrystallization in meteoric-derived groundwaters during early burial diagenesis. Assuming open-system behavior, reconstructed mean δ18Owater values of ~ -7‰ (middle Eocene) to -9‰ (late Eocene/early Oligocene) are consistent with a low-elevation origin of the corresponding meteoric waters that permeated the sandstone/conglomerate members of the Eocene sedimentary units. In light of the paleogeographic setting of the Chumstick basin, the reconstructed δ18Owater values agree well with Pacific-derived moisture that did not experience strong rainout. The absence of a rain shadow effect therefore permits only moderate Eocene/Oligocene elevations at least for the southern part of the Washington proto-Cascades.

  4. Tectonic and climatic significance of a late Eocene low-relief, high-level geomorphic surface, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kathryn M.; Chase, Clement G

    1994-01-01

    New paleobotanical data suggest that in the late Eocene the erosion surface which capped the Front Range, Colorado was 2.2-2.3 km in elevation, which is similar to the 2.5-km present elevation of surface remnants. This estimated elevation casts doubt on the conventional belief that the low-relief geomorphic surface was formed by lateral planation of streams to a base level not much higher than sea level and that the present deeply incised canyons must represent Neogene uplift of Colorado. Description of the surface, calculations of sediment volume, and isostatic balance and fluvial landsculpting models demonstrate that while the high elevation of the erosion surface was due to tectonic forces, its smoothness was mostly a result of climatic factors. A sediment balance calculated for the Front Range suggests that from 2 to 4 km of material were eroded by the late Eocene, consistent with fission track ages. This amount of erosion would remove a significant portionof the 7 km of Laramide upper crustal thickening. Isostatic modeling implies that the 2.2-3.3 km elevation was most likely created by lower crustal thickening during the Laramide. A numerical model of fluvial erosion and deposition suggests a way that a late Eocene surface could have formed at this high elevation without incision. A humid climate with a preponderance of small storm events will diffusively smooth topography and is a possible mechanism for formation oflow-relief, high-level surfaces. Paleoclimate models suggest a lack of large strom events in the late Eocene because of cool sea surface temperatures in the equatorial region. Return to a drier but stormier climate post-Eocene could have caused the incision of the surface by young canyons. By this interpretation, regional erosion surfaces may represent regional climatic rather than tectonic conditions.

  5. After the Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Genan T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the interactions among 4-year olds engaged in outdoor play at a preschool, where overnight rains filled the center's sand area and students improvised activities in the wet sand. Notes how, during the discovery exercise, students worked together as teams. Concludes that the measure of quality in early childhood programs must not be…

  6. Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures." Contents are organized into the following…

  7. Acid Rain Classroom Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchik, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a curriculum plan in which students learn about acid rain through instructional media, research and class presentations, lab activities, simulations, design, and design implementation. Describes the simulation activity in detail and includes materials, procedures, instructions, examples, results, and discussion sections. (SAH)

  8. Acid rain bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Sayers, C.S.

    1983-09-01

    This bibliography identifies 900 citations on various aspects of Acid Rain, covering published bibliographies, books, reports, conference and symposium proceedings, audio visual materials, pamphlets and newsletters. It includes five sections: citations index (complete record of author, title, source, order number); KWIC index; title index; author index; and source index. 900 references.

  9. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates-Bockenstedt, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity designed to motivate students by incorporating science-related issues into a classroom debate. Includes "The Acid Rain Bill" and "Position Guides" for student roles as committee members, consumers, governors, industry owners, tourism professionals, senators, and debate directors. (DKM)

  10. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity which provides opportunities for role-playing as industrialists, ecologists, and government officials. The activity involves forming an international commission on acid rain, taking testimony, and, based on the testimony, making recommendations to governments on specific ways to solve the problem. Includes suggestions for…

  11. The Acid Rain Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Steven J.; Glenn, Allen

    1982-01-01

    Provides rationale for and description of an acid rain game (designed for two players), a problem-solving model for elementary students. Although complete instructions are provided, including a copy of the game board, the game is also available for Apple II microcomputers. Information for the computer program is available from the author.…

  12. Acid Rain Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugo, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students investigate the formation of solid ammonium chloride aerosol particles to help students better understand the concept of acid rain. Provides activity objectives, procedures, sample data, clean-up instructions, and questions and answers to help interpret the data. (MDH)

  13. Slouching in the Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Herb

    2013-01-01

    A number of papers find the velocity that minimizes the wetness of a traveler caught in the rain. In this capsule we determine, in addition, the necessary amount of forward bend (slouching) so that the traveler stays as dry as possible.

  14. People & Tropical Rain Forests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Discusses ways people who live in rain forests make a living and some of the products that enrich our lives. Provides activities covering forest people, tropical treats, jungle in the pantry, treetop explorers, and three copyable pages to accompany activities. (Author/RT)

  15. Torrential Rain in China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Concentric ovals of red, orange, yellow, and green are draped over southern China, showing rainfall totals for the week of June 4 through June 11, 2007. The rainfall totals are from the Goddard Space Flight Center Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis, which is based on rainfall measurements taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Though seasonal rains are not unexpected in the area, the rain that fell during the week was torrential and relentless. As the image shows, a broad stretch of China received up to 200 millimeters (8 inches) of rain, and some areas were inundated with up to 500 millimeters (20 inches). Floods and landslides resulted, destroying crops and forcing some 643,000 people from their homes, reported the Xinhua News Agency on ReliefWeb. As of June 11, 71 people had died and 13 were missing. The most affected area was the southern coast, where rainfall totals are highest in this image. Heavy tropical rains combined with steep mountains make southeastern China prone to devastating landslides. Monitoring landslide-producing conditions typically requires extensive networks of ground-based rain gauges and weather instruments. But many developing countries in high-risk areas lack the resources to maintain such systems; heavy rains and flooding often wash away ground-based instruments. Robert Adler, a senior scientist in the Laboratory for Atmospheres at Goddard Space Flight Center, and Yang Hong, a research scientist at Goddard Earth Sciences Technology Center, are confronting the problem by developing a satellite-based system for predicting landslides. The system relies on TRMM data to predict when rainfall in different areas has reached a landslide-triggering threshold. The system makes data available on the Internet just a few hours after the satellite makes its observations. To read more about the landslide-monitoring system, please read the feature article Satellite Monitors Rains That Trigger Landslides, http

  16. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  17. Equatorial zonal circulations: Historical perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastenrath, Stefan

    2007-04-01

    The changing perceptions on zonal circulations in the equatorial belt are traced for (a) stratospheric wind regimes, and (b) vertical-zonal circulation cells in the troposphere. (a) Observations from the Krakatoa eruption 1883 and Berson's 1908 expedition to East Africa, along with later soundings over Batavia (Jakarta) led to the notion of "Krakatoa easterlies" around 30 km (10 mb) and "Berson westerlies" around 20 km (50 mb). Prompted by contrary observations since the late 1950s, this dogma was replaced by the notion of easterlies alternating with westerlies in the equatorial stratosphere at a rhythm of about 26 months. (b) Stimulated by Bjerknes' postulate of a "Walker circulation" along the Pacific Equator, a multitude of such cells have been hypothesized at other longitudes, in part from zonal contrasts of temperature and cloudiness. Essential for the diagnosis of equatorial zonal circulation cells is the continuity following the flow between the centers of ascending and subsiding motion. Evaluation of the recent NCEP-NCAR and ECMWF Reanalysis upper-air datasets reveals equatorial zonal circulation cells over the Pacific all year round, over the Atlantic only in boreal winter, and over the Indian Ocean only in autumn, all being seasons and oceanic longitudes with strong zonal flow in the lower troposphere.

  18. Acid rain: Reign of controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Acid Rain is a primer on the science and politics of acid rain. Several introductory chapters describe in simple terms the relevant principles of water chemistry, soil chemistry, and plant physiology and discuss the demonstrated or postulated effects of acid rain on fresh waters and forests as well as on statuary and other exposed objects. There follow discussions on the economic and social implications of acid rain (for example, possible health effects) and on the sources, transport, and distribution of air pollutants.

  19. Low-Latitude Ethane Rain on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, Paul; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years (Barnes, J. W. et al. 2012, Icarus, submitted). These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally (Turtle, E. P. et al. 2011, Science, 331, 1414-1417). Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the “methanological” cycle that dominates Titan's surface and atmosphere. In this study, we use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a thorough spectroscopic investigation of rain-wetted areas near Yalaing Terra, Hetpet Regio and central Adiri on Titan. We compute “before-and-after” spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain at any point in the time span of August 2009 to January 2012. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane that was calculated to match the resolution and sampling interval of VIMS (Brown, R. H. et al. 2008, Nature, 454, 607-610), we find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fortunately fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. We show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, we show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form as well. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

  20. Low-latitude ethane rain on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, P. A.; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years (Barnes, J. W. et al. 2012, Icarus, submitted). These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally (Turtle, E. P. et al. 2011, Science, 331, 1414-1417). Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the "methanological" cycle that dominates Titan's surface and atmosphere. In this study, we use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a thorough spectroscopic investigation of rain-wetted areas near Yalaing Terra, Hetpet Regio and central Adiri on Titan. We compute "before-and-after" spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain at any point in the time span of August 2009 to January 2012. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane that was calculated to match the resolution and sampling interval of VIMS (Brown, R. H. et al. 2008, Nature, 454, 607-610), we find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fortunately fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. We show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, we show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form as well. Funded by NASA.

  1. Lessons from the Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Shelley

    2002-01-01

    Presents a first-grade art project after students learned about the rain forest and heard the story, "The Great Kapok Tree: A Tale of the Amazon Rain Forest" (Lynn Cherry). Explains that the students created pictures of the rain forest. (CMK)

  2. When It Rains, It Pours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Linda

    2012-01-01

    "It's raining, it's pouring, the old man is snoring!" "The itsy, bitsy spider crawled up the waterspout, down came the rain and washed the spider out. Out came the sun and dried up all the rain, and the itsy, bitsy spider went up the spout again." What do children's nursery rhymes have to do with the school library? The author begins by telling a…

  3. Late Eocene rings around the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, E. A.

    1980-01-01

    The suggestion of O'Keefe (1980) that the terminal Eocene event was caused by rings of tektite material encircling the earth is discussed. It is argued that the assumption that the tektites are of lunar volcanic origin is unwarranted and contrary to existing data, including the lack of lunar rocks of suitable composition, the lack of lunar rocks of the correct age, the lack of evidence that the North American tektites fell throughout a sedimentary rock column of a few million years, and the nondetection of a tektite with a measurable cosmic ray exposure age. Alternatively, it is suggested that the terminal Eocene event may be associated with volcanic ash, air-fall tuff and bentonite in the late Eocene. O'Keefe replies that the hypothesis of the terrestrial origin of the tektites conflicts with the laws of physics, for example in the glass structure and shaping of the tektites. Furthermore, evidence is cited for lunar rocks of the proper major-element composition and ages, and it is noted that the proposed solar Poynting-Robertson effect would account for the particle fall distributions and cosmic ray ages.

  4. Eocene continental climates and latitudinal temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, David R.; Wing, Scott L.

    1995-11-01

    Global climate during the Mesozoic and early Cenozoic is thought to have been warmer than at present, but there is debate about winter temperatures. Paleontological data indicate mild temperatures even at high latitudes and in mid-latitude continental interiors, whereas computer simulations of continental paleoclimates produce winter temperatures closer to modern levels. Foliar physiognomy and floristic composition of 23 Eocene floras from the interior of North America and Australia indicate cold month means generally >2 °C, even where the mean annual temperature (MAT) was <15 °C. Reconstructed Eocene latitudinal gradients of MAT are curvilinear but are about 0.4 °C per 1° of latitude in continental interiors at mid-latitudes, much less than the 0.8 1.0 °C per 1° of latitude observed in eastern and central North America today, but similar to modern gradients in the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes and on the west coast of North America. Latitudinal temperature gradients reconstructed here are broadly representative of Eocene climates, showing that the discrepancy between proxy data and simulations will not be resolved by regional adjustments to paleogeography or reinterpretation of individual fossil assemblages. Similar discrepancies between proxy data and general circulation model simulations for other time periods suggest that there is a basic flaw with the way climate models simulate heat transport to, or loss from, continental surfaces.

  5. Geochronology of Early Eocene strata, Baja California

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.J.; Cipolletti, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent discoveries clearly indicate a Wasatchian (Early Eocene) land mammal age for fossil vertebrates from the Punta Prieta area, Baja California North, Mexico. This fauna provides a rare test for discriminating the temporal significance of mammalian faunas over a broad geographic area. The authors sampled intertonguing, fossiliferous terrestrial and marine strata for paleomagnetic and biostratigraphic analyses to provide an independent age determination for the Punta Prieta area mammal fauna. The marine macroinvertebrate assemblage is most likely upper Meganos to lower Capay West Coast Molluscan Stage based on the temporal ranges of all the taxa; also, none of the taxa occur in pre-Meganos stages. Two genera of planktonic forams indicate a probably Eocene age. They sampled seventeen paleomagnetic sites over 50 meters in the terrestrial mammal-bearing section, and thirteen sites over 25 meters in the marine section. The entire terrestrial sequence is reversely magnetized; initial results indicate the marine sequence probably also is reversely magnetized. Based on all the available biochronologic evidence this reversed sequence most likely should be correlated with the long reversed polarity Chron C24R. Clarkforkian to Early Wasatchian faunas in Wyoming also are associated with Chron C24R. All the available biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic evidence strongly supports an Early Eocene age for the Punta Prieta mammalian fauna and temporal equivalence of the Punta Prieta Wasatchian fauna with Wasatchian faunas from the Western United States. Land mammal ages are synchronous and applicable across broad geographic areas.

  6. The influence of extraterrestrial material on the late Eocene marine Os isotope record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquay, François S.; Ravizza, Greg; Coccioni, Rodolfo

    2014-11-01

    A reconstruction of seawater 187Os/188Os ratios during the late Eocene (∼36-34 Ma), based upon bulk sediment analyses from the sub-Antarctic Southern Atlantic Ocean (Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1090), Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean (ODP Sites 1218 and 1219) and the uplifted (land-based) Tethyan section (Massignano, Italy), confirms that the previously reported abrupt shift to lower 187Os/188Os is a unique global feature of the marine Os isotope record that occurs in magnetochron C16n.1n. This feature is interpreted to represent the change in seawater 187Os/188Os caused by the Popigai impact event. Higher in the Massignano section, two other iridium anomalies previously proposed to represent additional impact events do not show a comparable excursion to low 187Os/188Os, suggesting that these horizons do not record multiple large impacts. Comparison of records from three different ocean basins indicates that seawater 187Os/188Os begins to decline in advance of the Popigai impact event. At Massignano this decline coincides with a previously reported episode of elevated 3He flux, suggesting that increased influx of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contributed to the pre-impact shift in 187Os/188Os and not to the longer-term latest Eocene 187Os/188Os decline that occurred ∼1 million year after the Popigai impact event.

  7. Sudden spreading of corrosive bottom water during the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Kaitlin; J. Meissner, Katrin; J. Bralower, Timothy

    2015-06-01

    The Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, approximately 55 million years ago, was a period of rapid warming linked to a massive release of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere system. This warming event was also marked by widespread dissolution of carbonates at the sea floor. The acidification of deep waters was generally more extensive and severe in the Atlantic and Caribbean, with more modest changes in the Southern and Pacific oceans. Here we use the UVic ESCM global climate model to show that corrosive deep water spreading from the North Atlantic can explain the spatial variations in carbonate dissolution during the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. In our simulations, highly corrosive waters accumulate in the deep North Atlantic at the onset of the event. Several thousand years after an imposed atmospheric carbon release, warming of the deep ocean destabilizes the North Atlantic water column and triggers deep-water formation. This deep convection causes the corrosive bottom water to spill over an equatorial sill into the South Atlantic. The bottom water then spreads through the Southern and Pacific oceans, progressively gaining alkalinity. We conclude that the pattern of sediment dissolution simulated along the path taken by the corrosive water is consistent with most dissolution estimates from the sediment record.

  8. The politics of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcher, M.E. )

    1989-01-01

    This work examines and compares the acid rain policies through the different political systems of Canada, Great Britain and the United States. Because the flow of acid rain can transcend national boundaries, acid rain has become a crucial international problem. According to the author, because of differences in governmental institutions and structure, the extent of governmental intervention in the industrial economy, the degree of reliance on coal for power generation, and the extent of acid rain damage, national responses to the acid rain problem have varied.

  9. Adaptive rain fade compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rautio, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A large available margin must be provided for satellite communications systems operating near 20 GHz, which occasionally experience fades due to rain attenuation. It is proposed that this margin may be achieved in high-capacity FDMA satellites by dynamically providing a large margin to those links which are experiencing deep fades, while maintaining a small fade margin on all others. Single-beam SCPC operation and multiple-beam, satellite-switched FDMA systems are described, and the optimization of the dynamic FDMA links in a severely fading environment is investigated. A solution is derived which takes into account: (1) transponder intermodulation distortion, (2) cochannel and cross-polarization antenna interference, and (3) rain fade characteristics. The sample system configuration presented shows that such systems reach availability levels approaching 0.9999 at Ka-Band.

  10. Middle Eocene to early Miocene environmental changes in the sub-Antarctic Southern Ocean: evidence from biogenic and terrigenous depositional patterns at ODP Site 1090

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diekmann, Bernhard; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer; Mackensen, Andreas

    2004-02-01

    During Leg 177 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), a well-preserved middle Eocene to lower Miocene sediment record was recovered at Site 1090 on the Agulhas Ridge in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. This new sediment record shows evidence of a hitherto unknown late Eocene opal pulse. Lithological variations, compositional data, mass-accumulation rates of biogenic and lithogenic sediment constituents, grain-size distributions, geochemistry, and clay mineralogy are used to gain insights into mid-Cenozoic environmental changes and to explore the circumstances of the late Eocene opal pulse in terms of reorganizations in ocean circulation. The base of the section is composed of middle Eocene nannofossil oozes mixed with red clays enriched in authigenic clinoptilolite and smectite, deposited at low sedimentation rates (≤2 cm ka -1). It indicates reduced terrigenous sediment input and moderate biological productivity during this preglacial warm climatic stage. The basal strata are overlain by an extended succession (100 m, 4 cm ka -1) of biosiliceous oozes and muds, comprising the upper middle Eocene, the entire late Eocene, and the lowermost early Oligocene. The opal pulse occurred between 37.5 and 33.5 Ma and documents the development of upwelling cells along topographic highs, and the utilization of a marine nutrient- and silica reservoir established during the pre-late Eocene through enhanced submarine hydrothermal activity and the introduction of terrigenous solutions from chemical weathering on adjacent continents. This palaeoceanographic overturn probably was initiated through the onset of increased meridional ocean circulation, caused by the diversion of the Indian equatorial current to the south. The opal pulse was accompanied by increased influxes of terrigenous detritus from southern African sources (illite), mediated by enhanced ocean particle advection in response to modified ocean circulation. The opal pulse ended because of frontal shifts to

  11. Orbital control on carbon cycle alterations and hyperthermal events in a cooling world: the late Early to Mid Eocene record at Possagno (southern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeotti, Simone; Sprovieri, Mario; Moretti, Matteo; Rio, Domenico; Fornaciari, Eliana; Giusberti, Luca; Agnini, Claudia; Backman, Jan; Lanci, Luca; Luciani, Valeria

    2013-04-01

    The late Early Eocene to Middle Eocene ~50-45 Million years ago (Ma) time interval in the middle bathyal, pelagic/hemipelagic succession of the Western Tethys Possagno section (southern Alps, Veneto), contains several episodes of negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) and concomitant dissolution of carbonates. These episodes are superimposed on a long term global climate cooling that started at about 51 Ma following the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Spectral analysis indicates that CIEs and dissolution events are paced by orbital forcing, confirming the global significance of previous finding on the same interval from Western and Southern Atlantic and Equatorial Pacific sites. The frequency and magnitude of CIEs through time is controlled by long-term modulations of orbital parameters, including long eccentricity (400 kyr) and a 1.2 million year modulation. Highest frequency of events - at the orbital scale - is observed across the EECO, which provides an observational basis to validate theoretical models predicting a threshold effect resulting from orbital forcing superimposed on gradually changing mean global boundary conditions. The observation of the 1.2 million year beat (long-term modulation of obliquity) together with previously published observation of enhanced obliquity (41 kyr) forcing across major CIEs and dissolution intervals indicates that high latitude feedbacks to orbital forcing played a fundamental role in the emplacement of the hyperthermals. The observed orbital forcing signature closely match that of early Eocene hyperthermals, suggesting similar driving processes.

  12. Controlling acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines recent transfer of electric power among 48 states and present evidence of significant transfers of electric power from so-called ''perpetrator'' to ''victim'' states. The book compares the efforts of several midwestern and northeastern states during the 1970's to control the sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions causing acid rain. The report includes utility and government data on electricity production and sales, on purchase of out-of-state electricity, and on coal use and sulfur dioxide emissions, state by state, for 48 states.

  13. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of the IODP Site U1332 sediments - relative paleointensity during Eocene and Oligocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Acton, G.; Channell, J. E.; Palmer, E. C.; Richter, C.; Yamazaki, T.

    2011-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expeditions 320 and 321 recovered sediment cores from equatorial Pacific. Cores were taken at eight Sites (U1331-U1338) and onboard measurements showed that those from Sites U1331, U1332, U1333 and U1334 covered Eocene and/or Oligocene (Expedition 320/321 Scientists, 2010). Although many efforts have been made to reveal relative geomagnetic paleointensity variations in geologic time, those prior to ca. 3 m.y. have been not yet reported except a few studies (e.g. ca. 23-34 Ma, Tauxe and Hartl, 1997). This study concentrates on paleomagnetic and rock magnetic measurements on the Site U1332 sediment core. The measurements include stepwise alternating field demagnetization of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM), the anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) and the isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM). The magnetostrartigraphy constructed from the NRM data show that the sedimentary section extends from the early Oligocene to middle Eocene (23.030-41.358 Ma). Intensity variation of ARM and IRM is within about a factor of six throughout the core. Magnetic grain size proxy, ARM/IRM, differ between Eocene (about 0.11) and Oligocene (about 0.14). These suggest that relative paleointensity (RPI) estimation is basically possible if we divide the core into Eocene and Oligocene periods. RPI estimates have been done by using ARM and IRM as normalizers for NRM. RPIs by ARM and IRM generally show consistent variations. However, several experimental results imply that RPI by IRM may be more preferable. We will compare the U1332 RPI record with the U1331, U1333 and U1334 RPI records.

  14. Missing organic carbon in Eocene marine sediments: Is metabolism the biological feedback that maintains end-member climates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivarez Lyle, Annette; Lyle, Mitchell W.

    2006-06-01

    Ocean chemistry is affected by pCO2 in the atmosphere by increasing the dissolution of solid calcium carbonate and elevating the dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations in seawater. Positive feedbacks between the ocean and atmosphere can maintain high atmospheric pCO2 and affect global climate. We report evidence for changes in the oceanic carbon cycle from the first high-quality organic carbon (Corg) data set of Eocene sediments beneath the equatorial Pacific upwelling region (Leg 199 of the Ocean Drilling Program). Eocene Corg mass accumulation rates (MARs) are 10 times lower than Holocene rates, even though expected Corg MARs estimated from biogenic-barium MARs (an indicator of biological production) equal or exceed modern fluxes. What happened to the missing Corg? Recent advances in ecology and biochemical kinetics show that the metabolism of nearly all animals, marine and terrestrial, is positively correlated by first principles to environmental temperatures. The approximately 10°C abyssal temperature difference from Eocene to Holocene should have radically reduced pelagic Corg burial, as we observe. We propose that higher basal metabolism and nutrient utilization/recycling rates in the Eocene water column and surface sediments precluded Corg sediment burial in the pelagic ocean. Increased rates of metabolism, nutrient utilization, and lowered Corg sedimentation caused by increased temperature may have acted as a biological feedback to maintain high atmospheric pCO2 and hothouse climates. Conversely, these same parameters would reverse sign to maintain low pCO2 when temperatures decrease, thereby maintaining "icehouse" conditions during cold climate regimes.

  15. Simulated acid rain on crops

    SciTech Connect

    Plocher, M.D.; Perrigan, S.C.; Hevel, R.J.; Cooper, R.M.; Moss, D.N.

    1985-10-01

    In 1981, simulated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ acid rain was applied to alfalfa and tall fescue and a 2:1 ratio of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/:HNO/sub 3/ acid rain was applied to alfalfa, tall fescue, barley, wheat, potato, tomato, radish, and corn crops growing in the open field at Corvallis, Oregon. Careful attention was given to effects of the acid rain on the appearance of the foliage, and the effects on yield were measured. Because the effect of pH 4.0 rain on corn yield was the only significant effect noted in the 1981 studies, in 1982, more-extensive studies of the effect of simulated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//HNO/sub 3/ rain on corn were conducted. No significant effects of acid rain were found on foliage appearance, or on yield of grain or stover in the 1982 studies.

  16. Acid rain: effects on fish and wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, K.S.; Multer, E.P.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The following questions concerning acid rain are discussed: what is acid rain; what causes acid rain; where do sulfur and nitrogen oxides originate; what areas in the U.S. are susceptible to acid rain; are there early warning signals of acidification to aquatic resources; how does acid rain affect fishery resources; does acid rain affect wildlife; and how can effects of acid rain be reduced.

  17. Micro-halocline enabled nutrient recycling may explain extreme Azolla event in the Eocene Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    van Kempen, Monique M L; Smolders, Alfons J P; Lamers, Leon P M; Roelofs, Jan G M

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the physicochemical mechanisms that could explain the massive growth of Azolla arctica in the Eocene Arctic Ocean, we carried out a laboratory experiment in which we studied the interacting effects of rain and wind on the development of salinity stratification, both in the presence and in the absence of a dense Azolla cover. Additionally, we carried out a mesocosm experiment to get a better understanding of the nutrient cycling within and beneath a dense Azolla cover in both freshwater and brackish water environments. Here we show that Azolla is able to create a windproof, small-scale salinity gradient in brackish waters, which allows for efficient recycling of nutrients. We suggest that this mechanism ensures the maintenance of a large standing biomass in which additional input of nutrients ultimately result in a further expansion of an Azolla cover. As such, it may not only explain the extent of the Azolla event during the Eocene, but also the absence of intact vegetative Azolla remains and the relatively low burial efficiency of organic carbon during this interval. PMID:23166833

  18. A "tropical" Early Eocene marine environment on the Antarctic margin: TEX86 results from IODP expedition 318

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendle, J. A.; Bijl, P.; Toney, J. L.; Pross, J.; Contreras, L.; Schouten, S.; Roehl, U.; Tauxe, L.; Huber, M.; Brinkhuis, H.; Scientific Team of IODP Drilling Leg 318

    2011-12-01

    The early Eocene was characterised by high pCO2 (ca.1,000 to more than 2,000ppm) and mean global temperatures that reached a long-term maximum. Relative to the present day, meridional temperature gradients were unusually low, with warmer equatorial regions and much warmer subtropical Arctic and mid-latitude climates. Yet global climatic conditions during this pre-glacial interval have remained poorly constrained, as only a few temperature records are available portraying the Cenozoic climatic evolution of the high southern latitudes. Here we present dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and organic geochemical tetraether based sea-surface temperature estimates from IODP expedition 318, extracted from bio- and magnetostratigraphically dated, late early to early middle Eocene sediments recovered at Site U1356. For the first time, we reconstruct marine temperatures and ecological conditions from the Eocene Greenhouse world in direct proximity to the Antarctic continent. Early Eocene dinocyst assemblages are dominated by tropical dinocyst genus Apectodinium, whilst TEX86 results indicate persistent and remarkable warmth, with the magnitude of the reconstructed SSTs dependent on the applied calibration: TEX86-L = 20 - 26°C (Av. 23°C); TEX86-H = 27 - 33°C (Av. 32°C). Our marine based proxies are just several strands from multiple independent lines of evidence emerging from the Early Eocene of the Wilkes Land Antarctic margin, including: pollen, terrestrial biomarkers (e.g. MBT/CBT-MAT estimates of 22 - 27°C , Av. 26°C), compound specific plant wax D/H measurements and clay minerals. Taken together, this evidence of very high temperatures, thermophilic fauna, an invigorated hydrological cycle, chemically weathered soils and well developed wetlands gives a very compelling picture of environmental conditions comparable to the modern tropics. These results confirm that exceptionally warm polar-regions are a feature common to reconstructed Greenhouse periods. Such

  19. Interplay Between the Equatorial Geophysical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, R.

    2006-11-01

    r_sridharanspl@yahoo.com With the sun as the main driving force, the Equatorial Ionosphere- thermosphere system supports a variety of Geophysical phenomena, essentially controlled by the neutral dynamical and electro dynamical processes that are peculiar to this region. All the neutral atmospheric parameters and the ionospheric parameters show a large variability like the diurnal, seasonal semi annual, annual, solar activity and those that are geomagnetic activity dependent. In addition, there is interplay between the ionized and the neutral atmospheric constituents. They manifest themselves as the Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ), Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA), Equatorial Spread F (ESF), Equatorial Temperature and Wind Anomaly (ETWA). Recent studies have revealed that these phenomena, though apparently might show up as independent ones, are in reality interlinked. The interplay between these equatorial processes forms the theme for the present talk.

  20. Possible role of oceanic heat transport in early Eocene climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, L. C.; Walker, J. C.; Moore, T. C. Jr

    1995-01-01

    Increased oceanic heat transport has often been cited as a means of maintaining warm high-latitude surface temperatures in many intervals of the geologic past, including the early Eocene. Although the excess amount of oceanic heat transport required by warm high latitude sea surface temperatures can be calculated empirically, determining how additional oceanic heat transport would take place has yet to be accomplished. That the mechanisms of enhanced poleward oceanic heat transport remain undefined in paleoclimate reconstructions is an important point that is often overlooked. Using early Eocene climate as an example, we consider various ways to produce enhanced poleward heat transport and latitudinal energy redistribution of the sign and magnitude required by interpreted early Eocene conditions. Our interpolation of early Eocene paleotemperature data indicate that an approximately 30% increase in poleward heat transport would be required to maintain Eocene high-latitude temperatures. This increased heat transport appears difficult to accomplish by any means of ocean circulation if we use present ocean circulation characteristics to evaluate early Eocene rates. Either oceanic processes were very different from those of the present to produce the early Eocene climate conditions or oceanic heat transport was not the primary cause of that climate. We believe that atmospheric processes, with contributions from other factors, such as clouds, were the most likely primary cause of early Eocene climate.

  1. Early Eocene uplift of southernmost San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.A.; Cox, B.F.

    1989-04-01

    Stratigraphic studies in the southern San Joaquin basin and in the El Paso Mountains of the southwestern Great Basin corroborate a hypothesized early Eocene regional uplift event. Eocene uplift and erosion of the southernmost San Joaquin basin south of Bakersfield were recently proposed because an early Paleogene fluviodeltaic sequence in the El Paso Mountains (Goler Formation) apparently had no seaward counterpart to the southwest. New microfossil data (coccoliths) indicate that marine deposits near the top of the Goler Formation are uppermost Paleocene (nannofossil zone CP8) rather than lower Eocene, as reported previously. These data (1) confirm that the oldest known Tertiary strata south of Bakersfield (Eocene Tejon Formation) are younger than the uppermost Goler Formation and (2) seem to restrict uplift to the earliest Eocene. The authors propose that the uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene deposits were eroded and the Mushrush trough was cut and filled mainly in response to earliest Eocene uplift. The uplift was transverse to the northwest-trending forearc basin. Thus, it was distinct from late early Eocene (pre-Comengine Formation) regional tilting and uplift, which produced northwest-trending structures. Early Eocene uplift probably played only a minor role in the southward termination of pre-Maastrichtian parts of the forearc basin, which they instead attribute to massive uplift of the southernmost Sierra Nevada during the early(.) Late Cretaceous.

  2. A Robust, Microwave Rain Gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansheim, T. J.; Niemeier, J. J.; Kruger, A.

    2008-12-01

    Researchers at The University of Iowa have developed an all-electronic rain gauge that uses microwave sensors operating at either 10 GHz or 23 GHz, and measures the Doppler shift caused by falling raindrops. It is straightforward to interface these sensors with conventional data loggers, or integrate them into a wireless sensor network. A disadvantage of these microwave rain gauges is that they consume significant power when they are operating. However, this may be partially negated by using data loggers' or sensors networks' sleep-wake-sleep mechanism. Advantages of the microwave rain gauges are that one can make them very robust, they cannot clog, they don't have mechanical parts that wear out, and they don't have to be perfectly level. Prototype microwave rain gauges were collocated with tipping-bucket rain gauges, and data were collected for two seasons. At higher rain rates, microwave rain gauge measurements compare well with tipping-bucket measurements. At lower rain rates, the microwave rain gauges provide more detailed information than tipping buckets, which quantize measurement typically in 1 tip per 0.01 inch, or 1 tip per mm of rainfall.

  3. Acid rain: Rhetoric and reality

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Acid rain is now one of the most serious environmental problems in developed countries. Emissions and fallout were previously extremely localized, but since the introduction of tall stacks policies in both Britain and the US - pardoxically to disperse particulate pollutants and hence reduce local damage - emissions are now lifted into the upper air currents and carried long distances downwind. The acid rain debate now embraces many western countries - including Canada, the US, England, Scotland, Wales, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, West Germany, the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland - and a growing number of eastern countries - including the Soviet Union, Poland, East Germany, and Czechoslovakia. The problem of acid rain arises, strictly speaking, not so much from the rainfall itself as from its effects on the environment. Runoff affects surface water and groundwater, as well as soils and vegetation. Consequently changes in rainfall acidity can trigger off a range of impacts on the chemistry and ecology of lakes and rivers, soil chemistry and processes, the health and productivity of plants, and building materials, and metallic structures. The most suitable solutions to the problems of acid rain require prevention rather than cure, and there is broad agreement in both the political scientific communities on the need to reduce emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides to the atmosphere. Book divisions discuss: the problem of acid rain, the science of acid rain, the technology of acid rain, and the politics of acid rain, in an effort to evaluate this growing global problem of acid rain.

  4. More rain compensation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sworder, D. D.; Vojak, R.

    1992-01-01

    To reduce the impact of rain-induced attenuation in the 20/30 GHz band, the attenuation at a specified signal frequency must be estimated and extrapolated forward in time on the basis of a noisy beacon measurement. Several studies have used model based procedures for solving this problem in statistical inference. Perhaps the most widely used model-based paradigm leads to the Kalman filter and its lineal variants. In this formulation, the dynamic features of the attenuation are represented by a state process (x(sub t)). The observation process (y(sub t)) is derived from beacon measurements. Some ideas relating to the signal processing problems related to uplink power control are presented. It is shown that some easily implemented algorithms hold promise for use in estimating rain induced fades. The algorithms were applied to actual data generated at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VPI) test facility. Because only one such event was studied, it is not clear that the algorithms will have the same effectiveness when a wide range of events are studied.

  5. Radio wave scintillations at equatorial regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poularikas, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Radio waves, passing through the atmosphere, experience amplitude and phase fluctuations know as scintillations. A characterization of equatorial scintillation, which has resulted from studies of data recorded primarily in South America and equatorial Africa, is presented. Equatorial scintillation phenomena are complex because they appear to vary with time of day (pre-and postmidnight), season (equinoxes), and magnetic activity. A wider and more systematic geographical coverage is needed for both scientific and engineering purposes; therefore, it is recommended that more observations should be made at earth stations (at low-geomagnetic latitudes) to record equatorial scintillation phenomena.

  6. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27[degree]C, but never 31[degree]C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  7. Ozone measurements in the troposphere of an Amazonian rain forest environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.; Browell, E. V.; Gregory, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    Ozone concentration profiles from the ground to above the stratospheric peak were obtained in an equatorial rain forest environment near Manaus in the Amazon Basin between July and August of 1985. The peak ozone concentration (4.4 x 10 to the 22 molecules/cu cm) was found at 20 mbar (26.6 km). A major pollution (biomass-burning) event which occurred near the end of the experiment was responsible for large changes in ozone concentration.

  8. Acid Rain: The Scientific Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Documents the workings and findings of the Massachusetts Acid Rain Monitoring Project, which has pooled the volunteer efforts of more than 1,000 amateur and professional scientists since 1983. Reports on the origins of air pollution, the prediction of acid rain, and its effects on both water life and land resources. (JJK)

  9. Acid Rain: An Educational Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, James I.

    1984-01-01

    Deals with how educators can handle the subject of acid rain; illustrates suggestions with experiences of grade nine students visiting Frost Valley Environmental Education Center (Oliverea, New York) to learn scientific concepts through observation of outdoor phenomena, including a stream; and discusses acid rain, pH levels, and pollution control…

  10. An Umbrella for Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1979-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded several grants to study effects of and possible solutions to the problem of "acid rain"; pollution from atmospheric nitric and sulfuric acids. The research program is administered through North Carolina State University at Raleigh and will focus on biological effects of acid rain. (JMF)

  11. Acid Rain: What's the Forecast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various types of acid rain, considered to be a century-old problem. Topics include: wet and dry deposition, effects on a variety of environments, ecosystems subject to detrimental effects, and possible solutions to the problem. A list of recommended resources on acid rain is provided. (BC)

  12. Acid rain & electric utilities II

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This document presents reports which were presented at the Acid Rain and Electric Utilities Conference. Topics include environmental issues and electric utilities; acid rain program overview; global climate change and carbon dioxide; emissions data management; compliance; emissions control; allowance and trading; nitrogen oxides; and assessment. Individual reports have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  13. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  14. SIMULATED ACID RAIN ON CROPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1981, simulated H2SO4 acid rain was applied to alfalfa and tall fescue and a 2:1 ratio of H2SO4:HNO3 acid rain was applied to alfalfa, tall fescue, barley, wheat, potato, tomato, radish, and corn crops growing in the open field at Corvallis, Oregon. Careful attention was given...

  15. Acid rain: a background report

    SciTech Connect

    Glustrom, L.; Stolzenberg, J.

    1982-07-08

    This Staff Brief was prepared for the Wisconsin Legislative Council's Special Committee on Acid Rain to provide an introduction to the issue of acid rain. It is divided into four parts. Part I provides an overview on the controversies surrounding the measurement, formation and effects of acid rain. As described in Part I, the term acid rain is used to describe the deposition of acidic components through both wet deposition (e.g., rain or snow) and dry deposition (e.g., direct contact between atmospheric constituents and the land, water or vegetation of the earth). Part II presents background information on state agency activities relating to acid rain in Wisconsin, describes what is known about the occurrence of, susceptibility to and effects of acid rain in Wisconsin, and provides information related to man-made sources of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in Wisconsin. Part III describes major policies and regulations relating to acid rain which have been or are being developed jointly by the United States and Canadian governments, by the United States government and by the State of Wisconsin. Part IV briefly discusses possible areas for Committee action.

  16. RAPID ACCESS INFORMATION SYSTEM (RAINS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    RAINS has been designed to provide you fast, easy, flexible access to the Region's vast stores of environmental, programmatic, and administrative data and information. RAINS will allow users to approach and interact with this information in an integrated, multi-dimensional contex...

  17. Status of heavy rain tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy

    1991-01-01

    The heavy rain effects program is presented in the form of the view-graphs. The following topics are covered: rain effects on airfoil performance; two-phase flow dynamics; wind tunnel test results; issues; large-scale results; and summary.

  18. Rain Gardens: Stormwater Infiltrating Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrological dynamics and changes in stormwater nutrient concentrations within rain gardens were studied by introducing captured stormwater runoff to rain gardens at EPA’s Urban Water Research Facility in Edison, New Jersey. The runoff used in these experiments was collected...

  19. Industrial ecotoxicology "acid rain".

    PubMed

    Astolfi, E; Gotelli, C; Higa, J

    1986-01-01

    The acid rain phenomenon was studied in the province of Cordoba, Argentina. This study, based on a previously outlined framework, determined the anthropogenic origin of the low pH due to the presence of industrial hydrochloric acid wastage. This industrial ecotoxicological phenomenon seriously affected the forest wealth, causing a great defoliation of trees and shrubs, with a lower effect on crops. A survey on its effects on human beings has not been carried out, but considering the corrosion caused to different metals and its denouncing biocide effect on plants and animals, we should expect to find some kind of harm to the health of the workers involved or others engaged in farming, and even to those who are far away from the polluting agent. PMID:3758667

  20. Acid rain in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  1. Tectonic control of Eocene arkosic sediment deposition, Oregon and Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Armentrout, J.M.; Ulrich, A.R.

    1983-03-01

    Chronostratigraphic and geographic studies of Eocene arkosic sandstones suggest deposition during a volcanically quiet interval resulting from the westward jump of the Farallon-Kula plate subduction zone in Oregon and Washington. The Eocene arkosic sandstones were deposited as part of a broad fluvial plain-coastal plain-shelf margin basin complex extending throughout Oregon and Washington between uplands of Mesozoic rocks. Feldspathic-quartzose sediments were transported from the east by river systems draining granitic terrains perhaps as far away as the Idaho Batholith. Chronostratigraphic correlations suggest that the arkosic sandstones were deposited along the margins of the depositional system during the early Eocene, prograded westward during the middle Eocene, and then regressed during the latest Eocene and Oligocene simultaneously with the influx of abundant pyroclastic debris. During the early Eocene, a northwest-southeast seamount chain was extruded on the Farallon and Kula plates west of an eastward-dipping subduction zone. Subduction of the oceanic plates moved the seamount chain obliquely toward the subduction zone. In middle Eocene time-49 to 40 m.y.b.p-the seamount chain reached the subduction zone creating instability in the subduction system and resulting in the westward jump of the underthrust boundary between the Farallon-Kula and North American plates. Coincident with and continuing after the subduction zone jump and seamount accretion, eastwardly derived arkosic sediments prograded across Oregon and Washington spilling into the new fore-arc basin and enveloping the seamounts.

  2. Equatorial potassium currents in lenses.

    PubMed

    Wind, B E; Walsh, S; Patterson, J W

    1988-02-01

    Earlier work with the vibrating probe demonstrated the existence of outward potassium currents at the equator and inward sodium currents at the optical poles of the lens. By adding microelectrodes to the system, it is possible to relate steady currents (J) to the potential difference (PD) measured with a microelectrode. By injecting an outward current (I), it is possible to determine resistances and also the PD at which the steady outward potassium current becomes zero (PDJ = 0). At this PD the concentration gradient for potassium efflux and the electrical gradient for potassium influx are balanced so that there is no net flow of potassium across the membranes associated with the production of J. The PDJ = 0 for 18 rat lenses was 86 mV and that for 12 frogs lenses was -95 mV. This agrees with the potassium equilibrium potential and provides strong evidence to support the view that the outward equatorial current, J, is a potassium current. With the injection of outward current, I, the PD becomes more negative, the outward equatorial current, J, decreases, and the inward current at the optical poles increases. This suggests that there are separate electrical loops for K+ and Na+ that are partially linked by the Na, K-pump. Using Ohm's law, it is possible to calculate the input resistance (R = delta PD/I), the resistance related to the production of J (RJ = delta PD/delta J), and the effect of the combined resistances (delta J/I). The driving force for J can be estimated (PDJ = 0-PD). The relationships among currents, voltages and resistance can be used to determine the characteristics of the membranes that are associated with the outward potassium current observed at the equator. The effects of graded deformation of the lens were determined. The effects were reversible. The sites of inward and outward currents were not altered. Following deformation, the equatorial current, J, increased, and the PD became less negative. The PDJ = 0 remains the same so the ratio of K

  3. The Arctic Forest of the Middle Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahren, A. Hope

    2007-05-01

    Lush forests, dominated by deciduous conifers, existed well north of the Arctic Circle during the middle Eocene (45 Ma). The Fossil Forest site, located on Axel Heiberg Island, Canada, has yielded a particularly rich assemblage of plant macro- and microfossils, as well as paleosols -- all exquisitely preserved. Methods ranging from classical paleobotany, to stable-isotope geochemistry, have been applied to materials excavated from the Fossil Forest and have revealed layers of diverse conifer forests with a rich angiosperm understory that successfully endured three months of continuous light and three months of continuous darkness. Paleoenvironmental reconstructions suggest a warm, ice-free environment, with high growing-season-relative humidity, and high rates of soil methanogenesis. Methods to evaluate intraseasonal variability highlight the switchover from stored to actively fixed carbon during the short annual growing season.

  4. Seven Guideposts for Tropical Rain Forest Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Identifies seven guideposts for tropical rain forest education. Aids teachers in finding structure and creating educational experiences that promote more complete understanding of tropical rain forests. (CCM)

  5. Acidification and Acid Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    endangers the existing biota. Concerns about acid (or acidic) rain in its modern sense were publicized by the Swedish soil scientist Svante Odén (1968). He argued, initially in the Swedish press, that long-term increases in the atmospheric deposition of acid could lower the pH of surface waters, cause a decline in fish stocks, deplete soils of nutrients, and accelerate damage to materials. By the 1970s, acidification of surface waters was reported in many countries in Europe as well as in North America. The late twentieth-century rush to understand the impact of acid rain was driven by: (i) reports of damaged or threatened freshwater fisheries and (ii) damaged forests. Perhaps the earliest linkage between acidic surface water and damage to fish was made by Dahl (1921) in southern Norway. There, spring runoff was sufficiently acidic to kill trout. It was not until the 1970s that a strong link was established between depressed pH, mobilization of aluminum from soil, and fish status ( Schofield and Trojnar,1980). The relationship between acidification of soils and forest health started with hypotheses in the 1960s and has slowly developed. Acid rain enhances the availability of some nutrients (e.g., nitrogen), and may either enhance or diminish the availability of others (e.g., calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus). Damage to anthropogenic structures, human health, and visibility have also raised concerns. The history of these early developments was summarized by Cowling (1982). Since the 1970s, sulfur and nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere have been reduced by 50-85% and 0-30%, respectively, both in North America and Europe. The emission reductions have occurred as a consequence of knowledge gained and economic factors. While recovery of water quality is underway in some areas, problems of acidification persist, and are now complicated by the effects of climate change ( Schindler, 1997).

  6. Geodynamics of Sundaland since the Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Gurnis, M.

    2014-12-01

    Sundaland is the continental core of southeast Asia bounded by subduction zones since early Mesozoic. Many Sundaland basins, extensional in origin, have formed since Late Eocene. These rift basins experienced extensive inversion since early Miocene. The basins and the adjacent continental crust subsided with a regional sea level rise during a period of basin inversion and falling global sea level, suggesting control beyond eustasy and lithospheric deformation. The mechanism of this large-scale synchronous inversion and subsidence is not well understood. We use four dimensional dynamic models that explicitly assimilate the plate tectonic history and additional geological and geophysical data to investigate the underlying causes for the enigmatic evolution of Cenozoic Sundaland basins. The assimilation method honors both empirical data at the surface (including the seafloor age, plate motion velocity, subduction history) and mantle dynamics at depth and predicts mantle structure, surface topography and intraplate stress. These later expressions are compared against independent observations. With continuously closing plates, we embed deforming plates into the conventional rigid plate models in GPlates, thus enabling us to model continental deformation and mantle dynamics jointly. Models are initiated in the early Eocene with the temperature field derived from the backward integration of the present temperature field synthesized from seismic models. The velocity-temperature perturbation scaling ratio and depth and temperature dependent viscosity are derived by fitting the geoid. Our models are consistent with a slab avalanche occurring beneath Sundaland in the early Miocene. The slab avalanche induced large scale subsidence and compression across the southern Sundaland region, which correspond to the synchronous marine inundation and basin inversion since early to middle Miocene regionally. The model results suggest that the evolution of Sundaland basins is dominated

  7. Was the Arctic Eocene 'rainforest' monsoonal? Estimates of seasonal precipitation from early Eocene megafloras from Ellesmere Island, Nunavut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Christopher K.; Greenwood, David R.; Basinger, James F.

    2015-10-01

    The early Eocene was the warmest interval of the Cenozoic, and included within it were several hyperthermal events, with the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) the most pronounced of these. These globally warm climates extended into the Arctic and substantive paleobotanical evidence for high Arctic precipitation (MAP > 150 cm/yr) is indicative of an Arctic rainforest, which contradicts some climate models that show low Arctic precipitation. Prior studies of Arctic early Eocene wood stable-isotope chemistry, however, have shown a summer peak in precipitation, which suggests modern analogs are best sought on the summer-wet east coast of the Asia (e.g., China, Japan, South Korea), not the winter-wet west coasts of the Pacific Northwest of North America). Furthermore, some prior modeling data suggest that highly seasonal 'monsoon-type' summer-wet precipitation regimes (i.e., summer:MAP > 55%) characterized certain mid and lower latitude regions in the early to mid-Eocene. Presented here is a new analysis using leaf physiognomy of 3 leaf megafloras (Split Lake, Stenkul Fiord and Strathcona Fiord) and palynofloral Bioclimatic Analysis from the Margaret Formation from Ellesmere Island, placed stratigraphically as early Eocene, possibly occurring during or following one of the early Eocene hyperthermals. These new data indicate high summer precipitation in the Arctic during the early Eocene, which in part corroborates the results from Eocene wood chemistry. Nevertheless, in contradiction to the wood analysis, monsoonal conditions are not indicated by our analysis, consistent with current modeling studies. High summer (light season) and winter (dark season) precipitation in the Eocene Arctic during hyperthermals would have contributed to regional warmth.

  8. Can crops tolerate acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.K.

    1989-11-01

    This brief article describes work by scientists at the ARS Air Quality-Plant Growth and Development Laboratory in Raleigh, North Carolina, that indicates little damage to crops as a result of acid rain. In studies with simulated acid rain and 216 exposed varieties of 18 crops, there were no significant injuries nor was there reduced growth in most species. Results of chronic and acute exposures were correlated in sensitive tomato and soybean plants and in tolerant winter wheat and lettuce plants. These results suggest that 1-hour exposures could be used in the future to screen varieties for sensitivity to acid rain.

  9. Be an acid rain detective

    SciTech Connect

    Atwill, L.

    1982-07-01

    Acid rain is discussed in a question and answer format. The article is aimed at educating sport fishermen on the subject, and also to encourage them to write their congressmen, senators, and the President about the acid rain problem. The article also announces the availability of an acid rain test kit available through the magazine, ''Sports Afield.'' The kit consists of pH-test paper that turns different shades of pink and blue according to the pH of the water tested. The color of the test paper is then compared to a color chart furnished in the kit and an approximate pH can be determined.

  10. The Terrestrial Eocene-Oligocene Transition in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothero, Donald R.; Emry, Robert J.

    1996-06-01

    The transition from the Eocene to the Oligocene epoch, occurring approximately 47 to 30 million years ago, was the most dramatic episode of climatic and biotic change since the demise of the dinosaurs. The mild tropical climates of the Paleocene and early Eocene were replaced by modern climatic conditions and extremes, including glacial ice in Antarctica. The first part of this book summarizes the latest information in the dating and correlation of the strata of late middle Eocene through early Oligocene age in North America. The second part reviews almost all the important terrestrial reptiles and mammals found near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, in the White River Chronofauna--from the turtles, snakes and lizards to the common rodents, carnivores, oreodonts and deer of the Badlands. This is the first comprehensive treatment of these topics in over sixty years, and will be invaluable to vertebrate paleontologists, geologists, mammalogists and evolutionary biologists.

  11. EQUATORIAL SUPERROTATION ON TIDALLY LOCKED EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Showman, Adam P.; Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    2011-09-01

    The increasing richness of exoplanet observations has motivated a variety of three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric circulation models of these planets. Under strongly irradiated conditions, models of tidally locked, short-period planets (both hot Jupiters and terrestrial planets) tend to exhibit a circulation dominated by a fast eastward, or 'superrotating', jet stream at the equator. When the radiative and advection timescales are comparable, this phenomenon can cause the hottest regions to be displaced eastward from the substellar point by tens of degrees longitude. Such an offset has been subsequently observed on HD 189733b, supporting the possibility of equatorial jets on short-period exoplanets. Despite its relevance, however, the dynamical mechanisms responsible for generating the equatorial superrotation in such models have not been identified. Here, we show that the equatorial jet results from the interaction of the mean flow with standing Rossby waves induced by the day-night thermal forcing. The strong longitudinal variations in radiative heating-namely intense dayside heating and nightside cooling-trigger the formation of standing, planetary-scale equatorial Rossby and Kelvin waves. The Rossby waves develop phase tilts that pump eastward momentum from high latitudes to the equator, thereby inducing equatorial superrotation. We present an analytic theory demonstrating this mechanism and explore its properties in a hierarchy of one-layer (shallow-water) calculations and fully 3D models. The wave-mean-flow interaction produces an equatorial jet whose latitudinal width is comparable to that of the Rossby waves, namely the equatorial Rossby deformation radius modified by radiative and frictional effects. For conditions typical of synchronously rotating hot Jupiters, this length is comparable to a planetary radius, explaining the broad scale of the equatorial jet obtained in most hot-Jupiter models. Our theory illuminates the dependence of the equatorial jet

  12. Vertical cloud structure of Jupiter's equatorial plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, C. R.; Hord, C.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple-scattering radiative transfer calculations were used to deduce the vertical cloud structure (VCS) of Jupiter's equatorial region. The VCS model of the equatorial plumes is obtained through an analysis of Voyager images of the 6190-A methane band and the 6000-A continuum, and ground-based 8900-A methane band images. The VCS of the equatorial plumes is found to be consistent with the hypothesis that the plumes are caused by upwelling at the ammonia condensation level produced by buoyancy due to latent heat release from the condensation of water clouds nearly three scale heights below the plumes.

  13. Ozone and Aitken nuclei over equatorial Africa - Airborne observations during DECAFE 88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Chapuis, A.; Cros, B.; Fontan, J.; Helas, G.; Justice, C.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Minga, A.; Nganga, D.

    1992-01-01

    Results of ozone and Aitken condensation nuclei measurements made over the rain forest in equatorial Africa during February 12-25, 1988 are presented. The results indicate the presence of a layer between 1 and 4 km altitude where these species are strongly enriched. Based on information derived from simultaneous measurements of other chemical and meteorological parameters, satellite imagery, and trajectory calculations, this enrichment is attributed to emissions from biomass burning in sub-Saharan Africa, from which ozone is formed by photochemical reactions.

  14. Toward the camera rain gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamano, P.; Croci, A.; Laio, F.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a novel technique based on the quantitative detection of rain intensity from images, i.e., from pictures taken in rainy conditions. The method is fully analytical and based on the fundamentals of camera optics. A rigorous statistical framing of the technique allows one to obtain the rain rate estimates in terms of expected values and associated uncertainty. We show that the method can be profitably applied to real rain events, and we obtain promising results with errors of the order of ±25%. A precise quantification of the method's accuracy will require a more systematic and long-term comparison with benchmark measures. The significant step forward with respect to standard rain gauges resides in the possibility to retrieve measures at very high temporal resolution (e.g., 30 measures per minute) at a very low cost. Perspective applications include the possibility to dramatically increase the spatial density of rain observations by exporting the technique to crowdsourced pictures of rain acquired with cameras and smartphones.

  15. Rain Rate Statistics in Southern New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulic, Frank J., Jr.; Horan, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    The methodology used in determining empirical rain-rate distributions for Southern New Mexico in the vicinity of White Sands APT site is discussed. The hardware and the software developed to extract rain rate from the rain accumulation data collected at White Sands APT site are described. The accuracy of Crane's Global Model for rain rate predictions is analyzed.

  16. Two-day Convective Disturbances in the Equatorial Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Kuo, H. C.; Johnson, R. H.; Ciesielski, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Quasi two-day convective disturbances were observed in the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) convectively active period in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) field campaign in 2011. The initial focus of the study is on seven significant precipitating events at Gan in October having two-days periodicity identified using TRMM 3B42(V7) rainfall data. In this study, gridded observations, TRMM rainfall and Meteosat-7 IR brightness temperature datasets were analyzed, the time-longitude diagrams and the composite analyses show that the two-day periodicity is related to westward propagating convection with propagation speed ~12m/s and zonal spatial scale ~2000km. In order to examine the vertical structure of the two-day convective disturbances, high-vertical resolution upper-air sounding data and the combined KAZR/S-Pol radar data (only available at Gan Island, 0.69°S, 73.15°E) from DYNAMO were also used to construct composite fields over a 48-hour period centered at the maximum rain rate of these precipitating events. The composited moisture, stability, temperature anomaly and cloud radiative effect reveal a distinct pattern of convective evolution - shallow convection to deep convection to stratiform precipitation - similar to that observed on longer time scales all the way up to that of the MJO. These results indicate several characteristics of two-day disturbances over the equatorial Indian Ocean, which can also be found in the western Pacific during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE).

  17. The storm-time equatorial electrojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, K.; Sastry, T. S. G.; Sampath, S.; Stolarik, J. D.; Usher, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A Petrel rocket carrying a double cell rubidium magnetometer was launched from the Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station during the early main phase of a magnetic storm. No ionospheric currents associated with the storm were observed, and the large field depression at the flight time must therefore be attributed to currents at higher altitudes. The equatorial enhancement of ionospheric magnetic storm currents, predicted on the basis of theory and earlier ground data, was not observed.

  18. The storm-time equatorial electrojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, K.; Sastry, T. S. G.; Sampath, S.; Stolarik, J. D.; Usher, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    A Petrel rocket carrying a double cell rubidium magnetometer was launched from the Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station during the early main phase of a magnetic storm. No ionospheric currents associated with the storm were observed and the large field depression, at the flight time, must therefore be attributed to currents at higher altitudes. The equatorial enhancement of ionospheric magnetic storm currents, predicted on the basis of theory and earlier ground data, was not observed.

  19. Substorm currents in the equatorial magnetotail

    SciTech Connect

    Iijima, T.; Watanabe, M.; Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J.; Kan, J.R.; Akasofu, S.I.

    1993-10-01

    The authors have determined characteristics of magnetospheric equatorial currents during substorms from the vector magnetic field data acquired with the GOES 5 and GOES 6 satellites, separated about 1.9 hours in MLT in geosynchronous orbit. These data have been used to determine the local time (azimuthal) and radial variation of the equatorial current. The divergence of the equatorial current was computed from these variations, and systems of field-aligned currents were deduced. During the growth phase to the maximum phase of the taillike reconfiguration of the near-Earth magnetic field, a positive divergence (away from the equatorial plane) of the westward equatorial current occurs in the late evening to premidnight MLT sector, and a negative divergence (away from the equatorial plane) occurs in the late evening to premidnight MLT sector, and a negative divergence (away from the equatorial plane) occurs in the premidnight to early morning MLT sector. This flow direction pattern is the same as that of the region 2 field-aligned current system. The authors have also determined the presence of a radial current that flows toward the earth in the late evening to premidnight sector and flows away from the Earth in the midnight to morning sector. The intensity of the radial currents increases before the expansion phase. Consequently, the patterns of field-aligned currents associated with various substorm phases are the superposition of currents driven by multiple sources with different temporal variations. They have identified at least three different but related sources of field-aligned currents during the growth and expansion phases. These sources are related to the divergence of the westward flowing equatorial current and to distributions of pressure and magnetic field gradients that evolve in the magnetotail. When combined, these complicated systems support the basic region 1 to region 2 field-aligned current flow pattern. 22 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Vertical shear in the Jovian equatorial zone.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layton, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    Jupiter photographs taken in two different wavelength regions (blue and red) are studied for clues to differing Jovian atmosphere motions. The relative motions of features visible on these photographs may be interpreted as a vertical shear at visible cloud level. The value obtained implies that the north equatorial zone must be about 0.35 deg K warmer than the adjacent equatorial zone. Deeper in the atmosphere the reverse must hold.

  1. EQUATORIAL ZONAL JETS AND JUPITER's GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, D.; Liao, X.; Zhang, K.; Schubert, G.

    2014-08-20

    The depth of penetration of Jupiter's zonal winds into the planet's interior is unknown. A possible way to determine the depth is to measure the effects of the winds on the planet's high-order zonal gravitational coefficients, a task to be undertaken by the Juno spacecraft. It is shown here that the equatorial winds alone largely determine these coefficients which are nearly independent of the depth of the non-equatorial winds.

  2. The dynamics of rain-induced fades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, Dennis G.; Bostian, Charles W.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of rain-induced fades on satellite radio links is studied by evaluating the rate at which the first Fresnel zone volume fills with rain. A compact expression for the fade slope on a terrestrial path is derived which shows that once the rain rate is specified, fade slope is very sensitive to differences in rain velocity. Thus, there is no unique relationship between fade slope and rain rate.

  3. Seminal role of stratiform clouds in large-scale aggregation of tropical rain in boreal summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Siddharth; Arora, Anika; Chattopadhyay, R.; Hazra, Anupam; Rao, Suryachandra A.; Goswami, B. N.

    2016-04-01

    Modification of the vertical structure of non-adiabatic heating by significant abundance of the stratiform rain in the tropics has been known to influence the large-scale circulation. However, the role of the stratiform rain on the space-time evolution of the observed Boreal summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillations (MISO) has so far been ignored. In the present study, we unravel a feedback mechanism through which the stratiform component of the rain leads to aggregation (organization) of rain on the MISO scale, making it an indispensable component of the MISO evolution dynamics. Using TRMM 3A25 monthly mean data (between 1998 and 2013), the ratio between convective and stratiform rain (RCS) is shown to be strongly related to the total rainfall. Further, composites of rainfall and circulation anomalies corresponding to high (low) values of RCS over the Central India or over the Equatorial Indian Ocean show spatial structures remarkably similar to that associated with the MISOs. Analyzing lead-lag relationship between the convective rain, the stratiform rain and the large scale moisture convergence with respect to peak active (break) spells from daily modern era retrospective-analysis for research and applications data, we unravel that the initial isolated convective elements spawn the stratiform rain which in turn modifies the vertical distribution of heating and leads to stronger large scale moisture convergence thereby producing more convective elements and more stratiform rain ultimately leading to aggregation of rain on the MISO scale. Our finding indicates that large and persisting systematic biases in simulating the summer monsoon rainfall over the Asian monsoon region by climate models are likely to be related to the systematic biases in simulating the MISOs which in turn are related to the serious underestimation of stratiform rain in most climate models.

  4. Anomalously wet and dry rainy seasons in Equatorial East Africa and associated differences in intra-seasonal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippon, N.; Camberlin, P.; Moron, V.; Boyard-Micheau, J.

    2015-10-01

    Differences between anomalously wet and dry rainy seasons over the period 1961-2001 in Equatorial East Africa (Kenya, northern Tanzania) are studied at local scale using a 53 rain-gauge network and analysing six intra-seasonal characteristics (ISCs): the onset and end dates, the wet spells number and length, daily mean rainfall amount and the dry spells length. As compared to anomalously dry Long Rains, anomalously wet ones record earlier onsets, more wet spells with higher daily mean rainfall amounts (above 14 mm/day). For the Short Rains, the end date is also widely modulated across the rain gauge network, and daily mean rainfall amounts above (below) 10 mm/day are more (less) frequent during anomalously wet (dry) seasons. The differences in the number, length and daily mean rainfall amount of wet spells between anomalously wet and anomalously dry rainy seasons is also analysed in an ensemble of 24 sea surface temperature-forced runs of the ECHAM4.5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model. For the Long Rains, results are inconsistent between runs which suggests a lack of reproducibility of the ISCs in the model. For the Short Rains, the ISCs distributions between anomalously wet and anomalously dry years are significantly different in most of the runs/locations. In particular, daily mean rainfall amounts above 8 mm/day are more (less) frequent in the model during anomalously wet (dry) years.

  5. Swarm Equatorial Electric Field Inversion Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, Patrick; Maus, Stefan; Vigneron, Pierre; Sirol, Olivier; Hulot, Gauthier

    2014-05-01

    The day-time eastward equatorial electric field (EEF) in the ionospheric E-region plays a crucial role in equatorial ionospheric dynamics. It is responsible for driving the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) current system, equatorial vertical ion drifts, and the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). Due to its importance, there is much interest in accurately measuring and modeling the EEF for both climatological and near real-time studies. The Swarm satellite mission offers a unique opportunity to estimate the equatorial electric field from measurements of the geomagnetic field. Due to the near-polar orbits of each satellite, the on-board magnetometers record a full profile in latitude of the ionospheric current signatures at satellite altitude. These latitudinal magnetic profiles are then modeled using a first principles approach with empirical climatological inputs specifying the state of the ionosphere, in order to recover the EEF. We will present preliminary estimates of the EEF using the first Swarm geomagnetic field measurements, and compare them with independently measured electric fields from the JULIA ground-based radar in Peru.

  6. Ectomycorrhizas from a Lower Eocene angiosperm forest.

    PubMed

    Beimforde, Christina; Schäfer, Nadine; Dörfelt, Heinrich; Nascimbene, Paul C; Singh, Hukam; Heinrichs, Jochen; Reitner, Joachim; Rana, Rajendra S; Schmidt, Alexander R

    2011-12-01

    The development of mycorrhizal associations is considered a key innovation that enabled vascular plants to extensively colonize terrestrial habitats. Here, we present the first known fossil ectomycorrhizas from an angiosperm forest. Our fossils are preserved in a 52 million-yr-old piece of amber from the Tadkeshwar Lignite Mine of Gujarat State, western India. The amber was produced by representatives of Dipterocarpaceae in an early tropical broadleaf forest. The ectomycorrhizas were investigated using light microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Dissolving the amber surrounding one of the fossils allowed ultrastructural analyses and Raman spectroscopy. Approx. 20 unramified, cruciform and monopodial-pinnate ectomycorrhizas are fossilized adjacent to rootlets, and different developmental stages of the fossil mycorrhizas are delicately preserved in the ancient resin. Compounds of melanins were detectable in the dark hyphae. The mycobiont, Eomelanomyces cenococcoides gen. et spec. nov., is considered to be an ascomycete; the host is most likely a dipterocarp representative. An early ectomycorrhizal association may have conferred an evolutionary advantage on dipterocarps. Our find indicates that ectomycorrhizas occurred contemporaneously within both gymnosperms (Pinaceae) and angiosperms (Dipterocarpaceae) by the Lower Eocene. PMID:22074339

  7. Jupiter's Great Red Spot and South Equatorial Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This Voyager 2 picture shows the Great Red Spot and the south equatorial belt extending into the equatorial region. At right is an interchange of material between the south equatorial belt and the equatorial zone. The clouds in the equatorial zone are more diffuse and do not display the structures seen in other locations. Considerable structure is evident within the Great Red Spot. The Voyagers are managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  8. Paleoclimatic analyses of middle Eocene through Oligocene planktic foraminiferal faunas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, G.

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative faunal analyses and oxygen isotope ranking of individual planktic foraminiferal species from deep sea sequences of three oceans are used to make paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic inferences. Species grouped into surface, intermediate and deep water categories based on ??18O values provide evidence of major changes in water-mass stratification, and individual species abundances indicate low frequency cool-warm oscillations. These data suggest that relatively stable climatic phases with minor cool-warm oscillations of ???0.5 m.y. frequency are separated by rapid cooling events during middle Eocene to early Oligocene time. Five major climatic phases are evident in the water-mass stratification between middle Eocene through Oligocene time. Phase changes occur at P14/P15, P15/P16, P20/P21 and P21/P22 Zone boundaries and are marked by major faunal turnovers, rapid cooling in the isotope record, hiatuses and changes in the eustatic sea level. A general cooling trend between middle Eocene to early late Oligocene is indicated by the successive replacement of warm middle Eocene surface water species by cooler late Eocene intermediate water species and still cooler Oligocene intermediate and deep water species. Increased water-mass stratification in the latest Eocene (P17), indicated by the coexistence of surface, intermediate and deep dwelling species groups, suggest that increased thermal gradients developed between the equator and poles nearly coincident with the development of the psychrosphere. This pattern may be related to significant ice accumulation between late Eocene and early late Oligocene time. ?? 1983.

  9. A comparison of the fine-scale structure of the diurnal cycle of tropical rain and lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, V.; Virts, K.; Sukhatme, J.; Wallace, J. M.; Chattopadhyay, B.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the fine-scale structure of the diurnal variability of ground-based lightning is systematically compared with satellite-based rain. At the outset, it is shown that tropical variability of lightning exhibits a prominent diurnal mode, much like rain. A comparison of the geographical distribution of the timing of the diurnal maximum shows that there is very good agreement between the two observables over continental and coastal regions throughout the tropics. Following this global tropical comparison, we focus on two regions, Borneo and equatorial South America, both of which show the interplay between oceanward and landward propagations of the phase of the diurnal maximum. Over Borneo, both rain and lightning clearly show a climatological cycle of "breathing in" (afternoon to early morning) and "breathing out" (morning to early afternoon). Over the equatorial east coast of South America, landward propagation is noticed in rain and lightning from early afternoon to early morning. Along the Pacific coast of South America, both rain and lightning show oceanward propagation. Though qualitatively consistent, over both regions the propagation is seen to extend further in rainfall. Additionally, given that lightning highlights vigorous convection, the timing of its diurnal maximum often precedes that of rainfall in the convective life cycle.

  10. Latitudinal comparisons of equatorial Pacific zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, M. R.; Dam, H. G.; Le Borgne, R.; Zhang, X.

    Zooplankton biomass and rates of ingestion, egestion and production in the equatorial Pacific Ocean along 140°W and 180° exhibit maximum values in the High-Nutrient Low-Chlorophyll (HNLC) zone associated with equatorial upwelling (5°S-5°N) as compared to the more oligotrophic regions to the north and south. Zooplankton biomass and rates are not usually highest on the equator, but increase "downstream" of the upwelling center as the zooplankton populations exhibit a delayed response to enhanced phytoplankton production. The vertical distribution of zooplankton biomass in the equatorial HNLC area tends to be concentrated in surface waters and is more uniform with depth in oligotrophic regions to the north and south of the equatorial upwelling zone. In general, the amount of mesozooplankton (>200 μm) carbon biomass is approximately 25% of estimated phytoplankton biomass and 30% of bacterial biomass in the HNLC area of the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Zooplankton grazing on phytoplankton is low in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, generally <5% of the total chlorophyll-a standing stock grazed per day. Based on estimates of metabolic demand, it is apparent that zooplankton in the equatorial Pacific Ocean are omnivores, consuming primarily microzooplankton and detritus. Estimated zooplankton growth rates in the warm waters of the HNLC equatorial Pacific Ocean are high, ranging from 0.58 d -1 for 64-200 μm zooplankton to 0.08 d -1 for 1000-2000 μm zooplankton. Thus, the numerical and functional response of equatorial zooplankton to increases in phytoplankton production are more rapid than normally occurs in sub-tropical and temperate waters. Potential zooplankton fecal pellet production, estimated from metabolic demand, is approximately 1.6 times the estimated gravitational carbon flux at 150 m in the zone of equatorial upwelling (5°S-5°N) and 1.1 times the export flux in the more oligotrophic regions to the north and south. The active flux of carbon by diel migrant

  11. Atmospheric dust and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, L.O.; Likens, G.E.

    1996-12-01

    Why is acid rain still an environmental problem in Europe and North America despite antipollution reforms? The answer really is blowing in the wind: atmospheric dust. These airborne particles can help neutralize the acids falling on forests, but dust levels are unusually low these days. In the air dust particles can neutralize acid rain. What can we do about acid rain and atmospheric dust? Suggestions range from the improbable to the feasible. One reasonable suggestion is to reduce emissions of acidic pollutants to levels that can be buffered by natural quantities of basic compounds in the atmosphere; such a goal would mean continued reductions in sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, perhaps even greater than those prescribed in the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act in the U.S. 5 figs.

  12. Acid rain degradation of nylon

    SciTech Connect

    Kyllo, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Acid rain, precipitation with a pH less than 5.6, is known to damage lakes, vegetation and buildings. Degradation of outdoor textiles by acid rain is strongly suspected but not well documented. This study reports the effects of sunlight, aqueous acid, heat and humidity (acid rain conditions) on spun delustered nylon 6,6 fabric. Untreated nylon and nylon treated with sulfuric acid of pH 2.0, 3.0, and 4.4 were exposed to light in an Atlas Xenon-arc fadeometer at 63/sup 0/C and 65% R.H. for up to 640 AATCC Fading Units. The untreated and acid treated nylon fabrics were also exposed to similar temperature and humidity condition without light. Nylon degradation was determined by changes in breaking strength, elongation, molecular weight, color, amino end group concentration (NH/sub 2/) and /sup 13/C NMR spectra. Physical damage was assessed using SEM.

  13. Palynostratigraphy and depositional environment of Vastan Lignite Mine (Early Eocene), Gujarat, western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. R.; Sahni, Ashok; Rana, R. S.; Verma, Poonam

    2013-04-01

    Early Eocene sedimentary successions of south Asia, are marked by the development of extensive fossil-bearing, lignite-rich sediments prior to the collision of India with Asia and provide data on contemporary equatorial faunal and vegetational assemblages. One such productive locality in western India is the Vastan Lignite Mine representing approximately a 54-52 Ma sequence dated by the presence of benthic zone marker species, Nummulites burdigalensis burdigalensis. The present study on Vastan Lignite Mine succession is based on the spore-pollen and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and documents contemporary vegetational changes. 86 genera and 105 species belonging to algal remains (including dinoflagellate cysts), fungal remains, pteridophytic spores and angiospermous pollen grains have been recorded. On the basis of first appearance, acme and decline of palynotaxa, three cenozones have been recognized and broadly reflect changing palaeodepositional environments. These are in ascending stratigraphic order (i) Proxapertites Spp. Cenozone, (ii) Operculodinium centrocarpum Cenozone and (iii) Spinizonocolpites Spp. Cenozone. The basal sequence is lagoonal, palm-dominated and overlain by more open marine conditions with dinoflagellate cysts and at the top, mangrove elements are dominant. The succession has also provided a unique record of fish, lizards, snakes, and mammals.

  14. The terminal Eocene event - Formation of a ring system around the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested that the formation of a ring system about the earth by particles and debris related to the North American strewn tektite field is responsible for the terminal Eocene event of 34 million years ago, in which severe climatic changes accompanied by widespread biological extinctions occurred. Botanical data is cited which implies a 20-C decrease in winter temperature with no change in summer temperature, and evidence of the correlation of the North American tektite fall, which is estimated to have a total mass of 10 to the 9th to 10 to the 10th tons, with the disappearance of five of the most abundant species of radiolaria is presented. The possible connection between the tektites and climatic change is argued to result from the screening of sunlight by an equatorial ring of trapped particles of extraterrestrial origin in geocentric orbit which would cut off sunlight only in the winter months. Such a ring, located at a distance of between 1.5 and 2.5 earth radii (the Roche limit) is estimated to have a lifetime of a few million years.

  15. Rapid and sustained surface ocean acidification during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penman, Donald E.; Hönisch, Bärbel; Zeebe, Richard E.; Thomas, Ellen; Zachos, James C.

    2014-05-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) has been associated with the release of several thousands of petagrams of carbon (Pg C) as methane and/or carbon dioxide into the ocean-atmosphere system within ~10 kyr, on the basis of the co-occurrence of a carbon isotope excursion (CIE), widespread dissolution of deep sea carbonates, and global warming. In theory, this rapid carbon release should have severely acidified the surface ocean, though no geochemical evidence has yet been presented. Using boron-based proxies for surface ocean carbonate chemistry, we present the first observational evidence for a drop in the pH of surface and thermocline seawater during the PETM. Planktic foraminifers from a drill site in the North Pacific (Ocean Drilling Program Site 1209) show a ~0.8‰ decrease in boron isotopic composition (δ11B) at the onset of the event, along with a 30-40% reduction in shell B/Ca. Similar trends in δ11B are present in two lower-resolution records from the South Atlantic and Equatorial Pacific. These observations are consistent with significant, global acidification of the surface ocean lasting at least 70 kyr and requiring sustained carbon release. The anomalies in the B records are consistent with an initial surface pH drop of ~0.3 units, at the upper range of model-based estimates of acidification.

  16. Constructing an Eocene Marine Ecosystem Sensitivity Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'haenens, S.; Bornemann, A.; Speijer, R. P.; Hull, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    A key question in the face of current global environmental change is how marine ecosystems will respond and evolve in the future. To answer this, we first need to understand the relationship between environmental and ecosystem change - i.e., the ecosystem sensitivity. Addressing this question requires understanding of how biota respond to (a succession of) sudden environmental perturbations of varying sizes and durations in varying background conditions (i.e., climatic, oceanographic, biotic). Here, we compare new and published data from the Early to Middle Eocene greenhouse world to understand the sensitivity of marine ecosystems to background environmental change and hyperthermal events. This work focuses on the early Paleogene, because it is considered to be a good analog for a future high CO2 world. Newly generated high-resolution multiproxy datasets based on northern Atlantic DSDP Leg 48 and IODP Leg 342 material will allow us to compare the marine ecosystem responses (including bentho-pelagic systems) to abiotic drivers across climatic disruptions of differing magnitude. Initial results of a benthic foraminiferal community comparison including the PETM and ETM2 hyperthermals in the northeastern Atlantic DSDP sites 401 and 5501 suggest that benthic ecosystem sensitivity may actually be non-linearly linked to background climate states as reflected by a range of geochemical proxies (XRF, TOC, CaCO3, grain sizes, XRD clay mineralogy and foraminiferal δ18O, δ13C, Mg/Ca)2,3, in contrast to planktic communities4. Testing the type of scaling across different taxa, communities, initial background conditions and time scales may be the first big step to disentangle the often synergistic effects of environmental change on ecosystems5. References: 1D'haenens et al., 2012, in prep. 2Bornemann et al., 2014, EPSL 3D'haenens et al., 2014, PA 4Gibbs et al., 2012, Biogeosc. 5 Norris et al., 2013, Science

  17. Taxonomy, affinities, and paleobiology of the tiny metatherian mammal Minusculodelphis, from the early Eocene of South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Édison Vicente; Zimicz, Natalia; Goin, Francisco J.

    2016-02-01

    With less than 3 g of estimated body mass, the early Eocene Minusculodelphis minimus Paula Couto (Mammalia, Metatheria, Jaskhadelphyidae) is one of the smallest mammals, living or extinct. It has alternatively been regarded as a didelphid or a derorhynchid "ameridelphian," or even as an eometatherian marsupial. Here, we describe a new species of Minusculodelphis coming from the same locality (Itaboraí Quarry, Brazil) and age (Itaboraian age) of the type species of the genus. It differs from M. minimus in its larger size and several dental characters. The new species offers data on the upper dentition and femur, which are unknown in the type species. Compared to other Paleogene metatherians, Minusculodelphis shows closer relationships with Jaskhadelphys, from the early Paleocene of Tiupampa, Bolivia, as well as with Kiruwamaq, from the late Eocene-early Oligocene of Perú. A cladistic analysis places all three genera within the family Jaskhadelphyidae (Metatheria, Order indet.), which includes small to tiny, insectivorous-like metatherians. We argue that insectivory (soft insects) is the best-supported diet for both species of Minusculodelphis, and that the most probable microhabitat for them was the understorey or leaf litter of tropical, rain forested environments.

  18. Taxonomy, affinities, and paleobiology of the tiny metatherian mammal Minusculodelphis, from the early Eocene of South America.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Édison Vicente; Zimicz, Natalia; Goin, Francisco J

    2016-02-01

    With less than 3 g of estimated body mass, the early Eocene Minusculodelphis minimus Paula Couto (Mammalia, Metatheria, Jaskhadelphyidae) is one of the smallest mammals, living or extinct. It has alternatively been regarded as a didelphid or a derorhynchid "ameridelphian," or even as an eometatherian marsupial. Here, we describe a new species of Minusculodelphis coming from the same locality (Itaboraí Quarry, Brazil) and age (Itaboraian age) of the type species of the genus. It differs from M. minimus in its larger size and several dental characters. The new species offers data on the upper dentition and femur, which are unknown in the type species. Compared to other Paleogene metatherians, Minusculodelphis shows closer relationships with Jaskhadelphys, from the early Paleocene of Tiupampa, Bolivia, as well as with Kiruwamaq, from the late Eocene-early Oligocene of Perú. A cladistic analysis places all three genera within the family Jaskhadelphyidae (Metatheria, Order indet.), which includes small to tiny, insectivorous-like metatherians. We argue that insectivory (soft insects) is the best-supported diet for both species of Minusculodelphis, and that the most probable microhabitat for them was the understorey or leaf litter of tropical, rain forested environments. PMID:26743194

  19. Widespread formation of cherts during the early Eocene climate optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muttoni, G.; Kent, D. V.

    2007-12-01

    Radiolarian cherts in the Tethyan realm of Jurassic age were recently interpreted as resulting from high biosiliceous productivity along upwelling zones in subequatorial paleolatitudes the locations of which were confirmed by revised paleomagnetic estimates. However, the widespread occurrence of cherts in the Eocene suggests that cherts may not always be reliable proxies of latitude and upwelling zones. In a new survey of the global spatiotemporal distribution of Cenozoic cherts in Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sediment cores, we found that cherts occur most frequently in the Paleocene and early Eocene, with a peak in occurrences at ~50 Ma that is coincident with the time of highest bottom water temperatures of the early Eocene climatic optimum (EECO) when the global ocean was presumably characterized by reduced upwelling efficiency and biosiliceous productivity. Cherts occur less commonly during the subsequent Eocene global cooling trend. Primary paleoclimatic factors rather than secondary diagenetic processes seem therefore to control chert formation. This timing of peak Eocene chert occurrence, which is supported by detailed stratigraphic correlations, contradicts currently accepted models that involve an initial loading of large amounts of dissolved silica from enhanced weathering and/or volcanism in a supposedly sluggish ocean of the EECO, followed during the subsequent middle Eocene global cooling by more vigorous oceanic circulation and consequent upwelling that made this silica reservoir available for enhanced biosilicification, with the formation of chert as a result of biosilica transformation during diagenesis. Instead, we suggest that basin-basin fractionation by deep-sea circulation could have raised the concentration of EECO dissolved silica especially in the North Atlantic, where an alternative mode of silica burial involving widespread direct precipitation and/or absorption of silica by clay minerals could have

  20. THE ACID RAIN NOX PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Between 350,000 and 400,000 tons of annual NOx emissions have been eliminated as a result of Phase I of the Acid Rain NOx Program. As expected. the utilities have chosen emissions averaging as the primary compliance option. This reflects that, in general, NO x reductions have ...

  1. Rain gauge calibration and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, John

    1994-01-01

    Prior to the Tropical Oceans Global Atmosphere-Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE), 42 Model 100 series optical gauges were tested in the rain simulator facility at Wallops Island before shipment to the field. Baseline measurements at several rain rates were made simultaneously with collector cans, tipping bucket, and a precision weighing gauge and held for post-COARE evaluation with a repeat set of measurements that were to be recorded after the instruments were returned. This was done as a means of detecting any calibration changes that might have occurred while deployed. Although it was known that the artificial rain in the simulator did not contain the required exponential distribution for accurate optical rain gauge rate measurements, use of the facility was necessary because it was the only means available for taking controlled observations with instruments that were received, tested, and shipped out in groups over a period of months. At that point, it was believed that these measurements would be adequately precise for detecting performance changes over time. However, analysis of the data by STI now indicates that this may not be true. Further study of the data will be undertaken to resolve this.

  2. Voronoi Diagrams and Spring Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perham, Arnold E.; Perham, Faustine L.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this geometry project is to use Voronoi diagrams, a powerful modeling tool across disciplines, and the integration of technology to analyze spring rainfall from rain gauge data over a region. In their investigation, students use familiar equipment from their mathematical toolbox: triangles and other polygons, circumcenters and…

  3. Scientist, researchers, and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Alm, L.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The role of the hidden participants in agenda-setting for environmental issues is discussed. These personnel involve academics, researchers, career bureaucrats, congressional staffers, consultants, and administration appointees below the top level. Scientists have been publicly involved in the acid rain issue from the beginning, using the media to dramatize the possible catastrophic consequences of acid rain. Presently, the scientific community is not in consensus about the solutions to the problem. Since the initial enactment of the National Acid Precipitation Act in 1980, not a single acid rain law has been passed, although many bills have been proposed. Spokesman for the coal and utility industries and Reagan administration personnel have used the scientific disagreements to delay abatement actions and refute claims that acid rain is a severe problem. Another result of the confusion is a distrust and even disdain for academic work. One possible solution to the stalemate is an accurate form for resolving scientific disputes that have a strong political component and that the forum should have a mechanism for converging on accurate science. 19 refs.

  4. Vegetable production after heavy rains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is not clear if extraordinary precipitation stored in the soil was able to support vegetable crops planted after rains events returned to normal levels. Cucumber and sweet corn were established from seed and non-pungent jalapeno peppers were established from 8-week old transplants on beds. Half...

  5. Molecular phylogenetics reveal multiple tertiary vicariance origins of the African rain forest trees

    PubMed Central

    Couvreur, Thomas LP; Chatrou, Lars W; Sosef, Marc SM; Richardson, James E

    2008-01-01

    Background Tropical rain forests are the most diverse terrestrial ecosystems on the planet. How this diversity evolved remains largely unexplained. In Africa, rain forests are situated in two geographically isolated regions: the West-Central Guineo-Congolian region and the coastal and montane regions of East Africa. These regions have strong floristic affinities with each other, suggesting a former connection via an Eocene pan-African rain forest. High levels of endemism observed in both regions have been hypothesized to be the result of either 1) a single break-up followed by a long isolation or 2) multiple fragmentation and reconnection since the Oligocene. To test these hypotheses the evolutionary history of endemic taxa within a rain forest restricted African lineage of the plant family Annonaceae was studied. Molecular phylogenies and divergence dates were estimated using a Bayesian relaxed uncorrelated molecular clock assumption accounting for both calibration and phylogenetic uncertainties. Results Our results provide strong evidence that East African endemic lineages of Annonaceae have multiple origins dated to significantly different times spanning the Oligocene and Miocene epochs. Moreover, these successive origins (c. 33, 16 and 8 million years – Myr) coincide with known periods of aridification and geological activity in Africa that would have recurrently isolated the Guineo-Congolian rain forest from the East African one. All East African taxa were found to have diversified prior to Pleistocene times. Conclusion Molecular phylogenetic dating analyses of this large pan-African clade of Annonaceae unravels an interesting pattern of diversification for rain forest restricted trees co-occurring in West/Central and East African rain forests. Our results suggest that repeated reconnections between the West/Central and East African rain forest blocks allowed for biotic exchange while the break-ups induced speciation via vicariance, enhancing the levels of

  6. High plant diversity in Eocene South America: Evidence from Patagonia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilf, P.; Cuneo, N.R.; Johnson, K.R.; Hicks, J.F.; Wing, S.L.; Obradovich, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    Tropical South America has the highest plant diversity of any region today, but this richness is usually characterized as a geologically recent development (Neogene or Pleistocene). From caldera-lake beds exposed at Laguna del Hunco in Patagonia, Argentina, paleolatitude ???47??S, we report 102 leaf species. Radioisotopic and paleomagnetic analyses indicate that the flora was deposited 52 million years ago, the time of the early Eocene climatic optimum, when tropical plant taxa and warm, equable climates reached middle latitudes of both hemispheres. Adjusted for sample size, observed richness exceeds that of any other Eocene leaf flora, supporting an ancient history of high plant diversity in warm areas of South America.

  7. Acid Rain: The Silent Environmental Threat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zmud, Mia

    1992-01-01

    Describes the silent environmental threat posed by acid rain. Caused mainly by manmade pollutants, acid rain damages water and trees, decreases visibility, corrodes monuments, and threatens public health. The article includes guidelines for action. (SM)

  8. Nature in the Classroom: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Charles

    1982-01-01

    As a lesson topic, acid rain is defined, its chemistry given, and its development since the 1950s described. The worldwide effects of acid rain are discussed along with the available technology for controlling the problem. (CM)

  9. Validation of JASON and Envisat Rain flags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournadre, J.; Quartly, G.

    2003-04-01

    A new rain flag based on the differential attenuation between the two operating frequency of the JASON (Ku/C band) and Envisat RA2 (Ku/S band) altimeters has been defined and is operationaly used. These rain flags use the departure from a normal (or rain free) KU/C or Ku/S backscatter data relation to detect the presence of rain within the altimeter footprint. For both altimeters, the validation of the rain flag required first the validation of the dual frequency sigmanaugh relation and then a validation of the rain flagging process. We present the validation of the two rain flags. For Jason the results are then compared to the coincident Topex data. We also present a first estimate of the rain climatology estimated from each altimeter (Topex, Jason, Envisat) and by combining the 2 or 3 sensors.

  10. Inter-comparison of automatic rain gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nystuen, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    The Ocean Acoustics Division (OAD) of the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), in cooperation with NOAA/NESDIS and NASA, has deployed six rain gauges for calibration and intercomparison purposes. These instruments include: (1) a weighing rain gauge, (2) a RM Young Model 50202 capacitance rain gauge, (3) a ScTI ORG-705 (long path) optical rain gauge, (4) a ScTI ORG-105 (mini-ORG) optical rain gauge, (5) a Belfort Model 382 tipping bucket rain gauge, and (6) a Distromet RD-69 disdrometer. The system has been running continuously since July 1993. During this time period, roughly 150 events with maximum rainfall rate over 10 mm/hr and 25 events with maximum rainfall rates over 100 mm/hr have been recorded. All rain gauge types have performed well, with intercorrelations 0.9 or higher. However, limitations for each type of rain gauge have been observed.

  11. 3D Modeling of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, Joseph; Joyce, Glenn; Krall, Jonathan

    2011-10-01

    Post-sunset ionospheric irregularities in the equatorial F region were first observed by Booker and Wells (1938) using ionosondes. This phenomenon has become known as equatorial spread F (ESF). During ESF the equatorial ionosphere becomes unstable because of a Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability: large scale (10s km) electron density ``bubbles'' can develop and rise to high altitudes (1000 km or greater at times). Understanding and modeling ESF is important because of its impact on space weather: it causes radio wave scintillation that degrades communication and navigation systems. In fact, it is the focus of of the Air Force Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast Satellite (C/NOFS) mission. We will describe 3D simulation results from the NRL ionosphere models SAMI3 and SAMI3/ESF of this phenomenon. In particular, we will examine the causes of the day-to-day ariability of ESF which is an unresolved problem at this time. Post-sunset ionospheric irregularities in the equatorial F region were first observed by Booker and Wells (1938) using ionosondes. This phenomenon has become known as equatorial spread F (ESF). During ESF the equatorial ionosphere becomes unstable because of a Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability: large scale (10s km) electron density ``bubbles'' can develop and rise to high altitudes (1000 km or greater at times). Understanding and modeling ESF is important because of its impact on space weather: it causes radio wave scintillation that degrades communication and navigation systems. In fact, it is the focus of of the Air Force Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast Satellite (C/NOFS) mission. We will describe 3D simulation results from the NRL ionosphere models SAMI3 and SAMI3/ESF of this phenomenon. In particular, we will examine the causes of the day-to-day ariability of ESF which is an unresolved problem at this time. Research supported by ONR.

  12. Rain Hampers Tsunami Relief Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The cleanup and relief efforts from the recent tsunamis continue in coastal communities that were ravaged by the waves all across the Indian Ocean. Heavy rains have further complicated the matter and added to the misery in parts of eastern Sri Lanka. Between December 28, 2004, and January 5, 2005, up to 10 to 15 inches of rain may have fallen along the southeast coast of the island, and as much as 20 inches (red areas) fell just offshore. This rainfall map was created by the TRMM-based, near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, which monitors rainfall over the global tropics. The map shows that many other regions around the Indian Ocean were also affected by the rains, including Malaysia and parts of Sumatra. The heaviest rains fell on December 31 and January 4. The rains were likely the result of a combination of the northeast monsoon interacting with the topography and an active phase of what is known as the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) (or 30-60 day oscillation). The MJO is a large-scale disturbance that propagates eastward from the Indian Ocean into the West Pacific Ocean, bringing extended periods of unsettled weather with it. Individual convective complexes within the MJO can last on the order of a day. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA. NASA image produced by Hal Pierce (SSAI/NASA GSFC) and caption by Steve Lang (SSAI/NASA GSFC).

  13. Equatorial waves in the stratosphere of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, David P.; Magalhaes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses of radio occultation data from Voyager 2 have led to the discovery and characterization of an equatorial wave in the Uranus stratosphere. The observed quasi-periodic vertical atmospheric density variations are in close agreement with theoretical predictions for a wave that propagates vertically through the observed background structure of the stratosphere. Quantitative comparisons between measurements obtained at immersion and at emersion yielded constraints on the meridional and zonal structure of the wave; the fact that the two sets of measurements are correlated suggests a wave of planetary scale. Two equatorial wave models are proposed for the wave.

  14. Equatorially coordinated lanthanide single ion magnets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Li; Wang, Chao; Xue, Shufang; Lin, Shuang-Yan; Tang, Jinkui

    2014-03-26

    The magnetic relaxation dynamics of low-coordinate Dy(III) and Er(III) complexes, namely three-coordinate ones with an equatorially coordinated triangle geometry and five-coordinate ones with a trigonal bipyramidal geometry, have been exploited for the first time. The three-coordinate Er-based complex is the first equatorially coordinated mononuclear Er-based single-molecule magnet (SMM) corroborating that simple models can effectively direct the design of target SMMs incorporating 4f-elements. PMID:24625001

  15. Acid rain control: the costs of compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Gilleland, D.S.; Swisher, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    This document is the proceedings from a conference sponsored by the Illinois Energy Resources Commission and the Coal Extraction and Utilization Research Center, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and held in Carbondale on March 18, 1984. Topics addressed include: the sources and impacts of acid rain, the problems inherent in modeling the impacts of acid rain legislation, the effects of acid rain legislation on the socio-economic sector, compliance costs, and the impact of acid rain legislation on related industries (railroads).

  16. Rain Altimetry - Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartly, G. D.

    2006-07-01

    Although radar altimeters are often considered to have an "all weather" capability , this is not strictly true - rain may severely affect the ocean return signal. This paper charts the progress in understanding and modelling of rain's effect, and the various techniques used to flag rain-affected data, both for main taining the quality of altimetric height data and for studies of rain per se. It finishes with some pointers towards the currently active research areas.

  17. An analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: to what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects.

  18. Acid Rain: What We Must Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham, Eville

    1983-01-01

    Addresses questions about the nature, source, and history of acid rain. In addition, discusses the questions: Why is acid rain a problem? Is acid rain getting worse? What is the threat of further problems? Concludes that it is time to act on the problem and recommends an appropriate course of action. (JN)

  19. A Walk in the Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Glenn

    2001-01-01

    Presents a learning project in which students prepare a guided, multisensory rain forest tour representing its ecology. Develops five stop points presenting a theme or an important aspect of the rain forest. Includes a list of selected resources for rain forest studies. (YDS)

  20. Create a Rain Forest in the Gym.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Karen

    1995-01-01

    Describes a creative interdisciplinary program for K-3 students that involves setting up a rain forest in the gymnasium to teach students gymnastic skills in the context of the Amazon rain forest. The paper describes how to set up the rain forest and teach a variety of classes. Rainforest resources are included. (SM)

  1. Rain, fog, and clouds for aircraft simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    Environmental chamber creates realistic fog and rain effects in aircraft simulator. It reproduces clouds, homogeneous fog, patches of fog, rain and fog, and rain only. It is used with real time digital computer, color computer generated image display that simulates airport lights, or color television camera that produces moving display of airport runway as depicted on model terrain board.

  2. Rain, Snow, and Spring Runoff Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the theory behind the correlation between warm rain, rapid snowmelt, and the subsequent runoff using the concepts of enthalpy, thermal transfer, and energy transfer. Concludes that rapid runoff is not a consequence of rain per se but of the high humidities associated with the rain. (JRH)

  3. Rain cell size statistics as a function of rain rate for attenuation modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, J.

    1983-01-01

    Rain cell size statistics as a function of rain rate have been deduced by employing a radar data base of rain reflectivity data acquired over a three-year period at Wallops Island, VA. These cell statistics have important applications in slant path rain attenuation modeling and remote sensing of the earth's surface from space at frequencies above 10 GHz.

  4. Longitudinal Variation and Waves in Jupiter's South Equatorial Wind Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon-Miller, A. A.; Rogers, J. H.; Gierasch, P. J.; Choi, D.; Allison, M. D.; Adamoli, G.; Mettig, H.-J.

    2012-03-01

    Jupiter's south equatorial winds and clouds are consistent with a high frequency, gravity-inertia, wave. A second, westward-moving, Rossby wave was also identified. Asymmetry with the north equatorial clouds are likely due to the Great Red Spot.

  5. Living on the edge: The oxygen isotope record of Eocene Basins at the margin of the Cenozoic North American plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methner, Katharina; Mulch, Andreas; Chamberlain, Page

    2013-04-01

    the site or within close proximity. However, paleofloral data from e.g. the Chumstick basin to the E of the modern Cascades indicate moderate elevations and montane rain forest conditions during a warm (MAT = 14°C) and rather wet, seasonal Eocene climate. Therefore, we tentatively suggest that these basins were at moderate elevations, allowing dense vegetation and seasonal drying of soils, but were fed by isotopically highly 18O-depleted runoff and groundwater from elevated catchment areas in the vicinity of the basins. This requires Eocene highlands of the North American Cordillera to be laterally extensive already during the Eocene and places important constraints on the impact of the plateau region on atmospheric circulation patterns.

  6. Lower Eocene carbonate facies of Egypt: paleogeographic and tectonic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The northern Arabo-Nubian craton witnessed a major Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary marine transgression that culminated in the deposition of widespread shelf-sea carbonates during Early Eocene (Ypresian) time. Outer shelf facies characterize exposures in central Egypt (Assiut, Luxor, Kharga), and are composed primarily of rhythmically interbedded chalk and micritic limestone with minor intercalated marine hardgrounds. To the south (Kurkur-Dungul), these fine-grained lithologies give way to inner shelf foraminiferal wackestones and grainstones, typical Tethyan Nummulitic facies. Missing in southern Egypt is the restricted dolomitic evaporitic facies predicted by the Irwin model and observed in the lower Eocene of the Sirte basin to the west and the Arabian Platform to the east. Comparing the areal distribution of these lower Eocene carbonates to coeval facies developed across the remained of northern Africa and Arabia reveals the presence of a broad marine embayment which extended through central and eastern Egypt into northern Sudan during Ypresian time. The widespread subsidence that resulted in the development of this features may have been an effect of regional crustal attenuation preceding the rifting of the Red Sea. Concomitant with this regional subsidence were localized uplift and extensional block faulting in the vicinity of the incipient Red Sea rift (the Safaga-Quseir coastal plain). Here, lower Eocene carbonate facies are indicative of shallow water platforms developed on horst blocks, and deeper water, turbidite-fed basins in intervening grabens.

  7. Climate stability across the Eocene-Oligocene transition, southern Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Matthew J.; Josef, Jennifer A.; Madden, Richard; Kay, Richard; Vucetich, Guiomar; Carlini, Alfredo A.

    2004-07-01

    Fossil mammal teeth from mid-latitude southern Argentina (˜46°S) that closely bracket the Eocene-Oligocene transition show no resolvable change in oxygen isotope compositions. In combination with paleofloral observations and geographic considerations, this finding implies not only that climate was essentially constant, despite interpretations elsewhere for major mid- and high-latitude cooling, but also that evolution of hypsodonty did not coincide with climate change during the Eocene-Oligocene transition. One possible explanation for Eocene-Oligocene transition climatic stability is that southern high-latitude cooling increased latitudinal temperature gradients and strengthened ocean circulation gyres, including the southward-flowing Brazil Current in the western South Atlantic. Regionally increased heat transport in the western Atlantic offset global cooling, producing a nearly constant temperature in southern South America. A more radical interpretation, supported by some marine data, is that the paradigm of major global cooling at the Eocene-Oligocene transition is largely false, in that mean sea-surface temperatures changed very little.

  8. High bat (Chiroptera) diversity in the Early Eocene of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Thierry; Rana, Rajendra S.; Missiaen, Pieter; Rose, Kenneth D.; Sahni, Ashok; Singh, Hukam; Singh, Lachham

    2007-12-01

    The geographic origin of bats is still unknown, and fossils of earliest bats are rare and poorly diversified, with, maybe, the exception of Europe. The earliest bats are recorded from the Early Eocene of North America, Europe, North Africa and Australia where they seem to appear suddenly and simultaneously. Until now, the oldest record in Asia was from the Middle Eocene. In this paper, we report the discovery of the oldest bat fauna of Asia dating from the Early Eocene of the Cambay Formation at Vastan Lignite Mine in Western India. The fossil taxa are described on the basis of well-preserved fragments of dentaries and lower teeth. The fauna is highly diversified and is represented by seven species belonging to seven genera and at least four families. Two genera and five species are new. Three species exhibit very primitive dental characters, whereas four others indicate more advanced states. Unexpectedly, this fauna presents strong affinities with the European faunas from the French Paris Basin and the German Messel locality. This could result from the limited fossil record of bats in Asia, but could also suggest new palaeobiogeographic scenarios involving the relative position of India during the Early Eocene.

  9. Arctic plant diversity in the Early Eocene greenhouse

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Guy J.; Eberle, Jaelyn; Le-Page, Ben A.; Dawson, Mary; Hutchison, J. Howard

    2012-01-01

    For the majority of the Early Caenozoic, a remarkable expanse of humid, mesothermal to temperate forests spread across Northern Polar regions that now contain specialized plant and animal communities adapted to life in extreme environments. Little is known on the taxonomic diversity of Arctic floras during greenhouse periods of the Caenozoic. We show for the first time that plant richness in the globally warm Early Eocene (approx. 55–52 Myr) in the Canadian High Arctic (76° N) is comparable with that approximately 3500 km further south at mid-latitudes in the US western interior (44–47° N). Arctic Eocene pollen floras are most comparable in richness with today's forests in the southeastern United States, some 5000 km further south of the Arctic. Nearly half of the Eocene, Arctic plant taxa are endemic and the richness of pollen floras implies significant patchiness to the vegetation type and clear regional richness of angiosperms. The reduced latitudinal diversity gradient in Early Eocene North American plant species demonstrates that extreme photoperiod in the Arctic did not limit taxonomic diversity of plants. PMID:22072610

  10. Equatorial scintillations: advances since ISEA-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sunanda; Basu, Santimay

    1985-10-01

    Since the last equatorial aeronomy meeting in 1980, our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced greatly due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the GHz range has been demonstrated. The fact that night-time F-region dynamics is an important factor in controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations in the light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation. A distinct class of equatorial irregularities known as the bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) type has been identified. Unlike equatorial bubbles, these irregularities occur in very large patches, sometimes in excess of several thousand kilometers in the E-W direction and are associated with frequency spread on ionograms. Scintillations caused by such irregularities exist only in the VHF band, exhibit Fresnel oscillations in intensity spectra and are found to give rise to extremely long durations (~ several hours) of uninterrupted scintillations. These irregularities maximize during solstices, so that in the VHF range, scintillation morphology at an equatorial station is determined by considering occurrence characteristics of both bubble type and BSS type irregularities. The temporal structure of scintillations in relation to the in situ measurements of irregularity spatial structure within equatorial bubbles has been critically examined. A two-component irregularity spectrum with a shallow slope ( p1

  11. Equatorial deep jets in the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, P.; Greatbatch, R. J.; Didwischus, S.-H.; Claus, M.; Hormann, V.; Funk, A.; Dengler, M.

    2012-04-01

    Vertically alternating deep zonal jets of short vertical wavelength were discovered in the equatorial oceans more than 35 years ago. These jets that are observed to be coherent across the equatorial basins are characterized by vertically alternating eastward and westward currents lying within 1° of the equator, with amplitudes of 0.1-0.2 ms-1 and vertical wavelengths between 300 and 700 m. In the Atlantic, equatorial deep jets oscillate with a period of about 4.5 years, while their energy propagates upward. The 4.5 year signal can be seen in sea surface temperature as well as atmospheric data (e.g. surface wind and rainfall) indicating the significance of the deep jets for climate. Here we analyse velocity data from more than 7 years of moored observations at the equator, 23°W as well as shipboard hydrographic and current observations along the 23°W repeat section. Our focus is on intermediate depth levels (300-700 m), where the deep jets are superimposed on a mean flow composed of the westward flowing Equatorial Intermediate Current centred on the equator and the eastward Southern and Northern Intermediate Countercurrents located at 2°S and 2°N, respectively. The large zonal oxygen gradient from the well ventilated western boundary toward low-oxygen values near the eastern boundary makes the meridional oxygen distribution in the central equatorial Atlantic sensitive to zonal flow variations in time and latitude. We compare the observed meridional structures of the mean and anomalous oxygen and zonal velocity distributions as well as their temporal evolution with results of an advection-diffusion model driven by a prescribed velocity field, restoring to high oxygen values at the western boundary, and otherwise constant oxygen consumption. The prescribed velocity field is composed of a high order baroclinic vertical normal mode aimed at representing the 4.5-year cycle and a mean velocity field resembling the observed mean zonal current structure. Similarities

  12. The rain-powered cart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.; Lipscombe, Trevor C.

    2016-09-01

    A frictionless cart in the shape of a right triangle (with the vertical side forward) is elastically impacted by vertically falling raindrops. The speed of the cart as a function of time can be analytically deduced as an exercise in the use of trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. A characteristic time defines the approach to a terminal speed which is a sizeable fraction of the speed of the rain. The treatment is accessible to a student in a calculus-based mechanics course.

  13. Acid Rain: What It Is -- How You Can Help!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This publication discusses the nature and consequences of acid precipitation (commonly called acid rain). Topic areas include: (1) the chemical nature of acid rain; (2) sources of acid rain; (3) geographic areas where acid rain is a problem; (4) effects of acid rain on lakes; (5) effect of acid rain on vegetation; (6) possible effects of acid rain…

  14. The Longitudinal Variation of Equatorial Electrodynamics Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M.; Valladares, C. E.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Biouele, C. M.; Yumoto, K.; Pfaff, R. F.; Heelis, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    The uneven distribution of ground-based instruments due to the large ocean coverage in the equatorial regions hinders our ability to obtain a global understanding of the dynamics and structure of the equatorial ionosphere. In Africa, which has been mostly devoid of ground-based instruments, the ionospheric density structure has been traditionally estimated by model interpolation over vast geographic areas. Recent ground- and space-based observations have shown that geomagnetic storms can have dramatic longitudinal differences in equatorial ionospheric electrodynamics, such as enhanced generation of F-region plasma irregularities, and super fountain effect at low latitudes. For example, satellite observations have shown very unique equatorial ionospheric density structures in the African region. The African region is the longitude sector where the occurrence of large scale bubble activity (zonal width, depletion level, and spacing) peaks. No other region in the globe shows similar characteristics. One of the possible driving mechanisms that govern the equatorial electrodynamics is the vertical ExB drift, which strongly affects the structure and dynamics of the ionosphere in the low/mid-latitude region. According to the observations performed at different longitudes, using recently deployed limited ground-based instruments, the vertical ExB drift has significant longitudinal differences. This paper presents initial results of vertical ExB drifts observed at three different longitudes: East African, West African, and West American sectors. The drift is estimated using a pairs of ground-based magnetometers technique. In the African sector stations from the AMBER, INTERMAGNET, and MAGDAS, and in the American sector SAMBA and LISN magnetometer arrays have been used for this study. Finally, the comparison between the magnetometer estimated ExB drift and the vertical drift observations (VEFI and IVM) on board C/NOFS satellites have also been performed, showing promising

  15. Wave Forcing of Saturn's Equatorial Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.; Schlinder, P. J.; Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based measurements and Cassini data from CIRS thermal-infrared spectra and radio-occultation soundings have characterized the spatial structure and temporal behavior of a 15-year equatorial oscillation in Saturn's stratosphere. The equatorial region displays a vertical pattern of alternating warm and cold anomalies and, concomitantly, easterly and westerly winds relative to the cloud-top winds, with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 200 m/s. Comparison of the Cassini data over a four-year period has established that the pattern of mean zonal winds and temperatures descends at a rate of roughly I scale height over 4 years. This behavior is reminiscent of the equatorial oscillations in Earth's middle atmosphere. Here the zonal-mean spatial structure and descending pattern are driven by the absorption of vertically propagating waves. The maximum excursions in the pattern of easterly and westerly winds is determined by the limits of the zonal phase velocities of the waves. Here we report on the characterization of the waves seen in the temperature profiles retrieved from the Cassini radio-occultation soundings. The equatorial profiles exhibit a complex pattern of wavelike structure with dimensions one pressure scale height and smaller. We combine a spectral decomposition with a WKBJ analysis, where the vertical wavelength is assumed to vary slowly with the ambient static stability and doppler-shifted phase velocity of the wave. Use of the temperature and zonal wind maps from CIRS makes this approach viable. On Earth, the wave forcing associated with the equatorial oscillations generates secondary meridional circulations that affect the mean flow and planetary wave ducting well away from the equator. This may relate to the triggering of the recently reported mid-latitude storms on Saturn.

  16. The Rise of Flowering Plants and Land Surface Physics: The Cretaceous and Eocene Were Different

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upchurch, G. R.; Feild, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Cretaceous and Eocene have served as the poster children of past greenhouse climates. One difference between the two time periods is that angiosperms (flowering plants) underwent a major diversification and rise to dominance during the mid-Cretaceous to Paleocene. Flowering plants differ from all other living and fossil plants in having significantly higher rates of transpiration and photosynthesis, which in modern leaves correlate with the density of venation (Dv), a feature that can be measured directly from fossils. This increase in Dv, coupled with an increase in the abundance of angiosperms, is thought to have had major impact on the climate system. This is, in part, because transpiration plays an important role in determining the ratio of sensible to latent heat flux from the land surface and in determining precipitation rate in regions such as the equatorial rainforest. Analysis of Dv in fossil leaves indicates two phases of increase in transpiration rate for angiosperms during the Cretaceous-Paleocene. The oldest known angiosperms (Aptian-early Albian) have a low Dv characteristic of extant and fossil ferns and gymnosperms. At this time angiosperms are low-stature plants of minor importance in terms of relative abundance and diversity (<5%). The first phase of Dv increase occurs during the Late Albian to Cenomanian, where average Dv is 40% greater than that of conifers and ferns, and maximum Dv reaches levels characteristic of many trees from the temperate zone. This first phase coincides with the first local dominance of angiosperms, the first occurrence of moderate to large angiosperm trees (up to 1 m in diameter) , and the first common occurrence of angiosperms in the Arctic. The second phase of Dv increase occurs during the Maastrichtian to Paleocene, where average Dv reaches levels characteristic of modern tropical forests and maximum Dv reaches the level found in highly productive modern vegetation. This second phase coincides with the rise to

  17. Seasonal variability in Arctic temperatures during early Eocene time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Jaelyn J.; Fricke, Henry C.; Humphrey, John D.; Hackett, Logan; Newbrey, Michael G.; Hutchison, J. Howard

    2010-08-01

    As a deep time analog for today's rapidly warming Arctic region, early Eocene (52-53 Ma) rock on Ellesmere Island in Canada's High Arctic (˜ 79°N.) preserves evidence of lush swamp forests inhabited by turtles, alligators, primates, tapirs, and hippo-like Coryphodon. Although the rich flora and fauna of the early Eocene Arctic imply warmer, wetter conditions than at present, the quantification of Eocene Arctic climate has been more elusive. By analyzing oxygen isotope ratios of biogenic phosphate from mammal, fish, and turtle fossils from a single locality on central Ellesmere Island, we infer early Eocene Arctic temperatures, including mean annual temperature (MAT) of ˜ 8 °C, mean annual range in temperature of ˜ 16.5-19 °C, warm month mean temperature of 19-20 °C, and cold month mean temperature of 0-3.5 °C. Our seasonal range in temperature is similar to the range in estimated MAT obtained using different proxies. In particular, relatively high estimates of early Eocene Arctic MAT and SST by others that are based upon the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids in terrestrial soil bacteria and isoprenoid tetraether lipids in marine Crenarchaeota fall close to our warm month temperature, suggesting a bias towards summer values. From a paleontologic perspective, our temperature estimates verify that alligators and tortoises, by way of nearest living relative-based climatic inference, are viable paleoclimate proxies for mild, above-freezing year-round temperatures. Although for both of these reptilian groups, past temperature tolerances probably were greater than in living descendants.

  18. Seasonal variability in Arctic temperatures during the early Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, J. J.; Fricke, H. C.; Humphrey, J.; Hackett, L.; Newbrey, M.; Hutchison, H.

    2009-12-01

    As a deep time analog for today’s rapidly warming Arctic region, early Eocene (~53 Ma) rocks on Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada (~79° N.) preserve evidence of lush swamp forests inhabited by turtles, alligators, primates, tapirs, and hippo-like Coryphodon. Although the rich flora and fauna of the early Eocene Arctic imply warmer, wetter conditions that at present, quantitative estimates of Eocene Arctic climate are rare. By analyzing oxygen isotope ratios of biogenic phosphate from mammal, fish, and turtle fossils from a single locality on central Ellesmere Island, we provide estimates of early Eocene Arctic temperature, including mean annual temperature (MAT) of ~ 8° C, mean annual range in temperature (MART) of ~ 16.5° C, warm month mean temperature (WMMT) of 16 - 19° C, and cold month mean temperature (CMMT) of 0 - 1° C. Our seasonal range in temperature is similar to the range in estimated MAT obtained using different proxies. In particular, unusually high estimates of early Eocene Arctic MAT and sea surface temperature (SST) by others that are based upon the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids in terrestrial soil bacteria and marine Crenarchaeota fall within our range of WMMT, suggesting a bias towards summer values. Consequently, caution should be taken when using these methods to infer MAT and SST that, in turn, are used to constrain climate models. From a paleontologic perspective, our temperature estimates verify that alligators and tortoises, by way of nearest living relative-based climatic inference, are viable paleoclimate proxies for mild, above-freezing year-round temperatures. Although in both of these reptiles, past temperature tolerances were greater than in their living descendants.

  19. Rapid Middle Eocene temperature change in western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methner, Katharina; Mulch, Andreas; Fiebig, Jens; Wacker, Ulrike; Gerdes, Axel; Graham, Stephan A.; Chamberlain, C. Page

    2016-09-01

    Eocene hyperthermals are among the most enigmatic phenomena of Cenozoic climate dynamics. These hyperthermals represent temperature extremes superimposed on an already warm Eocene climate and dramatically affected the marine and terrestrial biosphere, yet our knowledge of temperature and rainfall in continental interiors is still rather limited. We present stable isotope (δ18O) and clumped isotope temperature (Δ47) records from a middle Eocene (41 to 40 Ma) high-elevation mammal fossil locality in the North American continental interior (Montana, USA). Δ47 paleotemperatures of soil carbonates delineate a rapid +9/-11 °C temperature excursion in the paleosol record. Δ47 temperatures progressively increase from 23 °C ± 3 °C to peak temperatures of 32 °C ± 3 °C and subsequently drop by 11 °C. This hyperthermal event in the middle Eocene is accompanied by low δ18O values and reduced pedogenic carbonate concentrations in paleosols. Based on laser ablation U/Pb geochronology of paleosol carbonates in combination with magnetostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, stable isotope, and Δ47 evidence, we suggest that this pronounced warming event reflects the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) in western North America. The terrestrial expression of northern hemisphere MECO in western North America appears to be characterized by warmer and wetter (sub-humid) conditions, compared to the post-MECO phase. Large and rapid shifts in δ18O values of precipitation and pedogenic CaCO3 contents parallel temperature changes, indicating the profound impact of the MECO on atmospheric circulation and rainfall patterns in the western North American continental interior during this transient warming event.

  20. Sediment detachment by rain power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, Emmanuel J.; Dunne, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    In interrill areas, overland flow is often incapable of detaching soil particles so detachment is primarily by raindrop impact. We derive a mathematical expression, rain power (R, W m-2), relating the energy expenditure of raindrops impacting a soil surface to the rate of detachment of soil particles. Rain power incorporates rainfall, hillslope, and vegetation characteristics and is modulated by flow depths. Rainfall simulation experiments on natural hillslopes were performed to measure detachment rates and across-slope flow depth distributions in surface runoff. Our results indicate that flow depths follow a Poisson distribution, and this observation is used to develop a dimensionless function, A(?, d), that accounts for the interaction of flow depths (h) and raindrop diameter (d) in moderating detachment rates. Rain power correlates well with the detachment rate of fine-grained particles (ψ, g m-2 s-1) so that ψ = 0.011R1.4A(?, d) (n = 44, R2 = 0.88, p < 0.005). We generalize this result to represent natural rainfall conditions and present a method for modeling sediment detachment rates and sediment discharge along entire lengths of hillslopes under the range of conditions where detached sediment is transported as wash load. Modeling simulations demonstrate the temporal and spatial variation in detachment rates caused by increases in flow depth.

  1. A Geostatistical Framework for Estimating Rain Intensity Fields Using Dense Rain Gauge Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, L.; Mariethoz, G.

    2015-12-01

    Rain gauges provide direct and continuous observations of rain accumulation with a high time resolution (up to 1min). However the representativeness of these measurements is restricted to the funnel where rainwater is collected. Due to the high spatial heterogeneity of rainfall, this poor spatial representativeness is a strong limitation for the detailed reconstruction of rain intensity fields. Here we propose a geostatistical framework that is able to generate an ensemble of simulated rain fields based on data from a dense rain gauge network. When the density of rain gauges is high (sensor spacing in the range 500m to 1km), the spatial correlation between precipitation time series becomes sufficient to identify and track the rain patterns observed at the rain gauge sampling rate. Rain observations derived from such networks can thus be used to reconstruct the rain field with a high resolution in both space and time (i.e. 1min in time, 100m in space). Our method produces an ensemble of realizations that honor the rain intensities measured throughout the rain gauge network and preserve the main features of the rain intensity field at the considered scale, i.e.: the advection and morphing properties of rain cells over time, the intermittency and the skewed distribution of rainfall, and the decrease of the rain rate near the rain cell borders (dry drift). This allows to image the observed rain field and characterize its main features, as well as to quantify the related uncertainty. The obtained reconstruction of the rainfall are continuous in time, and therefore can complement weather radar observations which are snapshots of the rain field. In addition, the application of this method to networks with a spatial extent comparable to the one of a radar pixel (i.e. around 1km2) could allow exploration of the rain field within a single radar pixel.

  2. Evidence of trends in rain event size effecting trends in rain fade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulson, Kevin S.

    2016-03-01

    Rain gauge studies have shown that the incidence of rain at rates associated with outage on terrestrial links has shown an increasing trend in several countries over the last 30 years. However, no evidence is available from microwave links to show whether outage rates, or the incidence of fade, is similarly increasing. This paper presents evidence of fade trends, derived from a decade of rain radar data. Although a decade is too short a period to observe rain rate trends, evidence is presented that trends in the size of rain events is leading to changes in the relationship between point rain rates and rain fade. Furthermore, these trends are shown to vary significantly across the UK. Temporal trends in both rain rates and their link to rain fade, make it more difficult to adapt International Telecommunication Union Radiocommunication Reccomendations to a changing climate.

  3. Rainfall time series synthesis from queue scheduling of rain event fractals over radio links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonge, Akintunde A.; Afullo, Thomas J.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall attenuation over wireless networks stems from random fluctuations in the natural process of arriving rainfall rates over radio links. This arrival process results in discernible rainfall traffic pattern which manifests as naturally scheduled and queue-generated rain spikes. Hence, the phenomenon of rainfall process can be approached as a semi-Markovian queueing process, with event characteristics dependent on queue parameters. However, a constraint to this approach is the knowledge of the physical characteristics of queue-generated rain spikes. Therefore, this paper explores the probability theory and descriptive mathematics of rain spikes in rainfall processes. This investigation presents the synthesis of rainfall queue with rain spikes at subtropical and equatorial locations of Durban (29°52'S, 30°58'E) and Butare (2°36'S, 29°44'E), respectively. The resulting comparative analysis of rainfall distributions, using error analysis at both locations, reveals that queue-generated rainfall compares well with measured rainfall data set. This suggests that the time-varying process of rainfall, though stochastic, can be synthesized via queue scheduling with the application of relevant queue parameters at any location.

  4. Equatorial Pacific Productivity Events and Intervals in the Middle and late Miocene through XRF-Scanned Bulk Sediment Composition Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyle, M. W.; Stepanova, A.; Wilson, J. K.; Marcantonio, F.

    2014-12-01

    The equatorial Pacific is the largest open ocean productivity center, responsible for nearly half of global marine new production and about 40% of CaCO3 burial. Understanding how the equatorial Pacific upwelling system has evolved over the Neogene is critical to understand the evolution of the global carbon cycle. We know from reconnaissance studies that productivity in equatorial Pacific surface waters as well as dissolution driven by deep waters have strongly affected the sediment record. We have used calibrated XRF scanning to capture anomalies in equatorial Pacific upwelling and productivity at Milankovitch-resolving resolution since the early Miocene. The 8 elements calibrated in the XRF scans can be used to distinguish intervals of high carbonate dissolution from those of high productivity. Carbonate dissolution intervals are recorded by a drop of CaCO3 relative to Aeolian clays, with little change in the ratio between estimated opal and clay (estimated by TiO2). In contrast, high production intervals have high opal/TiO2 and low CaCO3. Low CaCO3 contents are caused partly by dilution, since high production skews tropical particulate rain to be more opal-rich relative to carbonate, and additional C-org rain can help to increase CaCO3 dissolution within near-surface sediments. We observe long-lived high production anomalies modulated by orbitally-driven climate variability. Prominent intervals are found at the end of the Miocene climate optimum (~ 14 Ma), interspersed with dissolution intervals in the Carbonate Crash interval (~9-11 Ma), and in the Biogenic Bloom interval (8-4.5 Ma). Using relationships among biogenic fluxes in modern equatorial sediment trap studies, especially the positive correlations between biogenic Ba , C-org, and CaCO3 fluxes, we find that the highest production intervals have much higher opal/C-org in the particulate rain, implying an inefficient carbon pump to the deep ocean. If confirmed, productivity was not as strong a feedback to

  5. ODP Hole 689B spherules and upper Eocene microtektite and clinopyroxene-bearing spherule strewn fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, B. P.; Koeberl, C.

    1999-03-01

    Montanari et al. (1993) reported a positive Ir anomaly in the upper Eocene sediments from Ocean Drilling Program Hole 689B on the Maud Rise, Southern Ocean. Vonhof (1998) described microtektites and clinopyroxene-bearing (cpx) spherules associated with the Ir anomaly in Hole 689B and suggested that they belong to the North American and equatorial Pacific cpx strewn fields, respectively. We searched a suite of 27 samples taken through the spherule layer from Hole 689B and we recovered 386 microtektites and 667 cpx spherules. We studied the petrography of the microtektites and cpx spherules and determined the major element compositions of 31 microtektites and 14 cpx spherules using energy dispersive x-ray analysis. We also determined the minor element compositions of eight microtektites using instrumental neutron activation analysis. We found that the peak abundance of cpx spherules is ~2 cm below the peak abundance of the microtektites (~128.7 m below sea floor), suggesting that the cpx spherule layer may be slightly older (~3-5 ka). The microtektites are mostly spherical and are generally transparent and colorless. They are similar to the North American microtektites in composition; the biggest differences being their generally lower Na2O and generally higher Zr, Ba, and Ir (up to 0.3 ppb) contents. We agree with Vonhof (1998) that the Hole 689B microtektites probably belong to the North American tektite strewn field. We calculate that the number of microtektites (>125 microns)/cm2 at Hole 689B is 52. This number is close to the concentration predicted by extrapolation of the trend of concentration versus distance from the Chesapeake Bay structure based on data from other North American microtektite-bearing sites. Thus, the North American strewn field may be at least four times larger than previously mapped. The Hole 689B cpx spherules range from translucent yellow to opaque black, but most are opaque tan to dark brown. They are generally spherical in shape and all

  6. AMISR-14: Observations of equatorial spread F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, F. S.; Nicolls, M. J.; Milla, M. A.; Smith, J. M.; Varney, R. H.; Strømme, A.; Martinis, C.; Arratia, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    A new, 14-panel Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar (AMISR-14) system was recently deployed at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. We present results of the first coherent backscatter radar observations of equatorial spread F(ESF) irregularities made with the system. Colocation with the 50 MHz Jicamarca Unattended Long-term studies of the Ionosphere and Atmosphere (JULIA) radar allowed unique simultaneous observations of meter and submeter irregularities. Observations from both systems produced similar Range-Time-Intensity maps during bottom-type and bottomside ESF events. We were also able to use the electronic beam steering capability of AMISR-14 to "image" scattering structures in the magnetic equatorial plane and track their appearance, evolution, and decay with a much larger field of view than previously possible at Jicamarca. The results suggest zonal variations in the instability conditions leading to irregularities and demonstrate the dynamic behavior of F region scattering structures as they evolve and drift across the radar beams.

  7. Atmosphere dynamics in the equatorial meteor zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascheev, B. L.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the atmospheric circulation of the Earth from its surface to the altitudes of 100 to 110 km is essential for establishing atmospheric motion regularities with a view toward perfecting weather forecasting. The main results of the Soviet equatorial meteor expedition (SEME) are presented. A continuous cycle of measurements was carried out. Considerable interdiurnal variation of the zonal component was observed. Importantly, in the meridional component, the prevalence of a two day component was established in the equatorial meteor zone for the first time. The pronounced westward motion of the atmosphere over the equator is noted. The SEME data analysis has shown that the meteor zone is characterized by flashes of intensity of the internal gravity waves and turbulence at highest instability moments of atmosphere due to tidal motion.

  8. Metallic ions in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Goldberg, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Four positive ion composition measurements of the equatorial E region made at Thumba, India, are presented. During the day, the major ions between 90 and 125 km are NO(+) and O2(+). A metallic ion layer centered at 92 km is observed, and found to contain Mg(+), Fe(+), Ca(+), K(+), Al(+), and Na(+) ions. The layer is explained in terms of a similarly shaped latitude distribution of neutral atoms which are photoionized and charge-exchanged with NO(+) and O2(+). Three body reactions form molecular metallic ions which are rapidly lost by dissociative ion-electron recombination. Nighttime observations show downward drifting of the metallic ion layer caused by equatorial dynamo effects. These ions react and form neutral metals which exchange charges with NO(+) and O2(+) to produce an observed depletion of those ions within the metallic ion region.

  9. Swarm equatorial electric field chain: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, P.; Maus, S.; Chulliat, A.; Vigneron, P.; Sirol, O.; Hulot, G.

    2015-02-01

    The eastward equatorial electric field (EEF) in the E region ionosphere drives many important phenomena at low latitudes. We developed a method of estimating the EEF from magnetometer measurements of near-polar orbiting satellites as they cross the magnetic equator, by recovering a clean signal of the equatorial electrojet current and modeling the observed current to determine the electric field present during the satellite pass. This algorithm is now implemented as an official Level-2 Swarm product. Here we present first results of EEF estimates from nearly a year of Swarm data. We find excellent agreement with independent measurements from the ground-based coherent scatter radar at Jicamarca, Peru, as well as horizontal field measurements from the West African Magnetometer Network magnetic observatory chain. We also calculate longitudinal gradients of EEF measurements made by the A and C lower satellite pair and find gradients up to about 0.05 mV/m/deg with significant longitudinal variability.

  10. Acid rain and electricity conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, H.; Miller, E.; Ledbetter, M.; Miller, P.

    1987-01-01

    Conservation directly lowers the emissions of SO/sub 2/ and other pollutants by reducing the amount of coal and other fuels that must be burned to meet electricity demand. This book is the first report to provide an integrated analysis of electricity supply, acid raid abatement, and conservation opportunities. The authors use a utility simulation model to examine SO/sub 2/ emissions, electric rates, and overall costs to consumers for different load growth and emissions control scenarios. The study also suggests how acid rain legislation can be designed to encourage electricity conservation.

  11. Spread of acid rain over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khemani, L. T.; Momin, G. A.; Rao, P. S. Prakasa; Safai, P. D.; Singh, G.; Kapoor, R. K.

    Rain water and aerosol samples were collected at a few locations representative of urban and non-urban regions in India. Also, rain water samples were collected in and around a coal-fired power plant. All the rain water and aerosol samples were analyzed for major chemical components along with pH. The rain water at all the places of measurement, except near the industrial sources, has been found to be alkaline and was characterized by the presence of excess cations, particularly by Ca 2+. The acid rain near the industrial sources was associated with excess anions, especially SO 42-. The atmospheric aerosols at all the places of measurement were found rich with basic components, suggesting that the alkaline soil dust and fly ash are responsible at present for preventing the spread of acid rain in India.

  12. Two groups challenge US acid rain efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    In its report, Acid Rain Invades Our National Parks, the National Parks and Conservation Association (NPCA) says acid rain is being detected at all 27 national park monitoring sites. In 1980, 87 national parks expressed concern in a NPCA survey over acid rain. Repolled in 1986, more than half of the respondents reported that no research on acid rain was under way. The NPCA report concludes that the alarm that was sounded in 1980 fell largely on deaf ears, and calls for the structural and scientific reorganization of the National Park Service. The National Audubon Society shares NPCA's dissatisfaction with federal efforts to tackle the problem of acid rain and has taken testing into its own hands. Through its Citizens Acid Rain Monitoring Network, Audubon volunteers have collected readings of acidity at 64 monitoring stations in 31 states since July.

  13. Analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, C.A.

    1984-12-11

    Although science has largely determined that man-made emissions cause acid rain, there is uncertainty concerning the extent and timing of its anticipated effects. Thus, at the present time scientific information alone does not lead unequivocally to a conclusion on whether it is appropriate to begin control actions now or to await better understanding. Given this uncertainty, decisionmakers must weigh the risks of further, potentially avoidable environmental damage against the risks of economic impacts from acid rain control actions which may ultimately prove to be unwarranted. GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: To what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects. 5 figures, 20 tables.

  14. Sunrise enhancement of equatorial vertical plasma drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Libo; Zhang, Ruilong; Le, Huijun

    2016-04-01

    Sunrise enhancement in vertical plasma drift over equatorial regions is not discernible in the statistical picture compared with the significant enhancement during dusk hours. In this report, it is the first time to investigate the occurrence of the dawn enhancement in the equatorial ionospheric vertical plasma drift from ROCSAT-1 observations during geomagnetic quiet times. The dawn enhancements occur most frequently in June solstice and least frequently in December solstice. The statistical survey shows that the occurrence depends on the magnetic declination. The enhancement has the strongest amplitude in regions near 320° longitude and peaks during June solstice. The dawn enhancement reaches its peak after the sunrise in conjugated E regions. Furthermore, it is found that the dawn enhancement is closely related to the difference between the sunrise times in the conjugated E regions (sunrise time lag). The dawn enhancement occurs easily in regions with a large sunrise time lag. Moreover, we will report the effects of the sunrise enhancement of vertical plasma drift on the equatorial ionosphere as indicated from the observations and model simulations. We thanks National Central University of Taiwan providing the ROCSAT-1 data. The Ap and F107 indices are obtained from the National Geophysical Data Center (http://spidr.ngdc.noaa.gov/spidr/). This research is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (41231065), the Chinese Academy of Sciences project (KZZD-EW-01-3), National Key Basic Research Program of China (2012CB825604) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (41321003).

  15. Equatorial scintillations: advances since ISEA-6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations inthe light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation. A distinct class of equatorial irregularities known as the bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) type was identified. These irregularities occur in very large patches, sometimes in excess of several thousand kilometers in the E-W direction and are associated with frequency spread on ionograms. Scintillations caused by such irregularities exist only in the VHF band, exhibit Fresnel oscillations in intensity spectra and are found to give rise to extremely long durations (approx. several hours) of uninterrrupted scintillations.

  16. First fossil record of Discocephalinae (Insecta, Pentatomidae): a new genus from the middle Eocene of Río Pichileufú, Patagonia, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Petrulevičius, Julián F.; Popov, Yuri A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new genus and species of Discocephalini, Acanthocephalonotum martinsnetoi gen. n. et sp. n. is described from Río Pichileufú, middle Eocene of Patagonia, Argentina at palaeolatitude ~ 46°S. The new species is the first fossil representative of the Discocephalinae. This taxon is extant in equatorial to subtropical America, and some species reach warm temperate latitudes (Buenos Aires province). The new genus is distinguished from the other genera of Discocephalini by the combination of these characters: interocular width greater than head length; head massive and quadrangular with the anterior margin almost straight; juga touching each other; labrum thick and curved; triangular ante-ocular process extending beyond the eye; broad spine-like antero-lateral process of the pronotum; pronotum explanate and bean shaped; scutellum triangular with a circular tongue reaching the anterior side of abdominal segment 7; and wings well developed with membrane just surpassing end of abdomen. PMID:25061387

  17. Late Eocene diatomite from the Peruvian coastal desert, coastal upwelling in the eastern Pacific, and Pacific circulation before the terminal Eocene event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, Richard; Dunbar, Robert; Martin, Jonathan B.; Baker, Paul

    1988-09-01

    Previously undocumented late Eocene diatomaceous sediments are present near Fundo Desbarrancado (FD) in southern Peru. These sediments are similar to Miocene diatomite from the same area but, unlike the Miocene diatomite, the FD sediments contain cherty layers, are enriched in CaCO3, have a diverse and abundant radiolarian fauna, and possess varved-massive and millimetre- and metre-scale biogenic-terrigenous alternations. The FD sediments are part of an Eocene sequence that includes the clastic sediments of the Paracas Formation, and they are correlative to the Chira Formation of northern Peru. The Paleogene biogenic sediments of western South America show that coastal upwelling developed in the eastern Pacific before the latest Eocene, argue for the existence of a proto-Humboldt current at this time, and suggest that the terminal Eocene event was the culmination of gradual changes and not a catastrophic event at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary.

  18. Late Eocene diatomite from the Peruvian coastal desert, coastal upwelling in the eastern Pacific, and Pacific circulation before the terminal Eocene event

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, R.; Dunbar, R.; Martin, J.B.; Baker, P.

    1988-09-01

    Previously undocumented late Eocene diatomaceous sediments are present near Fundo Desbarrancado (FD) in southern Peru. These sediments are similar to Miocene diatomite from the same area but, unlike the Miocene diatomite, the FD sediments contain cherty layers, are enriched in CaCO/sub 3/, have a diverse and abundant radiolarian fauna, and possess varved-massive and millimeter- and meter-scale biogenic-terrigenous alternations. The FD sediments are part of an Eocene sequence that includes the clastic sediments of the Paracas Formation, and they are correlative to the Chira Formation of northern Peru. The Paleogene biogenic sediments of western South America show that coastal upwelling developed in the eastern Pacific before the latest Eocene, argue for the existence of a proto-Humboldt current at this time, and suggest that the terminal Eocene event was the culmination of gradual changes and not a catastrophic event at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary.

  19. Acid rain information book. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of increasingly widespread acid rain demand that this phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Reveiw of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses major aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty, and summarizes current and projected research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations.

  20. High plant diversity in Eocene South America: evidence from Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Wilf, Peter; Cúneo, N Rubén; Johnson, Kirk R; Hicks, Jason F; Wing, Scott L; Obradovich, John D

    2003-04-01

    Tropical South America has the highest plant diversity of any region today, but this richness is usually characterized as a geologically recent development (Neogene or Pleistocene). From caldera-lake beds exposed at Laguna del Hunco in Patagonia, Argentina, paleolatitude approximately 47 degrees S, we report 102 leaf species. Radioisotopic and paleomagnetic analyses indicate that the flora was deposited 52 million years ago, the time of the early Eocene climatic optimum, when tropical plant taxa and warm, equable climates reached middle latitudes of both hemispheres. Adjusted for sample size, observed richness exceeds that of any other Eocene leaf flora, supporting an ancient history of high plant diversity in warm areas of South America. PMID:12677065

  1. Transient Middle Eocene atmospheric CO₂ and temperature variations.

    PubMed

    Bijl, Peter K; Houben, Alexander J P; Schouten, Stefan; Bohaty, Steven M; Sluijs, Appy; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2010-11-01

    The long-term warmth of the Eocene (~56 to 34 million years ago) is commonly associated with elevated partial pressure of atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO(2)). However, a direct relationship between the two has not been established for short-term climate perturbations. We reconstructed changes in both pCO(2) and temperature over an episode of transient global warming called the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO; ~40 million years ago). Organic molecular paleothermometry indicates a warming of southwest Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs) by 3° to 6°C. Reconstructions of pCO(2) indicate a concomitant increase by a factor of 2 to 3. The marked consistency between SST and pCO(2) trends during the MECO suggests that elevated pCO(2) played a major role in global warming during the MECO. PMID:21051636

  2. The Middle Eocene flora of Csordakút (N Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdei, Boglárka; Rákosi, László

    2009-02-01

    The Middle Eocene fossil plant assemblage from Csordakút (N Hungary) comprises plant remains preserved exclusively as impressions. Algae are represented by abundant remains of Characeae, including both vegetative fragments and gyrogonites. Remains of angiosperms comprise Lauraceae (Daphnogene sp.), Fagaceae (cf. Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis), Ulmaceae (Cedrelospermum div. sp.), Myricaceae (Myrica sp., Comptonia div. sp.), Leguminosae (leaves and fruit), Rhamnaceae (?Zizyphus zizyphoides), Elaeocarpaceae (Sloanea nimrodi, Sloanea sp. fruit), Smilacaceae (Smilax div. sp.). The absence of gymnosperms is indicative of a floristic similarity to the coeval floras of Tatabánya (N Hungary) and Girbou in Romania. Sloanea nimrodi (Ettingshausen) Kvaček & Hably, a new element for the Hungarian fossil record indicates a floristic relation to the Late Eocene flora of Kučlin (Bohemia).

  3. Asian Eocene monsoons as revealed by leaf architectural signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Robert A.; Yang, Jian; Herman, Alexei B.; Kodrul, Tatiana; Maslova, Natalia; Spicer, Teresa E. V.; Aleksandrova, Galina; Jin, Jianhua

    2016-09-01

    The onset and development of the Asian monsoon systems is a topic that has attracted considerable research effort but proxy data limitations, coupled with a diversity of definitions and metrics characterizing monsoon phenomena, have generated much debate. Failure of geological proxies to yield metrics capable of distinguishing between rainfall seasonality induced by migrations of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) from that attributable to topographically modified seasonal pressure reversals has frustrated attempts to understand mechanisms underpinning monsoon development and dynamics. Here we circumvent the use of such single climate parameter metrics in favor of detecting directly the distinctive attributes of different monsoon regimes encoded in leaf fossils. Leaf form adapts to the prevailing climate, particularly under the extreme seasonal stresses imposed by monsoons, so it is likely that fossil leaves carry a unique signature of past monsoon regimes. Leaf form trait spectra obtained from fossils from Eocene basins in southern China were compared with those seen in modern leaves growing under known climate regimes. The fossil leaf trait spectra, including those derived from previously published fossil floras from northwestern India, were most similar to those found in vegetation exposed to the modern Indonesia-Australia Monsoon (I-AM), which is largely a product of seasonal migrations of the ITCZ. The presence of this distinctive leaf physiognomic signature suggests that although a monsoon climate existed in Eocene time across southern Asia the characteristics of the modern topographically-enhanced South Asia Monsoon had yet to develop. By the Eocene leaves in South Asia had become well adapted to an I-AM type regime across many taxa and points to the existence of a pervasive monsoon climate prior to the Eocene. No fossil trait spectra typical of exposure to the modern East Asia monsoon were seen, suggesting the effects of this system in southern

  4. Paleomagnetism of Eocene volcanic rocks, Talkeetna Mountains, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Panuska, B.C. ); Stone, D.B.; Turner, D.L. )

    1990-05-10

    Previous paleomagnetic studies of Eocene rocks deposited in the Talkeetna Mountains on the northern edge of the combined Peninsular, Wrangellia, and Alexander terranes (the southern Alaska superterrane (SAS)) yield a paleolatitude of 76{degree}N, while Late Cretaceous rocks on the southern edge of the SAS record a 32{degree}N paleolatitude. At face value, these drastically different paleolatitudes imply that Wrangellia moved 44{degree} to the north in only 20 m.y., requiring a northward component of velocity of about 24 cm/yr. Alternatively, the discrepancy might be explained by postulating an unrecognized tectonic boundary separating the two localities, allowing different emplacement ages. The authors have tested the unrecognized tectonic boundary hypothesis by sampling Eocene volcanic rocks deposited near the southern edge of the SAS in the Talkeetna Mountains. The data set comprises measurements from 97 oriented cores collected from 26 lava flows and two tuffs distributed over a distance of 50 km. A primary remanence is indicated by positive fold tests and penecontemporaneous intrusion tests. Age control is provided by nine new K-Ar whole rock age determinations ranging from 38.8 to 53.6 Ma. The mean paleomagnetic pole calculated for this study is not significantly different from the pole derived from the Eocene flows to the north and gives a paleolatitude of 78{degree}, thus ruling out the hypothesis of an unrecognized suture accommodating major post-Eocene displacement. This result has prompted a reevaluation of the data. The bulk of the evidence suggests northward displacement from lower latitudes; however, the error limits are such that the dramatic velocities previously postulated are not required.

  5. Climate directly influences Eocene mammal faunal dynamics in North America

    PubMed Central

    Woodburne, Michael O.; Gunnell, Gregg F.; Stucky, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    The modern effect of climate on plants and animals is well documented. Some have cautioned against assigning climate a direct role in Cenozoic land mammal faunal changes. We illustrate 3 episodes of significant mammalian reorganization in the Eocene of North America that are considered direct responses to dramatic climatic events. The first episode occurred during the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), beginning the Eocene (55.8 Ma), and earliest Wasatchian North American Land Mammal Age (NALMA). The PETM documents a short (<170 k.y.) global temperature increase of ≈5 °C and a substantial increase in first appearances of mammals traced to climate-induced immigration. A 4-m.y. period of climatic and evolutionary stasis then ensued. The second climate episode, the late early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO, 53–50 Ma), is marked by a temperature increase to the highest prolonged Cenozoic ocean temperature and a similarly distinctive continental interior mean annual temperature (MAT) of 23 °C. This MAT increase [and of mean annual precipitation (MAP) to 150 cm/y) promoted a major increase in floral diversity and habitat complexity under temporally unique, moist, paratropical conditions. Subsequent climatic deterioration in a third interval, from 50 to 47 Ma, resulted in major faunal diversity loss at both continental and local scales. In this Bridgerian Crash, relative abundance shifted from very diverse, evenly represented, communities to those dominated by the condylarth Hyopsodus. Rather than being “optimum,” the EECO began the greatest episode of faunal turnover of the first 15 m.y. of the Cenozoic. PMID:19666605

  6. Climate directly influences Eocene mammal faunal dynamics in North America.

    PubMed

    Woodburne, Michael O; Gunnell, Gregg F; Stucky, Richard K

    2009-08-11

    The modern effect of climate on plants and animals is well documented. Some have cautioned against assigning climate a direct role in Cenozoic land mammal faunal changes. We illustrate 3 episodes of significant mammalian reorganization in the Eocene of North America that are considered direct responses to dramatic climatic events. The first episode occurred during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), beginning the Eocene (55.8 Ma), and earliest Wasatchian North American Land Mammal Age (NALMA). The PETM documents a short (<170 k.y.) global temperature increase of approximately 5 degrees C and a substantial increase in first appearances of mammals traced to climate-induced immigration. A 4-m.y. period of climatic and evolutionary stasis then ensued. The second climate episode, the late early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO, 53-50 Ma), is marked by a temperature increase to the highest prolonged Cenozoic ocean temperature and a similarly distinctive continental interior mean annual temperature (MAT) of 23 degrees C. This MAT increase [and of mean annual precipitation (MAP) to 150 cm/y) promoted a major increase in floral diversity and habitat complexity under temporally unique, moist, paratropical conditions. Subsequent climatic deterioration in a third interval, from 50 to 47 Ma, resulted in major faunal diversity loss at both continental and local scales. In this Bridgerian Crash, relative abundance shifted from very diverse, evenly represented, communities to those dominated by the condylarth Hyopsodus. Rather than being "optimum," the EECO began the greatest episode of faunal turnover of the first 15 m.y. of the Cenozoic. PMID:19666605

  7. A New Eocene Casquehead Lizard (Reptilia, Corytophanidae) from North America.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Jack L

    2015-01-01

    A new fossil showing affinities with extant Laemanctus offers the first clear evidence for a casquehead lizard (Corytophanidae) from the Eocene of North America. Along with Geiseltaliellus from roughly coeval rocks in central Europe, the new find further documents the tropical fauna present during greenhouse conditions in the northern mid-latitudes approximately 50 million years ago (Ma). Modern Corytophanidae is a neotropical clade of iguanian lizards ranging from southern Mexico to northern South America. PMID:26131767

  8. A New Eocene Casquehead Lizard (Reptilia, Corytophanidae) from North America

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    A new fossil showing affinities with extant Laemanctus offers the first clear evidence for a casquehead lizard (Corytophanidae) from the Eocene of North America. Along with Geiseltaliellus from roughly coeval rocks in central Europe, the new find further documents the tropical fauna present during greenhouse conditions in the northern mid-latitudes approximately 50 million years ago (Ma). Modern Corytophanidae is a neotropical clade of iguanian lizards ranging from southern Mexico to northern South America. PMID:26131767

  9. Airborne scientists begin Ohio acid rain study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    Atmospheric scientists spent June flying through storm clouds over Ohio to collect rain and air samples to better understand rain chemistry, the conditions that cause acid rain and methods for controlling it. The authors will be collecting samples in the Columbus, Ohio area because many of the materials suspected of causing acid rain, such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrogen peroxide, can be found in this vicinity. The study is part of the US Department of the Energy's Processing of Emissions by Clouds and Precipitation program (PRECP).

  10. Vibration (?) spikes during natural rain events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Limited analysis of optical rain gauge (ORG) data from shipboard and ground based sensors has shown the existence of spikes, possibly attributable to sensor vibration, while rain is occurring. An extreme example of this behavior was noted aboard the PRC#5 on the evening of December 24, 1992 as the ship began repositioning during a rain event in the TOGA/COARE IFA. The spikes are readily evident in the one-second resolution data, but may be indistinguishable from natural rain rate fluctuations in subsampled or averaged data. Such spikes result in increased rainfall totals.

  11. Acid rain threatens marine life

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    In freshwater, acid rain harms aquatic organisms because one of its components, sulfur dioxide, lowers the water's pH. In seawater, the damage comes from other components of acid precipitation: nitrogen oxides. Acting as a nutrient, nitrogen promotes excessive algal growth, which blocks sunlight and depletes dissolved oxygen, thereby suffocating other plants and animals. Known as eutrophication, this phenomenon has been increasing in both frequency and intensity on the Atlantic coast during the past few years. The New York City-based Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), study focused on the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary and an important spawning ground for many species of economic importance. It has long been known that the bay is suffering from nitrogen pollution. Until now, it was assumed that most of the nitrogen was coming from sewage and agricultural runoff. However, based on data collected from both federal and state agencies, EDF scientists estimated that nitrates from acid rain are responsible for 25% of the nitrogen entering the bay. The report says that if present trends continue, airborne nitrates will contribute 42% of annual nitrogen deposits into the Chesapeake Bay by the year 2030.

  12. Rain from Tropical Storm Noel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Though not the most powerful storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane season, Tropical Storm Noel was among the most deadly. Only Category 5 Hurricane Felix and its associated flooding had a higher toll. The slow-moving Tropical Storm Noel inundated the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, and the Bahamas with heavy rain between October 28 and November 1, 2007. The resulting floods and mudslides left at least 115 dead and thousands homeless throughout the Caribbean, reported the Associated Press on November 2, 2007. This image shows the distribution of the rainfall that made Noel a deadly storm. The image shows rainfall totals as measured by the Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center from October 26 through November 1, 2007. The analysis is based on measurements taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Dominican Republic and the Bahamas, northeast of Noel's center. Areas of dark red show that rainfall totals over the south-central Dominican Republic and parts of the Bahamas were over 551 millimeters (21 inches). Much of eastern Hispaniola, including both the Dominican Republic and Haiti received at least 200 mm (about 8 inches) of rain, shown in yellow. Rainfall totals over Haiti and Cuba were less, with a range of at least 50 mm (2 inches) to over 200 mm (8 inches).

  13. Eocene-Oligocene boundary problems, west coast, North America

    SciTech Connect

    Armentrout, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Correlation of the international Eocene-Oligocene boundary with the provincial biostratigraphic framework of the northeast Pacific margin has been and continues to be controversial. The controversy centers about historical nomenclature and correlations, and current correlations based on planktonic fossil group. The Geological Society of America's C.E. Weaver Committee published the first interdisciplinary correlation chart for the Cenozoic rocks of the western United States in 1944. The committee placed the Eocene-Oligocene boundary at the base of the Keasey Molluscan Stage and Refugian Benthic Foraminiferal Stage. The most useful provincial boundaries of Late Eocene to Oligocene age are the Narizian-Refugian and Refugian-Zemorrian Benthic Foraminiferal Stage boundaries. Reevaluation of the Refugian Stage has recently been completed. The stage boundaries have been correlated to the international geologic time scale using planktonic microfossils. Planktonic assemblages are rare in samples from above and below the Refugian-Zemorrian Benthic Foraminiferal Stage boundary. In California this boundary is commonly at an unconformity or without superposition of diagnostic faunas. In southwestern Washington the Refugian-Zemorrian boundary occurs in continuously deposited and foraminiferally rich sections. Radiometric calibration of the provincial boundaries is not yet possible. Whole rock potassium-argon and fission track dates are available but both have very large error bars or lack adequate biostratigraphic control to be useful. Fossiliferous stratigraphic sections have rocks with sufficient remanent magnetism for magnetostratigraphic studies but to date only reconnaissance data are available.

  14. Eocene tidal deposits, northern San Diego County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, L.I.; Abbott, P.L.

    1985-02-01

    A transgressive-regressive sedimentation sequence is recorded in a band of middle Eocene strata a few miles wide. An abundance of primary sedimentary structures, along with interfingering relationships and paleontology, define 12 lithofacies representing depositional environments including nearshore shelf, outer and inner barrier island, tidal flats and channels, lagoon and lagoonal delta. Tide-influenced sedimentary features are well defined and include meandering and abandoned tidal channels, oppositely inclined superimposed cross-strata, interlaminated mud and sand along the basal and lateral accretion surfaces of migrating tidal channels, flaser and wavy bedding, and storm-deposited strata. The first sedimentary half cycle was transgressive and documents the compression of dominantly tidal-flat and lagoonal environments against a steep, hilly coastline by the overall rising sea level of early and medial middle Eocene time. The inboard tidal-flat and lagoonal mudstones (Delmar and Friars Formations) and outboard tidal flat, channel and bar sandstones (Torrey Sandstone and Scripps Formation) interfinger in a landward-climbing, 3-dimensional sedimentary mass that parallels and meets the basement with a pronounced unconformity. The second half cycle was regressive and occurred in the medial and late middle Eocene. It formed due to the influx of coarser, more angular sediment from the adjacent basement into the narrowed paralic zone. This westward (seaward) progradation of lagoonal delta and inner tidal-flat sandy sediments occurred despite the still-rising sea level.

  15. Late Eocene impact events recorded in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    Raup and Sepkoski proposed that mass extinctions have occurred every 26 Myr during the last 250 Myr. In order to explain this 26 Myr periodicity, it was proposed that the mass extinctions were caused by periodic increases in cometary impacts. One method to test this hypothesis is to determine if there were periodic increases in impact events (based on crater ages) that correlate with mass extinctions. A way to test the hypothesis that mass extinctions were caused by periodic increases in impact cratering is to look for evidence of impact events in deep-sea deposits. This method allows direct observation of the temporal relationship between impact events and extinctions as recorded in the sedimentary record. There is evidence in the deep-sea record for two (possibly three) impact events in the late Eocene. The younger event, represented by the North American microtektite layer, is not associated with an Ir anomaly. The older event, defined by the cpx spherule layer, is associated with an Ir anomaly. However, neither of the two impact events recorded in late Eocene deposits appears to be associated with an unusual number of extinctions. Thus there is little evidence in the deep-sea record for an impact-related mass extinction in the late Eocene.

  16. Orbital Forcing of Paleocene-Eocene Hyperthermal Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeotti, S.

    2013-05-01

    The Late Paleocene to Early Eocene records a succession of short-term negative carbon isotope excursions in marine carbonates and organic carbon. At least three of these episodes, including the Eocene Thermal Maximum (ETM)1 at ca. 55.5, the ETM2 at ca. 53.5 Ma and the ETM3 at ca. 52 Ma, were associated with rapid warming and widespread dissolution of marine carbonate forced by shoaling of the carbonate lysocline and lowering of the carbonate saturation state. Cyclostratigraphic analyses of marine sequences suggest that these episodes are part of a continuum of C-cycle anomalies and were triggered by changes in local climates at high latitudes. The frequency and magnitude of related dissolution events is controlled by long-term modulations of orbital parameters, including long eccentricity (400 kyr) and a ~1 million year modulation. Highest frequency of events - at the orbital scale - is observed across the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum, which provides an observational basis to validate theoretical models predicting a threshold effect resulting from orbital forcing superimposed on gradually changing mean global boundary conditions.

  17. Asian monsoons in a late Eocene greenhouse world.

    PubMed

    Licht, A; van Cappelle, M; Abels, H A; Ladant, J-B; Trabucho-Alexandre, J; France-Lanord, C; Donnadieu, Y; Vandenberghe, J; Rigaudier, T; Lécuyer, C; Terry, D; Adriaens, R; Boura, A; Guo, Z; Soe, Aung Naing; Quade, J; Dupont-Nivet, G; Jaeger, J-J

    2014-09-25

    The strong present-day Asian monsoons are thought to have originated between 25 and 22 million years (Myr) ago, driven by Tibetan-Himalayan uplift. However, the existence of older Asian monsoons and their response to enhanced greenhouse conditions such as those in the Eocene period (55-34 Myr ago) are unknown because of the paucity of well-dated records. Here we show late Eocene climate records revealing marked monsoon-like patterns in rainfall and wind south and north of the Tibetan-Himalayan orogen. This is indicated by low oxygen isotope values with strong seasonality in gastropod shells and mammal teeth from Myanmar, and by aeolian dust deposition in northwest China. Our climate simulations support modern-like Eocene monsoonal rainfall and show that a reinforced hydrological cycle responding to enhanced greenhouse conditions counterbalanced the negative effect of lower Tibetan relief on precipitation. These strong monsoons later weakened with the global shift to icehouse conditions 34 Myr ago. PMID:25219854

  18. The terminal eocene event and the polish connection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Couvering, J. A.; Aubry, M.-P.; Berggren, W.A.; Bujak, J.P.; Naeser, C.W.; Wieser, T.

    1981-01-01

    The Eocene/Oligocene boundary in Europe is marked by major discontinuities in all environments: the "Grande Coupure" in continental mammals; the elimination of semitropical elements from high-latitude floras; the virtually complete replacement of the shallow-marine malacofauna; and an extraordinary downslope excursion of carbonate deposition in deep-ocean basins (drop in the CCD). These phenomena collectively represent the "Terminal Eocene Event" (TEE). In the Carpathian Mountains, the TEE is manifested in the thin but regionally persistent Globigerina Marl, a calcareous unit containing abundant cool-water microplankton that occurs within very thick, siliceous, bathyal flysch sequences. In southern Poland, the marl is of very latest Eocene age, within planktonic foraminifera zone P17, calcareous nannoplankton zone NP19/20, and the zone of the dinoflagellate Rhomdodinium perforatum. Zircons from bentonites bracketing the marl are dated by fission-track analysis; at Polany, two underlying bentonites are 41.7 and 39.8 Ma, and at Znamirowice two overlying bentonites are 34.6 and 28.9 Ma, in sequence. This accords with glauconite K/Ar ages in Western Europe by which the Eo/Oligocene boundary age is estimated at 37-38 Ma. Global correlations indicate that the TEE corresponds to a major glacio-eustatic regression with a duration of about 0.5 Ma, in which a large Antarctic ice cap was formed, the ocean circulation was permanently changed to the psychrospheric condition, and world climate shifted irreversibly towards the modern state. ?? 1981.

  19. Late Eocene white pines (Pinus subgenus Strobus) from southern China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingqing; Zhou, Wenjun; Kodrul, Tatiana M.; Naugolnykh, Serge V.; Jin, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Fossil records indicate that the genus Pinus L. split into two subgenera by the Late Cretaceous, although subgenus Strobus (D. Don) Lemmon is less well documented than subgenus Pinus L., especially in eastern Asia. In this paper, Pinus maomingensis sp. nov. is established based on a compressed seed cone from the upper Eocene of the Maoming Basin of southern China. This species is attributed to genus Pinus, subgenus Strobus, section Quinquefoliae Duhamel, subsection Strobus Loudon based on the combination of morphological characters obtained from the cone scales, specifically from the terminal umbo, rhombic apophysis, and cuticle structure. Associated fascicles of needle leaves with deciduous sheaths and bulbous bases are recognized as Pinus sp. and also represent Pinus subgenus Strobus. This new discovery from the Maoming Basin constitutes the first megafossil record of subgenus Strobus from southern China and implies that the members of this subgenus arrived in the southern region of China by the late Eocene. The extant species of subgenus Strobus are mainly distributed in northern temperate and tropical to subtropical mountainous regions. We propose that the Maoming Basin was adjacent to a mountainous region during the late Eocene. PMID:26548658

  20. Eocene Diversification of Crown Group Rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae)

    PubMed Central

    García–R, Juan C.; Gibb, Gillian C.; Trewick, Steve A.

    2014-01-01

    Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves. PMID:25291147

  1. Hydrocarbon potential of Middle Eocene carbonates, Sirt Basin, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swei, Giuma H.; Tucker, Maurice E.

    2015-11-01

    Deposition of Middle Eocene carbonates in the Sirt Basin in Libya has been the subject of considerable study in recent years because of the importance of sediments of this age as hydrocarbon reservoirs. The Gialo Formation is an important gas-producing reservoir in the Assumood, Sahl and other nearby fields. The gas which is generated from the gas-prone Sirt Shale source rock of the northern Ajdabiya Trough probably migrated in to the Assumood Ridge from the northeast through late Cretaceous, Paleocene and early Eocene carbonates, before being trapped beneath the Augila Shale (Upper Eocene) which is the principal regional seal in the area. This integrated study has enhanced our understanding of reservoir heterogeneity and hydrocarbon potential of the Gialo carbonates and should lead to improved exploration in the future. Reservoir quality in the Gialo Formation is a function of grain types, pore types, grain size, sorting, cementation and compaction, and predicting areas of high reservoir quality has proved difficult; exploration should be oriented to positioning wells into the main trend of the mid-ramp, nummulite accumulation. Different nummulite facies can be reservoirs depending on their diagenetic history. A diagenetic reduction in porosity must be distinguished from a lack of porosity resulting from an unfavourable depositional environment, so that exploration alternatives can be assessed. This integrated study has demonstrated the presence of suitable reservoir rocks, hydrocarbon traps and the close proximity of potential source rocks. These features should encourage further hydrocarbon exploration in the area.

  2. Stable warm tropical climate through the Eocene Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Paul N.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Nicholas, Christopher J.; Pancost, Richard D.; Schouten, Stefan; Singano, Joyce M.; Wade, Bridget S.

    2007-03-01

    Earth's climate cooled from a period of extreme warmth in the early Eocene Epoch (ca. 50 Ma) to the early Oligocene (ca. 33 Ma), when a large ice cap first appeared on Antarctica. Evidence from the planktonic foraminifer oxygen isotope record in deep-sea cores has suggested that tropical sea-surface temperatures declined by 5-10 degrees over this interval, eventually becoming much cooler than modern temperatures. Here we present paleotemperature estimates from foraminifer isotopes and the membrane lipids of marine Crenarcheota from new drill cores in Tanzania that indicate a warm and generally stable tropical climate over this period. We reinterpret the previously published isotope records in the light of comparative textural analysis of the deep-sea foraminifer shells, which shows that in contrast to the Tanzanian material, they have been diagenetically recrystallized. We suggest that increasingly severe alteration of the deep-sea plankton shells through the Eocene produced a diagenetic overprint on their oxygen isotope ratios that imparts the false appearance of a tropical sea-surface cooling trend. This implies that the long-term Eocene climatic cooling trend occurred mainly at the poles and had little effect at lower latitudes.

  3. Response of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone to global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation across the Eocene Oligocene Transition.

    PubMed

    Hyeong, Kiseong; Kuroda, Junichiro; Seo, Inah; Wilson, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 34 million years ago across the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT), Earth's climate tipped from a largely unglaciated state into one that sustained large ice sheets on Antarctica. Antarctic glaciation is attributed to a threshold response to slow decline in atmospheric CO2 but our understanding of the feedback processes triggered and of climate change on the other contents is limited. Here we present new geochemical records of terrigenous dust accumulating on the sea floor across the EOT from a site in the central equatorial Pacific. We report a change in dust chemistry from an Asian affinity to a Central-South American provenance that occurs geologically synchronously with the initiation of stepwise global cooling, glaciation of Antarctica and aridification on the northern continents. We infer that the inter-tropical convergence zone of intense precipitation extended to our site during late Eocene, at least four degrees latitude further south than today, but that it migrated northwards in step with global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation. Our findings point to an atmospheric teleconnection between extratropical cooling and rainfall climate in the tropics and the mid-latitude belt of the westerlies operating across the most pivotal transition in climate state of the Cenozoic Era. PMID:27507793

  4. Evaluation of TRMM Ground-Validation Radar-Rain Errors Using Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Wolff, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Ground-validation (GV) radar-rain products are often utilized for validation of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spaced-based rain estimates, and hence, quantitative evaluation of the GV radar-rain product error characteristics is vital. This study uses quality-controlled gauge data to compare with TRMM GV radar rain rates in an effort to provide such error characteristics. The results show that significant differences of concurrent radar-gauge rain rates exist at various time scales ranging from 5 min to 1 day, despite lower overall long-term bias. However, the differences between the radar area-averaged rain rates and gauge point rain rates cannot be explained as due to radar error only. The error variance separation method is adapted to partition the variance of radar-gauge differences into the gauge area-point error variance and radar rain estimation error variance. The results provide relatively reliable quantitative uncertainty evaluation of TRMM GV radar rain estimates at various times scales, and are helpful to better understand the differences between measured radar and gauge rain rates. It is envisaged that this study will contribute to better utilization of GV radar rain products to validate versatile spaced-based rain estimates from TRMM, as well as the proposed Global Precipitation Measurement, and other satellites.

  5. Geologic history indicated by the fossiliferous deposits of the Wilcox group (Eocene) at Meridian, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Edward Wilber

    1917-01-01

    The presence of erosion intervals at several horizons in the Eocene of the Gulf States has been pointed out in a recent paper, and the evidence of an erosion interval between the period of deposition of the sediments of the Wilcox group (lower Eocene) and that of the Claiborne group (middle Eocene) was reviewed in some detail in a general discussion of the extensive flora of the Wilcox group of that region.

  6. Pollen selection under acid rain stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.

    1994-01-01

    To investigate whether acid rain stress induces pollen selection in nature, three different approaches were used, based on the assumption that the response of pollen grains to acid rain is controlled by an acid sensitive gene product. Germination of pollen from homozygous and heterozygous individuals under acid rain stress was examined to detect any differences in rate of germination between populations of homogeneous and heterogeneous pollen grains. In vitro and in vivo bulked segregant analysis using RAPDs was used to search for differences in DNA constitution between the survivors of acid rain stressed and non-acid rain stressed pollen populations in vitro and between the progenies of acid rain stressed and non-acid rain stressed populations during pollination, respectively. No evidence for the pollen selection under acid rain stress was obtained in any of the test systems. Inhibition of protein synthesis using cycloheximide led to significant reduction of tube elongation at 4 hr and had no effect on pollen germination at any time interval tested. Total proteins extracted from control and acid rain stressed pollen grain populations exhibited no differences. The reduction of corn pollen germination in vitro under acid rain stress was mainly due to pollen rupture. The present data indicates the reduction of pollen germination and tube growth under acid rain stress may be a physiological response rather than a genetic response. A simple, nontoxic, and effective method to separate germinated from ungerminated pollen grains has been developed using pollen from corn (Zea mays, L. cv. Pioneer 3747). The separated germinated pollen grains retained viability and continued tube growth when placed in culture medium.

  7. Iridium and Spherules in Late Eocene Impact Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, F. T.; Liu, S.

    2002-01-01

    We have been independently examining the Ir (FTK) and spherule (SL) contents of recently discovered late Eocene impact deposits from the south Atlantic and western Indian oceans. These include ODP Sites 1090 [14,15], 709 [lo], and 699 [Liu in prep.]. Iridium abundances at these sites are within the typical range reported for late Eocene deposits, with peak concentrations between 100 and 1000 pg/g. In Table 1 we present estimated net Ir fluences (in ng Ir/cm ) for these and nine other sites. Although there are fewer sites than the K/T boundary, the average of 9 ng Ir/cm2 is probably a good estimate of the late Eocene global flux. This is enough Ir for a 6 km comet (assuming 250 ng/g Ir, p=1.5), is sufficient to produce the Popigai or Chesapeake Bay structures, and is 16% of the flux estimated for the K/T boundary (55 ng/cm2 [ 161). Figure 1 shows the relative abundances of Ir, glassy microtektites and cpx-bearing spherules in sediments from Sites 699 and 1090, which are separated by only 3100 km. Although these two sites have similar Ir anomalies, the abundances of spherules are quite different. Site 1090 has well-defined peaks for both types of spherules, with a peak of 562 cpx spheruledg, while Site 699 contains only a few glassy microtektites and no cpx spherules. While the different abundances of spherules may reflect a heterogeneous distribution of spherules on the Earth s surface, an equally likely cause of this difference may be differential preservation of spherules in the sediment. recovered are only a trace residue of the initial impact deposit. Earlier work found 0.22 ng/g Ir in glassy microtektites from Site 689 [17], an insufficient concentration to support 0.16 ng/g in the bulk sediment at this site. We measured 15 ng/g Ir in a group of 95 cpx spherules from Site 1090 with sizes from 63 to -200 pm, a set typical of the size distribution at this site. Although this is a significant concentration it also cannot support the Ir peak. We presently lack

  8. Palaeotectonic implications of increased late Eocene-early Oligocene volcanism from South Pacific DSDP sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennett, J.P.; Von Der Borch, C.; Baker, P.A.; Barton, C.E.; Boersma, A.; Cauler, J.P.; Dudley, W.C., Jr.; Gardner, J.V.; Jenkins, D.G.; Lohman, W.H.; Martini, E.; Merrill, R.B.; Morin, R.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Robert, C.; Srinivasan, M.S.; Stein, R.; Takeuchi, A.; Murphy, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Late Eocene-early Oligocene (42-35 Myr) sediments cored at two DSDP sites in the south-west Pacific contain evidence of a pronounced increase in local volcanic activity, particularly in close association with the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. This pulse of volcanism is coeval with that in New Zealand and resulted from the development of an Indo- Australian / Pacific Plate boundary through the region during the late Eocene. The late Eocene / earliest Oligocene was marked by widespread volcanism and tectonism throughout the Pacific and elsewhere, and by one of the most important episodes of Cenozoic climatic cooling. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. Discovery of an embrithopod mammal (Arsinoitherium?) in the late Eocene of Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vialle, Nicolas; Merzeraud, Gilles; Delmer, Cyrille; Feist, Monique; Jiquel, Suzanne; Marivaux, Laurent; Ramdarshan, Anusha; Vianey-Liaud, Monique; Essid, El Mabrouk; Marzougui, Wissem; Ammar, Hayet Khayati; Tabuce, Rodolphe

    2013-11-01

    Dental and postcranial remains (an atlas, carpus and metacarpus elements, and a part of the pelvic girdle) of an embrithopod mammal are described from Bir Om Ali, Tunisia, a new late Eocene locality. The enamel microstructure of a tooth fragment found in association shows 'arsinoitheriid radial enamel', an enamel condition which is characteristic of Arsinoitherium (Arsinoitheriidae, Embrithopoda). Although the postcranial elements slightly differ in size and morphology from those of Arsinoitherium zitteli (late Eocene to early Oligocene), we tentatively refer this new Eocene Tunisian material to that genus. These fossils represent the first known embrithopod from the Eocene of Tunisia.

  10. Eocene to Miocene biostratigraphy of New Jersey core ACGS #4; implications for regional stratigraphy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, Richard Z.; Bybell, Laurel M.

    1988-01-01

    A time versus depth plot controlled primarily by nannofossil zone boundaries shows that sediment accumulation rates during the early and middle Eocene were in the range of 6 to 15 feet per million years. During the late Eocene, accumulation rates were much higher, perhaps exceeding 70 feet per million years. The only clear hiatus detected in the Paleogene part of ACGS #4 on the basis of microfossils is between the early and (?)late Oligocene. However, hiatuses are suspected at the early-middle Eocene boundary and within the late Eocene. Occurrences of calcareous nannofossils and planktic foraminifers are documented, and a number of key taxa are illustrated.

  11. New Eocene damselflies and first Cenozoic damsel-dragonfly of the isophlebiopteran lineage (Insecta: Odonata).

    PubMed

    Garrouste, Romain; Nel, André

    2015-01-01

    The study of a new specimen of Petrolestes hendersoni from the Eocene Green Formation allows a more precise description of the enigmatic damselfly and the diagnosis of the Petrolestini. Petrolestes messelensis sp. nov. is described from the Eocene Messel Formation in Germany, extending the distribution of the Petrolestini to the European Eocene. The new damsel-dragonfly family Pseudostenolestidae is described for the new genus and species Pseudostenolestes bechlyi, from the Eocene Messel Formation. It is the first Cenozoic representative of the Mesozoic clade Isophlebioptera. PMID:26624314

  12. New palynology-based astronomical and revised 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Eocene maar lake of Messel (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Olaf K.; Wilde, Volker; Mertz, Dieter F.; Riegel, Walter

    2015-04-01

    The annually laminated oil shale from the Eocene maar lake at Messel (Federal State of Hessen, Germany) provides unique paleoenvironmental data for a time interval of ~640 ka during the Paleogene greenhouse phase. As a consequence of orbitally controlled changes in the vegetation in the vicinity of the lake, the lacustrine laminites can now be astronomically tuned. Dating is based on the short eccentricity amplitude modulations of the regional pollen rain and their correlation to the astronomical La2010a/La2010d solutions in combination with a revised 40Ar/39Ar age of a basalt fragment from a lapilli tuff section below the first lacustrine sediments. Depending on different newly suggested ages for the Fish Canyon sanidine used as monitor for neutron irradiation, the age for the eruption at Messel is between 48.27 ± 0.22 and 48.11 ± 0.22 Ma. This allows for the first time the exact correlation of a Paleogene lacustrine sequence to the marine record in Central Europe. The Messel oil shale becomes now slightly older than previously assumed and includes the Ypresian/Lutetian boundary that moves the base of the European Land Mammal Age Geiseltalian (MP 11) into the Lower Eocene. This opens a window for establishing an independent chronostratigraphic framework for Paleogene terrestrial records and their correlation to the marine realm. Furthermore, the study reveals that higher amounts of pollen from "wet" and thermophilous plants indicate less seasonal and more balanced precipitation and slightly higher temperatures during a well-expressed eccentricity minimum.

  13. Environmental Education about the Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkmuller, Klaus

    Designed to help in the development of an educational program about the value of rain forests, this handbook presents a condensation of issues, facts, and concepts. The handbook is divided into three parts. Part one introduces the rain forest ecosystem and provides conceptual background material needed in the determination of problems, the…

  14. Acid Rain: Activities for Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven complete secondary/college level acid rain activities are provided. Activities include overview; background information and societal implications; major concepts; student objectives; vocabulary/material lists; procedures; instructional strategies; and questions/discussion and extension suggestions. Activities consider effects of acid rain on…

  15. Human Ecology: Acid Rain and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1983-01-01

    A connection between science and society can be seen in the human and ecological dimensions of one contemporary problem: acid rain. Introduces a human ecological theme and relationships between acid rain and public policy, considering scientific understanding and public awareness, scientific research and public policy, and national politics and…

  16. Acid Rain Students Do Original Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outdoor Communicator, 1984

    1984-01-01

    At Park Senior High School (Cottage Grove, Minnesota), 46 juniors and seniors planted 384 red pine seedlings in connection with their original research on acid rain, with advice from Dr. Harriet Stubbs, director of the Acid Precipitation Awareness Program (West Saint Paul), which has been developing acid rain teaching materials. (MH)

  17. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  18. Acid Rain. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollmann, Pauline, Comp.

    The term "acid rain," also called "acid precipitation," generally refers to any precipitation having a pH value of less than 5.6. This guide to the literature on acid rain in the collections of the Library of Congress is not necessarily intended to be a comprehensive bibliography. It is designed to provide the reader with a set of resources that…

  19. GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE RESEARCH PROGRAM: Rain Gardens

    EPA Science Inventory

    the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) rain garden evaluation is part of a larger collection of long-term research that evaluates a variety of stormwater management practices. The U.S. EPA recognizes the potential of rain gardens as a green infrastructure manag...

  20. Rainy Day Fun: Rain-Inspired Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanger, Annie Moretz

    1999-01-01

    Rainy days are opportunities to teach campers about weather and to plan activities around a rain theme. Indoor and outdoor science-based activities concerned with rain, water, or water conservation are suggested for specific age groups from ages 5-7 through 11-14. Campers can also develop ideas for activities using questions provided. (CDS)

  1. Rain garden guidelines for southwest Ohio

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rain gardens are a unique and practical landscape feature that can enhance the beauty of home gardens. When properly installed, they are one method of limiting the negative effects of rainfall runoff in urban areas. Indeed, rain gardens turn a "negative" into a "positive" by capt...

  2. Lake sensitivity to acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Shurkin, J.; Goldstein, R.

    1985-06-01

    Research in the Adirondacks suggests that watershed dynamics are the key to a lake's vulnerability to acidification. The Electric Power Research Institute's Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) produced a computer model that successfully integrated the physical and chemical factors that determine these dynamics. The research required an unprecedented level of awareness of how watersheds work and how rain, soil, forests, and rocks interact. One outcome of the field and laboratory studies was the finding that some soils act as buffers, taking certain ions out of the water, while some added ions. While the ability of the watershed as a whole to neutralize acid is the main determinant of a lake's vulnerability, seasonal changes demonstrate that time is a factor. The model is in demand to test water in other locations and to explore buffering agents. 2 figures.

  3. Rain underscores need for injection

    SciTech Connect

    Stelling, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1987, steam production totals at The Geysers Geothermal field have fallen and water injection totals have remained quite stable, except for the unusually dry winter months of 1994 when injection fell by a record amount. The heavy rainfall in the first half of 1995 altered the long-term production and injection patterns and underscored the need to increase injection in the field. From January to June 1995, steam production at The Geysers was reduced by 37 percent form the amount produced during the same period in 1994--because the rain increased availability of hydroelectric power. At the same time, water injection in the field rose by 25 percent because more rainwater was available for injection. Consequently, both reservoir pressure and available steam reserves grew, and most power plants that returned on line in the second half of the year produced more megawatts with less steam. This confirmed findings form several injection studies at The Geyser`s.

  4. Desert Dust and Monsoon Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent have know that heavy dust events brought on by strong winds occur frequently in the pre-monsoon season, before the onset of heavy rain. Yet scientists have never seriously considered the possibility that natural dust can affect monsoon rainfall. Up to now, most studies of the impacts of aerosols on Indian monsoon rainfall have focused on anthropogenic aerosols in the context of climate change. However, a few recent studies have show that aerosols from antropogenic and natural sources over the Indian subcontinent may affect the transition from break to active monsoon phases on short timescales of days to weeks. Writing in Nature Geoscience, Vinoj and colleagues describe how they have shown that desert dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia can strenghten the summer monsoon over the Indial subcontinent in a matter of days.

  5. Precipitation chemistry in the Mayombe forest of equatorial Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaux, J. P.; Delmas, R.; Kouadio, G.; Cros, B.; Andreae, M. O.

    1992-04-01

    Results of long-term (November 1986 to September 1987) precipitation measurements in the coastal forest of equatorial Congo conducted within the framework of the DECAFE program are reported. The chemical characteristics of the precipitation formed over this region are identified, and changes due to emissions of gases and particles emitted by the surrounding ecosystems are determined. A comparison is made between the precipitation characteristics of equatorial Africa and those of the equatorial regions of South America.

  6. MACSAT - A Near Equatorial Earth Observation Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. J.; Park, S.; Kim, E.-E.; Park, W.; Chang, H.; Seon, J.

    MACSAT mission was initiated by Malaysia to launch a high-resolution remote sensing satellite into Near Equatorial Orbit (NEO). Due to its geographical location, Malaysia can have large benefits from NEO satellite operation. From the baseline circular orbit of 685 km altitude with 7 degrees of inclination, the neighboring regions around Malaysian territory can be frequently monitored. The equatorial environment around the globe can also be regularly observed with unique revisit characteristics. The primary mission objective of MACSAT program is to develop and validate technologies for a near equatorial orbit remote sensing satellite system. MACSAT is optimally designed to accommodate an electro-optic Earth observation payload, Medium-sized Aperture Camera (MAC). Malaysian and Korean joint engineering teams are formed for the effective implementation of the satellite system. An integrated team approach is adopted for the joint development for MACSAT. MAC is a pushbroom type camera with 2.5 m of Ground Sampling Distance (GSD) in panchromatic band and 5 m of GSD in four multi-spectral bands. The satellite platform is a mini-class satellite. Including MAC payload, the satellite weighs under 200 kg. Spacecraft bus is designed optimally to support payload operations during 3 years of mission life. The payload has 20 km of swath width with +/- 30 o of tilting capability. 32 Gbits of solid state recorder is implemented as the mass image storage. The ground element is an integrated ground station for mission control and payload operation. It is equipped with S- band up/down link for commanding and telemetry reception as well as 30 Mbps class X-band down link for image reception and processing. The MACSAT system is capable of generating 1:25,000-scale image maps. It is also anticipated to have capability for cross-track stereo imaging for Digital elevation Model (DEM) generation.

  7. Ionospheric Storms in Equatorial Region: Digisonde Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paznukhov, V.; Altadill, D.; Blanch, E.

    2011-12-01

    We present a study of the ionospheric storms observed in the low-latitude and equatorial ionosphere at several digisonde stations: Jicamarca (Geomagnetic Coordinates: 2.0 S, 355.3 E), Kwajalein Island (3.8 N, 238.2 E), Ascension Island (2.5 S, 56.8 E), Fortaleza (4.8 N, 33.7 W), and Ramey (28.6 N, 5.2 E). The strongest geomagnetic storms from years 1995-2009 have been analyzed. The main ionospheric characteristics, hmF2 and foF2 were used in the study, making it possible to investigate the changes in the ionosphere peak density and height during the storms. All digisonde data were manually processed to assure the accuracy of the measurements. Solar wind data, geomagnetic field variations, and auroral activity indices have been used to characterize the geomagnetic environment during the events. It was found in our analysis that the major drivers for the ionospheric storms, electric field and neutral wind have approximately equal importance at the low-latitude and equatorial latitudes. This is noticeably different from the behavior of the ionsphere in the middle latitudes, where the neutral wind is usually a dominant factor. It was found that the auroral index, AE is the best precursor of the ionospheric effects observed during the storms in this region. We analyze the difference between time delays of the storm effects observed at the stations located in different local time sectors. The overall statistics of the time delays of the storms as a function of the local time at the stations is also presented. Several very interesting cases of sudden very strong ionospheric uplifting and their possible relation to the equatorial super fountain effect are investigated in greater details.

  8. Lunar influence on equatorial atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian; Zotov, Leonid; Sidorenkov, Nikolay

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the equatorial atmospheric angular momentum oscillation in the nonrotating frame and the quasi-diurnal lunar tidal potential. Between 2 and 30 days, the corresponding equatorial component, called Celestial Atmospheric Angular Momentum (CEAM), is mostly constituted of prograde circular motions, especially of a harmonic at 13.66 days, a sidelobe at 13.63 days, and of a weekly broadband variation. A simple equilibrium tide model explains the 13.66 day pressure term as a result of the O1 lunar tide. The powerful episodic fluctuations between 5 and 8 days possibly reflect an atmospheric normal mode excited by the tidal waves Q1 (6.86 days) and σ1 (7.095 days). The lunar tidal influence on the spectral band from 2 to 30 days is confirmed by two specific features, not occurring for seasonal band dominated by the solar thermal effect. First, Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute equally and synchronously to the CEAM wind term. Second, the pressure and wind terms are proportional, which follows from angular momentum budget considerations where the topographic and friction torques on the solid Earth are much smaller than the one resulting from the equatorial bulge. Such a configuration is expected for the case of tidally induced circulation, where the surface pressure variation is tesseral and cannot contribute to the topographic torque, and tidal winds blow only at high altitudes. The likely effects of the lunar-driven atmospheric circulation on Earth's nutation are estimated and discussed in light of the present-day capabilities of space geodetic techniques.

  9. Scale Dependence of Spatiotemporal Intermittence of Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Siddani, Ravi K.

    2011-01-01

    It is a common experience that rainfall is intermittent in space and time. This is reflected by the fact that the statistics of area- and/or time-averaged rain rate is described by a mixed distribution with a nonzero probability of having a sharp value zero. In this paper we have explored the dependence of the probability of zero rain on the averaging space and time scales in large multiyear data sets based on radar and rain gauge observations. A stretched exponential fannula fits the observed scale dependence of the zero-rain probability. The proposed formula makes it apparent that the space-time support of the rain field is not quite a set of measure zero as is sometimes supposed. We also give an ex.planation of the observed behavior in tenus of a simple probabilistic model based on the premise that rainfall process has an intrinsic memory.

  10. The equatorial electrojet satellite and surface comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, J. C. (Editor); Sweeney, R. E. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    The OGO 4 and 6 (POGO) magnetic field results for the equatorial electrojet indicate that while the present models are approximately correct, the possibility of a westward component must be incorporated. The scatter diagrams of POGO amplitudes and surface data show a correlation. The ratios between the amplitudes estimated from surface data and those at 400 km altitude are as follows: India 5 to 8, East Africa (Addis Ababa) 4, Central Africa 3, West Africa (Nigeria) 3, South America (Huancayo) 5, and Philippines 5. The variation in the ratio is due to the conductivity structure of the earth in various zones.

  11. An equatorial coronal hole at solar minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromage, B. J. I.; DelZanna, G.; DeForest, C.; Thompson, B.; Clegg, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The large transequatorial coronal hole that was observed in the solar corona at the end of August 1996 is presented. It consists of a north polar coronal hole called the 'elephant's trunk or tusk'. The observations of this coronal hole were carried out with the coronal diagnostic spectrometer onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The magnetic field associated with the equatorial coronal hole is strongly connected to that of the active region at its base, resulting in the two features rotating at almost the same rate.

  12. Equatorial Oscillations in Jupiter's and Saturn's Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.; Schinder, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Equatorial oscillations in the zonal-mean temperatures and zonal winds have been well documented in Earth's middle atmosphere. A growing body of evidence from ground-based and Cassini spacecraft observations indicates that such phenomena also occur in the stratospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. Earth-based midinfrared measurements spanning several decades have established that the equatorial stratospheric temperatures on Jupiter vary with a cycle of 4-5 years and on Saturn with a cycle of approximately 15 years. Spectra obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) during the Cassini swingby at the end of 2000, with much better vertical resolution than the ground-based data, indicated a series of vertically stacked warm and cold anomalics at Jupiter's equator; a similar structurc was seen at Saturn's equator in CIRS limb measurements made in 2005, in the early phase of Cassini's orbital tour. The thermal wind equation implied similar patterns of mean zonal winds increasing and decreasing with altitude. On Saturn the peak-to-pcak amplitude of this variation was nearly 200 meters per second. The alternating vertical pattern of wanner and colder cquatorial tcmperatures and easterly and westerly tendencies of the zonal winds is seen in Earth's equatorial oscillations, where the pattern descends with time, The Cassini Jupiter and early Saturn observations were snapshots within a limited time interval, and they did not show the temporal evolution of the spatial patterns. However, more recent Saturn observations by CIRS (2010) and Cassini radio-occultation soundings (2009-2010) have provided an opportunity to follow the change of the temperature-zonal wind pattern, and they suggest there is descent, at a rate of roughly one scale height over four years. On Earth, the observed descent in the zonal-mean structure is associated with the absorption of a combination of vertically propagating waves with easlerly and westerly phase velocities. The peak-to-peak zonal wind

  13. Modulation of Cenozoic climate by weathering of large igneous provinces on continents drifting through equatorial humid belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muttoni, G.; Kent, D. V.

    2011-12-01

    The small reservoir of CO2 in the atmosphere (pCO2) that modulates climate through the greenhouse effect is a delicate balance between large fluxes of sources and sinks. The major long-term source of CO2 is global degassing from sea-floor spreading, subduction, hotspot activity, and metamorphism; the ultimate sink is through weathering of continental silicates. Most carbon cycle models are driven by changes in the source flux, in particular, variable rates of ocean floor production (and concomitant subduction) but the area/age versus age distribution of the modern ocean is compatible with a steady rate since 180 Ma (Rowley, 2002 GSA Bulletin). We previously suggested (2008 PNAS) that evidence of high pCO2 and warm climates in the Cretaceous-early Cenozoic could be explained by the subduction of Tethyan ocean crust loaded with equatorial carbonate-rich pelagic (more readily subductable) sediments since the onset of India's northward flight at ~120 Ma up until the CO2-producing decarbonation factory slowed down with collision of India and Asia at the Early Eocene Climate Optimum at 50 Ma. At about this time, the India continent and the highly weatherable Deccan Traps drifted into the equatorial humid belt where uptake of CO2 by efficient silicate weathering would further lower the level of pCO2. Continued weathering uptake was influenced by the southerly extrusion of SE Asia in response to the Indian indentor starting at ~40 Ma (Molnar & Tapponnier, 1975 Science) as well as the emplacement of the Ethiopian traps near the Equator at 30 Ma. The ongoing impingement of India into Asia and resultant southerly tectonic extrusion of SE Asia (Replumaz & Tapponnier, 2003 JGR) makes it the dominant new area in the equatorial humid belt. Moreover, SE Asia presently accounts for 25% of CO2 consumption of all basaltic provinces, which account for ~1/3 of the total consumption by continental silicate weathering (Dessert et al., 2003 Chemical Geology) that is within the range of

  14. Acid Rain: A Teaching Focus for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Renee B.; Adams, Neil D.

    1992-01-01

    The study of acid rain provides ample opportunities for active, interdisciplinary learning. This article describes 12 hands-on activities designed to expand students' understanding of acid rain. Background information on acid rain is included. (LB)

  15. Gravity Wave Seeding of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sardul; Johnson, F. S.; Power, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Some examples from the Atmosphere Explorer E data showing plasma bubble development from wavy ion density structures in the bottomside F layer are described. The wavy structures mostly had east-west wavelengths of 150-800 km, in one example it was about 3000 km. The ionization troughs in the wavy structures later broke up into either a multiple-bubble patch or a single bubble, depending upon whether, in the precursor wavy structure, shorter wavelengths were superimposed on the larger scale wavelengths. In the multiple bubble patches, intrabubble spacings vaned from 55 km to 140 km. In a fully developed equatorial spread F case, east-west wavelengths from 690 km down to about 0.5 km were present simultaneously. The spacings between bubble patches or between bubbles in a patch appear to be determined by the wavelengths present in the precursor wave structure. In some cases, deeper bubbles developed on the western edge of a bubble patch, suggesting an east-west asymmetry. Simultaneous horizontal neutral wind measurements showed wavelike perturbations that were closely associated with perturbations in the plasma horizontal drift velocity. We argue that the wave structures observed here that served as the initial seed ion density perturbations were caused by gravity waves, strengthening the view that gravity waves seed equatorial spread F irregularities.

  16. Topside sounder observations of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, P. L.; Benson, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    Large scale regions of depleted equatorial ionospheric plasma, called equatorial bubbles, are investigated using topside sounder data. The sounder's unique remote measuring capability enables the magnetic field-aligned nature of the bubbles to be investigated. A search of all available Alouette 2 and ISIS 1 ionograms during nighttime perigee passes near the magnetic equator has revealed a variety of echo signatures associated with bubbles. In addition to a sudden drop in electron density, these signatures usually include in situ spread F and ducted traces. The ducted traces have been used to determine the electron density distribution and to infer changes in ion composition along the magnetic field line within the duct associated with the bubble. In some cases it can be determined that the bubble is asymmetric with respect to the magnetic equator. Even though such features require 3 dimensional models for their explanation, the great field-aligned extent of the bubbles (relative to their cross section) suggests that current theories, which ignore variations along the magnetic field, are still applicable.

  17. Fading of Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sola, Michael A.; Orton, Glenn; Baines, Kevin; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma

    2011-01-01

    One of Jupiter's most dominant features, the South Equatorial Belt, has historically gone through a "fading" cycle. The usual dark, brownish clouds turn white, and after a period of time, the region returns to its normal color. Understanding this phenomenon, the latest occurring in 2010, will increase our knowledge of planetary atmospheres. Using the near infrared camera, NSFCAM2, at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii, images were taken of Jupiter accompanied by data describing the circumstances of each observation. These images are then processed and reduced through an IDL program. By scanning the central meridian of the planet, graphs were produced plotting the average values across the central meridian, which are used to find variations in the region of interest. Calculations using Albert4, a FORTRAN program that calculates the upwelling reflected sunlight from a designated cloud model, can be used to determine the effects of a model atmosphere due to various absorption, scattering, and emission processes. Spectra that were produced show ammonia bands in the South Equatorial Belt. So far, we can deduce from this information that an upwelling of ammonia particles caused a cloud layer to cover up the region. Further investigations using Albert4 and other models will help us to constrain better the chemical make up of the cloud and its location in the atmosphere.

  18. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX). Design document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Earth`s climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27{degree}C, but never 31{degree}C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  19. Exploring Terrestrial Temperature Changes during the Early Eocene Hyperthermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, K. E.; Clyde, W. C.; Fricke, H. C.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Early Eocene is marked by a number of rapid global warming events called hyperthermals. These hyperthermals are associated with negative carbon isotope excursions (CIE) in both marine and terrestrial records. Multiple theories exist to explain the connection of these hyperthermals with the CIEs and each theory predicts different responses by the climate system. Characterizing the timing, duration and magnitude of temperature change that is associated with these hyperthermals is important for determining whether the hyperthermals are all driven by the same underlying climate dynamics or perhaps differ from one another in cause and climatic consequences. In the simplest case, all share a common underlying mechanism; this predicts that the associated temperature changes scale in a predictable way with the magnitude of the CIE (and perhaps exhibit other similarities, such as the relative amplitudes of marine and terrestrial temperature change). To our knowledge, however, the only hyperthermal with paleotemperature data from land is the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Here we present preliminary carbonate clumped isotope paleotemperature estimates for Early Eocene hyperthermal ETM2/H2 from paleosol carbonates from the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming, USA. We compare the results to existing clumped isotope paleotemperature estimates for the PETM in the Bighorn Basin. Temperatures recorded by paleosol carbonates (which likely reflect near-peak summer ground temperatures) prior to each CIE are ~30°C and increase to ~40-43°C during the apex of each CIE. Following both CIEs, temperatures drop back to pre-CIE values. In the case of ETM2/H2, temperatures begin to rise again immediately, possibly in association with a later hyperthermal, though further work needs to be done to establish this with certainty. These preliminary data suggest that both the absolute values and the magnitudes of temperature changes associated with the PETM and ETM2/H2 are similar; the

  20. Climatic conditions governing extensive Azolla bloom during the Middle Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Rolande; Speelman, Eveline N.; Barke, Judith; Konijnendijk, Tiuri; Sinninge Damste, Jaap S.; Reichart, Gert-Jan

    2010-05-01

    Enormous amounts of intact mega- and microspores from the free floating aquatic fern Azolla were found in sediments recovered during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program expedition 302, indicating that Azolla grew and reproduced in situ in the Eocene Arctic Ocean. In general, the Early/Middle Eocene is characterized by enhanced greenhouse conditions with elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Arctic (~10°C), while tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs) were only a little warmer than today (with a mean annual temperature (MAT) of 32-34 °C) (Pearson et al., 2007). The consequently reduced temperature gradient between the equator and the poles and the presence of freshwater at the North Pole as indicated by the presence of the freshwater fern Azolla (Brinkhuis et al., 2006) provide important boundary conditions for understanding the hydrological cycle and latent heat transport during this interval. Here we reconstruct variations in SST and mean annual air temperature using the TEX86 and MBT temperature proxies for the Azolla interval. Sediments from around the Arctic Basin have been analyzed, including samples from Alaska, the Mackenzie Basin, Greenland (IODP core 913b), and Denmark. Furthermore, a high resolution sea surface temperature record for the Azolla interval has been constructed from sediment samples from the Lomonosov Ridge, showing a cyclic signal. Model experiments have shown that the here confirmed low equator-to-pole temperature gradient modulated the hydrological cycle. Since the growth of Azolla is restricted to low salinity conditions, changes in the hydrological cycle are proposed to coincide with the cyclic occurrence of Azolla throughout the interval. To confirm the overlapping presence of high quantities of Azolla and increased precipitation, changes in the hydrogen cycle are reconstructed by creating a high resolution hydrogen isotope record throughout the interval. By performing compound specific analyses (δD) on terrestrial derived

  1. Comet or asteroid shower in the late Eocene?

    PubMed

    Tagle, Roald; Claeys, Philippe

    2004-07-23

    The passage of a comet shower approximately 35 million years ago is generally advocated to explain the coincidence during Earth's late Eocene of an unusually high flux of interplanetary dust particles and the formation of the two largest craters in the Cenozoic, Popigai and the Chesapeake Bay. However, new platinum-group element analyses indicate that Popigai was formed by the impact of an L-chondrite meteorite. Such an asteroidal projectile is difficult to reconcile with a cometary origin. Perhaps instead the higher delivery rate of extraterrestrial matter, dust, and large objects was caused by a major collision in the asteroid belt. PMID:15273387

  2. The oldest accurate record of Scenopinidae in the Lowermost Eocene amber of France (Diptera: Brachycera).

    PubMed

    Garrouste, Romain; Azar, Dany; Nel, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Eocenotrichia magnifica gen. et sp. nov. (Diptera: Scenopinidae: Metatrichini) is described and illustrated from the Lowermost Eocene amber of Oise (France) and represents the oldest definitive window fly fossil. The present discovery in the Earliest Eocene supports the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene age currently proposed for the emergence of Metatrichini. PMID:27394507

  3. Mass-movement deposits in the lacustrine Eocene Green River Formation, Piceance Basin, western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Mercier, Tracey J.

    2015-01-01

    The Eocene Green River Formation was deposited in two large Eocene saline lakes, Lake Uinta in the Uinta and Piceance Basins and Lake Gosiute in the Greater Green River Basin. Here we will discuss mass-movement deposits in just the Piceance Basin part of Lake Uinta.

  4. Transequatorial propagation through equatorial plasma bubbles - Discrete events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, M. L.

    1980-08-01

    The discrete nature of VHF transequatorial propagation path openings is pointed out. These events are shown to be consistent with the concept of guided propagation inside equatorial plasma bubbles. The important prediction of this work is that observations on discrete transequatorial VHF links may be used to track the production and development of equatorial plasma bubbles.

  5. Phytochelatin concentrations in the equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahner, Beth A.; Lee, Jennifer G.; Price, Neil M.; Morel, François M. M.

    1998-11-01

    Phytochelatin, an intracellular metal-binding polypeptide synthesized in eucaryotic algae in response to metals such as Cd and Cu, was measured in particulate samples collected from the equatorial Pacific. The concentrations in these samples (normalized to total particulate chl a) were unexpectedly high compared to laboratory culture data and were on average slightly more than in coastal areas where the metal concentrations are typically much greater. In part, the high field concentrations can be explained by the low cellular concentrations of chlorophyll a resulting from very low ambient Fe, but laboratory experiments provide a possible explanation for the rest of the difference. At low concentrations of inorganic Cd (Cd'=3 pM), increasing amounts of phytochelatin were induced by decreasing Zn concentrations in the culture medium of two diatoms: Thalassiosira weissflogii, a coastal species, and T. parthenaia, an isolate from the equatorial Pacific. In all previous studies, phytochelatin production has been directly correlated with increasing metal concentrations. Decreasing Co also resulted in higher phytochelatin concentrations in T. weissflogii and Emiliania huxleyi. Replicating the field concentrations of Zn, Co, and Cd in the laboratory results in cellular concentrations (amol -1 cell) that are very similar to those estimated for the field. Contrary to the expectation that high metal concentrations in the equatorial upwelling would cause elevated phytochelatin concentrations, there was no increase in phytochelatin concentrations from 20° S to 10° N—near surface samples were roughly the same at all stations. Also, most of the depth profiles had a distinct subsurface maximum. Neither of these features is readily explained by the available Zn and Cd data. Incubations with additions of Cd and Cu performed on water sampled at four separate stations induced significantly higher concentrations of phytochelatins than those in controls in a majority of the samples

  6. The equatorial electrojet during geomagnetic storms and substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yosuke; Kosch, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    The climatology of the equatorial electrojet during periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity is examined using long-term records of ground-based magnetometers in the Indian and Peruvian regions. Equatorial electrojet perturbations due to geomagnetic storms and substorms are evaluated using the disturbance storm time (Dst) index and auroral electrojet (AE) index, respectively. The response of the equatorial electrojet to rapid changes in the AE index indicates effects of both prompt penetration electric field and disturbance dynamo electric field, consistent with previous studies based on F region equatorial vertical plasma drift measurements at Jicamarca. The average response of the equatorial electrojet to geomagnetic storms (Dst<-50 nT) reveals persistent disturbances during the recovery phase, which can last for approximately 24 h after the Dst index reaches its minimum value. This "after-storm" effect is found to depend on the magnitude of the storm, solar EUV activity, season, and longitude.

  7. Provenance of the Eocene Soebi Blanco formation, Bonaire, Leeward Antilles: Correlations with post-Eocene tectonic evolution of northern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, S.; Cardona, A.; Montes, C.; Valencia, V.; Vervoort, J.; Reiners, P.

    2014-07-01

    Middle to upper Eocene fluvial strata in the island of Bonaire contain detrital components that were tracked to Precambrian to Triassic massifs in northern Colombia and Venezuela. These detrital components confirm previous hypothesis suggesting that Bonaire and the Leeward Antilles were attached to South American basement massifs (SABM). These are composed of different fragmented South American blocks (Paraguana, Falcon, Maracaibo, Guajira, Perija, and Santa Marta) representing an Eocene, right-laterally displaced tectonic piercing point along the southern Caribbean plate margin. U-Pb LA-ICP-MS from the metamorphic boulders of the Soebi Blanco Formation in Bonaire yield Grenvillian peaks ages (1000-1200 Ma), while detrital zircons recovered from the sandy matrix of the conglomerates contain populations with peaks of 1000 Ma-1200 Ma, 750-950 Ma, and 200-300 Ma. These populations match with geochronological data reported for the northern South American massifs. Thermochronological results from the metamorphic clasts yield Paleocene-middle Eocene ages (65-50 Ma) that confirm a regional-scale cooling event in this time. These data imply a land connection between the SABM and the Leeward Antilles in late Eocene times, followed by a significant strike slip right-lateral displacement and transtensional basin opening starting in latest Eocene times. The succession of Eocene tectonic events recorded by the Soebi Blanco Formation and adjacent basins is a major tracer of the oblique convergence of the Caribbean plate against the South American margin.

  8. Eocene Podocarpium (Leguminosae) from South China and its biogeographic implications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingqing; Qiu, Jue; Zhou, Zhekun; Jin, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Podocarpium A. Braun ex Stizenberger is one of the most common legumes in the Neogene of Eurasia, including fossil fruits, seeds, leaves, and possible flower and pollen grains. This genus is not completely consistent with any extant genera according to gross morphological characters and poorly preserved cuticular structures reported in previous studies. The fossil pods collected from the coal-bearing series of the Changchang Basin of Hainan Island and Maoming Basin of Guangdong, South China, are examined by morphologically comparative work, with special reference to venation patterns and placental position. These distinctive features, as well as the ovule development of pods from different developmental stages and the epidermal structure of the pods, as distinguished from previous records lead to the conclusion that these fossils can be recognized as a new species of Podocarpium, P. eocenicum sp. nov. This new discovery indicates that Podocarpium had arrived in South China by the Eocene. Investigation on the fossil records of this extinct genus shows that P. eocenicum is the earliest and lowest latitude fossil data. The possible occurrence pattern of this genus is revealed as follows: Podocarpium had distributed in the South China at least in the middle Eocene, and then migrated to Europe during the Oligocene; in the Miocene this genus reached its peak in Eurasia, spreading extensively across subtropical areas to warm temperate areas; finally, Podocarpium shrank rapidly and became extinct in Eurasia during the Pliocene. PMID:26579179

  9. Sequence stratigraphy of the Misoa Formation (Eocene) Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Marais-Gilchrist, G.; Higgs, R. )

    1993-02-01

    A preliminary sequence analysis of the Misoa Formation has been done in the Maraven concession area, Lake Maracaibo, using well logs supported by palynological and seismic data. The Misoa Formation is interpreted to comprise a lower transgressive unit containing at least four third-order cycles (lithostratigraphic units C7 to C3, approximately), and an upper dominantly regressive unit consisting of six third-order cycles (approximately C2 to B1). A major flooding surface (gamma-ray log maximum) provides a marker near the top of the lower unit, almost coincident with the important N-M local pollen zone. A tentative correlation can be achieved with the Haq-Vail coastal onlap curves for the Tejas A 2.3 to 3.3 third-order cycles, 55 to 44 ma. The maximum flooding surface would correlate with the maximum Eocene onlap at 52.5 ma. These ages broadly agree with the local pollen zonation. Incised valley fill units interpreted on the basis of blocky log character in some wells could have accumulated during global Eocene sea level falls, particularly those between 55 and 54 ma. The sequences gradually onlap onto the Paleocene unconformity and converge in a southwestward (landward) direction. Although north-south-oriented high-angle sinusoidal events are evident on some seismic lines, these are thought to indicate rotated listric fault-bounded blocks formed during an extensional episode, possibly syn-Misoa. The study should aid exploration for stratigraphic traps in the lake area.

  10. Episodic fresh surface waters in the Eocene Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Brinkhuis, Henk; Schouten, Stefan; Collinson, Margaret E; Sluijs, Appy; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Dickens, Gerald R; Huber, Matthew; Cronin, Thomas M; Onodera, Jonaotaro; Takahashi, Kozo; Bujak, Jonathan P; Stein, Ruediger; van der Burgh, Johan; Eldrett, James S; Harding, Ian C; Lotter, André F; Sangiorgi, Francesca; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, Han; de Leeuw, Jan W; Matthiessen, Jens; Backman, Jan; Moran, Kathryn

    2006-06-01

    It has been suggested, on the basis of modern hydrology and fully coupled palaeoclimate simulations, that the warm greenhouse conditions that characterized the early Palaeogene period (55-45 Myr ago) probably induced an intensified hydrological cycle with precipitation exceeding evaporation at high latitudes. Little field evidence, however, has been available to constrain oceanic conditions in the Arctic during this period. Here we analyse Palaeogene sediments obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition, showing that large quantities of the free-floating fern Azolla grew and reproduced in the Arctic Ocean by the onset of the middle Eocene epoch (approximately 50 Myr ago). The Azolla and accompanying abundant freshwater organic and siliceous microfossils indicate an episodic freshening of Arctic surface waters during an approximately 800,000-year interval. The abundant remains of Azolla that characterize basal middle Eocene marine deposits of all Nordic seas probably represent transported assemblages resulting from freshwater spills from the Arctic Ocean that reached as far south as the North Sea. The termination of the Azolla phase in the Arctic coincides with a local sea surface temperature rise from approximately 10 degrees C to 13 degrees C, pointing to simultaneous increases in salt and heat supply owing to the influx of waters from adjacent oceans. We suggest that onset and termination of the Azolla phase depended on the degree of oceanic exchange between Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas. PMID:16752440

  11. Diversity of Scydmaeninae (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) in Upper Eocene Rovno amber.

    PubMed

    Jałoszyński, Paweł; Perkovsky, Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Among nearly 1270 inclusions of Coleoptera found in Upper Eocene Rovno amber, 69 were identified as ant-like stone beetles (Scydmaeninae); 34 were possible to unambiguously determine to the tribal level and were studied in detail. Rovnoleptochromus ableptonoides gen. & sp. n. (Mastigitae: Clidicini), Vertheia quadrisetosa gen. & sp. n. (Cephenniitae: Eutheiini), Cephennomicrus giganteus sp. n. (Cephenniitae: Cephenniini), Glaesoconnus unicus gen. & sp. n. (Scydmaenitae: Glandulariini), Rovnoscydmus frontalis gen. & sp. n. (Scydmaenitae: Glandulariini; type species of Rovnoscydmus), Rovnoscydmus microscopicus sp. n., Euconnus (incertae sedis, near Cladoconnus) palaeogenus sp. n. (Scydmaenitae: Glandulariini), and Stenichnus (s. str.) proavus sp. n. (Scydmaenitae: Glandulariini) are described. Additionally, specimens representing one undescribed species of Vertheia, one of Cephennodes, five of Cephennomicrus, one of Euconnus, one of Microscydmus are recorded, and nine specimens representing an unknown number of species of Rovnoscydmus (and two putative Rovnoscydmus), one Euconnus (and one putative Euconnus), two putative Microscydmus and one putative Scydmoraphes were found in the studied material. The composition of Scydmaeninae fauna in Rovno amber is discussed in the context of ecological preferences and distribution of extant taxa. It is concluded that subtropical and tropical taxa were present in the region where Rovno amber has formed, most notably the second genus and species of the extant tribe Clidicini known from the Eocene of Europe, and six species of the extant genus Cephennomicrus, for the first time found in the fossil record. An annotated catalog of nominal species of Scydmaeninae known in the fossil record is given. PMID:27615867

  12. A Phororhacoid bird from the Eocene of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourer-Chauviré, Cécile; Tabuce, Rodolphe; Mahboubi, M'hammed; Adaci, Mohammed; Bensalah, Mustapha

    2011-10-01

    The bird fossil record is globally scarce in Africa. The early Tertiary evolution of terrestrial birds is virtually unknown in that continent. Here, we report on a femur of a large terrestrial new genus discovered from the early or early middle Eocene (between ˜52 and 46 Ma) of south-western Algeria. This femur shows all the morphological features of the Phororhacoidea, the so-called Terror Birds. Most of the phororhacoids were indeed large, or even gigantic, flightless predators or scavengers with no close modern analogs. It is likely that this extinct group originated in South America, where they are known from the late Paleocene to the late Pleistocene (˜59 to 0.01 Ma). The presence of a phororhacoid bird in Africa cannot be explained by a vicariant mechanism because these birds first appeared in South America well after the onset of the mid-Cretaceous Gondwana break up (˜100 million years old). Here, we propose two hypotheses to account for this occurrence, either an early dispersal of small members of this group, which were still able of a limited flight, or a transoceanic migration of flightless birds from South America to Africa during the Paleocene or earliest Eocene. Paleogeographic reconstructions of the South Atlantic Ocean suggest the existence of several islands of considerable size between South America and Africa during the early Tertiary, which could have helped a transatlantic dispersal of phororhacoids.

  13. Foraminiferal repopulation of the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie

    2012-01-01

    The Chickahominy Formation is the initial postimpact deposit in the 85km-diameter Chesapeake Bay impact crater, which is centered under the town of Cape Charles, Virginia, USA. The formation comprises dominantly microfossil-rich, silty, marine clay, which accumulated during the final ~1.6myr of late Eocene time. At cored sites, the Chickahominy Formation is 16.8-93.7m thick, and fills a series of small troughs and subbasins, which subdivide the larger Chickahominy basin. Nine coreholes drilled through the Chickahominy Formation (five inside the crater, two near the crater margin, and two ~3km outside the crater) record the stratigraphic and paleoecologic succession of 301 indigenous species of benthic foraminifera, as well as associated planktonic foraminifera and bolboformids. Two hundred twenty of these benthic species are described herein, and illustrated with scanning electron photomicrographs. Absence of key planktonic foraminiferal and Bolboforma species in early Chickahominy sediments indicates that detrimental effects of the impact also disturbed the upper oceanic water column for at least 80-100kyr postimpact. After an average of ~73kyr of stressed, rapidly fluctuating paleoenvironments, which were destabilized by after-effects of the impact, most of the cored Chickahominy subbasins maintained stable, nutrient-rich, low-oxygen bottom waters and interstitial microhabitats for the remaining ~1.3myr of late Eocene time.

  14. Eocene Podocarpium (Leguminosae) from South China and its biogeographic implications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingqing; Qiu, Jue; Zhou, Zhekun; Jin, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Podocarpium A. Braun ex Stizenberger is one of the most common legumes in the Neogene of Eurasia, including fossil fruits, seeds, leaves, and possible flower and pollen grains. This genus is not completely consistent with any extant genera according to gross morphological characters and poorly preserved cuticular structures reported in previous studies. The fossil pods collected from the coal-bearing series of the Changchang Basin of Hainan Island and Maoming Basin of Guangdong, South China, are examined by morphologically comparative work, with special reference to venation patterns and placental position. These distinctive features, as well as the ovule development of pods from different developmental stages and the epidermal structure of the pods, as distinguished from previous records lead to the conclusion that these fossils can be recognized as a new species of Podocarpium, P. eocenicum sp. nov. This new discovery indicates that Podocarpium had arrived in South China by the Eocene. Investigation on the fossil records of this extinct genus shows that P. eocenicum is the earliest and lowest latitude fossil data. The possible occurrence pattern of this genus is revealed as follows: Podocarpium had distributed in the South China at least in the middle Eocene, and then migrated to Europe during the Oligocene; in the Miocene this genus reached its peak in Eurasia, spreading extensively across subtropical areas to warm temperate areas; finally, Podocarpium shrank rapidly and became extinct in Eurasia during the Pliocene. PMID:26579179

  15. Episodic fresh surface waters in the Eocene Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkhuis, Henk; Schouten, Stefan; Collinson, Margaret E.; Sluijs, Appy; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe; Dickens, Gerald R.; Huber, Matthew; Cronin, Thomas M.; Onodera, Jonaotaro; Takahashi, Kozo; Bujak, Jonathan P.; Stein, Ruediger; van der Burgh, Johan; Eldrett, James S.; Harding, Ian C.; Lotter, André F.; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Cittert, Han Van Konijnenburg-Van; de Leeuw, Jan W.; Matthiessen, Jens; Backman, Jan; Moran, Kathryn; Expedition 302 Scientists

    2006-06-01

    It has been suggested, on the basis of modern hydrology and fully coupled palaeoclimate simulations, that the warm greenhouse conditions that characterized the early Palaeogene period (55-45Myr ago) probably induced an intensified hydrological cycle with precipitation exceeding evaporation at high latitudes. Little field evidence, however, has been available to constrain oceanic conditions in the Arctic during this period. Here we analyse Palaeogene sediments obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition, showing that large quantities of the free-floating fern Azolla grew and reproduced in the Arctic Ocean by the onset of the middle Eocene epoch (~50Myr ago). The Azolla and accompanying abundant freshwater organic and siliceous microfossils indicate an episodic freshening of Arctic surface waters during an ~800,000-year interval. The abundant remains of Azolla that characterize basal middle Eocene marine deposits of all Nordic seas probably represent transported assemblages resulting from freshwater spills from the Arctic Ocean that reached as far south as the North Sea. The termination of the Azolla phase in the Arctic coincides with a local sea surface temperature rise from ~10°C to 13°C, pointing to simultaneous increases in salt and heat supply owing to the influx of waters from adjacent oceans. We suggest that onset and termination of the Azolla phase depended on the degree of oceanic exchange between Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas.

  16. Eocene paleosols of King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinola, Diogo; Portes, Raquel; Schaefer, Carlos; Kühn, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Red layers between lava flows on King George Island, Maritime Antarctica, were formed during the Eocene, which was one of the warmest periods on Earth in the Cenozoic. Our hypothesis is that these red layers are paleosols formed in periods of little or no volcanic activity. Therefore, our main objective was to identify the main pedogenic properties and features to distinguish these from diagenetic features formed after the lava emplacement. Additionally, we compared our results with volcanic soils formed under different climates to find the best present analogue. The macromorphological features indicate a pedogenic origin, because of the occurrence of well-defined horizons based on colour and structure. Micromorphological analyses showed that most important pedogenic features are the presence of biological channels, plant residues, anisotropic b-fabric, neoformed and illuvial clay and distinct soil microstructure. Although the paleosols are not strongly weathered, the geochemical data also support the pedogenic origin despite of diagenetic features as the partial induration of the profiles and zeolites filling nearly all voids in the horizons in contact with the overlying lava flow, indicating circulation of hydrothermal fluids. The macromorphological and micromorphological features of these paleosols are similar to the soils formed under seasonal climates. Thus, these paleosol features do not correspond to the other proxies (e.g. sediment, plant fossils), which indicate a wet, non-seasonal climate, as in Valdivian Forest, Chile, during the Eocene in King George Island

  17. Episodic fresh surface waters in the Eocene Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brinkhuis, H.; Schouten, S.; Collinson, M.E.; Sluijs, A.; Damste, J.S.S.; Dickens, G.R.; Huber, M.; Cronin, T. M.; Onodera, J.; Takahashi, K.; Bujak, J.P.; Stein, R.; Van Der Burgh, J.; Eldrett, J.S.; Harding, I.C.; Lotter, A.F.; Sangiorgi, F.; Cittert, H.V.K.V.; De Leeuw, J. W.; Matthiessen, J.; Backman, J.; Moran, K.

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested, on the basis of modern hydrology and fully coupled palaeoclimate simulations, that the warm greenhouse conditions that characterized the early Palaeogene period (55-45 Myr ago) probably induced an intensified hydrological cycle with precipitation exceeding evaporation at high latitudes. Little field evidence, however, has been available to constrain oceanic conditions in the Arctic during this period. Here we analyse Palaeogene sediments obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition, showing that large quantities of the free-floating fern Azolla grew and reproduced in the Arctic Ocean by the onset of the middle Eocene epoch (???50 Myr ago). The Azolla and accompanying abundant freshwater organic and siliceous microfossils indicate an episodic freshening of Arctic surface waters during an ???800,000-year interval. The abundant remains of Azolla that characterize basal middle Eocene marine deposits of all Nordic seas probably represent transported assemblages resulting from freshwater spills from the Arctic Ocean that reached as far south as the North Sea. The termination of the Azolla phase in the Arctic coincides with a local sea surface temperature rise from ???10??C to 13??C, pointing to simultaneous increases in salt and heat supply owing to the influx of waters from adjacent oceans. We suggest that onset and termination of the Azolla phase depended on the degree of oceanic exchange between Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. Eocene Tibetan plateau remnants preserved in the northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Beek, Peter; van Melle, Jérémie; Guillot, Stéphane; Pêcher, Arnaud; Reiners, Peter W.; Nicolescu, Stefan; Latif, Mohammad

    2009-05-01

    The northwest Himalaya shows strongly contrasting relief. Deeply incised mountain ranges that are characterized by extremely rapid exhumation and some of the highest peaks in the world are in contrast with high-elevation, low-relief areas such as the Deosai plateau in northern Pakistan, which lies at an altitude of 4,000m. The origin and evolution of such plateau regions at the convergence of the most active continental collision in the world remain elusive. Here we report low-temperature thermochronology data from the Deosai plateau and use thermal history modelling to show that the plateau has undergone continuous slow denudation at rates below 250mMyr-1 for the past 35Myr at least. This finding suggests tectonic and morphologic stability of the plateau since at least Eocene times, only 15-20Myr after the onset of the India-Asia collision. Our work contradicts the hypothesis that widespread low-relief surfaces in the northwest Himalaya result from efficient kilometre-scale glacial erosion during Quaternary times. We show that similarly stable surfaces exist throughout the entire northwest Himalaya and share common morphologic characteristics and denudation histories, which are comparable to those of the western Tibetan plateau. Our results suggest that these surfaces are preserved remnants of an Eocene southwestern Tibetan plateau that was more extensive than today.

  19. Composition of Eocene Ice-Rafted Debris, Central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstad, C.; St. John, K.

    2007-12-01

    IODP Expedition 302 drilled a 400-m sediment record which contains physical evidence of ice-rafting in the Eocene and Neogene in the Arctic (Backman et al., 2006; Moran et al., 2006, St. John, in press). An increase in the terrigenous sand abundance occurs above 246 mcd (~46 Ma), with a flux similar to that in the Neogene. Higher resolution sampling in an interval of good recovery from 246-236 mcd shows evidence of cyclic input of IRD and biogenic components that fits with Milankovitch forcing at the obliquity period (Sangiorgi et al., in press). The question remains - what areas of the Arctic were ice-covered at this early stage in the Cenozoic? To address this provenance issue the composition of the terrigenous sands (250 micron fraction) in cores 55-56X is being quantified. Grains in 75 samples are being point-counted and their compositions categorized. Quartz grains are the dominant component (greater than 10,000 grains per gram), with some being hematite-stained, and there are lesser amounts of mafic minerals. No carbonate grains are identified so far in this study. Possible sources areas for Eocene IRD are the Eastern European and Russian Arctic margins. Tracking compositional variations of the IRD over the interval of cyclic deposition, should indicate whether the cyclic IRD deposition was consistently derived from one source region or multiple regions during this time.

  20. Eocene Arctic Ocean and earth's Early Cenozoic climate

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Seasonal changes of the Arctic Ocean are an approximate microcosm of the present advanced interglacial climate of the Earth. A similar relationship has existed for several million years but was the Early Cenozoic Arctic Ocean an analog of Earth's climate, as well. Absence of polar ice during the Cretaceous is relatively well established. During the Cenozoic a worldwide decrease in mean annual ocean temperature resulted from such factors as altered oceanic circulation and lower atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels. Limited Arctic Ocean data for the middle or late Eocene indicate the presence of upwelling conditions and accompanying high productivity of diatoms, ebridians, silicoflagellates and archaeomonads. During this interval, some seasonality is suggested from the varve-like nature of a single sediment core. However, the absence of drop stones or any ice-rafted sediment supports the idea of an open water, ice-free central Arctic Ocean during this time. Latest Cretaceous Arctic Ocean sediment is interpreted to represent approximately the same conditions as those suggested for the Eocene and together with that data suggest that the central Arctic Ocean was ice-free during part if not all of the first 20 my of the Cenozoic. Sediment representing the succeeding 30 my has not been recovered but by latest Miocene or earl Pliocene, ice-rafted sediment was accumulating, both pack ice and icebergs covered the Arctic Ocean reflecting cyclic glacial climate.

  1. How many upper Eocene microspherule layers: More than we thought

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazel, Joseph E.

    1988-01-01

    The scientific controversy over the origin of upper Eocene tektites, microtektites and other microspherules cannot be logically resolved until it is determined just how many events are involved. The microspherule-bearing beds in marine sediments have been dated using standard biozonal techniques. Although a powerful stratigraphic tool, zonal biostratigraph has its limitations. One is that if an event, such as a microspherule occurrence, is observed to occur in a zone at one locality and then a similar event observed in the same zone at another locality, it still may be unwarranted to conclude that these events exactly correlate. To be in a zone a sample only need be between the fossil events that define the zone boundaries. It is often very difficult to accurately determine where within a zone one might be. Further, the zone defining events do not everywhere occur at the same points in time. That is, the ranges of the defining taxa are not always filled. Thus, the length of time represented by a zone (but not, of course, its chronozone) can vary from place to place. These problems can be offset by use of chronostratigraphic modelling techniques such as Graphic Correlation. This technique was used to build a Cretaceous and Cenozoic model containing fossil, magnetopolarity, and other events. The scale of the model can be demonstrated to be linear with time. This model was used to determine the chronostratigraphic position of upper Eocene microspherule layers.

  2. Constraining carbon input for early-middle Eocene 'hyperthermals'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtland, S. E.; Sexton, P. F.; Ridgwell, A.; Norris, R. D.

    2010-12-01

    The past ten years have witnessed the continuing discovery of short-lived warming events (‘hyperthermals’) smaller in size and shorter in duration than the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). For example, a 2.4 Myr-long benthic foraminiferal stable isotope record from Demerara Rise has revealed the occurrence of multiple short-lived ‘hyperthermals’ across the early to middle Eocene transition (47.6 to 50 Myr ago). While the PETM is widely attributed to a massive injection of carbon into the oceans-atmosphere from a buried, sedimentary source, the size, duration, and shape of these less-extreme events suggests that their genesis may not require the release of sedimentary-sourced carbon. Instead, redistribution of carbon from readily exchangeable surficial carbon reservoirs could provide a source consistent with the magnitude and shape of these events. Here we use GENIE (Gride Enabled Integrated Earth system model) to evaluate how details of the shape and magnitude of these observed isotopic excursions in both bulk and benthic records relate to the source and quantity of carbon input. In particular, we test competing mechanisms and carbon sources to explain the relatively rapid recovery of these events.

  3. Cretaceous to Eocene passive margin sedimentation in Northeastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, J.P. )

    1993-02-01

    Twenty two palinspastic paleogeographic maps are presented for the Cretaceous to Eocene strata of the Serrania del Interior of northeastern Venezuela. The mapped lithologies, environmental conditions, and evolving depositional systems record [approximately]90 m.y. of dominantly marine sedimentation on the only observable Mesozoic passive margin in the Western Hemisphere. The depositional systems of the passive margin are heterogeneous at lateral (i.e., along-margin) length scales greater than [approximately]40 km. The primary lateral heterogeneity is caused by a major Lower Cretaceous deltaic system that emanated southwest of the Serrania del Interior. All important intervals, such as the laterally variable Aptian-Albian El Cantil platform limestone and the hydrocarbon source rocks of the Upper Cretaceous Querecual and San Antonio formations, are related to probable causal mechanisms and environmental conditions. Stratigraphic events have been interpreted as of either local or regional extent; based on a combination of outcrop sedimentologic analyses and regional depositional systems interpretation. The 3-dimensional distribution of depositional systems and systems tracts reveals 4-6 regional sequence boundaries separated by 4-20 m.y. Subsidence analyses support the facies interpretation of a passive margin by showing continuous, thermally dominated subsidence during the Cretaceous to Eocene interval. Subsidence and accumulation rates increased and facies changed significantly in the Oligocene, indicating the end of passive margin sedimentation and the initiation of foredeep subsidence and accumulation associated with overthrusting the eastward-advancing Caribbean Plate.

  4. Continental ice in Greenland during the Eocene and Oligocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldrett, James S.; Harding, Ian C.; Wilson, Paul A.; Butler, Emily; Roberts, Andrew P.

    2007-03-01

    The Eocene and Oligocene epochs (~55 to 23 million years ago) comprise a critical phase in Earth history. An array of geological records supported by climate modelling indicates a profound shift in global climate during this interval, from a state that was largely free of polar ice caps to one in which ice sheets on Antarctica approached their modern size. However, the early glaciation history of the Northern Hemisphere is a subject of controversy. Here we report stratigraphically extensive ice-rafted debris, including macroscopic dropstones, in late Eocene to early Oligocene sediments from the Norwegian-Greenland Sea that were deposited between about 38 and 30million years ago. Our data indicate sediment rafting by glacial ice, rather than sea ice, and point to East Greenland as the likely source. Records of this type from one site alone cannot be used to determine the extent of ice involved. However, our data suggest the existence of (at least) isolated glaciers on Greenland about 20million years earlier than previously documented, at a time when temperatures and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations were substantially higher.

  5. TECHNOLOGICAL OPTIONS FOR ACID RAIN CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discussed are acid rain control options available to the electric utility industry. They include coal switching, flue gas desulfurization, and such emerging lower cost technologies as Limestone Injection Multistage Burners (LIMB) and Advanced Silicate (ADVACATE), both developed ...

  6. Air pollution, acid rain and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mellanby, K.

    1988-01-01

    This book reports on the Watt Committee's working group on acid rain, which was set up in 1981. The authors consider the relationship between natural and the man-made factors and the effects of possible remedial strategies. In the first phase of the study, the group looked at the fate of airborne pollution, vegetation and soils, freshwater and remedial strategy. In this report, which contains the results of a further phase of study, these topics are included and have been brought up to date. The scope of the report is extended to include buildings and non-living materials. Consideration is given to the problem of acid rain and air pollution worldwide. Emphasis is placed on the United Kingdom. The main conclusion is that more research is necessary on some aspects of acid rain and air pollution, but that some of the reports widespread damage caused by acid rain cannot be confirmed.

  7. The Eastern Equatorial Pacific Chlorophyll Dynamics: Update of the `Equatorial Box' Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westberry, T.; Wang, X.; Murtugudde, R.; Behrenfeld, M.; Roesler, C.

    2006-12-01

    The `Equatorial Box' Project utilizes the mooring observations along the 125 and 140 TAO lines to provide carbon component data, including chlorophyll, primary production, POC and DOC. These parameters together with other oceanographic properties can be used to validate ocean circulation-ecosystem models. In turn, a validated model can offer considerable promise for not only filling the gaps in the spatial and temporal coverage from the available observations, but also enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the variability. Here, we present both measured and simulated vertical-meridional chlorophyll distributions and primary production along 125W and 140W. While there is a permanent layer of deep chlorophyll maximum at 30-60 m, there is no deep maximum in phytoplankton carbon biomass or primary production. Our analyses focus on impact of nutrient stress and light conditions on chlorophyll dynamics in the eastern equatorial Pacific. We also compare modeled primary productivity with ocean color derived rates.

  8. Investigation of TEC variations over the magnetic equatorial and equatorial anomaly regions of the African sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oryema, B.; Jurua, E.; D'ujanga, F. M.; Ssebiyonga, N.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the annual, seasonal and diurnal variations in ionospheric TEC along the African equatorial region. The study also investigated the effects of a geomagnetic storm on ionospheric TEC values. Dual-frequency GPS derived TEC data obtained from four stations within the African equatorial region for the high solar activity year 2012 were used in this study. Annual variations showed TEC having two peaks in the equinoctial months, while minima values were observed in the summer and winter solstices. The diurnal pattern showed a pre-dawn minimum, a steady increase from about sunrise to an afternoon maximum and then a gradual fall after sunset to attain a minimum just before sunrise. Nighttime enhancements of TEC were observed mostly in the equinoctial months. There was comparably higher percentage TEC variability during nighttime than daytime and highest during equinoxes, moderate in winter and least during summer solstice. TEC was observed to exhibit a good correlation with geomagnetic storm indices.

  9. Equatorial thermospheric composition and its variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, G. P.; Pelz, D. T.; Kasprzak, W. T.

    1972-01-01

    The neutral atmospheric composition experiment on the San Marco - 3 satellite has measured the composition of the equatorial atmosphere from 29 April to 29 November 1971. Preliminary results on the diurnal variation of atmospheric composition from 19 May to 30 June at 225 km. altitude are presented. The diurnal variation of helium is seen to reach its maximum near 0800 hours and its minimum in the late afternoon in contrast to the behavior of molecular nitrogen and argon. The atomic oxygen densities show smaller variations than the other gases. The mass densities calculated from the composition data agree well with those determined from the in situ drag force measurements and from orbital decay measurements.

  10. Equatorial thermospheric composition and its variations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, G. P.; Pelz, D. T.; Kasprzak, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    The neutral atmospheric composition experiment on the San Marco 3 satellite has measured the composition of the equatorial atmosphere from Apr. 29 to Nov. 29, 1971. Preliminary results on the diurnal variation of atmospheric composition from May 19 to June 30 at 225 km altitude are presented. The diurnal variation of helium is seen to reach its maximum near 0800 hours and its minimum in the late afternoon, in contrast to the behavior of molecular nitrogen and argon. The atomic oxygen densities show smaller variations than those of the other gases. The mass densities calculated from the composition data agree well with those determined from the in situ drag force measurements and from orbital decay measurements.

  11. Equatorial phenomena in neutral thermospheric composition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reber, C. A.; Hedin, A. E.; Chandra, S.

    1973-01-01

    Several interesting phenomena relating to the equatorial ionosphere have been observed in the data from the OGO-6 mass spectrometer. The diurnal variations during equinox at an altitude of 450 km show the N2 and O densities peaking near 1500 hr while He peaks near 1000 hr. The latitudinal variation in N2 during the day is very similar to the F-region electron density exhibiting the well known features of the ionospheric anomaly. During periods of intense geomagnetic disturbance (e.g. the large storm of 8 March 1970), the low latitude thermospheric temperature increases on the order of 50-150 K, while at mid latitudes, increases of more than 1000 K are observed.

  12. Interior models of Mercury with equatorial ellipticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, M.

    2012-09-01

    The combination of planetary rotation observations and gravity field measurements by the MESSENGER spacecraft can be used to constrain the internal structure of Mercury. A recently published model suggests a mean mantle density of ρm = 3650 ± 225 kg m-3, substantially larger than that expected of a silicate mantle (3300 kg m-3) and possibly hinting at the presence of an FeS-rich layer at the base of the mantle. Here, we show that a large ρm is only required if the core-mantle boundary (CMB) of the planet is assumed axially-symmetric. An equatorial ellipticity of CMB of the order of 2 · 10-5 allows to satisfy gravity and rotation constraints with a mean mantle density typical of silicate material. Possible origin of such topography include past mantle convection, aspherical planetary shrinking, remnant tidal deformation, or a combination thereof.

  13. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the west, from between the cloud layers and over the patchy white clouds to the east of the hotspot. This is probably an area where moist convection is occurring over large horizontal distances, similar to the atmosphere over the equatorial ocean on Earth. The clouds are high and thick, and are observed to change rapidly over short time scales.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756

  14. The morphological catalogue of galaxies equatorial survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huchra, John; Latham, David W.; Da Costa, L. N.; Pellegrini, P. S.; Willmer, C. N. A.

    1993-01-01

    We present 865 redshifts of galaxies located in the equatorial strip delta between -17.5 deg and -2.5 deg in the right ascension range between 20 h and 5 h. Redshifts have been obtained for the complete sample of all 833 galaxies in the Morphological Catalog of Galaxies with magnitudes brighter than m = 14.5 (corresponding approximately to m(Zwicky) = 15.0). This sample also includes three galaxies from other sources with more reliable magnitudes, satisfying this limit, and 29 fainter galaxies, usually companions of the galaxies in the magnitude limited sample. Our maps of a very large volume of nearby space demonstrate a variety of coherent large scale structures which include large voids, 20-50/h Mpc in diameter and large walls at least 70/h Mpc across.

  15. Pathways into the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, P. J.; Hazeleger, W.; de Vries, P.; Cane, M.

    2003-04-01

    A time-dependent trajectory algorithm is used to determine the sources of the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) in the OCCAM simulation. The primary sources and pathways are identified and the transformation of properties in temperature/salinity space are explored. An estimate for the quantity of recirculation, a notoriously difficult property to estimate from observational data, is given. Two-thirds of the water in the Pacific EUC originates south of the equator. Three-fifths of the EUC is ventilated outside of the tropics (poleward of 13°S or 10°N) : two-thirds of these extratropical trajectories travel through the western boundary currents between their subduction and incorporation into the EUC and one quarter of the extratropical trajectories enter and leave the tropical band at least once before entering the EUC.

  16. Dynamical variability in Saturn Equatorial Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Hueso, R.; Rojas, J. F.; French, R. G.; Grupo Ciencias Planetarias Team

    2003-05-01

    Historical ground-based and recent HST observations show that Saturn's Equatorial Atmosphere is the region where the most intense large-scale dynamical variability took place at cloud level in the planet. Large-scale convective storms (nicknamed the ``Great White Spots") occurred in 1876, 1933 and 1990. The best studied case (the 1990 storm), produced a dramatic change in the cloud aspect in the years following the outburst of September 1990. Subsequently, a new large storm formed in 1994 and from 1996 to 2002 our HST observations showed periods of unusual cloud activity in the southern part of the Equator. This contrast with the aspect observed during the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters in 1980 and 1981 when the Equator was calm, except for some mid-scale plume-like features seen in 1981. Cloud-tracking of the features have revealed a dramatic slow down in the equatorial winds from maximum velocities of ˜ 475 m/s in 1980-1981 to ˜ 275 m/s during 1996-2002, as we have recently reported in Nature, Vol. 423, 623 (2003). We discuss the possibility that seasonal and ring-shadowing effects are involved in generating this activity and variability. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Spanish MCYT PNAYA 2000-0932. SPH acknowledges a PhD fellowship from the Spanish MECD and RH a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco. RGF was supported in part by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program NAG5-10197 and STSCI Grant GO-08660.01A.

  17. NASA's DC-8 With Rain Mapping Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In a joint venture between NASA and Japan's NASDA, scientists have been using satellites, airplanes, and boats to measure rain physics in and under thunderstorms over open water. This Quick Time movie shows NASA's DC-8 jet with the instruments like the airborne rain mapping radar, i.e., the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) and a lightening imaging sensor. Earth science and weather studies are an important ongoing function of NASA and its affiliates.

  18. Simulating Rain Fade In A Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Nagy, Lawrence A.; Svoboda, James K.

    1994-01-01

    Automated, computer-controlled assembly of electronic equipment developed for use in simulation testing of downlink portion of Earth/satellite microwave digital communication system. Designed to show effects upon performance of system of rain-induced fading in received signal and increases in transmitted power meant to compensate for rain-induced fading. Design of communication system improved iteratively in response to results of simulations, leading eventually to design ensuring clear, uninterrupted transmission of digital signals.

  19. Neutral rains at Athens, Greece: a natural safeguard against acidification of rains.

    PubMed

    Kita, Itsuro; Sato, Takayuki; Kase, Yoshinori; Mitropoulos, Panagiotis

    2004-07-01

    Samples of all rains in a period from October, 1998 to January, 1999 at Athens, Greece, were collected. The pH values of almost all of these rains clustered in a high range of 7.0-7.5, with no relation between pH and their SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-) and Cl(-) contents. In addition, a few rains with low contents of chemical components similar to pure water also were observed, giving a pH (approx. 5.5) of rain caused by dissolution of only atmospheric CO(2) in it. These results indicate that the level of air pollution of Athens by human activity has become lower during the last decade, restoring the neutral condition of rain in this area. Furthermore, the Ca contents and Ca/Mg ratios in these rains, as well as their chemical and isotopic behavior, suggest that particles of calcium carbonate taken in as dust act as a neutralizer of rains. The dust must be derived not only from the urban area of Athens but also from its environs or areas distant from it. Such a mechanism causing universally neutral rains throughout the rainy season at Athens must have worked as a natural safeguard against rains acidified naturally and artificially from ancient times up to recent years, keeping the remains of ancient Greece in a good state of preservation during such a long period. PMID:15172587

  20. Observations of Interannual Equatorial Fresh Water Jets in the Western Equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Clarke, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Using upper ocean monthly salinity and temperature data from the moored TAO/TRITON array in the western equatorial Pacific since the late 1990s, we found, consistent with previous work, that the region experiences large interannual fluctuations in salinity. On the equator at 147 degrees E, 156 degrees E and 165 degrees E the interannual sea surface salinity (SSS) has peak to peak amplitudes that often exceed 1 psu. The salinity variability, which matches well the comparatively short record of overlapping SSS estimated by the Aquarius satellite, changes little over the top 50 m of the water column. Beneath this mixed layer depth the amplitude of the salinity variability steadily decreases over the remaining part of the order 100 m thick isothermal layer. Corresponding hydrostatic estimates of dynamic height over the isothermal layer lead to interannual sea level variability of only a few cm amplitude. However, the sea level due to the fresher water is associated geostrophically with a strong fresh water zonal equatorial interannual jet that at 156 degrees E has an amplitude of about 27 cm/s. Along-track altimeter data give a geostrophic equatorial zonal interannual flow that agrees well with this, suggesting that the near-surface interannual flow in the region is due to the shallow fresh jet. A zonal momentum balance indicates that this jet is mostly due to zonal wind stress forcing. The fresh water jet is maximally correlated with the Nino3.4 El Nino index when the jet leads by 3 months.

  1. Presenting the Rain-Sea Interaction Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, Larry F.; Elfouhaily, Tonas M.

    1993-01-01

    The new Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) was established at GSFC/WFF and the first finds are presented. The unique feature of this laboratory is the ability to systematically study microwave scattering from a water surface roughened by artificial rain, for which the droplets are at terminal velocity. The fundamental instruments and systems (e.g., the rain simulator, scatterometers, and surface elevation probes) were installed and evaluated during these first experiments - so the majority of the data were obtained with the rain simulator at 1 m above the water tank. From these initial experiments, three new models were proposed: the square-root function for NCS vs. R, the log Gaussian model for ring-wave elevation frequency spectrum, and the Erland probability density distribution for back scattered power. Rain rate is the main input for these models, although the coefficients may be dependent upon other factors (drop-size distribution, fall velocity, radar configuration, etc.). The facility is functional and we foresee collaborative studies with investigators who are engaged in measuring and modeling rain-sea interaction processes.

  2. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.; Kender, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, 8 additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids were observed at pH 2.5 in 1980. The relationship between acid-rain and oxidant stipple, chlorosis, and soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid-rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.

  3. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.; Kender, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines (Vitis labrusca, Bailey) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to pH 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, eight additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH 2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Only the cultivars de Chaunac and Ives had reduced berry soluble solids with chronic weekly sprays at pH 2.75. Reduction in soluble solids was not associated with increased oxidant stipple (ozone injury) in Concord and de Chaunac cultivars, but this association was observed in Ives. There was no evidence that acid rain in combination with ozone increased oxidant stipple as occurs when ozone and SO/sub 2/ are combined. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.

  4. Boron Proxy Evidence for Ocean Acidification during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoenisch, B.; Penman, D. E.; Zeebe, R. E.; Zachos, J. C.; Thomas, E.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the magnitude and rate of carbon cycle perturbations is key to identifying and interpreting past intervals of ocean acidification. However, paleocean acidification has commonly been inferred from biotic changes, which could have been caused by other environmental changes, including temperature, nutrient supply and oxygenation. Independent geochemical proxy evidence for paleo- seawater pH and carbonate saturation is therefore critical to confirm that ocean acidification did indeed take place, and how severe it was. We focus on the Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum (56 Ma), an extreme climate perturbation that closely resembles worst-case scenarios for the future, in terms of massive carbon release (~4,500 Pg C) as expressed in a global negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE), and associated global warming (5-9°C). We used samples from the central equatorial Pacific to perform high resolution boron isotope and B/Ca analyses in shells of the surface dwelling, symbiont-bearing planktic foraminifer Morozovella velascoensis, to quantify the extent of ocean acidification during this event. We found a significant decrease in values of both proxies, paralleling the CIE, and followed by recovery to pre-event conditions. Onset and duration of the observed geochemical anomalies are similar to carbon cycle model simulations, but the magnitude of both the boron isotope and B/Ca excursions is larger than suggested by the model. Quantification of the pH change is difficult because of a number of uncertainties, including the largely unknown boron isotopic composition of seawater, the baseline-pH prior to the event, temperature and salinity, and the effects of partial dissolution, recrystallization, and potential loss of symbionts. Complementary analyses of M. velascoensis from two sites in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans yield similar results, confirming that diagenesis likely did not bias the records. Using the best possible constraints, we estimate that the ocean

  5. Acid rain: a primer on what, where, and how much

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R.

    1985-04-01

    Acid rain is introduced by defining its components: wet and dry deposition. Data bases on precipitation chemistry from several monitoring networks are used to show where acid rain occurs. Precipitation chemistry and air quality data are used to discuss what is in acid rain. Maps of the deposition of the major constituents of wet deposition are presented to contrast the amount of material deposited (deposition) in acid rain with its composition (concentration). The interactions of acid rain with the surfaces on which it falls are used to trace the paths by which acid rain reaches surface and soil waters. Implications of acid rain effects are introduced but not discussed in detail.

  6. Variation of slant path Ka/V-band rain attenuation over seven tropical locations in Nigeria using synthetic storm techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, J. S.; Adediji, A. T.; Mandeep, J. S.; Ismail, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, rain characteristics and slant path rain attenuation at 30 and 40 GHz using synthetic storm techniques over seven tropical locations in Nigeria have been presented. The technique can be used to predict the local first-order statistical rain attenuation to mitigate the severe fade experienced at higher frequency bands by employing local rainfall rate statistics. Three years rain rate data at seven tropical and equatorial locations in Nigeria were utilized for the purpose of this work. The predicted statistics are in good agreement with those obtained from the propagation beacon measurement (EUTELSAT W4/W7 satellite-12.245 GHz) It could be observed that at 99.99 % link availability over these locations, the fade margin of higher dB (74 and 81 dB) are required at 30 and 40 GHz frequency bands, respectively. When diurnal variation was observed for four time intervals: 00:00-06:00, 06:00-12:00, 12:00-18:00, and 18:00-24:00, there is a variation of the fade margin over the hours of the day. The overall results will be needed for an acceptable planning that can effectively reduce the fade margin to a very low value for an optimum data communication over the studied locations.

  7. Changes in equatorial Pacific seasonality due to orbital forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erb, M. P.; Broccoli, A. J.; Wittenberg, A. T.; Vecchi, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Results from a set of coupled atmosphere-ocean GCM simulations show that the seasonal cycle of equatorial Pacific sea surface temperatures can be strongly affected by precession, while changes in obliquity produce only small differences. Two sets of idealized simulations were conducted with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory CM2.1 model. In one set of simulations, the effects of obliquity were isolated by altering its value while leaving all other boundary conditions unchanged. In the other set, the effects of precession were isolated by running four simulations with the longitude of the perihelion separated by 90 degrees. While obliquity forcing produces almost no change in equatorial Pacific seasonality, precession alters the strength of the seasonal cycle through both thermodynamic and dynamic mechanisms. In the western equatorial Pacific, insolation anomalies caused by precession alter the strength of the monsoonal circulation over the Maritime Continent, inducing anomalous downwelling in the Pacific warm pool. The resulting temperature anomalies travel eastward along the thermocline, surfacing in the eastern equatorial Pacific several months later. This anomalous redistribution of heat, aided by the direct thermodynamic effect of insolation anomalies, results in large changes to the strength and timing of the seasonal cycle in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Because equatorial Pacific sea surface temperatures have local climate impacts as well as non-local impacts though teleconnections, these results may be important to understanding paleoclimate variations both inside and outside of the equatorial Pacific.

  8. Reconstruction of the Eocene Arctic Ocean Using Ichthyolith Isotope Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, J. D.; Thomas, D. J.; Moore, T. C.; Waddell, L. M.; Blum, J. D.; Haley, B. A.

    2007-12-01

    Nd, Sr, O and C isotopic compositions of Eocene fish debris (teeth, bones, scales), and their reduced organic coatings, have been used to reconstruct water mass composition, water column structure, surface productivity and salinities of the Arctic Ocean Basin at Lomonosov Ridge between 55 and 44 Ma. Cleaned ichthyolith samples from IODP Expedition 302 (ACEX) record epsilon Nd values that range from -5.7 to -7.8, distinct from modern Arctic Intermediate Water (-10.5) and North Atlantic Deep Water. These Nd values may record some exchange with Pacific/Tethyan water masses, but inputs from local continental sources are more likely. Sr isotopic values are consistent with a brackish-to-fresh water surface layer (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7079-0.7087) that was poorly mixed with Eocene global seawater (0.7077-0.7078). Leaching experiments show reduced organic coatings to be more radiogenic (>0.7090) than cleaned ichthyolith phosphate. Ichthyolith Sr isotopic variations likely reflect changes in localized river input as a function of shifts in the Arctic hydrologic cycle, and 87Sr/86Sr values might be used as a proxy for surface water salinity. Model mixing calculations indicate salinities of 5 to 20 per mil, lower than estimates based on O isotopes from fish bone carbonate (16 to 26 per mil). Significant salinity drops (i.e., 55 Ma PETM and 48.5 Ma Azolla event) registered in oxygen isotopes do not show large excursions in the 87Sr/86Sr data. Carbon isotopes in fish debris record a spike in organic activity at 48.5 Ma (Azolla event), and otherwise high-productivity waters between 55 and 44 Ma. The combined Sr-Nd-O-C isotopic record is consistent with highly restricted basin-wide circulation in the Eocene, indicative of a highly stratified water column with anoxic bottom waters, a "fresh" water upper layer, and enhanced continental runoff during warm intervals until the first appearance of ice rafted debris at 45 Ma.

  9. The Eocene to Oligocene Landscape of the Northern Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassel, E. J.; Graham, S. A.

    2007-12-01

    To gain a better understanding of the Cenozoic tectonic and landscape evolution of the northern Sierra Nevada, well-preserved Eocene to Oligocene sedimentary and volcanic units form the focus of a detailed stratigraphic study which incorporates geochemical and stable isotopic analyses. Widespread silicic ash-flow tuffs (31-28 Ma) crop out across the northern Sierra from near paleo-sea level at the eastern edge of the Great Valley across the modern crest of the range into Nevada. On the western flank of the northern Sierra, they cap Eocene prevolcanic fluvial sediments of the ancestral Yuba and Feather Rivers. The Eocene fluvial system was dominantly controlled by bedrock structure, consisting of two types of coeval valley morphologies: steep, narrow high-energy valley segments and broader, lower-gradient braided stream valley segments. The braided fluvial sequence contains four upward-fining cycles: coarse lower intervals consist of gravel-sand dunes and lateral accretion elements deposited within higher energy channels; upper fine intervals consist of 1-5 m thick lignite-bearing clay and silt marsh deposits. Full-valley width exposures of clay eliminate the possibility of autocyclic controls, indicating that the multiple upward-fining cycles reflect base-level change. Two distinctive overlying ash-flow tuffs were identified and correlated by trace and rare earth element composition of volcanic glass and lithologic criteria. Hydrated glass was used as a proxy for hydrogen isotopic composition of precipitation to determine the paleoelevation gradient in the Oligocene. The δD of ancient meteoric waters, which scales at a predictable rate with change in elevation, decreases steadily across a range-perpendicular transect, from -125‰ ± 1‰ in the west to -160‰ ± 4‰ in the east. This 35‰ decrease in the δD of precipitation is similar to the compositional gradient of the range today, and reflects an increase in ancient mean elevation along the transect. These

  10. Eocene Tibetan Plateau remnants preserved in the Northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Beek, P. A.; van Melle, J.; Guillot, S.; Pêcher, A.; Reiners, P. W.; Nicolescu, S.; Latif, M.

    2009-04-01

    The northwest Himalaya shows strongly contrasting relief, opposing deeply incised mountain ranges characterized by extremely rapid exhumation and some of the highest peaks in the world (i.e., the Karakorum range and Nanga Parbat massif) to high-elevation, low-relief areas such as the 4000-m high Deosai plateau in northern Pakistan and the 5000-m high Tso Morari in Indian Ladakh. The origin and evolution of such plateau regions in the syntaxis of the most active continental collision in the world remain elusive. Here, we report the first low-temperature thermochronology (apatite fission-track, apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He) data from the Deosai plateau and use thermal history modelling to show that it has undergone continuous slow (≤ 200 m/Myr) denudation and has thus remained tectonically stable for the last 35 Myr at least. The inferred history of constant slow denudation of the plateau contradicts the hypothesis that widespread low-relief surfaces in the northwest Himalaya result from efficient, km-scale glacial erosion during Quaternary times; such erosion would have been recorded as a phase of rapid recent denudation that is not observed in the data. Slow continuous denudation since Eocene times, i.e. only 15-20 Myr after the onset of India-Asia collision implies that the Deosai plateau surface developed early in the Himalayan history and limits the phase of orogenic relief growth in the Ladakh-Kohistan arc to the early Paleogene. Although thermochronology data do not directly record surface uplift, the simplest explanation for the inferred constant denudation rates is that the plateau had reached its present-day elevation already during the Eocene, as a later phase of surface uplift would have triggered an erosional response that would have been recorded by the thermochronology data. We use morphological analyses to characterise such plateaux and identify them at the scale of the entire northwest Himalaya and compare our thermochronological data with

  11. Intercalibration of Passive Microwave Rain Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilburn, K.; Wentz, F.

    2006-05-01

    Remote Sensing Systems processes passive microwave radiometer data from a variety of satellites: SSM/I on six DMSP satellites (F08, F10, F11, F13, F14, and F15), TMI on TRMM, and AMSR on Aqua and Midori-II. A great deal of effort has been spent accurately calibrating each sensor and intercalibrating all of the sensors. A standard algorithm has been developed that provides a suite of geophysical parameters, and the same algorithm is applied to the data from each sensor. Retrievals of sea surface temperature, surface wind speed, and water vapor made by the various sensors are in excellent agreement, and the retrievals have been extensively validated. Despite these facts, as we began to analyze rain rate retrievals, we found significant systematic discrepancies. The largest source of discrepancy, by far, was related to the resolution of the sensor. The resolution of the SSM/I measurements is nominally 32 km, while the other sensors are roughly 12 km. This difference in resolution has a profound effect on the retrieved rain rates through "the beamfilling effect". The beamfilling effect does not impact the other parameters because the measured parameters are not nearly as spatially inhomogeneous as rain, and the relationships between those parameters and the radiometer measurements is not nearly as nonlinear as it is for rain. We will discuss the algorithmic changes we made in order to account for the beamfilling effect. We will present our rain rates both before and after correction, compare our rain rates against other climatologies, and present available validation. Finally, we will show the impact of the diurnal cycle on these measurements, and present analysis of space-time variability across the full range of scales for this now 18 year global record of rain rate over the oceans.

  12. Radiative forcing by forest and subsequent feedbacks in the early Eocene climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Port, U.; Claussen, M.; Brovkin, V.

    2015-03-01

    Using the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model, we investigate the forcing of forests and the feedback triggered by forests in the pre-industrial climate and in the early Eocene climate (about 54 to 52 million years ago). Other than the interglacial, pre-industrial climate, the early Eocene climate was characterised by high temperatures which led to almost ice-free poles. We compare simulations in which all continents are covered either by dense forest or by bare soil. To isolate the effect of soil albedo, we choose either bright soils or dark soils, respectively. Considering bright soil, forests warm in both, the early Eocene climate and the current climate, but the warming differs due to differences in climate feedbacks. The lapse-rate and water-vapour feedback is stronger in early Eocene climate than in current climate, but strong and negative cloud feedbacks and cloud masking in the early Eocene climate outweigh the stronger positive lapse-rate and water-vapour feedback. In the sum, global mean warming is weaker in the early Eocene climate. Sea-ice related feedbacks are weak in the almost ice-free climate of the early Eocene leading to a weak polar amplification. Considering dark soil, our results change. Forests cools stronger in the early Eocene climate than in the current climate because the lapse-rate and water-vapour feedback is stronger in the early Eocene climate while cloud feedbacks and cloud masking are equally strong in both climates. The different temperature change by forest in both climates highlights the state-dependency of vegetation's impact on climate.

  13. First Record of Eocene Bony Fishes and Crocodyliforms from Canada’s Western Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Jaelyn J.; Gottfried, Michael D.; Hutchison, J. Howard; Brochu, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Discovery of Eocene non-marine vertebrates, including crocodylians, turtles, bony fishes, and mammals in Canada’s High Arctic was a critical paleontological contribution of the last century because it indicated that this region of the Arctic had been mild, temperate, and ice-free during the early – middle Eocene (∼53–50 Ma), despite being well above the Arctic Circle. To date, these discoveries have been restricted to Canada’s easternmost Arctic – Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands (Nunavut). Although temporally correlative strata crop out over 1,000 km west, on Canada’s westernmost Arctic Island – Banks Island, Northwest Territories – they have been interpreted as predominantly marine. We document the first Eocene bony fish and crocodyliform fossils from Banks Island. Principal Findings We describe fossils of bony fishes, including lepisosteid (Atractosteus), esocid (pike), and amiid, and a crocodyliform, from lower – middle Eocene strata of the Cyclic Member, Eureka Sound Formation within Aulavik National Park (∼76°N. paleolat.). Palynology suggests the sediments are late early to middle Eocene in age, and likely spanned the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Conclusions/Significance These fossils extend the geographic range of Eocene Arctic lepisosteids, esocids, amiids, and crocodyliforms west by approximately 40° of longitude or ∼1100 km. The low diversity bony fish fauna, at least at the family level, is essentially identical on Ellesmere and Banks Islands, suggesting a pan-High Arctic bony fish fauna of relatively basal groups around the margin of the Eocene Arctic Ocean. From a paleoclimatic perspective, presence of a crocodyliform, gar and amiid fishes on northern Banks provides further evidence that mild, year-round temperatures extended across the Canadian Arctic during early – middle Eocene time. Additionally, the Banks Island crocodyliform is consistent with the phylogenetic hypothesis of a Paleogene divergence

  14. Lidar Observation of Tropopause Ozone Profiles in the Equatorial Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Tropospheric ozone in the tropics zone is significant in terms of the oxidizing efficiency and greenhouse effect. However, in the upper troposphere, the ozone budget in the tropics has not been fully understood yet because of the sparsity of the range-resolved observations of vertical ozone concentration profiles. A DIAL (differential absorption lidar) system for vertical ozone profiles have been installed in the equatorial tropopause region over Kototabang, Indonesia (100.3E, 0.2S). We have observed large ozone enhancement in the upper troposphere, altitude of 13 - 17 km, concurring with a zonal wind oscillation associated with the equatorial Kelvin wave around the tropopause at equatorial region.

  15. Low transition-region characteristics of equatorial coronal holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patsourakos, S.; Bocchialini, K.; Vial, J.-C.

    1997-01-01

    The results of observations concerning the low transition region of equatorial coronal holes, performed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), are discussed. A study performed by other authors led to the conclusion that the chromospheric network corresponding to an equatorial hole is brighter in some lines than the one corresponding to the quiet sun. A statistical study on equatorial holes using the Lyman beta lines from the solar ultraviolet measurements of emitted radiation (SUMER), onboard SOHO, is presented. The mean profiles of cell, network and bright points in and out of the coronal holes are discussed, together with the possible implications of the observations.

  16. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view from above and to the south of the visualized area, showing the entire model. The entire region is overlain by a thin, transparent haze. In places the haze is high and thick, especially to the east (to the right of) the hotspot.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on more sophisticated studies of Jupiter's cloud structure. The upper

  17. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the northeast, from between the cloud layers and above the streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot. The upper haze layer has some features that match the lower cloud, such as the bright streak in the foreground of the frame. These are probably thick clouds that span several tens of vertical kilometers.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly

  18. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the southeast, from between the cloud layers and over the north center of the region. The tall white clouds in the lower cloud deck are probably much like large terrestrial thunderclouds. They may be regions where atmospheric water powers vertical convection over large horizontal distances.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756 nm. This model is overly simplistic, but is based on

  19. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view to the northeast, from between the cloud layers and above the streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot. The hotspot is clearly visible as a deep blue feature. The cloud streaks end near the hotspot, consistent with the idea that clouds traveling along these streak lines descend and evaporate as they approach the hotspot. The upper haze layer is slightly bowed upwards above the hotspot.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional

  20. Three dimensional Visualization of Jupiter's Equatorial Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frames from a three dimensional visualization of Jupiter's equatorial region. The images used cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles) near an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the site where the probe from NASA's Galileo spacecraft entered Jupiter's atmosphere on December 7th, 1995. These features are holes in the bright, reflective, equatorial cloud layer where warmer thermal emission from Jupiter's deep atmosphere can pass through. The circulation patterns observed here along with the composition measurements from the Galileo Probe suggest that dry air may be converging and sinking over these regions, maintaining their cloud-free appearance. The bright clouds to the right of the hotspot as well as the other bright features may be examples of upwelling of moist air and condensation.

    This frame is a view from the southwest looking northeast, from an altitude just above the high haze layer. The streaks in the lower cloud leading towards the hotspot are visible. The upper haze layer is mostly flat, with notable small peaks that can be matched with features in the lower cloud. In reality, these areas may represent a continuous vertical cloud column.

    Galileo is the first spacecraft to image Jupiter in near-infrared light (which is invisible to the human eye) using three filters at 727, 756, and 889 nanometers (nm). Because light at these three wavelengths is absorbed at different altitudes by atmospheric methane, a comparison of the resulting images reveals information about the heights of clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. This information can be visualized by rendering cloud surfaces with the appropriate height variations.

    The visualization reduces Jupiter's true cloud structure to two layers. The height of a high haze layer is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity of Jupiter at 889 nm. The height of a lower tropospheric cloud is assumed to be proportional to the reflectivity at 727 nm divided by that at 756

  1. Biochronology and paleoclimatic implications of Middle Eocene to Oligocene planktic foraminiferal faunas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, G.

    1983-01-01

    Planktic foraminiferal assemblages have been analyzed quantitatively in six DSDP sites in the Atlantic (Site 363), Pacific (Sites 292, 77B, 277), and Indian Ocean (Sites 219, 253) in order to determine the nature of the faunal turnover during Middle Eocene to Oligocene time. Biostratigraphic ranges of taxa and abundance distributions of dominant species are presented and illustrate striking similarities in faunal assemblages of low latitude regions in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. A high resolution biochronology, based on dominant faunal characteristics and 55 datum events, permits correlation between all three oceans with a high degree of precision. Population studies provide a view of the global impact of the paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic changes occurring during Middle Eocene to Oligocene time. Planktic foraminiferal assemblage changes indicate a general cooling trend between Middle Eocene to Oligocene time, consistent with previously published oxygen isotope data. Major faunal changes, indicating cooling episodes, occur, however, at discrete intervals: in the Middle Eocene 44-43 Ma (P13), the Middle/Late Eocene boundary 41-40 Ma ( P14 P15), the Late Eocene 39-38 Ma ( P15 P16), the Eocene/Oligocene boundary 37-36 Ma (P18), and the Late Oligocene 31-29 Ma ( P20 P21). With the exception of the E 0 boundary, faunal changes occur abruptly during short stratigraphic intervals, and are characterized by major species extinctions and first appearances. The Eocene/Oligocene boundary cooling is marked primarily by increasing abundances of cool water species. This suggests that the E 0 boundary cooling, which marks a major event in the oxygen isotope record affected planktic faunas less than during other cooling episodes. Planktic foraminiferal faunas indicate that the E 0 boundary event is part of a continued cooling trend which began during the Middle Eocene. Two hiatus intervals are recognized in low and high latitude sections at the Middle/Late Eocene

  2. Paleocene and Lower Eocene sections in the southern part of the Crimean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugrova, I. Yu.; Bugrova, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    This work summarizes updated data on Paleocene and Lower Eocene deposits of the Crimean Peninsula concerning the systematics of assemblages of small foraminifers (and partly data on other microfossils) and results of biostratigraphic subdivision of sections. It is shown that Lower Paleocene and Lower-Middle Eocene deposits accumulated during two cycles of carbonate sedimentation in a warm-water shallow basin. These deposits are separated by Upper Paleocene deep-water deposits. The systematic composition of foraminifers testifies that there were different facies conditions in different parts of the Crimean basin and its connection to Western European and Tethyan basins during the Paleocene-early Eocene.

  3. Identification of Late Eocene Impact Deposits at ODP Site 1090

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2001-01-01

    Anomalous concentrations of Ir have been found in upper Eocene sediments from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 1090B. Clear and dark-colored spherules that are believed to be microtektites and clinopyroxene- bearing microkrystites, respectively, were found in the samples with highest Ir. The peak Ir concentration in Sample 177- 1090B-30X-5,105-106 cm (954 pg/g) and the net Ir fluence (14 ng/cm2) at this site are higher that at most other localities except for Caribbean site RC9-58. The Ir anomaly and impact debris are probably correlative with similar deposits found at ODP Site 689 on the Maude Rise and at other localities around the world.

  4. Geochemical evidence for a comet shower in the late Eocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farley, K.A.; Montanari, A.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Shoemaker, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of pelagic limestones indicate that the flux of extraterrestrial helium-3 to Earth was increased for a 2.5-million year (My) period in the late Eocene. The enhancement began ~1 My before and ended ~1.5 My after the major impact events that produced the large Popigai and Chesapeake Bay craters ~36 million years ago. The correlation between increased concentrations of helium-3, a tracer of fine-grained interplanetary dust, and large impacts indicates that the abundance of Earth-crossing objects and dustiness in the inner solar system were simultaneously but only briefly enhanced. These observations provide evidence for a comet shower triggered by an impulsive perturbation of the Oort cloud.

  5. High latitude hydrological changes during the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Srinath; Pagani, Mark; Huber, Matthew; Sluijs, Appy

    2014-10-01

    The Eocene hyperthermals, including the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2), represent extreme global warming events ∼56 and 54 million years ago associated with rapid increases in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. An initial study on PETM characteristics in the Arctic region argued for intensification of the hydrological cycle and a substantial increase in poleward moisture transport during global warming based on compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotopic (2H/1H) records from sedimentary leaf-wax lipids. In this study, we apply this isotopic and hydrological approach on sediments deposited during ETM2 from the Lomonosov Ridge (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 302). Our results show similar 2H/1H changes during ETM2 as during the PETM, with a period of 2H-enrichment (∼20‰) relative to “pre-event” values just prior to the negative carbon isotope shift (CIE) that is often taken as the onset of the hyperthermal, and more negative lipid δ2H values (∼-15‰) during peak warming. Notably, lipid 2H-enrichment at the base of the event is coeval with colder TEX86H temperatures. If 2H/1H values of leaf waxes primarily reflect the hydrogen isotopic composition of precipitation, the observed local relationship between temperature and 2H/1H values for the body of ETM2 is precisely the opposite of what would be predicted using a simple Rayleigh isotope distillation model, assuming a meridional vapor trajectory and a reduction in equator-pole temperature gradients. Overall, a negative correlation exists between the average chain length of n-alkanes and 2H/1H suggesting that local changes in ecology could have impacted the hydrogen isotopic compositions of leaf waxes. The negative correlation falls across three separate intervals - the base of the event, the initial CIE, and during the H2 hyperthermal (of which the assignment is not fully certain). Three possible mechanisms potentially explain 2H

  6. Geochemical evidence for a comet shower in the late Eocene.

    PubMed

    Farley, K A; Montanari, A; Shoemaker, E M; Shoemaker, C S

    1998-05-22

    Analyses of pelagic limestones indicate that the flux of extraterrestrial helium-3 to Earth was increased for a 2.5-million year (My) period in the late Eocene. The enhancement began approximately 1 My before and ended approximately 1.5 My after the major impact events that produced the large Popigai and Chesapeake Bay craters approximately 36 million years ago. The correlation between increased concentrations of helium-3, a tracer of fine-grained interplanetary dust, and large impacts indicates that the abundance of Earth-crossing objects and dustiness in the inner solar system were simultaneously but only briefly enhanced. These observations provide evidence for a comet shower triggered by an impulsive perturbation of the Oort cloud. PMID:9596575

  7. Late Eocene Hydrological Conditions on the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feakins, S. J.; Deconto, R. M.; Warny, S.

    2013-12-01

    The late Eocene to Oligocene transition (EOT) witnessed a major ice advance on Antarctica. Little is known about hydrological conditions in the Antarctic Peninsula during the late Eocene prior to the major ice advance. Here we explore the hydrological conditions with proxy reconstructions from marine sediment core NBP0602A-3C, adjacent to the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, with sediments dated to approximately 35.9 × 1.1 Ma providing a snapshot of conditions prior to the EOT. We combine plant leaf wax hydrogen isotopic evidence paired with previously-published evidence from pollen assemblages from the marine core, and compare to results of climate model experiments. The pollen from late Eocene sediments of NBP0602A-3C indicate a Nothofagidites (southern beech) dominated landscape. In the same sediments, leaf wax hydrogen isotope (δDwax) values average -202×7‰ (1σ, n=22) for the C28 n-alkanoic acid. Based on an estimated net fractionation of -100‰, these values suggest paleoprecipitation δD values on the order of -118×8‰. The similarity between Late Eocene precipitation isotopic reconstructions (with no ice on what was then an island) and in situ modern isotopic values (while ice-covered) is surprising as ice-free conditions should imply warmer temperatures which would normally imply more enriched isotopic values. Convergent isotopic compositions during demonstrably different environments require a dynamical test to evaluate this validity of this isotopic result. In order to test the isotopic response to an expanding Antarctic ice sheet across the EOT, we conducted experiments with an isotope-enabled GCM. We simulated conditions before, during, and after the transition by systematically decreasing carbon dioxide levels from 1000 to 560 ppm while increasing ice volume to represent an ice-free to fully glaciated continent. Model experiments predict changes in vegetation cover from mixed forest to tundra biomes, reductions in austral summer temperature of

  8. Rain rate duration statistics derived from the Mid-Atlantic coast rain gauge network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius

    1993-01-01

    A rain gauge network comprised of 10 tipping bucket rain gauges located in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States has been in continuous operation since June 1, 1986. Rain rate distributions and estimated slant path fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz covering the first five year period were derived from the gauge network measurements, and these results were described by Goldhirsh. In this effort, rain rate time duration statistics are presented. The rain duration statistics are of interest for better understanding the physical nature of precipitation and to present a data base which may be used by modelers to convert to slant path fade duration statistics. Such statistics are important for better assessing optimal coding procedures over defined bandwidths.

  9. Eocene Structural Development of the Valhalla Complex, Southeastern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Sharon D.; Parrish, Randall R.; Brown, Richard L.

    1987-04-01

    The Valhalla complex, a Cordilleran metamorphic core complex, is a 100 km by 30 km structural culmination within the Omineca belt of southeastern British Columbia. It comprises sheets of granitic orthogneiss ranging in age from 100 to 59 Ma with intervening paragneiss of uncertain age and stratigraphic correlation. The complex is roofed by the ductile Valkyr shear zone and the ductile/brittle Slocan Lake fault zone; the upper plate comprises lower grade metasedimentary rocks intruded by middle Jurassic plutons. The Valkyr shear zone and the Slocan Lake fault zone deform 62 and 59 Ma granitic sheets in their footwalls. The easterly directed Valkyr shear zone is a 2 to 3 km thick zone of distributed ductile strain which is arched over the complex and is exposed around the periphery on the northern, western, and southern margins. The shear zone was active between 59 and 54 Ma under amphibolite facies conditions. The juxtaposition of upper and lower plates with different structural and metamorphic histories indicates that the Valkyr shear zone is a significant structure with large displacement. There is evidence to support an easterly rooting direction consistent with an extensional origin; its surface breakaway is suggested to be west of the Valhalla complex. The Slocan Lake fault zone on the eastern side of the complex is a gently (30°), easterly dipping ductile/brittle normal fault which roots to the east. It was active between 54 and approximately 45 Ma and truncates the Valkyr shear zone. Timing and structural relationships indicate that the Valkyr shear zone and the Slocan Lake fault zone are genetically related. Movement on the ductile Valkyr shear zone, arching of the complex, and displacement on the Slocan Lake fault zone occurred as a continuum in Early to Middle Eocene time. This paper documents the presence of significant Eocene ductile strain in the Valhalla complex and suggests that the role of extension in this region is more profound than had been

  10. Isotopic interrogation of a suspected late Eocene glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scher, Howie D.; Bohaty, Steven M.; Smith, Brian W.; Munn, Gabrielle H.

    2014-06-01

    Ephemeral polar glaciations during the middle-to-late Eocene (48-34 Ma) have been proposed based on far-field ice volume proxy records and near-field glacigenic sediments, although the scale, timing, and duration of these events are poorly constrained. Here we confirm the existence of a transient cool event within a new high-resolution benthic foraminiferal δ18O record at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 738 (Kerguelen Plateau; Southern Ocean). This event, named the Priabonian oxygen isotope maximum (PrOM) Event, lasted ~140 kyr and is tentatively placed within magnetochron C17n.1n (~37.3 Ma) based on the correlation to ODP Site 689 (Maud Rise, Southern Ocean). A contemporaneous change in the provenance of sediments delivered to the Kerguelen Plateau occurs at the study site, determined from the <63 µm fraction of decarbonated and reductively leached sediment samples. Changes in the mixture of bottom waters, based on fossil fish tooth ɛNd, were less pronounced and slower relative to the benthic δ18O and terrigenous ɛNd changes. Terrigenous sediment ɛNd values rapidly shifted to less radiogenic signatures at the onset of the PrOM Event, indicating an abrupt change in provenance favoring ancient sources such as the Paleoproterozoic East Antarctic craton. Bottom water ɛNd reached a minimum value during the PrOM Event, although the shift begins much earlier than the terrigenous ɛNd excursion. The origin of the abrupt change in terrigenous sediment provenance is compatible with a change in Antarctic terrigenous sediment flux and/or source as opposed to a reorganization of ocean currents. A change in terrigenous flux and/or source of Antarctic sediments during the oxygen isotope maximum suggests a combination of cooling and ice growth in East Antarctica during the early late Eocene.

  11. Widanelfarasia, a diminutive placental from the late Eocene of Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Seiffert, Erik R.; Simons, Elwyn L.

    2000-01-01

    The lower dentition of Widanelfarasia (new genus), a diminutive late Eocene placental from the Fayum Depression in Egypt, is described. Widanelfarasia exhibits a complex of features associated with incipient zalambdodonty and at least three unequivocal apomorphies [loss of P1, an enlarged I2 (relative to I3), and a basal cusp on I2], which provide weak support for its placement as a possible sister taxon of either a tenrecid–chrysochlorid clade or of solenodontids. The former hypothesis gains additional support from biogeographical evidence, but both scenarios are currently tenuous as Widanelfarasia is clearly not truly zalambdodont. Phylogenetic hypotheses positing affinities with tenrecids alone or chrysochlorids alone must invoke either convergent acquisition of zalambdodonty in these taxa or autapomorphic reversal in Widanelfarasia. Given these considerations, a relationship with more generalized taxa from the Laurasian Paleogene (e.g., geolabidids, nyctitheriids, leptictids) cannot yet be ruled out. Comparisons with other Paleogene Afro-Arabian forms are generally inconclusive. A relationship with the earlier Eocene Chambilestes from Tunisia—currently represented by a single specimen preserving P4–M3—seems possible based on the geometry and predicted occlusal relationships of these teeth, but cannot be confidently determined until these two taxa come to be represented by common diagnostic elements. Todralestes (late Paleocene, Morocco) exhibits general phenetic similarities to Widanelfarasia, but it is not yet known whether this taxon shares any of Widanelfarasia's unequivocal dental apomorphies. Pending the recovery of more informative material, we tentatively refer Widanelfarasia to Placentalia incertae sedis. Truly zalambdodont placentals remain conspicuously absent from the Paleogene of Afro-Arabia. PMID:10694573

  12. Rain-induced spring wheat harvest losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, A.; Black, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    When rain or a combination of rain and high humidity delay wheat harvest, losses can occur in grain yield and/or grain quality. Yield losses can result from shattering, from reduction in test weight, and in the case of windrowed grain, from rooting of sprouting grain at the soil: windrow contact. Losses in grain quality can result from reduction in test weight and from sprouting. Sprouting causes a degradation of grain proteins and starches, hence flour quality is reduced, and the grain price deteriorates to the value of feed grain. Although losses in grain yield and quality are rain-induced, these losses do not necessarily occur because a standing or windrowed crop is wetted by rain. Spike water concentration in hard red spring wheat must be increased to about 45-49% before sprouting is initiated in grain that has overcome dormancy. The time required to overcome this dormancy after the cultivar has dried to 12 to 14% water concentration differs with hard red spring cultivars. The effect of rain on threshing-ready standing and windrowed hard red spring wheat grain yeild and quality was evaluated. A goal was to develop the capability to forecast the extent of expected loss of grain yield and quality from specific climatic events that delay threshing.

  13. Acid rain and its ecological consequences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anita; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2008-01-01

    Acidification of rain-water is identified as one of the most serious environmental problems of transboundary nature. Acid rain is mainly a mixture of sulphuric and nitric acids depending upon the relative quantities of oxides of sulphur and nitrogen emissions. Due to the interaction of these acids with other constituents of the atmosphere, protons are released causing increase in the soil acidity Lowering of soil pH mobilizes and leaches away nutrient cations and increases availability of toxic heavy metals. Such changes in the soil chemical characteristics reduce the soil fertility which ultimately causes the negative impact on growth and productivity of forest trees and crop plants. Acidification of water bodies causes large scale negative impact on aquatic organisms including fishes. Acidification has some indirect effects on human health also. Acid rain affects each and every components of ecosystem. Acid rain also damages man-made materials and structures. By reducing the emission of the precursors of acid rain and to some extent by liming, the problem of acidification of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem has been reduced during last two decades. PMID:18831326

  14. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  15. Multidimensional Modeling of Coronal Rain Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2013-07-01

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  16. Study of interference by rain scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capsoni, C.; Paraboni, A.; Barbaliscia, F.; Martellucci, A.; Ordano, L.; Tarducci, D.; Poiares Baptista, J. P. V.

    Of the more important aspects of the problem of rain-scatter interference between radio links at frequencies above 10 GHz, some involve electromagnetic phenomena and the interaction between waves and scattering particles, and others the statistical properties of the rain structures and their influence on the interference statistics resulting from the movement of these structures across the antenna beams. The main physical, geometrical and 'system' aspects that play a role in the interference phenomena are briefly reviewed and appraised. The statistical aspects are also considered and the effects of the rain's spatial structure are described. The role of the radiating characteristics of the antennas is also considered. The algorithms proposed are then applied to practical systems and the results discussed. The main areas investigated are the bistatic radar equation, the effect of wave polarization and drop shape, a model for the horizontal structure of rain, a model for the spatial distribution of rain cells, the effect of the real antenna pattern, and the degradation of radio system performance.

  17. An improved model of equatorial scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secan, J. A.; Bussey, R. M.; Fremouw, E. J.; Basu, Sa.

    1995-05-01

    One of the main limitations of the modeling work that went into the equatorial section of the Wideband ionospheric scintillation model (WBMOD) was that the data set used in the modeling was limited to two stations near the dip equator (Ancon, Peru, and Kwajalein Island, in the North Pacific Ocean) at two fixed local times (nominally 1000 and 2200). Over the past year this section of the WBMOD model has been replaced by a model developed using data from three additional stations (Ascension Island, in the South Atlantic Ocean, Huancayo, Peru, and Manila, Phillipines; data collected under the auspices of the USAF Phillips Laboratory Geophysics Directorate) which provide a greater diversity in both latitude and longitude, as well as cover the entire day. The new model includes variations with latitude, local time, longitude, season, solar epoch, and geomagnetic activity levels. The way in which the irregularity strength parameter CkL is modeled has also been changed. The new model provides the variation of the full probability distribution function (PDF) of log (CkL) rather than simply the average of log (CkL). This permits the user to specify a threshold on scintillation level, and the model will calculate the percent of the time that scintillation will exceed that level in the user-specified scenario. It will also permit calculation of scintillation levels at a user-specified percentile. A final improvement to the WBMOD model is the implementation of a new theory for calculating S4 on a two-way channel.

  18. Resent Status of ITER Equatorial Launcher Development

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Kasugai, A.; Oda, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.

    2009-11-26

    The ITER equatorial launcher is divided into a front shield and a port plug. The front shield is composed of fourteen blanket shield modules so as to form three openings for the injection of mm-wave beams into plasma. Twenty-four waveguide transmission lines, internal shields, cooling pipes and so on are installed in the port plug. The transmission lines consist of the corrugated waveguides, miter bends and the free space propagation region utilizing two mirrors in front of the waveguide outlet. The analysis of mm-wave beam propagation in the region shows that the transmission efficiency more than 99.5% is attained. The high power experiments of the launcher mock-up have been carried out and the measured field patterns at each mirror and the outlet of the launcher are agreed with the calculations. It is concluded that the transmission line components in the launcher mock-up are fabricated as designed and the present mm-wave design in the launcher is feasible.

  19. The Condor equatorial electrojet campaign - Radar results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudeki, Erhan; Fejer, Bela G.; Farley, Donald T.; Hanuise, Christian

    1987-12-01

    The results of two Condor equatorial electrojet experiments (i.e., a daytime and a nighttime experiments on March 12, 1983), in which Condor rocked turbulence measurements were obtained simultaneously with VHF radar interferometer and HF radar backscatter observations, are discussed. The daytime Condor experiment showed that the electrojet could be made turbulent by either the gradient drift or the two-stream instability, or both. Pure two-stream turbulence was observed on the topside layer in the daytime electrojet suggesting that mode coupling processes should be included in nonlinear saturation theories of two-stream waves. In the nighttime experiment, radar data showed a bifurcated layer with the two parts having comparable echo strength but oppositely directed zonal drift velocities. The lower layer showed narrow backscatter spectra, while the upper layer was characterized by kilometer scale waves and vertically propagating type one waves. The characteristics of the topside large-scale waves were consistent with the predictions of nonlocal gradient drift instability theories.

  20. Three-dimensional modeling equatorial spread F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Krall, J.; Joyce, G.

    2008-12-01

    Equatorial spread F (ESF) is a low-latitude ionospheric phenomenon that leads to the development of large scale electron density depletions that adversely affect communications and navigation systems. The development of models to understand and predict the onset and evolution of ESF is therefore critically important to a number of space-based systems. To this end, NRL has developed a three-dimensional model of ESF. The global NRL ionosphere model SAMI3 has been modified to simulate a narrow wedge of the post-sunset ionosphere to capture the onset and evolution of ESF. Preliminary results indicate that (1) bubbles can rise to ~ 1600 km, (2) extremely steep ion density gradients can develop in both longitude and latitude, (3) upward plasma velocities approach 1 km/s, and (4) the growth time of the instability is ~eq 15 min. We will also report the effects of meridional and zonal winds on bubble development, as well as ion composition (both atomic and molecular). The simulations will focus on current, low solar activity conditions, and results will be compared to C/NOFS data where available. Research supported by ONR

  1. Vertical motions in the equatorial middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisman, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A single station vertical velocity equation which considers ageostrophic and diabatic effects derived from the first law of thermodynamics and a generalized thermal wind relation is presented. An analysis and verification procedure which accounts for measurement and calculation errors as well as time and space continuity arguments and theoretical predictions are described. Vertical velocities are calculated at every kilometer between 25 and 60 km and for approximately every three hours for the above diurnal period at Kourou (French Guiana), Fort Sherman (Panama Canal Zone), Ascension Island, Antigua (British West Indies) and Natal (Brazil). The results, plotted as time series cross sections, suggest vertical motions ranging in magnitude from 1 or 2 cm/sec at 30 km to as much as 15 cm/sec at 60 km. Many of the general features of the results agree well with atmospheric tidal predictions but many particular features suggest that both smaller time scale gravity waves (periods less than 6 hours) and synoptic type waves (periods greater than 1 day) may be interacting significantly with the tidal fields. The results suggest that vertical motions can be calculated for the equatorial middle atmosphere and must be considered a significant part of the motion for time scales from 8 to 24 hours.

  2. Onset conditions for equatorial spread F

    SciTech Connect

    Mendillo, M.; Baumgardner, J.; Xiaoqing Pi; Sultan, P.J. ); Tsunoda, R. )

    1992-09-01

    The problem of day-to-day variability in the occurrence of equatorial spread F (ESF) is addressed using multidiagnostic observations and semiempirical modeling. The observational results are derived from a two-night case study of ESF onset conditions observed at Kwajalein Atoll (Marshall Islands) using the ALTAIR incoherent scatter radar and all-sky optical imaging techniques. The major difference between nights when ESF instabilities did not occur (August 14, 1988) and did occur (August 15, 1988) in the Kwajalein sector was that the northern meridional gradient of 6300-[angstrom] airglow was reduced on the night of limited ESF activity. Modeling results suggest that this unusual airglow pattern is due to equatorward neutral winds. Previous researchers have shown that transequatorial thermospheric winds can exert a control over ESF seasonal and longitudinal occurrence patterns by inhibiting Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rates. They present evidence to suggest that this picture can be extended to far shorter time scales, namely, that 'surges' in transequatoral winds acting over characteristic times of a few hours to a day can result in a stabilizing influence upon irregularity growth rates. The seemingly capricious nature of ESF onset may thus be controlled, in part, by the inherent variability of low-latitude thermospheric winds.

  3. Onset conditions for equatorial spread F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendillo, Michael; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Pi, Xiaoqing; Sultan, Peter J.; Tsunoda, Roland

    1992-01-01

    The problem of day-to-day variability in the occurrence of equatorial spread F (ESF) is addressed using multidiagnostic observations and semiempirical modeling. The observational results are derived from a two-night case study of ESF onset conditions observed at Kwajalein Atoll (Marshall Islands) using the ALTAIR incoherent scatter radar and all-sky optical imaging techniques. The major difference between nights when ESF instabilities did not occur (August 14, 1988) and did occur (August 15, 1988) in the Kwajalein sector was that the northern meridional gradient of 6300-A airglow was reduced on the night of limited ESF activity. Modeling results suggest that this unusual airglow pattern is due to equatorward neutral winds. Previous researchers have shown that transequatorial thermospheric winds can exert a control over ESF seasonal and longitudinal occurrence patterns by inhibiting Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rates. Evidence is presented to suggest that this picture can be extended to far shorter time scales, namely, that 'surges' in transequatorial winds acting over characteristic times of a few hours to a day can result in a stabilizing influence upon irregularity growth rates. The seemingly capricious nature of ESF onset may thus be controlled, in part, by the inherent variability of low-latitude thermospheric winds.

  4. Intercomparison of simulated South Equatorial Current Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorelli, N. T.; Treguier, A. M.; Wainer, I.; Deshayes, J.

    2013-05-01

    The gradual weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the twenty-first century, as predicted by climate models contributing to the 4th IPCC report, motivated numerous studies of the AMOC using observations and model simulations in the North Atlantic, but only few studies have focused on the South Atlantic. This study investigates and intercompares the AMOC in the South Atlantic in SODA ocean reanalysis and various model simulations. Close to Brazilian shelf, the North Brazilian Undercurrent (NBUC) is one of the main conduits for AMOC upper branch. Another one is the Intermediate Western Boundary Current (IWBC). Both of these western boundary currents are affected by the South Equatorial Current bifurcation. Since the bifurcation is under distinct regimes in the surface and intermediate depths with dissimilar temporal variability, at least at seasonal timescales, NBUC and IWBC systems are expected to contribute differently to AMOC variability. We test this hypothesis using the outputs of 3 ocean-only models of varying resolution (1, 1/2 and 1/12 deg) forced by atmospheric reanalyses, and the ocean reanalysis SODA. Preliminary investigations concern the time variability of the bifurcation position, on seasonal to interannual timescales, and its relationship with atmospheric forcings (e.g. wind stress curl) and global climate indices (such as AMOC, ENSO, NAO, AMO…).

  5. POGO observations of the equatorial electrojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, J. C.; Sweeney, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    During intervals in 1967 to 1970, the OGO-4 and 6 spacecraft made over 2000 traversals over the equatorial electrojet in the altitude range 400-800 km when local times were between 9 and 15 hours. These spacecraft carried total field magnetometers making measurements to an accuracy of 2 gamma with a sample rate greater than once a second. Delta F values, the deviations from these observations, were formed from an internal reference model. The results were plotted for a 30 deg band about the equator, and the characteristics of the electrojet effect in the data were investigated. This effect was characterized by a sharp negative V-signature of some 16-19 deg in width and a variable amplitude. The position of this minimum was found to lie within 0.5 deg of the dip equator. A slight northward shift was noted at the longitude of Huancayo. The jet amplitudes were normalized to 400 km amplitudes and observed to be highly variable in time. Amplitudes over the longitude range 50 to 90 deg W averaged 60% higher than elsewhere, as expected, due to the weaker main field. However, though the scatter of amplitudes is high, the expected minima in east Asia was not evident. It was speculated that this could be due to a less conducting upper mantle in this area.

  6. Resent Status of ITER Equatorial Launcher Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Kasugai, A.; Oda, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.

    2009-11-01

    The ITER equatorial launcher is divided into a front shield and a port plug. The front shield is composed of fourteen blanket shield modules so as to form three openings for the injection of mm-wave beams into plasma. Twenty-four waveguide transmission lines, internal shields, cooling pipes and so on are installed in the port plug. The transmission lines consist of the corrugated waveguides, miter bends and the free space propagation region utilizing two mirrors in front of the waveguide outlet. The analysis of mm-wave beam propagation in the region shows that the transmission efficiency more than 99.5% is attained. The high power experiments of the launcher mock-up have been carried out and the measured field patterns at each mirror and the outlet of the launcher are agreed with the calculations. It is concluded that the transmission line components in the launcher mock-up are fabricated as designed and the present mm-wave design in the launcher is feasible.

  7. Catastrophic ape decline in western equatorial Africa.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Peter D; Abernethy, Kate A; Bermejo, Magdalena; Beyers, Rene; De Wachter, Pauwel; Akou, Marc Ella; Huijbregts, Bas; Mambounga, Daniel Idiata; Toham, Andre Kamdem; Kilbourn, Annelisa M; Lahm, Sally A; Latour, Stefanie; Maisels, Fiona; Mbina, Christian; Mihindou, Yves; Obiang, Sosthène Ndong; Effa, Ernestine Ntsame; Starkey, Malcolm P; Telfer, Paul; Thibault, Marc; Tutin, Caroline E G; White, Lee J T; Wilkie, David S

    2003-04-10

    Because rapidly expanding human populations have devastated gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) and common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) habitats in East and West Africa, the relatively intact forests of western equatorial Africa have been viewed as the last stronghold of African apes. Gabon and the Republic of Congo alone are thought to hold roughly 80% of the world's gorillas and most of the common chimpanzees. Here we present survey results conservatively indicating that ape populations in Gabon declined by more than half between 1983 and 2000. The primary cause of the decline in ape numbers during this period was commercial hunting, facilitated by the rapid expansion of mechanized logging. Furthermore, Ebola haemorrhagic fever is currently spreading through ape populations in Gabon and Congo and now rivals hunting as a threat to apes. Gorillas and common chimpanzees should be elevated immediately to 'critically endangered' status. Without aggressive investments in law enforcement, protected area management and Ebola prevention, the next decade will see our closest relatives pushed to the brink of extinction. PMID:12679788

  8. Exact and Explicit Internal Equatorial Water Waves with Underlying Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluczek, Mateusz

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present an exact and explicit solution to the geophysical governing equations in the Equatorial region, which represents internal oceanic waves in the presence of a constant underlying current.

  9. AN EQUATORIAL PACIFIC RAIN EVENT: INFLUENCE ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF IRON AND HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods are described for measuring changes in atmospheric O2 concentration with emphasis on gas handling procedures. Cryogenically dried air samples are collected in 5 L glass flasks at ambient pressure and analyzed against reference gases derived from high-pressure aluminum tan...

  10. On Irrotational Flows Beneath Periodic Traveling Equatorial Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirchmayr, Ronald

    2016-08-01

    We discuss some aspects of the velocity field and particle trajectories beneath periodic traveling equatorial surface waves over a flat bed in a flow with uniform underlying currents. The system under study consists of the governing equations for equatorial ocean waves within a non-inertial frame of reference, where Euler's equation of motion has to be suitably adjusted, in order to account for the influence of the earth's rotation.

  11. Photoelectron escape fluxes over the equatorial and midlatitude regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasingarao, B. C.; Singh, R. N.; Maier, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite measurements of photoelectron escape flux around noontime made by Explorer 31 in 600-800 km altitude range are reported for the equatorial and midlatitude regions. The pitch angle distributions and the spectral distributions are derived from the data. Analyzed data show that the flux for equatorial regions is lower by a factor 2 to 3 in comparison to that of midlatitude regions. Theoretical calculations are also made to compare with observed escape fluxes.

  12. Pollutant particle scavenging by rain drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, J. J.; Cârsteanu, A. A.; García, C. A.

    2003-04-01

    Scavenging of air pollutants by rain drops has been studied from various angles of the phenomenon: spatial distribution of drops, size distribution of the larger drops, and scavenging properties of individual drops have been taken into account. The latter makes the object of the present work. In order to study the movement of pollutant particles in the neighborhood of a falling rain drop, a fixed drop is subjected in situ to a vertical air current containing pollutant particles of several microns in size, originating from a Diesel engine exhaust, which are essentially composed of soot. While the speed of the air current reproduces the terminal velocity of the respective rain drop, the trajectories of the particles around the drops are being followed by digital imagery, through an optical microscope. We present the adhesion statistics of boundary layer particles to the water drops, and the incorporation of these results into a multifractal rainfall field model.

  13. Canada issues booklet describing acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A booklet recently released by Environment Canada describes acid rain in terms easily understood by the general public. Although Acid Rain — The Facts tends somewhat to give the Canadian side of this intercountry controversial subject, it nevertheless presents some very interesting, simple statistics of interest to people in either the U.S. or Canada. Copies of the booklet can be obtained from Inquiry Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A OH3, Canada, tel. 613-997-2800.The booklet points out that acid rain is caused by emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Once released into the atmosphere, these substances can be carried long distances by prevailing winds and return to Earth as acidic rain, snow, fog, or dust. The main sources of SO2 emissions in North America are coal-fired power generating stations and nonferrous ore smelters. The main sources of NOx emissions are vehicles and fuel combustion. From economical and environmental viewpoints, Canada believes acid rain is one of the most serious problems presently facing the country: increasing the acidity of more than 20% of Canada's 300,000 lakes to the point that aquatic life is depleted and acidity of soil water and shallow groundwater is increasing, causing decline in forest growth and water fowl populations, and eating away at buildings and monuments. Acid rain is endangering fisheries, tourism, agriculture, and forest resources in an area of 2.6 million km2 (one million square miles) of eastern Canada, about 8% of Canada's gross national product.

  14. Rain in the U.S. Midwest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The powerful storms that moved across the U.S. Midwest during the first week of May 2007 brought wind, hail, tornadoes, and drenching rain. This image shows rainfall totals over parts of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska between May 1 and May 8, based in part on measurements made by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. More than 400 millimeters (15.7 inches) of rain fell over some regions, corresponding with locations where the National Weather Service reported severe weather. A wide swath of red and orange (between 240 and 400 millimeters of rain) arcs in a clockwise direction from western Oklahoma, through central Kansas, and into southeastern Nebraska. The reddish-orange bull's-eye over southeastern Louisiana is evidence of the torrential rains that pounded visitors to the annual New Orleans Jazz Festival. South-central Texas' Edward Plateau was soaked with more than 240 millimeters of rain during the period, as well. From May 4 to May 8, the National Weather Service received approximately 683 reports of severe weather, 140 of which were reports of tornadoes, including the massive F5 tornado that devastated the city of Greensburg, Kansas. Beyond the damaging winds and tornadoes, the torrential rain triggered extensive flooding throughout the Central Plains. On the evening of May 7, flood warnings were in effect from South Dakota to southern Texas, and by May 8, the Hydrologic Information Center reported moderate to major flooding at 53 stream gauge sites in South Dakota, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, and Arkansas. The floods could be as severe as the 1993 flood, one of the costliest floods in U.S. history, reported the Associated Press.

  15. Late Cretaceous-Early Eocene Climate Change Linked to Tectonic Eevolution of Neo-Tethyan Subduction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, O. E.; Royden, L.; Macdonald, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we demonstrate that the two tectonic events in the late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary triggered the two distinct cooling events that followed the Cretaceous Thermal Maximum (CTM). During much of the Cretaceous time, the northern Neo Tethyan ocean was dominated by two east-west striking subduction system. Subduction underneath Eurasia formed a continental arc on the southern margin of Eurasia and intra oceanic subduction in the equatorial region of the Neo Tethys formed and intra oceanic arc. Beginning at ~85-90 Ma the western part of the TTSS collided southward with the Afro-Arabian continental margin, terminating subduction. This resulted in southward obduction of the peri-Arabian ophiolite belt, which extends for ~4000 km along strike and includes the Cypus, Semail and Zagros ophiolites. At the same time also the eastern part of the TTS collided northwards wit Eurasia. After this collisional event, only the central part of the subduction system remained active until it collided with the northern margin of the Indian continent at ~50-55 Ma. The collision of the arc with the Indian margin, over a length of ~3000 km, also resulted in the obduction of arc material and ophiolitic rocks. Remnants of these rocks are preserved today as the Kohistan-Ladakh arc and ophiolites of the Indus-Tsangpo suture zone of the Himalayas. Both of these collision events occurred in the equatorial region, near or within the ITCZ, where chemical weathering rates are high and are contemporaneous with the onset of the global cooling events that mark the end of the CTM and the EECO. The tectonic collision events resulted in a shut down of subduction zone magmatism, a major CO2 source and emplacement of highly weatherable basaltic rocks within the ITCZ (CO2 sink). In order to explore the effect of the events in the TTSS on atmospheric CO2, we model the potential contribution of subduction zone volcanism (source) and ophiolite obduction (sink) to the global atmospheric CO2

  16. Differing Eocene floral histories in southeastern North America and Western Europe: influence of paleogeography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederiksen, N.O.

    1995-01-01

    Pollen data show that in southeastern North America, the Eocene angiosperm flora attained its maximum relative diversity some 8 m.y. after the late early Eocene to earliest middle Eocene to earliest middle Eocene climatic maximum. Increasing diversity resulted in part from the flora's position on a large continent which allowed easy migration. In western Europe, the floral diversity began decreasing even before the climatic maximum. Paleogeography played large roles in this diversity decrease. In western Europe, terrestrial floras were on islands and peninsulas in the sea, so that the floras underwent increasing isolation and partial local extermination. Temperate plants generally did not migrate to western Europe, because of a lack of nearby uplands, lack of northern terrestrial source areas for these plants, and presence of the Turgai Straights barrier. -from Authors

  17. Microfloral diversity patterns of the late Paleocene Eocene interval in Colombia, northern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Carlos A.; Dilcher, David L.

    2000-09-01

    The late Paleocene early Eocene interval was characterized by a long period of global warming that culminated with the highest temperatures of the Tertiary. This interval was also associated with plant extinctions and a subsequent increase in plant diversity in temperate latitudes. However, tropical regions remain largely unknown. We compare the microfloral diversity of the late Paleocene with the late early to middle Eocene in flood plain, coastal plain, and estuarine facies of a section in the Colombian eastern Andes. Several techniques such as range-through method, rarefaction, bootstrap, detrended correspondence analysis, and Simpson index were used to assess the significance of the diversity pattern observed throughout the section. The microfloral record indicates a distinct, diverse Paleocene flora declining toward the end of the Paleocene, being replaced by a different and much more diverse Eocene flora. It is uncertain, however, how these floral changes correlate with the latest Paleocene thermal maximum and Eocene thermal maximum events.

  18. Fossil palm beetles refine upland winter temperatures in the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, S. Bruce; Morse, Geoffrey E.; Greenwood, David R.; Mathewes, Rolf W.

    2014-01-01

    Eocene climate and associated biotic patterns provide an analog system to understand their modern interactions. The relationship between mean annual temperatures and winter temperatures—temperature seasonality—may be an important factor in this dynamic. Fossils of frost-intolerant palms imply low Eocene temperature seasonality into high latitudes, constraining average winter temperatures there to >8 °C. However, their presence in a paleocommunity may be obscured by taphonomic and identification factors for macrofossils and pollen. We circumvented these problems by establishing the presence of obligate palm-feeding beetles (Chrysomelidae: Pachymerina) at three localities (a fourth, tentatively) in microthermal to lower mesothermal Early Eocene upland communities in Washington and British Columbia. This provides support for warmer winter Eocene climates extending northward into cooler Canadian uplands. PMID:24821798

  19. Acid rain and electric utilities 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This proceedings contains more than 100 technical presentations dealing with a variety of topics concerning the Title IV acid rain provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Some of the major topics addressed include: emerging environmental issues impacting electric utilities (proposed revisions to the ozone and particulate matter NAAQS), acid rain program overview, continuous emissions monitoring rule revisions, global climate change and CO{sub 2}, emissions data management, Clean Air Power Initiative and regional issues, compliance/designated representative, flow monitoring, emissions control technology, allowance and trading, emission reductions, NO{sub x} control issues, hazardous air pollutants, and CEMS advances.

  20. Influence of Assimilation of Subsurface Temperature Measurements on Simulations of Equatorial Undercurrent and South Equatorial Current Along the Pacific Equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Leetmaan, Ants; Reynolds, Richard W.; Ji, Ming

    1997-01-01

    Equatorial Pacific current and temperature fields were simulated with and without assimilation of subsurface temperature measurements for April 1992 - March 1995, and compared with moored bouy and research vessel current measurements.

  1. Late Eocene- Oligocene magnetostratigraphy and biostratigraphy at South Atlantic DSDP site 522.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, R.Z.; Tauxe, L.; Percival, S.F., Jr.; Labrecque, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Upper Eocene to lowest Miocene sediments recovered at DSDP Site 522 in the S Atlantic Ocean allow direct calibration of magnetostratigraphy and calcareous plankton biostratigraphy. The results from Site 522 show that the Eocene/Oligocene boundary occurs in the reversed interval of magnetic Chron C13 (= C13R) and that the Oligocene/Miocene boundary probably occurs in the upper part of Chron C6C.-Authors

  2. Benthic foraminifera at the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum in the western Tethys (Forada section): variability in climate and productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusberti, L.; Boscolo Galazzo, F.; Thomas, E.

    2015-09-01

    overall arid climate, characterized by strong winds and intense upwelling, with an overall humid climate, with abundant rains and high sediment delivery (including refractory organic carbon) from land. Precessionally paced marl-limestone couplets occur throughout the recovery interval of the CIE and up to ten meters above it, suggesting that these wet-dry cycles persisted, though at declining intensity, after the peak PETM. Enhanced climate extremes at mid-latitudes might have been a direct response to the massive CO2 input in the ocean atmosphere system at the Paleocene-Eocene transition, and may have had a primary role in restoring the Earth system to steady state.

  3. Variability in climate and productivity during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in the western Tethys (Forada section)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusberti, L.; Boscolo Galazzo, F.; Thomas, E.

    2016-02-01

    arid climate, characterized by strong winds and intense upwelling, and an overall humid climate, with abundant rains and high sediment delivery (including refractory organic carbon) from land. Precessionally paced marl-limestone couplets occur throughout the recovery interval of the carbon isotope excursion (CIE) and up to 10 m above it, suggesting that these wet-dry cycles persisted, though at declining intensity, after the peak PETM. Enhanced climate extremes at mid-latitudes might have been a direct response to the massive CO2 input in the ocean atmosphere system at the Paleocene-Eocene transition, and may have had a primary role in restoring the Earth system to steady state.

  4. Equatorial Kelvin waves: A UARS MLS view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canziani, Pablo O.; Holton, James R.; Fishbein, Evan; Froidevaux, Lucien; Waters, Joe W.

    1994-01-01

    Data from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are used to compare two periods of Kelvin wave activity during different stages of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation. The analysis is carried out using an asynoptic mapping technique. A wide bandpass filter is used to isolate the frequency bands where Kelvin waves have been identified in previous studies. Time-height and time-latitude plots of the bandpassed data are used to identify Kelvin wave activity in the temperature and ozone fields. Frequency spectra of temperature and ozone amplitudes are constructed to further analyze the latitudinal and meridional distribution of Kelvin wave activity in zonal wavenumbers 1 and 2. The characteristics identified in these plots agree well with theoretical predictions and previous observations of middle atmosphere Kelvin waves. The time-height and time-latitude plots support the existence of Kelvin waves in discrete frequency bands; the slow, fast, and ultrafast Kelvin modes are all identified in the data. The characteristics of these modes do not vary much despite different mean flow conditions in the two periods examined. For the Kelvin wave-induced perturbations in ozone, the change from a transport-dominated regime below 10 hPa to a photochemically controlled regime above 10 hPa is clearly apparent in the height dependence of the phase difference between temperature and ozone. The ratios of the ozone perturbation amplitude to the temperature perturbation amplitude for the various observed Kelvin wave modes are in agreement with model estimates and LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) observations in the lower half of the region sampled but appear to be too large in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere.

  5. Isostatic compensation of equatorial highlands on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucinskas, Algis B.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    Spherical harmonic models for Venus' global topography and gravity incorporating Magellan data are used to test isostatic compensation models in five 30 deg x 30 deg regions representative of the main classes of equatorial highlands. The power spectral density for the harmonic models obeys a power-law scaling with spectral slope Beta approximately 2 (Brown noise) for the topography and Beta approximately 3 (Kaula's law) for the geoid, similar to what is observed for Earth. The Venus topography spectrum has lower amplitudes than Earth's which reflects the dominant lowland topography on Venus. Observed degree geoid to topography ratios (GTRs) on Venus are significantly smaller than degree GTRs for uncompensated topography, indicative of substantial compensation. Assuming a global Airy compensation, most of the topography is compensated at depths greater than 100 km, suggesting a thick lithosphere on Venus. For each region considered we obtain a regional degree of compensation C from a linear regression of Bouguer anomaly versus Bouguer gravity data. Geoid anomaly (N) versus topography variation (h) data for each sample were compared, in the least-squares sense, to theoretical correlations for Pratt, Airy, and thermal thinning isostasy models yielding regional GTR, zero-elevation crustal thickness (H), and zero elevation thermal lithosphere thickness (y(sub L(sub 0)), respectively. We find the regional compensation to be substantial (C approximately 52-80%), and the h, N data correlations in the chosen areas can be explained by isostasy models applicable on the Earth and involving variations in crustal thickness (Airy) and/or lithospheric (thermal thinning) thickness. However, a thick crust and lithosphere (y(sub L(sub 0)) approximately 300 km) must be assumed for Venus.

  6. A Drying Trend in Central Equatorial Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, J.; Hartter, J.; Ryan, S. J.; Palace, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    There has been considerable uncertainty about changes in rainfall over central equatorial Africa over the past three decades due to a lack of reliable rainfall data in the region. This region contains the northern portion of the Albertine Rift, which is one of the world's hotspots for biodiversity, and within this region there is an exploding human population dependent on rainfed agriculture. Both the human population and conservation/preservation areas are becoming increasingly sensitive to changes in rainfall. There now exists an accurate, high-resolution, satellite based precipitation dataset, African Rainfall Climatology version 2 (ARC2), for the region that provides daily rainfall estimates from 1983 to the present. Here we show significant declines in monthly and annual rainfall in west-central Uganda, which exists in the far northeastern portion of the Rift, from 1983-2012. The decrease in annual rainfall was 110 mm per decade. Therefore, the current annual rainfall of approximately 1,200 mm is less than 80% of the annual rainfall three decades ago. The drying trend most likely extended westward into the Congo Basin. There were significant increasing (decreasing) trends in light-rainfall (heavy-rainfall) days over the period. Using results from previous studies, Indian Ocean warming and increasing carbonaceous aerosols from biomass burning in tropical Africa, are explored as potential causes of the drying trend. The aim of the study is not to find the fingerprint of local and regional anthropogenic forcings on the drying trend, but our results suggest that those forcings could be a leading cause of the drying trend.

  7. Neotectonics in the northern equatorial Brazilian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Dilce F.; Souza, Lena S. B.; Prado, Renato; Elis, Vagner R.

    2012-08-01

    An increasing volume of publications has addressed the role of tectonics in inland areas of northern Brazil during the Neogene and Quaternary, despite its location in a passive margin. Hence, northern South America plate in this time interval might have not been as passive as usually regarded. This proposal needs further support, particularly including field data. In this work, we applied an integrated approach to reveal tectonic structures in Miocene and late Quaternary strata in a coastal area of the Amazonas lowland. The investigation, undertaken in Marajó Island, mouth of the Amazonas River, consisted of shallow sub-surface geophysical data including vertical electric sounding and ground penetrating radar. These methods were combined with morphostructural analysis and sedimentological/stratigraphic data from shallow cores and a few outcrops. The results revealed two stratigraphic units, a lower one with Miocene age, and an upper one of Late Pleistocene-Holocene age. An abundance of faults and folds were recorded in the Miocene deposits and, to a minor extent, in overlying Late Pleistocene-Holocene strata. In addition to characterize these structures, we discuss their origin, considering three potential mechanisms: Andean tectonics, gravity tectonics related to sediment loading in the Amazon Fan, and rifting at the continental margin. Amongst these hypotheses, the most likely is that the faults and folds recorded in Marajó Island reflect tectonics associated with the history of continental rifting that gave rise to the South Atlantic Ocean. This study supports sediment deposition influenced by transpression and transtension associated with strike-slip divergence along the northern Equatorial Brazilian margin in the Miocene and Late Pleistocene-Holocene. This work records tectonic evidence only for the uppermost few ten of meters of this sedimentary succession. However, available geological data indicate a thickness of up to 6 km, which is remarkably thick for

  8. New rain rate analyses to assess rain attenuation on satellite EHF communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattelman, Paul

    1989-03-01

    This paper provides estimates of the frequency of occurrence, duration, and probability of satellite EHF communication outages due to attenuation by rain. These can be used to determine optimum frequencies, power levels, and the need for space diversity of terminals or other alternatives to maintain reliable communications. Ten years of 1 min rain rates at each of 12 U.S. cities were used in conjunction with an attenuation model to quantify communication outages at locations representing a variety of climatic regimes. Analyses of the 1 min rain rates and outage estimates at 10, 30 and 45 GHz for elevation angles of 10, 30, 50 and 70 deg are presented.

  9. Response To The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum Of Calcareous Nannofossils: Observations On Composition, Preservation And Calcification In Sediments From ODP Reference Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffi, I.; de Bernardi, B.

    2007-12-01

    Studies on a climate extreme as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~ 55 myrs ago) have shown the effects of these critical conditions on global biogeochemical cycles and ecosystem, including the marine and terrestrial biota. A prominent negative shift (~ 3 ‰) in marine δ13C, the Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE) reflects the input of a large amount of isotopically depleted carbon in the ocean- atmosphere system. Studies of the few complete deep-sea sections recovered to date have shown how global climate, atmospheric CO2 levels, marine carbonate chemistry and continental weathering were dynamically related during the PETM. Together, these changes should have strongly influenced the calcifying organisms living in the surface (photic zone) of the oceans. For this reason, recent investigations have focus on the planktonic community response to the shifts in oceanic environments during the PETM, specifically the response of calcifying microplankton to higher CO2 and lower pH, as well as the possible role of plankton in drawing down CO2. Calcareous nannofossils seem to play an important role in these interrelated mechanisms. For this reason we have performed detailed micropaleontologic analysis (using a SEM) of calcareous nannofossil assemblages in selected samples from selected Paleocene/Eocene deep-sea sediment cores with the purpose of documenting possible influence on assemblage composition and preservation. The sediments studied in detail are from ODP Site 1263 (from Southern East Atlantic, Walvis Ridge) that has been chosen as representative of one of the few complete PETM deep-sea cores. Comparative analyses were performed in few selected samples from sections located at different latitudes in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans (ODP Site 929, paleo-equatorial Atlantic, Ceara Rise; ODP Site 689, high-latitude Southern Atlantic, Maud Rise; ODP Sites 1215 and 1221, Eastern equatorial Pacific; ODP Site 1209, central Pacific, Shatsky Rise). This study documents

  10. The palaeobiology of high latitude birds from the early Eocene greenhouse of Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada.

    PubMed

    Stidham, Thomas A; Eberle, Jaelyn J

    2016-01-01

    Fossils attributable to the extinct waterfowl clade Presbyornithidae and the large flightless Gastornithidae from the early Eocene (~52-53 Ma) of Ellesmere Island, in northernmost Canada are the oldest Cenozoic avian fossils from the Arctic. Except for its slightly larger size, the Arctic presbyornithid humerus is not distinguishable from fossils of Presbyornis pervetus from the western United States, and the Gastornis phalanx is within the known size range of mid-latitude individuals. The occurrence of Presbyornis above the Arctic Circle in the Eocene could be the result of annual migration like that of its living duck and geese relatives, or it may have been a year-round resident similar to some Eocene mammals on Ellesmere and some extant species of sea ducks. Gastornis, along with some of the mammalian and reptilian members of the Eocene Arctic fauna, likely over-wintered in the Arctic. Despite the milder (above freezing) Eocene climate on Ellesmere Island, prolonged periods of darkness occurred during the winter. Presence of these extinct birds at both mid and high latitudes on the northern continents provides evidence that future increases in climatic warming (closer to Eocene levels) could lead to the establishment of new migratory or resident populations within the Arctic Circle. PMID:26867798

  11. A structural intermediate between triisodontids and mesonychians (Mammalia, Acreodi) from the earliest Eocene of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Tabuce, Rodolphe; Clavel, Julien; Antunes, Miguel Telles

    2011-02-01

    A new mammal, Mondegodon eutrigonus gen. et sp. nov., is described from the earliest Eocene locality of Silveirinha, Portugal. This species shows dental adaptations indicative of a carnivorous diet. M. eutrigonus is referred to the order Acreodi and considered, along with the early Paleocene North American species Oxyclaenus cuspidatus, as a morphological intermediate between two groups of ungulate-like mammals, namely, the triisodontids and mesonychians. Considering that triisodontids are early to early-late Paleocene North American taxa, Mondegodon probably belongs to a group that migrated from North America towards Europe during the first part of the Paleocene. Mondegodon could represent thus a relict genus, belonging to the ante-Eocene European mammalian fauna. The occurrence of such a taxon in Southern Europe may reflect a period of isolation of this continental area during the Paleocene/Eocene transition. In this context, the non-occurrence of closely allied forms of Mondegodon in the Eocene North European mammalian faunas is significant. This strengthens the hypothesis that the mammalian fauna from Southern Europe is characterized by a certain degree of endemism during the earliest Eocene. Mondegodon also presents some striking similarities with an unnamed genus from the early Eocene of India which could represent the first Asian known transitional form between the triisodontids and mesonychians. PMID:21181109

  12. A structural intermediate between triisodontids and mesonychians (Mammalia, Acreodi) from the earliest Eocene of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabuce, Rodolphe; Clavel, Julien; Antunes, Miguel Telles

    2011-02-01

    A new mammal, Mondegodon eutrigonus gen. et sp. nov., is described from the earliest Eocene locality of Silveirinha, Portugal. This species shows dental adaptations indicative of a carnivorous diet. M. eutrigonus is referred to the order Acreodi and considered, along with the early Paleocene North American species Oxyclaenus cuspidatus, as a morphological intermediate between two groups of ungulate-like mammals, namely, the triisodontids and mesonychians. Considering that triisodontids are early to early-late Paleocene North American taxa, Mondegodon probably belongs to a group that migrated from North America towards Europe during the first part of the Paleocene. Mondegodon could represent thus a relict genus, belonging to the ante-Eocene European mammalian fauna. The occurrence of such a taxon in Southern Europe may reflect a period of isolation of this continental area during the Paleocene/Eocene transition. In this context, the non-occurrence of closely allied forms of Mondegodon in the Eocene North European mammalian faunas is significant. This strengthens the hypothesis that the mammalian fauna from Southern Europe is characterized by a certain degree of endemism during the earliest Eocene. Mondegodon also presents some striking similarities with an unnamed genus from the early Eocene of India which could represent the first Asian known transitional form between the triisodontids and mesonychians.

  13. The palaeobiology of high latitude birds from the early Eocene greenhouse of Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada

    PubMed Central

    Stidham, Thomas A.; Eberle, Jaelyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Fossils attributable to the extinct waterfowl clade Presbyornithidae and the large flightless Gastornithidae from the early Eocene (~52–53 Ma) of Ellesmere Island, in northernmost Canada are the oldest Cenozoic avian fossils from the Arctic. Except for its slightly larger size, the Arctic presbyornithid humerus is not distinguishable from fossils of Presbyornis pervetus from the western United States, and the Gastornis phalanx is within the known size range of mid-latitude individuals. The occurrence of Presbyornis above the Arctic Circle in the Eocene could be the result of annual migration like that of its living duck and geese relatives, or it may have been a year-round resident similar to some Eocene mammals on Ellesmere and some extant species of sea ducks. Gastornis, along with some of the mammalian and reptilian members of the Eocene Arctic fauna, likely over-wintered in the Arctic. Despite the milder (above freezing) Eocene climate on Ellesmere Island, prolonged periods of darkness occurred during the winter. Presence of these extinct birds at both mid and high latitudes on the northern continents provides evidence that future increases in climatic warming (closer to Eocene levels) could lead to the establishment of new migratory or resident populations within the Arctic Circle. PMID:26867798

  14. A redescription of Lithornis vulturinus (Aves, Palaeognathae) from the Early Eocene Fur Formation of Denmark.

    PubMed

    Bourdon, Estelle; Lindow, Bent

    2015-01-01

    The extinct Lithornithidae include several genera and species of flying palaeognathous birds of controversial affinities known from the Early Paleogene of North America and Europe. An almost complete, articulated skeleton from the Early Eocene marine deposits of the Fur Formation (Denmark) was recently assigned to Lithornis vulturinus Owen, 1840. This study provides a detailed redescription and comparison of this three-dimensionally preserved specimen (MGUH 26770), which is one of the best preserved representatives of the Lithornithidae yet known. We suggest that some new features might be diagnostic of Lithornis vulturinus, including a pterygoid fossa shallower than in other species of Lithornis and the presence of a small caudal process on the os palatinum. We propose that Lithornis nasi (Harrison, 1984) is a junior synonym of Lithornis vulturinus and we interpret minor differences in size and shape among the specimens as intraspecific variation. To date, Lithornis vulturinus is known with certainty from the latest Paleocene-earliest Eocene to Early Eocene of the North Sea Basin (Ølst, Fur and London Clay Formations). Among the four species of the genus Lithornis, the possibility that Lithornis plebius Houde, 1988 (Early Eocene of Wyoming) is conspecific with either Lithornis vulturinus or Lithornis promiscuus Houde, 1988 (Early Eocene of Wyoming) is discussed. The presence of closely related species of Lithornis on either side of the North Atlantic in the Early Eocene reflects the existence of a high-latitude land connection between Europe and North America at that time. PMID:26624382

  15. Cross section through the Toa Baja drillsite: Evidence for northward change in Late Eocene deformation intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Larue, D.K. ); Berrong, B. )

    1991-03-01

    A 55 km geologic cross section through the Toa Baja Drillsite, generated by integrating geologic mapping data from the foothills of the Central Mountains of Puerto Rico with onshore and offshore multichannel seismic reflection data, provides an opportunity to examine in profile from the arc interior northward to within 40 km of the current trench slope break. Three structural divisions are recognized. In the foothills of Puerto Rico, Cretaceous and Eocene rocks are separated by transpressional strike-slip faults. In the vicinity of the Toa Baja drillsite where both seismic reflection and borehole data are available, Eocene rocks, deformed by thrust faults, .ie above a lower unit, interpreted to be of Cretaceous age. Offshore, north of the drilling site, seismic reflections suggest Eocene rocks onlap structural basement, thought to be Cretaceous rocks, and both units appear only slightly deformed. All Eocene and Eocene ( ) rocks are overlain by little deformed Oligocene to Recent rocks. From south to north, or from the arc massif interior toward the present-day trench, there is an apparent decrease in amount of Late Eocene to Middle Oligocene strike-slip and shortening deformation. Deformation events occurred mostly in the arc-interior and were not directly associated with the plate boundary which was probably near the Puerto Rico Trench.

  16. Long-Term Changes in the Equatorial Pacific Trade Winds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Allan J.; Lebedev, Anna

    1996-05-01

    Past work has shown that surface zonal equatorial wind stress, zonally integrated from one side of the Pacific to the other, is the key variable for estimating long-term El Niño behavior in the eastern Pacific. The long-term behavior of this key variable is difficult to determine directly because of the paucity of the equatorial wind observations and because of false trends in the wind data introduced by gradual changes in the methods of wind measurement. However, surface pressure data generally does not suffer from these false trends and theory suggests that this key wind variable is linearly related to the difference (p) of surface atmospheric pressure between the eastern and western equatorial Pacific. Detrended COADS pressure in the eastern and western equatorial Pacific and post 1960 detrended equatorial wind stress zonally averaged across the Pacific were used to verify this relationship. Pressure difference and zonally averaged equatorial zonal windstress () were highly correlated (r = 0.90) and the regression also showed that advection of zonal momentum contributes substantially to the momentum balance in the equatorial atmospheric boundary layer. Further, hindcasts of eastern equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature and sea level indicated that from p was more accurate than from winds even since 1960 when wind data were more plentiful. This suggests that the simple pressure difference p is an effective way to monitor both in the past and in the future.Using the p time series as a proxy for zonally integrated wind stress suggests that the equatorial trades strengthened during the early and mid-1930s, weakened from the late 1930s to late 1950s, strengthened during the 1960s, and weakened rapidly since. This pattern is qualitatively consistent with the long record of sea surface temperature measurements at Puerto Chicama (Peru). The more recent rapid weakening is consistent with trends in several physical variables reported previously by others. The long

  17. Equatorial hydrology studies by satellite telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robison, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-12-30

    We are using a geostationary satellite functioning as a transponder to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Enewetak and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely measure net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water-flux model predicted wet season plant-transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6- to 7-mm/d evaporation-pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. From the microclimate data we estimated a 1:3 and 1:20 /sup 137/Cs dry-matter concentration ratio, which was later confirmed by radioisotopic analysis. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  18. Stochastic Models of Tropical Rain-Rate Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    Because of the extreme variability of rain rate in space and time and the difficulties with remote sensing methods of measuring rain rates, accurate determination of rainfall over large areas and time periods has long been a problem for hydrologists, meteorogists, and climatologists. A number of statistical models of rain have been developed in order to investigate the impact of rain variability on satellite remote sensing methods, validation of satellite rain products, and generation of rain maps with accompanying error estimates. These models may be useful in examining 'sub-grid scale' issues in representing precipitation in numerical mdoels. A stochastic model will first be described which can generate time-dependent high-resolution spatial rain fields with space and time correlations similar to those seen in rain data, as well as representing the presence of areas with zero rain rate and log-normally distributed rain rates where there is rain. A simpler model derived from this, formulated in the spectral domain, seems to imply fractal-like rain statistics at small scales when fit to rain data.

  19. Arctic Ocean circulation during the anoxic Eocene Azolla event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speelman, Eveline; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap; März, Christian; Brumsack, Hans; Reichart, Gert-Jan

    2010-05-01

    The Azolla interval, as encountered in Eocene sediments from the Arctic Ocean, is characterized by organic rich sediments ( 4wt% Corg). In general, high levels of organic matter may be caused by increased productivity, i.e. extensive growth of Azolla, and/or enhanced preservation of organic matter, or a combination of both. Anoxic (bottom) water conditions, expanded oxygen minimum zones, or increased sedimentation rates all potentially increase organic matter preservation. According to plate tectonic, bathymetric, and paleogeographic reconstructions, the Arctic Ocean was a virtually isolated shallow basin, with one possible deeper connection to the Nordic Seas represented by a still shallow Fram Strait (Jakobsson et al., 2007), hampering ventilation of the Arctic Basin. During the Azolla interval surface waters freshened, while at the same time bottom waters appear to have remained saline, indicating that the Arctic was highly stratified. The restricted ventilation and stratification in concert with ongoing export of organic matter most likely resulted in the development of anoxic conditions in the lower part of the water column. Whereas the excess precipitation over evaporation maintained the freshwater lid, sustained input of Nordic Sea water is needed to keep the deeper waters saline. To which degree the Arctic Ocean exchanged with the Nordic Seas is, however, still largely unknown. Here we present a high-resolution trace metal record (ICP-MS and ICP-OES) for the expanded Early/Middle Eocene section capturing the Azolla interval from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 302 (ACEX) drilled on the Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean. Euxinic conditions throughout the interval resulted in the efficient removal of redox sensitive trace metals from the water column. Using the sedimentary trace metal record we also constrained circulation in the Arctic Ocean by assessing the relative importance of trace metal input sources (i.e. fluvial, eolian, and

  20. Rain Barrels: A Catalyst for Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakacs, Michele E.; Haberland, Mike; Mangiafico, Salvatore S.; Winquist, Aileen; Obropta, Christopher C.; Boyajian, Amy; Mellor, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 4 years, rain barrel programming for residents has been implemented in both Northern Virginia and New Jersey as a method for educating the public about stormwater management and water conservation. Program participants demonstrated a significant increase in knowledge of water resource issues. Follow-up surveys showed 58% of New…

  1. Air quality monitor and acid rain networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, H.

    1980-01-01

    The air quality monitor program which consists of two permanent air monitor stations (PAMS's) and four mobile shuttle pollutant air monitor stations (SPAMS's) is evaluated. The PAMS measures SO sub X, NO sub X particulates, CO, O3, and nonmethane hydrocarbons. The SPAMS measures O3, SO2, HCl, and particulates. The collection and analysis of data in the rain monitor program are discussed.

  2. Acid Rain: Resource Materials for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Provides listings of acid rain resource material groups under: (1) printed materials (pamphlets, books, articles); (2) audiovisuals (slide/tape presentations, tape, video-cassette); (3) miscellaneous (buttons, pocket lab, umbrella); (4) transparencies; (5) bibliographies; and (6) curriculum materials. Sources and prices (when applicable) are…

  3. Acid Rain. Teacher's Guide. LHS GEMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocking, Colin; Barber, Jacqueline; Coonrod, Jan

    This teacher's guide presents a unit on acid rain and introduces hands-on activities for sixth through eighth grade students. In each unit, students act as real scientists and gather evidence by using science process skills such as observing, measuring and recording data, classifying, role playing, problem solving, critical thinking, synthesizing…

  4. Acid Rain Materials for Classroom Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Factor, Lance; Kooser, Robert G.

    This booklet contains three separate papers suitable for use in an advanced high school or college chemistry course. The first paper provides background information on acids and bases. The second paper provides additional background information, focusing on certain aspects of atmospheric chemistry as it relates to the acid rain problem. An attempt…

  5. Acid Rain: A Description of Bilingual Friesland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zondag, Koen

    1984-01-01

    Using acid rain as a metaphor, discusses the status of the Frisian language and culture as one which, though apparently thriving, is really threatened. Examines the sources of this threat, i.e., the education system, the church, mass communication and transportation, and the demise of the Frisian village community. (SED)

  6. Acid Rain Program CEM audit program

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, K.O.T.; Alexander, T.H.; Dupree, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    This presentation will give an overview of the Acid Rain Program CEM Audit Program: electronic and field audits. The presentation will include the reasons for audits, field audit types and levels the steps used in develop in the audit program and the audit procedures.

  7. Acid Rain: A Student's First Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Beth Ann; And Others

    The purpose of this guide is to help students better understand the science, citizen action, and research issues that are part of the acid rain problem. The guide is designed for students in grades 4-8 and their teachers. Following an introduction, the first seven sections are informative in nature. They include: (1) "Observations about Acidity";…

  8. Effects of rain damage on wilting forages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most common problems faced by hay or silage producers is how to manage production schedules around unfavorable weather. Inevitably, some wilting forage crops are damaged by unexpected rainfall events each year, and producers often inquire about the effects of unexpected rain damage, and w...

  9. Promoting nitrate removal in rain gardens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rain gardens are vegetated surface depressions, often located at low points in landscapes, designed to receive stormwater runoff from roads, roofs, and parking lots. The gardens’ sandy soils allow stormwater to drain quickly to the native soils below and eventually to groundwate...

  10. TECHNOLOGICAL OPTIONS FOR ACID RAIN CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses technological options for acid rain control. Compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will require careful scrutiny of a number of issues before selecting control options to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions...

  11. Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew. MJ

    2009-12-01

    The Distromet disdrometer model RD-80 and NovaLynx tipping bucket rain gauge model 260-2500E-12 are two devices deployed a few meters apart to measure the character and amount of liquid precipitation. The main purpose of the disdrometer is to measure drop size distribution, which it does over 20 size classes from 0.3 mm to 5.4 mm. The data from both instruments can be used to determine rain rate. The disdrometer results can also be used to infer several properties including drop number density, radar reflectivity, liquid water content, and energy flux. Two coefficients, N0 and Λ, from an exponential fit between drop diameter and drop number density, are routinely calculated. Data are collected once a minute. The instruments make completely different kinds of measurements. Rain that falls on the disdrometer sensor moves a plunger on a vertical axis. The disdrometer transforms the plunger motion into electrical impulses whose strength is proportional to drop diameter. The rain gauge is the conventional tipping bucket type. Each tip collects an amount equivalent to 0.01 in. of water, and each tip is counted by a data acquisition system anchored by a Campbell CR1000 data logger.

  12. Rain observations in tropical storm Cora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, T. T.; Chang, A. T. C.; King, J. L.; Rodgers, E. B.; Nieman, R. A.; Krupp, B. M.; Siddalingaiah, H.; Diesen, B. C.; Stratigos, J.

    1979-01-01

    Passive microwave observations were made in tropical storm Cora at 19.35 and 94GHz. These observations suggest that 94GHz is appropriate for mapping the extent of rain over either land or ocean backgrounds and that some rainfall intensity measurement is also possible.

  13. Rain compensation algorithm for ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, Barry K.

    1992-01-01

    The initial advanced communication technology satellite (ACTS) mobile terminal (AMT) demonstrations will involve two-way communications between the high-bit-rate link evaluation terminal (HBR-LET), which is a fixed terminal (FT), and a van-housed mobile terminal (MT). The HBR-LET has the capability of adjusting its transmitted uplink power over an approximately 10-dB range to compensate for forward uplink rain attenuation. However, because of size and weight limitations, the MT cannot use power control as a rain compensation technique. Consequently, the AMT rain compensation algorithm (RCA) is based on a formula for varying the transmitted data rate in either direction to maintain link performance within acceptable limits. The objective of the AMT RCA is to ensure reliable operation in both the forward and return directions despite the possibility of uplink or downlink fading due to rain events in the vicinity of the FT or MT. In particular, the RCA must maintain at least a 3-dB link margin at the highest possible transmission rate (AMT can operate at 9.6, 4.8, or 2.4 kb/s) permitted by the prevailing channel conditions. The 3-dB minimum link margin is a system design safety factor to accommodate conceivable implementation losses.

  14. Acid Rain Analysis by Standard Addition Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The standard addition titration is a precise and rapid method for the determination of the acidity in rain or snow samples. The method requires use of a standard buret, a pH meter, and Gran's plot to determine the equivalence point. Experimental procedures used and typical results obtained are presented. (JN)

  15. EFFECTS OF ACID RAIN ON GRAPEVINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, 8 additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid...

  16. GPM Rain Rates in Tropical Cyclone Pam

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA-JAXA's GPM Satellite Close-up of Cyclone Pam's Rainfall NASA-JAXA's GPM core satellite captured rain rates in Tropical Cyclone Pam at 03:51 UTC (2:51 p.m. local time) on March 14, 2015. Heavie...

  17. Rain sensor for automatic systems on vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Alexandru; Vasile, Irina; Nistor, Adrian; Vladareanu, Luige; Pantazica, Mihaela; Caldararu, Florin; Bonea, Andreea; Drumea, Andrei; Plotog, Ioan

    2010-11-01

    Despite the fact that today vehicles are easier to drive and more reliable, the drivers' carefulness is diverted by a large number of factors (road conditions, traffic conditions, phone calls, navigation systems etc.). The automatic system of controlling the windscreen wipers meets exactly one of the carelessness factors. A rain sensor makes the activation of the system of windscreen wipers to become something that you turn on and forget about it. This completely automated system activated by rain measures the rain intensity and also the necessity to turn on the windscreen wipers and with what velocity. Using an advanced optical system, analogue signal processing and a control algorithm, this technology offers more safety and comfort on different weather conditions. The sensor beams an infrared light on the windshield at an angle carefully chosen. If the windshield is dry, the beam is reflected back in the sensor. If on the glass there are rain drops, they will reflect the light in different directions (the wetter the windshield is, the least of the beam ray is reflected back in the sensor).

  18. Nonlinear bounce resonances between magnetosonic waves and equatorially mirroring electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lunjin; Maldonado, Armando; Bortnik, Jacob; Thorne, Richard M.; Li, Jinxing; Dai, Lei; Zhan, Xiaoya

    2015-08-01

    Equatorially mirroring energetic electrons pose an interesting scientific problem, since they generally cannot resonate with any known plasma waves and hence cannot be scattered down to lower pitch angles. Observationally it is well known that the flux of these equatorial particles does not simply continue to build up indefinitely, and so a mechanism must necessarily exist that transports these particles from an equatorial pitch angle of 90° down to lower values. However, this mechanism has not been uniquely identified yet. Here we investigate the mechanism of bounce resonance with equatorial noise (or fast magnetosonic waves). A test particle simulation is used to examine the effects of monochromatic magnetosonic waves on the equatorially mirroring energetic electrons, with a special interest in characterizing the effectiveness of bounce resonances. Our analysis shows that bounce resonances can occur at the first three harmonics of the bounce frequency (nωb, n = 1, 2, and 3) and can effectively reduce the equatorial pitch angle to values where resonant scattering by whistler mode waves becomes possible. We demonstrate that the nature of bounce resonance is nonlinear, and we propose a nonlinear oscillation model for characterizing bounce resonances using two key parameters, effective wave amplitude à and normalized wave number k~z. The threshold for higher harmonic resonance is more strict, favoring higher à and k~z, and the change in equatorial pitch angle is strongly controlled by k~z. We also investigate the dependence of bounce resonance effects on various physical parameters, including wave amplitude, frequency, wave normal angle and initial phase, plasma density, and electron energy. It is found that the effect of bounce resonance is sensitive to the wave normal angle. We suggest that the bounce resonant interaction might lead to an observed pitch angle distribution with a minimum at 90°.

  19. Response of Deep Ocean Carbon Cycling to Astronomical Forcing in the Non-Glaciated Eocene 'Greenhouse' World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, P. F.; Wilson, P. A.; Pälike, H.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations predicted for 2100 may not have existed on Earth since the early part of the Eocene epoch when global conditions were much warmer and less glaciated than today. Yet our understanding of carbon cycling and climate stability within the Eocene is extremely rudimentary. Here we present the first high-resolution paleoceanographic records across the early to middle Eocene boundary. Our records reveal multiple prominent perturbations to Eocene climate and the carbon cycle. We also observe breakdown in the post-Eocene/Oligocene boundary spatial pattern of astronomical pacing of deep ocean sediment calcium carbonate content. We attribute this divergent response to astronomical forcing to the deglaciated early Eocene climate state.

  20. Red Rain Cells Recovered from Interior of the Polonnaruwa Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarathne, K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    2013-03-01

    Red rain cells were discovered in extracts from the Polonnaruwa (Aralaganwila) meteorite that fell nearly ten days before a red rain event in the same location in Sri Lanka. A causal connection is speculated.

  1. Acid rain: the impact of local sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spaite, P.; Esposito, M.P.; Szabo, M.F.; Devitt, T.W.

    1980-11-24

    It has been assumed that acid rain is predominantly a problem of long-range transport of pollutants from large fossil fuel combustion sources, namely coal-fired utilities. However, close examination of fuel use information and source emission characteristics in the Adirondacks, Florida, and California suggests that local oil burning and automotive sources may be major contributors to the occurrence of acid rain in these areas. This report describes the possible role of local combustion sources in the production of acid rain, discusses the implications of the findings, and their relevance to alternative control strategies for acid rain. Oil-fired boilers, especially the smaller commercial, industrial, and residential units, produce at least 3 to 10 times as much primary sulfate per unit of sulfur content as coal-fired units. Moreover, oil-fired units emit comparatively large quantities of catalytic compounds capable of rapidly converting still more sulfur oxide to sulfate in the atmosphere. Thus, in areas where large quantities of oil are burned, the direct impact from locally generated sulfates may equal or even exceed that produced by imported sulfates derived from distant coal-burning sources. Fuel consumption data show that large quantities of oil are being consumed in areas experiencing acid rain. Forty percent of the residual and 36 percent of the distillate oil burned in the United States is consumed in the eight-state area surrounding the Adirondacks. California is the next largest oil-consuming area and Florida is third. Nitric acid is responsible for about 30 percent of rainfall acidity in the Northeast and Florida, and for about 30 to 75 percent of the rainfall acidity in California.

  2. Was the Eocene Arctic a Source Area for Exotic Plants and Mammals? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, J. J.; Harrington, G. J.; Fricke, H. C.; Humphrey, J.; Hackett, L.; Newbrey, M.; Hutchison, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Today’s High Arctic is undergoing rapid warming, but the impact on its animal and plant communities is not clear. As a deep time analog to better understand and predict the impacts of global warming on the Arctic biota, early Eocene (52-53 Ma) rocks on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut in Canada’s High Arctic (~79°N latitude) preserve evidence of diverse terrestrial ecosystems that supported dense forests inhabited by turtles, alligators, snakes, primates, tapirs, brontotheres, and hippo-like Coryphodon. The fossil localities were just a few degrees further south and still well above the Arctic Circle during the early Eocene; consequently, the biota experienced months of continuous sunlight as well as darkness, the Arctic summer and winter, respectively. The flora and fauna of the early Eocene Arctic imply warmer, wetter conditions than at present, and recently published analyses of biogenic phosphate from fossil fish, turtle, and mammal estimate warm summers (19 - 20 C) and mild, above-freezing winters. In general, temperature estimates for the early Eocene Arctic can be compared to those found today in temperate rainforests in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. The early Eocene Arctic mammalian fauna shares most genera with coeval mid-latitude faunas thousands of kilometers to the south in the US Western Interior, and several genera also are shared with Europe and Asia. Recent analyses suggest that the large herbivores such as hippo-like Coryphodon were year-round inhabitants in the Eocene Arctic forests. Although several of the Eocene Arctic mammalian taxa are hypothesized to have originated in either mid-latitude North America or Asia, the earlier occurrence of certain clades (e.g., tapirs) in the Arctic raises the possibility of a northern high-latitude origin. Analysis of the early Eocene Arctic palynoflora indicates comparable richness to early Eocene plant communities in the US Western Interior, but nearly 50% of its species (mostly angiosperms) are

  3. Sea surface salinity of the Eocene Arctic Azolla event using innovative isotope modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speelman, E. N.; Sewall, J. O.; Noone, D.; Huber, M.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.; Reichart, G. J.

    2009-04-01

    With the realization that the Eocene Arctic Ocean was covered with enormous quantities of the free floating freshwater fern Azolla, new questions regarding Eocene conditions facilitating these blooms arose. Our present research focuses on constraining the actual salinity of, and water sources for, the Eocene Arctic basin through the application of stable water isotope tracers. Precipitation pathways potentially strongly affect the final isotopic composition of water entering the Arctic Basin. Therefore we use the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3), developed by NCAR, combined with a recently developed integrated isotope tracer code to reconstruct the isotopic composition of global Eocene precipitation and run-off patterns. We further addressed the sensitivity of the modeled hydrological cycle to changes in boundary conditions, such as pCO2, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and sea ice formation. In this way it is possible to assess the effect of uncertainties in proxy estimates of these parameters. Overall, results of all runs with Eocene boundary conditions, including Eocene topography, bathymetry, vegetation patterns, TEX86 derived SSTs and pCO2 estimates, show the presence of an intensified hydrological cycle with precipitation exceeding evaporation in the Arctic region. Enriched, precipitation weighted, isotopic values of around -120‰ are reported for the Arctic region. Combining new results obtained from compound specific isotope analyses (δD) on terrestrially derived n-alkanes extracted from Eocene sediments, and model outcomes make it possible to verify climate reconstructions for the middle Eocene Arctic. Furthermore, recently, characteristic long-chain mid-chain ω20 hydroxy wax constituents of Azolla were found in ACEX sediments. δD values of these C32 - C36 diols provide insight into the isotopic composition of the Eocene Arctic surface water. As the isotopic signature of the runoff entering the Arctic is modelled, and the final isotopic composition of

  4. Rain event properties and dimensionless rain event hyetographs at the source of the Blue Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haile, A. T.; Rientjes, T.; Habib, E.; Jetten, V.

    2010-08-01

    In the present study, the spatial and temporal patterns of the rain event properties are analysed. The event properties are rain event depth, event duration, mean event intensity, peak intensity and the time span between two consecutive rain events which is referred to as inter-event time (IET). Dimensionless event hyetographs are established by relating fractions of event intensities to the corresponding fractions of event durations. The spatial variation of the characteristics of the hyetographs is also evaluated. A model in the form of the beta distribution function is applied to reproduce the dimensionless hyetographs. Rainfall data is obtained from a field campaign in two wet seasons of June-August (JJA) of 2007 and 2008 in the Gilgel Abbay watershed that is situated at the source basin of the upper Blue Nile River in Ethiopia. The rainfall data was recorded at eight stations. The results reveal that rain event depth is more related to peak intensity than to event duration. At the start and towards the end of the wet season, the rain events have larger depth with longer duration and longer IET than the rain events in the mid-season. Mean event intensity and IET are strongly related to terrain elevation. Sekela which is on a mountain area has the shortest IET while Bahir Dar which is at the south shore of the lake has the longest IET.

  5. Study of magnetic transient variations signature at equatorial region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J.; Trivedi, N.; Dutra, S.

    Transient variations in the H magnetic field component of magnetograms at high latitude are a common feature. They are associated with interaction process between solar wind and Earth's magnetic field. Abrupt changes in the solar wind interacting with Earth's magnetic field generate Alfvén and fast mode waves. The Alfvén wave doesn't propagate in the direction perpendicular to the geomagnetic field, so equatorial signatures are probably caused by fast mode waves. On the other hand, complex signatures observed at high latitudes represent a composition of Alfvén and fast mode waves. A second suggested propagation mechanism to low latitudes is the Earth-ionosphere wave-guide. In this work, geomagnetic data from the Brazilian magnetic stations at Belém/Tatuoca (BLM), Eusébio (EUS), Ji-Paraná (JIP), São luis (SLZ) and São Martinho da Serra (SMS) were used to look for equatorial signatures of magnetic transient events. We identified their morphological characteristics and time occurrence distribution. Satellite data (ACE and GOES) were used to see magnetosphere signatures and solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field conditions that increase the probability of occurrence for the equatorial events. Trivedi et al. (2002a) present evidence for corresponding signatures of TCV at Belém, São Luis, and Terezina and other stations under or nearby the equatorial electrojet. The conclusions of Trivedi et al. (2002a) are that equatorial signatures differ greatly from event to event; when the high-latitude transient events exhibited clear, strong, isolated signatures corresponding to TCVs, they generally detected isolated bipolar compressional signatures at geosynchronous orbit and transient impulses in equatorial ground magnetograms; when high-latitude events were quasiperiodic, weaker, spatially limited, or did not exhibit clear TCV signatures the equatorial signatures are difficult to identify; the equatorial signatures cannot be simply result from remote

  6. Seawater calcium isotope ratios across the Eocene-Oligocene transition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, E.M.; Paytan, A.; Eisenhauer, A.; Bullen, T.D.; Thomas, E.

    2011-01-01

    During the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT, ca. 34 Ma), Earth's climate cooled significantly from a greenhouse to an icehouse climate, while the calcite (CaCO3) compensation depth (CCD) in the Pacific Ocean increased rapidly. Fluctuations in the CCD could result from various processes that create an imbalance between calcium (Ca) sources to, and sinks from, the ocean (e.g., weathering and CaCO3 deposition), with different effects on the isotopic composition of dissolved Ca in the oceans due to differences in the Ca isotopic composition of various inputs and outputs. We used Ca isotope ratios (??44/40Ca) of coeval pelagic marine barite and bulk carbonate to evaluate changes in the marine Ca cycle across the EOT. We show that the permanent deepening of the CCD was not accompanied by a pronounced change in seawater ??44/40Ca, whereas time intervals in the Neogene with smaller carbonate depositional changes are characterized by seawater ??44/40Ca shifts. This suggests that the response of seawater ??44/40Ca to changes in weathering fluxes and to imbalances in the oceanic alkalinity budget depends on the chemical composition of seawater. A minor and transient fluctuation in the Ca isotope ratio of bulk carbonate may reflect a change in isotopic fractionation associated with CaCO3 precipitation from seawater due to a combination of factors, including changes in temperature and/or in the assemblages of calcifying organisms. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  7. Primate postcrania from the late middle Eocene of Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Ciochon, R L; Gingerich, P D; Gunnell, G F; Simons, E L

    2001-07-01

    Fossil primates have been known from the late middle to late Eocene Pondaung Formation of Myanmar since the description of Pondaungia cotteri in 1927. Three additional primate taxa, Amphipithecus mogaungensis, Bahinia pondaungensis and Myanmarpithecus yarshensis, were subsequently described. These primates are represented mostly by fragmentary dental and cranial remains. Here we describe the first primate postcrania from Myanmar, including a complete left humerus, a fragmentary right humerus, parts of left and right ulnae, and the distal half of a left calcaneum, all representing one individual. We assign this specimen to a large species of Pondaungia based on body size and the known geographic distribution and diversity of Myanmar primates. Body weight estimates of Pondaungia range from 4,000 to 9,000 g, based on humeral length, humeral midshaft diameter, and tooth area by using extant primate regressions. The humerus and ulna indicate that Pondaungia was capable of a wide variety of forelimb movements, with great mobility at the shoulder joint. Morphology of the distal calcaneus indicates that the hind feet were mobile at the transverse tarsal joint. Postcrania of Pondaungia present a mosaic of features, some shared in common with notharctine and adapine adapiforms, some shared with extant lorises and cebids, some shared with fossil anthropoids, and some unique. Overall, Pondaungia humeral and calcaneal morphology is most consistent with that of other known adapiforms. It does not support the inclusion of Pondaungia in Anthropoidea. PMID:11438722

  8. Continental warming preceding the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum.

    PubMed

    Secord, Ross; Gingerich, Philip D; Lohmann, Kyger C; Macleod, Kenneth G

    2010-10-21

    Marine and continental records show an abrupt negative shift in carbon isotope values at ∼55.8 Myr ago. This carbon isotope excursion (CIE) is consistent with the release of a massive amount of isotopically light carbon into the atmosphere and was associated with a dramatic rise in global temperatures termed the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). Greenhouse gases released during the CIE, probably including methane, have often been considered the main cause of PETM warming. However, some evidence from the marine record suggests that warming directly preceded the CIE, raising the possibility that the CIE and PETM may have been linked to earlier warming with different origins. Yet pre-CIE warming is still uncertain. Disentangling the sequence of events before and during the CIE and PETM is important for understanding the causes of, and Earth system responses to, abrupt climate change. Here we show that continental warming of about 5 °C preceded the CIE in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. Our evidence, based on oxygen isotopes in mammal teeth (which reflect temperature-sensitive fractionation processes) and other proxies, reveals a marked temperature increase directly below the CIE, and again in the CIE. Pre-CIE warming is also supported by a negative amplification of δ(13)C values in soil carbonates below the CIE. Our results suggest that at least two sources of warming-the earlier of which is unlikely to have been methane-contributed to the PETM. PMID:20962843

  9. Middle Eocene seagrass facies from Apennine carbonate platforms (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassetti, Laura; Benedetti, Andrea; Brandano, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Two stratigraphic sections located in the Latium-Abruzzi (Monte Porchio, Central Apennines, Central Italy) and in the Apulian carbonate platform (S. Cesarea-Torre Tiggiano, Salento, Southern Italy) were measured and sampled to document the sedimentological characteristic and the faunistic assemblages of Middle Eocene seagrass deposits. The faunistic assemblages are dominated by porcellaneous foraminifera Orbitolites, Alveolina, Idalina, Spiroloculina, Quinqueloculina, Triloculina and abundant hooked-shaped gypsinids, associated with hooked red algae and green algae Halimeda. Fabiania, rotaliids and textulariids as well as nummulitids are subordinated. The samples were assigned to Lutetian (SBZ13-16) according to the occurrence of Nummulites cf. lehneri, Alveolina ex. gr. elliptica, Idalina berthelini, Orbitolites complanatus, Slovenites decastroi and Medocia blayensis. At Santa Cesarea reticulate nummulites occur in association with Alveolina spp. and Halkyardia minima marking the lower Bartonian (SBZ17). Three main facies associations have been recognised: I) larger porcellaneous foraminiferal grainstones with orbitolitids and alveolinids deposited into high-energy shallow-water settings influenced by wave processes that reworked the sediments associated with a seagrass; II) grainstone to packstone with small porcellaneous foraminifera and abundant permanently-attached gypsinids deposited in a more protected (e.g., small embayment) in situ vegetated environment; III) bioclastic packstone with parautochthonous material reworked from the seagrass by rip currents and accumulated into rip channels in a slightly deeper environment. The biotic assemblages suggest that the depositional environment is consistent with tropical to subtropical vegetated environments within oligotrophic conditions.

  10. Water isotopes and the Eocene. A tectonic sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrande, A. N.; Roberts, C. D.; Tripati, A.; Schmidt, G. A.

    2009-04-01

    The early Eocene (54 Million years ago) is one of the warmest periods in the last 65 Million years. Its climate is postulated to have been the result of enhanced greenhouse gas concentration, with CO2 roughly 4 times pre-industrial and methane 7 times pre-industrial concentrations. One interesting feature of this period to emerge recently is the intermittent presence of fossilized Azolla, a type of freshwater fern, in the Arctic Ocean. Synchronous (within dating error) with this appearance were major changes in the restriction of the Arctic Ocean and the other global oceans. We investigate this time period using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE-R, a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model that incorporates water isotopes throughout the hydrologic cycle, making it an ideal model to test hypotheses of past climate change and to compare to paleoclimate proxy data. We assess the impact of tectonic variability by using minimal and maximal levels of restriction for the Arctic Ocean seaways. We find that the modulation of connectivity of these basins dramatically alters global salinity distribution, leading to large changes in ocean circulation. Greater restriction of the Arctic Basin is associated with fresh and relatively warmer conditions. The same mechanisms responsible for this redistribution of salt also change the global distribution of water isotopes, and can alias (water isotope) proxy climate signals of warmth.

  11. Primate postcrania from the late middle Eocene of Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Ciochon, Russell L.; Gingerich, Philip D.; Gunnell, Gregg F.; Simons, Elwyn L.

    2001-01-01

    Fossil primates have been known from the late middle to late Eocene Pondaung Formation of Myanmar since the description of Pondaungia cotteri in 1927. Three additional primate taxa, Amphipithecus mogaungensis, Bahinia pondaungensis and Myanmarpithecus yarshensis, were subsequently described. These primates are represented mostly by fragmentary dental and cranial remains. Here we describe the first primate postcrania from Myanmar, including a complete left humerus, a fragmentary right humerus, parts of left and right ulnae, and the distal half of a left calcaneum, all representing one individual. We assign this specimen to a large species of Pondaungia based on body size and the known geographic distribution and diversity of Myanmar primates. Body weight estimates of Pondaungia range from 4,000 to 9,000 g, based on humeral length, humeral midshaft diameter, and tooth area by using extant primate regressions. The humerus and ulna indicate that Pondaungia was capable of a wide variety of forelimb movements, with great mobility at the shoulder joint. Morphology of the distal calcaneus indicates that the hind feet were mobile at the transverse tarsal joint. Postcrania of Pondaungia present a mosaic of features, some shared in common with notharctine and adapine adapiforms, some shared with extant lorises and cebids, some shared with fossil anthropoids, and some unique. Overall, Pondaungia humeral and calcaneal morphology is most consistent with that of other known adapiforms. It does not support the inclusion of Pondaungia in Anthropoidea. PMID:11438722

  12. Century scale climatic rhythms in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the late Quaternary: Faunal and geochemical proxies from the Maldivian Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S.; Gupta, A. K.

    2012-04-01

    The equatorial Indian Ocean is swept by the Indian Ocean equatorial westerlies (IEW) which are strong during monsoon transitions in April-May and October-November, driving Eastward Equatorial Current (EEC) in the upper ocean. This study is based on the biogenic sediments from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 716A, recovered beneath the narrow equatorial track (7 Degree North to 7 Degree South) along which the IEW prevail. We analyzed 300 Kyr record of benthic and planktic foraminifera, pteropods combined with stable isotope values measured on planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber from 451 core samples to understand paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the late Quaternary (~450 - 150 Kyrs). Factor and cluster analyses of the 53 highest-ranked benthic foraminiferal species enabled to identify five biofacies, indicating varied nature of deep-sea environments during the late Quaternary, with a major shift across the middle Brunhes epoch (across Marine Isotope Stage 9 and 8). Biofacies Robulus nicobarensis - Trifarina reussi (Rn-Tr), Uvigerina porrecta - Reussella simplex (Upo-Rs) and Cymbaloporetta squammosa - Bolivinita sp. (Cs-Bsp) document high organic flux with low oxygen paleoenvironment dominating before the mid-Brunhes event, similar to Globigerina bulloides population, while benthic foraminiferal biofacies Hoeglundina elegans - Miliolinella subrotunda (He-Ms) and Uvigerina peregrina - Quinqueloculina seminulum (Upe-Qs) record high seasonality in food supply with well-oxygenated deep water after ~300 Kyr. These changes are also visible in planktic foraminifera and pteropod record. In the present day, the strength of the IEW is inversely related to the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). The IEW weakened across MIS 9/8 during which time the IOD strengthened, causing heavy rains and floods over the equatorial East Africa and deficient rainfall over Australasia. The proxy response changed from low to high frequency cycles

  13. Seasonal influence of ENSO on the Atlantic ITCZ and equatorial South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münnich, M.; Neelin, J. D.

    2005-11-01

    In late boreal spring, especially May, a strong relationship exists in observations among precipitation anomalies over equatorial South America and the Atlantic intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), and eastern equatorial Pacific and central equatorial Atlantic sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA). A chain of correlations of equatorial Pacific SSTA, western equatorial Atlantic wind stress (WEA), equatorial Atlantic SSTA, sea surface height, and precipitation supports a causal chain in which El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) induces WEA stress anomalies, which in turn affect Atlantic equatorial ocean dynamics. These correlations show strong seasonality, apparently arising within the atmospheric links of the chain. This pathway and the influence of equatorial Atlantic SSTA on South American rainfall in May appear independent of that of the northern tropical Atlantic. Brazil's Nordeste is affected by the northern tropical Atlantic. The equatorial influence lies further to the north over the eastern Amazon and the Guiana Highlands.

  14. Equatorial superrotation in a thermally driven zonally symmetric circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.

    1981-01-01

    Near the equator where the Coriolis force vanishes, the momentum balance for the axially symmetric circulation is established between horizontal and vertical diffusion, which, a priori, does not impose constraints on the direction or magnitude of the zonal winds. Solar radiation absorbed at low latitudes is a major force in driving large scale motions with air rising near the equator and falling at higher latitudes. In the upper leg of the meridional cell, angular momentum is redistributed so that the atmosphere tends to subrotate (or corotate) at low latitudes and superrotate at high latitudes. In the lower leg, however, the process is reversed and produces a tendency for the equatorial region to superrotate. The outcome depends on the energy budget which is closely coupled to the momentum budget through the thermal wind equation; a pressure (temperature) maximum is required to sustain equatorial superrotation. Such a condition arises in regions which are convectively unstable and the temperature lapse rate is superadiabatic. It should arise in the tropospheres of Jupiter and Saturn; planetary energy from the interior is carried to higher altitudes where radiation to space becomes important. Upward equatorial motions in the direct and indirect circulations (Ferrel-Thomson type) imposed by insolation can then trap dynamic energy for equatorial heating which can sustain the superrotation of the equatorial region.

  15. Equatorial Winds on Saturn and the Stratospheric Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Liming; Jian, Xun; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Porco, Carolyn C.; West, Robert A.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Orton, Glenn S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Baines, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    The zonal jets on the giant planets are generally thought to be stable with time. Recently, there are still some debates about the general thought. Here, we report a significant temporal variation of the equatorial jet at high-altitude on Saturn. Long-term (2004-2009) observations by Cassini reveal that wind speed at the 60-mbar level increased from 270 m/s in 2004 to 290 m/s in 2008, while the wind speed has been mostly constant over time at the 500-mbar level in the southern equatorial region. The Cassini observations further reveal that the equatorial jet intensified approximately 60 m/s in the stratosphere (1-5 mbar) from 2005 to 2008. The fact that the wind acceleration is weaker at the 60-mbar level (approximately 20 m/s) than at the 1-mbar level (approximately 60 m/s) demonstrates that the equatorial oscillation is damped when it propagates downwards to the tropopause around 60 mbar. The direct measurement of the varying equatorial jet around the tropopause also serves as a key boundary condition when deriving the thermal wind fields in the stratosphere.

  16. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions. The following provisions of part 72...

  17. Effects of acid rain on crops and trees

    SciTech Connect

    Cowling, E.B.; Dochinger, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    A general treatment of the subject of acid rain and its effets are discussed along with sources of acid rain and its near-term (the last couple of decades). The effects of acid rain on terrestrial ecosystems are treated in some detail. Some treatment is given of the ecosystem-level effects of acid precipitation.

  18. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  19. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  20. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  1. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  2. 14 CFR 33.78 - Rain and hail ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rain and hail ingestion. 33.78 Section 33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.78 Rain and... rain and hail, as defined in appendix B to this part. Acceptable engine operation precludes...

  3. 14 CFR 33.78 - Rain and hail ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rain and hail ingestion. 33.78 Section 33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.78 Rain and... rain and hail, as defined in appendix B to this part. Acceptable engine operation precludes...

  4. 14 CFR 33.78 - Rain and hail ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rain and hail ingestion. 33.78 Section 33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.78 Rain and... rain and hail, as defined in appendix B to this part. Acceptable engine operation precludes...

  5. 14 CFR 33.78 - Rain and hail ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rain and hail ingestion. 33.78 Section 33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.78 Rain and... rain and hail, as defined in appendix B to this part. Acceptable engine operation precludes...

  6. 14 CFR 33.78 - Rain and hail ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rain and hail ingestion. 33.78 Section 33... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.78 Rain and... rain and hail, as defined in appendix B to this part. Acceptable engine operation precludes...

  7. The Effects of Rain Garden Size on Performance

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation discusses the effect of rain garden size on the hydrologic and pollutant removal performance of rain garden systems. The slides will summarize data from both the full-scale rain garden project associated with the permeable pavement parking lot as well as the pilo...

  8. The potential influence of rain on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The potential influence of heavy rain on airfoil performance is discussed. Experimental methods for evaluating rain effects are reviewed. Important scaling considerations for extrapolating model data are presented. It is shown that considerable additional effort, both analytical and experimental, is necessary to understand the degree of hazard associated with flight operations in rain.

  9. Delayed formation of the equatorial ridge on Iapetus from a subsatellite created in a giant impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombard, Andrew J.; Cheng, Andrew F.; McKinnon, William B.; Kay, Jonathan P.

    2012-03-01

    The great equatorial ridge on Saturn's moon Iapetus is arguably the most perplexing landform in the solar system. The ridge is a mountain range up to 20 km tall and sitting on the equator of Iapetus, and explaining its creation is an unresolved challenge. Models of its formation must satisfy three critical observations: why the ridge (1) sits exactly on the equator, (2) is found only on the equator, and (3) is thus far found only on Iapetus. We argue that all previously proposed models fail to satisfy these observations, and we expand upon our previous proposal that the ridge ultimately formed from an ancient giant impact that produced a subsatellite around Iapetus. The orbit of this subsatellite would then decay, once Iapetus itself had despun due to tides raised by Saturn, until tidal forces from Iapetus tore the subsatellite apart. The resultant debris formed a transient ring around Iapetus, the material of which rained down on the surface to build the ridge. By sequestering the material in a subsatellite with a tidally evolving orbit, formation of the ridge is delayed, which increases the likelihood of preservation against the high-impact flux early in the solar system's history and allows the ridge to form on thick, stiff lithosphere (heat flow likely <1 mW m-2) required to support this massive load without apparent flexure. This mechanism thus explains the three critical observations.

  10. Inter- annual variability of water vapor over an equatorial coastal station using Microwave Radiometer observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renju, Ramachandran Pillai; Uma, K. N.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Mathew, Nizy; Raju C, Suresh

    The south-western region of the Indian peninsula is the gateway of Indian summer monsoon. This region experiences continuous monsoon rain for a longer period of about six months from June to November. The amount of water vapor variability is one of the important parameters to study the onset, active and break phases of the monsoon. Keeping this in view, a multi-frequency Microwave Radiometer Profiler (MRP) has been made operational for continuous measurements of water vapor over an equatorial coastal station Thiruvananthapuram (8.5(°) N, 76.9(°) E) since April 2010. The MRP estimated precipitable water vapor (PWV) for different seasons including monsoon periods have been evaluated by comparing with the collocated GPS derived water vapor and radiosonde measurements. The diurnal, seasonal and inter annual variation of water vapor has been studied for the last four years (2010-2013) over this station. The significant diurnal variability of water vapor is found only during the winter and pre-monsoon periods (Dec -April). The vertical distribution of water vapour is studied in order to understand its variability especially during the onset of monsoon. During the building up of south-west monsoon, the specific humidity increases to ˜ 10g/kg in the altitude range of 4-6 km and consistently maintained it throughout the active spells and reduces to below 2g/kg during break spells of monsoon. The instrument details and the results will be presented.

  11. Late Eocene stable isotope stratigraphy of North Atlantic IODP Site U1411: Orbitally paced climatic heartbeat at the close of the Eocene greenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coxall, Helen; Bohaty, Steve; Wilson, Paul; Liebrand, Diederik; Nyberg, Anna; Holmström, Max

    2016-04-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 342 drilled sediment drifts on the Newfoundland margin to recover high-resolution records of North Atlantic ocean-climate history and track the evolution of the modern climate system through the Late Cretaceous and Early Cenozoic. An early Paleogene deep-sea benthic stable isotope composite record from multiple Exp. 342 sites is currently in development and will provide a key reference section for investigations of Atlantic and global climate dynamics. This study presents initial results for the late Eocene slice of the composite from Site U1411, located at mid depth (˜2850m Eocene paleodepth) on the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge. Stable oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) isotope ratios were measured on 640 samples hosting exceptionally well-preserved epifaunal benthic foraminifera obtained from the microfossil-rich uppermost Eocene clays at 4cm spacing. Sedimentation rates average 2-3 cm/kyr through the late Eocene, such that our sampling resolution is sufficient to capture the dominant Milankovitch frequencies. Late Eocene Site U1411 benthic δ18O values (1.4 to 0.5‰ VPDB) are comparable to the Pacific and elsewhere in the Atlantic at similar depths; however, δ13C is lower by ˜0.5 ‰ with values intermediate between those of the Southern Labrador Sea to the north (-1 to 0) and mid latitude/South Atlantic (0.5 to 1.5) to the south, suggesting poorly ventilated bottom waters in the late Eocene North Atlantic and limited production of North Atlantic deep water. Applying the initial shipboard magneto-biostratigraphic age framework, the Site U1411 benthic δ13C and δ18O records display clear cyclicity on orbital timescales. Spectral analysis of the raw unfiltered datasets identifies eccentricity (400 and 100 kyr), obliquity (40 kyr) and precession (˜20 kyr) signals imprinted on our time series, revealing distinct climatic heart beats in the late Eocene prior to the transition into the 'ice house'.

  12. The geography of diversification in mutualistic ants: a gene's-eye view into the Neogene history of Sundaland rain forests.

    PubMed

    Quek, S-P; Davies, S J; Ashton, P S; Itino, T; Pierce, N E

    2007-05-01

    We investigate the geographical and historical context of diversification in a complex of mutualistic Crematogaster ants living in Macaranga trees in the equatorial rain forests of Southeast Asia. Using mitochondrial DNA from 433 ant colonies collected from 32 locations spanning Borneo, Malaya and Sumatra, we infer branching relationships, patterns of genetic diversity and population history. We reconstruct a time frame for the ants' diversification and demographic expansions, and identify areas that might have been refugia or centres of diversification. Seventeen operational lineages are identified, most of which can be distinguished by host preference and geographical range. The ants first diversified 16-20 Ma, not long after the onset of the everwet forests in Sundaland, and achieved most of their taxonomic diversity during the Pliocene. Pleistocene demographic expansions are inferred for several of the younger lineages. Phylogenetic relationships suggest a Bornean cradle and major axis of diversification. Taxonomic diversity tends to be associated with mountain ranges; in Borneo, it is greatest in the Crocker Range of Sabah and concentrated also in other parts of the northern northwest coast. Within-lineage genetic diversity in Malaya and Sumatra tends to also coincide with mountain ranges. A series of disjunct and restricted distributions spanning northern northwest Borneo and the major mountain ranges of Malaya and Sumatra, seen in three pairs of sister lineages, further suggests that these regions were rain-forest refuges during drier climatic phases of the Pleistocene. Results are discussed in the context of the history of Sundaland's rain forests. PMID:17498231

  13. In situ observations of bifurcation of equatorial ionospheric plasma depletions

    SciTech Connect

    Aggson, T.L.; Pfaff, R.F.; Maynard, N.C.

    1996-03-01

    Vector electric field measurements from the San Marco D satellite are utilized to investigate the bifurcation of ionospheric plasma depletions (sometimes called {open_quotes}bubbles{close_quotes}) associated with nightside equatorial spread F. These depletions are identified by enhanced upward ExB convection in depleted plasma density channels in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere. The in situ determination of the bifurcation process is based on dc electric field measurements of the bipolar variation in the zonal flow, westward and eastward, as the eastbound satellite crosses isolated signatures of updrafting plasma depletion regions. The authors also present data in which more complicated regions of zonal velocity variations appear as the possible result of multiple bifurcations of updrafting equatorial plasma bubbles. 10 refs., 7 fig.

  14. The Equatorial Ridges of Pan and Atlas: Terminal Accretionary Ornaments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnoz, Sébastien; Brahic, André; Thomas, Peter C.; Porco, Carolyn C.

    2007-12-01

    In the outer regions of Saturn’s main rings, strong tidal forces balance gravitational accretion processes. Thus, unusual phenomena may be expected there. The Cassini spacecraft has recently revealed the strange “flying saucer” shape of two small satellites, Pan and Atlas, located in this region, showing prominent equatorial ridges. The accretion of ring particles onto the equatorial surfaces of already-formed bodies embedded in the rings may explain the formation of the ridges. This ridge formation process is in good agreement with detailed Cassini images showing differences between rough polar and smooth equatorial terrains. We propose that Pan and Atlas ridges are kilometers-thick “ring-particle piles” formed after the satellites themselves and after the flattening of the rings but before the complete depletion of ring material from their surroundings.

  15. The equatorial ridges of Pan and Atlas: terminal accretionary ornaments?

    PubMed

    Charnoz, Sébastien; Brahic, André; Thomas, Peter C; Porco, Carolyn C

    2007-12-01

    In the outer regions of Saturn's main rings, strong tidal forces balance gravitational accretion processes. Thus, unusual phenomena may be expected there. The Cassini spacecraft has recently revealed the strange "flying saucer" shape of two small satellites, Pan and Atlas, located in this region, showing prominent equatorial ridges. The accretion of ring particles onto the equatorial surfaces of already-formed bodies embedded in the rings may explain the formation of the ridges. This ridge formation process is in good agreement with detailed Cassini images showing differences between rough polar and smooth equatorial terrains. We propose that Pan and Atlas ridges are kilometers-thick "ring-particle piles" formed after the satellites themselves and after the flattening of the rings but before the complete depletion of ring material from their surroundings. PMID:18063797

  16. The effect of islands on low frequency equatorial motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, M. A.; Du Penhoat, Y.

    1982-01-01

    A complete analytic solution is presented for the influence of equatorial islands on steady low-frequency waves. If the island is small (the meridional extent is much less than the equatorial radius of deformation, R), the waves pass it almost undisturbed, with the mass flux incident on the upstream side flowing around it nearly equally to the north and to the south and continuing on downstream in the lee of the island. For large islands (comparable in extent with R or larger), the principal response is organized as it would be if the island barrier were meridionally infinite. An incident Kelvin wave is largely reflected as long Rossby waves; symmetric long Rossby waves are reflected as equatorial Kelvin waves, while antisymmetric ones stop at the island barrier. In all cases, a boundary current composed of short Rossby waves forms at the eastern side of the island and accomplishes the required meridional redistribution of the zonal mass flux.

  17. Marine and terrestrial environmental changes in NW Europe preceding carbon release at the Paleocene-Eocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kender, Sev; Stephenson, Michael H.; Riding, James B.; Leng, Melanie J.; Knox, Robert W. O.'B.; Peck, Victoria L.; Kendrick, Christopher P.; Ellis, Michael A.; Vane, Christopher H.; Jamieson, Rachel

    2012-11-01

    Environmental changes associated with the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM, ∼56 Ma) have not yet been documented in detail from the North Sea Basin. Located within proximity to the North Atlantic igneous province (NAIP), the Kilda Basin, and the northern rain belt (paleolatitude 54 °N) during the PETM, this is a critical region for testing proposed triggers of atmospheric carbon release that may have caused the global negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) in marine and terrestrial environments. The CIE onset is identified from organic matter δ13C in exceptional detail within a highly expanded sedimentary sequence. Pollen and spore assemblages analysed in the same samples for the first time allow a reconstruction of possible changes to vegetation on the surrounding landmass. Multiproxy palynological, geochemical, and sedimentologic records demonstrate enhanced halocline stratification and terrigenous deposition well before (103 yrs) the CIE, interpreted as due to either tectonic uplift possibly from a nearby magmatic intrusion, or increased precipitation and fluvial runoff possibly from an enhanced hydrologic cycle. Stratification and terrigenous deposition increased further at the onset and within the earliest CIE which, coupled with evidence for sea level rise, may be interpreted as resulting from an increase in precipitation over NW Europe consistent with an enhanced hydrologic cycle in response to global warming during the PETM. Palynological evidence indicates a flora dominated by pollen from coastal swamp conifers before the CIE was abruptly replaced with a more diverse assemblage of generalist species including pollen similar to modern alder, fern, and fungal spores. This may have resulted from flooding of coastal areas due to relative sea level rise, and/or ecologic changes forced by climate. A shift towards more diverse angiosperm and pteridophyte vegetation within the early CIE, including pollen similar to modern hickory, documents a long term

  18. Low-altitude equatorial ions: A new look with SAMPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenspan, M. E.; Mason, G. M.; Mazur, J. E.

    1999-09-01

    We have used the Low-Energy Ion Composition Analyzer (LICA) instrument on the low altitude, polar orbiting SAMPEX spacecraft to survey energetic ions near the magnetic equator from late 1992 through 1998; that is, through the declining phase of Solar Cycle 22, solar minimum, and into the rise of Solar Cycle 23. This survey gives us a unique opportunity to examine both the long-term variation in the low-altitude equatorial ion population and short-term enhancements that occur during magnetic storms. During the survey period, 40 storms with minimum Dst<=100nT occurred: the majority were accompanied by increases in the equatorial ion flux. Although LICA detects ions with energies far above the bulk of the ring current ion population, the times of the maximum equatorial fluxes clustered around the time of minimum Dst, i.e., the time of maximum ring current energy content. The storm associated flux maxima were unevenly distributed in geographic longitude, with the maximum flux enhancements occurring at longitudes just west of the South Atlantic Anomaly. Except for an increase in 1994, the quiet time monthly average equatorial flux declined steadily from 1992 until early 1998; then it began to rise again. The monthly average equatorial ion fluxes had a very significant correlation with the Ap index during this period (R=0.54), indicating that geomagnetic activity dominated the long-term variation. During the survey, we also discovered enhancements in the equatorial ion flux that occurred shortly after the onsets of three recent, large solar energetic particle events. These enhancements began well before the commencements of the associated geomagnetic storms. The major ion species present were H, He, C, and O, therefore ruling out an ionospheric source. These ions could not have penetrated directly from interplanetary space to the magnetic equator, and we do not understand the mechanism that produces the SEP-associated enhancements.

  19. State acid rain permitting programs: A report from EPA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    States and EPA are laying the groundwork for state acid rain permitting in Phase 2 of the Acid Rain Program. Early indications suggest a high degree of state compliance with the acid rain permitting requirements of the Acid Rain Program. Phase 2 acid rain permitting forms have been revised and are available on EPA`s Technology Transfer Network. EPA has developed a policy and rationale concerning submission of Phase 2 permit applications, as well as suggested state timing and methodology regarding adoption of 40 CFR Part 76, the NO{sub x} regulation.

  20. A recent, equatorial, periglacial environment on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balme, M. R.; Gallagher, C.; Murray, J. B.; Muller, J.-P.

    2009-04-01

    During the Viking era, Mars' recent climatic history was held to be cold and dry with little evidence for long-lived liquid water near the surface; signs of a past wetter, warmer climate were confined to ancient Noachian or Hesperian-aged terrains. Recent missions have revealed contemporary near-surface water-ice to be abundant at high latitudes, and a population of mid-latitude fluvial-like gullies that appear to have formed by transient melting of ice or snow. Thus today's view of Mars' recent surface evolution is one of global permafrost existing within a framework of climate change, the timescales of which are governed by obliquity cycles with periods of tens to hundreds of thousands of years. However, in recent mapping work of the equatorial Elysium Planitia region using the latest very high resolution images of Mars (HiRISE; 25cm/pixel) we have found evidence for longer-lived, geologically recent liquid water at the martian surface. This suggests that there was a recent period when the climate was warmer than current obliquity cycle-based models predict. The Elysium Planitia region of Mars is both geologically young (late Amazonian period; <100 Ma) and hosts a variety of landforms that are morphologically similar to those of periglacial and permafrost environments on Earth. The region was exposed to massive flooding from deep underground sources during the late Amazonian, as demonstrated by the distinctive fluvial morphologies seen in the outflow channel Athabasca Vallis. These floods would have provided both the source of ice and particulate material required for a periglacial or permafrost landscape and there was probably a long-lived, but slowly freezing, lake or sea in the downstream Elysium basin. However, the provenance of the materials and landforms of this region is disputed: many authors still regard the Athabasca Vallis and Elysium basin as being flood lava provinces, with effusive volcanic materials reoccupying earlier flood landscapes (a classic

  1. Fraud in the acid rain debate

    SciTech Connect

    Bagge, C.

    1984-06-01

    Electric utility executives, according to the author, and millions of other Americans are the victims of a gigantic fraud being carried on in the name of controlling acid rain. This fraud, states the author, involves the distorted, dire image of acidity in nature being created by environmental groups, politicians and others - to gain public sympathy for their legislative goals. The alleged fraud involves the very nature of the legislation being promoted as a low-cost cure for acid rain. On the basis of scientific evidence to date there is no assurance it will reduce acidity by any appreciable amount, but on the other hand it most certainly will cost users of electricity hundreds of billions of dollars in new costs. What has already happened to the nuclear industry is also meant for coal.

  2. The Acid Rain Program: Monitoring the future

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, B.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a summary of the development of the Acid Rain Program`s approach to Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) and their use in the market based pollution control program of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The roles of the regulatory agencies are discussed and projections are put forward as to how the roles will evolve over time. In addition a discussion of the activities the regulated community is expected to focus on is presented. Finally, a discussion occurs about the requirements that new technologies and instrument providers and purchasers should keep in mind about the Acid Rain Program`s monitoring requirements as they attempt to bring new products into this market.

  3. Observations of ELF electromagnetic waves associated with equatorial spread F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Holtet, J. A.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    Extreme low frequency electromagnetic waves have been observed below the F peak in the equatorial ionosphere by instruments onboard OGO-6. Electrostatic wave observations indicate that the steep gradient was unstable to the process which causes equatorial spread F above the region where the electromagnetic waves were observed. The data are very similar to observations near the polar cusp and give further evidence that ELF waves are excluded from regions of rapid and irregular density increases. Low level electromagnetic waves with similar properties were occasionally observed on the nightside by the OVI-17 electric field sensor and may be plasmaspheric hiss which has propagated to low altitude.

  4. Longitudinal Variation and Waves in Jupiter's South Equatorial Wind Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, A. A.; Rogers, John H.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Choi, David; Allison, Michael; Adamoli, Gianluigi; Mettig, Hans-Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed study of the cloud features in the strong southern equatorial wind jet near 7.5 S planetographic latitude. To understand the apparent variations in average zonal wind jet velocity at this latitude [e.g.. 1,2,3], we have searched for variations iIi both feature latitude and velocity with longitude and time. In particular, we focused on the repetitive chevron-shaped dark spots visible on most dates and the more transient large anticyclonic system known as the South Equatorial Disturbance (SED). These small dark spots are interpreted as cloud holes, and are often used as material tracers of the wind field.

  5. NASA's DC-8 With Rain Mapping Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In a joint venture between NASA and Japan's NASDA, scientists have been using satellites, airplanes, and boats to measure rain physics in and under thunderstorms over open water. This Quick Time movie shows the ER-2, a high altitude reconnaissance aircraft equipped with 8 lightening detectors and other instruments used to study hurricanes and thunderstorms. Earth science and weather studies are an important ongoing function of NASA and its affiliates.

  6. Spaceborne Radar Would Measure Rain And Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Kellogg, Kent H.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes conceptual design of spaceborne radar system mapping precipitation and clouds at mid-latitudes to provide data for research on global weather and climate. Radar operates at two frequencies. Lower (35 GHz) provides vertical profiles of rainfall at rates up to 20 mm/h and enables probing of cirrus clouds. Higher (94 GHz) enables detection and quantitative measurements of clouds of all types and provides rain profiles at rates up to 10 mm/h.

  7. Simulator Of Rain In Flowing Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Richard M.; Cho, Young I.; Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Back, Lloyd H.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes relatively inexpensive apparatus that creates simulated precipitation from drizzle to heavy rain in flowing air. Small, positive-displacement pump and water-injecting device positioned at low-airspeed end of converging section of wind tunnel 10 in. in diameter. Drops injected by array entrained in flow of air as it accelerates toward narrower outlet, 15 in. downstream. Outlet 5 in. in diameter.

  8. Late paleogene (eocene to oligocene) paleoceanography of the northern North Atlantic. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.G.

    1982-11-01

    Seismic stratigraphic evidence indicates that a major change in abyssal circulation occurred in the latest Eocene-earliest Oligocene of the North Atlantic. Reflector R4 reflects a change from weakly (Eocene) to vigorously circulating bottom water (early Oligocene). Sediment distribution studies indicate a northern source for this bottom water, probably from the Arctic via the Norwegian-Greenland Sea/Faeroe-Shetland Channel. Current-controlled sedimentation and erosion continued through the Oligocene; however, above reflector R3 (upper Oligocene), the general intensity of abyssal currents decreased. Above reflector R2 (lower Miocene) a further reduction in abyssal currents resulted in more coherent current-controlled sedimentation and a major phase of sediment drift development. Major deep-sea benthic foraminiferal changes occurred between the middle Eocene and earliest Oligocene: an agglutinated assemblage was replaced by a calcareous assemblage (abyssal Labrador Sea), and an indigenous Eocene calcareious fauna became extinct (abyssal Bay of Biscay). In shallower Atlantic sites (< 3km paleodepth), a Nuttallides truempyi assemblage was replaced by an assemblage of long- and wide-ranging taxa in the early late Eocene.

  9. Larger benthic foraminiferal turnover across the Eocene-Oligocene transition at Siwa Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orabi, H.; El Beshtawy, M.; Osman, R.; Gadallah, M.

    2015-05-01

    In the Eocene part of the Siwa Oasis, the larger foraminifera are represented by the genera Nummulites, Arxina, Operculina, Sphaerogypsina, Asterocyclina, Grzybowskia, Silvestriella, Gaziryina and Discocyclina in order of abundance. Operculina continues up to the early Oligocene as modern representatives in tropical regions, while the other genera became extinct. Nevertheless, the most common larger foraminiferal genus Lepidocyclina (Nephrolepidina) appears only in the lowermost Oligocene. In spite of the Eocene-Oligocene (E/O) transition is thought to have been attended by major continental cooling at northern middle and high latitudes, we discover that at the Siwa Oasis, there is a clear warming trend from the late Eocene (extinction level of Nummulites, Sphaerogypsina, Asterocyclina, Grzybowskia, Silvestriella and Discocyclina) to the early Oligocene is observed due to the high abundance of Operculina and occurrence of kaolinite and gypsiferous shale deposits in both Qatrani and El Qara formations (Oligocene) at this transition. The El Qara Formation is a new rock unit proposed herein for the Oligocene (Rupelian age) in the first time. Several episodes of volcanic activity occurred in Egypt during the Cenozoic. Mid Tertiary volcanicity was widespread and a number of successive volcanic pulses are starting in the late Eocene. The release of mantle CO2 from this very active volcanic episode may have in fact directly caused the warm Eocene-Oligocene greenhouse climate effect.

  10. Fossil plant stomata indicate decreasing atmospheric CO2 prior to the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinthorsdottir, M.; Porter, A. S.; Holohan, A.; Kunzmann, L.; Collinson, M.; McElwain, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    A unique stratigraphic sequence of fossil leaves of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis (extinct trees of the beech family, Fagaceae) from central Germany has been used to derive an atmospheric pCO2 record with multiple data points spanning the late middle to late Eocene, two sampling levels which may be earliest Oligocene, and two samples from later in the Oligocene. Using the inverse relationship between the density of stomata and pCO2, we show that pCO2 decreased continuously from the late middle to late Eocene, reaching a relatively stable low value before the end of the Eocene. Based on the subsequent records, pCO2 in parts of the Oligocene was similar to latest Eocene values. These results show that a decrease in pCO2 preceded the large shift in marine oxygen isotope records that characterizes the Eocene-Oliogocene transition. This may be related to the "hysteresis effect" previously proposed - where a certain threshold of pCO2 change was crossed before the cumulative effects of this and other factors resulted in rapid temperature decline, ice build up on Antarctica and hence a change of climate mode.

  11. Fossil plant stomata indicate decreasing atmospheric CO2 prior to the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinthorsdottir, Margret; Porter, Amanda S.; Holohan, Aidan; Kunzmann, Lutz; Collinson, Margaret; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2016-02-01

    A unique stratigraphic sequence of fossil leaves of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis (extinct trees of the beech family, Fagaceae) from central Germany has been used to derive an atmospheric pCO2 record with multiple data points spanning the late middle to late Eocene, two sampling levels which may be earliest Oligocene, and two samples from later in the Oligocene. Using the inverse relationship between the density of stomata and pCO2, we show that pCO2 decreased continuously from the late middle to late Eocene, reaching a relatively stable low value before the end of the Eocene. Based on the subsequent records, pCO2 in parts of the Oligocene was similar to latest Eocene values. These results suggest that a decrease in pCO2 preceded the large shift in marine oxygen isotope records that characterizes the Eocene-Oligocene transition and that when a certain threshold of pCO2 change was crossed, the cumulative effects of this and other factors resulted in rapid temperature decline, ice build up on Antarctica and hence a change of climate mode.

  12. Multiple microtektite horizons in upper Eocene marine sediments: No evidence for mass extinctions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, G.; D'Hondt, S.; Vallier, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    Microtektites have been recovered from three horizons in eight middle Eocene to middle Oligocene marine sediment sequences. Five of these occurrences are coeval and of latest Eocene age (37.5 to 38.0 million years ago); three are coeval and of early late Eocene age (38.5 to 39.5 million years ago); and three are of middle Oligocene age (31 to 32 million years ago). In addition, rare probable microtektites have been found in sediments with ages of about 36.0 to 36.5 million years. The microtektite horizon at 37.5 to 38.0 million years can be correlated with the North American tektite-strewn field, which has a fission track age (minimum) of 34 to 35 million years and a paleomagnetic age of 37.5 to 38.0 million years. There is no evidence for mass faunal extinctions at any of the microtektite horizons. Many of the distinct faunal changes that occurred in the middle Eocene to middle Oligocene can be related to the formation of the Antarctic ice sheet and the associated cooling phenomena and intensification of bottom currents that led to large-scale dissolution of calcium carbonate and erosion, which created areally extensive hiatuses in the deep-sea sediment records. The occurrence of microtektite horizons of several ages and the lack of evidence for faunal extinctions suggest that the effects of extraterrestrial bolide impacts may be unimportant in the biologic realm during middle Eocene to middle Oligocene time.

  13. Geochronology of upper Paleocene and lower Eocene strata, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Tew, B.H. Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL )

    1994-03-01

    Four samples of glauconitic sand from upper Paleocene and lower Eocene strata of the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain were analyzed for conventional potassium-argon (K-Ar) age determination. Results from these analyses are as follows: Coal Bluff Marl Member of the Naheola Formation of the Midway Group (58.2 [+-] 1.5 MA), Ostrea thirsae beds of the Nanafalia Formation of the Wilcox Group (56.3 [+-] 1.5 MA), upper Tuscahoma Sand of the Wilcox Group (54.5 [+-] 1.4 MA), and Bashi Marl Member of the Hatchetigbee Formation of the Wilcox Group (53.4 [+-] 1.4 MA). The Nanafalia Formation (Wilcox Group) disconformably overlies the Naheola Formation (Midway Group), and based on the data presented here, the age of this unconformity is bracketed between 59.7 and 54.8 MA. The Paleocene-Eocene Epoch boundary occurs in the Wilcox Group and coincides with the lithostratigraphic contact of the upper Paleocene Tuscahoma Sand with the lower eocene Hatchetigbee Formation. The age of this boundary, which is also an unconformity, can be placed between 55.9 and 52.0 MA. The K-Ar age dates for this boundary in the Gulf Coastal Plain compare favorably with the numerical limits placed on the Paleocene-Eocene boundary in the published literature. Generally, the Paleocene-Eocene Epoch boundary is reported as approximately 54 to 55 MA.

  14. The oldest African bat from the early Eocene of El Kohol (Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravel, Anthony; Marivaux, Laurent; Tabuce, Rodolphe; Adaci, Mohammed; Mahboubi, Mohammed; Mebrouk, Fateh; Bensalah, Mustapha

    2011-05-01

    The Afro-Arabian Paleogene fossil record of Chiroptera is very poor. In North Africa and Arabia, this record is limited, thus far, to a few localities mainly in Tunisia (Chambi, late early Eocene), Egypt (Fayum, late Eocene to early Oligocene), and Sultanate of Oman (Taqah, early Oligocene). It consists primarily of isolated teeth or mandible fragments. Interestingly, these African fossil bats document two modern groups (Vespertilionoidea and Rhinolophoidea) from the early Eocene, while the bat fossil record of the same epoch of North America, Eurasia, and Australia principally includes members of the "Eochiroptera." This paraphyletic group contains all primitive microbats excluding modern families. In Algeria, the region of Brezina, southeast of the Atlas Mountains, is famous for the early Eocene El Kohol Formation, which has yielded one of the earliest mammalian faunas of the African landmass. Recent fieldwork in the same area has led to the discovery of a new vertebrate locality, including isolated teeth of Chiroptera. These fossils represent the oldest occurrence of Chiroptera in Africa, thus extending back the record of the group to the middle early Eocene (Ypresian) on that continent. The material consists of an upper molar and two fragments of lower molars. The dental character association matches that of "Eochiroptera." As such, although very fragmentary, the material testifies to the first occurrence of "Eochiroptera" in Algeria, and by extension in Africa. This discovery demonstrates that this basal group of Chiroptera had a worldwide distribution during the early Paleogene.

  15. The oldest African bat from the early Eocene of El Kohol (Algeria).

    PubMed

    Ravel, Anthony; Marivaux, Laurent; Tabuce, Rodolphe; Adaci, Mohammed; Mahboubi, Mohammed; Mebrouk, Fateh; Bensalah, Mustapha

    2011-05-01

    The Afro-Arabian Paleogene fossil record of Chiroptera is very poor. In North Africa and Arabia, this record is limited, thus far, to a few localities mainly in Tunisia (Chambi, late early Eocene), Egypt (Fayum, late Eocene to early Oligocene), and Sultanate of Oman (Taqah, early Oligocene). It consists primarily of isolated teeth or mandible fragments. Interestingly, these African fossil bats document two modern groups (Vespertilionoidea and Rhinolophoidea) from the early Eocene, while the bat fossil record of the same epoch of North America, Eurasia, and Australia principally includes members of the "Eochiroptera." This paraphyletic group contains all primitive microbats excluding modern families. In Algeria, the region of Brezina, southeast of the Atlas Mountains, is famous for the early Eocene El Kohol Formation, which has yielded one of the earliest mammalian faunas of the African landmass. Recent fieldwork in the same area has led to the discovery of a new vertebrate locality, including isolated teeth of Chiroptera. These fossils represent the oldest occurrence of Chiroptera in Africa, thus extending back the record of the group to the middle early Eocene (Ypresian) on that continent. The material consists of an upper molar and two fragments of lower molars. The dental character association matches that of "Eochiroptera." As such, although very fragmentary, the material testifies to the first occurrence of "Eochiroptera" in Algeria, and by extension in Africa. This discovery demonstrates that this basal group of Chiroptera had a worldwide distribution during the early Paleogene. PMID:21442243

  16. Response of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone to global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation across the Eocene Oligocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeong, Kiseong; Kuroda, Junichiro; Seo, Inah; Wilson, Paul A.

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 34 million years ago across the Eocene–Oligocene transition (EOT), Earth’s climate tipped from a largely unglaciated state into one that sustained large ice sheets on Antarctica. Antarctic glaciation is attributed to a threshold response to slow decline in atmospheric CO2 but our understanding of the feedback processes triggered and of climate change on the other contents is limited. Here we present new geochemical records of terrigenous dust accumulating on the sea floor across the EOT from a site in the central equatorial Pacific. We report a change in dust chemistry from an Asian affinity to a Central-South American provenance that occurs geologically synchronously with the initiation of stepwise global cooling, glaciation of Antarctica and aridification on the northern continents. We infer that the inter-tropical convergence zone of intense precipitation extended to our site during late Eocene, at least four degrees latitude further south than today, but that it migrated northwards in step with global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation. Our findings point to an atmospheric teleconnection between extratropical cooling and rainfall climate in the tropics and the mid-latitude belt of the westerlies operating across the most pivotal transition in climate state of the Cenozoic Era.

  17. Response of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone to global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation across the Eocene Oligocene Transition

    PubMed Central

    Hyeong, Kiseong; Kuroda, Junichiro; Seo, Inah; Wilson, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 34 million years ago across the Eocene–Oligocene transition (EOT), Earth’s climate tipped from a largely unglaciated state into one that sustained large ice sheets on Antarctica. Antarctic glaciation is attributed to a threshold response to slow decline in atmospheric CO2 but our understanding of the feedback processes triggered and of climate change on the other contents is limited. Here we present new geochemical records of terrigenous dust accumulating on the sea floor across the EOT from a site in the central equatorial Pacific. We report a change in dust chemistry from an Asian affinity to a Central-South American provenance that occurs geologically synchronously with the initiation of stepwise global cooling, glaciation of Antarctica and aridification on the northern continents. We infer that the inter-tropical convergence zone of intense precipitation extended to our site during late Eocene, at least four degrees latitude further south than today, but that it migrated northwards in step with global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation. Our findings point to an atmospheric teleconnection between extratropical cooling and rainfall climate in the tropics and the mid-latitude belt of the westerlies operating across the most pivotal transition in climate state of the Cenozoic Era. PMID:27507793

  18. Court date for EPA acid rain rule

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-03-04

    In an acid rain rulemaking that appears headed straight for the courtroom, the Environmental Protection Agency this week announced new limits on emissions of nitrogen oxides from coal-fired power plants. The regulations, announced March 1, are expected to achieve a 1.8 million ton per year reduction in power plant NOx emissions, which are considered a major contributor to acid rain. The agency issued companion regulations last year to cut power plant discharges of sulfur dioxide, the other major acid rain pollutant. The NOx rulemaking elicited contradictory responses from utility industry officials. One point of contention involves the agency's definition of low-NOx burner technology, a key regulatory determination. If a utility installs EPA-defined low-NOx burner technology and still cannot meet the new NOx limits, it can apply for a less stringent [open quotes]alternative emission limit.[close quotes] The other issue likely to be raised by industry officials involves the January 1995 compliance deadline for utilities included in Phase I of the NOx program. While EPA will allow individual utilities to seek a deadline extension until April 1996 in the event of operational difficulties, the agency rejected the industry's request for an across-the-board extension.

  19. Acid Rain in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Karen C.; Deviney, Frank A., Jr.; Olson, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Visitors to Shenandoah National Park (SNP) enjoy the animal and plant life and the scenery but may not realize how vulnerable these features are to various threats, such as invasion of exotic plants and insects, improper use of park resources by humans, and air and water pollution. The National Park Service strives to protect natural resources from such threats to ensure that the resources will be available for enjoyment now and in the future. Because SNP has limited influence over the air pollution that envelops the region, acidic deposition--commonly known as acid rain--is one of the more challenging threats facing park managers. With the help of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists, park managers can understand how acid rain interacts with ground- and surface-water resources, which enables them to explain why reductions in air pollution can help preserve park resources. Such understanding also provides essential insight into ecosystem processes, as managers strive to unravel and resolve other environmental problems that are interrelated to acid rain.

  20. Energetic photoelectrons and the polar rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Dwight T.; Jasperse, J. R.; Winningham, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    In the daytime midlatitudes, the Low Altitude Plasma Instrument (LAPI) on board the Dynamics Explorer 2 satellite has observed photoelectrons with energies as high as 850 eV. These energetic photoelectrons are an extension of the 'classical' photoelectrons (less than 60 eV) and result from photoionization of neutrals by soft solar X-rays. Since these photoelectrons are produced wherever the solar flux is incident on the earth's atmosphere, they should be present in sunlit polar cap. But in the polar cap, over these same energies, there is a well-known electron population: the polar rain, a low intensity electron flux of magnetospheric origin. Thus, in the sunlit polar cap, an energetic population of electrons should consist of both an ionospheric (photoelectron) and a magnetospheric (polar rain) component. Using numerical solutions of an electron transport equation with appropriate boundary conditions and sunlit polar cap LAPI data, it is shown that the two populations (photoelectron and polar rain) are indeed present and are both needed to explain polar cap observations.