These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Multiple, PKA-dependent and PKA-independent, signals are involved in cAMP-induced PRL expression in the eosinophilic cell line Eol-1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Besides its pivotal role in reproduction, the polypeptide hormone prolactin (PRL) has been attributed an immunomodulatory function. Extrapituitary PRL expression is regulated differently from that in the pituitary, due to the use of an alternative promoter. In leukocytes, cAMP is an important regulator of PRL expression. We report that in the human eosinophilic cell line Eol-1, cAMP-induced PRL expression is

Sarah Gerlo; Peggy Verdood; Elisabeth L. Hooghe-Peters; Ron Kooijman

2005-01-01

2

Mechanisms for the proliferation of eosinophilic leukemia cells by FIP1L1-PDGFR{alpha}  

SciTech Connect

The constitutively activated tyrosine kinase Fip1-like 1 (FIP1L1)-platelet-derived growth factor receptor {alpha} (PDGFR{alpha}) causes eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells to proliferate. Recently, we demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitors suppressed this proliferation and induced the differentiation of EoL-1 cells into eosinophils in parallel with a decrease in the level of FIP1L1-PDGFR{alpha}. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism by which FIP1L1-PDGFR{alpha} induces the proliferation and whether the suppression of cell proliferation triggers the differentiation into eosinophils. The FIP1L1-PDGFR{alpha} inhibitor imatinib inhibited the proliferation of EoL-1 cells and decreased the level of the oncoprotein c-Myc as well as the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The proliferation of EoL-1 cells and expression of c-Myc were also inhibited by the MEK inhibitor U0126 and JNK inhibitor SP600125. The expression of the eosinophilic differentiation marker CCR3 was not induced by imatinib. These findings suggest that FIP1L1-PDGFR{alpha} induces the proliferation of EoL-1 cells through the induction of c-Myc expression via ERK and JNK signaling pathways, but is not involved in the inhibition of differentiation toward mature eosinophils.

Ishihara, Kenji; Kitamura, Hajime; Hiraizumi, Kenji; Kaneko, Motoko; Takahashi, Aki [Laboratory of Pathophysiological Biochemistry, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Zee, OkPyo [Laboratory of Pharmacognosy, Graduate School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seyama, Toshio [Faculty of Pharmacy, Yasuda Women's University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hong, JangJa; Ohuchi, Kazuo [Laboratory of Pathophysiological Biochemistry, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Faculty of Pharmacy, Yasuda Women's University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hirasawa, Noriyasu [Laboratory of Pathophysiological Biochemistry, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)], E-mail: hirasawa@mail.pharm.tohoku.ac.jp

2008-02-22

3

Genetics Home Reference: PDGFRB-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer.Net: Leukemia--Eosinophilic: Treatment Genetic Testing Registry: Myeloproliferative disorder, chronic, with eosinophilia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Eosinophil Count--Absolute Seattle Cancer Care Alliance: Hypereosinophilia You might also find information ...

4

Murine model of hypereosinophilic syndromes/chronic eosinophilic leukemia.  

PubMed

Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) includes heterogeneous hematological disorders that are characterized by distinctive blood and tissue eosinophilia. In addition to classical HES criteria, the World Health Organization proposed a set of criteria that distinguish chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL) from HES. As such, the fusion gene FIP1L1/PDGFRA was found as a cause of CEL in a significant proportion of patients initially diagnosed as having HES. Several investigations have tried to dissect the mechanism of leukemogenesis; eosinophilia and signaling induced by FIP1L1/PDGFRalpha in cell lines, bone marrow mast cells, primary human eosinophils and in murine myeloproliferative disorder models. In this review, we introduce the current knowledge on the relationship between FIP1L1/PDGFRalpha and cell signaling, eosinophil proliferation, survival and activation and mastocytosis specially focusing on the evidence learned from murine models. PMID:19494514

Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Cancelas, Jose A; Rothenberg, Marc E

2009-01-01

5

Mast cells and eosinophils in mastocytosis, chronic eosinophilic leukemia, and non-clonal disorders.  

PubMed

Mast cells and eosinophils often travel in the same biologic circles. In non-clonal states, such as allergic and inflammatory conditions, cell-to-cell contact and the pleiotropic actions of multiple cytokines and chemokines, derived from local tissues or mast cells themselves, foster the co-recruitment of these cells to the same geographic cellular niche. While eosinophils and mast cells serve critical roles as part of the host immune response and in maintenance of normal homeostasis, these cell types can undergo neoplastic transformation due to the development of clonal molecular abnormalities that arise in early hematopoietic progenitors. The dysregulated tyrosine kinases, D816V KIT and FIP1L1-PDGFRA, are the prototypic oncogenic lesions resulting in systemic mastocytosis (SM) and chronic eosinophilic leukemia, respectively. We review the pathobiology of these myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) with a focus on the relationship between mast cells and eosinophils, and discuss murine models, which further elucidate how the phenotype of these diseases can be influenced by stem cell factor (SCF) and expression of the potent eosinophilopoietic cytokine, interleukin-5 (IL-5). Therapy of SM and FIP1L1-PDGFRA-positive disease and the prognostic relevance of increased peripheral blood and tissue mast cells in hematolymphoid malignancies will also be addressed. PMID:22449623

Gotlib, Jason; Akin, Cem

2012-04-01

6

EOL-1, the homolog of the mammalian Dom3Z, regulates olfactory learning in C. elegans.  

PubMed

Learning is an essential function of the nervous system. However, our understanding of molecular underpinnings of learning remains incomplete. Here, we characterize a conserved protein EOL-1 that regulates olfactory learning in Caenorhabditis elegans. A recessive allele of eol-1 (enhanced olfactory learning) learns better to adjust its olfactory preference for bacteria foods and eol-1 acts in the URX sensory neurons to regulate learning. The mammalian homolog of EOL-1, Dom3Z, which regulates quality control of pre-mRNAs, can substitute the function of EOL-1 in learning regulation, demonstrating functional conservation between these homologs. Mutating the residues of Dom3Z that are critical for its enzymatic activity, and the equivalent residues in EOL-1, abolishes the function of these proteins in learning. Together, our results provide insights into the function of EOL-1/Dom3Z and suggest that its activity in pre-mRNA quality control is involved in neural plasticity. PMID:25274815

Shen, Yu; Zhang, Jiangwen; Calarco, John A; Zhang, Yun

2014-10-01

7

Characteristics of an anti-eosinophil monoclonal antibody that recognizes granulocytes from patients with blood eosinophilia but not from subjects without eosinophilia.  

PubMed Central

To investigate cell surface antigens of activated human eosinophils using monoclonal antibodies, we established a murine anti-human eosinophil monoclonal antibody AE500 by immunizing with blood eosinophils from patients with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) and characterized the reactivity to a variety of human leucocytes by a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. AE500 reacted with blood eosinophils and neutrophils in nine out of 11 patients with marked eosinophilia (greater than or equal to 2500/microliters) (seven with idiopathic eosinophilia including HES and two with asthma), but not with those in asthmatic patients with mild eosinophilia (n = 10) or in healthy subjects (n = 8). AE500 did not react with blood lymphocytes, monocytes or platelets. AE500 did not react with human myeloid or lymphoid cell lines, including eosinophilic leukemia cell lines EOL-1 and EOL-3. The reactivity of AE500 to blood eosinophils and neutrophils in patients with marked eosinophilia changed in relation to blood eosinophil counts and prednisolone therapy. In addition, the reactivity of AE500 to blood eosinophils was increased in three out of four AE500-positive eosinophils by the incubation of the cells with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) at 37 degrees C for 30 min, but not with interleukin 3 or interleukin-5. These results suggest that the anti-eosinophil antibody AE500 detects a cell surface antigen expressed on blood granulocytes in a hypereosinophilic state. This anti-eosinophil antibody would be useful for analysing the mechanism of eosinophilia. PMID:2025954

Ochiai, K; Iwamoto, I; Takahashi, H; Yoshida, S; Nakagawa, N; Tomioka, H; Yoshida, S

1991-01-01

8

Inhibitory effect of turmeric curcuminoids on FLT3 expression and cell cycle arrest in the FLT3-overexpressing EoL-1 leukemic cell line.  

PubMed

Leukemia is a hematologic malignancy with a frequent incidence and high mortality rate. Previous studies have shown that the FLT3 gene is overexpressed in leukemic blast cells, especially in acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, a commercially available curcuminoid mixture (1), pure curcumin (2), pure demethoxycurcumin (3), and pure bisdemethoxycurcumin (4) were investigated for their inhibitory effects on cell growth, FLT3 expression, and cell cycle progression in an FLT3-overexpressing EoL-1 leukemic cell line using an MTT assay, Western blotting, and flow cytometry, respectively. The mixture (1) and compounds 2-4 demonstrated cytotoxic effects with IC50 values ranging from 6.5 to 22.5 ?M. A significant decrease in FLT3 protein levels was found after curcuminoid treatment with IC20 doses, especially with mixture 1 and compound 2. In addition, mixture 1 and curcumin (2) showed activity on cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and decreased the FLT3 and STAT5A protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. Compound 2 demonstrated the greatest potential for inhibiting cell growth, cell cycle progression, and FLT3 expression in EoL-1 cells. This investigation has provided new findings regarding the effect of turmeric curcuminoids on FLT3 expression in leukemic cells. PMID:24689857

Tima, Singkome; Ichikawa, Hideki; Ampasavate, Chadarat; Okonogi, Siriporn; Anuchapreeda, Songyot

2014-04-25

9

Rumex L. species induce apoptosis in 1301, EOL-1 and H-9 cell lines.  

PubMed

The Rumex L. (dock) species for many centuries have been used in medical treatment, through their adstringent, spasmolitic or cholagogic action. In the present study, the in vitro screening of cytotoxic activities of ethanol extract from roots, leaves and fruits of six Rumex species: R. acetosa L., R. acetosella L., R. confertus Willd., R. crispus L., R. hydrolapathum Huds. and R. obtusifolius L. were performed. We found remarkable cytotoxic activities on leukemic 1301 and EOL-1 cell lines and T cell line at concentration dependent manners. Cytotoxic activity was determined in two ways: trypan blue test and annexin-V FITC and propidium iodide assay. Received IC50 values of investigated extracts on 1301, EOL-1 and H-9 cell lines ranged from 0.22, 0.17 and 0.04 to 2.56, 1.91 and 1.83 mg/mL, respectively. Analysis of morphological changes demonstrated that the extract exerted cell-death via apoptosis. The overall activities of Rumex species support the traditional use of the extract from the fruits of R. confertus, R. crispus, R. hydrolapathum and R. obtusifolius in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22594263

Wegiera, Magdalena; Smolarz, Helena D; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna

2012-01-01

10

Novel association between vasoactive intestinal peptide and CRTH2 receptor in recruiting eosinophils: a possible biochemical mechanism for allergic eosinophilic inflammation of the airways.  

PubMed

We explored the relation between vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), CRTH2, and eosinophil recruitment. It is shown that CRTH2 expression by eosinophils from allergic rhinitis (AR) patients and eosinophil cell line (Eol-1 cells) was up-regulated by VIP treatment. This was functional and resulted in exaggerated migratory response of cells against PGD2. Nasal challenge of AR patients resulted in a significant increase of VIP contents in nasal secretion (ELISA), and the immunohistochemical studies of allergic nasal tissues showed significant expression of VIP in association with intense eosinophil recruitment. Biochemical assays showed that VIP-induced eosinophil chemotaxis from AR patients and Eol-1 cells was mediated through the CRTH2 receptor. Cell migration against VIP was sensitive to protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition but not to tyrosine kinase or p38 MAPK inhibition or calcium chelation. Western blot demonstrated a novel CRTH2-mediated cytosol-to-membrane translocation of PKC-?, PKC-?, and PKA-?, -?, and -II?reg in Eol-1 cells upon stimulation with VIP. Confocal images and FACS demonstrated a strong association and co-localization between VIP peptide and CRTH2 molecules. Further, VIP induced PGD2 secretion from eosinophils. Our results demonstrate the first evidence of association between VIP and CRTH2 in recruiting eosinophils. PMID:23168411

El-Shazly, Amr E; Begon, Dominique Y; Kustermans, Gaelle; Arafa, Mohammad; Dortu, Estelle; Henket, Monique; Lefebvre, Philippe P; Louis, Renaud; Delvenne, Philippe

2013-01-11

11

2B4 (CD244) is involved in eosinophil adhesion and chemotaxis, and its surface expression is increased in allergic rhinitis after challenge.  

PubMed

A role for the subtypes of CD2 Ig superfamily receptors has been recently demonstrated in eosinophilic inflammation in experimental asthma and atopic asthmatics. We investigated the functions of 2B4 (CD244) molecules in eosinophil adhesion and chemotaxis, and correlated the results to the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis (AR). Herein, we show that agonistic stimulation of 2B4 by C1.7, the anti-human 2B4 functional grade purified antibody, resulted in significant increase of eosinophils and eosinophil cell line (Eol-1 cells) adhesion to collagen type IV, and random migration. These functions were associated with tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of several protein residues of low molecular weight. Flow cytometry (FACS) experiments demonstrated that Eol-1 cells, normal peripheral blood eosinophils and eosinophils from AR patients, express surface 2B4 molecules. In vitro AR model demonstrated that the CC-chemokine receptor CCR3 stimulation by eotaxin induced significant increase in the expression of surface 2B4 in eosinophils and Eol-1 cells. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy images showed that eotaxin induces also redistribution of 2B4 molecules towards the pseudopods in eosinophils and Eol-1 cells, changing their shape. Blocking of 2B4 molecules by the corresponding neutralizing antibody inhibited eotaxin induced Eol-1-adhesion, chemotaxis and the cytoskeleton changes. Pretreatment of Eol-1 cells with 1 microM genistein blocked eotaxin-induced Eol-1 adhesion, chemotaxis and 2B4 up-regulated expression. In vivo correlation demonstrated the expression of 2B4 molecules in eosinophils from AR patients to be significantly increased, after nasal provocation challenge. These results identify a novel role for 2B4 molecules in eosinophil functional migratory response and may point to a novel tyrosine kinase-mediated ligation between CCR3 receptor and 2B4 co-receptor in eosinophil chemotaxis. If so, then 2B4 molecules would be a novel target for therapeutic modalities in diseases characterized by eosinophilia such as AR. PMID:22230401

El-Shazly, A E; Henket, M; Lefebvre, P P; Louis, R

2011-01-01

12

The Spectrum of FIP1L1-PDGFRA-Associated Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia: New Insights Based on a Survey of 44 Cases.  

PubMed

Imatinib is the treatment of choice for FIP1L1/PDGFRA (F/P)-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia (F/P CEL), but its optimal dosing, duration, and possibility of discontinuation are still a matter of debate. A retrospective multicenter study was conducted with 44 F/P CEL patients identified in the French Eosinophil Network and treated with imatinib. The most frequently involved systems were skin (57%), spleen (52%), and lung (45%), and eosinophilic heart disease was observed in 15 patients (34%). Complete hematologic response (CHR) was obtained in all patients, and complete molecular response (CMR) in 95% of patients (average initial imatinib dose, 165 mg/d). For 29 patients the imatinib dose was tapered with a maintenance dose of 58 mg/d (±34 mg/d), allowing sustained CHR and CMR. None of the patients developed resistance during a median follow-up of 52.3 months (range, 1.4-97.4 mo). Imatinib was stopped in 11 patients; 6 of the patients subsequently relapsed, but 5 remained in persistent CHR or CMR (range, 9-88 mo). These results confirm that an initial low-dose regimen of imatinib (100 mg/d) followed by a lower maintenance dose can be efficient for obtaining long-term CHR and CMR. Our data also suggest that imatinib can be stopped in some patients without molecular relapse. PMID:23982058

Legrand, Fanny; Renneville, Aline; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Mastrilli, Samuel; Ackermann, Felix; Cayuela, Jean Michel; Rousselot, Philippe; Schmidt-Tanguy, Aline; Fain, Olivier; Michel, Marc; de Jaureguiberry, Jean-Pierre; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Cony-Makhoul, Pascale; Lefranc, Didier; Sčne, Damien; Cottin, Vincent; Hamidou, Mohamed; Lidove, Olivier; Baruchel, André; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Bletry, Olivier; Preudhomme, Claude; Capron, Monique; Prin, Lionel; Kahn, Jean Emmanuel

2013-08-26

13

Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Search Espańol Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®) Last Modified: November 11, 2014 General Information About Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Myeloproliferative neoplasms are a group of ...

14

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of undetermined cause characterized by infiltration\\u000a of eosinophils in the GI tract. Eosinophils accumulate in tissues and may release highly cytotoxic granular proteins, which\\u000a cause severe tissue damage characteristic of eosinophilic gastroenteritis. Eotaxin may play a role in the recruitment of eosinophils\\u000a into tissue in combination with chemoattractants and cytokines, including interleukin

Rahim Daneshjoo; Nicholas J. Talley

2002-01-01

15

Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-01-09

16

Eosinophilic Pneumonias  

PubMed Central

Summary: This review starts with discussions of several infectious causes of eosinophilic pneumonia, which are almost exclusively parasitic in nature. Pulmonary infections due specifically to Ascaris, hookworms, Strongyloides, Paragonimus, filariasis, and Toxocara are considered in detail. The discussion then moves to noninfectious causes of eosinophilic pulmonary infiltration, including allergic sensitization to Aspergillus, acute and chronic eosinophilic pneumonias, Churg-Strauss syndrome, hypereosinophilic syndromes, and pulmonary eosinophilia due to exposure to specific medications or toxins. PMID:23034324

Akuthota, Praveen

2012-01-01

17

FIP1L1/PDGFRalpha synergizes with SCF to induce systemic mastocytosis in a murine model of chronic eosinophilic leukemia/hypereosinophilic syndrome.  

PubMed

Expression of the fusion gene FIP1-like 1/platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (FIP1L1/PDGFRalpha, F/P) and dysregulated c-kit tyrosine kinase activity are associated with systemic mastocytosis (SM) and chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL)/hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). We analyzed SM development and pathogenesis in a murine CEL model induced by F/P in hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors (HSCs/Ps) and T-cell overexpression of IL-5 (F/P-positive CEL mice). These mice had more mast cell (MC) infiltration in the bone marrow (BM), spleen, skin, and small intestine than control mice that received a transplant of IL-5 transgenic HSCs/Ps. Moreover, intestinal MC infiltration induced by F/P expression was severely diminished, but not abolished, in mice injected with neutralizing anti-c-kit antibody, suggesting that endogenous stem cell factor (SCF)/c-kit interaction synergizes with F/P expression to induce SM. F/P-expressing BM HSCs/Ps showed proliferation and MC differentiation in vitro in the absence of cytokines. SCF stimulated greater migration of F/P-expressing MCs than mock vector-transduced MCs. F/P-expressing bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) survived longer than mock vector control BMMCs in cytokine-deprived conditions. The increased proliferation and survival correlated with increased SCF-induced Akt activation. In summary, F/P synergistically promotes MC development, activation, and survival in vivo and in vitro in response to SCF. PMID:18539901

Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Sanchez-Aguilera, Abel; Brandt, Eric B; McBride, Melissa; Al-Moamen, Nabeel J H; Finkelman, Fred D; Williams, David A; Cancelas, Jose A; Rothenberg, Marc E

2008-09-15

18

Eosinophilic cystitis.  

PubMed

We describe four cases of eosinophilic cystitis in whom no specific cause could be found, and review the literature. Complaints at presentation included urgency, frequency, abdominal pain, and haematuria. In three patients the symptoms and ultrasound pictures suggested a bladder tumour. One patient was treated with anticholinergics and corticosteroids without relief of symptoms; a localised eosinophilic tumour was excised in one patient who remained symptom free; and two patients were managed conservatively with spontaneous resolution of bladder pathology and symptoms. One case was identified by random bladder biopsy in 150 consecutive patients with unexplained irritable micturition complaints. Eosinophilic cystitis is rare in children. After biopsy, we consider a wait and see policy is justified as symptoms tend to disappear spontaneously. Routine bladder biopsies in children with unexplained bladder symptoms is not justifiable. PMID:11259238

Verhagen, P C; Nikkels, P G; de Jong, T P

2001-04-01

19

Eosinophilic Cystitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: We present a large series of eosinophilic cystitis including 8 cases; 3 of them had tumor-like lesions. Materials and Methods: The archives of pathology clinic of Inonu University Medical Faculty were reviewed from 1988 to 2002. The characteristics of patients and their diseases were recorded. Data obtained from 180 cases (172 from the literature and 8 from the present

Süleyman Kiliç; Rezzan Erguvan; Deniz Ipek; Hasan Gökçe; N. Engin Aydin; Can Baydinç

2003-01-01

20

Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... adults and occur more often in men than women. Many Treatments Are Available There are many methods available to treat acute and chronic leukemia. They include chemotherapy, biological therapy, or stem cell transplantation. Some people receive a combination of ...

21

Eosinophilic esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated condition where infiltration of eosinophils into the esophageal mucosa leads to symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. It has rapidly emerged as an important cause of upper GI morbidity in patients of all ages and is encountered in a substantial proportion of patients undergoing diagnostic upper endoscopy. This review discusses the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of EoE and presents the most recent guidelines for diagnosis of EoE. It describes selected diagnostic dilemmas including distinguishing EoE from gastroesophageal reflux disease and addressing the newly recognized clinical entity of proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia. It also highlights evidence to support both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments, including topical corticosteroids, dietary elimination therapy, and endoscopic dilation. PMID:23452635

Dellon, Evan S.

2012-01-01

22

Eosinophilic Disorders  

MedlinePLUS

... Blood Cell Disorders Plasma Cell Disorders Leukemias Lymphomas Myeloproliferative Disorders Spleen Disorders Topics in White Blood Cell ... Brand Names GLEEVEC , a drug used to treat cancer. If these drugs fail, various other drugs may ...

23

Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-04-09

24

Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2013-06-03

25

Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2014-10-23

26

3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2014-12-16

27

Induction of eosinophil apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide promotes the resolution of allergic inflammation.  

PubMed

Eosinophils are effector cells that have an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. Defective removal of these cells likely leads to chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the elimination of eosinophils from inflammatory sites. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for certain mediators and molecular pathways responsible for the survival and death of leukocytes at sites of inflammation. Reactive oxygen species have been described as proinflammatory mediators but their role in the resolution phase of inflammation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reactive oxygen species in the resolution of allergic inflammatory responses. An eosinophilic cell line (Eol-1) was treated with hydrogen peroxide and apoptosis was measured. Allergic inflammation was induced in ovalbumin sensitized and challenged mouse models and reactive oxygen species were administered at the peak of inflammatory cell infiltrate. Inflammatory cell numbers, cytokine and chemokine levels, mucus production, inflammatory cell apoptosis and peribronchiolar matrix deposition was quantified in the lungs. Resistance and elastance were measured at baseline and after aerosolized methacholine. Hydrogen peroxide accelerates resolution of airway inflammation by induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils and decrease remodeling, mucus deposition, inflammatory cytokine production and airway hyperreactivity. Moreover, the inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by apocynin or in gp91(phox-/-) mice prolonged the inflammatory response. Hydrogen peroxide induces Eol-1 apoptosis in vitro and enhances the resolution of inflammation and improves lung function in vivo by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils. PMID:25675292

Reis, A C; Alessandri, A L; Athayde, R M; Perez, D A; Vago, J P; Ávila, T V; Ferreira, T P T; de Arantes, A Cs; de Sá Coutinho, D; Rachid, M A; Sousa, L P; Martins, M A; Menezes, G B; Rossi, A G; Teixeira, M M; Pinho, V

2015-01-01

28

[Eosinophil cystitis].  

PubMed

Authors report on two rare cases of eosinophilic cystitis, giving a review of the etiologic assumptions and pathogenetic, pathologic aspects of the disease, based on the available literary data. The course of the disease can be either acute or subacute, and is most often chronic. Relapse and progression can interchange in irregular manner, attention is therefore called to the importance of follow-ups. Resection deep into the intact--also containing muscle fibre--as well as histologic examination are considered essential as the only method of differentiation, giving precise diagnosis in the present two cases, too. PMID:10832381

Csata, S; Répássy, D; Hazslinszky, P; Járay, B

2000-04-30

29

Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-01-08

30

Cilengitide in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b)

2013-01-23

31

Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-03-22

32

Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-05-13

33

Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-07-25

34

Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-12-19

35

Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-09-27

36

Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2015-01-06

37

Eosinophilic annular erythema.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic annular erythema is a rare benign recurrent disease, originally described in children, characterized by the recurrent appearance of persistent non-pruritic, urticarial annular lesions. Histologically a perivascular infiltrate composed of lymphocytes and abundant eosinophils in the dermis is exhibited. We report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented with a 4-year history of recurrent flares of erythematous annular plaques on the trunk and extremities. The lesions resolved spontaneously after 3-5 weeks with no accompanying signs. A biopsy showed a mainly perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate with numerous eosinophils in the dermis. PMID:22483519

Sempau, Leticia; Larralde, Margarita; Luna, Paula Carolina; Casas, Jose; Staiger, Hernan

2012-03-01

38

Dapsone induced eosinophilic pneumonia.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic lung diseases (ELD) are a variety of several clinical entities, which may result from different etiologies, including drug treatment. Dapsone, a sulfone antibiotic widely used in leprosy (among other indications), has been described as a possible cause of ELD. We report a patient with leprosy who presented with respiratory symptoms and pulmonary infiltrates and was diagnosed as suffering from eosinophilic pneumonia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which the diagnosis of dapsone-induced eosinophilic pneumonia was supported by bronchoalveolar lavage, lung biopsy and typical response to therapy. PMID:22905598

Adar, T; Tayer-Shifman, O; Mizrahi, M; Tavdi, S; Barak, O; Shalit, M

2012-06-01

39

Eosinophil intracellular signalling: apoptosis.  

PubMed

Eosinophil apoptosis is considered critical for the resolution of eosinophilic inflammation in the airways of asthmatics. Apoptosis can be mediated by an extrinsic receptor-activated pathway or alternatively by an intrinsic pathway via distortion of mitochondrial function. Both of these pathways lead to activation of the caspase cascade resulting in degradation of cellular components. We describe here two methods to explore intracellular mechanisms mediating eosinophil apoptosis. Eosinophil staining by fluorescent probe JC-1 followed by flow cytometric analysis is a reliable method for determination of the state of mitochondrial membrane potential (??m). Lost ??m indicates distorted mitochondrial function and apoptosis. We also describe a method to explore the activation of effector caspase-6 by assessing degradation of its substrate lamin A/C by immunoblotting. PMID:24986608

Ilmarinen, Pinja; Moilanen, Eeva; Kankaanranta, Hannu

2014-01-01

40

Neurotoxicity of human eosinophils  

PubMed Central

Eosinophils contain a substance that is neurotoxic when injected intracerebrally or intrathecally into laboratory animals—an effect known as the “Gordon phenomenon.” We found neurotoxic activity in eosinophils from three patients with eosinophilic syndromes by injecting cell preparations into rabbits and guinea pigs. These animals developed a syndrome of muscular rigidity and ataxia, progressing to severe paralysis. No neurotoxic activity was found in preparations of polymorphonuclear or mononuclear leukocytes from normal donors. Examination of the brains of affected animals confirmed widespread loss of Purkinje cells, as described by earlier investigators. A new finding was severe spongy change occurring in the white matter of the cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. Electron microscopic examination showed that vacuoles formed within the myelin sheaths of axons by separation of lamellae. Associated axonal degeneration was common and was also seen occasionally in peripheral nerves. Gray matter in the cerebral hemispheres and spinal cord was normal. This eosinophil-derived neurotoxin was partially purified by ultracentrifugation of sonicated eosinophils and fractionation of the supernate by gel filtration. Fractions with neurotoxic activity eluted at a position consistent with a molecular weight of approximately 15,000. The neurotoxic activity of this material withstood lyophilization and dialysis but was destroyed by heating to 90°C. Injection of eosinophil-derived neurotoxin into laboratory animals may provide a useful short-term experimental model for study of mechanisms of damage to myelinated nerve fibers. The clinical significance of the Gordon phenomenon has yet to be established. Images PMID:286329

Durack, David T.; Sumi, S. Mark; Klebanoff, Seymour J.

1979-01-01

41

Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-05-09

42

Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-08-28

43

Leukotriene generation by eosinophils  

PubMed Central

Horse eosinophils purified to greater than 98% generated slow reacting substance (SRS) when incubated with the calcium ionophore A23187. On a per cell basis, eosinophils generated four to five times the SRS produced by similarly treated horse neutrophils. Eosinophil SRS production was inhibited by 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid and augmented by indomethacin and arachidonic acid, suggesting that it was a product(s) of the lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism. Compounds with SRS activity were purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and identified by ultraviolet spectra, spectral shift on treatment with lipoxygenase, incorporation of [14C]arachidonic acid, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and comparison of retention times on HPLC to authentic standards. The eosinophil products characterized were 5-(S), 12-(R)-dihydroxy-6-cis-8, 10-trans-14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid (leukotriene B4) and its 5-(S), 12-(R)-6-trans and 5-(S), 12-(S)-6-trans isomers, 5-(S)-hydroxy-6-(R)-S- glutathionyl-7,9-trans-11, 14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid (leukotriene C4) and its 11-trans isomer, and 5-(S)-hydroxy-6-(R)-S-cysteinylglycine- 7,9-trans-11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid (leukotriene D4). PMID:6120203

1982-01-01

44

Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-09-27

45

Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-05-01

46

Eosinophilic granuloma: MRI manifestations.  

PubMed

The appearance on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 16 cases of pathologically proven eosinophilic granuloma were reviewed retrospectively and correlated with the radiographic appearance of the lesion. The most common MR appearance (ten cases) was a focal lesion, surrounded by an extensive, ill-defined bone marrow and soft tissue reaction with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, considered to represent bone marrow and soft tissue edema (the flare phenomenon). The MRI manifestations of eosinophilic granuloma, especially during the early stages, are nonspecific, and may stimulate an aggressive lesion such as osteomyelitis or Ewings sarcoma, or other benign bone tumors such as osteoid osteoma or chondroblastoma. PMID:8480200

Beltran, J; Aparisi, F; Bonmati, L M; Rosenberg, Z S; Present, D; Steiner, G C

1993-01-01

47

[Eosinophilic inflammation in allergic diseases].  

PubMed

Tissular eosinophilia is a common feature of IgE-dependent allergic diseases. The classical concept links activated Th2 lymphocytes to eosinophil attraction and activation. However, comparisons of allergic diseases with non atopic "mirror "diseases reveal more complex underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. This article explores the links between allergic asthma and intrinsic asthma or asthma of the Churg-Strauss syndrome, nasal polyposis, vernal conjunctivitis, eosinophilic esophagitis (food allergy-induced or non allergic), DRESS, Ofuji disease, and eosinophilic cystitis. The results of recent mechanistic studies show that Th2 activation coupled with tissular eosinophilia can no longer be considered a hallmark of atopy. Allergic inflammation may depend on Th1 activation (vernal conjunctivitis, DRESS, eosinophilic esophagitis, etc) and simultaneous viral infection, eliciting drug hypersensitivity (DRESS). A predominant role of the epithelium in eosinophil attraction is an alternative concept with a sound basis in eosinophilic esophagitis. This concept could lead to new therapeutics aimed at controlling epithelial eotaxin 3 expression. PMID:21171247

Moneret-Vautrin, Denise-Anne

2010-03-01

48

Interleukin-9 enhances interleukin-5 receptor expression, differentiation, and survival of human eosinophils.  

PubMed

Interleukin-9 (IL-9) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders. To examine the interaction between IL-9 and eosinophils, we evaluated mature peripheral blood eosinophils for their expression of the specific alpha-subunit of the IL-9 receptor (IL-9R-alpha). The expression of IL-9R-alpha by human eosinophils was detected at the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry, and immunocytochemical analysis, respectively. Functional analyses demonstrated that recombinant human (rh)IL-9 inhibited in vitro peripheral blood human eosinophil apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We then examined the role of IL-9 in eosinophil differentiation using the human cord blood CD34(+) cells and human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60). The addition of IL-9 to CD34(+) cells cultured in IL-3 and IL-5 enhanced eosinophil development, and IL-9 alone induced the expression of IL-5R-alpha. IL-9 also up-regulated the IL-5R-alpha chain cell surface expression during terminal eosinophil differentiation of the HL-60 cell line. Our findings suggest that IL-9 may potentiate in vivo eosinophil function by increasing their survival and IL-5-mediated differentiation and maturation. Taken together, these results suggest a mechanism by which IL-9 potentiates airway and tissue eosinophilia. PMID:10979962

Gounni, A S; Gregory, B; Nutku, E; Aris, F; Latifa, K; Minshall, E; North, J; Tavernier, J; Levit, R; Nicolaides, N; Robinson, D; Hamid, Q

2000-09-15

49

Eosinophilic Cystitis with Eosinophilic Cholecystitis: A Rare Association  

PubMed Central

We describe a rare case of eosinophilic cystitis associated with eosinophilic cholecystitis in a 30-year-old patient who underwent bladder biopsy for irritative voiding symptoms and routine elective cholecystectomy for gallstones. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination. The rarity of this condition prompted us to report this entity in which no specific cause could be found. PMID:24195001

Mallat, F.; Hmida, W.; Mestiri, S.; Ziadi, S.; Sriha, B.; Mokni, M.; Mosbah, F.

2013-01-01

50

Eosinophilic cystitis with eosinophilic cholecystitis: a rare association.  

PubMed

We describe a rare case of eosinophilic cystitis associated with eosinophilic cholecystitis in a 30-year-old patient who underwent bladder biopsy for irritative voiding symptoms and routine elective cholecystectomy for gallstones. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination. The rarity of this condition prompted us to report this entity in which no specific cause could be found. PMID:24195001

Mallat, F; Hmida, W; Mestiri, S; Ziadi, S; Sriha, B; Mokni, M; Mosbah, F

2013-01-01

51

[Eosinophilic cystitis in children].  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is a rare disease that frequently suggests a bladder tumour at presentation. It affects both children and adults and its pathophysiology remains unclear. EC usually shows a benign course, but serious complications can occur and relapsing forms have been described. It has rarely been reported in children and therefore, might be poorly known by physicians and underdiagnosed. We report a case that differs from other observations by its unusually rapid resolution, and review the literature on EC's diagnosis, treatment, and course in children. PMID:21489763

Cohen, J; Letavernier, B; Garel, C; Boubnova, J; Boudjemaa, S; Bensman, A

2011-05-01

52

Radiographic manifestations of eosinophilic gastroenteritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is a rare inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, characterized by focal or diffuse eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. Although little over 250 cases of EG have been reported in the literature, EG is probably more common than reports in the literature would indicate. A retrospective review of 25 patients with EG along with a review of

K. M. Vitellas; W. F. Bennett; J. G. Bova; J. C. Johnson; J. K. Greenson; J. H. Caldwell

1995-01-01

53

MK2206 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-04-28

54

An Overview of Eosinophilic Esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal disease affecting both children and adults. The condition is characterized by an eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal epithelium. Symptoms of esophageal dysfunction include dysphagia, food impaction and symptoms mimicking gastroesophageal reflux disease. Endoscopic examination typically reveals mucosal fragility, ring or corrugated mucosa, longitudinal furrows, whitish plaques or a small caliber esophagus. Histologic findings of >15 eosinophils per high-power field is the diagnostic hallmark of EoE. An elimination diet, topical corticosteroids or endoscopic dilation for fibrostenotic disease serve as effective therapeutic option. PMID:25368745

Park, Hyojin

2014-01-01

55

Eosinophilic cystitis induced by penicillin.  

PubMed

A 30-year-old woman developed classic symptoms of painful bladder disease and eosinophilic cystitis as an adverse effect of penicillin for abdominal actinomycosis. The symptoms were reversible after stopping penicillin. PMID:15368685

Tsakiri, Anna; Balslev, Ingegerd; Klarskov, Peter

2004-01-01

56

[A case of eosinophilic cystitis].  

PubMed

A 67-year-old man presented with pollakisuria, and miction pain. The patient who had superficial bladder cancer was treated with transurethral resection and instillation of Pirarubicin hydrochloride. Urinalysis revealed a marked increase in eosinophilic cells. A cystoscopic examination revealed an ischemic lesion and hypervascular lesion throughout the bladder. Histological findings of biopsied bladder specimens showed eosinophilic cystitis. Bladder symptoms are improved with steroid administration. PMID:12491620

Maeda, Sumihiro; Hatayama, Tadashi

2002-10-01

57

Association of the blood eosinophil count with hematological malignancies and mortality.  

PubMed

Blood eosinophilia (?0.5 × 10(9) /l) may be an early sign of hematological malignancy. We investigated associations between levels of blood eosinophils and risks of hematological malignancies and mortality in order to provide clinically derived cut-offs for referral to specialist hematology care. From the Copenhagen Primary Care Differential Count (CopDiff) Database, we identified 356,196 individuals with at least one differential cell count encompassing the eosinophil count during 2000-2007 and matched these laboratory data with Danish nationwide health registers. We used multivariable logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for the 4-year incidences of hematological malignancies and mortality between the eosinophil counts and a reference count of 0.16 × 10(9) /l which was the median eosinophil count in our data. Risks of hematological malignancies and mortality increased above the median eosinophil count. At the 99th percentile, corresponding to an eosinophil count of 0.75 × 10(9) /l, risks of hematological malignancies were increased more than twofold with OR (95% C.I.) of 2.39 (1.91-2.99). Interestingly, risks reached a plateau around an eosinophil count of 1.0 × 10(9) /l. Risks also increased when the eosinophil count approached zero. Here, counts associated relatively more with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes whereas counts above 0.16 × 10(9) /l associated more with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Eosinophil counts associate with hematological malignancies and mortality even below the definition of eosinophilia. The observed plateau of risks around 1.0 × 10(9) /l is important for physicians encountering patients with eosinophilia since even mild-to-moderate eosinophilia according to traditional definitions confers maximally increased risks of subsequent/subclinical hematological malignancy. Am. J. Hematol. 90:225-229, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25488524

Andersen, Christen L; Siersma, Volkert D; Hasselbalch, Hans C; Vestergaard, Hanne; Mesa, Ruben; Felding, Peter; Olivarius, Niels D F; Bjerrum, Ole W

2015-03-01

58

Blood eosinophilia, corticoadrenal insufficiency and eosinophilic cystitis.  

PubMed

Blood eosinophilia generally indicates an underlying allergic, infectious or hematologic disease. Corticoadrenal insufficiency is known to be another cause of blood eosinophilia. Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare disease in which the bladder wall is infiltrated by eosinophils; however, the etiology of eosinophilic cystitis remains unclear. We report a case of corticoadrenal insufficiency with blood eosinophilia developing gross hematuria and eosinophilic cystitis. The patient was treated with medical therapy, including oral corticosteroids, obtaining excellent results. PMID:18362497

Lin, Hsin-Hung; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Chiang, Yang-Jen; Kuo, Huey-Liang

2008-01-01

59

Eosinophils function as antigen-presenting cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eosinophils release lipid mediators, in- cluding leukotriene C4, platelet-activating factor, and liposins, and contain four distinct granule cat- ionic proteins, major basic protein, eosinophil per- oxidase, eosinophil cationic protein, and eosino- phil-derived neurotoxin, which may cause dysfunc- tion and destruction of other cells. Eosinophils are primarily thought of as terminal effectors of aller- gic responses and of parasite elimination. Eosino-

Huan-Zhong Shi

2004-01-01

60

Eosinophilic vasculitis in connective tissue disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Neutrophilic and lymphocytic vascular inflammation is common in vasculitis associated with connective tissue disease (CTD). We recently identified eight patients with CTD and eosinophilic vasculitis.Objective: The purpose of this study was to characterize a variant form of vasculitis in CTD with eosinophilic infiltration.Methods: Of 98 CTD patients with cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis, eight were found with predominantly eosinophilic vascular infiltration.

Ko-Ron Chen; W. P Daniel Su; Mark R Pittelkow; Doyt L Conn; Terry George; Kristin M Leiferman

1996-01-01

61

Eosinophilic ascites, as a rare presentation of eosinophilic gastroenteritis  

PubMed Central

Background: Eosinophilic ascites is the most unusual presentation of eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE), caused by edema and eosinophilic inflammation of the small bowel wall's serosal layer. Case Report: We report the case of a 37-year-old woman, who presented with diffuse abdominal pain, nausea, abdominal distension, moderate ascites and diarrhea of two weeks duration. The rest of physical and clinical examination was unremarkable, and her past medical history was uneventful. Magnetic Resonance Imaging showed the presence of ascites and diffuse thickening of small bowel wall, but did not detect a primary malignancy in the abdominal cavity; and no signs of portal hypertension or liver damage. Laboratory test results revealed essential peripheral blood eosinophilia, elevated serum IgE and marked increase of eosinophils in the abdominal fluid. Treatment with corticosteroids normalized laboratory tests results, and the ascites resolved immediately. Conclusions: EGE is a rare entity and it should be kept in mind in patients of unexplained ascites. The absence of primary malignancy on imaging, coupled with marked increase of fluid esinophilia and immediate response to treatment with steroids, confirm indirectly the diagnosis of EGE. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (3): 275-277.

Cuko, L; Bilaj, F; Bega, B; Barbullushi, A; Resuli, B

2014-01-01

62

Eosinophils induce airway smooth muscle cell proliferation.  

PubMed

Asthma is characterized by eosinophilic airway inflammation and remodeling of the airway wall. Features of airway remodeling include increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. However, little is known about the interaction between inflammatory eosinophils and ASM cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of eosinophils on ASM cell proliferation. Eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of mild asthmatics and non-asthmatic subjects and co-cultured with human primary ASM cells. ASM proliferation was estimated using Ki-67 expression assay. The expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) mRNA in ASM cells was measured using quantitative real-time PCR. The role of eosinophil derived Cysteinyl Leukotrienes (CysLTs) in enhancing ASM proliferation was estimated by measuring the release of leukotrienes from eosinophils upon their direct contact with ASM cells using ELISA. This role was confirmed either by blocking eosinophil-ASM contact or co-culturing them in the presence of leukotrienes antagonist. ASM cells co-cultured with eosinophils, isolated from asthmatics, but not non-asthmatics, had a significantly higher rate of proliferation compared to controls. This increase in ASM proliferation was independent of their release of ECM proteins but dependent upon eosinophils release of CysLTs. Eosinophil-ASM cell to cell contact was required for CysLTs release. Preventing eosinophil contact with ASM cells using anti-adhesion molecules antibodies, or blocking the activity of eosinophil derived CysLTs using montelukast inhibited ASM proliferation. Our results indicated that eosinophils contribute to airway remodeling during asthma by enhancing ASM cell proliferation and hence increasing ASM mass. Direct contact of eosinophils with ASM cells triggers their release of CysLTs which enhance ASM proliferation. Eosinophils, and their binding to ASM cells, constitute a potential therapeutic target to interfere with the series of biological events leading to airway remodeling and Asthma. PMID:23180361

Halwani, Rabih; Vazquez-Tello, Alejandro; Sumi, Yuki; Pureza, Mary Angeline; Bahammam, Ahmed; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan; Soussi-Gounni, Abdelillah; Mahboub, Bassam; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Hamid, Qutayba

2013-04-01

63

Unusual location of eosinophilic granuloma.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic granuloma EG is a well-recognized benign form of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, most commonly involving the skull bones. In this paper, we report an 8-year-old girl with EG of posterior element of vertebra; she had complete resolution with surgical curettage and bone grafting. PMID:15448781

Haouimi, Ammar S; Al-Hawsawi, Zakaria M; Jameel, Ahmed N

2004-09-01

64

Tissue remodeling in eosinophilic esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a recently recognized, immune-mediated disease characterized clinically by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and histologically by eosinophil-predominant inflammation. The chronic esophageal eosinophilia of EoE is associated with tissue remodeling that includes epithelial hyperplasia, subepithelial fibrosis, and hypertrophy of esophageal smooth muscle. This remodeling causes the esophageal rings and strictures that frequently complicate EoE and underlies the mucosal fragility that predisposes to painful mucosal tears in the EoE esophagus. The pathogenesis of tissue remodeling in EoE is not completely understood, but emerging studies suggest that secretory products of eosinophils and mast cells, as well as cytokines produced by other inflammatory cells, epithelial cells, and stromal cells in the esophagus, all contribute to the process. Interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, Th2 cytokines overproduced in allergic disorders, have direct profibrotic and remodeling effects in EoE. The EoE esophagus exhibits increased expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-?1, which is a potent activator of fibroblasts and a strong inducer of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In addition, IL-4, IL-13, and TGF-? all have a role in regulating periostin, an extracellular matrix protein that might influence remodeling by acting as a ligand for integrins, by its effects on eosinophils or by activating fibrogenic genes in the esophagus. Presently, few treatments have been shown to affect the tissue remodeling that causes EoE complications. This report reviews the potential roles of fibroblasts, eosinophils, mast cells, and profibrotic cytokines in esophageal remodeling in EoE and identifies potential targets for future therapies that might prevent EoE complications. PMID:23019192

Cheng, Edaire; Souza, Rhonda F.

2012-01-01

65

An Essential Mediator of Eosinophil Trafficking into Mucosal Tissues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eosinophil accumulation in the peripheral blood and tis- sues is a hallmark feature of several important medical dis- eases, including atopic disorders (allergic rhinitis, asthma, and eczema), parasitic infections, and numerous systemic diseases (e.g., Churg Strauss syndrome, eosinophilic pneu- monia, eosinophilic gastroenteritis, and the idiopathic hyper- eosinophilic syndrome) (1). The findings that eosinophils normally account for only a small percent

Marc E. Rothenberg

1999-01-01

66

Eosinophilic oesophagitis: investigations and management.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EO) is an immune/antigen mediated, chronic, relapsing disease characterised by dysphagia, food bolus impaction and a dense oesophageal eosinophilic infiltrate. Characteristic endoscopic features include corrugated rings, linear furrows and white exudates, but none are diagnostic. Despite its increasing prevalence, EO remains underdiagnosed. There is a strong association with other atopic conditions. Symptoms, histology and endoscopic findings can overlap with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Currently endoscopy and oesophageal biopsies are the investigation of choice. Oesophageal physiology studies, endoscopic ultrasound, impedance planimetry and serology may have a role in the diagnosis and monitoring of response to therapy. Acid reducing medication is advocated as first line or adjuvant therapy. Dietary therapy is comprised of elimination diets or can be guided by allergen assessment. In adults, topical corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy. Endoscopic dilatation is safe and effective for the treatment of non-responsive strictures. Other therapeutic options (immunomodulators, biological agents, leukotriene receptor antagonists) are under investigation. PMID:24664254

Kumar, Mayur; Sweis, Rami; Wong, Terry

2014-05-01

67

Eosinophilic keratoconjunctivitis in seven horses.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic keratoconjunctivitis was diagnosed in 7 horses at The Ohio State University between 1976 and 1994. All horses had moderate-to-severe blepharospasm, chemosis, and conjunctival hyperemia; epiphora; and extensive yellow-to-white caseous mucoid discharge. Corneal ulcers associated with this disease were perilimbal and extended centrally. All ulcers were covered with a white necrotic plaque firmly attached to the underlying cornea. Other ophthalmic abnormalities were not detected. Corneal scrapings examined cytologically contained numerous eosinophils interspersed between epithelial cells, few mast cells, and neutrophils. Microbial organism were not seen. Bacterial and fungal cultures were negative for ocular pathogens. The initial diagnosis of eosinophilic keratoconjunctivitis was made on the basis of clinical and cytologic findings. In 5 horses, the condition completely resolved after topical treatment with corticosteroid (0.05% dexamethasone) and triple antibiotic ointments. However, the duration of treatment was prolonged, with a mean treatment time of 64 days (range, 45 to 106 days). All corneal ulcers remained superficial, and despite the prolonged duration of treatment, none of the horses developed secondary bacterial or fungal keratitis. One horse underwent superficial keratectomy and had the shortest resolution time (14 days). PMID:8837652

Yamagata, M; Wilkie, D A; Gilger, B C

1996-10-01

68

Eosinophilic cystitis and its management.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is a rare clinicopathological condition characterized by transmural inflammation of the bladder predominantly with eosinophils, associated with fibrosis with or without muscle necrosis. The cause of EC remains unclear, although it has been associated with various aetiological factors, such as allergy, bladder tumour, bladder trauma, parasitic infections and chemotherapeutic agents. EC is, probably, caused by the antigen-antibody reaction. This leads to the production of various immunoglobulins, which, in turn, cause the activation of eosinophils and initiates the inflammatory process. The most common symptom complex consists of frequency, haematuria, dysuria and suprapubic pain. Cystoscopy and biopsy are the gold standard for diagnosis. Additional laboratory evidence supporting the diagnosis includes proteinuria, microscopic haematuria and peripheral eosinophilia, the last one occurring in few patients. There is no curative treatment for this condition. Current treatment modalities include transurethral resection of the bladder lesion along with non-specific medical therapy, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents or steroids. Because the lesion tends to recur in spite of the above therapy, long-term follow-up is mandatory. PMID:15857336

Teegavarapu, P S; Sahai, A; Chandra, A; Dasgupta, P; Khan, M S

2005-03-01

69

Eosinophil Secretion of Granule-Derived Cytokines  

PubMed Central

Eosinophils are tissue-dwelling leukocytes, present in the thymus, and gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals at baseline, and recruited, often in large numbers, to allergic inflammatory foci and sites of active tissue repair. The biological significance of eosinophils is vast and varied. In health, eosinophils support uterine and mammary gland development, and maintain bone marrow plasma cells and adipose tissue alternatively activated macrophages, while in response to tissue insult eosinophils function as inflammatory effector cells, and, in the wake of an inflammatory response, promote tissue regeneration, and wound healing. One common mechanism driving many of the diverse eosinophil functions is the regulated and differential secretion of a vast array of eosinophil-derived cytokines. Eosinophils are distinguished from most other leukocytes in that many, if not all, of the over three dozen eosinophil-derived cytokines are pre-synthesized and stored within intracellular granules, poised for very rapid, stimulus-induced secretion. Eosinophils engaged in cytokine secretion in situ utilize distinct pathways of cytokine release that include classical exocytosis, whereby granules themselves fuse with the plasma membrane and release their entire contents extracellularly; piecemeal degranulation, whereby granule-derived cytokines are selectively mobilized into vesicles that emerge from granules, traverse the cytoplasm and fuse with the plasma membrane to release discrete packets of cytokines; and eosinophil cytolysis, whereby intact granules are extruded from eosinophils, and deposited within tissues. In this latter scenario, extracellular granules can themselves function as stimulus-responsive secretory-competent organelles within the tissue. Here, we review the distinctive processes of differential secretion of eosinophil granule-derived cytokines. PMID:25386174

Spencer, Lisa A.; Bonjour, Kennedy; Melo, Rossana C. N.; Weller, Peter F.

2014-01-01

70

Eosinophilic jejunitis presenting as intractable abdominal pain.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical manifestations are related to the layer(s) and extent of the bowel involved. In this paper, we present a case of intractable abdominal pain caused by jejunal submucosal eosinophilic infiltration without mucosal involvement, diagnosed by deep endoscopic biopsies. The patient was successfully treated with steroids without need for surgery for diagnosis or therapy. PMID:25565932

Mungan, Zeynel; Attila, Tan; Kapran, Yersu; Tokatli, Ilyas Pinar; Unal, Zeynep

2014-09-01

71

Eosinophilic Jejunitis Presenting as Intractable Abdominal Pain  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical manifestations are related to the layer(s) and extent of the bowel involved. In this paper, we present a case of intractable abdominal pain caused by jejunal submucosal eosinophilic infiltration without mucosal involvement, diagnosed by deep endoscopic biopsies. The patient was successfully treated with steroids without need for surgery for diagnosis or therapy. PMID:25565932

Mungan, Zeynel; Attila, Tan; Kapran, Yersu; Tokatli, Ilyas Pinar; Unal, Zeynep

2014-01-01

72

Eosinophilic cystitis associated with eosinophilic enterocolitis: case reports and review of the literature.  

PubMed

We report three cases of eosinophilic cystitis. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed characteristic bladder wall thickening exceeding 10 mm, with preservation of the mucosal lining and intense, progressive contrast enhancement on sequential arterial and delayed scans. Eosinophilic cystitis might have been associated with eosinophilic infiltration in other organs, such as the gastrointestinal tracts and liver. PMID:20505026

Kim, M S; Park, H; Park, C S; Lee, E J; Rho, M H; Park, N H; Joh, J

2010-06-01

73

Rare cause of dysuria: eosinophilic cystitis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis is an inflammatory condition characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of whole layers of the bladder wall. The condition occurs more commonly in adults. We report a case of eosinophilic cystitis mimicking a bladder tumor in a 5-year-old boy with symptoms of dysuria and urinary incontinence. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology and he underwent clinical treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and antihistamine (cetirizine). The symptoms fully resolved in follow up, which is continuing. Although very rare, eosinophilic cystitis should be considered in cases of dysuria and increased bladder wall thickness but no identified urinary tract infection. PMID:22652390

Abilov, Agil; Ozcan, Rah?an; Polat, Erdal; Dervi?o?lu, Sergülen; Emir, Haluk

2013-02-01

74

Bilateral eosinophilic mastitis: An uncommon unheard entity.  

PubMed

We are reporting a case of bilateral eosinophilic mastitis which is rare and hardly heard. It is a mimicker of carcinoma breast both clinically & radiologically. A 30 years old non diabetic female presented with bilateral breast lumps with history of rhinitis off & on and peripheral eosinophilia. Mammography was suspicious while ultrasonography was diagnostic of bilateral mastitis. Aspiration cytology exhibited inflammatory lesion rich in eosinophils. Histopathology revealed the diagnosis of eosinophilic mastitis. Eosinophilic infiltration of the breast is a rare manifestation of tissue involvement in peripheral eosinophilia and bilateralism is even rarer. PMID:25171213

Singh, Aminder; Kaur, Pavneet; Sood, Neena; Puri, Harpreet; Garg, Bhavna

2015-01-01

75

[Bladder fibrosis caused by eosinophilic cystitis].  

PubMed

A 70-years-old man with no history of allergy or genitourinary problems had bilateral hydronephrosis, a marked decrease in bladder capacity and severe eosinophilic infiltration with fibrosis of the bladder wall. A total cystoprostatectomy with ileal bladder replacement was performed. We reviewed the literature of eosinophilic cystitis for clinical presentation, diagnosis and therapeutic options. PMID:14606317

Slama, A; Khouni, H; Sriha, B; Brini, K; Ben Sorba, N; Taher Mosbah, A

2003-10-01

76

Gallium-67 pulmonary uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia  

SciTech Connect

Eosinophilic pneumonia is usually diagnosed based on the findings on chest x-ray, white blood count, and transbronchial biopsy. After reporting a case of Ga-67 lung uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia, its histopathology is discussed and the mechanisms of Ga-67 uptake by inflammatory lesions are reviewed.

Morais, J.; Carrier, L.; Gariepy, G.; Le Bel, L.; Chartrand, R.; Picard, D.

1988-01-01

77

Pattern-recognition receptors in human eosinophils  

PubMed Central

The pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) family includes Toll-like receptors (TLRs), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) -like receptors (NLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). They recognize various microbial signatures or host-derived danger signals and trigger an immune response. Eosinophils are multifunctional leucocytes involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory processes, including parasitic helminth infection, allergic diseases, tissue injury and tumour immunity. Human eosinophils express several PRRs, including TLR1–5, TLR7, TLR9, NOD1, NOD2, Dectin-1 and RAGE. Receptor stimulation induces survival, oxidative burst, activation of the adhesion system and release of cytokines (interleukin-1?, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-? and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor), chemokines (interleukin-8 and growth-related oncogene-?) and cytotoxic granule proteins (eosinophil cationic protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, eosinophil peroxidase and major basic protein). It is also evident that eosinophils play an immunomodulatory role by interacting with surrounding cells. The presence of a broad range of PRRs in eosinophils indicates that they are not only involved in defence against parasitic helminths, but also against bacteria, viruses and fungi. From a clinical perspective, eosinophilic PRRs seem to be involved in both allergic and malignant diseases by causing exacerbations and affecting tumour growth, respectively. PMID:22242941

Kvarnhammar, Anne Mĺnsson; Cardell, Lars Olaf

2012-01-01

78

Eosinophilic variant of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma is a distinct subtype of renal cell carcinoma that accounts for 5% of all renal tumors. This subtype is further subdivided into two variants, classic and eosinophilic, with the latter variant being less frequent. We report two cases of the eosinophilic variant of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma diagnosed at our institution between January 2008 and December 2012. PMID:25552800

Yourshaw, Charles J.; Zhang, Haiying

2015-01-01

79

Eosinophils in innate immunity: an evolving story  

PubMed Central

Eosinophils are innate immune leukocytes found in relatively low numbers within the blood. Terminal effector functions of eosinophils, deriving from their capacity to release their content of tissue-destructive cationic proteins, have historically been considered primary effector mechanisms against specific parasites, and are likewise implicated in tissue damage accompanying allergic responses such as asthma. However, the past decade has seen dramatic advancements in the field of eosinophil immunobiology, revealing eosinophils to also be key participants in many other facets of innate immunity, from bridging innate and adaptive immune responses to orchestrating tissue remodeling events. Here, we review the multifaceted functions of eosinophils in innate immunity that are currently known, and discuss new avenues in this evolving story. PMID:21042920

Shamri, Revital; Xenakis, Jason J.; Spencer, Lisa A.

2013-01-01

80

The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-? to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.

2014-01-01

81

Congenital leukemia.  

PubMed

Congenital leukemia is a rare but a well-documented disease in which leukemic process is detected at birth or very shortly thereafter (Philip McCoy and Roy Overton, Commun Clin Cytom 22:85-88, 1995). These leukemias represent approximately 0.8 % of all childhood leukemias. We present a case of congenital acute myeloid leukemia manifesting from the very first day of birth. Diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia was suspected by the presence of blasts in the peripheral blood smear and was confirmed on bone marrow by flowcytometry. Karyotyping revealed Trisomy 21. PMID:25332567

Raj, Aishwarya; Talukdar, Sewali; Das, Smita; Gogoi, Pabitra Kumar; Das, Damodar; Bhattacharya, Jina

2014-09-01

82

Eosinophil crystalloid granules: structure, function, and beyond  

PubMed Central

Eosinophils are granulocytes associated with host defense against parasitic helminths with allergic conditions and more recently, with immunoregulatory responses. Eosinophils are distinguished from leukocytes by their dominant population of cytoplasmic crystalloid (also termed secretory, specific, or secondary) granules that contain robust stores of diverse, preformed cationic proteins. Here, we provide an update on our knowledge about the unique and complex structure of human eosinophil crystalloid granules. We discuss their significance as rich sites of a variety of receptors and review our own recent research findings and those of others that highlight discoveries concerning the function of intracellular receptors and their potential implications in cell signaling. Special focus is provided on how eosinophils might use these intracellular receptors as mechanisms to secrete, selectively and rapidly, cytokines or chemokines and enable cell-free extracellular eosinophil granules to function as independent secretory structures. Potential roles of cell-free eosinophil granules as immune players in the absence of intact eosinophils will also be discussed. PMID:22672875

Muniz, Valdirene S.; Weller, Peter F.; Neves, Josiane S.

2012-01-01

83

What Is Childhood Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... slowing the activity of other immune system cells. Acute lymphocytic (lymphoblastic) leukemia (ALL), the most common type of childhood leukemia, ... leukemias The main types of acute leukemia are: Acute lymphocytic (lymphoblastic) leukemia (ALL): About 3 out of 4 cases of ...

84

Developmental, Malignancy-Related, and Cross-Species Analysis of Eosinophil, Mast Cell, and Basophil Siglec-8 Expression  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this study is to determine when during hematopoiesis Siglec-8 gets expressed, whether it is expressed on hematologic malignancies, and if there are other non-human species that express Siglec-8. Methods Siglec-8 mRNA and cell surface expression was monitored during in vitro maturation of human eosinophils and mast cells. Flow cytometry was performed on human blood and bone marrow samples, and on blood samples from dogs, baboons, and rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys. Results Siglec-8 is a late maturation marker. It is detectable on eosinophils and basophils from subjects with chronic eosinophilic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and on malignant and non-malignant bone marrow mast cells, as well as the HMC-1.2 cell line. None of the Siglec-8 monoclonal antibodies tested recognized leukocytes from dogs, baboons, and rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys. Conclusions Siglec-8-based therapies should not target immature human leukocytes but should recognize mature and malignant eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils. So far, there is no suitable species for preclinical testing of Siglec-8 monoclonal antibodies. PMID:21938510

Hudson, Sherry A.; Herrmann, Harald; Du, Jian; Cox, Paul; Haddad, El-Bdaoui; Butler, Barbara; Crocker, Paul R.; Ackerman, Steven J.; Valent, Peter

2012-01-01

85

Inhibitory effects of edible marine algae extracts on degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells and mouse eosinophils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inhibitory effects on degranulation of rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells and mouse eosinophils by marine algae extracts\\u000a were examined. More than 50% of the degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells was inhibited by water extracts of Ecklonia cava and Chrysymenia wrightii at a concentration of 100 ?g\\/mL. More than 50% of the degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells was inhibited by methanol extracts of

Takashi Kimiya; Kazuhiro Ohtani; Setsuko Satoh; Yuko Abe; Yoshihiko Ogita; Hirohisa Kawakita; Hideyuki Hamada; Yuko Konishi; Satoshi Kubota; Akira Tominaga

2008-01-01

86

MARKED DEPOSITION OF EOSINOPHIL-DERIVED NEUROTOXIN IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS  

PubMed Central

Objective Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized by infiltration of eosinophils into esophageal epithelium. Blood levels of an eosinophil granule protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), have been proposed as a biomarker for EoE. However, information regarding localization of EDN in the diseased tissues has not been available. The goal of this study was to evaluate the magnitude and distribution of EDN deposition in tissue specimens from the esophagus of EoE patients. Methods We studied specimens from 10 adult EoE patients and 8 histologically-normal controls (three under age 17). Sections from mid-esophageal biopsy specimens were stained for EDN by immunofluorescence, using a polyclonal rabbit antibody to EDN. Cellular staining (i.e. infiltration of intact eosinophils) and extracellular staining (i.e. deposition of released EDN) were scored in a blinded manner on an established 7-point scale. Results Esophageal biopsy specimens from histologically-normal controls showed no or few intact eosinophils and no or minimal extracellular EDN deposition. In contrast, EDN staining was clearly observed in specimens from all EoE patients. In some EoE patients, marked extracellular EDN deposition was observed despite relatively small numbers of intact eosinophils. Overall, there was no correlation between the eosinophil infiltration and the extracellular EDN staining scores. Conclusions Marked tissue deposition of extracellular EDN is present in the esophagus of EoE patients. Tissue eosinophil counts may underestimate how extensively eosinophils are involved, particularly in individuals with marked eosinophil degranulation. Evaluation of EDN staining in esophageal biopsy specimens may be useful to diagnose and manage patients with EoE. PMID:19888203

Kephart, Gail M.; Alexander, Jeffrey A.; Arora, Amindra S.; Romero, Yvonne; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Talley, Nicholas J.; Kita, Hirohito

2010-01-01

87

Two Cases of Eosinophilic Fasciitis  

PubMed Central

Eosinophic fasciitis (EF) is an uncommon connective tissue disease characterized by scleroderma-like cutaneous changes, peripheral eosinophilia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Typical histopathologic findings include chronic inflammatory infiltration affecting the deep fascia with lymphocytes, histiocytes, and occasionally eosinophils. We report two cases of EF, the first of which is a 36-year-old man with a tender brownish induration on both forearms, for 2 months. Histopathologic examination showed fibrotic fascia with a mixed inflammatory cell infiltration. The second case is a 52-year-old woman with a symmetrical painful swelling and skin induration on both forearms, for 4 months. A deep biopsy demonstrated chronic inflammatory cell infiltration and hyaline degeneration in the fascia. Increased signal intensity in the fascia and tendon sheath was shown on magnetic resonance imaging. In laboratory examination, mild eosinophilia was found in both cases. Both patients had a history of physical activity (weight training and excessive housework, respectively) and showed marked improvement with high doses of oral prednisolone for several months. PMID:21738370

Chun, Ji Hoon; Lee, Kyung Ho; Sung, Mi Sook

2011-01-01

88

Use of 111-Indium-labeled autologous eosinophils to establish the in vivo kinetics of human eosinophils in healthy subjects.  

PubMed

Eosinophils are the major cellular effectors of allergic inflammation and represent an important therapeutic target. Although the genesis and activation of eosinophils have been extensively explored, little is known about their intravascular kinetics or physiological fate. This study was designed to determine the intravascular life span of eosinophils, their partitioning between circulating and marginated pools, and sites of disposal in healthy persons. Using autologous, minimally manipulated 111-Indium-labeled leukocytes with blood sampling, we measured the eosinophil intravascular residence time as 25.2 hours (compared with 10.3 hours for neutrophils) and demonstrated a substantial marginated eosinophil pool. ? camera imaging studies using purified eosinophils demonstrated initial retention in the lungs, with early redistribution to the liver and spleen, and evidence of recirculation from a hepatic pool. This work provides the first in vivo measurements of eosinophil kinetics in healthy volunteers and shows that 111-Indium-labeled eosinophils can be used to monitor the fate of eosinophils noninvasively. PMID:22993388

Farahi, Neda; Singh, Nanak R; Heard, Sarah; Loutsios, Chrystalla; Summers, Charlotte; Solanki, Chandra K; Solanki, Kishor; Balan, Kottekkattu K; Ruparelia, Prina; Peters, A Michael; Condliffe, Alison M; Chilvers, Edwin R

2012-11-01

89

Novel targeted therapies for eosinophil-associated diseases and allergy.  

PubMed

Eosinophil-associated diseases often present with life-threatening manifestations and/or chronic organ damage. Currently available therapeutic options are limited to a few drugs that often have to be prescribed on a lifelong basis to keep eosinophil counts under control. In the past 10 years, treatment options and outcomes in patients with clonal eosinophilic and other eosinophilic disorders have improved substantially. Several new targeted therapies have emerged, addressing different aspects of eosinophil expansion and inflammation. In this review, we discuss available and currently tested agents as well as new strategies and drug targets relevant to both primary and secondary eosinophilic diseases, including allergic disorders. PMID:25340931

Radonjic-Hoesli, Susanne; Valent, Peter; Klion, Amy D; Wechsler, Michael E; Simon, Hans-Uwe

2015-01-01

90

[Drug induced eosinophilic pleural effusion].  

PubMed

The hypersensitivity reactions induced by drugs, some widely used, like central nervous system medication, can have various presentations. The lung is a frequent target for such events. We present the case of 40-year-old male patient, non-smoker, with infant encephalopaty, seizures since age of 6 with polimorphic crisis (mainly absences), with anticonvulsivant treatment since 2011 (carbamazepine, sodium valproate, levetiracetam), with no respiratory medical history. Current symptoms started two weeks before, with chest pain, dry cough. He received no antibiotics. Chest X-ray and thoracic CT scan (27 June 2013) showed a left pleral effusion. Left exploratory thoracocentesis extracted 20 ml reddish pleural fluid: eosinophilic exsudate (60%) with normal adenosin deaminase. He also presents moderate blood eosinophilia (13.7%-1780/mm3). Pulmonary infarction with secondary pleurisy, thoracic trauma, acute pancreatitis with secondary pleurisy were excluded. No Loeffler transient infiltrates were documented, serology for Toxocara is IgG positive (historical) and not significant for current episode, no symptoms suggestive for toxocarosis (characteristic to young children, patient had no liver enlargement etc.), no hidatidosis or trichinelosis were found. As an exclusion diagnosis, a hypersensitivity reaction to anticonvulsivant medication was considered (mentioned in literature) carbamazepine and sodium valproate (even if medication was taken for a longer time), with blood and pleural eosinophilia. Together with the neurologist, the mentioned drugs were stopped and he was started on lamotrigine 2 tb/day and levetiracetam 1 tb/day, well tolerated, no absences were noticed. Total remission of blood eosinophilia and partial remission of pleural effusion were noticed. Subsequent follow-ups confirm favourable evolution, with healing of pleurisy and normal blood cell count, which are stable at 7 months after changing anticonvulsivant treatment. PMID:25241560

Vasilescu, Raluca

2014-01-01

91

Indomethacin inhibits eosinophil migration to prostaglandin D2 : therapeutic potential of CRTH2 desensitization for eosinophilic pustular folliculitis.  

PubMed

Indomethacin is a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, and shows therapeutic potential for various eosinophilic skin diseases, particularly eosinophilic pustular folliculitis. One of the unique characteristics of indomethacin is that, unlike other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, it is a potent agonist of chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper type 2 cells (CRTH2), a receptor for prostaglandin D2 (PGD2 ). This study investigated the pharmacological actions of indomethacin on eosinophil migration to clarify the actual mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of indomethacin on eosinophilic pustular folliculitis. Eosinophils exhibited chemokinetic and chemotactic responses to both PGD2 and indomethacin through CRTH2 receptors. Pre-treatment of eosinophils with indomethacin greatly inhibited eosinophil migration to PGD2 and, to a much lesser extent, to eotaxin (CCL11); these effects could be mediated by homologous and heterologous desensitization of eosinophil CRTH2 and CCR3, respectively, by agonistic effects of indomethacin on CRTH2. Indomethacin also cancelled a priming effect of ?(12) -PGJ2 , a plasma metabolite of PGD2 , on eosinophil chemotaxis to eotaxin. Indomethacin down-modulated cell surface expression of both CRTH2 and CCR3. Hair follicle epithelium and epidermal keratinocytes around eosinophilic pustules together with the eccrine apparatus of palmoplantar lesions of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis were immunohistochemically positive for lipocalin-type PGD synthase. Indomethacin may exert therapeutic effects against eosinophilic skin diseases in which PGD2 -CRTH2 signals play major roles by reducing eosinophil responses to PGD2 . PMID:23582181

Kataoka, Naoko; Satoh, Takahiro; Hirai, Aiko; Saeki, Kazumi; Yokozeki, Hiroo

2013-09-01

92

Indomethacin inhibits eosinophil migration to prostaglandin D2: therapeutic potential of CRTH2 desensitization for eosinophilic pustular folliculitis  

PubMed Central

Summary Indomethacin is a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, and shows therapeutic potential for various eosinophilic skin diseases, particularly eosinophilic pustular folliculitis. One of the unique characteristics of indomethacin is that, unlike other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, it is a potent agonist of chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper type 2 cells (CRTH2), a receptor for prostaglandin D2 (PGD2). This study investigated the pharmacological actions of indomethacin on eosinophil migration to clarify the actual mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of indomethacin on eosinophilic pustular folliculitis. Eosinophils exhibited chemokinetic and chemotactic responses to both PGD2 and indomethacin through CRTH2 receptors. Pre-treatment of eosinophils with indomethacin greatly inhibited eosinophil migration to PGD2 and, to a much lesser extent, to eotaxin (CCL11); these effects could be mediated by homologous and heterologous desensitization of eosinophil CRTH2 and CCR3, respectively, by agonistic effects of indomethacin on CRTH2. Indomethacin also cancelled a priming effect of ?12-PGJ2, a plasma metabolite of PGD2, on eosinophil chemotaxis to eotaxin. Indomethacin down-modulated cell surface expression of both CRTH2 and CCR3. Hair follicle epithelium and epidermal keratinocytes around eosinophilic pustules together with the eccrine apparatus of palmoplantar lesions of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis were immunohistochemically positive for lipocalin-type PGD synthase. Indomethacin may exert therapeutic effects against eosinophilic skin diseases in which PGD2-CRTH2 signals play major roles by reducing eosinophil responses to PGD2. PMID:23582181

Kataoka, Naoko; Satoh, Takahiro; Hirai, Aiko; Saeki, Kazumi; Yokozeki, Hiroo

2013-01-01

93

Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis, formerly Churg-Strauss Syndrome (EGPA)  

MedlinePLUS

You are here: Home / Types of Vasculitis / Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis, formerly Churg-Strauss Syndrome (EGPA) Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis, formerly Churg-Strauss Syndrome (EGPA) First Description Who gets ...

94

Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... acute. Acute childhood leukemias are also divided into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) , depending on ... Leukemia (CML) Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) Cancer Center Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) When Cancer Keeps You Home Some Kinds ...

95

Childhood Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... and having had radiation or chemotherapy. Treatment often cures childhood leukemia. Treatment options include chemotherapy, other drug therapy and radiation. In some cases bone marrow and blood stem cell transplantation might help. NIH: National Cancer Institute

96

Understanding Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... For acute leukemia, they include: { { Tiredness or no energy { { Shortness of breath during physical activity { { Pale skin { { ... therapy. Treatment with x-rays or other high-energy rays. Refractory disease. Disease that has not responded ...

97

Dissection of the Hyperadhesive Phenotype of Airway Eosinophils in Asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Asthma is characterized by appearance of eosinophils in the airway. Eosinophils purified from the airway 48 h after segmental antigen challenge are described as exhibiting greater adhesion to albumin- coated surfaces via an unidentified 2 integrin and increased expres- sion ofM2 (CD11b\\/18) compared with purified blood eosinophils. We have investigated the determinants of this hyperadhesive pheno- type. Airway eosinophils exhibited

Steven R. Barthel; Nizar N. Jarjour; Deane F. Mosher; Mats W. Johansson

2006-01-01

98

Natural killer cells induce eosinophil activation and apoptosis.  

PubMed

Eosinophils are potent inflammatory cells with numerous immune functions, including antigen presentation and exacerbation of inflammatory responses through their capacity to release a range of largely preformed cytokines and lipid mediators. Thus, timely regulation of eosinophil activation and apoptosis is crucial to develop beneficial immune response and to avoid tissue damage and induce resolution of inflammation. Natural Killer (NK) cells have been reported to influence innate and adaptive immune responses by multiple mechanisms including cytotoxicity against other immune cells. In this study, we analyzed the effect of the interaction between NK cells and eosinophils. Co-culture experiments revealed that human NK cells could trigger autologous eosinophil activation, as shown by up-regulation of CD69 and down-regulation of CD62L, as well as degranulation, evidenced by increased CD63 surface expression, secretion of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil derived neurotoxin (EDN). Moreover, NK cells significantly and dose dependently increased eosinophil apoptosis as shown by annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Direct contact was necessary for eosinophil degranulation and apoptosis. Increased expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in cocultured eosinophils and inhibition of eosinophil CD63 expression by pharmacologic inhibitors suggest that MAPK and PI3K pathways are involved in NK cell-induced eosinophil degranulation. Finally, we showed that NK cells increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) expression by eosinophils in co-culture and that mitochondrial inhibitors (rotenone and antimycin) partially diminished NK cell-induced eosinophil apoptosis, suggesting the implication of mitochondrial ROS in NK cell-induced eosinophil apoptosis. Pan-caspase inhibitor (ZVAD-FMK) only slightly decreased eosinophil apoptosis in coculture. Altogether, our results suggest that NK cells regulate eosinophil functions by inducing their activation and their apoptosis. PMID:24727794

Awad, Ali; Yassine, Hanane; Barrier, Mathieu; Vorng, Han; Marquillies, Philippe; Tsicopoulos, Anne; Duez, Catherine

2014-01-01

99

Antiallergic and antiasthmatic effects of a novel enhydrazinone ester (CEE-1): inhibition of activation of both mast cells and eosinophils.  

PubMed

Activation of mast cells and eosinophils is a fundamental process in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases. We have previously reported that the novel enhydrazinone ester CEE-1 (ethyl 4-phenylhydrazinocyclohex-3-en-2-oxo-6-phenyl-1-oate) possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity. We have now tested whether the compound also possesses antiallergic and antiasthmatic effects in vitro and in vivo. The compound significantly inhibited degranulation and leukotriene C4 (LTC4) release from activated human eosinophils, as well as IgE-dependent degranulation and LTC4 release from passively sensitized rat basophilic leukemia cells and bone marrow-derived mouse mast cells. In human eosinophils, the drug was more potent in inhibiting degranulation than LTC4 release {IC50 = 0.4 ?M [confidence interval (CI): 0.1-0.9] versus 3.8 ?M (CI: 0.9-8.3)}, whereas in mast cells the reverse was essentially the case. The drug did not affect stimulus-induced calcium transients in eosinophils but significantly inhibited early phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and p38-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). In vivo, topical application of 4.5-15 mg/kg of the compound significantly inhibited allergen-induced passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice. Similarly, in the mouse asthma model, the intranasal administration of 6.5-12.5 mg/kg of the compound significantly inhibited bronchial inflammation and eosinophil accumulation in bronchial lavage fluid, as well as abolishing airway hyper-responsiveness to methacholine. These results show that CEE-1 inhibits the activation of both mast cells and eosinophils in vitro, probably by blocking MAPK-activation pathways, and that these effects are translated into antiallergic and antiasthmatic effects in vivo. The compound, therefore, has potential application in the treatment of asthma and other allergic diseases. PMID:24917545

Ezeamuzie, Charles I; El-Hashim, Ahmed Z; Renno, Waleed M; Edafiogho, Ivan O

2014-08-01

100

Multilevel Intramedullary Spinal Neurocysticercosis With Eosinophilic Meningitis  

PubMed Central

Background Cysticercal involvement of the spinal cord is a very rare form of neurocysticercosis. Intramedullary cysts are even less common. Objective To describe a novel presentation of multilevel intramedullary neurocysticercosis with eosinophilic meningitis. Design Case report. Patient A 35-year-old man with a history of cerebral neurocysticercosis who presented with both cauda equina and Brown-Sequard syndromes associated with cerebrospinal fluid findings of eosinophilic meningitis. Results Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the multilevel intramedullary cord lesions. The patientwas treated medically with dexamethasone and albendazole and had a good recovery. Conclusion Intramedullary neurocysticercosis should be considered as a potentially treatable cause of multilevel spinal lesions with subacute meningitis. PMID:15148157

Torabi, Amir M.; Quiceno, Mary; Mendelsohn, Dianne B.; Powell, Craig M.

2014-01-01

101

Eosinophilic Fasciitis Associated with Autoimmune Thyroiditis  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) is scleroderma-like disease without Raynaud's phenomenon or visceral involvement. It is characterized by painful swelling of the extremities, accompanied by rapid weight gain, fever and myalgia. The acute state of disease is associated with significant peripheral blood eosinophilia, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and hypergammaglobulinemia. EF is also frequently associated with hematological abnormalities, including malignant lymphoproliferative diseases, but rarely associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. In the present study we report a case of eosinophilic fasciitis associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:16134777

Hur, Jin-Wuk; Lee, Hye-Soon; Uhm, Wan-Sik; Jun, Jae-Bum; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Park, Chan-Kum

2005-01-01

102

Acute eosinophilic ascites: An unusual form of an unusual case.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) is an uncommon disease characterised by eosinophilic infiltration in the gastrointestinal tract. EGE may involve more than one layer of the gastrointestinal tract. Clinical features depend on the layer and location which is involved. We report an unusual case of eosinophilic ascites associated with antinuclear antibody positivity, which is an unusual variety of serosal form of EGE. PMID:25315240

Kodan, Parul; Shetty, Meenakshi A; Pavan, Mr; Kariappa, Ahalya; Mahabala, Chakrapani

2015-01-01

103

EOSINOPHILS: MULTIFACETED BIOLOGIC PROPERTIES AND ROLES IN HEALTH AND DISEASE  

PubMed Central

Summary Eosinophils are leukocytes resident in mucosal tissues. During Th2-type inflammation, eosinophils are recruited from bone marrow and blood to the sites of immune response. While eosinophils have been considered end-stage cells involved in host protection against parasite infection and immunopathology in hypersensitivity disease, recent studies changed this perspective. Eosinophils are now considered multifunctional leukocytes involved in tissue homeostasis, modulation of adaptive immune responses, and innate immunity to certain microbes. Eosinophils are capable of producing immunoregulatory cytokines and are actively involved in regulation of Th2-type immune responses. However, such new information does not preclude earlier observations showing that eosinophils, in particular human eosinophils, are also effector cells with pro-inflammatory and destructive capabilities. Eosinophils with activation phenotypes are observed in biological specimens from patients with disease, and deposition of eosinophil products is readily seen in the affected tissues from these patients. Therefore, it would be reasonable to consider the eosinophil a multifaceted leukocyte that contributes to various physiological and pathological processes depending on their location and activation status. This review summarizes the emerging concept of the multifaceted immunobiology of eosinophils and discusses the roles of eosinophils in health and disease and the challenges and perspectives in the field. PMID:21682744

Kita, Hirohito

2011-01-01

104

Eosinophils Mediate Protective Immunity against Secondary Nematode Infection.  

PubMed

Eosinophils are versatile cells that regulate innate and adaptive immunity, influence metabolism and tissue repair, and contribute to allergic lung disease. Within the context of immunity to parasitic worm infections, eosinophils are prominent yet highly varied in function. We have shown previously that when mice undergo primary infection with the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis, eosinophils play an important immune regulatory role that promotes larval growth and survival in skeletal muscle. In this study, we aimed to address the function of eosinophils in secondary infection with T. spiralis. By infecting eosinophil-ablated mice, we found that eosinophils are dispensable for immunity that clears adult worms or controls fecundity in secondary infection. In contrast, eosinophil ablation had a pronounced effect on secondary infection of skeletal muscle by migratory newborn larvae. Restoring eosinophils to previously infected, ablated mice caused them to limit muscle larvae burdens. Passive immunization of naive, ablated mice with sera or Ig from infected donors, together with transfer of eosinophils, served to limit the number of newborn larvae that migrated in tissue and colonized skeletal muscle. Results from these in vivo studies are consistent with earlier findings that eosinophils bind to larvae in the presence of Abs in vitro. Although our previous findings showed that eosinophils protect the parasite in primary infection, these new data show that eosinophils protect the host in secondary infection. PMID:25429065

Huang, Lu; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G; Gagliardo, Lucille F; Ruyechan, Maura C; Luber, Kierstin L; Lee, Nancy A; Lee, James J; Appleton, Judith A

2015-01-01

105

RESEARCH Open Access Idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia in children  

E-print Network

RESEARCH Open Access Idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia in children: the French experience Lisa® Group Abstract Background: Idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia is extremely rare in children and adults) and acute (IAEP) eosinophilic pneumonia in children. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed all cases of ICEP

106

Generation of Eosinophils from Cryopreserved Murine Bone Marrow Cells  

PubMed Central

Eosinophils are produced in the bone marrow from CD34+ eosinophil lineage–committed progenitors, whose levels in the bone marrow are elevated in a variety of human diseases. These findings suggest that increased eosinophil lineage–committed progenitor production is an important process in disease-associated eosinophilia. The pathways central to the biology of the eosinophil lineage–committed progenitor remain largely unknown. Thus, developing new methods to investigate the regulators of eosinophil lineage–committed progenitor differentiation is needed to identify potential therapeutic targets to specifically inhibit eosinophil production. We tested cytokine regimens to optimize liquid cultures for the study of eosinophil lineage–committed progenitor and eosinophil precursor differentiation into mature eosinophils. Stem cell factor (but not fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand) was required for optimal yield of eosinophils. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of cell preservation and scale on the culture, successfully culturing functional eosinophils from fresh and frozen murine bone marrow cells and in a standard-sized and 96-well culture format. In summary, we have developed an adaptable culture system that yields functionally competent eosinophils from murine low-density bone marrow cells and whose cytokine regime includes expansion of progenitors with stem cell factor alone with subsequent differentiation with interleukin 5. PMID:25551463

Schollaert, Kaila L.; Stephens, Michael R.; Gray, Jerilyn K.; Fulkerson, Patricia C.

2014-01-01

107

Inhaled corticosteroid effects both eosinophilic and non-eosinophilic inflammation in asthmatic patients.  

PubMed Central

AIM: To determine induced sputum cell counts and interleukin-8 (IL-8), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) levels as markers of neutrophilic inflammation in moderate persistent asthma, and to evaluate the response to inhaled steroid therapy. METHODS: Forty-five moderate asthmatic patients and 10 non-smoker controls were included in this study. All patients received inhaled corticosteroid (800 microg of budesonide) for 12 weeks. Before and after treatment pulmonary function tests were performed, and symptom scores were determined. Blood was drawn for analysis of serum inflammatory markers, and sputum was induced. RESULTS: Induced sputum cell counts and inflammatory markers were significantly higher in patients with asthma than in the control group. The induced sputum eosinophil counts of 12 patients (26%) were found to be less than 5%, the non-eosinophilic group, and sputum neutrophil counts, IL-8 and TNF-alpha levels were significantly higher than the eosinophilic group (neutrophil, 50+/-14% versus 19+/-10%, p<0.01). In both groups, there was a significant decrease in sputum total cell counts and serum and sputum IL-8, TNF-alpha and LTB4 levels after the treatment. There was no change in sputum neutrophil counts. Although the sputum eosinophil count decreased only in the eosinophilic subjects, there was no significant difference in inflammatory markers between the groups. The symptom scores were significantly improved after treatment, while the improvement did not reach statistical significance on pulmonary function test parameters. CONCLUSION: Notably, in chronic asthma there is a subgroup of patients whose predominant inflammatory cells are not eosinophils. Sputum neutrophil counts and neutrophilic inflammatory markers are significantly higher in these patients. In the non-eosinophilic group, inhaled steroid caused an important decrease in inflammatory markers; however, there was no change in the sputum eosinophil and neutrophil counts. PMID:15545060

Basyigit, Ilknur; Yildiz, Fusun; Ozkara, Sevgiye Kacar; Boyaci, Hasim; Ilgazli, Ahmet

2004-01-01

108

Optic Neuropathy Secondary to Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis.  

PubMed

: Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis (EAF) is a rare fibroinflammatory disorder with a predilection for upper respiratory tract submucosa. We report a 45-year-old man with progressive unilateral visual loss secondary to a retroorbital soft tissue mass with histological features consistent with EAF. The patient experienced marked improvement in vision after endoscopic optic nerve decompression through sphenoethmoidectomy. PMID:25232841

Lloyd, Adam P; Benzimra, James D; Warfield, Adrian T; Prasad, Balaji T S; Matthews, Timothy D; Ahmed, Shahzada K

2014-09-16

109

Constipation--another manifestation of eosinophilic gastroenteritis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic gastroenteris (EG) is a unique disease in which eosinophils penetrate into the layers of the GI tract. It is classified by the depth of the eosinophilic penetration, that can either be mucosal, muscularis or serosal. Symptoms vary with the bowel site involved as well as the depth of the eosinophilic penetration. Symptoms of the mucosal form of EG usually include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain while constipation is extremely rare. We present a case of mucosal EG presenting as constipation and abdominal pain in a 43 year old female. Constipation is not a typical symptom associated with EG and while muscularis EG can cause decreased colonic motility and obstruction, constipation with mucosal EG has not been previously reported. We are presenting the first case report of constipation associated with mucosal EG. Thus EG should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with constipation and abdominal pain and can easily be diagnosed with mucosal biopsies and treated with steroid therapy. PMID:22803505

Khan, Fahad; Chaudhry, Muhammad A; Nusrat, Salman; Qureshi, Noorulain; Ali, Tauseef

2012-01-01

110

Eosinophil pathogenicity mechanisms and therapeutics in neuromyelitis optica  

PubMed Central

Eosinophils are abundant in inflammatory demyelinating lesions in neuromyelitis optica (NMO). We used cell culture, ex vivo spinal cord slices, and in vivo mouse models of NMO to investigate the role of eosinophils in NMO pathogenesis and the therapeutic potential of eosinophil inhibitors. Eosinophils cultured from mouse bone marrow produced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in cell cultures expressing aquaporin-4 in the presence of NMO autoantibody (NMO-IgG). In the presence of complement, eosinophils greatly increased cell killing by a complement-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CDCC) mechanism. NMO pathology was produced in NMO-IgG–treated spinal cord slice cultures by inclusion of eosinophils or their granule toxins. The second-generation antihistamines cetirizine and ketotifen, which have eosinophil-stabilizing actions, greatly reduced NMO-IgG/eosinophil–dependent cytotoxicity and NMO pathology. In live mice, demyelinating NMO lesions produced by continuous intracerebral injection of NMO-IgG and complement showed marked eosinophil infiltration. Lesion severity was increased in transgenic hypereosinophilic mice. Lesion severity was reduced in mice made hypoeosinophilic by anti–IL-5 antibody or by gene deletion, and in normal mice receiving cetirizine orally. Our results implicate the involvement of eosinophils in NMO pathogenesis by ADCC and CDCC mechanisms and suggest the therapeutic utility of approved eosinophil-stabilizing drugs. PMID:23563310

Zhang, Hua; Verkman, A.S.

2013-01-01

111

Leukotriene B4 amplifies eosinophil accumulation in response to nematodes  

PubMed Central

Eosinophil accumulation is a defining feature of the immune response to parasitic worm infection. Tissue-resident cells, such as epithelial cells, are thought to initiate eosinophil recruitment. However, direct recognition of worms by eosinophils has not been explored as a mechanism for amplifying eosinophil accumulation. Here, we report that eosinophils rapidly migrate toward diverse nematode species in three-dimensional culture. These include the mammalian parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Surprisingly, collective migration toward worms requires paracrine leukotriene B4 signaling between eosinophils. In contrast, neutrophils show a minimal response to nematodes, yet are able to undergo robust leukotriene-dependent migration toward IgG-coated beads. We further demonstrate that eosinophils accumulate around C. elegans in the lungs of mice. This response is not dependent on bacterial products, CCR3, or complement activation. However, mice deficient in leukotriene signaling show markedly attenuated eosinophil accumulation after injection of C. elegans or N. brasiliensis. Our findings establish that nematode-derived signals can directly induce leukotriene production by eosinophils and that leukotriene signaling is a major contributor to nematode-induced eosinophil accumulation in the lung. The similarity of the eosinophil responses to diverse nematode species suggests that conserved features of nematodes are recognized during parasite infection. PMID:24889202

Patnode, Michael L.; Bando, Jennifer K.; Krummel, Matthew F.; Locksley, Richard M.

2014-01-01

112

Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis: An Overview  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) is a multisystemic disorder, belonging to the small vessel anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, defined as an eosinophil-rich and necrotizing granulomatous inflammation often involving the respiratory tract, and necrotizing vasculitis predominantly affecting small to medium-sized vessels, associated with asthma and eosinophilia. EGPA pathogenesis is not well known: HLA-DRB1*04 and *07, HLA-DRB4 and IL10.2 haplotype of the IL-10 promoter gene are the most studied genetic determinants. Among the acquired pathogenetic factors, the exposure to different allergens, infections, vaccinations, drugs, and silica exposure have been involved. Eosinophils are the most characteristic cells in EGPA and different studies have demonstrated their role as effector and immunoregulatory cells. EGPA is considered as a disease with a prevalent activation of the Th-2 cellular-mediated inflammatory response and also humoral immunity plays an important role. A link between B and T inflammatory responses may explain different disease features. EGPA typically develops into three sequential phases: the allergic phase, distinguished by the occurrence of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and sinusitis, the eosinophilic phase, in which the main pathological finding is the eosinophilic organ infiltrations (e.g., lungs, heart, and gastrointestinal system), and the vasculitic phase, characterized by purpura, peripheral neuropathy, and constitutional symptoms. ANCA (especially pANCA anti-myeloperoxidase) are present in 40–60% of the patients. An elevation of IgG4 is frequently found. Corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide are classically used for remission induction, while azathioprine and methotrexate are the therapeutic options for remission maintenance. B-cell depletion with rituximab has shown promising results for remission induction. PMID:25404930

Gioffredi, Andrea; Maritati, Federica; Oliva, Elena; Buzio, Carlo

2014-01-01

113

What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... years. But chronic leukemias are generally harder to cure than acute leukemias. What is a lymphocytic leukemia? Whether leukemia is myeloid or lymphocytic depends on which bone marrow cells the cancer starts in. Lymphocytic leukemias (also known as lymphoid ...

114

New genetic links in eosinophilic esophagitis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is increasingly diagnosed as a disorder throughout the world. It is characterized by eosinophils in the esophagus due to food allergies. Molecular analysis of esophageal biopsies and mouse models have indicated a clear role for the T helper 2 pathway, in particular interleukins 5 and 13, in this disease. Current treatment options for EoE involve avoidance of the allergens or using anti-inflammatory medications such as topical corticosteroids. In the past year, genomic research has led to the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and subsequently in the gene encoding its receptor, as disease susceptibility markers for EoE. Identification of this molecule and its receptor suggest the potential for new treatment options in the future. PMID:20822553

Spergel, Jonathan M

2010-01-01

115

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)  

MedlinePLUS

... this page Print this page Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a fast-growing cancer of a type ... that your body needs. Tweet Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) How transplant can treat ALL Transplant outcomes for ...

116

Eosinophilic esophagitis: the newest esophageal inflammatory disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic esophageal inflammatory disease of undetermined pathophysiology that results in dense mucosal eosinophilia and esophageal dysfunction. In childhood, vague symptoms associated with GERD and feeding difficulties are the first manifestations of EoE. Adults typically present with dysphagia and food impaction. No pathognomonic features have been identified for EoE and, therefore, its diagnosis must be made

Dan Atkins; Robert Kramer; Kelley Capocelli; Mark Lovell; Glenn T. Furuta

2009-01-01

117

Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis of the Nasal Septum  

PubMed Central

Background. Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis (EAF) is a rare benign condition of unknown aetiology that causes stenosis of the upper respiratory tract. It is most commonly found at the nasal septum and sinus mucosa causing mucosal thickening and nasal obstructive symptoms. The diagnosis is mainly based on characteristic histologic findings. Case Report. A 27-year-old young woman presented with a slow growing mass at her anterior nasal septum for over eight years. She complained of persistent nasal obstruction, epistaxis, sometimes diffused facial pain, and chronic headache. 3 years ago, the tumor was partially resected for ventilation and a nasal septum perforation was left. Imaging findings indicated soft-tissue thickening of the anterior part of septum and adjacent lateral nasal walls. Pathological examination showed numerous inflammatory cells infiltrates containing eosinophils, fibroinflammatory lesion with a whorled appearance fibrosis which typically surrounded vessels. A diagnosis of eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis was made. All laboratory tests were unremarkable. Skin prick test was positive. The tumor-like lesion was totally resected. Conclusions. EAF is a rare benign and progressive disorder causing destruction. Combined with radiological imaging of EAF historical findings contribute to the diagnosis. It is important to prevent tumor from recurrence by total resection of the lesion. PMID:23634315

Li, Yunchuan; Liu, Honggang; Zang, Hongrui; Wang, Tong; Hu, Bin

2013-01-01

118

Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis of the nasal septum.  

PubMed

Background. Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis (EAF) is a rare benign condition of unknown aetiology that causes stenosis of the upper respiratory tract. It is most commonly found at the nasal septum and sinus mucosa causing mucosal thickening and nasal obstructive symptoms. The diagnosis is mainly based on characteristic histologic findings. Case Report. A 27-year-old young woman presented with a slow growing mass at her anterior nasal septum for over eight years. She complained of persistent nasal obstruction, epistaxis, sometimes diffused facial pain, and chronic headache. 3 years ago, the tumor was partially resected for ventilation and a nasal septum perforation was left. Imaging findings indicated soft-tissue thickening of the anterior part of septum and adjacent lateral nasal walls. Pathological examination showed numerous inflammatory cells infiltrates containing eosinophils, fibroinflammatory lesion with a whorled appearance fibrosis which typically surrounded vessels. A diagnosis of eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis was made. All laboratory tests were unremarkable. Skin prick test was positive. The tumor-like lesion was totally resected. Conclusions. EAF is a rare benign and progressive disorder causing destruction. Combined with radiological imaging of EAF historical findings contribute to the diagnosis. It is important to prevent tumor from recurrence by total resection of the lesion. PMID:23634315

Li, Yunchuan; Liu, Honggang; Han, Demin; Zang, Hongrui; Wang, Tong; Hu, Bin

2013-01-01

119

The effects of phototherapy on eosinophil and eosinophilic cationic protein in newborns with hyperbilirubinemia.  

PubMed

Newborns with jaundice requiring or not requiring phototherapy (PT) are at greater risk of developing asthma later in life. In this study, we investigated the effect of PT treatment on eosinophil and eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) levels in newborns with severe hyperbilirubinemia. Thirty newborns diagnosed with severe hyperbilirubinemia and exposed to light-emitting diode (LED) PT were enrolled into the study. Total serum bilirubin (TSB) levels, complete blood count and serum ECP concentrations were measured before and after PT. TSB and hemoglobin (Hb) counts were lower after PT (p = 0.001). There was no difference between leukocyte, lymphocyte, neutrophil and platelet count before and after PT. Eosinophil levels were increased after PT, although not significantly. ECP levels were higher after PT (p = 0.006). It may be speculated that newborns treated with LED PT, increased ECP might play a role in developing allergic diseases later in life. PMID:24527832

Beken, Serdar; Aydin, Banu; Zenciro??lu, Aysegül; Dilli, Dilek; Özkan, Elif; Dursun, Arzu; Okumus, Nurullah

2014-06-01

120

Diagnosing Eosinophilic Colitis: Histopathological Pattern or Nosological Entity?  

PubMed Central

Reports of ?“eosinophilic colitis”—raised colonic mucosal eosinophil density in patients with lower gastrointestinal symptoms—have increased markedly over the last fifteen years, though it remains a rarity. There is no consensus over its diagnosis and management, and uncertainty is compounded by the use of the same term to describe an idiopathic increase in colonic eosinophils and an eosinophilic inflammatory reaction to known aetiological agents such as parasites or drugs. In patients with histologically proven colonic eosinophilia, it is important to seek out underlying causes and careful clinicopathological correlation is advised. Because of the variability of eosinophil density in the normal colon, it is recommended that histological reports of colonic eosinophilia include a quantitative morphometric assessment of eosinophil density, preferably across several sites. Few reported cases of “eosinophilic colitis” meet these criteria. As no correlation has been shown between colonic eosinophil density and symptoms in older children or adults, it is suggested that treatment should be directed towards alleviation of symptoms and response to treatment assessed clinically rather than by histological estimates of intramucosal eosinophils. PMID:24278727

Bates, Alan W. H.

2012-01-01

121

Recurrent eosinophilic cystitis with peripheral eosinophilia and hyperimmunoglobulinemia E.  

PubMed

A case of recurrent eosinophilic cystitis with peripheral eosinophilia and hyperimmunoglobulinemia E, which responded successfully to initial and secondary steroid therapies is reported. PMID:12740501

Matsuura, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Masaki; Arima, Kiminobu

2003-01-01

122

The role of eosinophils in Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection.  

PubMed

Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the causative agent of human eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in the Pacific Islands and Southeast Asia. Prominent eosinophilia in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the patients has been used as one of the diagnostic criteria for the disease but the role(s) of the CSF eosinophils has remained to be elucidated. In this article, Kentaro Yoshimura, Hiroko Sugaya and Kazuto Ishido discuss the involvement of CSF eosinophils in the killing of intracranial worms and the damage of the central nervous system of the hosts, and consider why eosinophils in A. cantonensis infection play a more important role in nonpermissive hosts (including humans) than in the permissive rat host. PMID:15275458

Yoshimura, K; Sugaya, H; Ishida, K

1994-06-01

123

Understanding Leukemias  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial is designed to aid medical students at all levels understand the laboratory diagnosis of leukemias. It includes introductory material on the basic laboratory tests specific to diagnoses, their general application and pitfalls in interpretation. The introductory material is followed by a series of short clinical vignettes illustrating the major categories of leukemia. This tutorial focuses on diagnosis and relative little on treatment is included. QuickTime movie player, Flash player and Java script runtime plug-in scripts are required for some pages. The tutorial concludes with a short self-help quiz covering the major points developed. The plug-ins noted above are available free at the following sites: http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/win.html and http://www.sun.com/ . Questions should be directed to Dr. Mark Braun; braunm@indiana.edu.Annotated: falseDisease diagnosis: neoplastic

Braun, Mark

124

Eosinophils in the Esophagus—Peptic or Allergic Eosinophilic Esophagitis? Case Series of Three Patients with Esophageal Eosinophilia  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES:Scattered eosinophils in the distal esophagus traditionally provide the hallmark for peptic esophagitis, but the upper limit of eosinophils and the longitudinal extent of peptic inflammation along the esophagus are unknown. Recently, adults and children with upper intestinal symptoms and >20 eosinophils\\/high-power field (eos\\/HPF) have been given the diagnosis of allergic esophagitis. Standardized diagnostic criteria for allergic esophagitis are lacking

Peter Ngo; Glenn T. Furuta; Donald A. Antonioli; Victor L. Fox

2006-01-01

125

Targeting AMCase reduces esophageal eosinophilic inflammation and remodeling in a mouse model of egg induced eosinophilic esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Studies of AMCase inhibition in mouse models of lung eosinophilic inflammation have produced conflicting results with some studies demonstrating inhibition of eosinophilic inflammation and others not. No studies have investigated the role of AMCase inhibition in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). We have used a mouse model of egg (OVA) induced EoE to determine whether pharmacologic inhibition of AMCase with allosamidin reduced eosinophilic inflammation and remodeling in the esophagus in EoE. Administration of intra-esophageal OVA for 6 weeks to BALB/c mice induced increased levels of esophageal eosinophils, mast cells, and features of esophageal remodeling (fibrosis, basal zone hyperplasia, deposition of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin). Administration of intraperitoneal (ip) allosamidin to BALB/c mice significantly inhibited AMCase enzymatic activity in the esophagus. Pharmacologic inhibition of AMCase with ip allosamidin inhibited both OVA induced increases in esophageal eosinophilic inflammation and OVA induced esophageal remodeling (fibrosis, epithelial basal zone hyperplasia, extracellular matrix deposition of fibronectin). This inhibition of eosinophilic inflammation in the esophagus by ip allosamidin was associated with reduced eotaxin-1 expression in the esophagus. Oral allosamidin inhibited eosinophilic inflammation in the epithelium but did not inhibit esophageal remodeling. These studies suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of AMCase results in inhibition of eosinophilic inflammation and remodeling in the esophagus in a mouse model of egg induced EoE partially through effects in the esophagus on reducing chemokines (i.e. eotaxin-1) implicated in the pathogenesis of EoE. PMID:24239745

Cho, Jae Youn; Rosenthal, Peter; Miller, Marina; Pham, Alexa; Aceves, Seema; Sakuda, Shohei; Broide, David H

2014-01-01

126

Emerging Therapeutic Options for Eosinophilic Esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the esophagus that often occurs in atopic persons. Management strategies include pharmacotherapy, dietary modification, and endoscopic therapy, although patients will often have a relapsing and remitting course. Currently, the primary pharmacotherapy for EoE consists of corticosteroids. Immuno-modulators, leukotriene antagonists, biologies, and monoclonal antibodies are currently under study for treatment of EoE. The role of immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic reactions has been well documented and may provide insight into the etiology and effective therapy of EoE. PMID:24803874

Dougherty, Timothy; Stephen, Sindu; Borum, Marie L.

2014-01-01

127

Esophageal Dysmotility in patients with Eosinophilic Esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Summary The understanding of esophageal motility alterations in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis is in its infancy despite the common presenting complaint of dysphagia. A diversity of motility disorders has been reported in patients with EE including achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus and non-specific motility alterations including high amplitude esophageal body contractions, tertiary contractions, LES pressure abnormalities and other peristaltic problems. Some evidence suggests that treatment of EE will result in some improvements in motility. The advent of technology such as high resolution manometry and combined manometry with impedance may provide new insight into more subtle motility abnormalities. PMID:18061103

Nurko, Samuel; Rosen, Rachel

2008-01-01

128

SAR103168: a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with therapeutic potential in myeloid leukemias.  

PubMed

SAR103168, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the pyrido [2,3-d] pyridimidine subclass, inhibited the kinase activities of the entire Src kinase family, Abl kinase, angiogenic receptor kinases (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor [VEGFR] 1 and 2), Tie2, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) 1 and 3, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). SAR103168 was a potent Src inhibitor, with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 0.65 ± 0.02 nM (at 100 ?M ATP), targeting the auto-phosphorylation of the kinase domain (Src(260-535)) and activity of the phosphorylated kinase. Phosphorylation of Src, Lyn and Src downstream signaling pathways (PYK2, P-130CAS, FAK, JNK and MAPK) were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. SAR103168 inhibited the phosphorylation of STAT5 in KG1 cells and fresh cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). SAR103168 inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in acute and chronic myeloid leukemic cells at nanomolar IC50. SAR103168 induced anti-proliferation of leukemic progenitors (CFU-L) from 29 patients with AML, and > 85% of AML patient samples were sensitive to SAR103168. These antagonist activities of SAR103168 were independent of FLT3 expression. SAR103168 treatment was effective in 50% of high-risk patient samples carrying chromosome 7 abnormalities or complex rearrangement. SAR103168 administration (intravenous or oral) impaired tumor growth and induced tumor regression in animals bearing human AML leukemic cells, correlating with potent inhibition of Src downstream signaling pathways in AML tumors. SAR103168 showed potent anti-tumor activity in SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice bearing AML (KG1, EOL-1, Kasumi-1, CTV1) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) (K562) tumors. The combination of cytarabine and SAR103168 showed synergistic activity in AML and CML tumor models. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of SAR103168 in myeloid leukemias and support the rationale for clinical investigations. PMID:23121564

Bourrié, Bernard; Brassard, Diana L; Cosnier-Pucheu, Sylvie; Zilberstein, Asher; Yu, Kin; Levit, Mikhail; Morrison, J Gil; Perreaut, Pierre; Jegham, Samir; Hilairet, Sandrine; Bouaboula, Monsif; Penarier, Geraldine; Guiot, Cécile; Larroze-Chicot, Philippe; Laurent, Guy; Demur, Cécile; Casellas, Pierre

2013-07-01

129

Eosinophilic lung diseases: a clinical, radiologic, and pathologic overview.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic lung diseases are a diverse group of pulmonary disorders associated with peripheral or tissue eosinophilia. They are classified as eosinophilic lung diseases of unknown cause (simple pulmonary eosinophilia [SPE], acute eosinophilic pneumonia [AEP], chronic eosinophilic pneumonia [CEP], idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome [IHS]), eosinophilic lung diseases of known cause (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis [ABPA], bronchocentric granulomatosis [BG], parasitic infections, drug reactions), and eosinophilic vasculitis (allergic angiitis, granulomatosis [Churg-Strauss syndrome]). The percentages of eosinophils in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid are essential parts of the evaluation. Chest computed tomography (CT) demonstrates a more characteristic pattern and distribution of parenchymal opacities than does conventional chest radiography. At CT, SPE and IHS are characterized by single or multiple nodules with a surrounding ground-glass-opacity halo, AEP mimics radiologically hydrostatic pulmonary edema, and CEP is characterized by nonsegmental airspace consolidations with peripheral predominance. ABPA manifests with bilateral central bronchiectasis with or without mucoid impaction. The CT manifestations of BG are nonspecific and consist of a focal mass or lobar consolidation with atelectasis. The most common CT findings in Churg-Strauss syndrome include sub-pleural consolidation with lobular distribution, centrilobular nodules, bronchial wall thickening, and interlobular septal thickening. The integration of clinical, radiologic, and pathologic findings facilitates the initial and differential diagnoses of various eosinophilic lung diseases. PMID:17495282

Jeong, Yeon Joo; Kim, Kun-Il; Seo, Im Jeong; Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Ki Nam; Kim, Ki Nam; Kim, Jeung Sook; Kwon, Woon Jung

2007-01-01

130

Severe eosinophilic cystitis in a woman with anorexia nervosa.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare inflammatory disorder. It is considered to be self limiting necessitating only supportive therapy. Surgical intervention is unusual. We report here an association between eosinophilic cystitis and anorexia nervosa in an adult woman requiring radical surgery for progressive relentless disease. Estrogen deficiency associated with a possible allergic etiology could explain this association. PMID:16903946

Philip, Joe; Ali, Faisal Sm; Zakhour, Hani D; Parr, Nigel J

2006-08-01

131

Eosinophilic panniculitis in a female child: An unusual presentation  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic panniculitis (EP) is characterized by prominent infiltration of subcutaneous fat with eosinophils. The etiology is diverse. This is not a disease but represents a reaction pattern that may occur in a variety of circumstances. The exact pathogenesis of the disease is still unclear. We present the case of a 6-year-old girl child who was diagnosed with EP.

Jain, Sonia; Jain, Pramod; Jakhar, Preeti; Shivkumar, V. B.

2015-01-01

132

Eosinophil diamine oxidase activity in acute inflammation in humans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eosinophil diamine oxidase, histaminase, activity was assayed in acute inflammatory states and correlated to disease activity. Correlation to serum and urine histamine, metabolites of histamine and granulocyte histamine metabolizing enzymes was also studied. Using a radiochromatagraphic assay, diamine oxidase, histaminese, activity was determined in human peripheral blood eosinophils from patients with acute inflammatory states including active asthma, cold-induced urticaria and

James Jay Herman; H. RICHTER; R. HESTERBERG; J. SCHMIDT; D. LECAVALIER; P. RYAN

1982-01-01

133

Eosinophil Survival and Apoptosis in Health and Disease  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilia is common feature of many disorders, including allergic diseases. There are many factors that influence the production, migration, survival and death of the eosinophil. Apoptosis is the most common form of physiological cell death and a necessary process to maintain but limit cell numbers in humans and other species. It has been directly demonstrated that eosinophil apoptosis is delayed in allergic inflammatory sites, and that this mechanism contributes to the expansion of eosinophil numbers within tissues. Among the proteins known to influence hematopoiesis and survival, expression of the cytokine interleukin-5 appears to be uniquely important and specific for eosinophils. In contrast, eosinophil death can result from withdrawal of survival factors, but also by activation of pro-apoptotic pathways via death factors. Recent observations suggest a role for cell surface death receptors and mitochondria in facilitating eosinophil apoptosis, although the mechanisms that trigger each of these death pathways remain incompletely delineated. Ultimately, the control of eosinophil apoptosis may someday become another therapeutic strategy for treating allergic diseases and other eosinophil-associated disorders. PMID:20358022

Park, Yong Mean

2010-01-01

134

Steroid responsive eosinophilic gastric outlet obstruction in a child  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Gastric outlet obstruction is a rare complication of eosinophilic gastroenteritis, most commonly treated surgically. We report a case of eosinophilic gastric outlet obstruction in a child that responded to conservative medical management. A brief review of this clinical entity is also provided....

135

Dissection of the Hyperadhesive Phenotype of Airway Eosinophils in Asthma  

E-print Network

Dissection of the Hyperadhesive Phenotype of Airway Eosinophils in Asthma Steven R. Barthel, Nizar, and Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin­Madison, Madison, Wisconsin Asthma is characterized. Keywords: adhesion molecules; cell trafficking; eosinophils; human Asthma is an inflammatory syndrome

Mosher, Deane F.

136

Studies on blood eosinophils. II. Patients with Löffler's cardiomyopathy.  

PubMed Central

Studies were done on blood eosinophils from four patients with raised blood eosinophil counts and heart failure. In three of the patients cardiological studies demonstrated the distinctive endocardial lesions and restrictive cardiomyopathy of Löffler's endocarditis and endomyocardial fibrosis. The fourth patient died with similar symptoms and signs. In blood films it was found that all four had more than 1 X 10(9) eosinophils per litre which were vacuolated and contained reduced numbers of crystalloid granules which were also shown to have ultrastructural changes. Unlike eosinophils from normal individuals the patients' eosinophils possessed receptors for rabbit IgG-coated erythrocytes and actively phagocytosed erythrocytes coated with rabbit IgG or human C3b. It is concluded that in these patients, a large proportion of the circulating eosinophils had developed characteristics of mature or stimulated eosinophils. This enabled them to respond to soluble substances in the bloodstream by forming endocytic vacuoles which led to degranulation of the crystalloid granules. These studies, taken in conjunction with other recent work in this field, support the concept that the restrictive cardiomyopathy of hypereosinophilic states, including Löffler's endocarditis and endomyocardial fibrosis, is a result of prolonged release of products from degranulated eosinophils while they are in the circulation. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 2c FIG. 3 PMID:939049

Spry, C J; Tai, P C

1976-01-01

137

Leukemia revisited  

SciTech Connect

Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

Cronkite, E P

1980-01-01

138

Eosinophils In Health and Disease: The LIAR Hypothesis  

PubMed Central

Discussions of eosinophils are often descriptions of end-stage effector cells with destructive capabilities mediated predominantly by released cytotoxic cationic granule proteins. Moreover, eosinophils in the medical literature are invariably associated with the pathologies linked with helminth infections or allergic diseases such as asthma. This has led to an almost fatalist view of eosinophil effector functions and associated therapeutic strategies targeting these cells that would make even William of Ockham proud - eosinophil effector functions have physiological consequences that increase patient morbidity/mortality and “the only good eosinophils are dead eosinophils”. Unfortunately, the strengths of dogmas are also their greatest weaknesses. Namely, while the repetitive proclamation of dogmatic concepts by authoritative sources (i.e., reviews, meeting proceedings, textbooks, etc.) builds consensus within the medical community and lower the entropies surrounding difficult issues, they often ignore not easily explained details and place diminished importance on alternative hypotheses. The goal of this perspective is two fold: (i) We will review recent observations regarding eosinophils and their activities as well as reinterpret earlier data as part of the synthesis of a new paradigm. In this paradigm, we hypothesize that eosinophils accumulate at unique sites in response to cell turnover or in response to local stem cell activity(ies). We further suggest that this accumulation is part of one or more mechanisms regulating tissue homeostasis. Specifically, instead of immune cells exclusively mediating innate host defense, we suggest that accumulating tissue eosinophils are actually regulators of Local Immunity And/or Remodeling/Repair in both health and disease - The LIAR Hypothesis; (ii) We want to be inflammatory (pun intended!) and challenge the currently common perspective of eosinophils as destructive end-stage effector cells. Our hope is to create more questions than we answer and provoke everyone to spend countless hours simply to prove us wrong! PMID:20447076

Lee, James J.; Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; McGarry, Michael P.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Lee, Nancy A.

2010-01-01

139

Unilateral nasal allergic reactions increase bilateral sinus eosinophil infiltration  

PubMed Central

We have previously shown that unilateral nasal challenge with antigen causes an increase in the number of eosinophils in the ipsilateral maxillary sinus. Here we aimed to determine whether there was an eosinophil response in the contralateral maxillary sinus after unilateral nasal challenge with antigen. Twenty subjects with a history of seasonal allergic rhinitis and a positive nasal challenge to ragweed or grass allergens were studied outside of their allergy season. Catheters were placed in both maxillary sinuses and the subjects were challenged with antigen via the left nostril. The subjects recorded nasal symptoms before and after each allergen challenge and hourly for 8 h afterward. We performed nasal lavages of the nose and sinuses at the same time as symptoms were recorded. The lavages were analyzed for the number of eosinophils and levels of albumin. Subjects showed a symptomatic response to challenge accompanied by an influx of eosinophils into the nose and increased vascular permeability. The number of eosinophils increased in both maxillary sinuses. The total change from diluent in eosinophils during the late phase response was higher in the ipsilateral maxillary sinus (median = 8,505; range = 0–100,360) compared with the contralateral sinus (median = 1,596; range = ?13,527–93,373; P = 0.03). We conclude that eosinophils increase in both maxillary sinuses after unilateral nasal challenge. We speculate that a central neurologic reflex initiated in the nose by the nasal challenge contributes to the bilateral eosinophil response in the maxillary sinuses. We further speculate that, since there are more eosinophils in the ipsilateral compared with the contralateral maxillary sinus, there is also an axonal reflex into the ipsilateral maxillary sinus that contributed to the eosinophil response. PMID:23970539

deTineo, Marcella; Naclerio, Robert M.

2013-01-01

140

Eosinophil Cytokines, Chemokines, and Growth Factors: Emerging Roles in Immunity  

PubMed Central

Eosinophils derive from the bone marrow and circulate at low levels in the blood in healthy individuals. These granulated cells preferentially leave the circulation and marginate to tissues, where they are implicated in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. In diseases such as allergic inflammation, eosinophil numbers escalate markedly in the blood and tissues where inflammatory foci are located. Eosinophils possess a range of immunomodulatory factors that are released upon cell activation, including over 35 cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines. Unlike T and B cells, eosinophils can rapidly release cytokines within minutes in response to stimulation. While some cytokines are stored as pre-formed mediators in crystalloid granules and secretory vesicles, eosinophils are also capable of undergoing de novo synthesis and secretion of these immunological factors. Some of the molecular mechanisms that coordinate the final steps of cytokine secretion are hypothesized to involve binding of membrane fusion complexes comprised of soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs). These intracellular receptors regulate the release of granules and vesicles containing a range of secreted proteins, among which are cytokines and chemokines. Emerging evidence from both human and animal model-based research has suggested an active participation of eosinophils in several physiological/pathological processes such as immunomodulation and tissue remodeling. The observed eosinophil effector functions in health and disease implicate eosinophil cytokine secretion as a fundamental immunoregulatory process. The focus of this review is to describe the cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines that are elaborated by eosinophils, and to illustrate some of the intracellular events leading to the release of eosinophil-derived cytokines. PMID:25426119

Davoine, Francis; Lacy, Paige

2014-01-01

141

[Eosinophilic cystitis: review and two case reports].  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis is a low frequency disease, with less than 200 reported cases in the world. It is characterized by a bladder wall inflammation, mainly by eosinophils, with fibrosis and muscle necrosis areas. Its origin seems to be immunological, although the triggers are not well known. Several predispose factor have been described such as allergic diseases, bladder injuries, drugs, infections, etc. It affects patient of all ages, mainly adults. It presents with frecuency, haematuria and suprapubic pain. Other less frequent symptoms are disuria, urinary retention, nicturia, and enuresis. The laboratory study (urinalysis, urinalysis and haemogram) and radiology (ultrasound, intravenous pyelography, computed tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance) are non specific. The lesions observed in the cystoscopy could emulate other diseases, that why the proper diagnostic is the histological analysis. The management could be observation o antihistaminic, anti-inflammatory and corticoid treatment. In refractory cases, surgery is an alternative. In this work, two male adult cases are reported with their symptoms, studies and management. PMID:19579899

Ebel Sepulveda, Luis F; Foneron, A; Troncoso, L; Cańoles, R; Carrasco, C; Hornig, A; Gil, G; Corti, D

2009-04-01

142

Therapeutic Targeting of Eosinophil Adhesion and Accumulation in Allergic Conjunctivitis  

PubMed Central

Considerable evidence indicates that eosinophils are important effectors of ocular allergy. Increased worldwide prevalence of allergic eye pathologies has stimulated the identification of novel drug targets, including eosinophils and adhesion molecules. Accumulation of eosinophils in the eye is a key event in the onset and maintenance of allergic inflammation and is mediated by different adhesion molecules. Antihistamines with multiple mechanisms of action can be effective during the early and late phases of allergic conjunctivitis by blocking the interaction between ?1 integrins and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. Small molecule antagonists that target key elements in the process of eosinophil recruitment have been identified and reinforce the validity of ?4?1 integrin as a therapeutic target. Glucocorticoids are among the most effective drugs for ocular allergy, but their use is limited by adverse effects. Novel dissociated glucocorticoids can prevent eosinophil accumulation and induce apoptosis of eosinophils, making them promising candidates for ophthalmic drugs. This article reviews recent understanding of the role of adhesion molecules in eosinophil recruitment in the inflamed conjunctiva along with effective treatments for allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:23271999

Baiula, Monica; Bedini, Andrea; Carbonari, Gioia; Dattoli, Samantha Deianira; Spampinato, Santi

2012-01-01

143

Therapeutic targeting of eosinophil adhesion and accumulation in allergic conjunctivitis.  

PubMed

Considerable evidence indicates that eosinophils are important effectors of ocular allergy. Increased worldwide prevalence of allergic eye pathologies has stimulated the identification of novel drug targets, including eosinophils and adhesion molecules. Accumulation of eosinophils in the eye is a key event in the onset and maintenance of allergic inflammation and is mediated by different adhesion molecules. Antihistamines with multiple mechanisms of action can be effective during the early and late phases of allergic conjunctivitis by blocking the interaction between ?(1) integrins and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. Small molecule antagonists that target key elements in the process of eosinophil recruitment have been identified and reinforce the validity of ?(4)?(1) integrin as a therapeutic target. Glucocorticoids are among the most effective drugs for ocular allergy, but their use is limited by adverse effects. Novel dissociated glucocorticoids can prevent eosinophil accumulation and induce apoptosis of eosinophils, making them promising candidates for ophthalmic drugs. This article reviews recent understanding of the role of adhesion molecules in eosinophil recruitment in the inflamed conjunctiva along with effective treatments for allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:23271999

Baiula, Monica; Bedini, Andrea; Carbonari, Gioia; Dattoli, Samantha Deianira; Spampinato, Santi

2012-01-01

144

Identification of a histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils--role in eosinophil chemotaxis.  

PubMed

Eosinophils are recruited to sites of inflammation via the action of a number of chemical mediators, including PAF, leukotrienes, eotaxins, ECF-A and histamine. Although many of the cell-surface receptors for these mediators have been identified, histamine-driven chemotaxis has not been conclusively attributed to any of the three known histamine receptor subtypes, suggesting the possibility of a 4th histamine-responsive receptor on eosinophils. We have identified and cloned a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), termed Pfi-013, from an IL-5 stimulated eosinophil cDNA library which is homologous to the human histamine H3 receptor, both at the sequence and gene structure level. Expression data indicates that Pfi-013 is predominantly expressed in peripheral blood leukocytes, with lower expression levels in spleen, testis and colon. Ligand-binding studies using Pfi-013 expressed in HEK-293Galpha15 cells, demonstrates specific binding to histamine with a Kd of 3.28 +/- 0.76 nM and possesses a unique rank order of potency against known histaminergic compounds in a competitive ligand-binding assay (histamine > clobenpropit > iodophenpropit > thioperamide > R-alpha-methylhistamine > cimetidine > pyrilamine). We have therefore termed this receptor human histamine H4. Chemotaxis studies on isolated human eosinophils have confirmed that histamine is chemotactic and that agonists of the known histamine receptors (H1, H2, and H3) do not induce such a response. Furthermore, studies employing histamine-receptor antagonists have shown an inhibition of chemotaxis only by the H3 antagonists clobenpropit and thioperamide. Since these compounds are also antagonists of hH4 we postulate that the receptor mediating histaminergic chemotaxis is this novel histamine H4 receptor. PMID:12503632

O'Reilly, Mark; Alpert, Robbin; Jenkinson, Stephen; Gladue, Ronald P; Foo, Shane; Trim, Steven; Peter, Beate; Trevethick, Mike; Fidock, Mark

2002-01-01

145

Eosinophil Deficiency Compromises Lung Defense against Aspergillus fumigatus  

PubMed Central

Exposure to the mold Aspergillus fumigatus may result in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis, or invasive aspergillosis (IA), depending on the host's immune status. Neutrophil deficiency is the predominant risk factor for the development of IA, the most life-threatening condition associated with A. fumigatus exposure. Here we demonstrate that in addition to neutrophils, eosinophils are an important contributor to the clearance of A. fumigatus from the lung. Acute A. fumigatus challenge in normal mice induced the recruitment of CD11b+ Siglec F+ Ly-6Glo Ly-6Cneg CCR3+ eosinophils to the lungs, which was accompanied by an increase in lung Epx (eosinophil peroxidase) mRNA levels. Mice deficient in the transcription factor dblGATA1, which exhibit a selective deficiency in eosinophils, demonstrated impaired A. fumigatus clearance and evidence of germinating organisms in the lung. Higher burden correlated with lower mRNA expression of Epx (eosinophil peroxidase) and Prg2 (major basic protein) as well as lower interleukin 1? (IL-1?), IL-6, IL-17A, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and CXCL1 levels. However, examination of lung inflammatory cell populations failed to demonstrate defects in monocyte/macrophage, dendritic cell, or neutrophil recruitment in dblGATA1-deficient mice, suggesting that the absence of eosinophils in dlbGATA1-deficient mice was the sole cause of impaired lung clearance. We show that eosinophils generated from bone marrow have potent killing activity against A. fumigtaus in vitro, which does not require cell contact and can be recapitulated by eosinophil whole-cell lysates. Collectively, our data support a role for eosinophils in the lung response after A. fumigatus exposure. PMID:24379296

Lilly, Lauren M.; Scopel, Michaella; Nelson, Michael P.; Burg, Ashley R.; Dunaway, Chad W.

2014-01-01

146

Spontaneous resolution of lumbar vertebral eosinophilic granuloma.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) is a rare disease but is more common in adults than children. It's often self-limiting. Spinal involvement is rare. It is the localized and most benign form of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (previously known as histiocytosis X), characterised by lytic lesions in one or more bones. Spontaneous resolution of vertebral body lesions is very rare. In this case, the patient had one EG in a cervical vertebra and a similar lesion in a lumbar vertebra. This case is important because it featured a symptomatic lesion in the cervical spine accompanied by an asymptomatic lesion in a lumbar vertebra. We treated the cervical lesion by surgical fusion and followed the lumbar lesion up conservatively, with the patient in a corset. After 8 years of follow-up, control MRI showed that the lumbar lesion had spontaneously resolved. PMID:14963750

Bavbek, M; Atalay, B; Altinörs, N; Caner, H

2004-02-01

147

Orbital Compartment Syndrome in Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis.  

PubMed

A 43-year-old man reported right visual loss after biopsy of an intranasal mass, which improved after treatment at another hospital. On first examination at our hospital, his visual acuity was 1.2 OD, and MRI showed a right intraorbital mass involving the ethmoid sinus. His visual acuity decreased to 0.08 OD 12 days after orbital biopsy, with right globe tenting shown by MRI. An emergent lateral canthotomy and cantholysis were performed. The histopathological diagnosis was eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis, and treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone (125 mg/day) and oral diaminophenyl sulfone (75 mg/day) was started immediately after surgery. One month later, the diaminophenyl sulfone was discontinued and cyclophosphamide (50 mg/day) was started. The methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide doses were tapered over 9 months and 7 months, respectively. At the 1.5-year follow-up examination, his visual acuity was 1.0 OD. The lesions did not grow in size. PMID:24828962

Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Emiko; Ichinose, Akihiro; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

2014-05-13

148

Eosinophilic fasciitis associated with L-tryptophan ingestion.  

PubMed Central

A 62 year old woman taking L-tryptophan developed eosinophilic fasciitis shortly after starting an exercise class. She received prednisone without benefit but improved after azathioprine treatment was started and L-tryptophan was discontinued. As products containing L-tryptophan have recently been implicated in development of the eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome it is suggested that the use of L-tryptophan might have contributed to the development of eosinophilic fasciitis in this patient. Similarities with toxic oil syndrome are noted. Additional studies are warranted to determine the prevalence of L-tryptophan ingestion among patients diagnosed as having eosinophilic fasciitis. Images PMID:1994870

Hamilton, M E

1991-01-01

149

Eosinophilic cholecystitis as a rare manifestation of visceral larva migrans  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic cholecystitis is an infrequent form of cholecystitis. The etiology of eosinophilic cholecystitis is still obscure, and it is sometimes accompanied with several complications, but a simultaneous onset with pericarditis is very rare. We would like to make an alternative interpretation of our recent report "Kaji K, Yoshiji H, Yoshikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ikenaka Y, Noguchi R, Sawai M, Ishikawa M, Mashitani T, Kitade M, Kawaratani H, Uemura M, Yamao J, Fujimoto M, Mitoro A, Toyohara M, Yoshida M, Fukui H. Eosinophilic cholecystitis along with pericarditis caused by Ascaris lumbricoides: A case report. World J Gastroenterol 2007; 13: 3760-3762." PMID:18023114

Yoshiji, Hitoshi; Yoshikawa, Masahide; Kaji, Kosuke; Fukui, Hiroshi

2007-01-01

150

Eosinophilic cystitis: treatment with intravesical steroids and oral antihistamines.  

PubMed

This is a case of eosinophilic cystitis in a 56-year-old indigenous Australian woman who presented with urosepsis on the background of a urinary tract infection unresponsive to oral antibiotics. After resolution of the urosepsis, she had persisting urinary retention and a cystoscopy/bladder biopsy suggested eosinophilic cystitis. After 1 month of intravesical hydrocortisone and oral loratadine, repeat cystoscopy showed vast improvement in the bladder lesions. This case further strengthens the use of intravesical steroids and oral antihistamines for the management of eosinophilic cystitis. PMID:24014555

Zaman, Shahriar Raj; Vermeulen, Tersia L; Parry, Jeremy

2013-01-01

151

The role of mast cells and eosinophils in chronic gastritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of mast cells and eosinophils in influencing\\u000a the pathology of chronic gastritis remains unclear. We\\u000a attempted to study the relationship between endoscopy and\\u000a the mast cell and eosinophil infiltrate. We also studied the\\u000a role of gene polymorphisms, Helicobacter pylori density and\\u000a the CagA antibody status in influencing the mast cell and\\u000a eosinophil infiltrate. One hundred and twenty consecutive

N. Moorchung; A. N. Srivastava; N. K. Gupta; A. K. Malaviya; B. R. Achyut; B. Mittal

2006-01-01

152

Advances in clinical management of eosinophilic esophagitis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune/antigen-mediated clinicopathologic condition that has become an increasingly important cause of upper gastrointestinal morbidity in adults and children over the past 2 decades. It is diagnosed based on symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, the presence of at least 15 eosinophils/high-power field in esophageal biopsy specimens, and exclusion of competing causes of esophageal eosinophilia, including proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia. We review what we have recently learned about the clinical aspects of EoE, discussing the clinical, endoscopic, and histological features of EoE in adults and children. We explain the current diagnostic criteria and challenges to diagnosis, including the role of gastroesophageal reflux disease and proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia. It is also important to consider the epidemiology of EoE (with a current incidence of 1 new case per 10,000 per year and prevalence of 0.5 to 1 case per 1000 per year) and disease progression. We review the main treatment approaches and new treatment options; EoE can be treated with topical corticosteroids, such as fluticasone and budesonide, or dietary strategies, such as amino acid-based formulas, allergy test-directed elimination diets, and nondirected empiric elimination diets. Endoscopic dilation has also become an important tool for treatment of fibrostenotic complications of EoE. There are a number of unresolved issues in EoE, including phenotypes, optimal treatment end points, the role of maintenance therapy, and treatment of refractory EoE. The care of patients with EoE and the study of the disease span many disciplines; EoE is ideally managed by a multidisciplinary team of gastroenterologists, allergists, pathologists, and dieticians. PMID:25109885

Dellon, Evan S; Liacouras, Chris A

2014-12-01

153

Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

154

Leukemia Trial Results  

MedlinePLUS

... Program Coordinating Center for Clinical Trials Leukemia Trial Results Ibrutinib Improves Survival Compared with Ofatumumab in Patients with Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (Posted: 06/27/2014) - In an international randomized phase III clinical trial, ...

155

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

156

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

157

Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

158

Eosinophilic cystitis after bladder instillation with dimethyl sulfoxide.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare and poorly understood disorder. We report the first case of an acute flare of eosinophilic cystitis in a 51-year-old woman after bladder instillation with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for presumed interstitial cystitis. The patient presented with severe bladder pain, fever, and eosinophilia several hours after instillation. These symptoms were unresponsive to conventional analgesic and antibiotic treatments. Cystoscopy revealed erythema and exudate at the bladder walls, along with edema of both ureteral orifices. Bladder biopsies demonstrated massive eosinophilic infiltration of the bladder, confirming the diagnosis of eosinophilic cystitis. Urologists should bear in mind this clinical entity, particularly when DMSO is administered to patients with multiple drug allergies. PMID:15183980

Abramov, Yoram; Goldberg, Roger P; McGuire, Michael; Golden, Barbara; Gandhi, Sanjay; Sand, Peter K

2004-06-01

159

Recurrent Postpartum Eosinophilic Pneumonia Presenting as Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic pneumonia (EP) is a rare disease of the lung. We aimed to present atypical course of two EP cases. They were admitted to our hospital because of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in postpartum period. Eosinophilia was detected in bronchoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage and laboratory examination. In these cases, no spesific cause for eosinophilic pneumonia was determined and steroid treatment was started. After the treatment, the patients were in full recovery which were confirmed by clinical and radiological investigations, readmitted to our clinic with relapses of ARDS. The patients have received regular treatment for 1 year. Our cases were neither fitting the classic definitions of acute eosinophilic pneumonia nor chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. Therefore, we wanted to contribute additional data in the literature by sharing these interesting cases.

Ucar, Elif Yilmazel; Araz, Omer; Yilmaz, Nafiye; Akgun, Metin

2011-01-01

160

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis with involvement of the urinary bladder.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis with eosinophilic infiltration of the urinary bladder wall is rare in children. We describe the CT findings of eosinophilic gastroenteritis accompanied by bladder involvement in an 11-year-old boy. CT imaging showed diffuse wall thickening of the entire gastrointestinal tract from the esophagus to the colon and revealed a halo sign, irregular fold thickening and luminal narrowing without obstruction of the gastrointestinal wall. Another CT finding was the diffuse thickening of the bladder wall with moderate enhancement on postcontrast CT. The boy underwent endoscopic biopsy from various sites of the gut wall and histology revealed increased eosinophiliac infiltration in the mucosa. After corticosteroid therapy, the boy recovered gradually. The case emphasizes that not only the gastrointestinal tract but also the urinary bladder may be involved in children with eosinophilic gastroenteritis and that recognition of CT features of this disease aids in early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:24839141

Zhou, Hai Chun; Lai, Can; Yang, Li

2014-11-01

161

Guide to Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... LP and TAP Pharmaceutical Products Inc. What is TIGER? The International Gastrointestinal Eosinophilic Researchers (TIGER) are a ... NUTRITION FOUNDATION For More Information Go To: www.TIGER-EGID.CDHNF.org Furrows Rings White plaques Images ...

162

Diagnosis and management of eosinophilic asthma: a US perspective  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic asthma is now recognized as an important subphenotype of asthma based on the pattern of inflammatory cellular infiltrate in the airway. Eosinophilic asthma can be associated with increased asthma severity, atopy, late-onset disease, and steroid refractoriness. Induced sputum cell count is the gold standard for identifying eosinophilic inflammation in asthma although several noninvasive biomarkers, including fractional exhaled nitric oxide and periostin, are emerging as potential surrogates. As novel therapies and biologic agents become increasingly available, there is an increased need for specific phenotype-directed treatment strategies. Greater recognition and understanding of the unique immunopathology of this asthma phenotype has important implications for management of the disease and the potential to improve patient outcomes. The present review provides a summary of the clinical features, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of eosinophilic asthma. PMID:24748808

Walford, Hannah H; Doherty, Taylor A

2014-01-01

163

UNUSUAL EOSINOPHILIC GRANULE CELL PROLIFERATION IN COHO SALMON (ONCHORHYNCHUS KISUTCH)  

EPA Science Inventory

Proliferative lesions comprised of eosinophilic granule cells (EGCs) extended throughout the gastrointestinal tract of several mature, spawning coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum). istological examination of the tumour showed extensive proliferation and infiltration of EGC...

164

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

What is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)? This type of cancer begins in the blood and bone marrow or mediastinum. The abnormal cells interfere ... www.mayoclinic.com (Mayo Clinic). Type the keywords acute lymphoblastic leukemia or leukemia into the search box. Healing begins ...

165

Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

What is acute myeloid leukemia (AML)? The second most common type of acute leukemia in adults, AML is a cancer of the blood and bone ... American Cancer Society). Type the keywords acute myeloid leukemia into the search box. What kinds of questions ...

166

[Solitary eosinophilic granuloma of the orbit: a case report].  

PubMed

The authors report a case of eosinophilic granuloma involving the roof and the lateral wall of the left orbit in a 5-year-old boy. The clinical presentation and especially the imaging features (computed tomography and MRI) suggested a malignant tumor and the final diagnosis was obtained by fine needle aspiration biopsy with histopathologic examination. Despite its alarming radiologic appearance, there was spontaneous healing of the eosinophilic granuloma with restitution ad-integrum of the bone. PMID:16395215

Harzallah, L; Braham, N; Ben Chérifa, L; Bakir, D; Hamdi, I; Bellara, I; Amara, H; Tahar Yakoubi, M; Kraiem, C

2005-11-01

167

Cystitis glanduralis complicating an eosinophilic cystitis: a case report.  

PubMed

We report on a rare case of cystitis glandularis complicating an eosinophilic cystitis in an adult. Complaints at presentation included dysuria, haematuria and abdominal pain. Ultrasound and cystoscopy suggested a bladder tumor. Histological analysis of bladder biopsy showed the typical findings of cystitis glandularis associated with eosinophilic cystitis. The patient was treated with transurethral resection of the lesion and a combination of corticosteroids and anthistaminics for three months. He is disease-free at 24 months of follow-up. PMID:14758734

Baldi, Alfonso; Di Marino, Maria Pia; Persichetti, Paolo; Ferrara, Nicola; Baldi, Feliciano

2003-01-01

168

Co-existent eosinophilic gastroenteritis and hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction.  

PubMed Central

A case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 42-year-old man is described. The patient had diarrhoea, faecal blood loss, a protein-losing enteropathy, malabsorption of fat, xylose and vitamin B12. Co-existent hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus and hypothalamic dysfunction was demonstrated. Complete clinical recovery occurred with pituitary replacement therapy alone. The association of this endocrine abnormality with the picture of eosinophilic gastroenteritis has not previously been described. Images Fig. 1 PMID:882484

Haeney, M. R.; Wilson, R. J.

1977-01-01

169

Concomitant herpetic and eosinophilic esophagitis--a causality dilemma.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic and herpetic esophagitis are listed as independent causes of dysphagia, especially in young adult males. However, herpetic esophagitis rarely affects immunocompetent individuals. We report the case of a young, not immunocompromised patient, admitted because of severe dysphagia secondary to herpes simplex virus esophagitis. After complete resolution, an endoscopic and histologic reevaluation established the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis. The potential association between the two conditions is discussed. PMID:23082710

Monsanto, P; Almeida, N; Cipriano, M A; Gouveia, H; Sofia, C

2012-09-01

170

A method to study apoptosis in eosinophils by flow cytometry.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to develop a simple flow cytometric procedure to study eosinophil apoptosis. Eosinophils were isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy, non-allergic individuals and then cultured in basal culture medium. The cells were examined after 24, 48 and 72 h for forward- and side scatter (FS-SSC) pattern, staining with FDA, PI, and anti-CD95, and light microscopic appearance. After culture for >24 h, two populations with different FS-SSC-patterns appeared, referred to as A and B. Population A consisted of living, FDA-positive eosinophils. The eosinophils in population B showed a lower FS scatter than those in population A and a staining pattern with PI indicating the presence of hypodiploid DNA. Anti-CD95 demonstrated a significant staining of the eosinophils in population B, which increased after 2 days in culture. The cells were sorted using a FACS-Scan cell sorter and by Annexin V-coated magnetic beads to permit separate analyses of PI-staining pattern, DNA electrophoresis, and light microscopic examination of the cells in population B. The present study suggest that it is possible to discriminate between apoptotic and living eosinophils using the FS-SSC pattern and the PI-staining pattern obtained by flow cytometry. PMID:10854601

Sandström, K; Hĺkansson, L; Lukinius, A; Venge, P

2000-06-23

171

Human vs. Mouse Eosinophils: “That which we call an eosinophil, by any other name would stain as red”  

PubMed Central

The respective life histories of humans and mice are well defined and describe a unique story of evolutionary conservation extending from sequence identity within the genome to the underpinnings of biochemical, cellular, and physiological pathways. As a consequence, the hematopoietic lineages of both species are invariantly maintained, each with identifiable eosinophils. This canonical presence nonetheless does not preclude disparities between human and mouse eosinophils and/or their effector functions. Indeed, many books and reviews dogmatically highlight differences, providing a rationale to discount the use of mouse models of human eosinophilic diseases. We suggest that this perspective is parochial and ignores the wealth of available studies and the consensus of the literature that overwhelming similarities (and not differences) exist between human and mouse eosinophils. The goal of this review is to summarize this literature and in some cases provide the experimental details, comparing and contrasting eosinophils and eosinophil effector functions in humans vs. mice. In particular, our review will provide a summation and an easy to use reference guide to important studies demonstrating that while differences exist, more often than not their consequences are unknown and do not necessarily reflect inherent disparities in eosinophil function, but instead, species-specific variations. The conclusion from this overview is that despite nominal differences, the vast similarities between human and mouse eosinophils provide important insights as to their roles in health and disease and, in turn, demonstrate the unique utility of mouse-based studies with an expectation of valid extrapolation to the understanding and treatment of patients. PMID:22935586

Lee, James J.; Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; Ochkur, Sergei I; McGarry, Michael P.; Condjella, Rachel M.; Doyle, Alfred D.; Luo, Huijun; Zellner, Katie R.; Protheroe, Cheryl A.; Willetts, Lian; LeSuer, William E.; Colbert, Dana C.; Helmers, Richard A.; Lacy, Paige; Moqbel, Redwan; Lee, Nancy A.

2012-01-01

172

Clavicular eosinophilic granuloma causing adult shoulder pain  

PubMed Central

Though rarely reported, neoplasms of the clavicle occur, and their symptoms can be mistaken for more common shoulder conditions. We present the case of a benign clavicular neoplasm, rarely seen in adults, presenting with pain, and eventual pathologic fracture in a 49 year-old. A 49 year-old male firefighter underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for shoulder pain after magnetic resonance imaging revealed supraspinatus tendon tear. The patient's pain persisted after surgery, and was described as routine until he developed severe pain after minor blunt trauma. A local Emergency Room performed the first x-rays, which revealed a pathologic fracture of the distal clavicle through a destructive lesion. The patient was referred to an orthopedic oncologist, who performed incisional biopsy, which initially diagnosed osteomyelitis. The patient was subsequently taken to surgery for debridement. Pathology then yielded the diagnosis of eosinophilic granuloma. The patient was taken back to surgery for formal curettage with open reduction and internal fixation. The patient's pain resolved, the pathologic fracture fully healed, and the patient returned to full time work as a firefighter. Though workup for common shoulder conditions often identifies incidental benign lesions of bone, the converse can be true. Persistent pain despite intervention should raise concern for further investigation. An x-ray alone can reveal a destructive bone lesion as the source of shoulder pain. PMID:23772307

Sugi, Michelle T.; Fedenko, Alexander N.; Menendez, Lawrence R.; Allison, Daniel C.

2013-01-01

173

Supportive Care for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... lymphocytic leukemia Radiation therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Leukapheresis for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Supportive care for chronic ... treatment information about chronic lymphocytic leukemia Previous Topic Leukapheresis for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Next Topic Stem cell ...

174

Chymase participates in chronic dermatitis by inducing eosinophil infiltration.  

PubMed

An epicutaneous application of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) to a mouse ear caused a transient skin swelling, and the repetition of the challenge enlarged the contact dermatitis. The repeated challenge with DNFB also induced eosinophil infiltration on the application site. Administration of a chymase inhibitor significantly inhibited the ear swelling as well as eosinophil accumulation. An intradermal injection of human chymase to the mouse ear also elicited transient skin swelling and eosinophil infiltration, both of which were augmented in proportion to the number of injections. Human serum albumin and heat-inactivated chymase failed to induce such skin reactions, suggesting the participation of proteolytic activity of the enzyme. In addition, chymase stimulated eosinophil migration in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, these observations suggest that mast cell chymase may contribute to development of the DNFB-induced dermatitis, probably by promoting eosinophil infiltration. It is therefore possible that chymase plays a role in pathogenesis of chronic dermatitis such as atopic dermatitis. PMID:12065690

Tomimori, Yoshiaki; Muto, Tsuyoshi; Fukami, Harukazu; Saito, Kayo; Horikawa, Chika; Tsuruoka, Nobuo; Saito, Masayuki; Sugiura, Namino; Yamashiro, Kyoko; Sumida, Motoo; Kakutani, Saki; Fukuda, Yoshiaki

2002-06-01

175

Unusual presentations of eosinophilic gastroenteritis: two case reports.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare disease that is characterized by eosinophil infiltration in one or multiple segments of the gastrointestinal tract. The etiology of this condition remains unknown. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis has heterogeneous clinical manifestations that depend upon the location and depth of infiltration in the gastrointestinal tract, and eosinophilia may or may not be present. This article reports two cases of eosinophilic gastroenteritis. The first is that of a 49-year-old woman with abdominal pain, ascites, eosinophilia, and a history of asthma. The second case is that of a 69-year-old male with a history of loss of appetite, belching, postprandial fullness, heartburn, and a 5-kilogram weight loss over a period of 9 months; ultimately, the patient was diagnosed with a gastric outlet obstruction due to pyloric stenosis. The rare character of eosinophilic gastroenteritis and its varied clinical presentations often lead to delayed diagnoses and complications. Case reports may help to disseminate knowledge about the disease, thereby increasing the likelihood of early diagnosis and intervention to prevent complications. PMID:25141324

Leal, Regina; Fayad, Leonardo; Vieira, Daniella; Figueiredo, Teresa; Lopes, Aldemae; Carvalho, Roberta; Dantas-Corręa, Esther; Schiavon, Leonardo; Narciso-Schiavon, Janaína

2014-06-01

176

Disruption of Fas Receptor Signaling by Nitric Oxide in Eosinophils  

PubMed Central

It has been suggested that Fas ligand–Fas receptor interactions are involved in the regulation of eosinophil apoptosis and that dysfunctions in this system could contribute to the accumulation of these cells in allergic and asthmatic diseases. Here, we demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO) specifically prevents Fas receptor–mediated apoptosis in freshly isolated human eosinophils. In contrast, rapid acceleration of eosinophil apoptosis by activation of the Fas receptor occurs in the presence of eosinophil hematopoietins. Analysis of the intracellular mechanisms revealed that NO disrupts Fas receptor–mediated signaling events at the level of, or proximal to, Jun kinase (JNK), but distal to sphingomyelinase (SMase) activation and ceramide generation. In addition, activation of SMase occurs downstream of an interleukin 1 converting enzyme–like (ICE-like) protease(s) that is not blocked by NO. However, NO prevents activation of a protease that targets lamin B1. These findings suggest a role for an additional NO-sensitive apoptotic signaling pathway that amplifies the proteolytic cascade initialized by activation of the Fas receptor. Therefore, NO concentrations within allergic inflammatory sites may be important in determining whether an eosinophil survives or undergoes apoptosis upon Fas ligand stimulation. PMID:9449721

Hebestreit, Holger; Dibbert, Birgit; Balatti, Ivo; Braun, Doris; Schapowal, Andreas; Blaser, Kurt; Simon, Hans-Uwe

1998-01-01

177

Eotaxin and the attraction of eosinophils to the asthmatic lung  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic leukocytes accumulate in high numbers in the lungs of asthmatic patients, and are believed to be important in the pathogenisis of asthma. A potent eosinophil chemoattractant is produced in the asthmatic lung. This small protein, the chemokine eotaxin, is synthesized by a number of different cell types, and is stimulated by interleukin-4 and interleukin-13, which are produced by T-helper (Th)2 lymphocytes. Low molecular weight compounds have been developed that can block the eotaxin receptor C-C chemokine receptor (CCR)3, and prevent stimulation by eotaxin. This provides the potential for orally available drugs that can prevent eosinophil recruitment into the lung and the associated damage and dysfunction. PMID:11686879

Conroy, Dolores M; Williams, Timothy J

2001-01-01

178

MR imaging findings of eosinophilic cystitis in an 8-year-old girl.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare inflammatory condition of the urinary bladder of unknown aetiology and characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the bladder wall. We report the unique MR findings of eosinophilic cystitis in an 8-year-old girl who presented with peripheral eosinophilia. MR imaging revealed smooth and nearly circumferential thickening of the bladder wall showing distinct low signal intensity on T2-weighted images, which may histologically represent high cellularity due to massive eosinophilic infiltration. PMID:17541780

Tamai, Ken; Koyama, Takashi; Saida, Satoshi; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Togashi, Kaori

2007-08-01

179

Beta 2-adrenergic receptors on eosinophils. Binding and functional studies  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the binding characteristics and functional effects of beta-adrenoceptors on human and guinea pig eosinophils. We determined the binding of the beta-antagonist radioligand (125I)pindolol (IPIN) to intact eosinophils obtained from the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs and from blood of patients with eosinophilia. Specific binding was saturable, and Scatchard analysis showed a single binding site with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 24.6 pM and maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 7,166 per cell. ICI 118,551, a beta 2-selective antagonist, inhibited IPIN binding with a Ki value of 0.28 nM and was approximately 5,000-fold more effective than the beta 1-selective antagonist, atenolol. Isoproterenol increased cAMP levels about 5.5-fold above basal levels (EC50 = 25 microM); albuterol, a beta 2-agonist, behaved as a partial agonist with a maximal stimulation of 80%. Binding to human eosinophils gave similar results with a Kd of 25.3 pM and a Bmax corresponding to 4,333 sites per cell. Incubation of both human and guinea pig eosinophils with opsonized zymosan (2 mg/ml) or with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (10(-8) and 10(-6) M) resulted in superoxide anion generation and the release of eosinophil peroxidase; albuterol (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) had no inhibitory effect on the release of these products. Thus, eosinophils from patients with eosinophilia and from the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs possess beta-receptors of the beta 2-subtype that are coupled to adenylate cyclase; however, these receptors do not modulate oxidative metabolism or degranulation. The possible therapeutic consequences of these observations to asthma are discussed.

Yukawa, T.; Ukena, D.; Kroegel, C.; Chanez, P.; Dent, G.; Chung, K.F.; Barnes, P.J. (National Heart and Lung Institute, Brompton Hospital, London (England))

1990-06-01

180

Clinicopathological and ultrasonographic features of cats with eosinophilic enteritis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic enteritis (EE) in cats is poorly characterized. The aim of the current study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and ultrasonographic findings in cats with histologic evidence of eosinophilic inflammation on gastrointestinal biopsy. Twenty-five cats with tissue eosinophilia on surgical (10) or endoscopic (15) biopsy of the gastrointestinal tract, having an abdominal ultrasound performed within 48 h of biopsy acquisition, were enrolled. History, clinical presentation, clinical pathology and abdominal ultrasound findings were reviewed. Intestinal biopsies were evaluated by a single pathologist and separated into two groups based on the degree of eosinophilic infiltrate: mild (<10 eosinophils/high-power field [HPF], 11/25 cats), or moderate/marked (>10 eosinophils/HPF, 14/25 cats). The former were considered primary lymphoplasmacytic or lymphocytic inflammatory bowel disease (LPE) with subtle eosinophilic infiltrates, and the latter to have EE. Signalment, history and clinical signs were similar in all cats. Only cats with EE (6/14) had palpably thickened intestines. The only distinguishing clinicopathological feature of cats with EE was the presence of peripheral eosinophilia (6/14). On ultrasound, when compared with cats with LPE, cats with EE had a greater mean jejunal wall thickness (3.34 mm ± 0.72 mm vs 4.07 mm ± 0.58 mm, respectively) and an increased incidence of thickening of the muscularis layer (1/11 and 11/14, respectively). In conclusion, ultrasonographic evidence of a prominent intestinal muscularis layer, palpably thickened intestines and peripheral eosinophilia can serve as biomarkers for the presence of EE in cats with chronic intestinal signs. PMID:24591305

Tucker, Samuel; Penninck, Dominique G; Keating, John H; Webster, Cynthia R L

2014-12-01

181

Recurrent eosinophilic cystitis in a child with chronic granulomatous disease.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis is an uncommon disease in children, and its association with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) has been previously reported in only five patients. In all those patients the disease showed either a self-limited benign course or a rapid response to corticosteroid treatment. The authors describe a child with X-linked CGD who developed eosinophilic cystitis with a recurrent course and difficult therapeutic management. The authors also discuss the pathogenesis of granuloma formation in CGD and review the literature for current therapies for these complications. PMID:15125617

Barese, Cecilia N; Podestá, Miguel; Litvak, Edith; Villa, Mariana; Rivas, Eva María

2004-03-01

182

Eosinophilic Cystitis: A Rare Cause of Hematuria in Children  

PubMed Central

A 7-year-old boy presented with a history of acute onset of hematuria, dysuria, and suprapubic pain. Urine routine and microscopy showed 40–45 red cells/high power field. Urine culture was sterile. Radiological investigations showed a focal mucosal lesion with bladder wall thickening. Biopsy of the lesion revealed an edematous mucosa with florid infiltration by eosinophils into the muscularis propria with focal areas of myonecrosis. He was diagnosed as a case of eosinophilic cystitis. The patient received 6 weeks of tapered prednisone therapy. He was asymptomatic on followup. PMID:24558612

Venkatesh, K. S.; Bhat, Shaila

2012-01-01

183

Polypoid eosinophilic cystitis with pseudosarcomatous proliferative tissue in a dog.  

PubMed

A dog presented with hematuria, and two small polypoid masses were detected in the urinary bladder. Histopathologically, the masses were located in the mucosal or submucosal layer. That tissue consisted of a random proliferation of spindle-shaped, round and pleomorphic cells with single or multiple large atypical nuclei and abundant cytoplasm, and eosinophil infiltration. These large cells were confirmed by immunohistochemical staining as fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and macrophages. Mitotic figure was rarely seen. These masses were diagnosed as eosinophilic polypoid cystitis with pseudosarcomatous proliferative tissue, since they consisted of a wide variety of cells and showed low growth activity. PMID:18388430

Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Nakahara, Yutaka; Narama, Isao

2008-03-01

184

Eosinophilic cystitis: a rare cause of hematuria in children.  

PubMed

A 7-year-old boy presented with a history of acute onset of hematuria, dysuria, and suprapubic pain. Urine routine and microscopy showed 40-45 red cells/high power field. Urine culture was sterile. Radiological investigations showed a focal mucosal lesion with bladder wall thickening. Biopsy of the lesion revealed an edematous mucosa with florid infiltration by eosinophils into the muscularis propria with focal areas of myonecrosis. He was diagnosed as a case of eosinophilic cystitis. The patient received 6 weeks of tapered prednisone therapy. He was asymptomatic on followup. PMID:24558612

Venkatesh, K S; Bhat, Shaila

2012-01-01

185

Presenting manifestations of eosinophilic cystitis in two Filipino children.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis is a very rare clinical disease entity in the pediatric population. We report two cases of Filipino children with eosinophilic cystitis who presented with irritative voiding symptoms, gross hematuria, peripheral eosinophilia, and hydroureteronephrosis and urinary bladder wall thickening visualized on ultrasonography and CT urography. Cystoscopy and transurethral biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Both patients were started with corticosteroid with or without an antihistamine. Resolution from the signs and symptoms were observed in both patients as documented by disappearance of peripheral eosinophilia, normal urinalysis results, and resolution of the hydroureteronephrosis and urinary bladder wall thickening on ultrasonography on follow-up. PMID:19866369

Galutira, Paul Joseph T; Canonigo, Beatrice B; Cabansag, Ma Rosario F; Bolong, David T; Ong, Remedios C; Lopez, Rolando A

2010-09-01

186

Eosinophilic cystitis: successful long-term treatment with montelukast sodium.  

PubMed

We report a rare case of eosinophilic cystitis in a 6-year-old boy who presented with irritative voiding symptoms, peripheral eosinophilia, and a bladder mass initially visualized on ultrasonography. Cystoscopy and transurethral biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Complete resolution of his symptoms occurred within 1 week of corticosteroid use and the x-ray findings improved within 6 weeks. At 6 months of follow-up, the patient continued to require a leukotriene receptor antagonist (montelukast sodium) despite several attempts to discontinue its use. We propose that eosinophilic cystitis in children who present with peripheral eosinophilia will often require long-term treatment. PMID:16461108

Sterrett, S; Morton, J; Perry, D; Donovan, J

2006-02-01

187

Release of platelet-activating factor from stimulated asthmatic eosinophils  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined platelet-activating factor (PAF)-like activity in eosinophils obtained from asthmatic and nonasthmatic patients. PAF-like activity was detected by aggregation of washed guinea pig platelets. Eosinophils from asthmatic patients stimulated with C5a (a human complement factor), N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP), or calcium ionophore A23187 had a mean activity of 8.86 ± 1.99 ng\\/106 cells in the supernatants and 20.34 ± 7.11 ng\\/106

Kunihiko Shindo; Yoshihiro Hirai; Kohei Koide

1996-01-01

188

A case of eosinophilic cystitis in a 5-year-old boy.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is rather an uncommon disease in childhood. A case of EC in a 5-year-old boy, in which open biopsy was needed for final diagnosis, is reported. After diagnosis, he was treated with pemirolast potassium followed-up with eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in serum and urine. Eosinophil cationic protein is an appropriate marker of EC. PMID:10710248

Sano, K; Terashima, K; Gotoh, K; Ijiri, R; Tanaka, Y

2000-02-01

189

Development and characterisation of a novel and rapid lung eosinophil influx model in the rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eosinophils play a major role in the development and severity of asthma. Robust and rapid preclinical animal models are desirable to profile novel therapeutics inhibiting the influx of eosinophils into the airways. To develop a rapid, airway eosinophil recruitment model in the rat, Brown-Norway (BN) rats were immunised with ovalbumin (OVA)\\/alum on day 0, 1 and 2 and challenged with

Melanie Werner-Klein; Rolf Göggel; Andreas Westhof; Klaus J. Erb

2008-01-01

190

Effect of Neutrophil-derived Eosinophil Chemotactic Factor (ECF) in Human and Guinea Pig Skin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The in vivo effectiveness of eosinophil chemotactic factor (ECF), secreted in vitro by human neutrophils (PMN) during phagocytosis, is tested in 2 model systems. Injection of ECF into guinea pig ears causes a preferential attraction of eosinophils with time that is more marked in animals with preexisting eosinophilia. In the same model system, activated serum attracts fewer eosinophils and more

Bean M. Czarnetzki; Peter J. Frosch; Fereydoun Vakilzadeh; Wolfgang B. Panneck

1980-01-01

191

Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-12-09

192

The Family Leukemia Association  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

Pollitt, Eleanor

1976-01-01

193

Eosinophils Are Important for Protection, Immunoregulation and Pathology during Infection with Nematode Microfilariae  

PubMed Central

Eosinophil responses typify both allergic and parasitic helminth disease. In helminthic disease, the role of eosinophils can be both protective in immune responses and destructive in pathological responses. To investigate whether eosinophils are involved in both protection and pathology during filarial nematode infection, we explored the role of eosinophils and their granule proteins, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and major basic protein-1 (MBP-1), during infection with Brugia malayi microfilariae. Using eosinophil-deficient mice (PHIL), we further clarify the role of eosinophils in clearance of microfilariae during primary, but not challenge infection in vivo. Deletion of EPO or MBP-1 alone was insufficient to abrogate parasite clearance suggesting that either these molecules are redundant or eosinophils act indirectly in parasite clearance via augmentation of other protective responses. Absence of eosinophils increased mast cell recruitment, but not other cell types, into the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid during challenge infection. In addition absence of eosinophils or EPO alone, augmented parasite-induced IgE responses, as measured by ELISA, demonstrating that eosinophils are involved in regulation of IgE. Whole body plethysmography indicated that nematode-induced changes in airway physiology were reduced in challenge infection in the absence of eosinophils and also during primary infection in the absence of EPO alone. However lack of eosinophils or MBP-1 actually increased goblet cell mucus production. We did not find any major differences in cytokine responses in the absence of eosinophils, EPO or MBP-1. These results reveal that eosinophils actively participate in regulation of IgE and goblet cell mucus production via granule secretion during nematode-induced pathology and highlight their importance both as effector cells, as damage-inducing cells and as supervisory cells that shape both innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:24626328

Cadman, Emma T.; Thysse, Katherine A.; Bearder, Siobhan; Cheung, Anita Y. N.; Johnston, Ashleigh C.; Lee, James J.; Lawrence, Rachel A.

2014-01-01

194

Immunotherapy for Pediatric Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of leukemia in childhood. Despite this, leukemia remains a leading cause of pediatric cancer-related mortality and the prognosis is guarded for individuals with relapsed or refractory disease. Standard therapies are associated with a wide array of acute and long-term toxicities and further treatment intensification may not be tolerable or beneficial. The curative potential of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is due in part to the graft-versus-leukemia effect, which provides evidence for the therapeutic capacity of immune-based therapies. In recent years there have been significant advances in the development and application of immunotherapy in the treatment of leukemias, including the demonstration of activity in chemotherapy-resistant cases. This review summarizes immunotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of pediatric leukemia including current results and future directions. PMID:23847759

Shah, Nirali N.; Dave, Hema; Wayne, Alan S.

2013-01-01

195

Eosinophilic meningitis: cause of a chronic pain syndrome.  

PubMed Central

Three tourists developed eosinophilic meningitis after visiting the Fijian Islands. Two had a severe and long lasting illness with chronic intractable pain. In one patient electrophysiological studies and MRI scan of the brain were abnormal and provided evidence of both radicular and cerebral parenchymal involvement by the most likely causative agent, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Images PMID:2246659

Clouston, P D; Corbett, A J; Pryor, D S; Garrick, R

1990-01-01

196

Eosinophilic cystitis in a female German wire-haired pointer.  

PubMed

A 7-month-old, intact female, German wire-haired pointer presented with a 3-week history of stranguria, pollakiuria, and dysuria that was nonresponsive to antibiotics. Two prior episodes of dysuria-stranguria appeared to respond to antibiotic therapy. Bladder wall biopsies revealed eosinophilic cystitis and the dog responded well to medical management. PMID:17542370

Evason, Michelle D; Carr, Anthony P

2007-05-01

197

Hypofibrinogenemia due to fibrin formation in subserosal type eosinophilic gastroenteropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 33-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and distention, diarrhoea and marked eosinophilia in blood and ascites. As other causes could be excluded, the subserosal type of eosinophilic gastroenteropathy was diagnosed. The low plasma fibrinogen level (< 100 mg\\/100 ml) found in this patient is an as yet undescribed feature. During prednisolone therapy it increased concurrently with the fall of

E. Presterl; L. Wagner; W. Base

1992-01-01

198

Chronic asthma is characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, fibrosis,  

E-print Network

Chronic asthma is characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, fibrosis, airway remodelling for the treatment of chronic asthma. Olive Leavy ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Shen, Z.-J. et al. Pin1 regulates TGF-1. Invest. 118, 479­490 (2008) Allergy And AsthmA Regulation of TGF1 PINned down ReseaRch highlights NATURE

Cai, Long

199

Eosinophil-associated lung diseases. A cry for surfactant proteins A and D help?  

PubMed

Surfactant proteins (SP)-A and SP-D (SP-A/-D) play important roles in numerous eosinophil-dominated diseases, including asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and allergic rhinitis. In these settings, SP-A/-D have been shown to modulate eosinophil chemotaxis, inhibit eosinophil mediator release, and mediate macrophage clearance of apoptotic eosinophils. Dysregulation of SP-A/-D function in eosinophil-dominated diseases is also not uncommon. Alterations in serum SP-A/-D levels are associated with disease severity in allergic rhinitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, oligimerization of SP-A/-D, necessary for their proper function, can be perturbed by reactive nitrogen species, which are increased in eosinophilic disease. In this review, we highlight the associations of eosinophilic lung diseases with SP-A and SP-D levels and functions. PMID:24960334

Ledford, Julie G; Addison, Kenneth J; Foster, Matthew W; Que, Loretta G

2014-11-01

200

Upper-airway cough syndrome with latent eosinophilic bronchitis.  

PubMed

Upper-airway cough syndrome often coexists with other diseases that elicit chronic cough. However, the concomitant conditions are not always relevant to chronic cough, which complicates the cause diagnosis of chronic cough. The objective of this study was to explore the diagnosis and clinical implication of upper-airway cough syndrome with latent eosinophilic bronchitis. Eleven patients with upper-airway cough syndrome and latent eosinophilic bronchitis were retrospectively analyzed for their clinical manifestations, changes of eosinophilia in induced sputum, and cough threshold with capsaicin defined as capsaicin concentration that elicits two or more coughs (C2) and five or more coughs (C5) between pretreatment and post-treatment. All patients reported a history of allergic rhinitis, showed persistent dry cough or small amounts of viscid sputum with a time course of 2-60 months (median = 7 months), and presented with symptoms and signs of rhinitis, normal lung function, and airway responsiveness. Initial eosinophil percentage in induced sputum was 3.5-8.0%. Cough disappeared after 2-5 (3 +/- 1) weeks of only oral antihistamine. With successful treatment, cough threshold C2 increased from 1.73 +/- 1.45 to 4.43 +/- 4.50 micromol/L (t = 2.64, P = 0.025) and C5 increased from 2.79 +/- 2.16 to 10.10 +/- 8.22 micromol/L (t = 3.10, P = 0.011). However, there was no significant change of eosinophil percentage in induced sputum (4.8 +/- 1.5% vs. 4.4 +/- 1.4%, t = 0.84, P = 0.427). Upper-airway cough syndrome with latent eosinophilic bronchitis is a unique condition. The recognition of the entity may avoid unnecessary use of corticosteroids. PMID:19862573

Yu, Li; Wei, Weili; Wang, Lan; Huang, Yang; Shi, Cuiqin; Lü, Hanjing; Qiu, Zhongmin

2010-01-01

201

CMRF35-like molecule 1 (CLM-1) regulates eosinophil homeostasis by suppressing cellular chemotaxis.  

PubMed

Eosinophil accumulation in health and disease is a hallmark characteristic of mucosal immunity and type 2 helper T cell (Th2) inflammation. Eotaxin-induced CCR3 (chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 3) signaling has a critical role in eosinophil chemotactic responses. Nevertheless, the expressions of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-bearing receptors such as CMRF35-like molecule-1 (CLM-1) and their ability to govern eosinophil migration are largely unknown. We now report that CLM-1 (but not CLM-8) is highly and distinctly expressed by colonic and adipose tissue eosinophils. Furthermore, Clm1?/? mice display elevated baseline tissue eosinophilia. CLM-1 negatively regulated eotaxin-induced eosinophil responses including eosinophil chemotaxis, actin polymerization, calcium influx, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2, but not p38 phosphorylation. Addition of CLM-1 ligand (e.g., phosphatidylserine) rendered wild-type eosinophils hypochemotactic in vitro and blockade of CLM-1/ligand interactions rendered wild-type eosinophils hyperchemotactic in vitro and in vivo in a model of allergic airway disease. Interestingly, suppression of cellular recruitment via CLM-1 was specific to eosinophils and eotaxin, as leukotriene B? (LTB?)- and macrophage inflammatory protein-1? (MIP-1?)-induced eosinophil and neutrophil migration were not negatively regulated by CLM-1. Finally, peripheral blood eosinophils obtained from allergic rhinitis patients displayed elevated CLM-1/CD300f levels. These data highlight CLM-1 as a novel regulator of eosinophil homeostasis and demonstrate that eosinophil accumulation is constantly governed by CLM-1, which negatively regulates eotaxin-induced eosinophil responses. PMID:23820751

Moshkovits, I; Shik, D; Itan, M; Karo-Atar, D; Bernshtein, B; Hershko, A Y; van Lookeren Campagne, M; Munitz, A

2014-03-01

202

Chromosome studies on 30 Chinese patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in Taiwan.  

PubMed

Cytogenetic studies were performed on 32 consecutive Chinese patients with de novo acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) in Taiwan. Of the 30 patients with adequate specimens, 20(66%) had clonal chromosome abnormalities. Structural rearrangements were detected in 18 of them. Seven (four were children) of the 16 patients with M2 ANLL had t(8;21). All six patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL; M3 subtype) had t(15;17). Two patients with M4 type leukemia and abnormal bone marrow eosinophils had inv(16)(p13q22). Another M4 patient with a mild increase of morphologically normal eosinophils in the bone marrow had an abnormal chromosome #16, t(1;16)(q21;p13) in which 16q22 was not involved. One patient with M5 ANLL had t(9;11). Only two patients had a numerical change as the sole abnormality. None of the patients had loss or deletion of chromosome #5 or loss of chromosome #7, and only one had a deletion of 7q. This study revealed a high incidence of t(8;21), t(15;17), and a low incidence of -5/5q- or -7/7q- in Chinese patients with ANLL. PMID:3162701

Tien, H F; Wang, C H; Lee, F Y; Chuang, S M; Chen, Y C; Lin, D T; Shen, M C; Liu, C H

1988-05-01

203

How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Found?  

MedlinePLUS

... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia found? At this time there are no special ... oncologist (doctor who treats cancer). Tests to find acute lymphocytic leukemia Most of the symptoms seen in leukemia can ...

204

Leukemia -- Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic  

MedlinePLUS

... Lymphocytic : Overview Print to PDF Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic : Overview This section has been reviewed and ... leukemia (AML) Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) About T-cell leukemia There are also less common types of ...

205

SDA, a DNA Aptamer Inhibiting E- and P-Selectin Mediated Adhesion of Cancer and Leukemia Cells, the First and Pivotal Step in Transendothelial Migration during Metastasis Formation  

PubMed Central

Endothelial (E-) and platelet (P-) selectin mediated adhesion of tumor cells to vascular endothelium is a pivotal step of hematogenous metastasis formation. Recent studies have demonstrated that selectin deficiency significantly reduces metastasis formation in vivo. We selected an E- and P-Selectin specific DNA Aptamer (SDA) via SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) with a Kd value of approximately 100 nM and the capability of inhibiting the interaction between selectin and its ligands. Employing human colorectal cancer (HT29) and leukemia (EOL-1) cell lines we could demonstrate an anti-adhesive effect for SDA in vitro. Under physiological shear stress conditions in a laminar flow adhesion assay, SDA inhibited dynamic tumor cell adhesion to immobilized E- or P-selectin. The stability of SDA for more than two hours allowed its application in cell-cell adhesion assays in cell culture medium. When adhesion of HT29 cells to TNF?-stimulated E-selectin presenting human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells was analyzed, inhibition via SDA could be demonstrated as well. In conclusion, SDA is a potential new therapeutic agent that antagonizes selectin-mediated adhesion during metastasis formation in human malignancies. PMID:24699049

Faryammanesh, Rassa; Lange, Tobias; Magbanua, Eileen; Haas, Sina; Meyer, Cindy; Wicklein, Daniel; Schumacher, Udo; Hahn, Ulrich

2014-01-01

206

Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

2013-01-16

207

Neutrophils but not eosinophils are involved in growth suppression of IL-4-secreting tumors.  

PubMed

Local expression of IL-4 by gene-modified tumor cells increases their immunogenicity by inducing an inflammatory response that is dominated by eosinophils. Eosinophils have been implicated as antitumor effector cells because the application of a granulocyte-depleting Ab inhibited rejection of IL-4 transfected tumors. This Ab did not discriminate between eosinophils and neutrophils and, therefore, this experiment could not exclude neutrophils as primary effector cells, whereas eosinophils were innocent bystander cells in IL-4 transfected tumors. We analyzed tumor growth suppression and granulocyte infiltration in IL-5-deficient (IL-5(-/-)) mice that had a deficiency of eosinophils, using two tumor lines (B16-F10 and MCA205) transfected to secrete IL-4. IL-4-expressing tumors were at least as efficiently rejected in IL-5(-/-) mice as in wild-type mice, despite an almost complete absence of tumor-infiltrating eosinophils. However, neutrophils were present in undiminished amounts and their depletion partially restored tumor growth. Furthermore, the growth of IL-5-secreting tumors was not impaired in either wild-type or IL-5(-/-) mice, even though it induced eosinophilia in both mouse strains. These findings demonstrate that eosinophils can be induced in IL-5(-/-) mice by exogenous IL-5 and argue against a compensatory effect of neutrophils in the absence of eosinophils. We conclude that 1) infiltration of IL-4 transfected tumors by eosinophils is completely IL-5 dependent, 2) eosinophils have no tumoricidal activity, and 3) neutrophils are responsible, at least in part, for tumor suppression. PMID:9551990

Noffz, G; Qin, Z; Kopf, M; Blankenstein, T

1998-01-01

208

Acute myeloid leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is cancer that starts inside bone marrow. This is the soft tissue in the center of bones that helps form all blood cells. The cancer grows from cells that would normally turn into ...

209

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)  

MedlinePLUS

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is cancer that starts inside bone marrow. This is the soft tissue in the center of bones that helps form all blood cells. CML causes an uncontrolled growth of immature cells that make ...

210

Cloning of the human eosinophil chemoattractant, eotaxin. Expression, receptor binding, and functional properties suggest a mechanism for the selective recruitment of eosinophils.  

PubMed Central

The CC chemokine eotaxin, identified in guinea pigs and also recently in mice, may be a key element for the selective recruitment of eosinophils to certain inflamed tissues. Using a partial mouse eotaxin CDNA probe, the human eotaxin gene was cloned and found to be 61.8 and 63.2% identical at the amino acid level to guinea pig and mouse eotaxin. Human eotaxin protein was a strong and specific eosinophil chemoattractant in vitro and was an effective eosinophil chemoattractant when injected into the skin of a rhesus monkey. Radiolabeled eotaxin was used to identify a high affinity receptor on eosinophils (0.52 nM Kd), expressed at 4.8 x 10(4) sites per cell. This receptor also bound RANTES and monocyte chemotactic protein-3 with lower affinity, but not macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha. Eotaxin could desensitize calcium responses of eosinophils to RANTES and monocyte chemotactic protein-3, although RANTES was able to only partially desensitize eosinophil calcium responses to eotaxin. Immunohistochemistry on human nasal polyp with antieotaxin mAbs showed that certain leukocytes as well as respiratory epithelium were intensely immunoreactive, and eosinophil infiltration occurred at sites of eotaxin upregulation. Thus eotaxin in humans is a potent and selective eosinophil chemoattractant that is expressed by a variety cell types in certain inflammatory conditions. PMID:8609214

Ponath, P D; Qin, S; Ringler, D J; Clark-Lewis, I; Wang, J; Kassam, N; Smith, H; Shi, X; Gonzalo, J A; Newman, W; Gutierrez-Ramos, J C; Mackay, C R

1996-01-01

211

Murine lung eosinophil activation and chemokine production in allergic airway inflammation  

PubMed Central

Eosinophils play important roles in asthma and lung infections. Murine models are widely used for assessing the functional significance and mechanistic basis for eosinophil involvements in these diseases. However, little is known about tissue eosinophils in homeostasis. In addition, little data on eosinophil chemokine production during allergic airway inflammation are available. In this study, the properties and functions of homeostatic and activated eosinophils were compared. Eosinophils from normal tissues expressed costimulation and adhesion molecules B7-1, B7-2 and ICAM-1 for Ag presentation but little major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, and were found to be poor stimulators of T-cell proliferation. However, these eosinophils expressed high levels of chemokine mRNA including C10, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1?, MIP-1?, MIP-2, eotaxin and monocyte chemoattractant protein-5 (MCP-5), and produced chemokine proteins. Eosinophil intracellular chemokines decreased rapidly with concomitant surface marker downregulation upon in vitro culturing consistent with piecemeal degranulation. Lung eosinophils from mice with induced allergic airway inflammation exhibited increased chemokines mRNA expression and chemokines protein production and upregulated MHC class II and CD11c expression. They were also found to be the predominant producers of the CCR1 ligands CCL6/C10 and CCL9/MIP-1? in inflamed lungs. Eosinophil production of C10 and MIP-1? correlated with the marked influx of CD11bhigh lung dendritic cells during allergic airway inflammation and the high expression of CCR1 on these dendritic cells (DCs). The study provided baseline information on tissue eosinophils, documented the upregulation of activation markers and chemokine production in activated eosinophils, and indicated that eosinophils were a key chemokine-producing cell type in allergic lung inflammation. PMID:20622891

Rose, C Edward; Lannigan, Joanne A; Kim, Paul; Lee, James J; Fu, Shu Man; Sung, Sun-sang J

2010-01-01

212

Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-04-01

213

Eosinophilic Pleuritis due to Sparganum: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by migrating plerocercoid tapeworm larva of the genus Spirometra. Infection in humans is mainly caused by the ingestion of raw or inadequately cooked flesh of infected frogs, snakes, and chickens. Here, we report a rare case of a 45-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with left lower chest pain. The chest radiograph and computed tomography (CT) scan revealed localized pleural effusion in the left lower lobe; further, peripheral blood eosinophilia and eosinophilic pleural effusion were present. Percutaneous catheter drainage was performed, which revealed long worm-shaped material that was identified as a sparganum by DNA sequencing. The patient showed clinical improvement after drainage of the sparganum. This study demonstrates the importance of considering parasitic diseases in the differential diagnosis of eosinophilic pleural effusion. PMID:25352705

Oh, Youngmin; Kim, Jeong-Tae; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Chang, You-Jin; Eom, Keeseon; Park, Jung-Gi; Lee, Ki-Man; Choe, Kang-Hyeon

2014-01-01

214

[Differencial diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease -- eosinophilic esophagitis: case report].  

PubMed

We report on a 22-year-old man with dysphagia and repeated bolus impaction in the esophagus for 10 years. Bolus impactions were frequently mobilised using an endoscope. At endoscopy, esophagitis IV degrees was described. After treatment with omeprazol there was no improvement. The patient was submitted to our hospital for fundoplication. pH-metry demonstrated an increased reflux. At endoscopy of the esophagus, we found red stripes which did not show the typical appearance of erosions. Manometry and X-ray films of the esophagus did not reveal any pathological findings. In combination with anamnesis, symptoms, and endoscopy, the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis was documented by histology. After administration of oral corticosteroids a rapid improvement of the clinical symptoms was observed. The diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis should be kept in mind in patients with chronic symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux persisting despite medical therapy, pathological pH-metry and repeated bolus impactions. PMID:15830305

Franzius, M; Stolte, M; Porschen, R

2005-04-01

215

[A case of eosinophilic cystitis presenting with urinary retention].  

PubMed

A 56-year-old woman was referred to our hospital presenting with urinary retention. Ultrasonography revealed bilateral hydronephrosis and magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis showed diffuse thickening of the bladder wall. The hydronephrosis was improved by urethral balloon catheter. A cystoscopic examination revealed papillary lesions, polypoid yellow lesions and gross mucosal edema in the whole bladder. Pathological examination of transurethral punch biopsy showed no malignancy but inflammatory infiltration in the submucosa of bladder wall with many eosinophils. She performed clean intermittent self-catheterization and was treated with corticosteroids and antihistaminics. Three months after diagnosis, conservative treatment resulted in an excellent relief of symptoms, decrement of residual urine and remission of the bladder lesions in cystoscopy. In women with urinary retention, eosinophilic cystitis (EC) must be considered in the differential diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is the first case of EC presenting with urinary retention reported in the Japanese literature. PMID:17310774

Umemoto, Susumu; Izumi, Koji; Kita, Kaoru; Kanno, Hitomi

2007-01-01

216

Eosinophilic/T-cell Chorionic Vasculitis: Histological and Clinical Correlations.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic T-cell chorionic vasculitis (E/TCV) is composed of eosinophils and T-lymphocytes originating within chorionic vessels, radiating toward the intervillous space and away from the amnion in a fashion different from the fetal vascular response seen in amnionitis. Clinical significance and risk factors are not well established. We report four pregnancies (five infants, one triplet was spared) with E/TCV, gestational ranging from 23 weeks to term. All had concurrent acute chorioamnionitis, three had the typical acute fetal inflammatory response. One had placental fetal obstructive vasculopathy and an upper extremity reduction defect (radio-ulnar synostosis), the mother had pre-eclampsia. A second case involved 2 of 3 23 week previable triplets. Our third case had a metatarsus varus resistant to casting, the mother had gestational diabetes. The last case was a normal infant. We review the literature, discuss the clinical findings and present the histologic characteristics of this infrequently recognized lesion. PMID:25338020

Cheek, Bradley; Heinrich, Stephen; Ward, Kenneth; Craver, Randall

2014-10-22

217

Acute eosinophilic pneumonia related to a mesalazine suppository  

PubMed Central

It has been well known that mesalazine can cause the interstitial lung disease, such as Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (BOOP), Non-Specific Interstitial Pneumonia (NSIP), or eosinophilic pneumonia. 5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), mesalazine, and sulfasalazine are important drugs for treating inflammatory bowel disease. Topical products of these limited systemic absorption and have less frequent side effects, therefore suppository form of these drugs have been used more than systemic drug. Most cases of measalzine-induced lung toxicity develop from systemic use of the drug. A 30-year-old woman had an interstitial lung disease after using mesalazine suppository because of ulcerative colitis. The lung biopsy demonstrated eosinophilic pneumonia combined with BOOP. She was recovered after stopping of mesalazine suppository and treatment with systemic steroid. PMID:23667838

Kim, Jung Hyun; Koh, Eun-Suk; Park, Sung woo; Jang, An-Soo; Kim, Dojin; Park, Choon-Sik

2013-01-01

218

Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) and Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML)  

MedlinePLUS

... Leukemia (CMML) and Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML)/5 Stem Cell Transplantation for CMML. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (giving ... stabilization and partial remission rather than complete remission. Stem Cell Transplantation for JMML. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (giving ...

219

Immunomodulatory therapy of eosinophil-associated gastrointestinal diseases.  

PubMed

Eosinophil-associated gastrointestinal disorders (EGIDs), including eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) and eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG), are a spectrum of increasingly recognized inflammatory diseases characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms and eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. Significant morbidity is associated with the development of esophageal strictures in some patients. Immune-mediated reactions to food allergens appear to drive the inflammation in a subset of patients, especially those with solitary EE, but dietary interventions remain difficult in EE and are less effective in EG. Despite the increasing incidence of these disorders and their increased recognition by physicians, there are currently no medications that either United States or European Union regulatory agencies have specifically approved for use in EGIDs. This lack of safe and effective therapies for EGIDs is a major obstacle in the care of these patients and underscores the need for new therapeutic approaches. This review briefly discusses the currently available 'off label' drug treatments for EGIDs, most notably topical and systemic corticosteroids. Pathogenesis studies of EGIDs suggest possible therapeutic targets, and conversely, clinical trials of mechanistically-targeted therapeutics give insight into disease pathogenesis. Thus, EGID pathogenesis is discussed as an introduction to mechanistically-targeted immunotherapeutics. The two biologic categories that have been used in EGIDs, anti-IgE (omalizumab) and anti-IL-5 (SCH55700/reslizumab and mepolizumab), are discussed. Because there are similarities in the pathogenesis of EGIDs with asthma and atopic dermatitis, biologic therapeutics currently in early trials for asthma management are also briefly discussed as potential therapeutic agents for EGIDs. Given the deficiencies of current therapeutics and the rapidly advancing knowledge of the pathogenesis of these disorders, EGIDs are an ideal model for translating recent advances in understanding immunopathogenesis into mechanistically-based therapeutics. Further understanding of the early events in pathogenesis is also needed to develop preventive and disease-modifying treatments. PMID:19037962

Stone, K D; Prussin, C

2008-12-01

220

Comprehensive multiplexed protein quantitation delineates eosinophilic and neutrophilic experimental asthma  

PubMed Central

Background Improvements in asthma diagnosis and management require deeper understanding of the heterogeneity of the complex airway inflammation. We hypothesise that differences in the two major inflammatory phenotypes of asthma; eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma, will be reflected in the lung protein expression profile of murine asthma models and can be delineated using proteomics of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Methods BAL from mice challenged with ovalbumin (OVA/OVA) alone (standard model of asthma, here considered eosinophilic) or OVA in combination with endotoxin (OVA/LPS, model of neutrophilic asthma) was analysed using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry, and compared with steroid-treated animals and healthy controls. In addition, conventional inflammatory markers were analysed using multiplexed ELISA (Bio-Plex™ assay). Multivariate statistics was performed on integrative proteomic fingerprints using principal component analysis. Proteomic data were complemented with lung mechanics and BAL cell counts. Results Several of the analysed proteins displayed significant differences between the controls and either or both of the two models reflecting eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma. Most of the proteins found with mass spectrometry analysis displayed a considerable increase in neutrophilic asthma compared with the other groups. Conversely, the larger number of the inflammatory markers analysed with Bio-Plex™ analysis were found to be increased in the eosinophilic model. In addition, major inflammation markers were correlated to peripheral airway closure, while commonly used asthma biomarkers only reflect central inflammation. Conclusion Our data suggest that the commercial markers we are currently relying on to diagnose asthma subtypes are not giving us comprehensive or specific enough information. The analysed protein profiles allowed to discriminate the two models and may add useful information for characterization of different asthma phenotypes. PMID:24993465

2014-01-01

221

Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia associated with an initiation of rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although peripheral blood eosinophilia is observed in patients with active inflammatory rheumatoid arthritis (RA), RA is not a recognised cause of pulmonary eosinophilia. We describe a 55-year-old woman affected by chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) concomitantly with an initiation of RA. Both diseases responded rapidly and completely to high-dose corticosteroid therapy. In this patient, the initiation of RA and CEP was

J.-J. Kwak; J.-E. Chang; J. Lee; Y.-J. Cho; S. H. Sung

2003-01-01

222

Eosinophilic cystitis: eight cases report and literature review.  

PubMed

Historically, eosinophilic cystitis is a rare disorder of bladder inflammation with eosinophils infiltration diagnosed by pathologic examination. The etiology is unclear despite the past identification of many factors contributing to this disease. Eight patients with eosinophilic cystitis were reported. The intact history, clinical manifestation, radiological examination and response to therapy were all evaluated. The results showed that 7 patients developed hematuria, 6 patients were with dysuria, 4 patients with frequency and 4 patients with urine retention. Seven patients had abnormal urinalysis but no positive finding in culture. Radiological findings revealed that one patient had bladder mass lesions and upper urinary tract dilation. Cystoscopic examination was performed in every patient and showed mass-like, edematous, ulcerative or hyperemic mucosa lesions. Cold-cup biopsy or transurethral resection of bladder lesions were all performed and could be the first priority to be considered. However, partial or total cystectomy should be taken into consideration when simple treatment failed to resolve this problem. Additionally, antihistamines, steroids or antibiotics are given to control the clinical symptoms. The results of these treatments were good except for one case who suffered from recurrence but recovered after simple operation and oral therapy. Although good results were found concerning treatment, long-term follow-up is necessary. PMID:12017980

Lin, Hung-Yu; Chou, Yii-Her; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Chun-Hsiung; Chai, Chee-Yin

2002-01-01

223

Titanium Dioxide Exposure Induces Acute Eosinophilic Lung Inflammation in Rabbits  

PubMed Central

Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is increasingly widely used in industrial, commercial and home products. TiO2 aggravates respiratory symptoms by induction of pulmonary inflammation although the mechanisms have not been well investigated. We aimed to investigate lung inflammation in rabbits after intratracheal instillation of P25 TiO2. One ml of 10, 50 and 250 µg of P25 TiO2 was instilled into one of the lungs of rabbits, chest computed-tomography was performed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected before, at 1 and 24 h after P25 TiO2 exposure. Changes in inflammatory cells in the BAL fluids were measured. Lung pathological assay was also carried out at 24 h after P25 TiO2 exposure. Ground glass opacities were noted in both lungs 1 h after P25 TiO2 and saline (control) instillation. Although the control lung showed complete resolution at 24 h, the lung exposed to P25 TiO2 showed persistent ground glass opacities at 24 h. The eosinophil counts in BAL fluid were significantly increased after P25 TiO2 exposure. P25 TiO2 induced a dose dependent increase of eosinophils in BAL fluid but no significant differences in neutrophil and lymphocyte cell counts were detected. The present findings suggest that P25 TiO2 induces lung inflammation in rabbits which is associated with eosinophilic inflammation. PMID:24705802

CHOI, Gil Soon; OAK, Chulho; CHUN, Bong-Kwon; WILSON, Donald; JANG, Tae Won; KIM, Hee-Kyoo; JUNG, Mannhong; TUTKUN, Engin; PARK, Eun-Kee

2014-01-01

224

Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with eosinophilic enteritis: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disorder that may present with various symptoms. It may involve the gastrointestinal tract in a variety of ways; some of the most well-known ones are transaminitis, lupus mesenteric vasculitis, lupus enteritis and mesenteric vascular leakage. We describe a case of a patient with SLE who presented with a five-month history of diarrhea caused by eosinophilic enteritis. To the best of our knowledge, there are few cases reported in the literature of patients with SLE who initially present with chronic diarrhea due to eosinophilic enteritis. Case presentation A 38-year-old Persian Iranian woman was admitted with a five-month history of diarrhea and abdominal pain. A physical examination showed nothing abnormal. Initially, she had only lymphopenia and mild eosinophilia. No autoimmune or infectious etiology was detected to justify these abnormalities. A thorough evaluation was not helpful in finding the etiology, until she developed a scalp lesion similar to discoid lupus erythematosus. Computed tomography showed small bowel wall thickening. Briefly, she manifested full-blown SLE, and it was revealed that the diarrhea was caused by eosinophilic enteritis. Conclusion Considering SLE in a patient who presents with chronic diarrhea and lymphopenia may be helpful in earlier diagnosis and therapy. This is an original case report of interest to physicians who practice internal medicine, family medicine and gastroenterology. PMID:21702974

2011-01-01

225

Graft-versus-leukemia in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

Immune-mediated anti-leukemia effects, often termed graft-versus-leukemia (GvL), operate after bone marrow or blood cell transplants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia. Sometimes the magnitude of this anti-leukemia effect exceeds that of high-dose anti-leukemia drugs and radiation and can result in leukemia cure. We analyzed leukemia relapse data after transplants for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in this context. These data support the notion of a strong GvL effect in CLL. However, as most of these data are from studies of allotransplants, it is uncertain whether GvL operates in settings where the anti-leukemia effector cells and target CLL cells are genetically identical except for leukemia-related mutations. It is also uncertain whether GvL is distinct from GvHD. These potential limitations have important implications on whether immune therapy of CLL will work in non-allotransplant settings. PMID:17322931

Ben-Bassat, I; Raanani, P; Gale, R P

2007-04-01

226

What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... breast and then spread to the bone marrow. Cancers that start elsewhere and then spread to the bone marrow are not leukemia. Normal bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissue To understand the different types of leukemia, it ...

227

Theophylline Inhibits TNF-?-Induced CD4 Expression on Human Eosinophils and CD4+ Eosinophil Migration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Increasing evidence regarding asthma suggests that CD4+ cells are preferentially recruited to sites of bronchial inflammation. Interleukin (IL)-16 has been reported as playing an important role in the accumulation of CD4+ cells. We have shown that the CD4 molecule is expressed on normal human eosinophils by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? stimulation. Methods: We evaluated the effects of theophylline, KF19514

Akihiro Tsukadaira; Yoshio Okubo; Shiro Horie; Sekiya Koyama

2001-01-01

228

Eosinophils in the 1990s: new perspectives on their role in health and disease.  

PubMed Central

Eosinophils are characterized by their unique crystalloid granules that contain four basic proteins--MBP, ECP, EDN and EPO. The cell has many common features with neutrophils but, unlike that cell type, eosinophils utilize VLA-4/VCAM-1 as an adherence pathway and have a number of other receptors not shared by neutrophils. These include recognition units for IgE (distinct from CD23), and receptors for IL-5, IL-3 and RANTES. Following stimulation with a variety of agents, eosinophils preferentially elaborate LTC4 as the major 5-lipoxygenase product of arachidonic acid and produce substantial amounts of PAF. Of particular interest is the ability of eosinophils to synthesize a number of cytokines. Thus eosinophils have marked pro-inflammatory potential. There is now convincing evidence that eosinophilia is T-cell dependent. The Th2-type cell, which selectively secretes IL-5 and IL-4, seems particularly involved. IL-5, IL-3 and GM-CSF are required for eosinophil maturation, and cause activation and prolonged survival of the mature cell. IL-5 is unique in that it promotes terminal differentiation of the committed eosinophil precursor and in vivo in mice appears to be sufficient on its own for eosinophil growth from uncommited stem cells. IL-4 selectively upregulates VCAM-1 expression on endothelial cells thus augmenting VLA-4-dependent eosinophil adhesion. The role of eosinophils in disease is complex but in general their numbers are increased in helminthic parasitic disease and atopic allergy and asthma. Eosinophil products can produce many of the pathological features of asthma, and helminthic larvae coated with immunoglobulin or complement are particularly susceptible to eosinophil-mediated cytotoxicity. Eosinopenia is often related to acute inflammation or stress. PMID:7937446

Wardlaw, A. J.

1994-01-01

229

[Acute myocardial infarction as Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Churg Strauss syndrome) initial presentation].  

PubMed

Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a rare primary vasculitic disease characterized by hypereosinophilia, late onset asthma and extravascular eosinophil granulomas. We report a case presented initially with acute myocardial infarction which later only proceed with asthma, skin manifestations and peripheral neuropathy. Laboratory parameters showed hypereosinohpilia with negative perinuclear pattern of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (p-ANCA). Skin biopsy showed leucocytoclastic vasculitis with eosinophilic infiltration while coronary angiography was normal. The patient's symptoms improved with IV methylprednisolone, pulse cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. PMID:25627304

Sulaiman, Wahinuddin; Seung, Ong Ping; Noor, Sabariah Mohd

2014-01-01

230

Eosinophilic cystitis causing spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder in a child.  

PubMed

We report a unique case of eosinophilic cystitis causing intraperitoneal bladder perforation in a child diagnosed by chance with no signs or history of trauma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of eosinophilic cystitis complicated by bladder rupture in children. The patient was successfully treated with primary repair. For children with non-traumatic bladder perforation, eosinophilic cystitis must be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:16734871

Hwang, Eu Chang; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Kim, Chan Jong; Kang, Taek Won; Park, Kwangsung; Ryu, Soo Bang; Ma, Jae Sook

2006-04-01

231

Eosinophilic cystitis induced by bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) intravesical instillation.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare and uncommon inflammatory bladder disease, in which the pathophysiology is unclear; only a few cases of such disease induced by intravesical instillations have been described. We report a case of eosinophilic cystitis after intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) instillation for nonmuscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. To our knowledge, this report is the first case of eosinophilic cystitis induced by intravesical BCG therapy. PMID:17905131

Hidoussi, Adnen; Slama, Adel; Jaidane, Mehdi; Zakhama, Walid; Youssef, Anis; Ben Sorba, Nabil; Mosbah, Ali F

2007-09-01

232

Azelastine hydrochloride inhibits platelet activating factor-like activity in human eosinophils  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the inhibitory effect of azelastine hydrochloride (azelastine), an anti-asthmatic drug, on platelet-activating factor (PAF)-like activity in eosinophils obtained from asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients. Eosinophils were preincubated with or without azelastine and stimulated with f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP, 10 ?mol) for 15 min. PAF-like activity was detected by aggregation of washed guinea-pig platelets. PAF-like activity released from asthmatic eosinophils without preincubation

Kunihiko Shindo; Motonori Fukumura

1996-01-01

233

Organ-specific eosinophilic disorders of the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract  

PubMed Central

Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that increase in various tissues in a variety of disorders. Locally, they can be involved in the initiation and propagation of diverse inflammatory responses. In this review, the clinical association of eosinophils with diseases of the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract is summarized. An approach to determining the causal role of eosinophils in these diseases is presented. Recent findings concerning molecular diagnosis, etiology and treatment are discussed. PMID:20392477

Simon, Dagmar; Wardlaw, Andrew; Rothenberg, Marc E.

2010-01-01

234

Bronchoalveolar lavage and technetium-99m glucoheptonate imaging in chronic eosinophilic pneumonia  

SciTech Connect

A patient with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia was evaluated using bronchoalveolar lavage, technetium-99m glucoheptonate, and transbronchial lung biopsy. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed 43 percent eosinophils and correlated well with results of transbronchial lung biopsy. Technetium-99m glucoheptonate lung imaging demonstrated intense parenchymal uptake. After eight weeks of corticosteroid therapy, the bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophil population and the technetium-99m glucoheptonate uptake had returned to normal. We suggest that bronchoalveolar lavage, with transbronchial lung biopsy, is a less invasive way than open lung biopsy to diagnose chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. The mechanism of uptake of technetium-99m glucoheptonate in this disorder remains to be defined.

Lieske, T.R.; Sunderrajan, E.V.; Passamonte, P.M.

1984-02-01

235

?M?2 Integrin–Mediated Adhesion and Motility of IL-5–Stimulated Eosinophils on Periostin  

PubMed Central

Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein that is up-regulated by T helper cell type 2 cytokines in the asthmatic airway and implicated in mouse studies as promoting eosinophil recruitment. We asked whether periostin modulates eosinophil adhesion and motility in vitro. Periostin adsorbed to polystyrene supported adhesion of purified human blood eosinophils stimulated by IL-5, IL-3, or granulocyte/macrophage colony–stimulating factor, but did not support adhesion of eosinophils treated with IL-4 or IL-13. The degree of adhesion depended on the concentrations of periostin during coating and activating cytokine during the adhesion assay. Both full-length periostin and alternatively spliced periostin, lacking C-terminal exons 17, 18, 19, and 21, supported adhesion. Adhesion was inhibited by monoclonal antibody to ?M or ?2 integrin subunits, but not by antibodies to other eosinophil integrin subunits. Adsorbed periostin also supported ?M?2-dependent random motility of IL-5–stimulated eosinophils with optimal movement at an intermediate coating concentration. In the presence of IL-5, eosinophils adherent on periostin formed punctate structures positive for filamentous actin, gelsolin, and phosphotyrosine. These structures fit the criteria for podosomes, highly dynamic adhesive contacts that are distinct from classical focal adhesions. The results establish ?M?2 (CD11b/CD18, Mac-1) as an adhesive and promigratory periostin receptor on cytokine-stimulated eosinophils, and suggest that periostin may function as a haptotactic stimulus able to guide eosinophils to areas of high periostin density in the asthmatic airway. PMID:23306834

Annis, Douglas S.; Mosher, Deane F.

2013-01-01

236

Pathogen Induced Chemo-attractant Hepoxilin A3 Drives Neutrophils, but not Eosinophils across Epithelial Barriers  

PubMed Central

Pathogen induced migration of neutrophils across mucosal epithelial barriers requires epithelial production of the chemotactic lipid mediator, hepoxilin A3 (HXA3). HXA3 is an eicosanoid derived from arachidonic acid. Although eosinophils are also capable of penetrating mucosal surfaces, eosinophilic infiltration occurs mainly during allergic processes whereas neutrophils dominate mucosal infection. Both neutrophils and eosinophils can respond to chemotactic gradients of certain eicosanoids, however, it is not known whether eosinophils respond to pathogen induced lipid mediators such as HXA3. In this study, neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated from human blood and placed on the basolateral side of polarized epithelial monolayers grown on permeable Transwell filters and challenged by various chemotactic gradients of distinct lipid mediators. We observed that both cell populations migrated across epithelial monolayers in response to a leukotriene B4 (LTB4) gradient, whereas only eosinophils migrated towards a prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) gradient. Interestingly, while pathogen induced neutrophil trans-epithelial migration was substantial, pathogen induced eosinophil trans-epithelial migration was not observed. Further, gradients of chemotactic lipids derived from pathogen infected epithelial cells known to be enriched for HXA3 as well as purified HXA3 drove significant numbers of neutrophils across epithelial barriers, whereas eosinophils failed to respond to these gradients. These data suggest that although the eicosanoid HXA3 serves as an important neutrophil chemo-attractant at mucosal surfaces during pathogenic infection, HXA3 does not appear to exhibit chemotactic activity towards eosinophils. PMID:24315875

Kubala, S. A.; Patil, S. U.; Shreffler, W. G.; Hurley, B. P.

2014-01-01

237

5-Lipoxygenase-Dependent Recruitment of Neutrophils and Macrophages by Eotaxin-Stimulated Murine Eosinophils  

PubMed Central

The roles of eosinophils in antimicrobial defense remain incompletely understood. In ovalbumin-sensitized mice, eosinophils are selectively recruited to the peritoneal cavity by antigen, eotaxin, or leukotriene(LT)B4, a 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolite. 5-LO blockade prevents responses to both antigen and eotaxin. We examined responses to eotaxin in the absence of sensitization and their dependence on 5-LO. BALB/c or PAS mice and their mutants (5-LO-deficient ALOX; eosinophil-deficient GATA-1) were injected i.p. with eotaxin, eosinophils, or both, and leukocyte accumulation was quantified up to 24?h. Significant recruitment of eosinophils by eotaxin in BALB/c, up to 24?h, was accompanied by much larger numbers of recruited neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages. These effects were abolished by eotaxin neutralization and 5-LO-activating protein inhibitor MK886. In ALOX (but not PAS) mice, eotaxin recruitment was abolished for eosinophils and halved for neutrophils. In GATA-1 mutants, eotaxin recruited neither neutrophils nor macrophages. Transfer of eosinophils cultured from bone-marrow of BALB/c donors, or from ALOX donors, into GATA-1 mutant recipients, i.p., restored eotaxin recruitment of neutrophils and showed that the critical step dependent on 5-LO is the initial recruitment of eosinophils by eotaxin, not the secondary neutrophil accumulation. Eosinophil-dependent recruitment of neutrophils in naive BALB/c mice was associated with increased binding of bacteria. PMID:24723744

Luz, Ricardo Alves; Xavier-Elsas, Pedro; de Luca, Bianca; Masid-de-Brito, Daniela; Cauduro, Priscila Soares; Gondar Arcanjo, Luiz Carlos; Cordeiro Faria dos Santos, Ana Carolina; de Oliveira, Ivi Cristina Maria; Gaspar-Elsas, Maria Ignez Capella

2014-01-01

238

Work in progress: radionuclide imaging of indium-111-labeled eosinophils in mice  

SciTech Connect

Eosinophils isolated from peritoneal exudates were labeled with indium-111-oxine and injected intravenously into sensitized mice. They became localized at sites of inflammation produced by intradermal injections of schistosomal antigen or Toxocara canis larvae, whereas labeled neutrophils did not. Intense uptake of eosinophils by normal spleen, liver, and bone marrow was noted, with tracer distribution effectively complete by 5 hours after injection. Indium-111-eosinophil studies appear to be quite sensitive to parasitic inflammatory reactions; in contrast, nonspecific inflammation such as that induced by turpentine causes localization of eosinophils, but to a lesser extent. This technique may be useful in the study of parasitic and allergic disease.

Runge, V.M.; Rand, T.H.; Clanton, J.A.; Jones, J.P.; Colley, D.G.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

1983-05-01

239

ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA FALLON, NEVADA  

E-print Network

1 ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA FALLON, NEVADA REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE EXPERT PANEL the state health department's investigation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases that had been of a hazardous chemical contaminant. However, the absence of cases of acute myeloid leukemia, the type

240

Obatoclax, Fludarabine, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

2013-09-27

241

[Classification of myeloid leukemias].  

PubMed

Myeloid leukemia in this series corresponds to the myeloid neoplasms of the 4th WHO classification of pathology and genetics of tumor of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissue. The myeloid neoplasms are composed of six categories, which are 1) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), a new category of 2) myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRA, PDGFRB or FGFR1, 3) myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/MPN, 4) MDS, 5) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and related precursor neoplasms, and 6) acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage. In MPNs without chronic myelogenous leukemia, the genetic marker of JAK2 V617F is added to the diagnostic criteria for polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis. MDS has the new subtype of refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia composed of refractory anemia, refractory neutropenia and refractory thrombocytopenia. AML with t(9; 11) (p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL, AML with t(6;9) (p23; q34); DEK-NUP214, AML with inv(3) (q21q26.2) or t(3; 3) (q21 ; q26.2); RPN1-EVI1 and AML (megakaryoblastic) with t(1; 22) (p13; q13); RBM15-MKL1 are added to the subtype of AML with recurrent genetic abnormalities, and AML with gene mutations of NPM1 and CEBPA are also added as provisional entities of it. The myeloid neoplasms of the 4th WHO classification are comprehensive and seem to be dynamic by incorporating the results of leukemia researches. PMID:19860179

Kuriyama, Kazutaka

2009-10-01

242

COPD exacerbation severity and frequency is associated with impaired macrophage efferocytosis of eosinophils  

PubMed Central

Background Eosinophilic airway inflammation is observed in 10-30% of COPD subjects. Whether increased eosinophils or impairment in their clearance by macrophages is associated with the severity and frequency of exacerbations is unknown. Methods We categorised 103 COPD subjects into 4 groups determined by the upper limit of normal for their cytoplasmic macrophage red hue (<6%), an indirect measure of macrophage efferocytosis of eosinophils, and area under the curve sputum eosinophil count (?3%/year). Eosinophil efferocytosis by monocyte-derived macrophages was studied in 17 COPD subjects and 8 normal controls. Results There were no differences in baseline lung function, health status or exacerbation frequency between the groups: A-low red hue, high sputum eosinophils (n?=?10), B-high red hue, high sputum eosinophils (n?=?16), C-low red hue, low sputum eosinophils (n?=?19) and D- high red hue, low sputum eosinophils (n?=?58). Positive bacterial culture was lower in groups A (10%) and B (6%) compared to C (44%) and D (21%) (p?=?0.01). The fall in FEV1 from stable to exacerbation was greatest in group A (?FEV1 [95 % CI] -0.41 L [-0.65 to -0.17]) versus group B (-0.16 L [-0.32 to -0.011]), C (-0.11 L [-0.23 to -0.002]) and D (-0.16 L [-0.22 to -0.10]; p?=?0.02). Macrophage efferocytosis of eosinophils was impaired in COPD versus controls (86 [75 to 92]% versus 93 [88 to 96]%; p?=?0.028); was most marked in group A (71 [70 to 84]%; p?=?0.0295) and was inversely correlated with exacerbation frequency (r?=?-0.63; p?=?0.006). Conclusions Macrophage efferocytosis of eosinophils is impaired in COPD and is related to the severity and frequency of COPD exacerbations. PMID:25007795

2014-01-01

243

Leukemia diagnostics with ow G. Ciuperca1  

E-print Network

Leukemia diagnostics with ow cytometry G. Ciuperca1 , M. Mafouz1 , C. Dumontet2 , V. Louvet1 , A'exposé Hematopoiesis and leukemias Flow cytometry Leukemias classication and Medical diagnosis Mathematical Models for diagnosis and classication of acute myeloid leukemia #12;Leukemia diagnostics with ow cytometry G. Ciuperca

Louvet, Violaine

244

Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells’ syndrome) caused by a temporary henna tattoo  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells’ syndrome) is an uncommon condition of unknown etiology. Wells’ syndrome is usually seen in adulthood but very rare in childhood. Although pathogenesis of the disease is not very clear, it is a hypersensitivity reaction developing against a variety of exogenous and endogenous antigenic stimuli. Paraphenylenediamine is a strong allergen frequently used as a temporary henna tattoo, which makes the color darker. Here, a 9-year-old male patient with Wells’ syndrome is presented, which developed following a temporary henna tattoo and shown by the patch test sensitivity to paraphenylenediamine. PMID:25395929

Celegen, Mehmet; Kark?ner, Canan Sule Unsal; Günay, Ilker; Diniz, Güllden; Can, Demet

2014-01-01

245

Determinants of eosinophil survival and apoptotic cell death.  

PubMed

Eosinophils (Eos) are potent inflammatory cells and abundantly present in the sputum and lung of patients with allergic asthma. During both transit to and residence in the lung, Eos contact prosurvival cytokines, particularly IL-3, IL-5 and GM-CSF, that attenuate cell death. Cytokine signaling modulates the expression and function of a number of intracellular pro- and anti-apoptotic molecules. Both intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic receptor-mediated pathways are affected. This article discusses the fundamental role of the extracellular and intracellular molecules that initiate and control survival decisions by human Eos and highlights the role of the cis-trans isomerase, Pin1 in controlling these processes. PMID:25563855

Shen, Zhong-Jian; Malter, James S

2015-02-01

246

HIV associated eosinophilic folliculitis--differential diagnosis and management  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic folliculitis (EF) is a chronic, intensely pruritic condition of unknown pathogenesis that causes marked morbidity in those HIV patients whom it affects. There is a wide differential diagnosis of itchy skin conditions in HIV which are amenable to different treatments. It is therefore essential to take a biopsy of each suspected case and examine multiple sections of the biopsy to confirm or refute a diagnosis of EF. Treatment of EF can be difficult but we hope that by suggesting a rational approach to this and considering possible therapeutic options more patients may be helped with this troublesome dermatosis. ??? PMID:10616350

Simpson-Dent, S.; Fearfield, L. A.; Staughton, R. C.

1999-01-01

247

Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) caused by a temporary henna tattoo.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) is an uncommon condition of unknown etiology. Wells' syndrome is usually seen in adulthood but very rare in childhood. Although pathogenesis of the disease is not very clear, it is a hypersensitivity reaction developing against a variety of exogenous and endogenous antigenic stimuli. Paraphenylenediamine is a strong allergen frequently used as a temporary henna tattoo, which makes the color darker. Here, a 9-year-old male patient with Wells' syndrome is presented, which developed following a temporary henna tattoo and shown by the patch test sensitivity to paraphenylenediamine. PMID:25395929

Nacaroglu, Hikmet Tekin; Celegen, Mehmet; Kark?ner, Canan Sule Unsal; Günay, Ilker; Diniz, Güllden; Can, Demet

2014-10-01

248

[Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss syndrome)].  

PubMed

Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) (Churg-Strauss), is a rare necrotizing vasculitis of small-sized vessels, associated to antimyeloperoxydase ANCA in 40% of patients. EGPA occurs in patients with asthma. Asthma is sever, associated with eosinophilia and extrapulmonary symptoms. Among them, mononeuritis multiplex is the most frequent symptom. When cardiac involvement is present, prognosis is poor. Despite a good overall prognosis, deaths are caused by vasculitis activity, gastrointestinal and cardiac involvement. Treatment is well codified based on steroids, which are quickly effective. Immunosuppressants combined with corticosteroids are compulsory to treat the most sever forms, mainly when cardiac and gastrointestinal or renal symptoms are present. PMID:22921086

Guillevin, Loďc

2012-10-01

249

Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis and Diffuse Gastrointestinal Involvement  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), formerly named Churg-Strauss syndrome, is a rare systemic small- and medium-sized-vessel vasculitis, characterized by the presence of severe asthma as well as blood and tissue eosinophilia. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, like diarrhea and abdominal pain, are common; however, there are few reports of histologic evidence of GI involvement. We report the case of a patient on treatment for EGPA who presented with recurrent small bowel obstruction and choledocholithiasis. Biopsies of the esophagus, small bowel and common bile duct showed diffuse eosinophilia, with clear EGPA in the GI tract. Improved awareness of GI EGPA may allow for timely management of this disorder. PMID:25473392

Franco, Diana L.; Ruff, Kevin; Mertz, Lester; Lam-Himlin, Dora M.; Heigh, Russell

2014-01-01

250

Chronic Cough and Eosinophilic Esophagitis: An Uncommon Association  

PubMed Central

An increasing number of children, usually with gastrointestinal symptoms, is diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis (EE), and a particular subset of these patients complains of airway manifestations. We present the case of a 2-year-old child with chronic dry cough in whom EE was found after a first diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) due to pathological 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. Traditional allergologic tests were negative, while patch tests were diagnostic for cow's milk allergy. We discuss the intriguing relationship between GERD and EE and the use of patch test for the allergologic screening of patients. PMID:21960955

Orizio, Paolo; Cinquini, Massimo; Minetti, Stefano; Alberti, Daniele; Paolo, Camilla Di; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Torri, Fabio; Crispino, Paola; Facchetti, Susanna; Rizzini, Fabio Lodi; Bassotti, Gabrio; Tosoni, Cinzia

2011-01-01

251

Monocyte Chemotactic Protein 3 Is a Most Effective Basophil and Eosinophil-activating Chemokine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary CC chemokines constitute a novel class of cytokines that attract and activate monocytes and lymphocytes, as well as basophil and eosinophil lenkocytes, with distinct target cell profiles, and are believed to be involved in the regulation of different types of inflammation. The action of the recently identified monocyte chemotactic protein 3 (MCP-3) on human basophil and eosinophil function was

Clemens A. Dahinden; Thomas Geiser; Thomas Brunner; Daniel Caput; Pascual Ferrara; Adrian Minty; Marco BaggioliniS

1994-01-01

252

Eosinophils from patients with blood eosinophilia express transforming growth factor beta 1.  

PubMed

The infiltration of eosinophils into tissues during pathologic responses is often associated with extracellular matrix alterations such as fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is a well-characterized multifunctional cytokine known to exert potent effects on the extracellular matrix. In this report, we showed the production of TGF-beta 1 by human eosinophils from patients with blood eosinophilia. Northern blot analysis using RNA isolated from eosinophils purified from a patient with the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) detected the 2.5-kb TGF-beta 1 transcript. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry of leukocytes from two patients with HES and two patients with blood eosinophilia localized TGF-beta 1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein to eosinophils. No other cell type contained TGF-beta 1 mRNA by in situ hybridization, whereas other leukocytes contained detectable TGF-beta 1 protein by immunohistochemistry. Eosinophils from four normal donors contained little or no detectable TGF-beta 1 protein by immunohistochemistry, whereas eosinophils from two of these four normal donors labeled weakly for TGF-beta 1 mRNA by in situ hybridization. These results show that eosinophils in the peripheral blood of patients with blood eosinophilia can express TGF-beta 1, but that eosinophils in the blood of normal donors contained little or no TGF-beta 1. PMID:1726708

Wong, D T; Elovic, A; Matossian, K; Nagura, N; McBride, J; Chou, M Y; Gordon, J R; Rand, T H; Galli, S J; Weller, P F

1991-11-15

253

Laser irradiation of centrosomes in newt eosinophils: evidence of centriole role in motility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Newt eosinophils are motile granulated leukocytes that uniquely display a highly visible centrosomal area. Electron microscope and tubulin antibody fluorescence confirms the presence of centrioles, pericentriolar material, and radiating microtubules within this visible area. Actin antibodies intensely stain the advancing cell edges and tail but only weakly stain pseudopods being withdrawn into the cell. Randomly activated eosinophils follow a roughly

M. P. Koonce; R. A. Cloney; M. W. Berns

1984-01-01

254

Diverse Effects of Eosinophil Cationic Granule Proteins on IMR32 Nerve Cell Signaling and Survival  

Microsoft Academic Search

Activatedeosinophilsreleasepotentiallytoxiccationicgranularpro- teins, including the major basic proteins (MBP) and eosinophil- derived neurotoxin (EDN). However, in inflammatory conditions including asthma and inflammatory bowel disease, localization of eosinophils to nerves is associated with nerve plasticity, specifically remodeling. In previous in vitro studies, we have shown that eosin- ophil adhesion to IMR-32 nerve cells, via nerve cell intercellular adhesion molecule-1, results in an

Ross K. Morgan; Richard W. Costello; Niamh Durcan; Paul J. Kingham; Gerald J. Gleich; W. Graham McLean; Marie-Therese Walsh

2005-01-01

255

Unusual Presentation of Chronic Eosinophilic Pneumonia with “Reversed Halo Sign”: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

The reversed halo sign (RHS) may sometimes be seen in patients with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), but is rarely associated with other diseases. Herein, we present a case of a 21-year-old woman with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, with high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) finding of RHS. This is an unusual and rare presentation of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. PMID:25035707

Gholamnejad, Mahdia; Rezaie, Nader

2014-01-01

256

Unusual presentation of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia with "reversed halo sign": a case report.  

PubMed

The reversed halo sign (RHS) may sometimes be seen in patients with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), but is rarely associated with other diseases. Herein, we present a case of a 21-year-old woman with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, with high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) finding of RHS. This is an unusual and rare presentation of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. PMID:25035707

Gholamnejad, Mahdia; Rezaie, Nader

2014-05-01

257

Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Modulates Airway Eosinophil Adhesion in Asthma  

E-print Network

Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Modulates Airway Eosinophil Adhesion in Asthma Anne M. Brooks during asthma exacerbations. While the mechanism(s) of this process is not known, the expressionPA, enhance eosinophil adhesion in patients with asthma. Patients with allergic asthma underwent segmental

Bertics, Paul J.

258

Correlation between exhaled nitric oxide, sputum eosinophils, and methacholine responsiveness in patients with mild asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Eosinophils in induced sputum and exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are currently used as non-invasive markers in the assessment of airway inflammation in asthma. As both sputum eosinophils (%) and exhaled NO are raised in asthmatic subjects not receiving inhaled steroids and decreased following corticosteroid therapy, a relationship between them is plausible. METHODS: Exhaled NO was measured by chemiluminescence analyser,

A. Jatakanon; S. Lim; S. A. Kharitonov; K. F. Chung; P. J. Barnes

1998-01-01

259

Molecular cloning and characterization of a human eotaxin receptor expressed selectively on eosinophils  

PubMed Central

The chemokine eotaxin is unusual in that it appears to be a highly specific chemoattractant for eosinophils. Ligand-binding studies with radiolabeled eotaxin demonstrated a receptor on eosinophils distinct from the known chemokine receptors CKR-1 and -2. The distinct eotaxin binding site on human eosinophils also bound RANTES (regulated on activation T expressed and secreted) and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)3. We have now isolated a cDNA from eosinophils, termed CKR-3, with significant sequence similarity to other well characterized chemokine receptors. Cells transfected with CKR-3 cDNA bound radiolabeled eotaxin specifically and with high affinity, comparable to the binding affinity observed with eosinophils. This receptor also bound RANTES and MCP-3 with high affinity, but not other CC or CXC chemokines. Furthermore, receptor transfectants generated in a murine B cell lymphoma cell line migrated in transwell chemotaxis assays to eotaxin, RANTES, and MCP-3, but not to any other chemokines. A monoclonal antibody recognizing CKR-3 was used to show that eosinophils, but not other leukocyte types, expressed this receptor. This pattern of expression was confirmed by Northern blot with RNA from highly purified leukocyte subsets. The restricted expression of CKR-3 on eosinophils and the fidelity of eotaxin binding to CKR-3, provides a potential mechanism for the selective recruitment and migration of eosinophils within tissues. PMID:8676064

1996-01-01

260

Notch Signaling in Leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent discoveries indicate that gain-of-function mutations in the Notch1 receptor are very common in human T cell acute lym- phoblastic leukemia\\/lymphoma. This review discusses what these mutations have taught us about normal and pathophysiologic Notch1 signaling, and how these insights may lead to new targeted therapies for patients with this aggressive form of cancer.

Jon C. Aster; Warren S. Pear; Stephen C. Blacklow

2008-01-01

261

Leukemia Steering Committee  

Cancer.gov

The LKSC follows an efficient, cost-effective, science-driven, and transparent process to identify and promote the "Best Science" in clinical research on leukemia and related diseases by addressing the design and prioritization of phase III trials and large phase II studies.

262

Myelodysplasia nd the leukemias  

Microsoft Academic Search

The armistice after World War II marked the beginning of an era that was to last to the end of the present century. It was an era in which many changes in medicine and nursing combined to alter the entire philosophy of managing malignant disease. More specifically, the fluid-phase tumors, which comprise myelodysplasia and the leukemias, were singled out for

Peter Jacobs

1997-01-01

263

Pulmonary Embolism in a Patient with Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Causal or Coincidental?  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immune-mediated disease characterized by infiltration of the esophageal mucosa with eosinophils and concomitant esophageal dysfunction. Though there are well-described associations between certain chronic inflammatory conditions and venous thromboembolism, there have been no reports of venous thromboembolism occurring in eosinophilic esophagitis. We report the case of a 33-year-old man with severe eosinophilic esophagitis resulting in recurrent esophageal strictures who was unresponsive to oral viscous budesonide therapy, and who developed an isolated pulmonary embolism in the absence of risk factors for venous thromboembolism. We then discuss potential mechanisms for venous thromboembolism in eosinophilic esophagitis, such as inflammation-mediated hypercoagulability, hypereosinophilia, and immunoglobulin E-mediated platelet activation. PMID:23626508

Jones, Patricia D.; Moll, Stephan; Dellon, Evan S.

2013-01-01

264

Acute eosinophilic pneumonia in a New York City firefighter exposed to World Trade Center dust.  

PubMed

We report a sentinel case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia in a firefighter exposed to high concentrations of World Trade Center dust during the rescue effort from September 11 to 24. The firefighter presented with a Pa(O2) of 53 mm Hg and responded to oxygen and corticosteroids. Computed tomography scan showed patchy ground glass density, thickened bronchial walls, and bilateral pleural effusions. Bronchoalveolar lavage recovered 70% eosinophils, with only 1% eosinophils in peripheral blood. Eosinophils were not degranulated and increased levels of interleukin-5 were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum. Mineralogic analysis counted 305 commercial asbestos fibers/10(6) macrophages including those with high aspect ratios, and significant quantities of fly ash and degraded fibrous glass. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is a rare consequence of acute high dust exposure. World Trade Center dust consists of large particle-size silicates, but fly ash and asbestos fibers may be found in bronchoalveolar lavage cells. PMID:12231487

Rom, William N; Weiden, Michael; Garcia, Roberto; Yie, Ting An; Vathesatogkit, Pratan; Tse, Doris B; McGuinness, Georgeann; Roggli, Victor; Prezant, David

2002-09-15

265

The lactoferrin receptor may mediate the reduction of eosinophils in the duodenum of pigs consuming milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin.  

PubMed

Lactoferrin is part of the immune system and multiple tissues including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, liver, and lung contain receptors for lactoferrin. Lactoferrin has many functions, including antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and iron binding. Additionally, lactoferrin inhibits the migration of eosinophils, which are constitutively present in the GI tract, and increase during inflammation. Lactoferrin suppresses eosinophil infiltration into the lungs and eosinophil migration in -vitro. Healthy pigs have a large population of eosinophils in their small intestine and like humans, pigs have small intestinal lactoferrin receptors (LFR); thus, pigs were chosen to investigate the effects of consumption of milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF-milk) on small intestinal eosinophils and expression of eosinophilic cytokines. In addition, LFR localization was analyzed in duodenum and circulating eosinophils to determine if the LFR could play a role in lactoferrin's ability to inhibit eosinophil migration. In the duodenum there were significantly fewer eosinophils/unit area in pigs fed rhLF-milk compared to pigs fed control milk (p = 0.025); this was not seen in the ileum (p = 0.669). In the duodenum, no differences were observed in expression of the LFR, or any eosinophil migratory cytokines, and the amount of LFR protein was not different (p = 0.386). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed that within the duodenum the LFR localized on the brush border of villi, crypts, and within the lamina propria. Circulating eosinophils also contained LFRs, which may be a mechanism allowing lactoferrin to directly inhibit eosinophil migration. PMID:25085595

Cooper, Caitlin; Nonnecke, Eric; Lönnerdal, Bo; Murray, James

2014-10-01

266

Human eosinophils can express the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha.  

PubMed Central

By in situ hybridization, 44-100% of the blood eosinophils from five patients with hypereosinophilia and four normal subjects exhibited intense hybridization signals for TNF-alpha mRNA. TNF-alpha protein was detectable by immunohistochemistry in blood eosinophils of hypereosinophilic subjects, and purified blood eosinophils from three atopic donors exhibited cycloheximide-inhibitable spontaneous release of TNF-alpha in vitro. Many blood eosinophils (39-91%) from hypereosinophilic donors exhibited intense labeling for macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) mRNA, whereas eosinophils of normal donors demonstrated only weak or undetectable hybridization signals for MIP-1 alpha mRNA. Most tissue eosinophils infiltrating nasal polyps were strongly positive for both TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha mRNA. By Northern blot analysis, highly enriched blood eosinophils from a patient with the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome exhibited differential expression of TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha mRNA. These findings indicate that human eosinophils represent a potential source of TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha, that levels of expression of mRNA for both cytokines are high in the blood eosinophils of hypereosinophilic donors and in eosinophils infiltrating nasal polyps, that the eosinophils of normal subjects express higher levels of TNF-alpha than MIP-1 alpha mRNA, and that eosinophils purified from the blood of atopic donors can release TNF-alpha in vitro. Images PMID:8514874

Costa, J J; Matossian, K; Resnick, M B; Beil, W J; Wong, D T; Gordon, J R; Dvorak, A M; Weller, P F; Galli, S J

1993-01-01

267

Leukemia and Benzene  

PubMed Central

Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called “second cancer” that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called “niches” that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these “niches” may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

Snyder, Robert

2012-01-01

268

Idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia in children: the French experience  

PubMed Central

Background Idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia is extremely rare in children and adults. We present herein the first series describing the specificities of idiopathic chronic (ICEP) and acute (IAEP) eosinophilic pneumonia in children. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all cases of ICEP and IAEP in children that were retrieved from French Reference Centers for rare pediatric lung diseases. Results Five cases of pediatric ICEP were identified. Corticosteroid or immunosuppressive therapy dramatically improved the outcome in three cases. The remaining two cases had a persistent interstitial pattern with progressive development of cystic airspace lesions. Three cases of IAEP in adolescents were reported, with one requiring four days of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Conclusion ICEP is a rare disease with a polymorphic clinical presentation in children. We identified patients with persistent interstitial patterns progressing to cystic airspace regions, for which the boundaries with idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are difficult to establish. We therefore propose a specific pediatric definition and classification algorithm. IAEP in children remains an inflammatory reaction of the lung to an acute toxic exposure, mainly tobacco, as in adults. International studies are required to comprehensively assess the various clinical forms of the disease as well as the appropriate therapeutic regimens. PMID:24555756

2014-01-01

269

Eosinophilic granuloma presenting as an epidural hematoma and cyst.  

PubMed

Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare immunologic disorder characterized by histiocyte proliferation in multiple organ systems. Eosinophilic granuloma, a benign bone lesion, represents a focal form of LCH. We experienced a case of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in a patient who presented with intracranial epidural hematoma and cyst on the midline of the frontal skull. A 10-year-old boy presented with a rapidly growing large scalp mass on the midline frontal area after mild head trauma. The scalp mass was painless and immobile. Plain skull x-ray showed a punched-out bone lesion. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a non-enhancing osteolytic lesion presenting with an epidural hematoma and cyst on the midline of the frontal skull. The lesion of the skull was completely resected and the patient's recovery was uneventful. The acute presentation of a solitary eosinophilic granuloma of skull with an epidural hematoma has been described in only five cases in the literature and we report the first case of LCH presenting as an intracranial epidural hematoma on frontal area. PMID:19096637

Lee, Young-Suk; Kwon, Jeong-Taik; Park, Yong-Sook

2008-06-01

270

Elimination diets in the management of eosinophilic esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic esophagitis, an increasingly recognized chronic inflammatory disorder isolated to the esophagus, is triggered by an abnormal allergic response to dietary antigens. Current treatment includes swallowed topical steroids and dietary modification, which aim to resolve symptoms and prevent long-term complications such as formation of strictures. The dietary approach has become more widely accepted because long-term steroid therapy is associated with potential risks. Dietary treatment includes elemental and elimination diets. An exclusive elemental diet, which requires replacement of all intact protein with amino acid-based formula, offers the best response of all available therapies, with remission in up to 96% of subjects proving it to be superior to all other available therapies including topical steroids. However, compliance with this approach is challenging because of poor taste and monotony. The high cost of formula and the associated psychosocial problems are additional drawbacks of this approach. Empiric and allergy test-directed elimination diets have gained popularity given that elimination of a limited number of foods is much easier and as such is more readily acceptable. There is a growing body of literature supporting this type of therapy in both children and adults. This paper reviews the evidence for all types of dietary therapy in eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:24920928

Wechsler, Joshua B; Schwartz, Sally; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F

2014-01-01

271

Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-08-18

272

How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?  

MedlinePLUS

... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Most types of cancer are assigned a ... other organs. The outlook for the person with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) depends on other information, such as the ...

273

Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... to Expect Ebola: What to Know Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Juvenile ... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

274

Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

2010-09-21

275

MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-02-09

276

Imatinib Mesylate and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2013-01-22

277

Temsirolimus and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2013-01-11

278

Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

2009-01-29

279

Down syndrome preleukemia and leukemia.  

PubMed

Children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute leukemias acute have unique biological, cytogenetic, and intrinsic factors that affect their treatment and outcome. Myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome (ML-DS) is associated with high event-free survival (EFS) rates and frequently preceded by a preleukemia condition, the transient abnormal hematopoiesis (TAM) present at birth. For acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), their EFS and overall survival are poorer than non-DS ALL, it is important to enroll them on therapeutic trials, including relapse trials; investigate new agents that could potentially improve their leukemia-free survival; and strive to maximize the supportive care these patients need. PMID:25435116

Maloney, Kelly W; Taub, Jeffrey W; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Roberts, Irene; Vyas, Paresh

2015-02-01

280

Semaphorin 7A is expressed on airway eosinophils and upregulated by IL-5 family cytokines.  

PubMed

Semaphorin 7A (sema7a) plays a major role in TGF-?1-induced lung fibrosis. Based on the accumulating evidence that eosinophils contribute to fibrosis/remodeling in the airway, we hypothesized that airway eosinophils may be a significant source of sema7a. In vivo, sema7a was expressed on the surface of circulating eosinophils and upregulated on bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophils obtained after segmental bronchoprovocation with allergen. Based on mRNA levels in unfractionated and isolated bronchoalveolar cells, eosinophils are the predominant source of sema7a. In vitro, among the members of the IL-5-family cytokines, sema7a protein on the surface of blood eosinophils was increased more by IL-3 than by GM-CSF or IL-5. Cytokine-induced expression of cell surface sema7a required translation of newly synthesized protein. Finally, a recombinant sema7a induced alpha-smooth muscle actin production in human bronchial fibroblasts. semaphorin 7A is a potentially important modulator of eosinophil profibrotic functions in the airway remodeling of patients with chronic asthma. PMID:24333536

Esnault, Stephane; Kelly, Elizabeth A; Johansson, Mats W; Liu, Lin Ying; Han, Shih-Tsung; Akhtar, Moneeb; Sandbo, Nathan; Mosher, Deane F; Denlinger, Loren C; Mathur, Sameer K; Malter, James S; Jarjour, Nizar N

2014-01-01

281

Blood Eosinophil Levels in Newborns with Severe Indirect Hyperbilirubinemia Treated with Phototherapy  

PubMed Central

Objective: Newborns who suffer from jaundice and/or receive phototherapy (PT) are at a higher risk of developing asthma. In this study we aimed to investigate the relationship between bilirubin and peripheral eosinophil counts in newborns with severe hyperbilirubinemia needing PT. Methods: In this study, a retrospective analysis was performed on 306 newborns with severe hyperbilirubinemia with gestational age ?35 weeks (Group 1) and the control group consisted of 295 age and gender-matched newborns (Group 2). Total serum bilirubin, hemoglobin, albumin, leucocyte and eosinophil counts before and after PT were recorded from medical charts. Findings : All the patients in Group 1 received phototherapy and 77 (25.2%) of them needed exchange transfusion (ET). Before receiving PT, the patients in Group 1 had lower levels of Hb and higher levels of total serum bilirubin and lymphocytes than those in Group 2 although there was no statistically significant difference with regard to peripheral eosinophil counts. Eosinophils were detected to be numerically lower in Group 1. Higher bilirubin subgroups had also lower eosinophil counts. The patients in Group 1 had lower levels of Hb, leucocyte, albumin and higher levels of eosinophil following PT. Conclusion: Peripheral eosinophil count may be affected by bilirubin levels and/or phototherapy. There is a need for further clinical research based on different models.

Ayd?n, Banu; Beken, Serdar; Zenciro?lu, Ay?egül; Dilli, Dilek; Okumu?, Nurullah

2014-01-01

282

Periostin is a systemic biomarker of eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatic patients  

PubMed Central

Background Eosinophilic airway inflammation is heterogeneous in asthmatic patients. We recently described a distinct subtype of asthma defined by the expression of genes inducible by TH2 cytokines in bronchial epithelium. This gene signature, which includes periostin, is present in approximately half of asthmatic patients and correlates with eosinophilic airway inflammation. However, identification of this subtype depends on invasive airway sampling, and hence noninvasive biomarkers of this phenotype are desirable. Objective We sought to identify systemic biomarkers of eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatic patients. Methods We measured fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (Feno), peripheral blood eosinophil, periostin, YKL-40, and IgE levels and compared these biomarkers with airway eosinophilia in asthmatic patients. Results We collected sputum, performed bronchoscopy, and matched peripheral blood samples from 67 asthmatic patients who remained symptomatic despite maximal inhaled corticosteroid treatment (mean FEV1, 60% of predicted value; mean Asthma Control Questionnaire [ACQ] score, 2.7). Serum periostin levels are significantly increased in asthmatic patients with evidence of eosinophilic airway inflammation relative to those with minimal eosinophilic airway inflammation. A logistic regression model, including sex, age, body mass index, IgE levels, blood eosinophil numbers, Feno levels, and serum periostin levels, in 59 patients with severe asthma showed that, of these indices, the serum periostin level was the single best predictor of airway eosinophilia (P = .007). Conclusion Periostin is a systemic biomarker of airway eosinophilia in asthmatic patients and has potential utility in patient selection for emerging asthma therapeutics targeting TH2 inflammation. PMID:22857879

Jia, Guiquan; Erickson, Richard W.; Choy, David F.; Mosesova, Sofia; Wu, Lawren C.; Solberg, Owen D.; Shikotra, Aarti; Carter, Richard; Audusseau, Séverine; Hamid, Qutayba; Bradding, Peter; Fahy, John V.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Harris, Jeffrey M.; Arron, Joseph R.

2012-01-01

283

Response of eosinophilic granule cells of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata, Teleostei) to bacteria and bacterial products.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic granule cells in the gills and peritoneal exudate of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) are characterized by the presence of prominent eosinophilic granules in their cytoplasm and are here described for the first time. The oval granules of these cells contain an electron-dense inclusion surrounded by a less dense filamentous matrix and are peroxidase- and acid phosphatase-negative. Unlike other granulocytes of gilthead seabream, eosinophilic granule cells do not ingest bacteria in vivo. The intraperitoneal injection of extracellular products of Pasteurella piscicida induces mobilization of eosinophilic granule cells to the blood and other tissues and causes changes in their structure. Shortly after injection, the granules of eosinophilic granule cells become swollen and some fuse with the cell membrane. From 7 h post-injection, many eosinophilic granule cells in the gills degenerate and are then phagocytosed by macrophages, which are especially abundant after 24 h. From 24 h to 72 h, eosinophilic granule cells from the gills contain abundant autolysosomes together with granules of a normal morphology. PMID:9011398

Noya, M; Lamas, J

1997-01-01

284

Semaphorin 7A is expressed on airway eosinophils and upregulated by IL-5 family cytokines  

PubMed Central

Semaphorin 7A (Sema7A) plays a major role in TGF-?1-induced lung fibrosis. Based on the accumulating evidence that eosinophils contribute to fibrosis/remodeling in the airway, we hypothesized that airway eosinophils may be a significant source of sema7A. In vivo, sema7A was expressed on the surface of circulating eosinophils and upregulated on bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophils obtained after segmental bronchoprovocation with allergen. Based on mRNA levels in unfractionated and isolated bronchoalveolar cells, eosinophils are the predominant source of sema7A. In vitro, among the members of the IL-5-family cytokines, sema7A protein on the surface of blood eosinophils was increased more by IL-3 than by GM-CSF or IL-5. Cytokine-induced expression of cell surface sema7A required translation of newly synthetized protein. Finally, a recombinant sema7A induced alpha-smooth muscle actin production in human bronchial fibroblasts. Semaphorin 7A is a potentially important modulator of eosinophil profibrotic functions in the airway remodeling of patients with chronic asthma. PMID:24333536

Esnault, Stephane; Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Johansson, Mats W.; Liu, Lin Ying; Han, Shih-Tsung; Akhtar, Moneeb; Sandbo, Nathan; Mosher, Deane F.; Denlinger, Loren C.; Mathur, Sameer K.; Malter, James S.; Jarjour, Nizar N.

2013-01-01

285

SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-01-10

286

Siglec-F Inhibition Reduces Esophageal Eosinophilia and Angiogenesis in a Mouse Model of Eosinophilic Esophagitis  

PubMed Central

Objectives Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a disorder characterized histologically by tissue eosinophilia. Sialic acid–binding immunoglobulin-like lectin (Siglec-F) is a receptor highly expressed on mouse eosinophils and mediates eosinophilic apoptosis. We investigated whether administration of an anti-Siglec-F Ab would reduce esophageal eosinophilic inflammation and remodeling in a mouse model of egg ovalbumin (OVA)–induced EoE. Subjects and Methods Three groups of mice were studied (no OVA, OVA + anti-Siglec-F Ab, and OVA + isotype control Ab). Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally and then challenged chronically with intraesophageal OVA. Levels of esophageal eosinophils and features of remodeling (angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor expression, deposition of fibronectin, basal zone hyperplasia, and fibrosis) were quantitated by immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Results Administration of an anti-Siglec-F Ab to OVA-challenged mice significantly reduced levels of esophageal eosinophils, down to levels noted in non-OVA-challenged mice. The anti-Siglec-F Ab also reduced features of OVA-induced remodeling, including angiogenesis, basal zone hyperplasia, and fibronectin deposition. The reduced angiogenesis in anti-Siglec-F Ab-treated mice was associated with reduced numbers of vascular endothelial growth factor–positive cells in the esophagus. The anti-Siglec-F antibody did not significantly reduce esophageal fibrosis as assessed by trichrome staining. Conclusions Administration of an anti-Siglec-F antibody significantly decreased the number of eosinophils in the esophagus in a mouse model of OVA-induced EoE. The reduction in eosinophilic inflammation was associated with a significant decrease in levels of angiogenesis, deposition of fibronectin, and basal zone hyperplasia. Studies in this pre-clinical model of EoE suggest that Siglec-F (and its human paralog Siglec-8) may be novel therapeutic targets to reduce eosinophilic inflammation in EoE. PMID:21970996

Rubinstein, Eitan; Cho, Jae Youn; Rosenthal, Peter; Chao, James; Miller, Marina; Pham, Alexa; Aceves, Seema S.; Varki, Ajit; Broide, David H.

2014-01-01

287

Eosinophils and mast cells in chronic gastritis: Possible implications in carcinogenesis  

PubMed Central

Eosinophils and mast cells participate in the immune response against Helicobacter pylori, but their involvement in the gastric precancerous process is unclear. This study aimed to estimate eosinophil and mast cell density in antral mucosa in subjects from two Colombian populations with contrasting gastric cancer risks. Gastric mucosa biopsies were collected from 117 adult males (72 from a high-risk area and 45 from a low-risk area). A histopathology score was used to quantify severity of the lesions. Quantitation of eosinophils in hematoxylin-eosin stained sections and mast cells in immunostained sections for CD117/c-Kit was performed. Helicobacter pylori infection and genotyping were assessed in Steiner stain and PCR, respectively. Logistic regression models and semi-parametric cubic smoothing splines were used for analysis of the results. Eosinophil density was significantly higher in subjects from the low-risk area compared with subjects from the high-risk area. In both populations, eosinophil density increased with the histopathology score in the progression of lesions from normal morphology to multifocal atrophic gastritis. Intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia specimens showed further increase in eosinophil density in the high-risk area, but an abrupt decrease in the low-risk area. Mast cell density increased in parallel to the histopathology score in both populations. Our results suggest that eosinophils play a dual role in chronic gastritis. In the low-risk area, elevated eosinophil density represents a Th2-biased response that may downregulate the effects of proinflammatory cytokines preventing cancer development. In contrast, in the high-risk area, eosinophils might promote a Th1-type response leading to progression of precancerous lesions. PMID:18614201

Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Camargo, M. Constanza; Mera, Robertino M.; Delgado, Alberto G.; Peek, Richard M.; Correa, Hernan; Schneider, Barbara G.; Sicinschi, Liviu A.; Mora, Yolanda; Bravo, Luis E.; Correa, Pelayo

2008-01-01

288

Expression and regulation of L-selectin on eosinophils from human adults and neonates.  

PubMed

L-Selectin, previously known as LEC.CAM-1, LECAM-1, LAM1, and as the MEL-14, Leu-8, TQ1, and DREG-56 antigens, is a leukocyte membrane protein that participates in adhesion to endothelium. We studied its expression on eosinophils using flow cytometry and the MAb Dreg-56 and Leu-8. Unstimulated peripheral blood eosinophils from healthy adults expressed about one third the level of L-selectin as neutrophils (mean +/- SD specific fluorescence: 20.9 +/- 3.2 versus 54.5 +/- 8.4, p = 0.0001, n = 18). After stimulation with A23187, L-selectin expression on eosinophils was rapidly lost. This was temporally correlated with increased expression of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18); the kinetics on eosinophils and neutrophils were similar. Eosinophil expression of L-selectin decreased modestly after stimulation with platelet activating factor, but was minimally affected by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, leukotriene B4, or C5a compared with their effects on neutrophils. Eosinophils from cord blood of healthy neonates born at term expressed less L-selectin than adult eosinophils (10.4 +/- 3.8 versus 19.4 +/- 2.7, p = 0.0001, n = 9); the relative reduction was the same as on cord blood neutrophils (36.4 +/- 8.2 versus 55.5 +/- 4.8, p = 0.0001, n = 9). Relative to baseline expression, the responses of neonatal and adult cells to stimulation did not differ. We conclude that neonatal eosinophils have abnormalities in L-selectin expression similar to neonatal neutrophils and suggest that decreased expression of L-selectin and a diminished responsiveness to direct stimulation with chemotactic factors are possible mechanisms that may limit the exudation of eosinophils. PMID:1279509

Smith, J B; Kunjummen, R D; Kishimoto, T K; Anderson, D C

1992-10-01

289

Immunodetection of occult eosinophils in lung tissue biopsies may help predict survival in acute lung injury  

PubMed Central

Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a serious respiratory disorder for which therapy is primarily supportive once infection is excluded. Surgical lung biopsy may rule out other diagnoses, but has not been generally useful for therapy decisions or prognosis in this setting. Importantly, tissue and peripheral blood eosinophilia, the hallmarks of steroid-responsive acute eosinophilic pneumonia, are not commonly linked with ALI. We hypothesized that occult eosinophilic pneumonia may explain better outcomes for some patients with ALI. Methods Immunohistochemistry using a novel monoclonal antibody recognizing eosinophil peroxidase (EPX-mAb) was used to assess intrapulmonary eosinophil accumulation/degranulation. Lung biopsies from ALI patients (n = 20) were identified following review of a pathology database; 45% of which (i.e., 9/20) displayed classical diffuse alveolar damage (ALI-DAD). Controls were obtained from uninvolved tissue in patients undergoing lobectomy for lung cancer (n = 10). Serial biopsy sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and subjected to EPX-mAb immunohistochemistry. Results EPX-mAb immunohistochemistry provided a >40-fold increased sensitivity to detect eosinophils in the lung relative to H&E stained sections. This increased sensitivity led to the identification of higher numbers of eosinophils in ALI patients compared with controls; differences using H&E staining alone were not significant. Clinical assessments showed that lung infiltrating eosinophil numbers were higher in ALI patients that survived hospitalization compared with non-survivors. A similar conclusion was reached quantifying eosinophil degranulation in each biopsy. Conclusion The enhanced sensitivity of EPX-mAb immunohistochemistry uniquely identified eosinophil accumulation/degranulation in patients with ALI relative to controls. More importantly, this method was a prognostic indicator of patient survival. These observations suggest that EPX-mAb immunohistochemistry may represent a diagnostic biomarker identifying a subset of ALI patients with improved clinical outcomes. PMID:21871108

2011-01-01

290

Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia  

PubMed Central

In three patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia who were heterozygous at the X-linked glucose-6-phospháte dehydrogenase locus, lymphocytes were studied to determine if they had the same stem cell origin as the leukemic myeloid cells. Normal tissues such as skin had both B and A glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes, but the leukemic myelogenous cells displayed only one isoenzyme type, consistent with their clonal origin. A population of cells with undoubted thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte characteristics had both isoenzymes. Presumably, then, these T cells did not arise from the leukemic stem cell, either because they antedated the development of leukemia in that stem cell or, more likely, because they arose from progenitors not involved by the disease. In contrast, another population of lymphocytes showed only one isoenzyme type, suggesting that it arose from the chronic myelocytic leukemia stem cell. However, although this population contained many cells with the characteristics of bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocytes, it is not certain that the single enzyme produced by the cells over all can be attributed to B lymphocytes rather than to contaminating non-B-lymphoid cells. PMID:308953

Fialkow, Philip J.; Denman, A. Michael; Jacobson, Robert J.; Lowenthal, Mark N.

1978-01-01

291

Eosinophilic Cystitis Mimicking Bladder Tumour – A Rare Case Report  

PubMed Central

A 16–year–old male presented with urinary urgency, a frequency of 4 months duration and intermittent gross haematuria which were there since one month. Eosinophilia was noted in complete blood count and CT KUB with contrast showed a filling defect in the right lateral wall, over the vesicoureteric junction. Cystoscopy revealed a sessile mass lesion over right vesico–ureteric junction, with bullous oedema . Rest of the mucosa was normal. Transurethral resection of lesion was performed and histological examination showed features of eosinophilic cystitis. Patient was treated with corticosteroids, antimicrobial agents and antihistaminics and he is recovering well. We are presenting this case for its rare presentation and its possibility of mimicking a bladder tumour. Biopsy of the lesion was diagnostic and an early treatment showed good results. PMID:24298501

D, Manimaran; T M, Karthikeyan; M, Sreenivasulu; V R, Mrinalini; V, Gopinath

2013-01-01

292

Eosinophilic cystitis: three cases, and a review over 10 years.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is a rare disease. We describe three cases, where presentations of the disease are similar. To highlight probable causes of the disease, symptoms, clinical findings and treatment modalities, we reviewed 56 cases over a 10-year period. The most common symptoms were frequency, dysuria, urgency, pain and haematuria. Common clinical findings were presence of bladder mass, peripheral eosinophilia and thickened bladder wall. A variety of medical treatments were used, most frequently steroids, antibiotics and antihistamines. Recurrence occurred in patients on tapering or discontinuing prednisone, among other reasons. There is no consensus about the treatment of EC, but In light of our findings in this review, the treatment of choice in our department will be tapered prednisone over 6-8?weeks in combination with antihistamine. PMID:25312971

Mosholt, Karina Sif Sřndergaard; Dahl, Claus; Azawi, Nessn Htum

2014-01-01

293

Eosinophilic cystitis mimicking bladder tumour - a rare case report.  

PubMed

A 16-year-old male presented with urinary urgency, a frequency of 4 months duration and intermittent gross haematuria which were there since one month. Eosinophilia was noted in complete blood count and CT KUB with contrast showed a filling defect in the right lateral wall, over the vesicoureteric junction. Cystoscopy revealed a sessile mass lesion over right vesico-ureteric junction, with bullous oedema . Rest of the mucosa was normal. Transurethral resection of lesion was performed and histological examination showed features of eosinophilic cystitis. Patient was treated with corticosteroids, antimicrobial agents and antihistaminics and he is recovering well. We are presenting this case for its rare presentation and its possibility of mimicking a bladder tumour. Biopsy of the lesion was diagnostic and an early treatment showed good results. PMID:24298501

D, Manimaran; T M, Karthikeyan; M, Sreenivasulu; V R, Mrinalini; V, Gopinath

2013-10-01

294

Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography  

PubMed Central

Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr?/?) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

2014-01-01

295

Different Sarcocystis spp. are present in bovine eosinophilic myositis.  

PubMed

It has been suggested that Sarcocystis species are associated with bovine eosinophilic myositis (BEM). To date, parasite identification in this myopathy has been based on morphological techniques. The aim of the present study was to use molecular techniques to identify Sarcocystis species inside lesions of BEM. Histologically, BEM lesions of 97 condemned carcasses were examined for the presence of Sarcocystis species. Intralesional and extralesional cysts were collected using laser capture microdissection and the species was determined with a PCR-based technique based on 18S rDNA. Intralesional sarcocysts or remnants were found in BEM lesions in 28% of the carcasses. The majority (82%) of intralesional Sarcocystis species were found to be S. hominis. However S. cruzi and S. hirsuta were also found, as well as an unidentified species. It can be concluded that Sarcocystis species present in lesions of BEM are not restricted to one species. PMID:23870431

Vangeel, Lieve; Houf, Kurt; Geldhof, Peter; De Preter, Katleen; Vercruysse, Jozef; Ducatelle, Richard; Chiers, Koen

2013-11-01

296

Extensive inflammatory eosinophilic bladder tumors in children: experience with three cases.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis, an uncommon lesion, is rare in children; < 25 cases have been reported. The intense inflammatory changes in the bladder wall associated with this lesion may produce heaped-up excrescences, which resemble vesical rhabdomyosarcoma. Our experience with 3 patients shows that the initial diagnosis of eosinophilic cystitis may not be easily made, and that the lesions produced may mask other disease processes. We alsoreport the fifth case of eosinophilic infiltration of the bladder occurring in association with chronic granulomatous disease. PMID:12356107

Redman, John F; Parham, David M

2002-09-01

297

Eosinophilic Pleural Effusion: A Rare Complication of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy  

PubMed Central

Background. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has been widely used to treat renal stones. The procedure is relatively safe with minor complications. Case. The patient is a 32-year-old man who presented with left sided pleural effusion after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Results. The pleural effusion study revealed an exudative fluid rich in eosinophils (30%). So, the diagnosis of eosinophilic pleural effusion as a complication of lithotripsy was made. Conclusion. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy should be regarded as an etiology of unexplained eosinophilic pleural effusion after this procedure. PMID:23935633

Mokhtari, Maral; Kumar, Perikala Vijayananda; Ghayumi, Mohammad-Ali

2013-01-01

298

Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia.  

PubMed

Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE. PMID:25548504

Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

2014-12-21

299

Esophageal dilations in eosinophilic esophagitis: A single center experience  

PubMed Central

AIM: To diagnose the clinical and histologic features that may be associated with or predictive of the need for dilation and dilation related complications; examine the safety of dilation in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). METHODS: The medical records of all patients diagnosed with EoE between January 2002 and July 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Esophageal biopsies were reexamined by an experienced pathologist to confirm the diagnosis (? 15 eos/hpf per current guidelines). Patients were divided into 2 groups: patients who did not receive dilation therapy and those who did. Demographics, clinical history, the use of pharmacologic therapy, endoscopic and pathology findings, and the number of biopsies and dilations carried out, if any, and their locations were recorded for each patient. The dilation group was further examined based on the interval between diagnosis and dilation, and whether or not a complication occurred. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients were identified with EoE and 22 (36%) of them underwent esophageal dilations for stricture/narrowing. The peak eos/hpf was significantly higher in patients who received a dilation (P = 0.04). Four (18% of pts.) minor complications occurred: deep mucosal tear 1, and small mucosal tears 3. There were no cases of esophageal perforations. Higher peak eos/hpf counts were not associated with increased risk of complications. CONCLUSION: Esophageal dilation appears to be a safe procedure in EoE patients, carrying a low complication rate. No correlation was found between the peak of eosinophil count and complication rate. Complications can occur independently of the histologic features. The long-term outcome of EoE treatment, with or without dilation, needs to be determined. PMID:25071351

Ukleja, Andrew; Shiroky, Jennifer; Agarwal, Amitesh; Allende, Daniela

2014-01-01

300

Eosinophilic granuloma of the temporal bone in children.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) is a bony destructive disease that frequently occurs in children; it is a subtype of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The aims of this study were to detect the presenting features of temporal bone lesions in children and to evaluate the efficacy of surgery combined with radiotherapy in treatment of the disease. A retrospective study on 12 children with EG of the temporal bone was done. Computed tomography and hearing assessment were performed for all patients. All patients were treated with cortical mastoidectomy followed by postoperative radiotherapy. Follow-up was carried out for at least 2 years. The patients' presenting symptoms were external ear canal mass in 10 patients (83.3%), postauricular swelling in 8 patients (66.7%), and persistent otorrhea in 4 patients (33.3%). Ten patients (83.3%) showed conductive hearing loss, whereas 2 patients (16.7%) showed mixed hearing loss on the affected side. Computed tomography showed osteolytic defects without sclerotic margins filled with soft tissue masses involving the mastoid bone. Histopathologic examination showed eosinophils and Langerhans cells that were immune reactive for CD1 antigen and S-100 protein. Postoperative follow-up showed complete cure of the disease in 10 children (83.3%), with recurrence detected in 2 patients (16.7%) who needed second surgical intervention. We concluded that temporal bone EG in children may present with features that mimic the features of chronic suppurative otitis media. However, computed tomography and histopathologic examination are diagnostic. Cortical mastoidectomy together with postoperative radiotherapy is an achievable treatment in most cases. PMID:24717312

Abdel-Aziz, Mosaad; Rashed, Mohammed; Khalifa, Badawi; Talaat, Ahmed; Nassar, Ahmed

2014-05-01

301

Increase of nitrosative stress in patients with eosinophilic pneumonia  

PubMed Central

Background Exhaled nitric oxide (NO) production is increased in asthma and reflects the degree of airway inflammation. The alveolar NO concentration (Calv) in interstitial pneumonia is reported to be increased. However, it remains unknown whether NO production is increased and nitrosative stress occurs in eosinophilic pneumonia (EP). We hypothesized that nitrosative stress markers including Calv, inducible type of NO synthase (iNOS), and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), are upregulated in EP. Methods Exhaled NO including fractional exhaled NO (FENO) and Calv was measured in ten healthy subjects, 13 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and 13 patients with EP. iNOS expression and 3-NT formation were assessed by immunocytochemistory in BALf cells. The exhaled NO, lung function, and systemic inflammatory markers of the EP patients were investigated after corticosteroid treatment for 4 weeks. Results The Calv levels in the EP group (14.4 ± 2.0 ppb) were significantly higher than those in the healthy subjects (5.1 ± 0.6 ppb, p < 0.01) and the IPF groups (6.3 ± 0.6 ppb, p < 0.01) as well as the FENO and the corrected Calv levels (all p < 0.01). More iNOS and 3-NT positive cells were observed in the EP group compared to the healthy subject and IPF patient. The Calv levels had significant positive correlations with both iNOS (r = 0.858, p < 0.05) and 3-NT positive cells (r = 0.924, p < 0.01). Corticosteroid treatment significantly reduced both the FENO (p < 0.05) and the Calv levels (p < 0.01). The magnitude of reduction in the Calv levels had a significant positive correlation with the peripheral blood eosinophil counts (r = 0.802, p < 0.05). Conclusions These results suggested that excessive nitrosative stress occurred in EP and that Calv could be a marker of the disease activity. PMID:21679473

2011-01-01

302

Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia  

PubMed Central

Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE.

Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

2014-01-01

303

Granulocytic sarcoma of the male breast in acute myeloblastic leukemia with concurrent deletion of 5q and trisomy 8.  

PubMed

We describe a unique case of Granulocytic Sarcoma (GS) in a male, who presented to us with a painless right breast mass without any prior history of Leukemia. GS is an extramedullary tumor of myeloproliferative precursors and may involve multiple sites of the body, but involvement of male breast is extremely rare. In the absence of clinical history or hematological abnormality, GS may be misdiagnosed, depending on the degree of myeloid differentiation present within the tumor. Often it is misdiagnosed as lymphoma. Diagnosis is made by finding eosinophilic myelocytes, myeloperoxidase, chloroacetate esterase staining, and lysozyme immunostain. Chemotherapy regimens similar to acute myeloid leukemia are recommended to treat GS. Recognition of this rare entity is important because early, aggressive chemotherapy can induce regression of the tumor and improve patient longevity. PMID:22937319

Rizwan, Muhammad; Islam, Md Monirul; Rehman, Zia Ur

2012-01-01

304

Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

1995-01-01

305

Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-01-22

306

SJG-136 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-09-27

307

Anti-IL-5 attenuates activation and surface density of ?2-integrins on circulating eosinophils after segmental antigen challenge  

PubMed Central

Background IL-5 activates ?M?2 integrin on blood eosinophils in vitro. Eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) following segmental antigen challenge have activated ?2-integrins. Objective To identify roles for IL-5 in regulating human eosinophil integrins in vivo. Methods Blood and BAL eosinophils were analyzed by flow cytometry in ten subjects with allergic asthma who underwent a segmental antigen challenge protocol before and after anti-IL-5 administration. Results Blood eosinophil reactivity with monoclonal antibody (mAb) KIM-127, which recognizes partially activated ?2-integrins, was decreased after anti-IL-5. Before anti-IL-5, surface densities of blood eosinophil ?2, ?M, and ?L integrin subunits increased modestly post-challenge. After anti-IL-5, such increases did not occur. Before or after anti-IL-5, surface densities of ?2,?M, ?L, and ?D and reactivity with KIM-127 and mAb CBRM1/5, which recognizes high-activity ?M?2, were similarly high on BAL eosinophils 48 h post-challenge. Density and activation state of ?1-integrins on blood and BAL eosinophils were not impacted by anti-IL-5, even though anti-IL-5 ablated a modest post-challenge increase on blood or BAL eosinophils of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), a receptor for P-selectin that causes activation of ?1-integrins. Forward scatter of blood eosinophils post-challenge was less heterogeneous and on the average decreased after anti-IL-5; however, anti-IL-5 had no effect on the decreased forward scatter of eosinophils in post-challenge BAL compared to eosinophils in blood. Blood eosinophil KIM-127 reactivity at the time of challenge correlated with the percentage of eosinophils in BAL post-challenge. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance IL-5 supports a heterogeneous population of circulating eosinophils with partially activated ?2-integrins and is responsible for upregulation of ?2-integrins and PSGL-1 on circulating eosinophils following segmental antigen challenge but has minimal effects on properties of eosinophils in BAL. Dampening of ?2-integrin function of eosinophils in transit to inflamed airway may contribute to the decrease in lung inflammation caused by anti-IL-5. PMID:23414537

Johansson, Mats W.; Gunderson, Kristin A.; Kelly, Elizabeth A. B.; Denlinger, Loren C.; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Mosher, Deane F.

2013-01-01

308

Eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis in an adolescent with mental retardation and pica disorder.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic meningitis or encephalitis is a rare disorder and is most commonly caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Humans are accidentally infected when they ingest raw snails or vegetables contaminated with the parasite larvae. Because of the improvement in sanitary food handling practices, the occurrence of A. cantonensis eosinophilic meningitis has been decreasing in Taiwan in recent decades. The common symptoms and signs of eosinophilic meningitis are severe headache, neck stiffness, paresthesia, vomiting, nausea, and fever. Acute urinary retention is a rare presentation. We report a case of A. cantonensis eosinophilic meningitis in an intellectually disabled patient who presented with acute urinary retention without any other meningeal signs. The patient received supportive treatment with corticosteroid therapy and was discharged and received urinary rehabilitation at home. PMID:23445744

Hsueh, Chang-Wei; Chen, Huan-Sheng; Li, Chen-Hua; Chen, Yu-Wei

2013-02-01

309

Eosinophilic cystitis in a patient with hypereosinophila syndrome: A case report.  

PubMed

Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a rare disorder that is characterized by hypereosinophilia and organ damage, caused by the infiltration of eosinophils. In rare cases, the urinary bladder may also be involved. The current case report presented a 56-year-old male with gross hematuria and hypereosinophilia. The diagnosis of eosinophilic cystitis associated HES was established. Oral prednisone with a slow tapering regimen was administered as the primary treatment for the patient, which achieved partial hematological remission and complete relief of cystitis during a six-month follow-up period. Although eosinophilic cystitis is not commonly the primary manifestation of HES, eosinophilic cystitis should be taken into consideration following the onset of urinary symptoms in patients with HES. PMID:24944595

Jiang, Peng; Wang, Chaojun; Jin, Baiye; Lin, Yiwei; Chen, Shanwen

2014-07-01

310

Eosinophilic cystitis in a patient with hypereosinophila syndrome: A case report  

PubMed Central

Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a rare disorder that is characterized by hypereosinophilia and organ damage, caused by the infiltration of eosinophils. In rare cases, the urinary bladder may also be involved. The current case report presented a 56-year-old male with gross hematuria and hypereosinophilia. The diagnosis of eosinophilic cystitis associated HES was established. Oral prednisone with a slow tapering regimen was administered as the primary treatment for the patient, which achieved partial hematological remission and complete relief of cystitis during a six-month follow-up period. Although eosinophilic cystitis is not commonly the primary manifestation of HES, eosinophilic cystitis should be taken into consideration following the onset of urinary symptoms in patients with HES. PMID:24944595

JIANG, PENG; WANG, CHAOJUN; JIN, BAIYE; LIN, YIWEI; CHEN, SHANWEN

2014-01-01

311

Expect the Unexpected: A Case of Isolated Eosinophilic Meningitis in Toxocariasis  

PubMed Central

We present the case of a young police officer suffering from headache without other neurological symptoms caused by isolated eosinophilic meningitis, which resulted from an infection with Toxocara cati, along with a discussion of the differential diagnosis. PMID:25535488

Sick, Christian; Hennerici, Michael G.

2014-01-01

312

ROLE OF MONOCYTES AND EOSINOPHILS IN RESPIRATORY SYNCTIAL VIRUS (RSV) INFECTION  

EPA Science Inventory

Role of Monocytes and Eosinophils in Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection Joleen M. Soukup and Susanne Becker US Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; ...

313

Expect the unexpected: a case of isolated eosinophilic meningitis in toxocariasis.  

PubMed

We present the case of a young police officer suffering from headache without other neurological symptoms caused by isolated eosinophilic meningitis, which resulted from an infection with Toxocara cati, along with a discussion of the differential diagnosis. PMID:25535488

Sick, Christian; Hennerici, Michael G

2014-09-01

314

Histopathologic study of eosinophilic bronchointerstitial pneumonia caused by Crenosoma striatum in the hedgehog.  

PubMed

Crenosoma striatum is a species of parasitic nematodes from the family Crenosomatidae responsible for pathologic lung lesions in the hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus). Infection with C. striatum can cause weight loss, dry cough, and bronchitis. In the present study, hedgehogs killed by road accidents, or trapped and found dead on farms in different parts of Mazandaran province (Iran), were transferred to the laboratory. After dissection, parasite samples collected from the lung were placed into 70% alcohol. After clarification with lactophenol and subsequent staining, the nematodes were identified as C. striatum according to previously published guidelines. For histopathologic examination, lung samples were collected. The tissues were fixed and following routine processing, sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Microscopic diagnoses included hyperemia, eosinophilic bronchointerstitial pneumonia, thickening of the interstitium, and eosinophilic microabscesses in bronchial airways. Eosinophilic pneumonia was characterized by eosinophil and other mononuclear leukocyte infiltration within the lung interstitium. Crenosoma striatum can lead to mortality in hedgehogs. PMID:25000695

Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Youssefi, Mohammad Reza; Mousapour, Aliasghar; Dozouri, Rohollah; Eshkevari, Shahab Ramezanpour; Nikzad, Mohammad; Nikzad, Reza; Omidzahir, Shila

2014-06-01

315

Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-04-30

316

Pseudo-tumoral eosinophilic cystitis in a 3 year-old girl.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is an uncommon form of bladder inflammation. It is a rare disorder in children and fewer than 25 cases have been described in the literature. We report a case of eosinophilic cystitis mimicking a bladder tumor in a 3 year-old girl with symptoms of urinary frequency. The diagnosis was confirmed with pathology and she underwent clinical treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:16274523

Guerra, Luis Antonio; Pike, John; Filler, Guido; Udjus, Kristin; de Nanassy, Joseph; Leonard, Michael

2005-10-01

317

An unusual cause of terminal hematuria in a child: Eosinophilic cystitis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the bladder; it rarely occurs in children. Patients typically show irritative urination symptoms frequently, with a possible need for urgency, alongside dysuria, gross haematuria, suprapubic pain and painful urination. Sometimes bladder mass accumulation with the possibility of malignancy is also observed. We present an 8-year-old male patient who gained admission for terminal hematuria and discuss the management of eosinophilic cystitis. PMID:25485018

Ozdo?an, Elif Bahat; Arslansoyu Çamlar, Seçil; Bilen, Sevcan; Imamo?lu, Mustafa; T?ra?, Sükran; Cansu, Ay?egül; Ozoran, Yavuz

2014-11-01

318

Role of cyclic GMP on inhibition by nitric oxide donors of human eosinophil chemotaxis in vitro  

PubMed Central

This study was designed to investigate the effects of the nitric oxide (NO) donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP), 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) on N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP, 1 × 10?7 M)-induced human eosinophil chemotaxis, cyclic guanosine-3?,5?-monophosphate (cGMP) levels, protein nitration and cytotoxicity. Human eosinophils were exposed to SNP, SIN-1 and SNAP (0.001–1.0 mM) for either short (10 min) or prolonged (90 min) time periods. Exposition of eosinophils with these NO donors significantly inhibited the eosinophil chemotaxis irrespective of whether cells were exposed to these agents for 10 or 90 min. No marked differences were detected among them regarding the profile of chemotaxis inhibition. Exposition of eosinophils to SNP, SIN-1 and SNAP (0.001–1.0 mM) markedly elevated the cGMP levels above basal levels, but the 90-min exposition resulted in significantly higher levels compared with the 10-min protocols (5.3±0.6 and 2.6±0.2 nM 1.5 × 106 cells?1, respectively). The cGMP levels achieved with SNAP were greater than SNP and SIN-1. The NO donors did not induce cell toxicity in any experimental condition used. Additionally, eosinophils exposed to SNP, SIN-1 and SNAP (1.0 mM each) either for 10 or 90 min did not show any tyrosine nitration in conditions where a strong nitration of bovine serum albumin was observed. Our findings show that inhibitory effects of fMLP-induced human eosinophil chemotaxis by NO donors at short or prolonged exposition time were accompanied by significant elevations of cGMP levels. However, additional elevations of cGMP levels do not change the functional profile (chemotaxis inhibition) of stimulated eosinophils. PMID:14744805

Thomazzi, Sara M; Moreira, Juliana; Marcondes, Sisi; Nucci, Gilberto De; Antunes, Edson

2004-01-01

319

Airway inflammation, airway responsiveness and cough before and after inhaled budesonide in patients with eosinophilic bronchitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Airway inflammation, airway responsiveness and cough before and after inhaled bude- sonide in patients with eosinophilic bronchitis. C.E. Brightling, R. Ward, A.J. Wardlaw, I.D. Pavord. #ERS Journals Ltd 2000. ABSTRACT: Eosinophilic bronchitis is a common cause of chronic cough, characterized by sputum eosinophilia similar to that seen in asthma, but unlike asthma the patients have no objective evidence of variable

C. E. Brightling; R. Ward; A. J. Wardlaw; I. D. Pavord

2000-01-01

320

Enhanced Tissue Factor Expression by Blood Eosinophils from Patients with Hypereosinophilia: A Possible Link with Thrombosis  

PubMed Central

Thrombotic risk is increased in eosinophil-mediated disorders, and several hypotheses have been proposed to link eosinophilia and thrombosis. In particular, eosinophils have been described as source of tissue factor (TF), the main initiator of blood coagulation; however, this aspect is still controversial. This study was aimed to evaluate whether TF expression varies in eosinophils isolated from normal subjects and patients with different hypereosinophilic conditions. Eosinophils were immunologically purified from peripheral blood samples of 9 patients with different hypereosinophilic conditions and 9 normal subjects. Western blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed to test eosinophil TF expression. For comparison, TF expression was evaluated in monocytes from blood donors and in human endothelial (ECV304) and fibroblast (IMR90) cell lines. Western blot analysis revealed a major band of 47,000 corresponding to native TF in homogenates of purified eosinophils with a higher intensity in the 9 patients than in the 9 controls (p<0.0001). According to RT-PCR cycle threshold (Ct), TF gene expression was higher in eosinophils from patients than in those from controls, median (range) 35.10 (19.45–36.50) vs 37.17 (35.33–37.87) (p?=?0.002), and was particularly abundant in one patient with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and ischemic heart attacks (Ct: 19.45). TF gene expression was moderate in monocytes, Ct: 31.32 (29.82–33.49) and abundant in endothelial cells, Ct: 28.70 (27.79–29.57) and fibroblasts, Ct: 22.77 (19.22–25.05). Our results indicate that human blood eosinophils contain variable amounts of TF. The higher TF expression in patients with hypereosinophilic disorders may contribute to increase the thrombotic risk. PMID:25375118

Cugno, Massimo; Marzano, Angelo V.; Lorini, Maurizio; Carbonelli, Vincenzo; Tedeschi, Alberto

2014-01-01

321

Platelet-activating factor-induced human eosinophil activation. Generation and release of cyclo-oxygenase metabolites in human blood eosinophils from asthmatics.  

PubMed Central

The spontaneous and stimulated generation of fatty acid cyclo-oxygenase pathway-derived products of arachidonic acid from highly purified (91.6 +/- 1.3%, n = 23) human blood eosinophils obtained from asthmatics were examined using combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Under resting conditions, eosinophils spontaneously generated 0.24 +/- 0.10 pg prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), 0.51 +/- 0.20 prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), 0.35 +/- 0.10 pg prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) and 8.5 +/- 2.2 pg thromboxane B2 (TXB2), the stable metabolite of TXA2 per 10(6) cells. In contrast, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha and 9 alpha,11 beta-prostaglandin F2 were not detectable. Stimulation of eosinophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF) for 5 min induced a two- to sixfold increase in the biosynthesis of prostanoids. More than 95% of the generated prostanoids were released into the surrounding medium. The response to PAF was inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2086 (1 microM). The fatty acid cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, ibuprofen, abolished both the spontaneous and PAF-stimulated generation of prostanoids by eosinophils. LTB4, PMA and calcimycin also produced an increase in prostanoid production, whereas lyso-PAF, the PAF precursor and metabolite, failed to induce prostanoid generation over basal production. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that PAF potently activates human eosinophils to generate and release several fatty acid cyclo-oxygenase metabolites of the arachidonic acid pathway, with TXB2 being the most abundant. These data are in agreement with previous observations suggesting that PAF may be an important stimulus for prostanoid release by the eosinophil in allergic diseases such as asthma. Images Figure 4 PMID:8473016

Kroegel, C; Matthys, H

1993-01-01

322

Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

2015-02-03

323

Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

2014-11-21

324

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), a rare myeloid malignancy that occurs in young children, is considered a clonal disease originating in pluripotent stem cells of the hematopoietic system. The pathogenesis of JMML involves disruption of signal transduction through the RAS pathway, with resultant selective hypersensitivity of JMML cells to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Progress has been made in understanding aspects of the molecular basis of JMML. How these molecular mechanisms may lead to targeted therapeutics and improved outcomes remains to be elucidated. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant is the only curative option for children with JMML, and it is fraught with frequent relapse and significant toxicity. PMID:25435114

Satwani, Prakash; Kahn, Justine; Dvorak, Christopher C

2015-02-01

325

Fatal eosinophilic myocarditis develops in the absence of IFN? and IL17A  

PubMed Central

CD4+ T cells play a central role in inflammatory heart disease, implicating a cytokine product associated with helper T cell effector function as a necessary mediator of this pathophysiology. IFN?-deficient mice developed severe autoimmune myocarditis (EAM), in which mice are immunized with cardiac myosin peptide, while IL17A-deficient mice were protected from progression to dilated cardiomyopathy. We generated IFN??/?IL17A?/? mice to assess whether IL17 signaling was responsible for the severe EAM of IFN??/? mice. Surprisingly, IFN??/?IL17A?/? mice developed a rapidly fatal EAM. Eosinophils comprised a third of infiltrating leukocytes, qualifying this disease eosinophilic myocarditis. We found increased cardiac production of CCL11/eotaxin, and Th2 deviation among heart-infiltrating CD4+ cells. Ablation of eosinophil development improved survival of IFN??/?IL17A?/? mice, demonstrating the necessity of eosinophils in fatal heart failure. The severe and rapidly fatal autoimmune inflammation that developed in the combined absence of IFN? and IL17A constitutes a novel model of eosinophilic heart disease in humans. This is also the first demonstration that eosinophils have the capacity to act as necessary mediators of morbidity in an autoimmune process. PMID:24048893

Barin, Jobert G.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Talor, Monica V.; Wu, Lei; Ong, SuFey; Fairweather, DeLisa; Bedja, Djahida; Stickel, Natalie R.; LeGault, Jillian A.; Cardamone, Ashley B.; Zheng, Dongfeng; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.; Rose, Noel R.; Cihakova, Daniela

2014-01-01

326

Eosinophils in the GI tract: How many is too many and what do they mean?  

PubMed

Eosinophils are commonly detected in normal mucosal biopsies from all sites within the gastrointestinal tract where they are dispersed in the lamina propria and, to a lesser extent, in the epithelium. The distinction between the upper limit of normal and abnormally increased tissue eosinophils is not well defined. However, eosinophils that infiltrate the epithelium in more than occasional numbers, coalesce to form aggregates, or show extensive degranulation are always abnormal and raise a broad differential diagnosis. Although the differential diagnosis of purely eosinophilic inflammation is largely limited to hypersensitivity reactions and some infections, they are increased in several gastrointestinal conditions, including gastroesophageal reflux disease, autoimmune gastritis, infections, drug reactions, inflammatory bowel disease, radiation enteritis, and collagen vascular disease. These disorders feature eosinophils as one component of a mixed inflammatory infiltrate that can, in some instances, be prominent enough to cause diagnostic confusion. The purpose of this review is to discuss the normal distribution of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal tract and the differential diagnosis of inflammatory conditions that feature prominent eosinophilia. PMID:25560601

Yantiss, Rhonda K

2015-01-01

327

[Clinical and pathogenic aspects of NARES (non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophilic syndrome)].  

PubMed

Non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophilic syndrome (NARES) accounts for 14% of rhinitis. It is defined by a syndrome of nasal hyper-reactivity over more than three months, the absence of any atopic factor, and an eosinophilia of nasal secretions 20% greater than the leukocytes. The main features are evidenced by the authors on the basis of 20 observations. The symptoms are significantly more marked than in other forms of rhinitis. Olfactive disorders occur very frequently. The symptoms often fail to respond to anti-histamines and even corticoids. The frequency of a micropolyposis starting in the meatus is confirmed by endoscopy and a CT-scan reveals the frequency of hyperplasia of the sinusal mucosa (affecting first and foremost the ethmoid cells). Hyperadrenergy is frequently evidenced by papavenire IDR and by the isoprenaline IV test. Two cases revealed the coexistence of an intolerance to aspirin and a bronchial hyper-reactivity, evidenced by the Carbachol test. The histological and immunofluorescent examination of the pituitary mucosa evidenced an eosinophilic infiltration in 40% of cases. This infiltrate is often labelled by the BB10 monoclonal antibody. The evolution of NARES appears to involve three stages: secretory eosinophilia with a healthy mucosa, eosinophilic mucosa infiltration, and in situ activation of the eosinophils. An evolution towards an eosinophilic PNS and then a triad was observed in two cases. Hopothčses are put forward by the authors to explain the local nasal influx of eosinophils. PMID:2052786

Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Jankowski, R; Wayoff, M

1991-01-01

328

Uterine type II estrogen-binding sites are not of eosinophil origin  

SciTech Connect

A recent report suggested that nuclear type II sites in the rat uterus are of eosinophil origin and may represent (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding to eosinophil peroxidase. To further evaluate this hypothesis the authors examined the response of nuclear type II sites to estrogen under conditions where eosinophils are not present. Results of the experiments show that physiological levels of estradiol-17..beta.. (10 nM for 72 h) will stimulate nuclear type II sites in highly purified cultures of rat uterine stromal and myometrial cells. The magnitude of the response of type II sites to estradiol in these stromal (4-fold) and myometrial (80-fold) cell cultures was essentially identical to that observed in the uterine cell types following in vivo estrogen treatment. Since these highly purified cultures of uterine cells were prepared from the uterus of a 21-day ovariectomized rat which is devoid of eosinophils, it was concluded that estradiol stimulation of nuclear type II sites is a direct intracellular response to estrogen which occurs independent of eosinophil accumulation. Furthermore, it was found that type II sites in the rat uterus are not peroxidase. Stimulation of cytosol and nuclear type II sites by estrogen in the rat uterus is a direct intracellular response to the hormone unrelated to eosinophil accumulation and/or peroxidase activity.

Not Available

1986-01-05

329

Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-07-16

330

Mechanisms of eosinophil accumulation around eggs of Schistosoma japonicum : Role of two purified components, allergen and eosinophil chemotactic factor, from soluble egg antigens measured on sensitized guinea pig skin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mechanisms of eosinophil response induced by soluble egg antigen (SEA) inSchistosoma japonicum-infected guinea pig tissues were analyzed using two purified components of SEA: major allergenic components (JEAL) and a major eosinophil chemotactic component (ECF-SjE). Eosinophil response to the crude SEA ofS. japonicum was detected at the injection site mainly at 2–8 h after the antigenic challenge; this response consisted of

Y. Horii; M. Owhashi; A. Ishii

1990-01-01

331

Marrow transplantation for leukemia  

SciTech Connect

Marrow transplantation for selected patients with leukemia, as for patients with severe combined immunologic deficiency or severe aplastic anemia, has now become an accepted clinical procedure. For patients with acute leukemia who have relapsed after achieving a remission of chemotherapy, marrow grafting from an identical twin or an HLA-identical sibling has now been demonstrated to produce median remissions as long as or longer than any reported for combination chemotherapy. In contrast to chemotherapy, marrow transplantation offers the possibility of cure for a small but significant fraction of these patients. Marrow transplantation for patients with ANL in first remission has now resulted in median survivals much longer than any reported with chemotherapy. Although it now appears that more than 50% of these patients can be cured with marrow transplantation, a much longer follow-up is indicated since some patients who achieve a complete remission with combination chemotherapy are now living for a long time, and some of these patients (less than 20%) may also be cured. Current intensive research with new modalities such as interferon, Acyclovir, Cyclosporin A, and monoclonal antibodies can reasonably be expected to improve the overall results of marrow transplantation.

Thomas, E.D.

1981-07-01

332

Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor A is an intrinsic, self-limiting suppressor of IL-5-induced eosinophil development  

PubMed Central

Summary Eosinophilia is a hallmark characteristic of TH2-associated diseases and is critically regulated by the central eosinophil growth factor interleukin 5 (IL-5). Here we demonstrate that IL-5 activity in eosinophils was regulated by paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PIR)-A and PIR-B. Upon self-recognition of ?2M molecules, PIR-B served as a permissive checkpoint for IL-5-induced eosinophil development by suppressing the pro-apoptotic activities of PIR-A, which were mediated by the Grb2-Erk-Bim pathway. PIR-B-deficient bone marrow (BM) eosinophils underwent compartmentalized apoptosis, resulting in decreased blood eosinophilia in naďve, IL-5- and aeroallergen-challenged mice. Subsequently, Pirb?/? mice displayed impaired aeroallergen-induced lung eosinophilia and induction of lung TH2 responses. Collectively, these data uncovers an intrinsic, self-limiting pathway regulating IL-5-induced eosinophil expansion, which has broad implications for eosinophil-associated diseases. PMID:24212998

Moshkovits, Itay; Itan, Michal; Karo-Atar, Danielle; Bouffi, Carine; Fulkerson, Patricia; Rashkovan, Diana; Jung, Steffen; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Munitz, Ariel

2013-01-01

333

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) in Adults (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... genetics of chronic myeloid leukemia Overview of the myeloproliferative neoplasms Overview of the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia ... genetics of chronic myeloid leukemia Overview of the myeloproliferative neoplasms Overview of the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia ...

334

CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

2013-01-22

335

Food allergy and eosinophilic esophagitis: what do we do?  

PubMed

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disease of the esophagus triggered by foods and possibly environmental allergens. Common conditions that mimic EoE include gastroesophageal reflux disease and proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia. These need to be excluded before confirming the diagnosis of EoE. Identification of food triggers for EoE using standard allergy tests remains challenging. Dietary therapy for EoE so far consists of test-directed elimination of foods, empiric elimination of common food allergens, or exclusive feeding of amino acid-based formulas, with variable success. No FDA-approved medications yet exist for EoE. Topical corticosteroids to the esophagus are being used. EoE is a chronic disease; therefore, long-term therapy seems to be necessary to avoid potential long-term complications such as esophageal remodeling and strictures. Optimal long-term therapies and follow-ups are still not established; therefore, discussion with patients and families regarding the choice of therapy is important to ensure the best possible outcomes from a medical and social standpoint. In this article, we discuss all the above issues in detail by using a hypothetical case; highlighting in a stepwise manner what is known with respect to diagnosis, work-up, and management of EoE; and discussing gaps in knowledge that need to be addressed in the future. PMID:25577614

Chehade, Mirna; Aceves, Seema S; Furuta, Glenn T; Fleischer, David M

2015-01-01

336

Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-23

337

PXD101 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-08

338

Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-02-25

339

Synthesis of ?(1,3) Fucosyltransferases IV- and VII-Dependent Eosinophil Selectin Ligand and Recruitment to the Skin  

PubMed Central

Selectins mediate the initial adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells in many contexts of inflammation-dependent leukocyte recruitment. The glycans that contribute to P- and E-selectin counterreceptor activity arise through glycosylation reactions in which the terminal steps are catalyzed by ?(1,3) fucosyltransferases (FTs). We examined how selectin ligand activities are controlled in eosinophils by characterizing FT expression profiles and regulatory mechanisms in eosinophils isolated from human blood. We found that FT-IV and FT-VII mRNAs were up-regulated by transforming growth factor-?1, but the FT-IV transcript consistently predominated in eosinophils. To further define the physiological role of FT-IV and FT-VII in expression of eosinophil selectin ligand, we characterized models of dermal eosinophilia in FT-IV- and/or FT-VII-deficient mice in vivo. FT-IV deficiency yielded a significant decrease in eosinophil recruitment to the skin. Likewise, deficiency of FT-VII also yielded a decrease in eosinophil recruitment. Eosinophil recruitment that remained in the absence of FT-VII was further inhibited by blocking P- or E-selectin and was essentially absent in mice deficient in both enzymes. These observations indicate that FT-IV and FT-VII are both important contributors to selectin-dependent eosinophil recruitment to the skin and may represent therapeutic targets for treating diseases in which eosinophil recruitment contributes to pathophysiology. PMID:16127157

Satoh, Takahiro; Kanai, Yasumasa; Wu, Ming-Hua; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Kannagi, Reiji; Lowe, John B.; Nishioka, Kiyoshi

2005-01-01

340

Eosinophilic Cystitis Presented as a Manifestation of Hypereosinophilic Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

Background Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a group of disorders marked by the sustained overproduction of eosinophils, in which eosinophilic infiltration and inflammatory substance release cause damage to multiple organs. Eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is an inflammatory disorder caused by eosinophilic infiltration of the bladder wall. Although EC is often associated with eosinophilia, it has been rarely reported as a manifestation of HES. We report a case of EC as a primary manifestation of HES. The patient was a 27-year-old male with a history of complete intracardiac repair of tetralogy of Fallot who presented with an acute onset of dysuria accompanied by eosinophilia (7.5 × 103/?l, 60% of white blood cells). Ultrasonography and MRI of the bladder showed a bladder mass, a biopsy of which revealed eosinophilic infiltration and degranulation. Methods We performed a literature search in PubMed from 2001 to 2012 to find patients with EC who may have had HES. Results There were 4 patients with HES who had EC including the present case. Of 14 patients reported as EC in whom the eosinophil count was described, 5 had eosinophils of ?1,500/?l. None of the 5 patients had secondary causes for eosinophilia. Of the 9 patients with definite or probable HES, 7 patients (78%) were male and 5 patients (56%) showed a concomitant eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorder. Conclusion HES may not be uncommon as the cause of EC. Thorough evaluation and close monitoring are warranted in EC patients with elevated eosinophils. PMID:23573073

Kojima, Katsuaki; Maeda, Jun; Mikami, Shuji; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Ide, Hiroki; Hattori, Seiya; Takahashi, Takao; Awazu, Midori

2013-01-01

341

Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-09-09

342

Effects of prednisone on eosinophilic bronchitis in asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis*,**  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect size of oral corticosteroid treatment on eosinophilic bronchitis in asthma, through systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: We systematically reviewed articles in the Medline, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, and LILACS databases. We selected studies meeting the following criteria: comparing at least two groups or time points (prednisone vs. control, prednisone vs. another drug, or pre- vs. post-treatment with prednisone); and evaluating parameters before and after prednisone use, including values for sputum eosinophils, sputum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and sputum IL-5-with or without values for post-bronchodilator FEV1-with corresponding 95% CIs or with sufficient data for calculation. The independent variables were the use, dose, and duration of prednisone treatment. The outcomes evaluated were sputum eosinophils, IL-5, and ECP, as well as post-bronchodilator FEV1. RESULTS: The pooled analysis of the pre- vs. post-treatment data revealed a significant mean reduction in sputum eosinophils (?8.18%; 95% CI: 7.69-8.67; p < 0.001), sputum IL-5 (?83.64 pg/mL; 95% CI: 52.45-114.83; p < 0.001), and sputum ECP (?267.60 µg/L; 95% CI: 244.57-290.63; p < 0.0001), as well as a significant mean increase in post-bronchodilator FEV1 (?8.09%; 95% CI: 5.35-10.83; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with moderate-to-severe eosinophilic bronchitis, treatment with prednisone caused a significant reduction in sputum eosinophil counts, as well as in the sputum levels of IL-5 and ECP. This reduction in the inflammatory response was accompanied by a significant increase in post-bronchodilator FEV1. PMID:25410844

Sakae, Thiago Mamôru; Maurici, Rosemeri; Trevisol, Daisson José; Pizzichini, Marcia Margaret Menezes; Pizzichini, Emílio

2014-01-01

343

Workshop Report from the NIH Taskforce on the Research Needs of Eosinophil-Associated Diseases (TREAD)  

PubMed Central

Background Eosinophils are blood cells that are often found in high numbers in the tissues of allergic conditions and helminthic parasite infections. The pathophysiological roles that eosinophils may serve in other human ‘eosinophil-associated’ diseases remain obscure. Objective NIH Institutes and the Office of Disease Prevention assembled an international taskforce of clinical and basic scientists with the charge to propose and prioritize unmet research needs in eosinophil-associated diseases. Methods The taskforce used an organ system approach to dissect out the different and common themes of eosinophil cell involvement in these diseases. In early 2012, a draft document was circulated for review. The document was amended and the prioritizations were set at a NIH-organized workshop in June 2012. Results The taskforce identified significant research needs. These needs cross disease entities but some are disease-specific. There are substantial shortcomings to the various preclinical animal models, as well as significant gaps in our epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic knowledge. The taskforce recognized that recent efforts by patient advocacy groups have played instrumental roles in improving the identification and characterization of these disorders. However, communication amongst the eosinophil interested communities, e.g., governmental funding and regulatory agencies, and industry and clinician scientists need to be more comprehensive. Conclusions Significant efforts are required to address our knowledge gaps in order to improve the outcomes of eosinophil-associated diseases. NIH Institutes, other federal agencies, lay organizations and the pharmaceutical industry should consider the taskforce’s recommendations in their future research activities. PMID:22935587

Bochner, Bruce S.; Book, Wendy; Busse, William W.; Butterfield, Joseph; Furuta, Glenn T.; Gleich, Gerald J.; Klion, Amy D.; Lee, James J.; Leiferman, Kristin M.; Minnicozzi, Michael; Moqbel, Redwan; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Schwartz, Lawrence B.; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Wechsler, Michael E.; Weller, Peter F.

2012-01-01

344

Repeated Nitrogen Dioxide Exposures and Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthmatics: A Randomized Crossover Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a ubiquitous atmospheric pollutant, may enhance the asthmatic response to allergens through eosinophilic activation in the airways. However, the effect of NO2 on inflammation without allergen exposure is poorly studied. Objectives: We investigated whether repeated peaks of NO2, at various realistic concentrations, induce changes in airway inflammation in asthmatics. Methods: Nineteen nonsmokers with asthma were exposed at rest in a double-blind, crossover study, in randomized order, to 200 ppb NO2, 600 ppb NO2, or clean air once for 30 min on day 1 and twice for 30 min on day 2. The three series of exposures were separated by 2 weeks. The inflammatory response in sputum was measured 6 hr (day 1), 32 hr (day 2), and 48 hr (day 3) after the first exposure, and compared with baseline values measured twice 10–30 days before the first exposure. Results: Compared with baseline measurements, the percentage of eosinophils in sputum increased by 57% after exposure to 600 ppb NO2 (p = 0.003) but did not change significantly after exposure to 200 ppb. The slope of the association between the percentage of eosinophils and NO2 exposure level was significant (p = 0.04). Eosinophil cationic protein in sputum was highly correlated with eosinophil count and increased significantly after exposure to 600 ppb NO2 (p = 0.001). Lung function, which was assessed daily, was not affected by NO2 exposure. Conclusions: We observed that repeated peak exposures of NO2 performed without allergen exposure were associated with airway eosinophilic inflammation in asthmatics in a dose-related manner. Citation: Ezratty V, Guillossou G, Neukirch C, Dehoux M, Koscielny S, Bonay M, Cabanes PA, Samet JM, Mure P, Ropert L, Tokarek S, Lambrozo J, Aubier M. 2014. Repeated nitrogen dioxide exposures and eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatics: a randomized crossover study. Environ Health Perspect 122:850–855;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307240 PMID:24747297

Guillossou, Gaëlle; Neukirch, Catherine; Dehoux, Monique; Koscielny, Serge; Bonay, Marcel; Cabanes, Pierre-André; Samet, Jonathan M.; Mure, Patrick; Ropert, Luc; Tokarek, Sandra; Lambrozo, Jacques; Aubier, Michel

2014-01-01

345

Epithelial calcium-sensing receptor activation by eosinophil granule protein analog stimulates collagen matrix contraction  

PubMed Central

Background Eosinophils reside in normal gastrointestinal tracts and increase in disease. Receptors for eosinophil derived granule proteins (EDGPs) have not been identified but highly cationic molecules, similar to eosinophil proteins, bind extracellular calcium-sensing receptors (CaSR). We hypothesized that stimulation of CaSR by eosinophil proteins activates epithelial cells. Methods Caco2 intestinal epithelial cells, AML14.3D10 eosinophils, wild type human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells not expressing CaSR (HEK-WT) or CaSR transfected HEK293 cells (HEK-CaSR) were stimulated with an eosinophil protein analog poly-L-arginine (PA) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (pERK) was measured. Functional activation was measured with collagen lattice contraction assays. Results Co-culture of Caco2 cells with AML14.3D10 eosinophils augmented lattice contraction compared to lattices containing Caco2 cells alone. PA stimulation of Caco2 lattices augmented contraction. HEK-CaSR stimulation with PA or Ca2+ resulted in greater pERK activation than stimulated HEK-WT cells. PA stimulated greater HEK-CaSR lattice contraction than unstimulated lattices. Contraction of PA stimulated and unstimulated HEK-WT lattices did not differ. Conclusion Exposure of intestinal epithelia to the EDGP analog, PA, stimulates CaSR dependent ERK phosphorylation and epithelial mediated collagen lattice contraction. We speculate that EDGP release within the epithelial layers activates the CaSR receptor leading to matrix contraction and tissue fibrosis. PMID:23269116

Ngo, Peter D.; MacLeod, R. John; Mukkada, Vince; Turki, Razan; Furuta, Glenn T.

2015-01-01

346

Management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia  

PubMed Central

In the last decade, the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has undergone profound changes that have been driven by an improved understanding of the biology of the disease and the approval of several new drugs. Moreover, many novel drugs are currently under evaluation for rapid approval or have been approved by regulatory agencies, further broadening the available therapeutic armamentarium for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The use of novel biological and genetic parameters combined with a careful clinical evaluation allows us to dissect some of the heterogeneity of the disease and to distinguish patients with a very mild onset and course, who often will not need any treatment, from those with an intermediate prognosis and a third group with a very aggressive course (high-risk leukemia). On this background, it becomes increasingly challenging to select the right treatment strategy. In this paper, we describe our own approach to the management of different patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24881042

Ghia, Paolo; Hallek, Michael

2014-01-01

347

What Is Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... In this way CMML is more like a myeloproliferative disease ( myelo -- bone marrow, proliferative -- excessive growth). Chronic myeloid leukemia is an example of a myeloproliferative disease where there is an overproduction of white ...

348

Genetic predispositions to childhood leukemia  

PubMed Central

While the majority of leukemia cases occur in the absence of any known predisposing factor, there are germline mutations that significantly increase the risk of developing hematopoietic malignancies in childhood. In this review article, we describe a number of these mutations and their clinical features. These predispositions can be broadly classified as those leading to bone marrow failure, those involving tumor suppressor genes, DNA repair defects, immunodeficiencies or other congenital syndromes associated with transient myeloid disorders. While leukemia can develop as a secondary event in the aforementioned syndromes, there are also several syndromes that specifically lead to the development of leukemia as their primary phenotype. Many of the genes discussed in this review can also be somatically mutated in other cancers, highlighting the importance of understanding shared alterations and mechanisms underpinning syndromic and sporadic leukemia. PMID:23926459

Stieglitz, Elliot

2013-01-01

349

[Plasma cell leukemia].  

PubMed

Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare disorder which develops spontaneously (primary PCL) or evolves in patients with multiple myeloma (secondary PCL). It is defined by the presence of 2 × 10(9)/L peripheral blood plasma cells or plasmacytosis accounting for more than 20 % of the differential white cell count. PCL presents more often extramedullary involvement, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypercalcemia, as well as impaired renal function. Cytogenetic abnormalities and mutations observed in PCL lead to escape from immune surveillance and independence from the bone marrow microenvironment with changes in expression of adhesion molecules or chemokines receptors. The outcome of PCL has improved with combination approaches with novel agents (including bortezomib and immunomodulatory drugs, such as lenalidomide) and with autologous stem cell transplantation. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is currently available for young patients. This article is an overview of this rare and severe disease and the different therapeutics options that are recommended. PMID:25418598

Ravinet, Aurélie; Bay, Jacques Olivier; Tournilhac, Olivier

2014-11-01

350

Myelodysplasia and the leukemias.  

PubMed

The armistice after World War II marked the beginning of an era that was to last to the end of the present century. It was an era in which many changes in medicine and nursing combined to alter the entire philosophy of managing malignant disease. More specifically, the fluid-phase tumors, which comprise myelodysplasia and the leukemias, were singled out for special attention. First there was the ease with which blood and bone marrow could be sampled, making serial investigations simple and practical. Second, cytotoxic drugs became available ranging from nitrogen mustard through cytosine arabinoside, the anthracycline antibiotics, and the epi-podophyllotoxins. Although cytomorphology of the hematopoietic tissue had been exquisitely defined with the use of Romanowsky stains coupled with electron microscopy, the diagnosis of leukemia was, before 1945, a death sentence for want of effective therapy. This changed dramatically with the introduction of the folate antagonists, and progress was unremitting as the range of new products expanded. Suddenly responses could be obtained with single agents, and fairly rapidly combinations were developed for cumulative antitumor effect. Many agents had undesirable toxicity among different organs. Although slightly different for myeloblastic or lymphoblastic variants, this approach produced apparent disease eradication. The concept of complete remission, both clinical and hematologic, was born. Some of our early enthusiasm has had to be tempered with the somber appreciation that not all patients can improve and many others experience relapses. Where then do we stand? Leukemic cells themselves seldom kill. It is the relentless and uncontrolled expansion of a neoplastic clone that leads to bone marrow failure, albeit at different rates in the various subtypes. In the acute forms, the common presentation remains symptomatic anemia, neutropenic sepsis, and thrombocytopenic bleeding. Differentiation from marrow aplasia may not be possible at first on clinical grounds, although bone tenderness, gingival hypertrophy, and skin infiltration are among the general useful differential signs. Findings in the circulation and the marrow are of cardinal importance in diagnosis; they provide the basis for classification. Improved accuracy has followed the introduction of cytochemical stains, and a widening range of monoclonal antibodies, and greater recourse to karyotyping, have enhanced diagnostic acumen. Treatment decisions rest on many variables or prognostic factors that include age, performance status, comorbidity, and disease category, with an ever increasing regard for the part played by cellular and molecular genetics. Despite skillful utilization of this wealth of information for optimal management, outcome often leaves much to be desired. Myelodysplasia encompasses a number of different syndromes in which the refractory anemias are indolent, whereas those with excess blasts progress toward overt leukemia. Considerable judgment is necessary in selecting patients for whom supportive therapy alone is appropriate and recognizing others, up to one third of patients for whom use growth factors that include erythropoietin, granulocyte or granulocyte monocyte-colony stimulating factors, and thrombopoietin can be justified. The often unfavorable result has been a stimulus to current investigations that examine the value of intensive chemotherapy or the more innovative bone marrow transplantation and its peripheral blood equivalent. Autografting is a newer alternative that does not have proved potential. Acute leukemia, whether myeloblastic or lymphoblastic, has been managed with mixed success. Remission rates have steadily increased and, notably among children, moved toward 100% in certain groupings. The downside of nonspecific drug regimens is that some patients simply may not respond, whereas others experience remissions and then relapses. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:9301644

Jacobs, P

1997-08-01

351

Immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with current chemotherapy regimens is still disappointing, with overall survival rates of ? 40% at 5 years. It is now well established that AML cells can evade the immune system through multiple mechanisms, including the expression of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase. Immunotherapeutic strategies, including both active, such as vaccination with leukemia-associated antigens, and passive, such as adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer cells, may overcome leukemia escape and lead to improved cure. Allogeneic hemopoeitic stem cell transplantation, the most effective treatment of AML, is the best known model of immunotherapy. Following transplant, recipient AML cells are eradicated by donor immune cells through the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. However, GVL is clinically associated with graft-versus-host disease, the major cause of mortality after transplant. GVL is mediated by donor T cells recognizing either leukemia-associated antigens or minor as well as major histocompatibility antigens. Several innovative strategies have been devised to generate leukemia reactive T cells so as to increase GVL responses with no or little graft-versus-host disease. PMID:24341888

Arpinati, Mario; Curti, Antonio

2014-01-01

352

Antibody Therapy for Pediatric Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Despite increasing cure rates for pediatric leukemia, relapsed disease still carries a poor prognosis with significant morbidity and mortality. Novel targeted therapies are currently being investigated in an attempt to reduce adverse events and improve survival outcomes. Antibody therapies represent a form of targeted therapy that offers a new treatment paradigm. Monoclonal antibodies are active in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are currently in Phase III trials. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are the next generation of antibodies where a highly potent cytotoxic agent is bound to an antibody by a linker, resulting in selective targeting of leukemia cells. ADCs are currently being tested in clinical trials for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and ALL. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibodies are a construct whereby each antibody contains two binding sites, with one designed to engage the patient’s own immune system and the other to target malignant cells. BiTE antibodies show great promise as a novel and effective therapy for childhood leukemia. This review will outline recent developments in targeted agents for pediatric leukemia including monoclonal antibodies, ADCs, and BiTE antibodies. PMID:24795859

Vedi, Aditi; Ziegler, David S.

2014-01-01

353

Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-11-15

354

Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation

2014-12-01

355

Nutritional support for chronic myelogenous and other leukemias: a review of the scientific literature.  

PubMed

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a slowly progressive disease characterized by the overproduction of granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils). A blood smear shows moderate elevations in white blood cell counts that may persist for years and be benign. Platelets are increased in number, although their function is impaired, resulting in symptoms of easy bleeding (purpura, swollen gums). Conventional medical treatment is a marrow transplant and alkylating agents, which are usually prescribed only during crisis. Several nutrients and botanicals have been studied for use in CML, including vitamin A and all-trans retinoic acid (Retin-A), vitamin D3, vitamin E, vitamin B12, indirubin (found in herbs including Indigofera tinctoria and Isatis tinctoria), and Curcuma longa. This article briefly reviews the scientific literature on the therapeutic use of these nutrients for CML. PMID:12410624

Steriti, Ronald

2002-10-01

356

Circulating eosinophil/basophil progenitors and nasal mucosal cytokines in seasonal allergic rhinitis.  

PubMed

Accumulation of eosinophils in the airways is characteristic of allergic rhinitis and asthma. The tissue eosinophilia may involve both recruitment of mature eosinophils and proliferation of their progenitors. This study examines mature eosinophils (nasal and circulating), their circulating progenitors, and a potential role of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in stimulating these progenitors. Twelve subjects with a history of seasonal allergic rhinitis and positive skin prick test for birch pollen were studied during four periods: shortly before, in the early and intense phase, at the end, and well after the Swedish birch-pollen season. Nasal mucosal and circulating eosinophils were examined in both nasal brushings and peripheral blood samples. Eosinophil/basophil progenitors were determined by counting colony-forming units in nonadherent mononuclear blood-cell cultures in methylcellulose at 14 days. The nasal mucosal cytokines GM-CSF, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-3, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, and RANTES were analyzed (ELISA) in nasal lavage (NAL) fluids. All patients developed severe symptoms of rhinitis at the height of the season, with increased numbers of eosinophils in the nasal mucosa (P<0.05) and in the circulation (P<0.05). At this time point, the number of circulating progenitors (P<0.05) and the NAL fluid level of GM-CSF (P<0.05) were also increased. In contrast, there was no change in the NAL fluid levels of IL-1beta, IL-3, IL-6, or IL-8. Neither IL-5 nor RANTES could be detected in any of the NAL fluids. At the end of or after the season, there was no increase in nasal eosinophils or circulating eosinophils or progenitors (P>0.05). Ex vivo addition of GM-CSF (10-100 U) increased the number of blood progenitors grown before (P<0.01) and after (P<0.05) the season, compared with during the season. The in vitro GM-CSF responsiveness of progenitors may be related to whether or not these already have been stimulated endogenously by GM-CSF. Taken together, our data thus suggest that GM-CSF may play a role in vivo to increase production of eosinophilic progenitors in allergic airway disease. PMID:10321556

Linden, M; Svensson, C; Andersson, M; Greiff, L; Andersson, E; Denburg, J A; Persson, C G

1999-03-01

357

Human Eosinophils Express the High Affinity IgE Receptor, Fc?RI, in Bullous Pemphigoid  

PubMed Central

Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease mediated by autoantibodies targeting BP180 (type XVII collagen). Patient sera and tissues typically have IgG and IgE autoantibodies and elevated eosinophil numbers. Although the pathogenicity of the IgE autoantibodies is established in BP, their contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Our aims were two-fold: 1) To establish the clinical relationships between total and BP180-specific IgE, eosinophilia and other markers of disease activity; and 2) To determine if eosinophils from BP patients express the high affinity IgE receptor, Fc?RI, as a potential mechanism of action for IgE in BP. Our analysis of 48 untreated BP patients revealed a correlation between BP180 IgG and both BP180 IgE and peripheral eosinophil count. Additionally, we established a correlation between total IgE concentration and both BP180 IgE levels and eosinophil count. When only sera from patients (n?=?16) with total IgE?400 IU/ml were analyzed, BP180 IgG levels correlated with disease severity, BP230 IgG, total circulating IgE and BP180 IgE. Finally, peripheral eosinophil count correlated more strongly with levels of BP180 IgE then with BP180 IgG. Next, eosinophil Fc?RI expression was investigated in the blood and skin using several methods. Peripheral eosinophils from BP patients expressed mRNA for all three chains (?, ? and ?) of the Fc?RI. Surface expression of the Fc?RI? was confirmed on both peripheral and tissue eosinophils from most BP patients by immunostaining. Furthermore, using a proximity ligation assay, interaction of the ?- and ?-chains of the Fc?RI was observed in some biopsy specimens, suggesting tissue expression of the trimeric receptor form in some patients. These studies provide clinical support for the relevance of IgE in BP disease and provide one mechanism of action of these antibodies, via binding to the Fc?RI on eosinophils. PMID:25255430

Messingham, Kelly N.; Holahan, Heather M.; Frydman, Alexandra S.; Fullenkamp, Colleen; Srikantha, Rupasree; Fairley, Janet A.

2014-01-01

358

Modulation of eotaxin formation and eosinophil migration by selective inhibitors of phosphodiesterase type 4 isoenzyme  

PubMed Central

This study was undertaken to investigate the possible contribution of the blockade of eotaxin generation to the anti-eosinophilotactic effect of phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 4 inhibitors. In some experiments, the putative synergistic interaction between PDE type 4 inhibitors and the ?2-agonist salbutamol was also assessed.Sensitized guinea-pigs aerosolized with antigen (5% ovalbumin, OVA) responded with a significant increase in eotaxin and eosinophil levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) at 6?h. Eosinophil recruitment was inhibited by both PDE type 4 inhibitors rolipram (5?mg?kg?1, i.p.) and RP 73401 (5?mg?kg?1, i.p.) treatments. In contrast, only rolipram inhibited eotaxin production.Sensitized rats intrapleurally challenged (i.pl.) with antigen (OVA, 12??g?cavity?1) showed a marked eosinophil infiltration at 24?h, preceded by eotaxin generation at 6?h. Intravenous administration of a rabbit anti-mouse eotaxin antibody (0.5?mg?kg?1) significantly reduced allergen-evoked eosinophilia in this model.Local pretreatment with rolipram (40??g?cavity?1) or RP 73401 (40??g?cavity?1) 1?h before challenge reduced eosinophil accumulation evaluated in the rat pleural effluent, but only the former was active against eotaxin generation. The inhibitors of PDE type 3 (SK&F 94836) and type 5 (zaprinast) failed to alter allergen-evoked eosinophil recruitment in rats.Local injection of ?2-agonist salbutamol (20??g?cavity?1) inhibited both eosinophil accumulation and eotaxin production following pleurisy. The former was better inhibited when salbutamol and rolipram were administered in combination.Treatment with rolipram and RP 73401 dose-dependently inhibited eosinophil adhesion and migration in vitro. These effects were clearly potentiated by salbutamol at concentrations that had no effect alone.Our findings indicate that although rolipram and RP 73401 are equally effective in inhibiting allergen-induced eosinophil infiltration only the former prevents eotaxin formation, indicating that PDE 4 inhibitors impair eosinophil accumulation by mechanisms independent of eotaxin production blockade. PMID:11564646

Silva, Patrícia M R; Alves, Alessandra C; Serra, Magda F; Pires, Ana Lucia A; Silva, Juliane P; Barreto, Emiliano O; Cordeiro, Renato S B; Jose, Peter J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Lagente, Vincent; Martins, Marco A

2001-01-01

359

Idiopathic acute eosinophilic pneumonia in a 14-month-old girl  

PubMed Central

Idiopathic acute eosinophilic pneumonia (IAEP), characterized by acute febrile respiratory failure associated with diffuse radiographic infiltrates and pulmonary eosinophilia, is rarely reported in children. Diagnosis is based on an association of characteristic features including acute respiratory failure with fever, bilateral infiltrates on the chest X-ray, severe hypoxemia and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid >25% eosinophils or a predominant eosinophilic infiltrate in lung biopsies in the absence of any identifiable etiology. We present a 14-month-old girl who was admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit because of acute respiratory distress. She had a fever, dry cough, and progressive dyspnea for 1 day. Chest X-ray showed multifocal consolidations, increased interstitial markings, parenchymal emphysema and pneumothorax. IAEP was confirmed by marked pulmonary infiltrates of eosinophils in the lung biopsy specimen. Most known causes of acute eosinophilic pneumonia, such as exposure to causative drugs, toxins, second-hand smoking and infections were excluded. Her symptoms were resolved quickly after corticosteroid therapy. PMID:23390444

Park, Ha Neul; Chung, Bo Hyun; Pyun, Jung Eun; Lee, Kwang Chul; Choung, Ji Tae; Lim, Choon Hak

2013-01-01

360

A Role for Eosinophils in the Intestinal Immunity against Infective Ascaris suum Larvae  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms of resistance against invading Ascaris suum larvae in pigs. Pigs received a low dose of 100 A. suum eggs daily for 14 weeks. This resulted in a >99% reduction in the number of larvae that could migrate through the host after a challenge infection of 5000 A. suum eggs, compared to naďve pigs. Histological analysis at the site of parasite entry, i.e. the caecum, identified eosinophilia, mastocytosis and goblet cell hyperplasia. Increased local transcription levels of genes for IL5, IL13, eosinophil peroxidase and eotaxin further supported the observed eosinophil influx. Further analysis showed that eosinophils degranulated in vitro in response to contact with infective Ascaris larvae in the presence of serum from both immune and naďve animals. This effect was diminished with heat-inactivated serum, indicating a complement dependent mechanism. Furthermore, eosinophils were efficient in killing the larvae in vitro when incubated together with serum from immune animals, suggesting that A. suum specific antibodies are required for efficient elimination of the larvae. Together, these results indicate an important role for eosinophils in the intestinal defense against invading A. suum larvae. PMID:23556022

Masure, Dries; Vlaminck, Johnny; Wang, Tao; Chiers, Koen; Van den Broeck, Wim; Vercruysse, Jozef; Geldhof, Peter

2013-01-01

361

Case of eosinophilic cystitis treated with suplatast tosilate as maintenance therapy.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare inflammatory lesion of the bladder, characterized by massive eosinophilic infiltration of the bladder wall. Its cause is not known definitely. A 49-year-old man consulted our department with a miction pain, gross hematuria, and frequent micturition. Urinalysis showed combined hematuria and pyuria, but urine culture was sterile. Abnormal findings of laboratory examination included an elevated white blood cell (WBC) count (15,700/?L) and the proportion of eosinophils in the peripheral blood was 12% of the WBCs (normal 0-5%). Cystoscopy revealed a solid mass with severe edematous mucosa. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also indicated marked bladder wall thickening, which was suspected for invasive bladder cancer. Transurethral biopsy of the bladder mass was performed with pathological examination revealing features of eosinophilic cystitis. After administration of a combination of prednisolone and suplatast tosilate, followed by monotherapy with suplatast tosilate, regression of the bladder mass, and normalization of the count of peripheral eosinophils were achieved. Fourteen months after steroid therapy, under treatment with suplatast tosilate, there was no relapse of urinary symptoms and the bladder mass. PMID:22997600

Yoshino, Tateki; Moriyama, Hiroyuki

2012-01-01

362

Case of Eosinophilic Cystitis Treated with Suplatast Tosilate as Maintenance Therapy  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare inflammatory lesion of the bladder, characterized by massive eosinophilic infiltration of the bladder wall. Its cause is not known definitely. A 49-year-old man consulted our department with a miction pain, gross hematuria, and frequent micturition. Urinalysis showed combined hematuria and pyuria, but urine culture was sterile. Abnormal findings of laboratory examination included an elevated white blood cell (WBC) count (15,700/?L) and the proportion of eosinophils in the peripheral blood was 12% of the WBCs (normal 0–5%). Cystoscopy revealed a solid mass with severe edematous mucosa. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also indicated marked bladder wall thickening, which was suspected for invasive bladder cancer. Transurethral biopsy of the bladder mass was performed with pathological examination revealing features of eosinophilic cystitis. After administration of a combination of prednisolone and suplatast tosilate, followed by monotherapy with suplatast tosilate, regression of the bladder mass, and normalization of the count of peripheral eosinophils were achieved. Fourteen months after steroid therapy, under treatment with suplatast tosilate, there was no relapse of urinary symptoms and the bladder mass. PMID:22997600

Yoshino, Tateki; Moriyama, Hiroyuki

2012-01-01

363

In vivo PAF-induced airway eosinophil accumulation reduces bronchial responsiveness to inhaled histamine.  

PubMed

Chronic eosinophilic bronchitis and bronchial hyperresponsiveness have been considered to be the fundamental features of bronchial asthma. However, the role of airway eosinophils in bronchial responsiveness in vivo has not been fully discussed. The aim of this study was to investigate the direct effect of airway eosinophil accumulation on bronchial responsiveness in vivo. Guinea pigs were transnasally treated with platelet activating factor (PAF) or vehicle twice a week for a total of 3 weeks. Anesthetized guinea pigs were surgically cannulated and artificially ventilated 48 h after the last administration of PAF or vehicle. Ten minutes after the installation of artificial ventilation, ascending doses of histamine were inhaled. In a subsequent study, selective inhibitors of diamine oxidase and histamine N-methyltransferase were intravenously administered before the histamine inhalation in the PAF-treated animals. Next study was conducted 20 min after treatment with indomethacin in this study line. Finally, ascending doses of methacholine were inhaled in our animal model. Proportion of eosinophils and the number of nuclear segmentation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid significantly increased in guinea pigs treated with PAF compared with vehicle and this finding was confirmed histologically. Nevertheless, bronchial responsiveness to inhaled histamine, but not methacholine, was significantly decreased by the PAF treatment. This bronchoprotective effect induced by PAF remained following aminoguanidine and histamine N-methyltransferase administration, but abolished by treatment of indomethacin. These results suggest that in vivo airway eosinophils may reduce nonspecific bronchial responsiveness through production of inhibitory or bronchoprotective prostanoids, but not through histaminase production. PMID:15789611

Ishiura, Yoshihisa; Fujimura, Masaki; Nobata, Kouichi; Oribe, Yoshitaka; Abo, Miki; Myou, Shigeharu; Nonomura, Akitaka

2005-01-01

364

Studies on the enhancement of human eosinophil function by mononuclear cell products in vitro.  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have shown that human mononuclear cells produce during culture an activity that enhances the functional properties of mature eosinophils, including their helminthotoxic potential (Veith & Butterworth, 1983). We have now found that the enhancing activity in mononuclear cell culture supernatants (MCS) is stable to dialysis for 24 h at pH 2 and sensitive to trypsin (0.1 mg/ml). It has a principal pI of 4.4 and possible secondary peaks with pI values of 5.0 and 5.7. The effect of MCS on eosinophils appears to be a general early stimulation of several functions. In comparison with eosinophils incubated in medium only, the proportion of eosinophils with Fc receptors is increased after incubation with MCS for 3.5 h (39 +/- 11% vs 16 +/- 3%) and 7 h (28 +/- 4% vs 17 +/- 3%). The temperature-dependent phase of eosinophil adherence to antibody coated schistosomula is enhanced after 3-4 h. The uptake of deoxyglucose is enhanced after a 1 h pre-incubation with MCS (24 +/- 1 X 10(3) d/min), compared with that of controls (15 +/- 2 X 10(3) d/min). Whether these effects are due to one mediator in MCS awaits further investigation. PMID:6509796

Veith, M; Taylor, D W; Thorne, K; Richardson, B A; Butterworth, A E

1984-01-01

365

Reference ranges for induced sputum eosinophil counts in Korean adult population  

PubMed Central

Background Induced sputum analyses are widely utilized to evaluate airway inflammation in asthmatics. However, the values have not been examined in Korean adults. Objective The purpose of this study is to determine reference ranges for induced sputum eosinophils and their influencing factors in Korean adults. Methods A total of 208 healthy nonasthmatic adults were recruited. Sputum induction and processing followed the international standard protocols. Results Adequate sputum samples were successfully collected from 81 subjects (38.9%). The upper 90 percentile for sputum eosinophil was calculated as 3.5%. The median value of eosinophil count percentage was significantly higher in subjects with atopy than those without atopy (median, 1.6%; range, 0-11.0% vs. median, 0%; range 0-3.6%, p=0.030). However, no significant correlations were found with age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, blood eosinophil, or fractional exhaled nitric oxide levels. Conclusion Current study was the first attempt to determine the reference ranges of induced sputum eosinophils in Korean adults. The cutoff value for sputum eosinophilia was 3.5%, and was significantly associated with atopy. PMID:25097850

Kim, Mi-Yeong; Jo, Eun-Jung; Lee, Seung-Eun; Lee, Suh-Young; Song, Woo-Jung; Kim, Tae-Wan; Hur, Gyu-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Tae-Bum; Park, Heung-Woo; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Park, Hae-Sim; Min, Kyung-Up

2014-01-01

366

Eosinophilic ascites and duodenal obstruction in a patient with liver cirrhosis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is a rare disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of portions of the gastrointestinal tract. Eosinophilic ascites is probably the most unusual and rare presentation of EG and is generally associated with the serosal form of EG. Hereby, we report a case of eosinophilic ascites with duodenal obstruction in a patient with liver cirrhosis. A 50-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of abdominal pain, nausea, bloating, and constipation. She had a history of laparotomy because of duodenal obstruction 2 years ago. Based on clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and pathological findings, and given the excluding the other causes of peripheral eosinophilia, the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis along with liver cirrhosis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis was established. Based on the findings of the present case, it is highly recommended that, in the patients presented with liver cirrhosis associated with peripheral blood or ascitic fluid eosinophilia, performing gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy can probably reveal this rare disorder of EG. PMID:24772356

Maleki, Nasrollah; Kalantar Hormozi, Mohammadreza; Bahtouee, Mehrzad; Tavosi, Zahra; Mosallai Pour, Hamidreza; Taghiyan Jamaleddin Kolaii, Seiiedeh Samaneh

2014-01-01

367

Eosinophilic Ascites and Duodenal Obstruction in a Patient with Liver Cirrhosis  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is a rare disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of portions of the gastrointestinal tract. Eosinophilic ascites is probably the most unusual and rare presentation of EG and is generally associated with the serosal form of EG. Hereby, we report a case of eosinophilic ascites with duodenal obstruction in a patient with liver cirrhosis. A 50-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of abdominal pain, nausea, bloating, and constipation. She had a history of laparotomy because of duodenal obstruction 2 years ago. Based on clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and pathological findings, and given the excluding the other causes of peripheral eosinophilia, the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis along with liver cirrhosis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis was established. Based on the findings of the present case, it is highly recommended that, in the patients presented with liver cirrhosis associated with peripheral blood or ascitic fluid eosinophilia, performing gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy can probably reveal this rare disorder of EG. PMID:24772356

Kalantar Hormozi, Mohammadreza; Bahtouee, Mehrzad; Tavosi, Zahra; Mosallai Pour, Hamidreza; Taghiyan Jamaleddin Kolaii, Seiiedeh Samaneh

2014-01-01

368

Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-02-17

369

General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... radiation may affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

370

General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

371

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Print A A A Text Size What's in ... child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood ...

372

What Happens After Treatment for Childhood Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Leukemia in Children » Detailed Guide » What happens after treatment for childhood ... 2014 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Leukemia in Children? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, ...

373

The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium  

PubMed Central

Background Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case–control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene–environment interactions. Objectives The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene–environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962–present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31 000 cases and 50 000 controls. Of these, 19 case–control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child–parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene–environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic groups. PMID:23403126

Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Clavel, Jacqueline; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Petridou, Eleni; Taylor, Malcolm; Schüz, Joachim; Spector, Logan G.; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Sinnett, Daniel; Murphy, Michael; Roman, Eve; Monge, Patricia; Ezzat, Sameera; Mueller, Beth A.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Birch, Jill; Kaatsch, Peter; Koifman, Sergio; Lightfoot, Tracy; Bhatti, Parveen; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rudant, Jérémie; O’Neill, Kate; Miligi, Lucia; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y.; Buffler, Patricia A.

2013-01-01

374

Childhood leukemia in Woburn, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

Possible associations between environmental hazards and the occurrence of childhood leukemia were investigated in Woburn, MA, for the period 1969-79. Residents of Woburn were concerned over what they perceived to be a large number of childhood leukemia cases; at the same time there was extensive publicity about uncontrolled hazardous waste sites in Woburn, which resulted in its being placed on the Superfund list. Many believed that the elevated rate of childhood leukemia was related to these sites or to two city water wells that had been closed in 1979 when they were found to be contaminated by organic chemicals. An occurrence was defined as childhood leukemia when it was diagnosed in a Woburn resident less than 20 years old between 1969 and 1979 and confirmed by review of hospital and pathology records. This investigation confirmed an increase in incidence which was distributed uniformly over the 11-year period. Six of the persons with leukemia were located close to each other in one census tract, 7.5 times the expected number. Parents of the children and of two matched control groups were interviewed about medical history, mother's pregnancy history, school history, and environmental exposures. There were no significant differences between the leukemia victims and persons in the control groups. No leukemia sufferer had contact with a hazardous waste site. While the contaminants of Wells G and H, which had been closed, are not known leukemogens, it is not possible to rule out exposure to this water as a factor, particularly in the eastern Woburn residents.

Cutler, J.J.; Parker, G.S.; Rosen, S.; Prenney, B.; Healey, R.; Caldwell, G.G.

1986-03-01

375

Eosinophilic pneumonia associated with bleomycin in a patient with mediastinal seminoma: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Lung toxicities resulting from the chemotherapeutic agent bleomycin encompass a variety of pathological changes, including bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, interstitial pneumonitis and progressive interstitial fibrosis. We report a rare case of eosinophilic pneumonia associated with bleomycin. Case presentation A 44-year-old Hispanic man with a primary mediastinal seminoma complicated by superior vena cava syndrome underwent treatment with four cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin. He had a complete positive response to the chemotherapy. However, three months after treatment he presented with shortness of breath and severe hypoxemia associated with peripheral eosinophilia. Computed tomography showed bilateral diffuse interstitial infiltrates that were refractory to antibiotic treatment. A lung biopsy showed eosinophilic pneumonia. He was subsequently treated with high-dose prednisone, resulting in a complete resolution of his symptoms and lung infiltrates. Conclusion This case illustrates that eosinophilic pneumonia may be a late sequela of bleomycin toxicity, and may respond dramatically to steroid treatment. PMID:20429899

2010-01-01

376

[A case of eosinophilic cystitis that was treated with oral suplatast tosilate (IPD-1151T)].  

PubMed

A 51-year-old woman with a chief complaint of micturition pain and sensation of incomplete voiding was suspected of suffering from a bladder tumor, according to the findings of cystoscopy and ultrasonography. Transurethral punch biopsy of the submucosa of the bladder wall revealed eosinophilic infiltration without malignancy. Conservative treatment with corticosteroids resulted in excellent relief of symptoms and objective remission of the bladder lesions. However, her symptoms recurred 11 weeks after finishing the treatment. She was then treated with a combination of corticosteroid and suplatast tosilate, followed by monotherapy with suplatast tosilate. The treatment was effective for the improvement of symptoms, and serum immunoglobulin E and blood eosinophil levels were reduced. No disease progression was noted after the treatment with suplatast tosilate. To our knowledge, this is the first case of eosinophilic cystitis treated with suplatast tosilate. PMID:19946192

Watanabe, Miho; Yamaguchi, Keiichi; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Kamai, Takao; Yoshida, Ken-Ichiro

2009-11-01

377

Eosinophils and mast cells as therapeutic targets in pediatric functional dyspepsia.  

PubMed

There is an increasing appreciation for the importance of inflammation as a pathophysiologic entity that contributes to functional gastrointestinal disorders including functional dyspepsia (FD). Importantly, inflammation may serve as a mediator between psychologic and physiologic functions. This manuscript reviews the literature implicating two inflammatory cell types, mast cells and eosinophils, in the generation of dyspeptic symptoms and explores their potential as targets for the treatment of FD. There are a number of inciting events which may initiate an inflammatory response, and the subsequent recruitment and activation of mast cells and eosinophils. These include internal triggers such as stress and anxiety, as well as external triggers such as microbes and allergens. Previous studies suggest that there may be efficacy in utilizing medications directed at mast cells and eosinophils. Evidence exists to suggest that combining "anti-inflammatory" medications with other treatments targeting stress can improve the rate of symptom resolution in pediatric FD. PMID:24199024

Friesen, Craig A; Schurman, Jennifer V; Colombo, Jennifer M; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M

2013-11-01

378

[Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis and granuloma facial with extra facial presentation, the same pathology?].  

PubMed

Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis is a rare fibro inflammatory lesion of unknown etiology which occurs usually in the upper respiratory tract mucosa of middle-aged adults. The histologic features show an eosinophilic vasculitis and an angiocentric fibrosis with onion-skin pattern. Firstly described as a mucosal variant of the granuloma facial, which is a rare cutaneous vasculitis with eosinophils, it is considerated by some authors as separated entities. Four cases have been described in the orbit and three of them were in fact an extension of a sinusal lesion. We report the first case affecting a 69-years-old male patient who showed an isolated orbital involvement in association with granuloma facial, extra facial. This observation illustrates the relationship between these two pathologies and consolidates the first hypothesis of a single disease with cutaneous or mucosal involvement. PMID:21736992

Depaepe, Lauriane; Chouvet, Brigitte; Claudy, Alain; Thomas, Luc; Berger, Françoise; Balme, Brigitte

2011-06-01

379

Selective eosinophil transendothelial migration triggered by eotaxin via modulation of Mac1\\/ICAM-1 and VLA4\\/VCAM-1 interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have recently cloned eotaxin, a highly efficacious eosinophilic chemokine involved in the development of lung eosinophilia during allergic inflammatory reactions. To understand more precisely how eotaxin facilitates the specific migration of eosinophils, we have studied which adhesion receptors are essential for eotaxin action both in vivo and in vitro. Experiments using mice genetically deficient in adhesion receptors demonstrated that

Gui-Quan Jia; Jose-Angel Gonzalo; Andres Hidalgo; Denisa Wagner; Myron Cybulsky; Jose C. Gutierrez-Ramos

1999-01-01

380

Correlation Between Number of Eosinophils and Reflux Index on Same Day Esophageal Biopsy and 24 Hour Esophageal pH Monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:The presence of eosinophils on esophageal biopsy is a marker of esophagitis in children. Eosinophilic inflammation without evidence of gastroesophageal reflux has led to the new diagnosis of eosinophilic, or allergic, esophagitis. The aim of this study was to correlate the number of eosinophils with the reflux index on same day esophageal biopsy and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring.METHODS:A retrospective

Steven J. Steiner; Sandeep K. Gupta; Joseph M. Croffie; Joseph F. Fitzgerald

2004-01-01

381

Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-10-30

382

Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2013-10-29

383

The European LeukemiaNet: achievements and perspectives  

PubMed Central

The only way to cure leukemia is by cooperative research. To optimize research, the European LeukemiaNet integrates 105 national leukemia trial groups and networks, 105 interdisciplinary partner groups and about 1,000 leukemia specialists from 175 institutions. They care for tens of thousands of leukemia patients in 33 countries across Europe. Their ultimate goal is to cure leukemia. Since its inception in 2002, the European LeukemiaNet has steadily expanded and has unified leukemia research across Europe. The European LeukemiaNet grew from two major roots: 1) the German Competence Network on Acute and Chronic Leukemias; and 2) the collaboration of European Investigators on Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. The European LeukemiaNet has improved leukemia research and management across Europe. Its concept has led to funding by the European Commission as a network of excellence. Other sources (European Science Foundation; European LeukemiaNet-Foundation) will take over when the support of the European Commission ends. PMID:21048032

Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Grimwade, David; Simonsson, Bengt; Apperley, Jane; Baccarani, Michele; Barbui, Tiziano; Barosi, Giovanni; Bassan, Renato; Béné, Marie C.; Berger, Ute; Büchner, Thomas; Burnett, Alan; Cross, Nicolas C.P.; de Witte, Theo J.M.; Döhner, Hartmut; Dombret, Hervé; Einsele, Hermann; Engelich, Georg; Foŕ, Robin; Fonatsch, Christa; Gökbuget, Nicola; Gluckman, Elaine; Gratwohl, Alois; Guilhot, Francois; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Thorsten; Hallek, Michael; Hasford, Jörg; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hoelzer, Dieter; Kiladjian, Jean-Jaques; Labar, Boris; Ljungman, Per; Mansmann, Ulrich; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Ribera, José M.; Rieder, Harald; Serve, Hubert; Schrotz-King, Petra; Sanz, Miguel A.; Saußele, Susanne

2011-01-01

384

Stimulated eosinophils and proteinases augment the transepithelial flux of albumin in bovine bronchial mucosa.  

PubMed Central

1. The apical to basolateral transmucosal flux of albumin has been measured in isolated sheets of bovine bronchial and tracheal mucosa. Under resting conditions the net unidirectional flux in the bronchial mucosa was not significantly different from that measured previously for the basolateral to apical vector. In contrast, the apical to basolateral flux in the tracheal mucosa was significantly lower than that measured in the opposite direction. 2. Addition of guinea-pig peritoneal eosinophils to the apical side of the tissues had no significant effect on the transmucosal flux of albumin in either the bronchial or tracheal mucosa. 3. When eosinophils were stimulated with the ionophore A23187 or by opsonic adherence to tissues treated with a guinea-pig anti-bovine airway epithelium antibody, the bronchial mucosal sheets that had been exposed showed a significant increase in the transmucosal flux of albumin. However, tissues from the tracheal mucosa were resistant to the effects of stimulated eosinophils. 4. Histologically, sheets of mucosa from bovine main bronchi that had been exposed to stimulated eosinophils were characterized by epithelial injury consisting of loss of columnar epithelium from the underlying basal cell layer and biomatrix. Much less evidence of cellular injury was observed in tracheal tissues. 5. Bacterial collagenases applied to the apical side of the sheets were shown to increase the permeability of the bronchial mucosa to albumin and to produce histological changes that had similarities with the pattern of damage produced by stimulated eosinophils. 6. These observations demonstrate that the ability of eosinophils to injure the bronchial mucosa is independent of the side of the tissue on which they are present.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8242259

Herbert, C. A.; Edwards, D.; Boot, J. R.; Robinson, C.

1993-01-01

385

Eosinophils in the oesophageal mucosa: clinical, pathological and epidemiological relevance in children: a cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EO) shows eosinophilic infiltration of the mucosa and can present with symptoms indistinguishable from gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GORD). The authors describe the clinical, endoscopic and histopathological features of all cases of histological EO presenting during 2007–2008 with a 2-year follow-up. The incidence of paediatric EO and the features of a subgroup with features of both GORD and EO (‘overlap’ syndrome (OS)) are described. Design Biopsies with an average of 15 eosinophils/high-power field (HPF) were reviewed in the cohort. OS was suggested when there was coexistence of clinical and histological features of EO and GORD (abnormal pH study), which improved with proton pump inhibitors. Setting Tertiary care. Participants All cases with ?15 eosinophils/HPF entered the study. Primary outcome measures Patients with EO had an average of 15 eosinophils/HPF. Secondary outcome measures Other histological features of EO included microabscesses, dilated intercellular spaces, basal cell hyperplasia, papillary elongation, etc. Results 24 cases of EO were identified, 13 men and 11 women. The incidence of paediatric oesophageal eosinophilia in the region was 9/100?000 children. 11 of the 24 patients (46%) presented with some form of allergy, six with poor feeding/food aversion, five with dysphagia and four with vomiting. After follow-up, 56.5% were confirmed to have EO, 30.5% responded to treatment for GORD and were categorised as OS, 9% developed eosinophilic gastroenteritis and 4% did not have further upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Conclusions Accurate diagnosis of EO, especially the differentiation from GORD, requires appropriate clinicopathological correlation. A significant proportion of patients with eosinophilia in the mucosa also have GORD (OS). These patients improve after treating the underlying GORD. The study was registered as a Service Evaluation with the Trust (number SE74). PMID:22240650

Rao, Prithviraj; Thomson, Mike; Al-Adnani, Mudher

2012-01-01

386

LEADING ARTICLE Proteomic analysis of childhood leukemia  

E-print Network

LEADING ARTICLE Proteomic analysis of childhood leukemia CM Hegedus1 , L Gunn1 , CF Skibola1 , L of Hematology-Oncology, Stanford, CA, USA Childhood acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemias are stratified expression profiles can discriminate between leukemia sub- types. Thus, proteome analysis similarly holds

California at Berkeley, University of

387

Retinal arteriolar spasm during transient monocular visual loss in eosinophilic vasculitis.  

PubMed

A patient with eosinophilic vasculitis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) developed episodic transient monocular visual loss. During or immediately after two visual loss episodes, we demonstrated narrowed retinal arterioles, delayed arterial filling time, and segmented retinal venous flow in the affected eye on fundus photography and fluorescein angiography (FA). Such findings have only rarely been reported in patients with transient monocular visual loss in other conditions, probably because the episodes have ended before fundus photography and FA could be performed. This is the first report to capture retinal vascular changes associated with transient monocular visual loss in a patient with eosinophilic vasculitis. PMID:19458579

Stasi, Kalliopi; Ramchandran, Rajeev S; Rao, Narsing A; Feldon, Steven E; DiLoreto, David A

2009-03-01

388

Eosinophilic cystitis mimicking tuberculosis: An analysis of five cases with review of literature  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is a rare disease. It is a transmural inflammation of the bladder, predominantly with eosinophils. High index of suspicion is needed for timely intervention. EC should be kept as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms due to small capacity bladder with a negative workup for urinary tuberculosis and in patients having hematuria and negative cytology, or incidentally found bladder lesions with known risk factors. Initial treatment is conservative with removal of risk factor, anti-histaminics and steroids. Augmentation cystoplasty should be considered in patients with a small capacity bladder. These patients need a strict and long term follow-up. PMID:23662013

Kumar, Santosh; Sharma, Varun; Ganesamoni, Raguram; Singh, Shrawan

2013-01-01

389

Eosinophilic cystitis mimicking tuberculosis: An analysis of five cases with review of literature.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is a rare disease. It is a transmural inflammation of the bladder, predominantly with eosinophils. High index of suspicion is needed for timely intervention. EC should be kept as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms due to small capacity bladder with a negative workup for urinary tuberculosis and in patients having hematuria and negative cytology, or incidentally found bladder lesions with known risk factors. Initial treatment is conservative with removal of risk factor, anti-histaminics and steroids. Augmentation cystoplasty should be considered in patients with a small capacity bladder. These patients need a strict and long term follow-up. PMID:23662013

Kumar, Santosh; Sharma, Varun; Ganesamoni, Raguram; Singh, Shrawan

2013-01-01

390

Automated image analysis in the study of lymphocyte subpopulation in eosinophilic oesophagitis  

PubMed Central

Background Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is characterized by the presence of eosinophils in oesophageal mucosa. Other inflammatory cells, mainly lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and mast cells may also play an important role in this disease. The aim of this study is to compare the inflammatory pattern of the mucosa between EoE and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), using automatic image analysis in digital slides, and to assess treatment response after elimination diet and food challenge test. Methods From 2010 to 2013, 35 oesophageal biopsies from EoE and GERD patients were randomly selected. In six EoE biopsies, patients had been treated with selective food exclusion diet. Immunohistochemical study with CD3, CD20, CD4, and CD8 for lymphocyte populations, CD1a for dendritic cells, and CD117/c-kit for mast cells was performed. Slides were scanned using Leica Aperio Scanscope XT with 40× magnification. Immunohistochemical expression was quantified in 245 immunohistochemistry digital slides with Leica Aperio positive pixel count algorithm using two different approaches: whole slide analysis versus selection of a 2 mm2 hot spot area. Results Average eosinophil cell count was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the first biopsy of EoE patients before treatment (30.75 eosinophils per high power field - HPF) than in GERD patients (0.85 eosinophils/HPF) or in EoE patients after treatment with elimination diet (1.60 eosinophils/HPF). In the immunohistochemical study, manual count and automatic image analysis showed a significant increase in the number of CD3 and CD8 cells in EoE patients, compared with GERD patients. However, the increase of CD117/c-kit was only statistically significant when manual counting procedures were used. CD20 positive cell count also showed a non-statistically significant tendency to reduce after elimination diet treatment. Manual eosinophil count correlated much better with CD3 and CD8 count using hot spot approach than with a whole slide approach. Conclusions Positive pixel count algorithm can be a useful tool to quantify the immunohistochemical expression of inflammatory cells in the diagnosis and follow up of eosinophilic oesophagitis. PMID:25565117

2014-01-01

391

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare fatal hematopoietic disorder of early childhood. We are presenting a case of 9-month-old female child who was admitted with abdominal distension, irritability, and hepatosplenomegaly. Peripheral blood film examination showed leukoerythroblastosis with leukocytosis, absolute monocytosis, microcytic hypo chromic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow examination showed myeloid hyperplasia, Hb HPLC revealed normal HbF (1.3 %) and HbA2 (2.9 %). There was absolute gamma globulinemia and DCT positivity. Cytogenetic studies revealed a normal karyotype with absence of Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, monosomy 7 or any other chromosomal abnormality. Diagnosis of JMML was rendered according to the diagnostic criteria laid down by WHO classification 2008 with presence of peripheral blood monocytosis >1 × 10(9)/L, blasts <20 % of leucocytes in blood or nucleated cells in bone marrow, absence of Ph chromosome, presence of immature granulocytes in the blood and WBC count >10 × 10(9)/L. The patient was then started on a regimen of chemotherapy to which she gave a promising response. PMID:24426365

Sethi, Neha; Kushwaha, Shivani; Dhingra, Bhawana; Pujani, Mukta; Chandra, Jagdish; Shukla, Shailaja

2013-09-01

392

Hairy cell leukemia.  

PubMed

Hairy cell leukemia is an indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with a characteristic presentation of pancytopenia, splenomegaly, and circulating hairy cells. An immunophenotypic pattern of CD11c, CD25, and CD103 expression. TRAP staining, reticulin deposition, and morphology of bone marrow and circulating cells help establish the diagnosis. Although up to 10% of patients might not require systemic treatment, for the vast majority effective treatments are available with the purine-nucleoside analogues cladribine and pentostatin. Cladribine is considered the drug of choice in the first-line setting due to the very high complete remission rate and prolonged duration of response following a single 7-day infusion. Cladribine and pentostatin both have unique but different mechanisms of action, with a lack of cross-resistance between them, which might be exploited in the relapsed or refractory disease setting. Therapy for relapsed and refractory patients also includes novel biologic agents as well as splenectomy. Despite the effective treatment options, the prospect of cure remains elusive due to the frequent presence of MRD even in complete responders. Future studies employing combination therapies targeting the eradication of MRD will hopefully improve relapse-free survivals as well as overall survival, and might even offer the prospect of cure. PMID:18283787

Fanta, Paul Timothy; Saven, Alan

2008-01-01

393

PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA  

PubMed Central

Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (? 20%) and absolute number (? 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

2014-01-01

394

PedsQL™ Eosinophilic Esophagitis Module: Feasibility, Reliability and Validity  

PubMed Central

Objective Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic esophageal inflammatory condition with a paucity of information on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The objective of the study was to report on the measurement properties of the PedsQL™ EoE Module. Methods The PedsQL™ EoE Module was completed in a multisite study by 196 pediatric EoE patients and 262 EoE parents. Results The PedsQL™ EoE Module scales evidenced excellent feasibility (0.6%–3.1% missing), excellent group comparison reliability across total scale scores (patient ? = 0.93; parent proxy ? = 0.94), good reliability for the seven individual scales (patient ? = 0.75–0.87; parent proxy ? = 0.81–0.92), excellent test-retest reliability (patient ICC = 0.88; parent ICC= 0.82), demonstrated no floor effects and low ceiling effects, and demonstrated a high percentage of scaling success for most scales. Intercorrelations with the PedsQL™ Generic Core Scales were in the medium (0.30) to large (0.50) range. PedsQL™ EoE Module scores were worse among patients with active histologic disease (> 5 eos/hpf) compared to those in remission (patient self-report: 63.3 vs. 69.9 [p<0.05]; parent proxy-report: 65.1 vs. 72.3 [p<0.01]), and those treated with dietary restrictions compared to those with no restrictions (patient self-report: 61.6 vs. 74.3 [p< 0.01]; parent proxy-report: 65.5 vs. 74.7 [p<0.01]). Conclusions The results demonstrate excellent measurement properties of the PedsQL™ EoE Module. Patients with active histologic disease and those treated with dietary restrictions demonstrated worse PedsQL™ scores. The PedsQL™ EoE Module may be utilized in evaluation of pediatric EoE disease-specific HRQOL in clinical research and practice. PMID:23478422

Franciosi, James P.; Hommel, Kevin A.; Bendo, Cristiane B.; King, Eileen C.; Collins, Margaret H.; Eby, Michael D.; Marsolo, Keith; Abonia, J. Pablo; von Tiehl, Karl F.; Putnam, Philip E.; Greenler, Alexandria J.; Greenberg, Allison B.; Bryson, Ronald A.; Davis, Carla M.; Olive, Anthony P.; Gupta, Sandeep K.; Erwin, Elizabeth A.; Klinnert, Mary D.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Denham, Jolanda M.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Varni, James W.

2014-01-01

395

Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-01-23

396

Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-02-02

397

Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2014-07-22

398

Infection and childhood leukemia: review of evidence  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To analyze studies that evaluated the role of infections as well as indirect measures of exposure to infection in the risk of childhood leukemia, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia. METHODS A search in Medline, Lilacs, and SciELO scientific publication databases initially using the descriptors "childhood leukemia" and "infection" and later searching for the words "childhood leukemia" and "maternal infection or disease" or "breastfeeding" or "daycare attendance" or "vaccination" resulted in 62 publications that met the following inclusion criteria: subject aged ? 15 years; specific analysis of cases diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or total leukemia; exposure assessment of mothers' or infants' to infections (or proxy of infection), and risk of leukemia. RESULTS Overall, 23 studies that assessed infections in children support the hypothesis that occurrence of infection during early childhood reduces the risk of leukemia, but there are disagreements within and between studies. The evaluation of exposure to infection by indirect measures showed evidence of reduced risk of leukemia associated mainly with daycare attendance. More than 50.0% of the 16 studies that assessed maternal exposure to infection observed increased risk of leukemia associated with episodes of influenza, pneumonia, chickenpox, herpes zoster, lower genital tract infection, skin disease, sexually transmitted diseases, Epstein-Barr virus, and Helicobacter pylori. CONCLUSIONS Although no specific infectious agent has been identified, scientific evidence suggests that exposure to infections has some effect on childhood leukemia etiology. PMID:24626555

Maia, Raquel da Rocha Paiva; Wünsch, Victor

2013-01-01

399

Selective T Cell Depletion in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Graft Versus Host Disease; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2014-09-03

400

Selective T Cell Depletion in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Graft Versus Host Disease; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2015-02-04

401

Eosinophilic esophagitis attributed to gastroesophageal reflux: Improvement with an amino acid-based formula  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Aims Treatment for gastroesophageal reflux may be ineffective in patients with an eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. The aim of this study was to investigate whether unremitting symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and biopsy abnormalities of the esophagus may be associated with the ingestion of certain foods. Methods Ten children previously diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux by standard testing with

Kevin J. Kelly; Audrey J. Lazenby; Peter C. Rowe; John H. Yardley; Jay A. Perman; Hugh A. Sampson

1995-01-01

402

Low Molecular Weight Eosinophil Chemotactic Factor (ECF) in the Serum of Murine Schistosomiasis Japonica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eosinophil chemotactic activity was detected in the serum obtained at an acute stage of murine schistosomiasis japonica. Gel filtration of the dialyzable fraction of the serum on Sephadex G25 showed that the chemotactic component had an apparent molecular weight of less than 1,000. It was stable to heating, but was sensitive to pronase or carboxypeptidase A digestions, indicating its peptide

Makoto Owhashi; Yoichro Horii; Akira Ishii; Yukifumi Nawa

1986-01-01

403

Eosinophils in the lung - modulating apoptosis and efferocytosis in airway inflammation.  

PubMed

Due to the key role of the lung in efficient transfer of oxygen in exchange for carbon dioxide, a controlled inflammatory response is essential for restoration of tissue homeostasis following airway exposure to bacterial pathogens or environmental toxins. Unregulated or prolonged inflammatory responses in the lungs can lead to tissue damage, disrupting normal tissue architecture, and consequently compromising efficient gaseous exchange. Failure to resolve inflammation underlies the development and/or progression of a number of inflammatory lung diseases including asthma. Eosinophils, granulocytic cells of the innate immune system, are primarily involved in defense against parasitic infections. However, the propagation of the allergic inflammatory response in chronic asthma is thought to involve excessive recruitment and impaired apoptosis of eosinophils together with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis). In terms of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of asthma, the widespread use of glucocorticoids is associated with a number of adverse health consequences after long-term use, while some patients suffer from steroid-resistant disease. A new approach for therapeutic intervention would be to promote the resolution of inflammation via modulation of eosinophil apoptosis and the phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. This review focuses on the mechanisms underpinning eosinophil-mediated lung damage, currently available treatments and therapeutic targets that might in future be harnessed to facilitate inflammation resolution by the manipulation of cell survival and clearance pathways. PMID:25071763

Felton, Jennifer M; Lucas, Christopher D; Rossi, Adriano G; Dransfield, Ian

2014-01-01

404

Expression of Tissue Factor by Eosinophils in Patients with Chronic Urticaria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Although several cases of chronic urticaria (CU) are currently regarded as autoimmune in origin, associated with histamine-releasing autoantibodies, an activation of blood coagulation via tissue factor (TF) and a strong expression of TF in lesional skin have been described. Eosinophils, which are involved in CU skin lesions, have recently been demonstrated as the major source of TF in human

Massimo Cugno; Angelo V. Marzano; Alberto Tedeschi; Daniele Fanoni; Luigia Venegoni; Riccardo Asero

2009-01-01

405

Activation of Neutrophils, Eosinophils, and Lymphocytes in the Lower Respiratory Tract in Wegener's Granulomatosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Levels of cell products released by neutrophils, eosinophils and lymphocytes were measured in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of 19 patients with pulmonary active Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) to assess in vivo the magnitude of cellular activation at sites of active disease. Measurements in- cluded the BAL cell profile and BALF levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), free proteinase 3 (fPR3), com- plexes

ARMIN SCHNABEL; ELENA CSERNOK; JÖRG BRAUN; WOLFGANG L. GROSS

2000-01-01

406

Lung miliary micro-nodules in human T-cell leukemia virus type I carriers.  

PubMed

Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) carriers are rarely subject to inflammatory disorders in multiple organs, other than the well-known complication, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). HTLV-1 associated bronchiolo-alveolar disorder (HABA) has been proposed as an immune mediated pulmonary reaction seen rarely in HTLV-1 carriers. The reported clinico-pathological patterns of HABA are diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP). We here report three cases of HTLV-1 carriers showing miliary micro-nodules throughout both lungs. Microscopic examination in the video assisted thoracic surgery biopsies demonstrated that all cases had multiple discrete micro-nodules which consisted of marked lymphoid infiltration, granulomas, eosinophils and a few foci of necrosis inside the granuloma. No findings indicating ATLL, other neoplastic conditions, infection or interstitial pneumonia, including DPB and LIP, were present following panels of special staining and immunohistochemical examinations. Two patients improved without treatment within one month, with no evidence of recurrence after 7 years. One patient showed slow deterioration of lung reticular shadows in spite of a low dose corticosteroid therapy (prednisolone 10 mg/day). We believe these cases may be a newly recognized variant of HABA. PMID:23464968

Fukuoka, Junya; Tominaga, Masaki; Ichikado, Kazuya; Tanaka, Tomonori; Ichiyasu, Hidenori; Kohrogi, Hirotsugu; Ishizawa, Shin; Suga, Moritaka

2013-02-01

407

Sorafenib Tosylate and Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-11-03

408

Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2015-01-30

409

Chemokine-induced eosinophil recruitment. Evidence of a role for endogenous eotaxin in an in vivo allergy model in mouse skin.  

PubMed Central

Selective eosinophil recruitment into tissues is a characteristic feature of allergic diseases. Chemokines are effective leukocyte chemoattractants and may play an important role in mediating eosinophil recruitment in various allergic conditions in man. Here, we describe a novel mouse model of eosinophil recruitment in which we have compared the in vivo chemoattractant activity of different C-C chemokines. Furthermore, we describe the use of antibodies to chemokines and receptor blockade to address the endogenous mechanisms involved in eosinophil recruitment in a late-phase allergic reaction in mouse skin. Intradermal injection of mEotaxin and mMIP-1alpha, but not mMCP-1, mRANTES, mMCP-5, or mMIP-1beta, induced significant 111In-eosinophil recruitment in mouse skin. Significant 111In-eosinophil recruitment was also observed in an active cutaneous anaphylactic reaction. Pretreatment of skin sites with antieotaxin antiserum, but not an antiMIP-1alpha antibody, suppressed 111In-eosinophil recruitment in this delayed-onset allergic reaction. Similarly, desensitization of the eosinophil eotaxin receptor CCR3 with mEotaxin, or blockade of the receptor with metRANTES, significantly inhibited 111In-eosinophil recruitment in the allergic reaction. These results demonstrate an important role for endogenous eotaxin in mediating the 111In-eosinophil recruitment in allergic inflammation, and suggest that blockade of the CCR3 receptor is a valid strategy to inhibit eosinophil migration in vivo. PMID:9312163

Teixeira, M M; Wells, T N; Lukacs, N W; Proudfoot, A E; Kunkel, S L; Williams, T J; Hellewell, P G

1997-01-01

410

Eosinophils in the blood of hematopoietic stem cell transplanted patients are activated and have different molecular marker profiles in acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease  

PubMed Central

While increased numbers of eosinophils may be detected in patients with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, it is not known if eosinophils play a role in GVHD. The aims of this study were to determine: whether eosinophils are activated during GVHD; whether the patterns of activation are similar in acute and chronic GVHD; and the ways in which systemic corticosteroids affect eosinophils. Transplanted patients (n = 35) were investigated for eosinophil numbers and the expression levels of 16 eosinophilic cell surface markers using flow cytometry; all the eosinophil data were analyzed by the multivariate method OPLS-DA. Different patterns of molecule expression were observed on the eosinophils from patients with acute, chronic, and no GVHD, respectively. The molecules that provided the best discrimination between acute and chronic GVHD were: the activation marker CD9; adhesion molecules CD11c and CD18; chemokine receptor CCR3; and prostaglandin receptor CRTH2. Patients with acute or chronic GVHD who received systemic corticosteroid treatment showed down-regulation of the cell surface markers on their eosinophils, whereas corticosteroid treatment had no effect on the eosinophil phenotype in the patients without GVHD. In summary, eosinophils are activated in GVHD, display different activation profiles in acute and chronic GVHD, and are highly responsive to systemic corticosteroids. PMID:25400930

Cromvik, Julia; Johnsson, Marianne; Vaht, Krista; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Wennerĺs, Christine

2014-01-01

411

Immunoregulatory properties of childhood leukemias  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of in vitro humoral immune responses and immunoregulatory properties of leukemic cell was carried out in 17 children with acute leukemia prior to therapy. Leukemias were of the non-T, non-B-cell type in 13 patients and of T-cell origin in four. Bone marrow and peripheral blood cells consisted of 24-96% lymphoblasts and were generally deficient in surface Ig-positive cells. Induction of Ig secreting cells in response to pokeweed mitogen was markedly decreased in marrow and peripheral mononuclear cell cultures of leukemic patients. Co-culture of leukemic cells with normal lymphocytes led to marked deviations from the expected Ig secreting-cell response of the cell mixtures. The predominant effect was enhancement, as was the case with eight non-T, non-B-cell and one T-cell leukemia samples. Suppression of the Ig secreting-cell response was observed in only three instances, two with non-T, non-B-cell and one with T-cell leukemia samples. These findings implicate non-T, non-B as well as more differentiated leukemic cells in having the potential for modifying Ig production by B cells.

Banker, D.S.; Pahwa, R.N.; Miller, D.R.; Hilgartner, M.W.; Good, R.A.; Pahwa, S.G.

1982-07-01

412

Increased pulmonary neuroendocrine cells with bombesin-like immunoreactivity in adult patients with eosinophilic granuloma.  

PubMed Central

Cigarette smoking is associated with hyperplasia of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells and variably increased levels of bombesin-like peptides in the lower respiratory tract. Because the neuropeptide bombesin is a chemoattractant for monocytes and a mitogen for 3T3 fibroblasts, we hypothesized that an excess of neuroendocrine cells and bombesin-like peptides could contribute to lung inflammation and fibrosis in certain cigarette smokers. Eosinophilic granuloma is a fibrotic lung disease of unknown etiology that in adults occurs almost invariably in cigarette smokers. We quantitated neuroendocrine cells with bombesin-like immunoreactivity in open lung biopsies from patients with eosinophilic granuloma (n = 6) and compared these with cigarette smokers (n = 6) who underwent lung resection for reasons other than primary lung disease. In addition, we compared them with patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 8), a disease not associated with cigarette smoking. Finally, we also examined the mitogenic effect of bombesin on cultured human adult lung fibroblasts. The patients with eosinophilic granuloma exhibited a 10-fold increase in neuroendocrine cells with bombesin-like immunoreactivity compared to both smokers (P = 0.005) and patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (P = 0.005). In addition, bombesin produced a significant mitogenic effect on cultured human adult lung fibroblasts at concentrations of 1 nM and above. We conclude that increased numbers of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells with bombesin-like immunoreactivity are commonly found in patients with eosinophilic granuloma and, since bombesin-like peptides are chemotactic for monocytes and mitogenic for human lung fibroblasts, we speculate that neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia may be important in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic granuloma in adult cigarette smokers. Images PMID:2394833

Aguayo, S M; King, T E; Waldron, J A; Sherritt, K M; Kane, M A; Miller, Y E

1990-01-01

413

Bortezomib and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

2015-02-12

414

Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2013-10-07

415

Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2014-05-22

416

Modulation of eosinophil cytotoxicity by blood mononuclear cells from healthy subjects and patients with chronic schistosomiasis mansoni.  

PubMed

Human blood mononuclear cells in culture release a factor(s) that markedly enhances eosinophil cytotoxicity. This factor(s) stimulates eosinophils to kill Schistosoma mansoni larvae at low antibody concentrations and cell/target ratios. A study of the mononuclear cells of 78 subjects with chronic schistosomiasis mansoni and 33 controls suggests that the production of eosinophil cytotoxicity enhancing activity (ECEA) is suppressed in most patients with S. mansoni infections. Suppression of ECEA production was not observed, however, with cells from many patients with heavy infections, including patients with hepatosplenomegaly. The possible role of ECEA in the development of pathology is discussed. PMID:6713539

Dessein, A J; Lenzi, H L; Bina, J C; Carvalho, E M; Weiser, W Y; Andrade, Z A; David, J R

1984-04-15

417

Eosinophil as a cellular target of the ocular anti-allergic action of mapracorat, a novel selective glucocorticoid receptor agonist  

PubMed Central

Purpose Glucocorticoids can either suppress gene transcription (transrepression) or activate it (transactivation). This latter process may contribute to certain side effects caused by these agents. Mapracorat (also known as BOL-303242-X or ZK 245186) is a novel selective glucocorticoid receptor agonist that maintains a beneficial anti-inflammatory activity but seems to be less effective in transactivation, resulting in a lower potential for side effects; it has been proposed for the topical treatment of inflammatory skin disorders. This study assessed the anti-allergic activity of mapracorat at the ocular level and whether eosinophils and mast cells are targets of its action. Methods With in vitro studies apoptosis was evaluated in human eosinophils by flow cytometry and western blot of caspase-3 fragments. Eosinophil migration toward platelet-activating factor was evaluated by transwell assays. Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), and the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5)/regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTES) were measured using a high-throughput multiplex luminex technology. Annexin I and the chemochine receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) were detected by flow cytometry. With in vivo studies, allergic conjunctivitis was induced in guinea pigs sensitized to ovalbumin by an ocular allergen challenge and evaluated by a clinical score. Conjunctival eosinophils were determined by microscopy or eosinophil peroxidase assay. Results In cultured human eosinophils, mapracorat showed the same potency as dexamethasone but displayed higher efficacy in increasing spontaneous apoptosis and in counteracting cytokine-sustained eosinophil survival. These effects were prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone. Mapracorat inhibited eosinophil migration and IL-8 release from eosinophils or the release of IL-6, IL-8, CCL5/RANTES, and TNF-? from a human mast cell line with equal potency as dexamethasone, whereas it was clearly less potent than this glucocorticoid in inducing annexin I and CXCR4 expression on the human eosinophil surface; this was taken as a possible sign of glucocorticoid-dependent transactivation. In the guinea pig, mapracorat or dexamethasone eye drops induced an analogous reduction in clinical symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis and conjunctival eosinophil accumulation. Conclusions Mapracorat appears to be a promising candidate for the topical treatment of allergic eye disorders. It maintains an anti-allergic profile similar to that of dexamethasone but seems to have fewer transactivation effects in comparison to this classical glucocorticoid. Some of its cellular targets may contribute to eosinophil apoptosis and/or to preventing their recruitment and activation and to inhibiting the release of cytokines and chemokines. PMID:22194647

Baiula, Monica; Spartŕ, Antonino; Bedini, Andrea; Carbonari, Gioia; Bucolo, Claudio; Ward, Keith W.; Zhang, Jin-Zhong; Govoni, Paolo

2011-01-01

418

Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML)  

MedlinePLUS

... for childhood leukemias Prognostic factors in childhood leukemia (ALL or AML) Certain differences among patients that affect ... myelogenous leukemia (AML). Prognostic factors for children with ALL Different systems are used to classify childhood ALL ...

419

What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... leukemia? What should you ask your doctor about acute lymphocytic leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... answer many of your questions. What kind of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) do I have? Do I have any ...

420

Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia by Risk Group  

MedlinePLUS

... lymphocytic leukemia Radiation therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Leukapheresis for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Supportive care for chronic ... removed from the blood with a procedure called leukapheresis. This treatment lowers blood counts right away. The ...

421

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Treatment in Adults (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... Leukemia Patient information Patient information: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment in adults (Beyond the Basics) Author Richard ... article ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA OVERVIEW GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT ALL TREATMENT INDUCTION OF REMISSION CONSOLIDATION/INTENSIFICATION THERAPY MAINTENANCE ...

422

ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia and mouse brain the experimental-wise false discovery rate. A human acute leukemia dataset corrected from 38 leukemia patients

Gu, Xun

423

Recognizing familial myeloid leukemia in adults  

PubMed Central

Germline testing for familial cases of myeloid leukemia in adults is becoming more common with the recognition of multiple genetic syndromes predisposing people to bone marrow disease. Currently, Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments approved testing exists for several myeloid leukemia predisposition syndromes: familial platelet disorder with propensity to acute myeloid leukemia (FPD/AML), caused by mutations in RUNX1; familial AML with mutated CEBPA; familial myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia with mutated GATA2; and the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, including dyskeratosis congenita, a disease of abnormal telomere maintenance. With the recognition of additional families with a genetic component to their leukemia, new predisposition alleles will likely be identified. We highlight how to recognize and manage these cases as well as outline the characteristics of the major known syndromes. We look forward to future research increasing our understanding of the scope of inherited myeloid leukemia syndromes. PMID:23926458

Nickels, Eric M.; Soodalter, Jesse; Churpek, Jane E.

2013-01-01

424

Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-02-01

425

Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2013-07-03

426

Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-02-18

427

[Determining asthma treatment in children by monitoring fractional exhaled nitric oxide, sputum eosinophils and leukotriene B4].  

PubMed

Sputum eosinophils and exhaled fractional nitric oxide (FENO) are markers of airway inflammation in asthma. Cytokines, cysteinyl-leukotrienes and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) are responsible for this inflammation. The aim of this study is to determine the usefulness of these markers in monitoring asthma treatment in children. FENO, sputum eosinophils, and LTB4 in induced sputum were performed in 10 children (9-15 years old). These determinations were repeated four months later, after the beginning or an increase in the treatment. FENO values tended to decrease (P=.15), pulmonary function tended to improve (P=.10), and sputum eosinophils decreased (P=.003) compared to the first determination. There were no differences in LTB4 concentrations (P=.88). Sputum eosinophils seem to be more precise than FENO in the monitoring of inflammation in asthmatic children. PMID:24857428

Vizmanos-Lamotte, G; Cruz, M J; Gómez-Ollés, S; Muńoz, X; de Mir Messa, I; Moreno-Galdó, A

2015-01-01

428

Azacitidine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-04-25

429

Genetics Home Reference: Acute promyelocytic leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... myeloid leukemia ; AML ; anemia ; blood clotting ; bone marrow ; cancer ; chromosome ; clotting ; differentiation ; fever ; gene ; gene transcription ; gums ; hematopoietic ; hematuria ; infection ; inherited ; ...

430

Lenalidomide and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Early-Stage Asymptomatic Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2015-02-18

431

Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-09

432

Eosinophil cationic protein/RNase 3 is another RNase A-family ribonuclease with direct antiviral activity.  

PubMed Central

Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is one of two RNase A-superfamily ribonucleases found in secretory granules of human eosinophilic leukocytes. Although the physiologic function of eosinophils [and thus of the two eosinophil ribonucleases, ECP and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN)] remains controversial, we have recently shown that isolated human eosinophils promote ribonuclease-dependent toxicity toward extracellular virions of the single-stranded RNA virus, respiratory syncytial virus, group B (RSV-B). We have also shown that recombinant human EDN (rhEDN) can act alone as a ribonuclease-dependent antiviral agent. In this work, we provide a biochemical characterization of recombinant human ECP (rhECP) prepared in baculovirus, and demonstrate that rhECP also promotes ribonuclease-dependent antiviral activity. The rhECP described here is N-glycosylated, as is native ECP, and has approximately 100-fold more ribonuclease activity than non-glycosylated rhECP prepared in bacteria. The enzymatic activity of rhECP was sensitive to inhibition by placental ribonuclease inhibitor (RI). Although rhECP was not as effective as rhEDN at reducing viral infectivity (500 nM rhECP reduced infectivity of RSV-B approximately 6 fold; 500 nM rhEDN, >50 fold), the antiviral activity appears to be unique to the eosinophil ribonucleases; no reduction in infectivity was promoted by bovine RNase A, by the amphibian ribonuclease, onconase, nor by the closely-related human ribonuclease, RNase k6. Interestingly, combinations of rhEDN and rhECP did not result in either a synergistic or even an additive antiviral effect. Taken together, these results suggest that that the interaction between the eosinophil ribonucleases and the extracellular virions of RSV-B may be specific and saturable. PMID:9649619

Domachowske, J B; Dyer, K D; Adams, A G; Leto, T L; Rosenberg, H F

1998-01-01

433

Eosinophilic cystitis and nephrogenic adenoma of the bladder: a rare association of 2 unusual findings in childhood.  

PubMed

Neither eosinophilic cystitis nor nephrogenic adenoma is often diagnosed in children, with few pediatric cases being reported in the literature. Although these maladies share the same predisposing conditions, namely, chronic irritation or injury to the urothelium and lower urinary tract and symptoms such as dysuria, hematuria, and urinary frequency, their concomitance is exceptional. Herein, we report the case of an 8-year-old boy with a previous history of bladder surgery presenting histologically diagnosed eosinophilic cystitis and nephrogenic adenoma. PMID:21496523

Rossi, Enrica; Pavanello, Piero; Marzola, Andrea; Franchella, Andrea

2011-04-01

434

Eosinophil Count and Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Count Ratio as Prognostic Markers in Patients with Bacteremia: A Retrospective Cohort Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionThere is scarce evidence on the use of eosinophil count as a marker of outcome in patients with infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether changes in eosinophil count, as well as the neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR), could be used as clinical markers of outcome in patients with bacteremia.MethodsWe performed a retrospective study of patients with a

Roser Terradas; Santiago Grau; Jordi Blanch; Marta Riu; Pere Saballs; Xavier Castells; Juan Pablo Horcajada; Hernando Knobel

2012-01-01

435

CC16 inhibits the migration of eosinophils towards the formyl peptide fMLF but not towards PGD2.  

PubMed

Clara cell 16-kDa (CC16) is an anti-inflammatory protein chiefly produced in the lung epithelium. CC16 has been shown to inhibit the migration of rabbit neutrophils and human monocytes toward the formyl peptide N-formyl-methionine-leucin-phenylalanin (fMLF). Eosinophils migrate towards prostaglandin D2 (PGD(2)) and CC16 has been shown to bind to PGD(2). Therefore we investigated if CC16 could inhibit the migration of human eosinophils and neutrophils towards fMLF and/or PGD(2). Migration of eosinophils and neutrophils was assessed in a microplate migration system using specific ligands and receptor antagonists. CC16 inhibited the migration of eosinophils and neutrophils toward fMLF, which is likely to result from the interaction of CC16 with members of the formyl-peptide receptor family. However, CC16 did not inhibit eosinophil migration towards PGD(2). We therefore propose that CC16 may down-modulate the entry of human eosinophils and neutrophils into the airways during inflammation in the lung. PMID:19132521

Johansson, Sofi; Andersson, Kerstin; Wennergren, Göran; Wennerĺs, Christine; Rudin, Anna

2009-04-01

436

Flow cytometric discrimination between viable neutrophils, apoptotic neutrophils and eosinophils by double labelling of permeabilized blood granulocytes.  

PubMed

Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) is frequently used to detect apoptotic cells in tissues, cytospins and suspensions. Here we show that TUNEL staining of freshly isolated granulocytes results in non-specific positivity of a distinct population, which can be observed in the presence or absence of TdT. The morphological features of the false-positive cells examined in fluorescence microscopy suggest that the non-specifically stained cells are eosinophilic granulocytes. Granules of eosinophilic granulocytes were brightly stained by non-specific TUNEL reaction independent of TdT. This staining does not, therefore, indicate apoptosis and most likely reflects 'stickiness' of the permeabilized eosinophils. Immunofluorescence with phycoerythrin (PE)-labelled CD16 antibodies performed simultaneously with conventional TUNEL staining confirmed that the false-positive cells in TUNEL staining were CD16-negative eosinophils. In this report we describe a new procedure that allows: (i) the differentiation of neutrophilic and eosinophilic granulocytes in forward scatter versus log side scatter histograms after permeabilisation; (ii) the reliable discrimination between viable neutrophils, apoptotic neutrophils and eosinophilic granulocytes in cytofluorimetry. PMID:10915845

Kern, P M; Herrmann, M; Stockmeyer, B; Kalden, J R; Valerius, T; Repp, R

2000-07-31

437

How I treat prolymphocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

T- and B-cell subtypes of prolymphocytic leukemia (PLL) are rare, aggressive lymphoid malignancies with characteristic morphologic, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular features. Recent studies have highlighted the role of specific oncogenes, such as TCL-1, MTCP-1, and ATM in the case of T-cell and TP53 mutations in the case of B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia. Despite the advances in the understanding of the biology of these conditions, the prognosis for these patients remains poor with short survival and no curative therapy. The advent of monoclonal antibodies has improved treatment options. Currently, the best treatment for T-PLL is intravenous alemtuzumab, which has resulted in very high response rates of more than 90% when given as first-line treatment and a significant improvement in survival. Consolidation of remissions with autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation further prolongs survival, and the latter may offer potential cure. In B-PLL, rituximab-based combination chemo-immunotherapy is effective in fitter patients. TP53 abnormalities are common and, as for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, these patients should be managed using an alemtuzumab-based therapy. The role of allogeneic transplant with nonmyeloablative conditioning needs to be explored further in both T- and B-cell PLL to broaden the patient eligibility for what may be a curative treatment. PMID:22649104

Dearden, Claire

2012-07-19

438

Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

SciTech Connect

Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

Pendergrass, T.W.

1985-06-01

439

Fulminant eosinophilic myocarditis associated with visceral larva migrans caused by Toxocara canis infection.  

PubMed

A 19-year-old man was transferred to hospital because of myocarditis with cardiogenic shock. Echocardiography showed a left ventricular ejection fraction of 23.8% and an intermediate amount of pericardial effusion. The patient immediately received an intra-aortic balloon pump and percutaneous cardiopulmonary support. Right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy was performed in the acute phase and showed extensive eosinophilic inflammatory cell infiltration, severe interstitial edema and moderate myocardial necrosis. High-dose corticosteroids were administered. Because the patient's antibody titer against Toxocara canis was high and his symptoms had appeared after eating raw deer meat, the diagnosis was fulminant eosinophilic myocarditis caused by a hypersensitivity reaction to visceral larval migrans. After starting high-dose corticosteroids, the ejection fraction dramatically improved, the eosinophilia decreased and the patient made a full recovery. PMID:19122304

Enko, Kenki; Tada, Takeshi; Ohgo, Keiko O; Nagase, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Ohta, Kei; Ichiba, Shingo; Ujike, Yoshihito; Nawa, Yukifumi; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Ohe, Tohru; Kusano, Kengo F

2009-07-01

440

Three cases of idiopathic eosinophilic enteritis with chronic obstinate diarrhea in Japanese Black fattening cattle.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic enteritis (EOE) is a type of inflammatory bowel disease and is characterized clinically by chronic obstinate diarrhea. Three Japanese Black (JB) fattening cattle (2 males and 1 female) on different cattle farms presented with chronic episodic diarrhea without fever or dehydration. Soft reddish spherical carneous tissues (1-3 cm) were occasionally excreted within the diarrheic feces. Administration of antibiotics, antidiarrheal drugs and vermicides had no therapeutic effect, but dexamethasone improved the fecal characteristics. The symptoms persisted until the animals were slaughtered at 27-30 months of age. Histopathological examination of the intestines revealed marked eosinophilic infiltration in the lamina propria and submucosa. From these findings, we diagnosed these cattle as the first cases of EOE in JB cattle. PMID:25391396

Fushimi, Yasuo; Takagi, Mitsuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Noriaki; Tsuka, Takeshi; Deguchi, Eisaburo

2014-11-12

First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10