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Sample records for eosinophilic leukemia eol-1

  1. Leukemia -- Eosinophilic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Leukemia - Eosinophilic Leukemia - Eosinophilic This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Leukemia - Eosinophilic. Use the menu below to choose the Overview section to get started. ...

  2. Mechanisms for the proliferation of eosinophilic leukemia cells by FIP1L1-PDGFR{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Kenji; Kitamura, Hajime; Hiraizumi, Kenji; Kaneko, Motoko; Takahashi, Aki; Zee, OkPyo; Seyama, Toshio; Hong, JangJa; Ohuchi, Kazuo; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2008-02-22

    The constitutively activated tyrosine kinase Fip1-like 1 (FIP1L1)-platelet-derived growth factor receptor {alpha} (PDGFR{alpha}) causes eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells to proliferate. Recently, we demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitors suppressed this proliferation and induced the differentiation of EoL-1 cells into eosinophils in parallel with a decrease in the level of FIP1L1-PDGFR{alpha}. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism by which FIP1L1-PDGFR{alpha} induces the proliferation and whether the suppression of cell proliferation triggers the differentiation into eosinophils. The FIP1L1-PDGFR{alpha} inhibitor imatinib inhibited the proliferation of EoL-1 cells and decreased the level of the oncoprotein c-Myc as well as the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The proliferation of EoL-1 cells and expression of c-Myc were also inhibited by the MEK inhibitor U0126 and JNK inhibitor SP600125. The expression of the eosinophilic differentiation marker CCR3 was not induced by imatinib. These findings suggest that FIP1L1-PDGFR{alpha} induces the proliferation of EoL-1 cells through the induction of c-Myc expression via ERK and JNK signaling pathways, but is not involved in the inhibition of differentiation toward mature eosinophils.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: PDGFRB-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer.Net: Leukemia--Eosinophilic: Treatment Genetic Testing Registry: Myeloproliferative disorder, chronic, with eosinophilia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Eosinophil Count--Absolute Seattle Cancer Care Alliance: Hypereosinophilia You might also find information ...

  4. Myeloprolipherative disorder type chronic myeloid leukemia--eosinophilic form.

    PubMed

    Arnautovic-Custovic, Aida; Hasic, Samira; Kopic, Emina; Jahic, Azra; Jovic, Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL) is a very rare form of leucemia in the western world. Adequate response is seldomly achieved after treatment with corticosteroids, interferon-alfa (INF-alfa) and medications containing hydroxi-urea (Litalir). The study presents a patient with CEL with no initial therapeutic response to the use of corticosteroids, INF-alfa and hydroxy-urea, and with neither clinical nor hematological response. After setting a diagnosis of CEL, patient was ordinated Imatinib (Glivec tabbletes) in a daily dose of 200 mg. Two days afterwards there was an evident withdrawal of subjective and clinical symptoms of disease, and the complete blood count showed significant amendment. PMID:21776882

  5. Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia—Not Otherwise Specified (NOS) in the Background of a Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalves, Wilson I.; He, Rong; Pardanani, Animesh; Gupta, Vinay; Smeltzer, Jacob P.; Hanson, Curtis A.; Witzig, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Clonal eosinophilic disorders are rare among hematological malignancies. Most eosinophilia tends to be due to secondary causes such as infections, hypersensitivity conditions, drug reactions, and connective tissue disorders. The presence of a primary clonal eosinophilic disorder such as chronic eosinophilic leukemia—not otherwise specified (NOS) in the presence of a synchronous large cell lymphoma—is rare making the diagnosis challenging. We present a case of a 51-year-old female with the aforementioned presentation and demonstrate the extensive workup performed to identify the diagnosis. PMID:24224106

  6. Genetics Home Reference: PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... forming the genetic blueprints for making proteins (messenger RNA or mRNA). The PDGFRA gene provides instructions for ... inflammation ; inherited ; leukemia ; ligand ; lymphoma ; mast cells ; messenger RNA ; mRNA ; mutation ; myeloid ; nervous system ; neutrophils ; population ; prevalence ; ...

  7. Comparative proteomic analysis of blood eosinophils reveals redox signaling modifications in patients with FIP1L1-PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Dutoit-Lefevre, Virginie; Duban-Deweer, Sophie; Chafey, Philippe; Pottiez, Gwenael; Lefranc, Didier; Fain, Olivier; Cordier, Jean-Francois; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Bletry, Olivier; Prin, Lionel

    2011-04-01

    The FIP1L1-PDGFRA (F/P) fusion gene, which was identified as a recurrent molecular finding in hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES), lead to a constitutively increased tyrosine kinase activity of the fusion protein. Despite data obtained in animals or cell lines models, the mechanisms underlying the predominant eosinophil lineage targeting and the cytotoxicity of eosinophils in this leukemia remain unclear. To define more precisely intrinsic molecular events associated with F/P gene, we performed a proteomic analysis comparing F/P+ eosinophils (F/P-Eos) and eosinophils from healthy donors (C-Eos). Using 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry techniques, we identified 41 proteins significantly overexpressed between F/P-Eos and C-Eos. Among them, 17.8% belonged to the oxidoreductase family. We further observed a down-expression of peroxiredoxin-2 (PRX-2) and an overexpression of src-homology-2 domain containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-1), enzymes regulating PDGFR downstream pathways, and especially intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This profile, confirmed in immunoblot analysis, appears specific to F/P-Eos compared to controls and patients with idiopathic HES. In this clonal disorder possibly involving a pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell, we postulate that the well documented relationships between PDGFRA downstream signals and intracellular ROS levels might influence the phenotype of this leukemia. PMID:21302907

  8. Identification of Ponatinib as a potent inhibitor of growth, migration and activation of neoplastic eosinophils carrying FIP1L1-PDGFRA

    PubMed Central

    Sadovnik, Irina; Lierman, Els; Peter, Barbara; Herrmann, Harald; Suppan, Verena; Stefanzl, Gabriele; Haas, Oskar; Lion, Thomas; Pickl, Winfried; Cools, Jan; Vandenberghe, Peter; Valent, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL), the transforming oncoprotein FIP1L1-PDGFRA is a major target of therapy. In most patients, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib induces complete remission. For patients who are intolerant or resistant, novel TKI have been proposed. We examined the in vitro effects of 14 kinase blockers on growth and function of EOL-1 cells, a FIP1L1-PDGFRA+ eosinophil cell line. Major growth-inhibitory effects were seen with all PDGFR-blocking agents, with IC50 values in the low nM-range: ponatinib: 0.1-0.2 nM, sorafenib: 0.1-0.2 nM, masitinib: 0.2-0.5 nM, nilotinib: 0.2-1 nM, dasatinib: 0.5-2 nM, sunitinib: 1-2 nM, midostaurin: 5-10 nM. These drugs were also found to block activation of PDGFR-downstream signaling molecules, including Akt, S6, and STAT5 in EOL-1 cells. All effective TKI produced apoptosis in EOL-1 cells as determined by microscopy, Annexin-V/PI, and caspase-3-staining. In addition, PDGFR-targeting TKI were found to inhibit cytokine-induced migration of EOL-1 cells. In all bioassays employed, ponatinib was found to be the most potent compound in EOL-1 cells. In addition, ponatinib was found to downregulate expression of the activation-linked surface antigen CD63 on EOL-1 cells, and to suppress growth of primary neoplastic eosinophils. We also examined drug effects on Ba/F3 cells expressing two clinically relevant imatinib-resistant mutant-forms of FIP1L1-PDGFRA, namely T674I and D842V. Strong inhibitory effects on both mutants were only seen with ponatinib. In summary, novel PDGFR-targeting TKI may be alternative agents for the treatment of patients with imatinib-resistant CEL. Although several different PDGFR-targeting agents are effective, the most potent drug appears to be ponatinib. PMID:24407160

  9. Chronic eosinophilic leukemia with FIP1L1-PDGFRA transcripts after occupational and therapeutic exposure to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Balatzenko, Gueorgui; Stoyanov, Nikolay; Bekrieva, Elena; Guenova, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    We present for the first time a 40-year-old male patient with a 20 year history of occupational exposure to radiation as a nuclear power plant worker, who developed FIP1L1-PDGFRA-positive chronic eosinophilic leukemia 27 months after radiotherapy for testicular seminoma. After an one-year history of dry cough, itching and night sweats, the patient presented with an elevated leukocyte count with absolute eosinophilia of 14.2×109/L, bone marrow and lymph node involvement. Treatment with Imatinib was initiated, resulting in complete hematological remission at the sixth month and complete molecular response by nested primers reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction - at the end of the first year. This case contributes to the clinical heterogeneity of a rare entity such as FIP1L1-PDGFA-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms, and for the possible role of occupational and therapeutic radiation, raising the question if one or both of them might be the causative factor. PMID:22184538

  10. Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms ...

  11. Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  12. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Identification of kitM541L somatic mutation in chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified and its implication in low-dose imatinib response

    PubMed Central

    Iurlo, Alessandra; Gianelli, Umberto; Beghini, Alessandro; Spinelli, Orietta; Orofino, Nicola; Lazzaroni, Francesca; Cambiaghi, Stefano; Intermesoli, Tamara; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Cortelezzi, Agostino

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of KIT receptor tyrosine kinase have been reported in different neoplasms. The M541L KIT substitution (KITM541L) has been described to be associated with pediatric mastocytosis, to enhance growth rate of the affected cells and to confer higher sensitivity to imatinib therapy. We investigated the presence of KITM541L in five males with chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified (CEL, NOS), all negative for Platelet-derived growth factor-alpha (PDGFR) or PDGFRbeta abnormalities, which responded to imatinib therapy. To assess whether the mutation was constitutive or somatic in nature, we evaluated its presence analyzing either the neoplastic or normal cell population (epidermal cells or CD3-positive T lymphocytes). KITM541L substitution was found in 4 out of 5 patients and in all it was somatic in nature. All patients were treated with low dose imatinib (100 mg daily orally), achieving complete and persistent clinical and hematological remission (median follow-up 74 months). One patient relapsed after 50 months. Our study strongly suggests to search for the KITM541L in patients with CEL, NOS, negative for PDGFRalpha and PDGFRbeta abnormalities, to identify a subgroup of cases who may benefit from low dose imatinib therapy. PMID:25015329

  14. Eosinophilic myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Baandrup, U

    2012-12-01

    Eosinophilic myocarditis is caused by activation of eosinophilic granulocytes whereby there is a release of eosinophilic granules. Quite a few of the released compounds, especially eosinophilic cationic proteins, have a tissue-damaging effect also in the myocardium. Eosinophilia may be due to hypersensitivity, parasitic infection etc. However, in hypereosinophilic syndromes and Loeffler's endomyocardial disease, the eosinophilia is"idiopathic." I believe that a clinical spectrum of the disease exists that is intimately correlated with the number of eosinophils and especially the degree of activation. When more is known about the cardiotropism of eosinophils in the various clinical settings, an important step will have been taken toward both the understanding and the treatment of this disease spectrum. PMID:23179050

  15. Eosinophilic Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Akuthota, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Summary: This review starts with discussions of several infectious causes of eosinophilic pneumonia, which are almost exclusively parasitic in nature. Pulmonary infections due specifically to Ascaris, hookworms, Strongyloides, Paragonimus, filariasis, and Toxocara are considered in detail. The discussion then moves to noninfectious causes of eosinophilic pulmonary infiltration, including allergic sensitization to Aspergillus, acute and chronic eosinophilic pneumonias, Churg-Strauss syndrome, hypereosinophilic syndromes, and pulmonary eosinophilia due to exposure to specific medications or toxins. PMID:23034324

  16. Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  17. Eosinophilic myeloid disorders.

    PubMed

    Noel, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of therapeutically relevant mutations involving platelet-derived growth factor receptors alpha and beta (PDGFRA and PDGFRB) changed the way we evaluate and treat patients with clonal eosinophilia. Despite our improved understanding of the pathobiology of clonal eosinophilia, more than 50% of patients are diagnosed with idiopathic disease, 10% to 20% with a clonal myeloid disorder, and the remainder with a lymphocytic variant. The World Health Organization classification of tumors recognized the importance of a semi-molecular classification of eosinophilic myeloid disorders and divided them into two major subgroups: (1) myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1); and (2) chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified. A key challenge remains the identification of tyrosine kinase responsive molecular lesions in patients in whom the pathogenesis of clonal eosinophilia remains unclear. PMID:22449622

  18. Eosinophilic Fasciitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Autoimmune Disorders of Connective Tissue Eosinophilic Fasciitis Symptoms Diagnosis Prognosis and Treatment Drugs ... DOCTORS: Go to Professional Version Autoimmune Disorders of Connective Tissue Overview of Autoimmune Disorders of Connective Tissue Systemic ...

  19. [Eosinophilic fasciitis].

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karolina; Niklas, Arkadiusz; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis is a rare connective tissue disease with unclear etiology and pathogenesis. It is classified as a scleroderma-like syndrome. The disease is characterized by fibrosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissues with significant thickening of fascia. Visceral involvement is rare. Characteristic feature in laboratory tests is peripheral blood eosinophilia. Differential diagnosis should be performed, including ruling out systemic sclerosis, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome, scleromyxedema, hypereosinophilic syndrome or Churg-Strauss syndrome. Final diagnosis is confirmed by histopathological examination. In treatment of the disease corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive drugs are used. Some other drugs showed activity in this disease e.g. dapsone, infiximab or rituximab. Prognosis is rather good but sometimes a long-term treatment is necessary. In this paper we summarized the current knowledge on eosinophilic fasciitis. PMID:25897110

  20. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  2. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. 3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-16

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  4. Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2015 54,270 % of All New Cancer Cases 3.3% Estimated Deaths in 2015 24,450 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2012, there were an estimated 318,389 people living with leukemia in the ...

  5. Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2011, CoFAR opened the Eosinophilic Esophagitis Databank . This clinical study investigates the genetic components underlying development of eosinophilic esophagitis. Last Updated November 17, 2015 ...

  6. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Induction of eosinophil apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide promotes the resolution of allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, A C; Alessandri, A L; Athayde, R M; Perez, D A; Vago, J P; Ávila, T V; Ferreira, T P T; de Arantes, A CS; de Sá Coutinho, D; Rachid, M A; Sousa, L P; Martins, M A; Menezes, G B; Rossi, A G; Teixeira, M M; Pinho, V

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are effector cells that have an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. Defective removal of these cells likely leads to chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the elimination of eosinophils from inflammatory sites. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for certain mediators and molecular pathways responsible for the survival and death of leukocytes at sites of inflammation. Reactive oxygen species have been described as proinflammatory mediators but their role in the resolution phase of inflammation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reactive oxygen species in the resolution of allergic inflammatory responses. An eosinophilic cell line (Eol-1) was treated with hydrogen peroxide and apoptosis was measured. Allergic inflammation was induced in ovalbumin sensitized and challenged mouse models and reactive oxygen species were administered at the peak of inflammatory cell infiltrate. Inflammatory cell numbers, cytokine and chemokine levels, mucus production, inflammatory cell apoptosis and peribronchiolar matrix deposition was quantified in the lungs. Resistance and elastance were measured at baseline and after aerosolized methacholine. Hydrogen peroxide accelerates resolution of airway inflammation by induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils and decrease remodeling, mucus deposition, inflammatory cytokine production and airway hyperreactivity. Moreover, the inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by apocynin or in gp91phox?/? mice prolonged the inflammatory response. Hydrogen peroxide induces Eol-1 apoptosis in vitro and enhances the resolution of inflammation and improves lung function in vivo by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils. PMID:25675292

  8. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Cilengitide in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b)

  10. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  15. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-08

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  16. Eltrombopag Olamine in Improving Platelet Recovery in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-11

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Eosinophilic ascites secondary to toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Tau, A H; Vizcaychipi, K A; Cabral, D H; Maradei, J L; Ferreyra, A H; San Sebastián, E I

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic ascites is a very rare disorder. It can be a manifestation of the eosinophilic gastroenteritis in its serosal form or it can be secondary to infections, malignancies, vasculitis or hypereosinophilic syndrome. Among all infections, the ones produced by invasive helminth parasites should be initially suspected and ruled out. We report the case of a patient with eosinophilic ascites associated with diarrhea, abdominal pain and eosinophilia in peripheral blood. Eosinophilic colitis was also demonstrated in a colonic biopsy and empirical steroid treatment was started for suspected eosinophilic gastroenteritis. Later on, the patient improved; the ascites disappeared and the eosinophil blood count returned to normal. Subsequently, serologic testing for toxocariasis was received positive and therefore, the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis was discarded; albendazole was also added to treatment. The patient remained asymptomatic on follow-up. We emphasize the need to rule out parasitic infections in all patients with gastrointestinal symptoms, eosinophilia and eosinophilic infiltration of gastrointestinal tissues. PMID:26448417

  2. Eosinophilic Liver Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa Rivera, Ivonne; Toro, Doris H.; Gutierrez, Jose; Acosta, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic liver infiltration is a commonly encountered focal eosinophil-related inflammation with or without necrosis, which can be seen on computed tomography (CT) in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Although this entity has a relatively benign course, it is related to numerable conditions for which diagnosis may be challenging and requires substantial diagnostic work-up for proper management and care of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a 1-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain with multiple ill-defined liver hypodensities associated with significant eosinophilia. PMID:26504883

  3. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. Siglec-F antibody administration to mice selectively reduces blood and tissue eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, N.; McBride, M. L.; Yamada, Y.; Hudson, S. A.; Jones, C.; Cromie, K. D.; Crocker, P. R.; Rothenberg, M. E.; Bochner, B. S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are a family of receptors that bind sialic acid and mostly contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs, suggesting that these molecules possess inhibitory functions. We have recently identified Siglec-8 as an eosinophil-prominent Siglec, and cross-linking of Siglec-8 on human eosinophils induces apoptosis. In this article, we address the in vivo consequences of Siglec engagement. We and others have identified mouse Siglec-F as the closest functional paralog of human Siglec-8, based on shared ligand-binding and expression pattern. We therefore hypothesized that Siglec-F engagement would affect levels and viability of eosinophils in vivo. Methods Wild type and hypereosinophilic mice were administered Siglec-F antibody and levels of eosinophils in peripheral blood and tissue were measured. Eosinophil apoptosis (in vivo and in vitro) was determined by binding of Annexin-V. Results Studies in IL-5 transgenic mice, displaying hypereosinophilia, show that administration of a single dose of Siglec-F antibody results in rapid reductions in quantum of eosinophils in the blood. This decrease was accompanied by reductions in tissue eosinophils. Quantum of eosinophils in blood was decreased using two separate antibodies, as well as in other mouse models (wild type mice and in a mouse model of chronic eosinophilic leukemia). Mechanistic studies demonstrated that Siglec-F antibody administration induced apoptosis of eosinophils in vivo and in vitro. Conclusion These data demonstrate that activation of innate immune receptors, like Siglec-F, can significantly reduce mouse eosinophil viability. As such, targeting Siglec-8/F may be a therapeutic approach for eosinophilic disorders. PMID:18699932

  5. Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease (EGID) can be classified as eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) when the eosinophilia is limited to the esophagus or as eosinophilic gastritis (EG) if it is limited to the gastric tract, eosinophilic colitis (EC) if it is limited to the colon, and eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) if the eosinophilia involves one or more parts of the gastrointestinal tract. EoE is by far the most common EGID. It is a well-defined chronic atopic disease due to a T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammation triggered often by food allergens. EoE diagnosis is done if an esophageal biopsy shows at least 15 eosinophils per high power field (eos/hpf). Globally accepted long-term therapies for EoE are the use of swallowed inhaled steroids or food antigen avoidance. The treatment of EoE is done not only to control symptoms but also to prevent complications such as esophageal stricture and food impaction. EGE cause non-specific gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and are diagnosed if esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD)/colonoscopy show eosinophilia in one or more parts of the GI tract. They are rare diseases with an unclear pathogenesis, and they are poorly defined in terms of diagnostic criteria and treatment. Before initiating treatment of any EGE, it is imperative to conduct a differential diagnosis to exclude other causes of hypereosinophilia with GI localization. EGE are often poorly responsive to therapy and there is no commonly accepted long-term treatment. EG has many characteristics similar to EoE, including the fact that it is often due to a food allergen-driven Th2 inflammation; transcriptome analysis however shows that it is more a systemic disease and has a different gene signature than EoE. EC is a benign form of delayed food allergy in infant and is instead a difficult-to-treat severe inflammatory condition in older children and adults. EC in the latter groups can be a manifestation of drug allergy or autoimmune disease. Overall EGE, EC, and EG are rare and are a diagnosis of exclusion until more common causes of eosinophilia have been excluded. PMID:26233430

  6. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  7. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis with eosinophilic ascites: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Tai, Y G; Liu, J D; Lin, K Y; Chang, J G; Wang, C K; Siauw, C P; Chen, P H

    1990-10-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a relatively uncommon disease of unknown etiology. Eosinophilic ascites resulting from significant serosal involvement is the rarest clinical subtype. The case reported here is of a 30-year-old male presenting with abdominal pain, diarrhea, and ascites. His personal history included childhood asthma, allergic rhinitis, and recurrent urticaria. The clinical picture was characterized by peripheral eosinophilia and eosinophilic infiltrates of the stomach and small bowel. Computed tomogram (CT) of the abdomen showed generalized thickening of the gastric and small bowel wall. Paracentesis revealed exudative ascites rich in eosinophils. The patient experienced an impressive response to steroid therapy. PMID:1981780

  8. Eosinophilic myositis: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Selva-O'Callaghan, A; Trallero-Araguás, E; Grau, J M

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilia-associated myopathies are clinically and pathologically heterogeneous conditions characterized by the presence of peripheral and/or muscle eosinophilia. There are at least three distinct subtypes: focal eosinophilic myositis, eosinophilic polymyositis, and eosinophilic perimyositis. Infiltrating eosinophils are not always identified in conventional muscle histologic examination, but the eosinophil major basic protein, whose extracellular diffusion is considered a hallmark of eosinophilic cytotoxicity, is usually detected by immunostaining in muscle biopsy. Whereas focal eosinophilic myositis seems to be a benign and isolated condition, and perimyositis is usually related with the inflammatory infiltrate due to fasciitis, eosinophilic polymyositis can be associated with muscular dystrophy or be a feature of multiorgan hypereosinophilic syndrome. Muscle biopsy remains the cornerstone for the diagnosis. Parasitic infections, connective tissue disorders, hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies, drugs, and toxic substances are the main etiologic agents of eosinophilia-associated myopathy. However, in some cases, no known etiologic factor is identified, and these are considered idiopathic. Glucocorticoids are the mainstay therapy in idiopathic forms. Imatinib and mepolizumab, a humanized anti-interleukin 5 monoclonal antibody, may be useful in patients with eosinophilic myositis as part of a hypereosinophilic syndrome. PMID:24424174

  9. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  10. MK2206 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. Characterization of Löeffler eosinophilic myocarditis by means of real time three-dimensional contrast-enhanced echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Del Bene, Maria Riccarda; Cappelli, Francesco; Rega, Luigi; Venditti, Francesco; Barletta, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    Löeffler endocarditis is a rare myocardial disease often due to eosinophil leukemia or idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome. Degranulation of eosinophils within the eosinophil infiltrated myocardium is associated with myocardial necrosis due to the release of toxic cationic proteins, and with mural thrombi formation, which can occur anywhere in the ventricles. Thrombus formed on denuded myocardium is replaced by fibrosis as the final pathological stage of the disease, eventually leading to restrictive cardiomyopathy. We describe a multimodality imaging approach to the diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of Löeffler disease complicated by thrombus formation and neoangiogenesis of LV apex. PMID:22066483

  12. Cisplatin-Induced Eosinophilic Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hirosako, Susumu; Kohrogi, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    A 67-year-old man suffering from esophageal cancer was admitted to our hospital complaining of dyspnea and hypoxemia. He had been treated with cisplatin, docetaxel, and fluorouracil combined with radiotherapy. Chest computed tomography revealed bilateral ground-glass opacity, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed increased eosinophils. Two episodes of transient eosinophilia in peripheral blood were observed after serial administration of anticancer drugs before the admission, and drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test to cisplatin was positive. Thus cisplatin-induced eosinophilic pneumonia was suspected, and corticosteroid was effectively administered. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of cisplatin-induced eosinophilic pneumonia. PMID:25478274

  13. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of leukemia in adults: Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) ... of leukemia may occur by itself, together with CLL , or CLL may turn into PLL. PLL tends ...

  14. [Eosinophilic diseases of the lungs].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary eosinophilias belong to a heterogenous group of the diseases characterized by pulmonary shadows related to pulmonary tissue and/or peripheral blood eosinophilia. Although the inflammatory infiltrate consists of macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils and eosinophils, a significant marker for the diagnosis and treatment is eosinophilia. By etiology eosinophilic diseases of the lungs fall into primary or idiopathic (common pulmonary eosinophilia, chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, hypereosinophilic syndrome), secondary or of known origin (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillesis, bronchocentric granulematosis, parasitic invasions, drug-induced reactions, fungal and mycobacterial infection, pulmonary diseases caused by radiation or toxins). Pulmonary eosinophilia can be also associated with systemic diseases (Churg-Strauss syndrome) and tumors. Clinicoroentgenological picture of different eosinophilic diseases of the lungs is almost the same. Verification of the diagnosis is based on the presence of bronchial asthma and extrapulmonary manifestations, the level of eosinophilia in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage and total IgE, histological and chest CT findings. This article presents modern classification, clinicoroentgenological and histological characteristics of different, primarily idiopathic, eosinophilic diseases of the lungs. PMID:22708427

  15. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Adolescent Patients Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Basics Overview Eosinophilic esophagitis also known as ( ... children may have vomiting and abdominal pain, and adolescents may complain of the feeling of food getting ...

  16. Atypical presentations of eosinophilic fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Tulin; Seckin, Dilek; Salman, Andac; Ocak, Esra Sarac; Yucelten, Ayse Deniz; Direskeneli, Haner; Demirkesen, Cuyan; Ekinci, Gazanfer; Bayik, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis is an uncommon connective tissue disease that may mimic and overlap with other sclerosing disorders such as morphea and lichen sclerosus. Herein, we report four patients (two men and two women, aged 16-64 yeas) with eosinophilic fasciitis. There was overlap with both morphea and lichen sclerosus in 2 patients and with morphoea alone in 1 patient. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used for diagnosis in three patients and for assessing treatment response in one patient. Eosinophilic fasciitis may co-exist with morhoea and lichen sclerosus. In view of the overlapping clinical and histopathological features of these disorders, MRI may be helful in delineating the conditions by detecting involvement of fascia. PMID:26728810

  17. A review of eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Muhammad Ahsan; Qadir, Abdul; Rasheed, Javeria

    2006-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is a rare disease of unknown etiology characterized by patchy or diffuse eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract wall with various gastrointestinal manifestations. As clinical presentation and radiological findings in EG are nonspecific, diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and exclusion of other disorders that are associated with peripheral eosinophilia. This article reviews the history, current concepts of this complex disorder and the common symptoms. Because there is no gold standard for this disease, a wide variety of diagnostic criteria is presented. Images Figure 1 PMID:17052051

  18. Eosinophil Granule Proteins: Form and Function

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, K. Ravi; Ackerman, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and clinical data strongly support a role for the eosinophil in the pathogenesis of asthma, allergic and parasitic diseases, and hypereosinophilic syndromes, in addition to more recently identified immunomodulatory roles in shaping innate host defense, adaptive immunity, tissue repair/remodeling, and maintenance of normal tissue homeostasis. A seminal finding was the dependence of allergic airway inflammation on eosinophil-induced recruitment of Th2-polarized effector T-cells to the lung, providing a missing link between these innate immune effectors (eosinophils) and adaptive T-cell responses. Eosinophils come equipped with preformed enzymatic and nonenzymatic cationic proteins, stored in and selectively secreted from their large secondary (specific) granules. These proteins contribute to the functions of the eosinophil in airway inflammation, tissue damage, and remodeling in the asthmatic diathesis. Studies using eosinophil-deficient mouse models, including eosinophil-derived granule protein double knock-out mice (major basic protein-1/eosinophil peroxidase dual gene deletion) show that eosinophils are required for all major hallmarks of asthma pathophysiology: airway epithelial damage and hyperreactivity, and airway remodeling including smooth muscle hyperplasia and subepithelial fibrosis. Here we review key molecular aspects of these eosinophil-derived granule proteins in terms of structure-function relationships to advance understanding of their roles in eosinophil cell biology, molecular biology, and immunobiology in health and disease. PMID:24802755

  19. Eosinophilic Gastritis Presenting as Tissue Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yong Min; Jang, Jin Seok; Han, Seung Hee; Kang, Sang Hyun; Kim, Woo Jae; Jeong, Jin Sook

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is very rare disorder that is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of any definite causes of eosinophilia. It is associated with various clinical gastrointestinal manifestations, and depends on the involved layer and site. We report a case of eosinophilic gastritis presenting with severe necrosis. The symptoms disappeared immediately after beginning steroid treatment, and the eosinophil count decreased to the reference range. The patient showed eosinophilic gastritis characterized by necrotic change such as necrotizing gastritis. It is a unique presentation of eosinophilic gastritis. To the best of our knowledge, no case of eosinophilic gastritis characterized by necrotic change such as necrotizing gastritis has been previously reported in Korea. PMID:26668805

  20. Eosinophilic myocarditis: case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kyoung-Hee; Song, Woo-Jung; Kim, Byung-Keun; Kang, Min-Koo; Lee, Suh-Young; Suh, Jung-Won; Yoon, Yeonyee E; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Youn, Tae-Jin; Cho, Sang-Heon; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2015-04-01

    Eosinophilic myocarditis is a condition resulting from various eosinophilic diseases, including helminth infection, drug hypersensitivity, systemic vasculitis or idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndromes. Clinical manifestations of eosinophilic myocarditis may vary from early necrosis to endomyocardial fibrosis. Eosinophilic myocarditis is one of the most fatal complications of hypereosinophilia. However, eosinophilic myocarditis has been rarely reported in the literature, particularly in Asia Pacific regions, reflecting the under-recognition of the disease among clinicians. Early recognition is crucial for improving clinical outcomes of eosinophilic myocarditis. Early administration of systemic corticosteroid is necessary in eosinophilic myocarditis regardless of underlying causes, as delayed treatment may result in fatal outcomes. In addition, differential diagnoses of underlying causes for eosinophilia are necessary to improve long-term outcomes. PMID:25938077

  1. Eosinophilic myocarditis: case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Kyoung-Hee; Song, Woo-Jung; Kim, Byung-Keun; Kang, Min-Koo; Lee, Suh-Young; Suh, Jung-Won; Yoon, Yeonyee E; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Youn, Tae-Jin; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic myocarditis is a condition resulting from various eosinophilic diseases, including helminth infection, drug hypersensitivity, systemic vasculitis or idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndromes. Clinical manifestations of eosinophilic myocarditis may vary from early necrosis to endomyocardial fibrosis. Eosinophilic myocarditis is one of the most fatal complications of hypereosinophilia. However, eosinophilic myocarditis has been rarely reported in the literature, particularly in Asia Pacific regions, reflecting the under-recognition of the disease among clinicians. Early recognition is crucial for improving clinical outcomes of eosinophilic myocarditis. Early administration of systemic corticosteroid is necessary in eosinophilic myocarditis regardless of underlying causes, as delayed treatment may result in fatal outcomes. In addition, differential diagnoses of underlying causes for eosinophilia are necessary to improve long-term outcomes. PMID:25938077

  2. Diagnostic Biomarkers in Eosinophilic Renal Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Khor, Li Yan; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Incidental small renal masses identified on imaging are increasingly investigated via needle core or fine needle aspiration biopsies with limited material provided for rendering a diagnosis. Lesions with a prominent eosinophilic or oncocytic cell presence showing morphologic overlap between well-known eosinophilic neoplasms are challenging to diagnose. We review the range of known benign and malignant eosinophilic renal neoplasms and their immunoprofiles to elucidate a useful panel of stains that may assist the pathologist in making an accurate diagnosis. PMID:26614031

  3. Eosinophil Secretion of Granule-Derived Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Lisa A.; Bonjour, Kennedy; Melo, Rossana C. N.; Weller, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are tissue-dwelling leukocytes, present in the thymus, and gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals at baseline, and recruited, often in large numbers, to allergic inflammatory foci and sites of active tissue repair. The biological significance of eosinophils is vast and varied. In health, eosinophils support uterine and mammary gland development, and maintain bone marrow plasma cells and adipose tissue alternatively activated macrophages, while in response to tissue insult eosinophils function as inflammatory effector cells, and, in the wake of an inflammatory response, promote tissue regeneration, and wound healing. One common mechanism driving many of the diverse eosinophil functions is the regulated and differential secretion of a vast array of eosinophil-derived cytokines. Eosinophils are distinguished from most other leukocytes in that many, if not all, of the over three dozen eosinophil-derived cytokines are pre-synthesized and stored within intracellular granules, poised for very rapid, stimulus-induced secretion. Eosinophils engaged in cytokine secretion in situ utilize distinct pathways of cytokine release that include classical exocytosis, whereby granules themselves fuse with the plasma membrane and release their entire contents extracellularly; piecemeal degranulation, whereby granule-derived cytokines are selectively mobilized into vesicles that emerge from granules, traverse the cytoplasm and fuse with the plasma membrane to release discrete packets of cytokines; and eosinophil cytolysis, whereby intact granules are extruded from eosinophils, and deposited within tissues. In this latter scenario, extracellular granules can themselves function as stimulus-responsive secretory-competent organelles within the tissue. Here, we review the distinctive processes of differential secretion of eosinophil granule-derived cytokines. PMID:25386174

  4. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePLUS

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  5. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  6. Eosinophils in Gastrointestinal Disorders: Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Diseases, Celiac Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, and Parasitic Infections.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Pooja; Furuta, Glenn T

    2015-08-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract provides an intriguing organ for considering the eosinophil's role in health and disease. The normal GI tract, except for the esophagus, is populated by eosinophils that are present throughout the mucosa, raising the possibility that eosinophils participate in innate mechanisms of defense. However, data from clinical studies associates increased numbers of eosinophils with inflammatory GI diseases, prompting concerns that eosinophils may have a deleterious effect on the gut. We present clinical features of 4 disease processes that have been associated with eosinophilia and suggest areas requiring investigation as to their clinical significance and scientific relevance. PMID:26209893

  7. Gallium-67 pulmonary uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Morais, J.; Carrier, L.; Gariepy, G.; Le Bel, L.; Chartrand, R.; Picard, D.

    1988-01-01

    Eosinophilic pneumonia is usually diagnosed based on the findings on chest x-ray, white blood count, and transbronchial biopsy. After reporting a case of Ga-67 lung uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia, its histopathology is discussed and the mechanisms of Ga-67 uptake by inflammatory lesions are reviewed.

  8. Coccidioidomycosis Masquerading as Eosinophilic Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Kourosh; Atla, Pradeep R.; Haq, Tahmina; Sheikh, Muhammad Y.

    2015-01-01

    Endemic to the southwestern parts of the United States, coccidioidomycosis, also known as “Valley Fever,” is a common fungal infection that primarily affects the lungs in both acute and chronic forms. Disseminated coccidioidomycosis is the most severe but very uncommon and usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. It can affect the central nervous system, bones, joints, skin, and, very rarely, the abdomen. This is the first case report of a patient with coccidioidal dissemination to the peritoneum presenting as eosinophilic ascites (EA). A 27-year-old male presented with acute abdominal pain and distention from ascites. He had eosinophilia of 11.1% with negative testing for stool studies, HIV, and tuberculosis infection. Ascitic fluid exam was remarkable for low serum-ascites albumin gradient (SAAG), PMN count >250/mm3, and eosinophils of 62%. Abdominal imaging showed thickened small bowel and endoscopic testing negative for gastric and small bowel biopsies. He was treated empirically for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, but no definitive diagnosis could be made until coccidioidal serology returned positive. We noted complete resolution of symptoms with oral fluconazole during outpatient follow-up. Disseminated coccidioidomycosis can present in an atypical fashion and may manifest as peritonitis with low SAAG EA. The finding of EA in an endemic area should raise the suspicion of coccidioidal dissemination. PMID:26266062

  9. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Therapeutic Antibodies in Advanced Eosinophilic Disorders and Systemic Mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gotlib, Jason

    2015-12-01

    World Health Organization-defined myeloproliferative neoplasms share a common pathobiologic theme of constitutive activation of tyrosine kinases (TKs). While myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and rearrangement of PDGFRA or PDGFRB exhibit exquisite responsiveness to imatinib, other eosinophilic disorders such as chronic eosinophilic leukemia-not otherwise specified (CEL-NOS) and idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) lack recurrent gene mutations or known druggable targets. In systemic mastocytosis (SM), KIT D816V is identified in ?90 % of patients, but demonstrates imatinib resistance. Recently, the multikinase/KIT inhibitor midostaurin (PKC412) has demonstrated encouraging activity in patients with advanced SM, and selective KIT D816V inhibitors are entering clinical development. Pre-clinical rationale also exists for use of small molecule inhibitors of TK-linked pathways (e.g., BTK, JAK-STAT, PI3K/AKT, and FGFR1) that are implicated in normal or dysregulated signaling in eosinophils or mast cells. A complementary therapeutic approach is the use of naked antibody (e.g., mepolizumab and alemtuzumab) or antibody-based drug immunoconjugates (brentuximab vedotin) against targets expressed on the surface of eosinophils or mastocytes that can block proliferation and/or induce apoptosis of these cells. Ultimately, biologic and molecular characterization of eosinophilia and SM cases will help to optimize selection of TK inhibitors or therapeutic antibodies for individual patients. PMID:26404639

  10. Severe Aplastic Anemia Associated With Eosinophilic Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    de Masson, Adèle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Benhamou, Ygal; Moluçon-Chabrot, Cécile; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Laquerrière, Annie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Michonneau, David; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Rybojad, Michel; Bonnotte, Bernard; Jardin, Fabrice; Lévesque, Hervé; Bagot, Martine; Socié, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Diffuse eosinophilic fasciitis (Shulman disease) is a rare sclerodermiform syndrome that, in most cases, resolves spontaneously or after corticosteroid therapy. It has been associated with hematologic disorders, such as aplastic anemia. The clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia have been poorly described. We report the cases of 4 patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated severe aplastic anemia. For 3 of these patients, aplastic anemia was refractory to conventional immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. One of the patients received rituximab as a second-line therapy with significant efficacy for both the skin and hematologic symptoms. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe rituximab used to treat eosinophilic fasciitis with associated aplastic anemia. In a literature review, we identified 19 additional cases of eosinophilic fasciitis and aplastic anemia. Compared to patients with isolated eosinophilic fasciitis, patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia were more likely to be men (70%) and older (mean age, 56 yr; range, 18–71 yr). Corticosteroid-containing regimens improved skin symptoms in 5 (42%) of 12 cases but were ineffective in the treatment of associated aplastic anemia in all but 1 case. Aplastic anemia was profound in 13 cases (57%) and was the cause of death in 8 cases (35%). Only 5 patients (22%) achieved long-term remission (allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: n = 2; cyclosporine-containing regimen: n = 2; high-dose corticosteroid-based regimen: n = 1). PMID:23429351

  11. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePLUS

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  12. Eosinophilic follicular reaction induced by Demodex folliculorum mite: a different disease from eosinophilic folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Marco, V; Escutia-Muñoz, B; Botella-Estrada, R

    2015-06-01

    Eosinophilic folliculitis (EF) is an idiopathic dermatitis included in the spectrum of eosinophilic pustular follicular reactions. Demodex folliculorum has been implicated as contributing to the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus-associated EF, but it has not been described outside this context. We present an immunocompetent 65-year-old white man with a 5-year history of recurrent pruritic erythematous and oedematous lesions on his face, neck and scalp. Histopathologically, an eosinophilic microabcess with Demodex folliculorum mite within a pilosebaceous follicle was seen, and considered the causal agent. There were also accumulations of eosinophil granules on collagen bundles, and flame figure formations in the dermis. We believe that 'eosinophilic follicular reaction' is an appropriate term to describe this case of EF induced by D. folliculorum and thus distinguish it from the idiopathic form of EF. Moreover, this case suggests that D. folliculorum can sometimes induce an eosinophilic immune reaction. PMID:25623943

  13. Esophageal Microbiome in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Kirk; Fang, Rui; Wagner, Brandie D.; Choe, Ha Na; Kelly, Caleb J.; Schroeder, Shauna; Moore, Wendy; Stevens, Mark J.; Yeckes, Alyson; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F.; Zalewski, Angelika; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Henry, Lauren N.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Robertson, Charles E.; Leung, Donald Y.; Pace, Norman R.; Ackerman, Steven J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Fillon, Sophie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The mucosa affected by eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is composed of a stratified squamous epithelia and contains intraepithelial eosinophils. To date, no studies have identified the esophageal microbiome in patients with EoE or the impact of treatment on these organisms. The aim of this study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in EoE and determine whether treatments change this profile. We hypothesized that clinically relevant alterations in bacterial populations are present in different forms of esophagitis. Design In this prospective study, secretions from the esophageal mucosa were collected from children and adults with EoE, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) and normal mucosa using the Esophageal String Test (EST). Bacterial load was determined using quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities, determined by 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing, were compared between health and disease. Results Samples from a total of 70 children and adult subjects were examined. Bacterial load was increased in both EoE and GERD relative to normal subjects. In subjects with EoE, load was increased regardless of treatment status or degree of mucosal eosinophilia compared with normal. Haemophilus was significantly increased in untreated EoE subjects as compared with normal subjects. Streptococcus was decreased in GERD subjects on proton pump inhibition as compared with normal subjects. Conclusions Diseases associated with mucosal eosinophilia are characterized by a different microbiome from that found in the normal mucosa. Microbiota may contribute to esophageal inflammation in EoE and GERD. PMID:26020633

  14. Spectrum of Surgical Presentation of Eosinophilic Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Spoorthy Sudhakar; Shetty, Charan Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic enteritis is a rare disorder presenting mostly with diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain, weight loss, and hypersensitivity. Surgical manifestation of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders depends on the site and extent of involvement. In our case series of four patients two of them had ileocaecal masses with recurrent subacute intestinal obstruction with past history of intake of antitubercular drugs for 9 months. On histopathological examination both of them proved to have eosinophilic enterocolitis. Thus it is a clinical dilemma to differentiate between these two conditions. The other two patients presented as acute abdomen with perforation and intussusception. All four patients were treated surgically. Postoperatively they recovered well with no symptoms on one year follow-up. In Indian setup tuberculosis being rampant there may be under reporting or wrongly diagnosed cases of eosinophilic enteritis. Thus a strong clinical suspicion and awareness of this clinical entity are essential among surgical community. PMID:25960910

  15. Protein Radical Formation Resulting from Eosinophil Peroxidase-catalyzed Oxidation of Sulfite.

    PubMed

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Ramirez, Dario C; Summers, Fiona A; Kadiiska, Maria B; Mason, Ronald P

    2010-07-30

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) is an abundant heme protein in eosinophils that catalyzes the formation of cytotoxic oxidants implicated in asthma, allergic inflammatory disorders, and cancer. It is known that some proteins with peroxidase activity (horseradish peroxidase and prostaglandin hydroperoxidase) can catalyze oxidation of bisulfite (hydrated sulfur dioxide), leading to the formation of sulfur trioxide anion radical ((.)SO(3)(-)). This free radical further reacts with oxygen to form peroxymonosulfate anion radical ((-)O(3)SOO(.)) and the very reactive sulfate anion radical (SO(4)()), which is nearly as strong an oxidant as the hydroxyl radical. However, the ability of EPO to generate reactive sulfur radicals has not yet been reported. Here we demonstrate that eosinophil peroxidase/H(2)O(2) is able to oxidize bisulfite, ultimately forming the sulfate anion radical (SO(4)()), and that these reactive intermediates can oxidize target proteins to protein radicals, thereby initiating protein oxidation. We used immuno-spin trapping and confocal microscopy to study protein oxidation by EPO/H(2)O(2) in the presence of bisulfite in a pure enzymatic system and in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 clone 15 cells, maturated to eosinophils. Polyclonal antiserum raised against the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) detected the presence of DMPO covalently attached to the proteins resulting from the DMPO trapping of protein free radicals. We found that sulfite oxidation mediated by EPO/H(2)O(2) induced the formation of radical-derived DMPO spin-trapped human serum albumin and, to a lesser extent, of DMPO-EPO. These studies suggest that EPO-dependent oxidative damage may play a role in tissue injury in bisulfite-exacerbated eosinophilic inflammatory disorders. PMID:20501663

  16. Post-translational Tyrosine Nitration of Eosinophil Granule Toxins Mediated by Eosinophil Peroxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Martina; Petre, Alina; Youhnovski, Nikolay; Prömm, Franziska; Schirle, Markus; Schumm, Michael; Pero, Ralph S.; Doyle, Alfred; Checkel, James; Kita, Hirohito; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Acharya, K. Ravi; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Schwarz, Heinz; Tsutsui, Masato; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Bellon, Gabriel; Lee, James J.; Przybylski, Michael; Döring, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Nitration of tyrosine residues has been observed during various acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanism of tyrosine nitration and the nature of the proteins that become tyrosine nitrated during inflammation remain unclear. Here we show that eosinophils but not other cell types including neutrophils contain nitrotyrosine-positive proteins in specific granules. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the human eosinophil toxins, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), major basic protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and the respective murine toxins, are post-translationally modified by nitration at tyrosine residues during cell maturation. High resolution affinity-mass spectrometry identified specific single nitration sites at Tyr349 in EPO and Tyr33 in both ECP and EDN. ECP and EDN crystal structures revealed and EPO structure modeling suggested that the nitrated tyrosine residues in the toxins are surface exposed. Studies in EPO-/-, gp91phox-/-, and NOS-/- mice revealed that tyrosine nitration of these toxins is mediated by EPO in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and minute amounts of NOx. Tyrosine nitration of eosinophil granule toxins occurs during maturation of eosinophils, independent of inflammation. These results provide evidence that post-translational tyrosine nitration is unique to eosinophils. PMID:18694936

  17. Allergic mechanisms of Eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Leung, John; Beukema, Koen Robert; Shen, Alice Hangzhou

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is characterized by oesophageal dysfunction and oesophageal eosinophilia refractory to proton-pump-inhibitor treatment. EoE is a food allergy, as elimination of food trigger(s) abrogates the disease, while trigger reintroduction causes recurrence. The allergic mechanism of EoE involves both IgE and non-IgE processes. There is a break in oral tolerance, the immune mechanism allowing enteric exposure to food and micro-organisms without causing deleterious immune responses. Changes in life-style, alterations in gut flora and use of antibiotics may be increasing disease prevalence. Mouse models of EoE and human studies revealed the role of regulatory T-cells and iNKT-cells in the pathogenesis. Th2-cytokines like IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, and other cytokines like TGF? and TSLP are involved, but perhaps no one cytokine is critically important for driving the disease. Control of EoE may require a pharmaceutical approach that blocks more than one target in the Th2-inflammatory pathway. PMID:26552770

  18. Novel targeted therapies for eosinophil-associated diseases and allergy.

    PubMed

    Radonjic-Hoesli, Susanne; Valent, Peter; Klion, Amy D; Wechsler, Michael E; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophil-associated diseases often present with life-threatening manifestations and/or chronic organ damage. Currently available therapeutic options are limited to a few drugs that often have to be prescribed on a lifelong basis to keep eosinophil counts under control. In the past 10 years, treatment options and outcomes in patients with clonal eosinophilic and other eosinophilic disorders have improved substantially. Several new targeted therapies have emerged, addressing different aspects of eosinophil expansion and inflammation. In this review, we discuss available and currently tested agents as well as new strategies and drug targets relevant to both primary and secondary eosinophilic diseases, including allergic disorders. PMID:25340931

  19. An extragranular compartment of blood eosinophils contains eosinophil protein X/eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EPX/EDN).

    PubMed

    Karawajczyk, Malgorzata; Peterson, Christer G B; Venge, Per; Garcia, Rodolfo C

    2013-04-01

    Serum and plasma profiles of eosinophil protein X (EPX/EDN) and those of other eosinophil proteins differ in various conditions, suggesting a different mobilisation from storage granules. This work studied the subcellular localisation of EPX/EDN in non-primed and in vivo primed blood eosinophils from healthy and allergic subjects, during and out of the pollen season. Primed eosinophils contain easily mobilisable secretory proteins. By fractionation on sucrose density gradients, EPX/EDN localised in the specific granules as well as in a cytoplasmic extra-granular compartment of low equilibrium density that partially overlapped with vesicular structures, cytosolic proteins and plasma membranes. This compartment was clearly separate from the low density peak of ECP that increases during the pollen season. There were no significant differences in the amounts of EPX/EDN present in the low density peak of healthy and allergic subjects. Immuno-gold labelling electron microscopy showed EPX/EDN in specific granules, cytoplasm and associated to plasma membranes. In conclusion, substantial amounts of EPX/EDN localise in an extra-granular, low equilibrium density compartment of human eosinophils. PMID:23053729

  20. Diagnostic Approach to Eosinophilic Renal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Jorda, Merce; Argani, Pedram; Epstein, Jonathan I.

    2015-01-01

    Context Eosinophilic renal neoplasms include a spectrum of solid and papillary tumors ranging from indolent benign oncocytoma to highly aggressive malignancies. Recognition of the correct nature of the tumor, especially in biopsy specimens, is paramount for patient management. Objective To review the diagnostic approach to eosinophilic renal neoplasms with light microscopy and ancillary techniques. Data Sources Review of the published literature and personal experience. Conclusions The following tumors are in the differential diagnosis of oncocytic renal cell neoplasm: oncocytoma, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC), hybrid tumor, tubulocystic carcinoma, papillary RCC, clear cell RCC with predominant eosinophilic cell morphology, follicular thyroid-like RCC, hereditary leiomyomatosis–associated RCC, acquired cystic disease–associated RCC, rhabdoid RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor translocation RCC, epithelioid angiomyolipoma, and unclassified RCC. In low-grade nonpapillary eosinophilic neoplasms, distinction between oncocytoma and low-grade RCC mostly rests on histomorphology; however, cytokeratin 7 immunostain may be helpful. In high-grade nonpapillary lesions, there is more of a role for ancillary techniques, including immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin 7, CA9, CD10, racemase, HMB45, and Melan-A. In papillary eosinophilic neoplasms, it is important to distinguish sporadic type 2 papillary RCC from microphthalmia transcription factor translocation and hereditary leiomyomatosis–associated RCC. Histologic and cytologic features along with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization tests for TFE3 (Xp11.2) and TFEB [t(6;11)] are reliable confirmatory tests. Eosinophilic epithelial neoplasms with architecture, cytology, and/or immunoprofile not qualifying for either of the established types of RCC should be classified as unclassified eosinophilic RCC and arbitrarily assigned a grade (low or high). PMID:25357116

  1. Does bee pollen cause to eosinophilic gastroenteropathy?

    PubMed

    Güç, Belgin Usta; Asilsoy, Suna; Canan, O?uz; Kayaselçuk, Fazilet

    2015-09-01

    Bee pollen is given to children by mothers in order to strengthen their immune systems. There are no studies related with the side effects of bee polen in the literature. In this article, the literature was reviewed by presenting a case of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy related with bee polen. A 5-year old child was admitted due to abdominal pain. Edema was detected on the eyelids and pretibial region. In laboratory investigations, pathology was not detected in terms of hepatic and renal causes that would explain the protein loss of the patient diagnosed with hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia. Urticaria was detected during the follow-up visit. When the history of the patient was deepened, it was learned that bee pollen was given to the patient every day. The total eosinophil count was found to be 1 800/mm(3). Allergic gastroenteropathy was considered because of hypereosinophilia and severe abdominal pain and endoscopy was performed. Biopsy revealed abundant eosinophils in the whole gastric mucosa. A diagnosis of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy was made. Bee polen was discontinued. Abdominal pain and edema disappeared in five days. Four weeks later, the levels of serum albumin and total eosinophil returned to normal. PMID:26568697

  2. Does bee pollen cause to eosinophilic gastroenteropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Güç, Belgin Usta; Asilsoy, Suna; Canan, O?uz; Kayaselçuk, Fazilet

    2015-01-01

    Bee pollen is given to children by mothers in order to strengthen their immune systems. There are no studies related with the side effects of bee polen in the literature. In this article, the literature was reviewed by presenting a case of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy related with bee polen. A 5-year old child was admitted due to abdominal pain. Edema was detected on the eyelids and pretibial region. In laboratory investigations, pathology was not detected in terms of hepatic and renal causes that would explain the protein loss of the patient diagnosed with hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia. Urticaria was detected during the follow-up visit. When the history of the patient was deepened, it was learned that bee pollen was given to the patient every day. The total eosinophil count was found to be 1 800/mm3. Allergic gastroenteropathy was considered because of hypereosinophilia and severe abdominal pain and endoscopy was performed. Biopsy revealed abundant eosinophils in the whole gastric mucosa. A diagnosis of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy was made. Bee polen was discontinued. Abdominal pain and edema disappeared in five days. Four weeks later, the levels of serum albumin and total eosinophil returned to normal. PMID:26568697

  3. New Insights into Eosinophilic Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hiromi; Yoshida, Naohiro; Iino, Yukiko

    2015-12-01

    Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is a type of intractable otitis media that occurs mainly in patients with bronchial asthma (BA). In 2011, the diagnostic criteria for EOM were established. EOM is characterized by the presence of a highly viscous yellowish effusion containing eosinophils and immunoglobulin E (IgE), eosinophil chemoattractants, such as eosinophil cationic protein, interleukin-5, and eotaxin. Local sensitization against foreign agents such as fungi or bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus) may result in local IgE production in the middle ear and may be responsible for the severity of EOM. The clinical features of EOM closely resemble localized eosinophilic granulomatosis polyangiitis, therefore it is necessary to be vigilant to the symptoms of mononeuritis, polyneuritis, and skin purpura during diagnosis. Standard treatment for EOM is the instillation of triamcinolone acetonide into the mesotympanum. However, severe cases exhibiting strong inflammation and otorrhea are not easily controlled with antibiotics and/or corticosteroids. We proposed the introduction of a severity score to evaluate the severity of EOM. This score correlated with local IgE levels in middle ear effusion. Clinically, the risk factors associated with this severity score were body mass index, and the duration of bronchial asthma (from the onset of BA to the age of the first consultation of otitis media to our hospital). We emphasize that early diagnosis and adequate treatment are vital in preventing progressive and sudden hearing loss resulting from EOM. PMID:26546407

  4. Eosinophilic granuloma - x-ray of the skull (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... x-ray of the skull shows an eosinophilic granuloma (a lesion made-up of a type of ... This condition can range from a single eosinophilic granuloma to massive infiltration of skin, bone, and body ...

  5. Roles and Regulation of Gastrointestinal Eosinophils in Immunity and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, YunJae; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils have been considered to be destructive end-stage effector cells that have a role in parasitic infections and allergy reactions by the release of their granule-derived cytotoxic proteins. However, an increasing number of experimental observations indicate that eosinophils also are multifunctional leukocytes involved in diverse inflammatory and physiologic immune responses. Under homeostatic conditions, eosinophils are particularly abundant in the lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract where their involvement in various biological processes within the gastrointestinal tract has been posited. In this review, we summarize the molecular steps involved in eosinophil development and describe eosinophil trafficking to the gastrointestinal tract. We synthesize the current findings on the phenotypic and functional properties of gastrointestinal eosinophils and the accumulating evidence that they have a contributory role in gastrointestinal disorders, with a focus on primary eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. Finally, we discuss the potential role of eosinophils as modulators of the intestinal immune system. PMID:25049430

  6. Natural Killer Cells Induce Eosinophil Activation and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Ali; Yassine, Hanane; Barrier, Mathieu; Vorng, Han; Marquillies, Philippe; Tsicopoulos, Anne; Duez, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are potent inflammatory cells with numerous immune functions, including antigen presentation and exacerbation of inflammatory responses through their capacity to release a range of largely preformed cytokines and lipid mediators. Thus, timely regulation of eosinophil activation and apoptosis is crucial to develop beneficial immune response and to avoid tissue damage and induce resolution of inflammation. Natural Killer (NK) cells have been reported to influence innate and adaptive immune responses by multiple mechanisms including cytotoxicity against other immune cells. In this study, we analyzed the effect of the interaction between NK cells and eosinophils. Co-culture experiments revealed that human NK cells could trigger autologous eosinophil activation, as shown by up-regulation of CD69 and down-regulation of CD62L, as well as degranulation, evidenced by increased CD63 surface expression, secretion of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil derived neurotoxin (EDN). Moreover, NK cells significantly and dose dependently increased eosinophil apoptosis as shown by annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Direct contact was necessary for eosinophil degranulation and apoptosis. Increased expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in cocultured eosinophils and inhibition of eosinophil CD63 expression by pharmacologic inhibitors suggest that MAPK and PI3K pathways are involved in NK cell-induced eosinophil degranulation. Finally, we showed that NK cells increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) expression by eosinophils in co-culture and that mitochondrial inhibitors (rotenone and antimycin) partially diminished NK cell-induced eosinophil apoptosis, suggesting the implication of mitochondrial ROS in NK cell-induced eosinophil apoptosis. Pan-caspase inhibitor (ZVAD-FMK) only slightly decreased eosinophil apoptosis in coculture. Altogether, our results suggest that NK cells regulate eosinophil functions by inducing their activation and their apoptosis. PMID:24727794

  7. Mepolizumab in the treatment of severe eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    Fainardi, Valentina; Pisi, Giovanna; Chetta, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    IL-5 is crucial in the pathogenesis and evolution of eosinophilic asthma. Mepolizumab is a high-affinity humanized monoclonal antibody of the IgG1/k subtype that inhibits the binding of IL-5 to its receptor expressed on eosinophils, thereby inducing significant reduction in eosinophil circulation, as well as asthma exacerbations and corticosteroid treatment. This review deals with the currently available studies of mepolizumab in the treatment of patients with severe eosinophilic asthma. PMID:26653083

  8. Systematic review: Eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Oshima, Naoki; Ishihara, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of Asian patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the PubMed and Web of Science databases for original studies, case series, and individual case reports of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries published from January 1980 to January 2015. We found 66 and 80 articles in the PubMed and Web of Science databases, respectively; 24 duplicate articles were removed. After excluding animal studies, articles not written in English, and meeting abstracts, 25 articles containing 217 patients were selected for analysis. RESULTS: Sample size-weighted mean values were determined for all pooled prevalence data and clinical characteristics. The mean age of the adult patients with eosinophilic esophagitis was approximately 50 years, and 73% of these patients were male. They frequently presented with allergic diseases including bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. Bronchial asthma was the most frequent comorbid allergic disease, occurring in 24% of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Dysphagia was the primary symptom reported; 44% of the patients complained of dysphagia. Although laboratory blood tests are not adequately sensitive for an accurate diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, endoscopic examinations revealed abnormal findings typical of this disease, including longitudinal furrows and concentric rings, in 82% of the cases. One-third of the cases responded to proton pump inhibitor administration. CONCLUSION: The characteristics of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian patients were similar to those reported in Western patients, indicating that this disease displays a similar pathogenesis between Western and Asian patients. PMID:26217096

  9. [Eosinophilic cellulitis: About a new pediatric case].

    PubMed

    Makni, Saadia; Kallel, Rim; Chaabène, Hend; Bahloul, Emna; Bahri, Ibtissem; Turki, Hamida; Gouiaa, Naourez; Boudawara, Tahya

    2015-12-01

    Wells' syndrome or "eosinophilic cellulitis" is characterized by clinical features of cellulitis and histological pictures of eosinophils infiltrate of the dermis with some « flame » figures. This is a very rare disease in the pediatric age. We report the case of a 14-month-old boy, presented with two farms painful nodular brownish lesions in the thigh and back of the foot as well as multiple erythematous papular and vesicular lesions on the forehead, cheeks, limbs and trunk. Biological analysis and histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of Wells' syndrome. The outcome was favorable with dermocorticoid. PMID:26586016

  10. Eosinophilic Pancreatitis Diagnosed With Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Hina; Cabrera, Julio; Chi, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic pancreatitis (EP) is a rare clinical entity, and few cases have been reported. It usually presents on imaging as a pancreatic mass leading to common bile duct obstruction and jaundice. Since it can mimic a malignancy, eosinophilic pancreatitis is often diagnosed after “false positive” pancreatic resections. To our knowledge, we report the only known case of EP in which the diagnosis was made by fine needle aspiration and core biopsy of the pancreas during EUS, sparing the patient a surgical resection. After a steroid course, there was improvement of clinical symptoms. PMID:26203451

  11. Participation of eosinophils in the toxic oil syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ten, R M; Kephart, G M; Posada, M; Abaitua, I; Soldevilla, L; Kilbourne, E M; Dunnette, S L; Gleich, G J

    1990-01-01

    The participation of eosinophils in the Spanish toxic oil syndrome (TOS) was investigated. Eosinophil infiltration and degranulation in tissues from 52 patients with the TOS were examined by immunofluorescence staining for the eosinophil granule major basic protein (MBP). Serum MBP levels were determined in sera from 323 patients. Eosinophil infiltration and degranulation were found in several tissues, especially during the acute phase of the TOS, and serum MBP was significantly elevated during all phases of the disease, suggesting that eosinophils play a role in the pathogenesis of the TOS. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2242612

  12. Spectrum of Eosinophilic End-Organ Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Akuthota, Praveen; Weller, Peter F

    2015-08-01

    Eosinophil-associated disorders can affect practically all tissues and organs in the body, either individually or in combination. This article provides an overview of end-organ manifestations of eosinophilia and discusses selected organ systems, including the upper and lower respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, nervous, dermatologic, and renal systems. Mechanisms by which eosinophilia leads to end-organ damage are also considered. PMID:26209892

  13. Leukotriene B4 amplifies eosinophil accumulation in response to nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Patnode, Michael L.; Bando, Jennifer K.; Krummel, Matthew F.; Locksley, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophil accumulation is a defining feature of the immune response to parasitic worm infection. Tissue-resident cells, such as epithelial cells, are thought to initiate eosinophil recruitment. However, direct recognition of worms by eosinophils has not been explored as a mechanism for amplifying eosinophil accumulation. Here, we report that eosinophils rapidly migrate toward diverse nematode species in three-dimensional culture. These include the mammalian parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Surprisingly, collective migration toward worms requires paracrine leukotriene B4 signaling between eosinophils. In contrast, neutrophils show a minimal response to nematodes, yet are able to undergo robust leukotriene-dependent migration toward IgG-coated beads. We further demonstrate that eosinophils accumulate around C. elegans in the lungs of mice. This response is not dependent on bacterial products, CCR3, or complement activation. However, mice deficient in leukotriene signaling show markedly attenuated eosinophil accumulation after injection of C. elegans or N. brasiliensis. Our findings establish that nematode-derived signals can directly induce leukotriene production by eosinophils and that leukotriene signaling is a major contributor to nematode-induced eosinophil accumulation in the lung. The similarity of the eosinophil responses to diverse nematode species suggests that conserved features of nematodes are recognized during parasite infection. PMID:24889202

  14. Galectin-10, a Potential Biomarker of Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Justin C.; Douglass, Jo A.; Gillman, Andrew; O'Hehir, Robyn E.; Meeusen, Els N.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of eosinophilic airway inflammation can assist in the diagnosis of allergic asthma and in the management of exacerbations, however its clinical implementation remains difficult. Galectin-10 has been associated with eosinophilic inflammation and has the potential to be used as a surrogate biomarker. This study aimed to assess the relationship between galectin-10 in sputum with sputum eosinophil counts, the current gold standard of eosinophil inflammation in the lung. Thirty-eight sputum samples were processed for both eosinophil counts by cytospins and semi-quantitative measurements of galectin-10 by western blots. A strong association was observed between galectin-10 levels in sputum and sputum eosinophil measurements, and they accurately determined sputum eosinophilia. The results support the potential for galectin-10 to be used as a surrogate biomarker of eosinophilic airway inflammation. PMID:22880030

  15. Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Gioffredi, Andrea; Maritati, Federica; Oliva, Elena; Buzio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) is a multisystemic disorder, belonging to the small vessel anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, defined as an eosinophil-rich and necrotizing granulomatous inflammation often involving the respiratory tract, and necrotizing vasculitis predominantly affecting small to medium-sized vessels, associated with asthma and eosinophilia. EGPA pathogenesis is not well known: HLA-DRB1*04 and *07, HLA-DRB4 and IL10.2 haplotype of the IL-10 promoter gene are the most studied genetic determinants. Among the acquired pathogenetic factors, the exposure to different allergens, infections, vaccinations, drugs, and silica exposure have been involved. Eosinophils are the most characteristic cells in EGPA and different studies have demonstrated their role as effector and immunoregulatory cells. EGPA is considered as a disease with a prevalent activation of the Th-2 cellular-mediated inflammatory response and also humoral immunity plays an important role. A link between B and T inflammatory responses may explain different disease features. EGPA typically develops into three sequential phases: the allergic phase, distinguished by the occurrence of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and sinusitis, the eosinophilic phase, in which the main pathological finding is the eosinophilic organ infiltrations (e.g., lungs, heart, and gastrointestinal system), and the vasculitic phase, characterized by purpura, peripheral neuropathy, and constitutional symptoms. ANCA (especially pANCA anti-myeloperoxidase) are present in 40–60% of the patients. An elevation of IgG4 is frequently found. Corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide are classically used for remission induction, while azathioprine and methotrexate are the therapeutic options for remission maintenance. B-cell depletion with rituximab has shown promising results for remission induction. PMID:25404930

  16. Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gioffredi, Andrea; Maritati, Federica; Oliva, Elena; Buzio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) is a multisystemic disorder, belonging to the small vessel anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, defined as an eosinophil-rich and necrotizing granulomatous inflammation often involving the respiratory tract, and necrotizing vasculitis predominantly affecting small to medium-sized vessels, associated with asthma and eosinophilia. EGPA pathogenesis is not well known: HLA-DRB1*04 and *07, HLA-DRB4 and IL10.2 haplotype of the IL-10 promoter gene are the most studied genetic determinants. Among the acquired pathogenetic factors, the exposure to different allergens, infections, vaccinations, drugs, and silica exposure have been involved. Eosinophils are the most characteristic cells in EGPA and different studies have demonstrated their role as effector and immunoregulatory cells. EGPA is considered as a disease with a prevalent activation of the Th-2 cellular-mediated inflammatory response and also humoral immunity plays an important role. A link between B and T inflammatory responses may explain different disease features. EGPA typically develops into three sequential phases: the allergic phase, distinguished by the occurrence of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and sinusitis, the eosinophilic phase, in which the main pathological finding is the eosinophilic organ infiltrations (e.g., lungs, heart, and gastrointestinal system), and the vasculitic phase, characterized by purpura, peripheral neuropathy, and constitutional symptoms. ANCA (especially pANCA anti-myeloperoxidase) are present in 40-60% of the patients. An elevation of IgG4 is frequently found. Corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide are classically used for remission induction, while azathioprine and methotrexate are the therapeutic options for remission maintenance. B-cell depletion with rituximab has shown promising results for remission induction. PMID:25404930

  17. The early history of the eosinophil.

    PubMed

    Kay, A B

    2015-03-01

    In 1879 Paul Ehrlich published his technique for staining blood films and his method for differential blood cell counting using coal tar dyes and mentions the eosinophil for the first time. Eosin is a bright red synthetic dye produced by the action of bromine on fluorescein and stains basic proteins due to its acidic nature. It was discovered in 1874 by Heinrich Caro, Director of the German chemical company Badische Anilin- und Soda-Fabrik. Ehrlich introduced the term 'eosinophil' to describe cells with granules (which he called alpha-granules) having an affinity for eosin and other acid dyes. He also observed black-staining, indulinophilic, beta-granules in bone marrow-derived eosinophils, which were probably immature crystalloid granules in eosinophil myelocytes. Ehrlich described the features of the alpha-granule and the cell's distribution in various species and tissues. He speculated correctly that the alpha-granule contents were secretory products and described several causes of eosinophilia including asthma, various skin diseases, helminths and reactions to medications. However, the cell was almost certainly observed by others before Ehrlich. In 1846 Thomas Wharton Jones (1808-1891) described 'granule blood cells' in the lamprey, frog, fowl, horse, elephant and man. He 'borrowed' the term granule cell from Julius Vogel (1814-1880) who had observed similar cells in inflammatory exudates. Vogel in turn was aware of the work of the Gottlieb (Théophile) Gluge (1812-1898) who used the term 'compound inflammatory globules' to describe cells in pus and serum. Almost 20 years before Ehrlich developed his staining methods, Max Johann Sigismund Schultze (1825-1874) performed functional experiments on coarse granular cells using a warm stage microscopic technique and showed they had amoeboid movement and phagocytic abilities. Although these early investigators recognised distinct granular cells Ehrlich's use of stains was a landmark contribution, which heralded modern studies on eosinophils and other blood leucocytes. PMID:25544991

  18. ATP drives eosinophil effector responses through P2 purinergic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takehito; Soma, Tomoyuki; Noguchi, Toru; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Nakamoto, Hidetomo; Kita, Hirohito; Nagata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophils recognize various stimuli, such as cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulins, complement, and external pathogens, resulting in their accumulation in mucosal tissues and the progression of inflammation. Eosinophils are also involved in innate Th2-type immune responses mediated through endogenous danger signals, including IL-33, uric acid (UA), or ATP, in non-sensitized mice exposed to environmental allergens. However, the mechanism involved in eosinophil responses to these danger signals remains insufficiently understood. Methods We examined migration, adhesion, superoxide production and degranulation of human eosinophils. Isolated eosinophils were incubated with monosodium urate (MSU) crystals and ATP?S, a nonhydrolysable ATP analogue. To determine the involvement of P2 or P2Y2 receptors in eosinophil responses to UA and ATP, eosinophils were preincubated with a pan-P2 receptor inhibitor, oxidized ATP (oATP), or anti-P2Y2 antibody before incubation with MSU crystals or ATP?S. Results MSU crystals induced adhesion of eosinophils to recombinant human (rh)-ICAM-1 and induced production of superoxide. oATP abolished eosinophil responses to MSU crystals, suggesting involvement of endogenous ATP and its receptors. Furthermore, exogenous ATP, as ATP?S, induced migration of eosinophils through a model basement membrane, adhesion to rh-ICAM-1, superoxide generation, and degranulation of eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). oATP and anti-P2Y2 significantly reduced these eosinophil responses. Conclusions ATP serves as an essential mediator of functional responses in human eosinophils. Eosinophil responses to ATP may be implicated in airway inflammation in patients with asthma. PMID:26344078

  19. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about chronic myeloid leukemia? What is chronic myeloid leukemia? Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), also known as chronic ... is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  20. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page Print this page Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a fast-growing cancer of a type ... that your body needs. Tweet Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Transplant outcomes for ALL Initial treatment of ALL ...

  1. Into the wild world of eosinophilic granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Dhull, Anil Kumar; Aggarwal, Sumeet; Kaushal, Vivek; Singh, Sunita

    2013-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a group of relatively rare disease processes of reticuloendothelial system with an abnormal proliferation of Langerhans cells or their precursors. A wide spectrum of treatment modalities is available for LCH which includes surgery, curettage, steroids, radiation, various chemotherapy regimens, either in combination or alone have so far been adopted. There are several case reports of eosinophilic granuloma but for recurrent cases very few have discussed on treatment of LCH in adults. We report a case of a 21-year-old man presented with eosinophilic granuloma with recurrence of the lesions after 6?years of the initial treatment. Patient was treated with combination chemotherapy with three weekly CHOP regimen and the patient is disease free after 6?months of follow-up. Contrary to other reports, this case demonstrates that a good response with standard therapy is possible. PMID:24252836

  2. [Eosinophilic gastroenteritis and ascites. Clinical case].

    PubMed

    Ottobrelli, A; Lagget, M; Arrigoni, A; Gindro, T; Bosio, C; Balbo, G; Rizzetto, M

    1991-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with recurrent subocclusive episodes and diarrhea (no malabsorption) associated with ascites, in the absence or liver, kidney or heart disease. The demonstration of hypereosinophilia in the peripheral blood and in the ascites fluid and the failure to identify parasitic or haematological disorders have led to a through examination of the stomach (Endoscopy, Echoendoscopy), small bowel (X-rays and Computerized Axial Tomography) and colon (colonoscopy) in a search for parietal lesions. The absence of segmental lesions and the observation of CAT images of diffuse, regular thickening of the ileum and of the mesentery, coupled with the monotonous clinical history spanning over three decades, have led to a diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis with involvement of the serosal layer. Serosal involvement is rare in eosinophilic disease of the gut; in analogy with other cases reported in the literature, steroids have improved clinical symptoms and normalized the hematological picture. PMID:1742398

  3. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection causing eosinophilic ascites.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shailaja; Chauhan, Richa; Wadhwa, Shveta; Sehgal, Shivali; Singh, Smita

    2015-09-01

    Strongyloidiasis is associated with Strongyloides stercoralis, an intestinal nematode with greater prevalence in tropical and subtropical regions. Hyperinfection syndrome with dissemination may occur in immunosuppressed individuals. However, invasion of peritoneal cavity with peritoneal effusion is rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of S. stercoralis hyperinfection in a young alcoholic patient with Diabetes mellitus, liver disease and ascites. Diagnostic paracentesis showed numerous filariform larvae of S. stercoralis against a background of eosinophils. PMID:26097138

  4. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: clinical presentation and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bystrom, Jonas; O'Shea, Nuala R

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disorder of the oesophagus which has become increasingly recognised over recent years, although it remains underdiagnosed in many centres. It is characterised histologically by a significant eosinophilic infiltration of the oesophageal mucosa (>15 eosinophils per high powered field), and clinically with features of oesophageal dysfunction such a dysphagia, food impaction, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) resistant dyspepsia. Fibrosis and oesophageal remodelling may occur and lead to oesophageal strictures. An allergic predisposition is common in the EoE population, which appears to be primarily food antigen driven in children and aeroallergen driven in adults. Evidence suggests that the pathogenesis of EoE is due to a dysregulated immunological response to an environmental allergen, resulting in a T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammatory disease and remodelling of the oesophagus in genetically susceptible individuals. Allergen elimination and anti-inflammatory therapy with corticosteroids are currently the mainstay of treatment; however, an increasing number of studies are now focused on targeting different stages in the disease pathogenesis. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms resulting in EoE will allow us to improve the therapeutic options available. PMID:24647582

  5. Treatment Adherence in Pediatric Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Franciosi, James P.; Hente, Elizabeth A.; Ahrens, Annette; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective?Examine treatment adherence rates in pediatric eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGID).?Methods?Participants were children aged 2.5–18 years with eosinophilic esophagitis or eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) and their caregivers. A multimethod, multi-informant assessment including parent report and electronic monitoring was utilized, with a 90% cut point for nonadherence.?Results?Medication nonadherence prevalence was 30%. Adherence frequency was 91%?±?14% (0–100%) per parent report and 100%?±?69% (0–194%) per electronic monitors. Tube-feeding adherence was 99%?±?3%. Food allergen exposures were less than 1 per 2 weeks, with 33% nonadherence prevalence. Patients with EGE and toddlers with both conditions demonstrated poorer medication adherence (p’s?

  6. Experimental production of pulmonary granulomas. IV. Eosinophilic granuloma.

    PubMed Central

    Hamamoto, Y.; Kinoshita, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Matsushita, T.; Kogishi, K.; Yasuhira, K.

    1983-01-01

    Pulmonary granulomas induced in rabbits by the endobronchial instillation of mycobacterial chemical fractions were re-examined for eosinophilic infiltration. Delayed type hypersensitivity reactions either of tuberculin type or of wax D type did not induce but rather suppressed eosinophilic infiltration in the inflamed area, although some peptidoglycans which are antigenic for the induction of immediate hypersensitivity and fatty acid fractions were weak stimulators of eosinophilic infiltration. Bacterial endotoxin, LPS, was a potent stimulator. It was found that some long chain fatty acids can cause severe eosinophilic infiltration in the induced granulomas. Arachidonic acid was the most active of those examined, so the activity of its metabolites was tested and PGE2 was found to be most active. As the eosinophilic infiltration was markedly suppressed in animals treated with a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (aspirin), the stimulators of eosinophilic infiltration were not fatty acids themselves but their metabolites, PGE2 and some others. The site of permeation of eosinophils from the circulation was found to be arteriolar in the inflamed lung. The granulomatous lesion with eosinophilic infiltration in rabbits is discussed to shed light on the aetiology of eosinophilic granuloma in the human lung. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 and 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 and 10 PMID:6849813

  7. Temporal bone Manifestations of Eosinophilic Granuloma.

    PubMed

    Acharya, B K; McShane, D P

    2001-10-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma is one of the triad of conditions collectively known as Histiocytosis-X. It is an uncommon granulomatous diseas which can affect the temporal bone(1) Allthough initially quiescent the disease may erode the mastoid cortex, destroy tegmen and extend into the cranial as well as erode the semicircular canals, cochlea or facial canal, giving rise to facial palsy. These lesions almost always become infected and can confused with chronic otomastoiditis. When diagnosed, theraphy consists of conservative surgery, radiation theraphy, steroids and chemotherapy(2). PMID:23119833

  8. Reversible Severe Eosinophilic Endomyocardial Fibrosis During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pineton de Chambrun, Marc; Charron, Philippe; Vauthier-Brouzes, Danièle; Cluzel, Philippe; Haroche, Julien; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Amoura, Zahir; Aubart, Fleur Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a condition of unknown origin characterized by clinical manifestations attributable to eosinophilia and eosinophilic infiltration of tissues. Cardiac involvement is rare and threatening accounting for 33% to 43% of death in HES. Management of pregnant patients with HES is challenging and have rarely been reported, particularly in the setting of heart failure. We here report on the case of a 29-year-old woman with HES who developed severe endomyocardial fibrosis with heart failure during pregnancy. Outcome was favorable under treatment with prednisone and azathioprine. This case illustrates a favorable outcome of endomyocardial fibrosis during pregnancy. PMID:26266372

  9. Leukemia revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E P

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

  10. Gut reactions: Eosinophils add another string to their bow.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Duncan B; Fagarasan, Sidonia

    2014-04-17

    Eosinophils are found in abundance in the gut. In this issue of Immunity, Chu et al. (2014) report that eosinophil-deficient mice have impaired intestinal immunoglobulin A production, accompanied by a disrupted mucosal layer and alterations in microbiota density and composition. PMID:24745328

  11. EOSINOPHILIC MYOSITIS DUE TO SARCOCYSTIS HOMINIS IN A BEEF COW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of eosinophilic myositis in an eight-year-old beef cow was investigated. The cow originated from a herd that had a high incidence of eosinophilic myositis in slaughtered adult females during a period of two years. Histologically, the lesions in the muscles were characterized as granulomas wit...

  12. Steroid responsive eosinophilic gastric outlet obstruction in a child

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric outlet obstruction is a rare complication of eosinophilic gastroenteritis, most commonly treated surgically. We report a case of eosinophilic gastric outlet obstruction in a child that responded to conservative medical management. A brief review of this clinical entity is also provided....

  13. Intranuclear crystalloids associated with abnormal granules in eosinophilic leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Parmley, R.T.; Crist, W.M.; Roper, M.; Takagi, M.; Austin, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    Ultrastructural evaluation of eosinophilic leukocytes from a 2-yr-old asymptomatic girl with chronic benign neutropenia (CBN) revealed a variety of morphological abnormalities. All eosinophils obtained from blood and marrow specimens contained multiple microcrystalloids in most of the mature cytoplasmic granules. An increase in crystalloid-free, immature granules in late (bilobed nuclei) eosinophils suggested a delay in granule maturation. The eosinophil granules appeared to be of normal size and demonstrated normal acid phosphatase reactivity. Eosinophilic myelocytes contained abnormal cisternae of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and lacked abundant elongated RER cisternae seen in normal cells. A few eosinophilic myelocytes in specimens of bone marrow from the child contained large intranuclear crystalloids measuring up to 3 mu in length. The intranuclear crystalloid contained as cubic lattice of dense material with a periodicity similar to that described for cytoplasmic crystalloids. The ultrastructural morphology of marrow neutrophils was normal, as described in other cases of CBN. Ultrastructural examination of blood eosinophils from the father demonstrated microcrystalloids in cytoplasmic granules identical to those seen in the child. The father was asymptomatic and had normal leukocyte counts. Thus, anomalous crystalloid granule genesis occurred in the father and daughter and was not necessarily associated with neutropenia or clinical symptomatology. This anomaly is associated with the accumulation of intranuclear crystalloid material in eosinophilic myelocytes, which do not appear to be released from the marrow compartment.

  14. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Idiopathic eosinophilic cholecystitis with cholelithiasis: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Monisha; Pujani, Mukta; Katiyar, Yogita; Jyotsna, P Lalita; Rautela, Archna

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic cholecystitis is a rare entity diagnosed on the basis of classical presentation of cholecystitis with presence of more than 90% eosinophilic infiltration within the gall bladder. The etiology of eosinophilic cholecystitis still remains obscure. However it is frequently associated with other more severe diseases like hypereosinophilic syndrome, eosinophilic-myalgia syndrome, parasitic infestations, few herbal medicines and certain drugs. We report two cases who presented with gall stone disease, which on histopathological evaluation was diagnosed as eosinophilic cholecystitis. Retrospective analysis of their case histories and investigation did not reveal any known etiology. These cases are being reported because of their rarity and to highlight the importance of complete workup to rule out other associated disorders that may be a manifestation of a more severe disease. PMID:24638193

  16. An Atypical Case of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting as Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Martillo, Miguel; Abed, Jean; Herman, Michael; Abed, Elie; Shi, Wenjing; Munot, Khushboo; Mankal, Pavan Kumar; Gurunathan, Rajan; Ionescu, Gabriel; Kotler, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition characterized by focal or diffuse infiltration of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of secondary causes. The pathogenesis of this condition is not well understood and its clinical presentation depends on the segment and layer of the gastrointestinal tract affected. The definition of eosinophilic gastroenteritis may be difficult, as the normal ranges of eosinophil numbers in normal and abnormal gastric and intestinal mucosa are not standardized. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who came to the hospital with hypovolemic shock and lethargy secondary to severe diarrhea. Laboratory analysis was significant for peripheral eosinophilia, and pathology from both the duodenum and colon showed marked eosinophilic infiltration. PMID:26078733

  17. Eosinophilic Pleural Effusion: A Rare Manifestation of Hypereosinophilic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Ndubuisi C.; Oso, Ayodeji A.; Oranu, Amanke C.; Wolff, Steven M.; Murray, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Several causes of eosinophilic pleural effusions have been described with malignancy being the commonest cause. Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a rare disease and very few cases have been reported of HES presenting as eosinophilic pleural effusion (EPE). We report a case of a 26-year-old male who presented with shortness of breath. He had bilateral pleural effusions, generalized lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and leukocytosis with marked peripheral blood eosinophilia. The pleural fluid was exudative, with 25%–30% eosinophilis, and absence of neoplastic cells. Hypereosinophilic syndrome was diagnosed after other causes of eosinophilia were excluded. He continued to be dyspneic with persistent accumulation of eosinophilic pleural fluid, even after his peripheral eosinophil count had normalized in response to treatment. This patient represents a very unusual presentation of HES with dyspnea and pleural effusions and demonstrates that treatment based on response of peripheral eosinophil counts, as is currently recommended, may not always be clinically adequate. PMID:20111739

  18. Unilateral nasal allergic reactions increase bilateral sinus eosinophil infiltration

    PubMed Central

    deTineo, Marcella; Naclerio, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that unilateral nasal challenge with antigen causes an increase in the number of eosinophils in the ipsilateral maxillary sinus. Here we aimed to determine whether there was an eosinophil response in the contralateral maxillary sinus after unilateral nasal challenge with antigen. Twenty subjects with a history of seasonal allergic rhinitis and a positive nasal challenge to ragweed or grass allergens were studied outside of their allergy season. Catheters were placed in both maxillary sinuses and the subjects were challenged with antigen via the left nostril. The subjects recorded nasal symptoms before and after each allergen challenge and hourly for 8 h afterward. We performed nasal lavages of the nose and sinuses at the same time as symptoms were recorded. The lavages were analyzed for the number of eosinophils and levels of albumin. Subjects showed a symptomatic response to challenge accompanied by an influx of eosinophils into the nose and increased vascular permeability. The number of eosinophils increased in both maxillary sinuses. The total change from diluent in eosinophils during the late phase response was higher in the ipsilateral maxillary sinus (median = 8,505; range = 0–100,360) compared with the contralateral sinus (median = 1,596; range = ?13,527–93,373; P = 0.03). We conclude that eosinophils increase in both maxillary sinuses after unilateral nasal challenge. We speculate that a central neurologic reflex initiated in the nose by the nasal challenge contributes to the bilateral eosinophil response in the maxillary sinuses. We further speculate that, since there are more eosinophils in the ipsilateral compared with the contralateral maxillary sinus, there is also an axonal reflex into the ipsilateral maxillary sinus that contributed to the eosinophil response. PMID:23970539

  19. Eosinophil Cytokines, Chemokines, and Growth Factors: Emerging Roles in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Davoine, Francis; Lacy, Paige

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils derive from the bone marrow and circulate at low levels in the blood in healthy individuals. These granulated cells preferentially leave the circulation and marginate to tissues, where they are implicated in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. In diseases such as allergic inflammation, eosinophil numbers escalate markedly in the blood and tissues where inflammatory foci are located. Eosinophils possess a range of immunomodulatory factors that are released upon cell activation, including over 35 cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines. Unlike T and B cells, eosinophils can rapidly release cytokines within minutes in response to stimulation. While some cytokines are stored as pre-formed mediators in crystalloid granules and secretory vesicles, eosinophils are also capable of undergoing de novo synthesis and secretion of these immunological factors. Some of the molecular mechanisms that coordinate the final steps of cytokine secretion are hypothesized to involve binding of membrane fusion complexes comprised of soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs). These intracellular receptors regulate the release of granules and vesicles containing a range of secreted proteins, among which are cytokines and chemokines. Emerging evidence from both human and animal model-based research has suggested an active participation of eosinophils in several physiological/pathological processes such as immunomodulation and tissue remodeling. The observed eosinophil effector functions in health and disease implicate eosinophil cytokine secretion as a fundamental immunoregulatory process. The focus of this review is to describe the cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines that are elaborated by eosinophils, and to illustrate some of the intracellular events leading to the release of eosinophil-derived cytokines. PMID:25426119

  20. Clinical application of autologous technetium-99m-labelled eosinophils to detect focal eosinophilic inflammation in the lung

    E-print Network

    Loutsios, Chrystalla; Farahi, Neda; Simmonds, Rosalind; Cullum, Ian; Gillett, Daniel; Solanki, Chandra; Solanki, Kishor; Buscombe, John; Condliffe, Alison M.; Peters, A. Mike; Chilvers, Edwin R.

    2015-06-24

    -risk to be performed safely. The use of injected autologous technetium-99m (Tc-99m)-labelled eosinophils coupled to single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been demonstrated to localise eosinophilic inflammation in the lungs of a patient...

  1. Clinical application of autologous technetium-99m-labelled eosinophils to detect focal eosinophilic inflammation in the lung

    E-print Network

    Loutsios, Chrystalla; Farahi, Neda; Simmonds, Rosalind; Cullum, Ian; Gillett, Daniel; Solanki, Chandra; Solanki, Kishor; Buscombe, John; Condliffe, Alison; Peters, Michael A.; Chilvers, Edwin

    2015-06-03

    -risk to be performed safely. The use of injected autologous technetium-99m (Tc-99m)-labelled eosinophils coupled to Single Photon Computed Tomography (SPECT)-CT has been demonstrated to localise eosinophilic inflammation in the lungs of a patient with ANCA...

  2. Current Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis 2015.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltrate (?15/hpf) in the esophageal epithelium and the absence of other potential causes of eosinophilia. The prevalence is increasing and is the most common cause of solid food dysphagia in children and young adults. This article will review the diagnosis and management of EoE based on consensus conferences, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis and highlights seminal studies in our evolving treatment of this disease. However, all answers are not available and I will remark about the lessons learned in my clinical practice seeing EoE patients over the last 25 years. The complicated etiology of the complaint of dysphagia in EoE patients will be reviewed. The importance of utilizing endoscopy, biopsies, and barium esophagram to help define the 2 phenotypes (inflammatory, fibrostenosis) of EoE will be highlighted. The controversy about PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia will be discussed and contrasted with idiopathic EoE. Finally, the 3 treatment options for EoE (drugs, diet, dilation) will be reviewed in detail and a useful clinical management algorithm presented. PMID:26485101

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis: From pathophysiology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Esposito, Dario; Pesce, Marcella; Cuomo, Rosario; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune disease, characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophagus, leading to bolus impaction and reflux-like symptoms. Traditionally considered a pediatric disease, the number of adult patients with EoE is continuously increasing, with a relatively higher incidence in western countries. Dysphagia and food impaction represent the main symptoms complained by patients, but gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms may also be present. Esophageal biopsies are mandatory for the diagnosis of EoE, though clinical manifestations and proton pump inhibitors responsiveness must be taken into consideration. The higher prevalence of EoE in patients suffering from atopic diseases suggests a common background with allergy, however both the etiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. Elimination diets are considered the first-line therapy in children, but this approach appears less effective in adults patients, who often require steroids; despite medical treatments, EoE is complicated in some cases by esophageal stricture and stenosis, that require additional endoscopic treatments. This review summarizes the evidence on EoE pathophysiology and illustrates the safety and efficacy of the most recent medical and endoscopic treatments. PMID:26600973

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Acute promyelocytic leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Leukemia American Cancer Society: Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia Genetic Testing Registry: Acute promyelocytic leukemia MedlinePlus ... do people use for acute promyelocytic leukemia? AML M3 APL leukemia, acute promyelocytic M3 ANLL myeloid leukemia, ...

  5. Quantitative microscopy of mole rat eosinophil granule morphology.

    PubMed

    Amihai, Dina; Meilijson, Isaac; Terkel, Joseph; Hammel, Ilan

    2015-10-01

    Mole rat bone marrow cells and peritoneal eosinophils are used to study granule morphological maturation by quantitative microscopy. The bulk eosinophil granule content is pre-stored in unique granular structures known as crystalloid or secondary granules. Mole rat eosinophil granules exhibit the basic structure of an electron-dense crystalloid core surrounded by a lighter, homogeneous matrix. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that bone marrow-derived eosinophil sphere-like granules display a periodic, multimodal granule volume distribution. In contrast, peritoneal eosinophils display cigar-shaped granules, whose crystalloid cores are more variable in size and shape as compared to bone marrow eosinophil granules. Using a morphometric approach, we deduced that the basic granule volume quantum is similar in both cases, suggesting that the sphere-like young eosinophil granules turn into dense ellipsoidal ones by intragranular processes in which both volume and membrane surface are conserved. Crystalloid granule mediators are known to be widely associated with allergic inflammatory events, which may damage the host tissue following secretion to the extracellular environment. Based on mathematical modeling, we suggest that this deviation from sphere-like to ellipsoidal shape reflects an adaptive response of the mole rat to its unique solitary life. PMID:25971930

  6. Eosinophilic cystitis: treatment with intravesical steroids and oral antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Shahriar Raj; Vermeulen, Tersia L; Parry, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    This is a case of eosinophilic cystitis in a 56-year-old indigenous Australian woman who presented with urosepsis on the background of a urinary tract infection unresponsive to oral antibiotics. After resolution of the urosepsis, she had persisting urinary retention and a cystoscopy/bladder biopsy suggested eosinophilic cystitis. After 1 month of intravesical hydrocortisone and oral loratadine, repeat cystoscopy showed vast improvement in the bladder lesions. This case further strengthens the use of intravesical steroids and oral antihistamines for the management of eosinophilic cystitis. PMID:24014555

  7. Biologic therapies targeting eosinophils: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Fanny; Klion, Amy D

    2015-01-01

    The recent explosion in the number of biologic therapies in clinical development for the treatment of eosinophilic disorders is unprecedented. As these agents become available for clinical use, the selection of the most appropriate agent for a given patient will become increasingly complicated. The aims of this review were 2-fold: (1) to present the lessons learned from clinical trials using the first generation of eosinophil-targeted biologics (anti-IL-5 antibodies) and (2) to discuss the advantages and potential limitations of currently available and novel targeted therapies to treat eosinophilic disorders. PMID:25754717

  8. Diagnostic approach to eosinophilic oesophagitis: Pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Schoepfer, Alain

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) has first been described a little over 20 years ago. EoE has been defined by a panel of international experts as a "chronic, immune/antigen-mediated, oesophageal disease, characterized clinically by symptoms related to oesophageal dysfunction and histologically by eosinophil-predominant inflammation". A value of ?15 eosinophils has been defined as histologic diagnostic cutoff. Other conditions associated with oesophageal eosinophilia, such as gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia, or Crohn's disease should be excluded before EoE can be diagnosed. This review highlights the latest insights regarding the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of EoE. PMID:26552777

  9. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  10. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  11. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  12. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  13. An overview of chronic myeloid leukemia and its animal models.

    PubMed

    Ma, WeiXu; Ma, Ning; Chen, XiaoHui; Zhang, YiYue; Zhang, WenQing

    2015-12-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a form of leukemia characterized by the presence of clonal bone marrow stem cells with the proliferation of mature granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) and their precursors. CML is a type of myeloproliferative disease associated with a characteristic chromosomal translocation called the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome or t (9;22) translocation (BCR-ABL). CML is now usually treated with targeted drugs called tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The mechanism and natural history of CML is still unclear. Here, we summarize the present CML animal disease models and compare them with each other. Meanwhile, we propose that it is a very wise choice to establish zebrafish (Danio rerio) CML model mimics clinical CML. This model could be used to learn more about the mechanism of CML, and to aid in the development of new drugs to treat CML. PMID:26582013

  14. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. An acute leukemia can become worse quickly if it is not treated and can result in death within months. AML is the most common type of acute leukemia in American adults and the average age of a patient with AML is 67.

  15. UNUSUAL EOSINOPHILIC GRANULE CELL PROLIFERATION IN COHO SALMON (ONCHORHYNCHUS KISUTCH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proliferative lesions comprised of eosinophilic granule cells (EGCs) extended throughout the gastrointestinal tract of several mature, spawning coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum). istological examination of the tumour showed extensive proliferation and infiltration of EGC...

  16. A novel cause of eosinophilic pneumonia: recreational marijuana exposure.

    PubMed

    Liebling, Peter D; Siu, Stanton

    2013-04-01

    Eosinophilic pneumonia is characterized by pulmonary infiltrates visible on radiography, eosinophilic infiltration into the lung parenchyma, and frequent peripheral eosinophilia. The etiology may be idiopathic or secondary to identifiable causes, including drugs, parasites, toxins, infections, or systemic diseases such as hypereosinophilic syndrome. A 60-year-old man was seen in pulmonary clinic with 4 weeks of cough and wheeze. He was found to have pulmonary infiltrates, a peripheral eosinophilia, and bronchoalveolar lavage demonstrated numerous eosinophils. Careful review of history revealed that the symptoms had started after a recreational exposure to marijuana from a different source than usual. Eosinophilic pneumonia from marijuana has been described once in conjunction with tobacco smoke in the pediatric literature, but to our knowledge this is the first report in the adult literature. PMID:23609259

  17. Diagnosis and management of eosinophilic asthma: a US perspective

    PubMed Central

    Walford, Hannah H; Doherty, Taylor A

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic asthma is now recognized as an important subphenotype of asthma based on the pattern of inflammatory cellular infiltrate in the airway. Eosinophilic asthma can be associated with increased asthma severity, atopy, late-onset disease, and steroid refractoriness. Induced sputum cell count is the gold standard for identifying eosinophilic inflammation in asthma although several noninvasive biomarkers, including fractional exhaled nitric oxide and periostin, are emerging as potential surrogates. As novel therapies and biologic agents become increasingly available, there is an increased need for specific phenotype-directed treatment strategies. Greater recognition and understanding of the unique immunopathology of this asthma phenotype has important implications for management of the disease and the potential to improve patient outcomes. The present review provides a summary of the clinical features, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of eosinophilic asthma. PMID:24748808

  18. [Eosinophilic gastroenteritis and colitis in pediatric patients: Increasingly frequent diseases].

    PubMed

    Lemale, J; Dainese, L; Tounian, P

    2015-07-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by no specific digestive symptoms associated with dense eosinophilic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of known causes for such tissue eosinophilia. Among these diseases, eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) and colitis (EC) are less common than esophagitis, but their incidence and prevalence have been increasing over the past decade due in part to increased disease recognition. The exact pathophysiology is not clear: EGE and EC are immune-mediated diseases implicating adaptive T-helper cell type 2 immunity. According to the site of eosinophilic infiltration, there is a wide spectrum of digestive symptoms ranging from food refusal, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, weight loss, gastrointestinal bleeding (anemia), protein loosing enteropathy, ascites, bowel obstruction or perforation for EGE and diarrhea ± bleeding for CE. Endoscopic lesions are not specific: friability, erythematous mucosa with superficial erosions, or ulceration is often observed. Histologically, markedly increased numbers of mucosal eosinophils are seen in biopsy specimens. However, no standards for the diagnosis of EGE or CE exist and few findings support the diagnosis: intraepithelial eosinophils, eosinophil crypt abscesses, and eosinophils in muscularis mucosa and/or submucosa. Other organs are not involved. The other causes of tissue eosinophilia (infections, inflammatory bowel diseases) should be excluded. Food allergy appears to play a central role in driving inflammation in EGE and CE, as evidenced by symptomatic improvement with initiation of food exclusion or elemental diets. Dietary treatment should be the first therapeutic option in children. If the elimination diet fails, corticosteroids are currently the best characterized treatment but appropriate duration is unknown and relapses are frequent. In severe forms, immunomodulators or biologic agents (anti-IL5, anti-IgE, or anti-TNFa) can potentially play a role in the treatment of EGE and CE. PMID:26051270

  19. Eosinophilic leukemoid reaction in a male adolescent with Löeffler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iclal, Bayhan Gulsum; Garipardic, Mesut; Karaman, Kamuran; Akbayram, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    The Löeffler syndrome is characterized by pulmonary infiltrates on a chest x-ray accompanied with peripheral eosinophilia. In this article, we have highlighted the Löeffler syndrome complicated with a eosinophilic leukemoid reaction in a previously healthy boy. The patient was treated with albendazole for five days, with a successful result. In countries where parasitic diseases are endemic, the Löeffler syndrome must always be considered in patients who present with a eosinophilic leukemoid reaction.

  20. Clinical application of autologous technetium-99m-labelled eosinophils to detect focal eosinophilic inflammation in the lung.

    PubMed

    Loutsios, Chrystalla; Farahi, Neda; Simmonds, Rosalind; Cullum, Ian; Gillett, Daniel; Solanki, Chandra; Solanki, Kishor; Buscombe, John; Condliffe, Alison M; Peters, A Mike; Chilvers, Edwin R

    2015-11-01

    The detection of focal eosinophilic inflammation by non-invasive means may aid the diagnosis and follow-up of a variety of pulmonary pathologies. All current methods of detection involve invasive sampling, which may be contraindicated or too high-risk to be performed safely. The use of injected autologous technetium-99m (Tc-99m)-labelled eosinophils coupled to single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been demonstrated to localise eosinophilic inflammation in the lungs of a patient with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis. Here, we report on the utility of this technique to detect active eosinophilic inflammation in a patient with focal lung inflammation where a biopsy was contraindicated. PMID:26108571

  1. Leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Testa, Ugo

    2011-03-01

    Leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) or leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are defined by their ability to form tumors after xenotransplantation in immunodeficient mice and appear to be rare in most human leukemias. In various leukemias, only small subpopulations of cells can transfer disease upon transplantation into immunocompromised NOD/SCID mice, and markers that distinguish the leukemogenic cancer cells from the bulk populations of non-leukemogenic cells have been identified. However, the phenotype of LICs is heterogeneous: it is variable for the different types of acute myeloid leukemias; cells with different membrane phenotype can act as LICs in each B-acute lymphoid leukemia; LICs change during the evolution of chronic myeloid leukemia from the chronic to the acute phase. There is a general consensus that the identification and characterization of leukemic stem cells might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets and, through this way, to more effective treatments by focusing therapy on the most malignant cells. PMID:21107841

  2. Diagnosis and classification of eosinophilic fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Pinal-Fernandez, I; Selva-O' Callaghan, A; Grau, J M

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) is a rare scleroderma-like syndrome with an unknown etiology and pathogenesis that should be considered an immune-allergic disorder. Painful swelling with progressive induration and thickening of the skin and soft tissues of the limbs and trunk are the clinical hallmarks of the disease. Peripheral blood eosinophilia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate are the main laboratory findings. Full-thickness wedge biopsy of the clinically affected skin showing inflammation and thickening of deep fascia is essential to establish the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes systemic sclerosis and other scleroderma subsets such as morphea, and epidemic fasciitis syndromes caused by toxic agents such as the myalgia-eosinophilia syndrome and toxic oil syndrome. Peripheral T cell lymphomas should also be ruled out. The diagnosis of EF can be established by clinical, laboratory and histological findings, but universally accepted international diagnostic criteria are lacking. Corticosteroids are efficacious and remain the standard therapy for EF, although some patients may improve spontaneously. PMID:24424187

  3. Clinical and radiological character of eosinophilic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Cai, Bing; Song, Hualin; Yang, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is a rare disease and remains a poorly understood. We explored the potential etiology, clinical and radiological presentation, diagnosis and therapeutic experience with EC. Materials and Methods: A pooled ten patients diagnosed with EC were retrospectively studied in our hospital to assess clinical presentation symptoms, radiological and pathological diagnosis, treatment and outcomes between 1998 and 2012. Results: Nine patients presented with irritative urinary symptoms, one was symptomless. Allergic history were found in 2 patients, bladder mass was detected in all by radiologic tests or cystoscopy. Radiology revealed diffuse thickening of bladder wall in 7 cases among which one with bilateral hydroureteronephrosis, solitary tumor-like lesion in other 3. Elevated serum leukocytes were evident in 4 cases while elevated peripheral eosinophilias were observed in 3. One was asymptomatic and without specific therapy (group 1, 10%), transurethral resection of the lesions in one tumor-like case (10%). The other 8 cases were treated with corticosteroid and/or antihistaminics and 5 patients had excellent outcome with symptom resolution (62.5%). Conclusions: EC usually follows a benign course, most treated with corticosteroids and resulted in relief of symptoms while some may relapse. Surgery is an available choice for drug refractory or localized EC. PMID:25785027

  4. Anti-IgE Treatment of Eosinophil Associated Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Foroughi, Shabnam; Foster, Barbara; Kim, NaYoung; Bernardino, Leigh B.; Scott, Linda M.; Hamilton, Robert G.; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Mannon, Peter J.; Prussin, Calman

    2009-01-01

    Background Eosinophil Associated Gastrointestinal Disorders (EGIDs) are commonly associated with atopy and are being recognized with increasing frequency. Current therapy for EGIDs is inadequate. Objective We sought to determine the efficacy of anti-IgE therapy in EGIDs and investigate the role of IgE in disease pathogenesis. Methods Nine subjects with EGIDs received omalizumab every 2 weeks for 16 weeks while other therapy was held constant. Blood absolute eosinophil counts, tissue eosinophil counts, symptom scores, and free IgE were serially measured. Allergen skin testing, and flow cytometry for basophil activation and Fc?RI were determined at baseline and at week 16. Results Omalizumab was associated with a decrease in absolute eosinophil count at both the 16 week (34%, p=0.004) and combined weeks 12–16 (42%, p=0.012) time points. Tissue eosinophils decreased in the duodenum (59%) and gastric antrum (69%), but did not reach statistical significance (p=0.074 and 0.098, respectively). Esophageal eosinophil counts remained unchanged. Basophil and dendritic cell Fc?RI expression, and free IgE were all significantly decreased (p<0.005). Omalizumab increased the concentration of allergen required to trigger half-maximal basophil activation by 170-fold. Allergen skin test wheal and erythema responses decreased by 78% and 82%, respectively. Symptom scores were decreased at both the midstudy (63%) and end of study (70%) time points (p<0.005 for both). Conclusion These results demonstrate that IgE-mediated processes contribute to the generation of eosinophilic inflammation in EGIDs, and suggest that anti-IgE therapy may be effective in these disorders. Clinical implications Anti-IgE may be a potential therapy for EGIDs. PMID:17765756

  5. Purinergic P2Y12 Receptor Activation in Eosinophils and the Schistosomal Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Muniz, Valdirene S.; Baptista-dos-Reis, Renata; Benjamim, Claudia F.; Mata-Santos, Hilton A.; Pyrrho, Alexandre S.; Strauch, Marcelo A.; Melo, Paulo A.; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Silva-Paiva, Juliana; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Weller, Peter F.; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T.; Neves, Josiane S.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying new target molecules through which eosinophils secrete their stored proteins may reveal new therapeutic approaches for the control of eosinophilic disorders such as host immune responses to parasites. We have recently reported the expression of the purinergic P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) in human eosinophils; however, its functional role in this cell type and its involvement in eosinophilic inflammation remain unknown. Here, we investigated functional roles of P2Y12R in isolated human eosinophils and in a murine model of eosinophilic inflammation induced by Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni) infection. We found that adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) induced human eosinophils to secrete eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) in a P2Y12R dependent manner. However, ADP did not interfere with human eosinophil apoptosis or chemotaxis in vitro. In vivo, C57Bl/6 mice were infected with cercariae of the Belo Horizonte strain of S. mansoni. Analyses performed 55 days post infection revealed that P2Y12R blockade reduced the granulomatous hepatic area and the eosinophilic infiltrate, collagen deposition and IL-13/IL-4 production in the liver without affecting the parasite oviposition. As found for humans, murine eosinophils also express the P2Y12R. P2Y12R inhibition increased blood eosinophilia, whereas it decreased the bone marrow eosinophil count. Our results suggest that P2Y12R has an important role in eosinophil EPO secretion and in establishing the inflammatory response in the course of a S. mansoni infection. PMID:26448282

  6. Integrins are Mechanosensors That Modulate Human Eosinophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzai, Mustafa; Small, Mike; Sehmi, Roma; Gauvreau, Gail; Janssen, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophil migration to the lung is primarily regulated by the eosinophil-selective family of eotaxin chemokines, which mobilize intracellular calcium (Ca2+) and orchestrate myriad changes in cell structure and function. Eosinophil function is also known to be flow-dependent, although the molecular cognate of this mechanical response has yet to be adequately characterized. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy, we determined the effects of fluid shear stress on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human peripheral blood eosinophils by perfusing cells in a parallel-plate flow chamber. Our results indicate that fluid perfusion evokes a calcium response that leads to cell flattening, increase in cell area, shape change, and non-directional migration. None of these changes are seen in the absence of a flow stimulus, and all are blocked by chelation of intracellular Ca2+ using BAPTA. These changes are enhanced by stimulating the cells with eotaxin-1. The perfusion-induced calcium response (PICR) could be blocked by pre-treating cells with selective (CDP-323) and non-selective (RGD tripeptides) integrin receptor antagonists, suggesting that ?4?7/?4?1 integrins mediate this response. Overall, our study provides the first pharmacological description of a molecular mechanosensor that may collaborate with the eotaxin-1 signaling program in order to control human eosinophil activation. PMID:26539194

  7. Integrins are Mechanosensors That Modulate Human Eosinophil Activation.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzai, Mustafa; Small, Mike; Sehmi, Roma; Gauvreau, Gail; Janssen, Luke J

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophil migration to the lung is primarily regulated by the eosinophil-selective family of eotaxin chemokines, which mobilize intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) and orchestrate myriad changes in cell structure and function. Eosinophil function is also known to be flow-dependent, although the molecular cognate of this mechanical response has yet to be adequately characterized. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy, we determined the effects of fluid shear stress on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in human peripheral blood eosinophils by perfusing cells in a parallel-plate flow chamber. Our results indicate that fluid perfusion evokes a calcium response that leads to cell flattening, increase in cell area, shape change, and non-directional migration. None of these changes are seen in the absence of a flow stimulus, and all are blocked by chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) using BAPTA. These changes are enhanced by stimulating the cells with eotaxin-1. The perfusion-induced calcium response (PICR) could be blocked by pre-treating cells with selective (CDP-323) and non-selective (RGD tripeptides) integrin receptor antagonists, suggesting that ?4?7/?4?1 integrins mediate this response. Overall, our study provides the first pharmacological description of a molecular mechanosensor that may collaborate with the eotaxin-1 signaling program in order to control human eosinophil activation. PMID:26539194

  8. EP4 receptor stimulation down-regulates human eosinophil function.

    PubMed

    Luschnig-Schratl, Petra; Sturm, Eva M; Konya, Viktoria; Philipose, Sonia; Marsche, Gunther; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Samberger, Claudia; Lang-Loidolt, Doris; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Lippe, Irmgard Th; Peskar, Bernhard A; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2011-11-01

    Accumulation of eosinophils in tissue is a hallmark of allergic inflammation. Here we observed that a selective agonist of the PGE(2) receptor EP4, ONO AE1-329, potently attenuated the chemotaxis of human peripheral blood eosinophils, upregulation of the adhesion molecule CD11b and the production of reactive oxygen species. These effects were accompanied by the inhibition of cytoskeletal rearrangement and Ca(2+) mobilization. The involvement of the EP4 receptor was substantiated by a selective EP4 antagonist, which reversed the inhibitory effects of PGE(2) and the EP4 agonist. Selective kinase inhibitors revealed that the inhibitory effect of EP4 stimulation on eosinophil migration depended upon activation of PI 3-kinase and PKC, but not cAMP. Finally, we found that EP4 receptors are expressed by human eosinophils, and are also present on infiltrating leukocytes in inflamed human nasal mucosa. These data indicate that EP4 agonists might be a novel therapeutic option in eosinophilic diseases. PMID:21365278

  9. Indigenous enteric eosinophils control DCs to initiate a primary Th2 immune response in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Derek K.; Jimenez-Saiz, Rodrigo; Verschoor, Christopher P.; Walker, Tina D.; Goncharova, Susanna; Llop-Guevara, Alba; Shen, Pamela; Gordon, Melissa E.; Barra, Nicole G.; Bassett, Jennifer D.; Kong, Joshua; Fattouh, Ramzi; McCoy, Kathy D.; Bowdish, Dawn M.; Erjefält, Jonas S.; Pabst, Oliver; Humbles, Alison A.; Kolbeck, Roland; Waserman, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils natively inhabit the small intestine, but a functional role for them there has remained elusive. Here, we show that eosinophil-deficient mice were protected from induction of Th2-mediated peanut food allergy and anaphylaxis, and Th2 priming was restored by reconstitution with il4+/+ or il4?/? eosinophils. Eosinophils controlled CD103+ dendritic cell (DC) activation and migration from the intestine to draining lymph nodes, events necessary for Th2 priming. Eosinophil activation in vitro and in vivo led to degranulation of eosinophil peroxidase, a granule protein whose enzymatic activity promoted DC activation in mice and humans in vitro, and intestinal and extraintestinal mouse DC activation and mobilization to lymph nodes in vivo. Further, eosinophil peroxidase enhanced responses to ovalbumin seen after immunization. Thus, eosinophils can be critical contributors to the intestinal immune system, and granule-mediated shaping of DC responses can promote both intestinal and extraintestinal adaptive immunity. PMID:25071163

  10. Eosinophilic ulcer of the tongue--Case report.

    PubMed

    Didona, Dario; Paolino, Giovanni; Donati, Michele; Didona, Biagio; Calvieri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa is a rare, self-limiting, chronic and benign lesion of unknown pathogenesis that affects the oral mucosa. We present the case of a 65 year-old Caucasian female with a five month history of a painful ulcer on the lateral side of her tongue. The ulcer was not adhered to the underlying structures and there was no evidence of regional lymph node involvement. Laboratory examinations and X-rays revealed no abnormalities. Topical treatments had been performed without any improvement. Histopathological examination showed an ulcerated surface and mixed inflammatory infiltrate with several eosinophils extending into the mucosa and submucosa. No cellular atypia was observed. Based on the patient-s history and mucosal biopsy, a final diagnosis of eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa was made. PMID:26312683

  11. Suppressive activity of epinastine hydrochloride on eosinophil activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yu-ichiro; Furuta, Atsuko; Furuya, Ayako; Kanai, Ken-ichi; Asano, Kazuhito; Suzaki, Harumi

    2008-01-01

    The influence of a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, epinastine hydrochloride (EP), on eosinophil functions was examined in vitro and in vivo. The first set of experiments was undertaken to examine whether EP could suppress eosinophilia and IgE hyperproduction induced by Mesocestoides cortii infection in BALB/c mice. The number of peripheral blood eosinophils and levels of IgE were examined 21 days after infection. Oral administration of EP at a daily dose of 0.3 mg/kg, which is the recommended human therapeutic dose, for 21 days was not able to suppress either peripheral blood eosinophilia or IgE hyperproduction, which was observed in mice infected with M. cortii. The second part of the experiment was designed to examine the influence of EP on eosinophil activation induced by stem cell factor (SCF) stimulation in vitro. Eosinophils were obtained from M. cortii-infected mice and stimulated with SCF in the presence of different concentrations of EP for 24 h. The addition of EP into cell cultures suppressed eosinophil activation induced by SCF stimulation as assessed by measuring the contents of acronym for Regulated upon Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and presumably Secreted (RANTES), macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta (MIP-1beta) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4) levels in culture supernatants. The minimum concentration of EP which caused significant suppression of factor productions was 25 ng/ml, which is similar to the concentration in plasma after oral administration of the therapeutic dose in humans. These results may suggest that EP exerts inhibitory effects on eosinophil activation and results in favorable modification of the clinical status of allergic patients. PMID:18396776

  12. ?? T Lymphocytes Coordinate Eosinophil Influx during Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Henriques, Maria Das Graças Muller; Penido, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Tissue eosinophil infiltration, which is a hallmark of allergic and helminthic diseases, is mainly coordinated by T lymphocytes, via the production of eosinophilotactic chemokines. Among T lymphocyte subsets, lymphocytes expressing ?? T cell receptor have been determined as a key factor for eosinophil accumulation via direct and indirect mechanisms. This knowledge is strongly supported by the fact that, in different experimental models of eosinophilic airway inflammation and helminth-induced Th2 lung inflammation, an evident tissue accumulation of ?? T lymphocytes is observed. In addition, the depletion of ?? T lymphocytes is correlated with the impairment of eosinophil accumulation in inflamed tissue. ?? T lymphocytes are non-conventional T lymphocytes, which comprise a minor T lymphocyte subset, mainly distributed in the tissue, and present crucial roles in innate and acquired immune responses. ?? T lymphocytes recognize several danger- and pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules and stress antigens in a MHC-independent fashion and can provide rapid tissue-specific responses, via the production of a wide range of chemical mediators capable to modulate other cell populations. These mediators include chemoattractant cytokines and chemokines that attract eosinophils into the tissue by either direct recognition (such as IL-5, CCL11/eotaxin), or indirect mechanisms via the modulation of ?? T lymphocytes and macrophages (through the production of interferon-?, IL-4, and CCL2/Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, MCP-1, for example). The present review presents an overview of how ?? T lymphocytes coordinate eosinophil accumulation in allergy, by focusing on their role in airway inflammation and by discussing the involvement of cytokines and chemokines in this phenomenon. PMID:23316161

  13. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors on eosinophils. Binding and functional studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yukawa, T.; Ukena, D.; Kroegel, C.; Chanez, P.; Dent, G.; Chung, K.F.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    We have studied the binding characteristics and functional effects of beta-adrenoceptors on human and guinea pig eosinophils. We determined the binding of the beta-antagonist radioligand (125I)pindolol (IPIN) to intact eosinophils obtained from the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs and from blood of patients with eosinophilia. Specific binding was saturable, and Scatchard analysis showed a single binding site with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 24.6 pM and maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 7,166 per cell. ICI 118,551, a beta 2-selective antagonist, inhibited IPIN binding with a Ki value of 0.28 nM and was approximately 5,000-fold more effective than the beta 1-selective antagonist, atenolol. Isoproterenol increased cAMP levels about 5.5-fold above basal levels (EC50 = 25 microM); albuterol, a beta 2-agonist, behaved as a partial agonist with a maximal stimulation of 80%. Binding to human eosinophils gave similar results with a Kd of 25.3 pM and a Bmax corresponding to 4,333 sites per cell. Incubation of both human and guinea pig eosinophils with opsonized zymosan (2 mg/ml) or with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (10(-8) and 10(-6) M) resulted in superoxide anion generation and the release of eosinophil peroxidase; albuterol (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) had no inhibitory effect on the release of these products. Thus, eosinophils from patients with eosinophilia and from the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs possess beta-receptors of the beta 2-subtype that are coupled to adenylate cyclase; however, these receptors do not modulate oxidative metabolism or degranulation. The possible therapeutic consequences of these observations to asthma are discussed.

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis as paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Prader, S; Spalinger, J; Caduff, J; Hürlimann, S; Rischewski, J

    2015-05-01

    A 16-month-old boy presented with failure to thrive despite sufficient caloric intake, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea and blepharitis. An eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was diagnosed by esophageal biopsy. Dietary restrictions and topical steroid treatment lead to no improvement. Further diagnostic work-up revealed an intrathoracal, paraspinal ganglioneuroblastoma. After operative extirpation of the tumour, all initial symptoms resolved. An esophageal control biopsy 4 weeks after tumour resection was normal. This is the first report of eosinophilic esophagitis as part of a paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with a malignant disease other than a carcinoma. PMID:25985452

  15. Leukotriene B4 receptors on guinea pig alveolar eosinophils

    SciTech Connect

    Maghni, K.; de Brum-Fernandes, A.J.; Foeldes-Filep, E.G.; Gaudry, M.; Borgeat, P.; Sirois, P. )

    1991-09-01

    The existence of receptors for LTB4 on highly purified guinea pig alveolar eosinophils was investigated. Massive infiltration of eosinophils in alveolar spaces was induced in guinea pigs by i.v. injections of Sephadex beads G50 (16 mg/kg). Alveolar eosinophils (50 {times} 10(6) cells) were purified to approximately 98% by Percoll continuous density gradient centrifugation. The binding studies indicated that alveolar eosinophils bind LTB4 in a saturable, reversible and specific manner. Scatchard analysis indicated the existence of high-affinity binding sites (Kd1 = 1.00 {plus minus} 0.22 nM; Bmax1 = 966 {plus minus} 266 sites/cell) and low-affinity binding sites (Kd2 = 62.5 {plus minus} 8.9 nM; Bmax2 = 5557 {plus minus} 757 sites/cell). The metabolism of LTB4 by alveolar eosinophils in binding conditions was assessed by RP-HPLC and no significant degradation of (3H)LTB4 was observed. LTB4 dose-dependently stimulated eosinophil migration in both chemokinesis and chemotaxis assays with an EC50 value of 1.30 {plus minus} 0.14 and 18.14 {plus minus} 1.57 nM, respectively. LTB4 caused a dose-dependent increase in the production of superoxide anion with an apparent EC50 value of 50 {times} 10(-9) M in the authors experimental conditions. LTB4 also induced a dose-dependent increase in the generation of TxA2 with an EC50 value of 46.2 {times} 10(-9) M. Taken together, their results demonstrated that guinea pig alveolar eosinophils express two classes of specific receptors for LTB4. The high-affinity binding sites seem associated to chemokinesis and chemotaxis whereas the low-affinity binding sites seem associated to superoxide anion production and generation of TxA2. The existence of LTB4 receptors in eosinophils could explain the presence of these cells in hypersensitivity reactions.

  16. Leukemia diagnostics with ow G. Ciuperca1

    E-print Network

    Louvet, Violaine

    for diagnosis and classication of acute myeloid leukemia #12;Leukemia diagnostics with ow cytometry G. Ciuperca and classication of acute myeloid leukemia #12;Leukemia diagnostics with ow cytometry G. Ciuperca, M. Mafouz, C of acute myeloid leukemia Hematopoiesis and leukemias #12;Leukemia diagnostics with ow cytometry G

  17. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Leukemia CTPM November 2011

    Cancer.gov

    The Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Working Group of the Leukemia Steering Committee held an in- person meeting on November 2nd, 2011 in Rockville, MD to discuss ALL treatment strategies, consider trials for disease subtypes, and obtain a general consensus on the next clinical trial(s).

  19. The Family Leukemia Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Eleanor

    1976-01-01

    An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

  20. ACUTE LEUKEMIAS ACUTE MYELOGENOUS

    E-print Network

    Trisomy 8(+8), t(9;22), t(6;9) 90% myeloblasts AML-M2 Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia with Maturation Black B, & Choloacetate Esterase t(8;21) #12;9/16/2013 4 AML-M3 Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia between chromosomes 8 and 21 AML with a translocation or inversion in chromosome 16 AML with changes

  1. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-21

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  2. Unraveling the complexity of lipid body organelles in human eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C. N.; Weller, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid-rich organelles are common in many cell types. In cells, such as adipocytes, these organelles are termed LDs, whereas in other cells, such as leukocytes, they are called LBs. The study of leukocyte LBs has attracted attention as a result of their association with human diseases. In leukocytes, such as eosinophils, LB accumulation has been documented extensively during inflammatory conditions. In these cells, LBs are linked to the regulation of immune responses by compartmentalization of several proteins and lipids involved in the control and biosynthesis of inflammatory mediators (eicosanoids). However, it has been unclear how diverse proteins, including membrane-associated enzymes involved in eicosanoid formation, incorporate into LBs, especially if the internal content of LBs is assumed to consist solely of stores of neutral lipids, as present within adipocyte LDs. Studies of the formation, function, and ultrastructure of LBs in eosinophils have been providing insights pertinent to LBs in other leukocytes. Here, we review current knowledge of the composition and function of leukocyte LBs as provided by studies of human eosinophil LBs, including recognitions of the internal architecture of eosinophil LBs based on 3D electron tomographic analyses. PMID:25210147

  3. A Functional ??TCR/CD3 Complex Distinct from ??T Cells Is Expressed by Human Eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Woerly, Gaëtane; Loiseau, Sylvie; Hermann, Emmanuel; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Héliot, Laurent; Mattot, Virginie; Soncin, Fabrice; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Dombrowicz, David; Capron, Monique

    2009-01-01

    Background Eosinophils are effector cells during parasitic infections and allergic responses. However, their contribution to innate immunity has been only recently unravelled. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that human eosinophils express CD3 and ?? T Cell Receptor (TCR) but not ?? TCR. Surface expression of ??TCR/CD3 is heterogeneous between eosinophil donors and inducible by mycobacterial ligands. Surface immunoprecipitation revealed expression of the full ??TCR/CD3 complex. Real-time PCR amplification for CD3, ? and ? TCR constant regions transcripts showed a significantly lower expression in eosinophils than in ??T cells. Limited TCR rearrangements occur in eosinophils as shown by spectratyping analysis of CDR3 length profiles and in situ hybridization. Release by eosinophils of Reactive Oxygen Species, granule proteins, Eosinophil Peroxidase and Eosinophil-Derived Neurotoxin and cytokines (IFN-? and TNF-?) was observed following activation by ??TCR-specific agonists or by mycobacteria. These effects were inhibited by anti-??TCR blocking antibodies and antagonists. Moreover, ??TCR/CD3 was involved in eosinophil cytotoxicity against tumor cells. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide evidence that human eosinophils express a functional ??TCR/CD3 with similar, but not identical, characteristics to ??TCR from ??T cells. We propose that this receptor contributes to eosinophil innate responses against mycobacteria and tumors and may represent an additional link between lymphoid and myeloid lineages. PMID:19536290

  4. ISOLATION OF GRANULES FROM EOSINOPHIL LEUCOCYTES AND STUDY OF THEIR ENZYME CONTENT

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Gordon T.; Hirsch, James G.

    1963-01-01

    Eosinophils were separated from other types of cells in horse blood or rat peritoneal fluid by centrifugation in concentrated albumin solutions. Eosinophils did not appear to be damaged by this separation procedure. A technique was also devised for isolation of cytoplasmic granules from eosinophils, thus allowing studies on enzyme content of the granules. Granules from both horse and rat eosinophils contained a number of hydrolytic enzymes, similar in variety and in concentration to those previously found in granules of rabbit polymorphonuclear leucocytes. Eosinophil granules differed from those of the rabbit granulocyte in their high content of peroxidase and the absence of lysozyme and phagocytin. On disruption of eosinophil granules by repeated freezing and thawing in saline, cathepsin, ribonuclease, arylsulfatase and beta glucuronidase were released into solution, but phosphatases were partially and peroxidase completely bound to the insoluble granule residue. Peroxidase could be extracted from the granule residue with weak acid. Eosinophil granules thus are lysosome-like structures. PMID:14074391

  5. Eosinophil-Associated Lung Diseases. A Cry for Surfactant Proteins A and D Help?

    PubMed Central

    Ledford, Julie G.; Addison, Kenneth J.; Foster, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP)-A and SP-D (SP-A/-D) play important roles in numerous eosinophil-dominated diseases, including asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and allergic rhinitis. In these settings, SP-A/-D have been shown to modulate eosinophil chemotaxis, inhibit eosinophil mediator release, and mediate macrophage clearance of apoptotic eosinophils. Dysregulation of SP-A/-D function in eosinophil-dominated diseases is also not uncommon. Alterations in serum SP-A/-D levels are associated with disease severity in allergic rhinitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, oligimerization of SP-A/-D, necessary for their proper function, can be perturbed by reactive nitrogen species, which are increased in eosinophilic disease. In this review, we highlight the associations of eosinophilic lung diseases with SP-A and SP-D levels and functions. PMID:24960334

  6. A Pilot Study of Omalizumab in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, Denise; Enav, Benjamin; Komlodi-Pasztor, Edina; Hider, Pamela; Kim-Chang, Julie; Noonan, Laura; Taber, Tabitha; Kaushal, Suhasini; Limgala, Renuka; Brown, Margaret; Gupta, Raavi; Balba, Nader; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Khojah, Amer; Alpan, Oral

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract are an emerging subset of immune pathologies within the spectrum of allergic inflammation. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE), once considered a rare disease, is increasing in incidence, with a rate of over 1 in 10,000 in the US, for unknown reasons. The clinical management of EoE is challenging, thus there is an urgent need for understanding the etiology and pathophysiology of this eosinophilic disease to develop better therapeutic approaches. In this open label, single arm, unblinded study, we evaluated the effects of an anti-IgE treatment, omalizumab, on local inflammation in the esophagus and clinical correlates in patients with EoE. Omalizumab was administered for 12 weeks to 15 subjects with long standing EoE. There were no serious side effects from the treatment. Esophageal tissue inflammation was assessed both before and after therapy. After 3 months on omalizumab, although tissue Immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels were significantly reduced in all but two of the subjects, we found that full remission of EoE, which is defined as histologic and clinical improvement only in 33% of the patients. The decrease in tryptase-positive cells and eosinophils correlated significantly with the clinical outcome as measured by improvement in endoscopy and symptom scores, respectively. Omalizumab-induced remission of EoE was limited to subjects with low peripheral blood absolute eosinophil counts. These findings demonstrate that in a subset of EoE patients, IgE plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease and that anti-IgE therapy with omalizumab may result in disease remission. Since this study is open label there is the potential for bias, hence the need for a larger double blind placebo controlled study. The data presented in this pilot study provides a foundation for proper patient selection to maximize clinical efficacy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01040598 PMID:25789989

  7. Curcumin alleviates eosinophilic meningitis through reduction of eosinophil count following albendazole treatment against Angiostrongylus cantonensis in mice.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Chang, Han-Hsin; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Lin, David Pei-Cheng; Teng, Ying-Hock; Lee, Hsiu-Hsiung

    2012-03-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) is the most common cause of parasitic eosinophilic meningitis worldwide. By using an animal model of BALB/c mice infected with A. cantonensis, previous studies indicated that the anthelmintic drug, albendazole, could kill A. cantonensis larvae and prevent further infection. However, the dead larvae will induce severe immune responses targeting at brain tissues. To alleviate the detrimental effects caused by the dead larvae, we administered curcumin, a traditional anti-inflammatory agent, as a complementary treatment in addition to albendazole therapy, to determine whether curcumin could be beneficial for treatment. The results showed that although curcumin treatment alone did not reduce worm number, combined treatment by albendazole and curcumin helped to reduce eosinophil count in the cerebrospinal fluid, better than using albendazole alone. This alleviating effect did not affect albendazole treatment alone, since histological analysis showed similar worm eradication with or without addition of curcumin. Nevertheless, curcumin treatment alone and combined albendazole-curcumin treatment did not inhibit MMP-9 expression in the brain tissue. In conclusion, curcumin, when used as a complementary treatment to albendazole, could help to alleviate eosinophilic meningitis through suppression of eosinophil count in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:22053741

  8. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Found?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia found? At this time there are no special ... oncologist (doctor who treats cancer). Tests to find acute lymphocytic leukemia Most of the symptoms seen in leukemia can ...

  9. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic ... germs by surrounding and digesting them. Development of leukemia Any type of early blood-forming cell of ...

  10. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  11. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  12. What Is Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... marrow, but these cancers are not leukemia. Normal bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissue To understand the different ... to know about the blood and lymph systems. Bone marrow Bone marrow is the soft inner part of ...

  13. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer that originates in the bone marrow from immature white blood cells known as myeloblasts. About 25% of all children with leukemia have AML. Although survival rates have increased since the 1970s, approximately half of all childhood AML cases relapse despite intensive treatment. Additional therapies following relapse are often unsuccessful and can be especially difficult and damaging for children. These patients would clearly benefit from targeted therapeutic approaches.

  14. Multifaceted Roles of Cysteinyl Leukotrienes in Eliciting Eosinophil Granule Protein Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Baptista-dos-Reis, Renata; Muniz, Valdirene S.; Neves, Josiane S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) are cell membrane-impermeant lipid mediators that play major roles in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic inflammation and are recognized to act via at least 2 receptors, namely, cysLT1 receptor (cysLT1R) and cysLT2 receptor (cysLT2R). Eosinophils, which are granulocytes classically associated with host defense against parasitic helminthes and allergic conditions, are distinguished from leukocytes by their dominant population of cytoplasmic crystalloid (also termed secretory, specific, or secondary) granules that contain robust stores of diverse preformed proteins. Human eosinophils are the main source of cysLTs and are recognized to express both cysLTs receptors (cysLTRs) on their surface, at the plasma membrane. More recently, we identified the expression of cysLTRs in eosinophil granule membranes and demonstrated that cysLTs, acting via their granule membrane-expressed receptors, elicit secretion from cell-free human eosinophil granules. Herein, we review the multifaceted roles of cysLTs in eliciting eosinophil granule protein secretion. We discuss the intracrine and autocrine/paracrine secretory responses evoked by cysLTs in eosinophils and in cell-free extracellular eosinophil crystalloid granules. We also discuss the importance of this finding in eosinophil immunobiology and speculate on its potential role(s) in eosinophilic diseases. PMID:25866815

  15. Interaction of eosinophils with endothelial cells is modulated by prostaglandin EP4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Konya, Viktoria; Philipose, Sonia; Bálint, Zoltán; Olschewski, Andrea; Marsche, Gunther; Sturm, Eva M; Schicho, Rudolf; Peskar, Bernhard A; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2011-08-01

    Eosinophil extravasation across the endothelium is a key feature of allergic inflammation. Here, we investigated the role of PGE(2) and its receptor, E-type prostanoid receptor (EP)-4, in the regulation of eosinophil interaction with human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells. PGE(2) and the EP4 receptor agonist ONO AE1-329 significantly reduced eotaxin-induced eosinophil adhesion to fibronectin, and formation of filamentous actin and gelsolin-rich adhesive structures. These inhibitory effects were reversed by a selective EP4 receptor antagonist, ONO AE3-208. PGE(2) and the EP4 agonist prevented the activation and cell-surface clustering of ?2 integrins, and L-selectin shedding of eosinophils. Under physiological flow conditions, eosinophils that were treated with the EP4 agonist showed reduced adhesion to endothelial monolayers upon stimulation with eotaxin, as well as after TNF-?-induced activation of the endothelial cells. Selective activation of EP1, EP2, and EP3 receptors did not alter eosinophil adhesion to endothelial cells, whereas the EP4 antagonist prevented PGE(2) from decreasing eosinophil adhesion. Finally, eosinophil transmigration across thrombin- and TNF-?-activated endothelial cells was effectively reduced by the EP4 agonist. These data suggest that PGE(2) -EP4 signaling might be protective against allergic responses by inhibiting the interaction of eosinophils with the endothelium and might hence be a useful therapeutic option for controlling inappropriate eosinophil infiltration. PMID:21681739

  16. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  17. Activation of ?1 Integrins on Blood Eosinophils by P-Selectin

    PubMed Central

    Mosher, Deane F.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of ?1 integrins of blood eosinophils, assessed by mAb N29, correlates inversely with FEV1 in two paradigms for studying control of human asthma. We asked whether P-selectin causes eosinophil ?1 integrin activation and results in increased adhesivity. By dual-label flow cytometry, eosinophils with high levels of surface-associated P-selectin had higher reactivity with the activation-sensitive anti-?1 mAbs N29, 8E3, and 9EG7 than eosinophils with no or with a low-level of surface-associated P-selectin. Among patients with nonsevere asthma, surface P-selectin correlated with N29, 8E3, and 9EG7 signals. By immunofluorescence microscopy, surface-associated P-selectin was present in patches on eosinophils, some of which stained for the platelet marker thrombospondin-1. Activated ?1 and P-selectin partially colocalized on eosinophils. Soluble P-selectin added to whole blood enhanced activation of eosinophil ?1, but not ?2, integrins. In contrast, IL-5 activated eosinophil ?2, but not ?1, integrins. Eosinophils that did not attach to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in a static adhesion assay had a lower N29 signal than the original population. Soluble P-selectin added to whole blood enhanced eosinophil adhesion to VCAM-1. These findings are compatible with a scenario whereby P-selectin, on eosinophil-associated activated platelets or acquired from plasma or from prior interactions with endothelial cells or platelets, activates eosinophil ?4?1 integrin and stimulates eosinophils to adhere to VCAM-1 and move to the airway in asthma. PMID:21441381

  18. Thrombosis and acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Solís, Erick

    2012-04-01

    Thrombosis is a common complication in patients with acute leukemia. While the presence of central venous lines, concomitant steroids, the use of Escherichia coli asparaginase and hereditary thrombophilic abnormalities are known risk factors for thrombosis in children, information on the pathogenesis, risk factors, and clinical outcome of thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still scarce. Expert consensus and guidelines regarding leukemia-specific risk factors, thrombosis prevention, and treatment strategies, as well as optimal type of central venous catheter in acute leukemia patients are required. It is likely that each subtype of acute leukemia represents a different setting for the development of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. This is perhaps due to a combination of different disease-specific pathogenic mechanisms of thrombosis, including the type of chemotherapy protocol chosen, the underlying patients health, associated risk factors, as well as the biology of the disease itself. The risk of thrombosis may also vary according to ethnicity and prevalence of hereditary risk factors for thrombosis; thus, it is advisable for Latin American, Asian, and African countries to report on their specific patient population. PMID:22507812

  19. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Emphysematous Eosinophilic Lymphangitis in the Ruminal Submucosa of Cattle.

    PubMed

    Ohfuji, S

    2015-11-01

    Twenty cattle (14 Holstein-Friesian, 3 Japanese Black, 3 Aberdeen Angus) ranging in age from 3 months to 8 years exhibited, at slaughter, emphysematous thickening of the ruminal submucosa owing to the appearance of numerous, contiguous, small gas bubbles. Microscopic changes in the ruminal submucosa consisted of (1) multiple cystic (emphysematous) lymphangiectasis that was frequently lined or occluded by granulomatous inflammatory infiltrates including macrophages, multinucleate giant cells, and eosinophils; (2) intralymphatic phagocytosis by macrophages and giant cells of eosinophils that showed positive labeling with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end-labeling assay; and (3) an inflammatory infiltrate extending from the area of lymphangitis into surrounding tissue, as well as edema, hemorrhage, fibrin exudation, fibroplasia, or capillary proliferation throughout the lesional submucosa. In addition, 15 (75%) of the cattle had globular leukocyte infiltrates in the mucosal epithelia of the rumen. PMID:25710949

  1. [Eosinophilic proctocolitis induced by foods. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Cordero Miranda, Miguel Angel; Blandón Vijil, Virginia; Reyes Ruiz, Norma Isabel; Avila Castañón, Lourdes; del Río Navarro, Blanca Estela; García Aranda, José Alberto; Blanco Rodríguez, Gerardo; Sienra Monge, Juan José Luis

    2002-01-01

    The food-induced eosinophilic proctocolitis is a major cause of blood-tinged stools and appears in the first two months of life. The infant is generally described as well, but the clinical features and laboratory results are often nonspecific. We present an early infant with fresh blood stools at 50 days. The colonoscopy and biopsy of the rectum and lower sigmoid revealed lymphoid nodular hyperplasia of the submucose and eosinophil infiltration (40 to 50 per high power field) of the lamina propria and intraepithelial. Elimination of the offending protein from the diet, through the use of an extensively hydrolyzed casein-based formula and soy, lead to clinical resolution of bleeding at 48 hours. We made a review of the case. PMID:12561652

  2. Eosinophilic Pneumonia in a Patient with Bronchial Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Arindom; Al-Ismaili, Suad; Ramadhan, Fatma A.; Al-Wardi, Talal H. M.; Al-Salmi, Quasem; Al-Hashami, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary myiasis is an unusual form of myiasis in humans and has been recently identified as a cause of eosinophilic pneumonia. We report the case of a 13-year-old Omani boy who presented to the Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in October 2014 with respiratory distress. Bronchial aspirates revealed features of eosinophilic pneumonia. Possible larvae identified in the cytology report, a high immunoglobulin E level and the patient history all indicated bronchial myiasis. The patient was treated with steroids and ventilation and has since been disease-free with no long-term side-effects. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of bronchial myiasis in Oman. PMID:26629385

  3. A rare cause of chronic dysphagia: eosinophilic esophagitis†

    PubMed Central

    Destek, Sebahattin; Gul, Vahit Onur; Ahioglu, Serkan; Tatar, Zeynep; Erbil, Yesim

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is attributable to environmental factors, allergens and several immunological causes. The most typical symptoms include dysphagia and sensation of food impingement in the retrosternal area. Although its clinical features resemble those of gastroesophageal reflux, proton pump inhibitors are not effective for its treatment. The diagnosis of EE is dependent on the pathological detection of eosinophilic infiltration in esophageal mucosa. In this study, we evaluated a patient who applied to our clinic with complaints of long-term difficulty in swallowing, sensation of food sticking while eating and weight loss; the patient was diagnosed with EE, following biochemical, radiological, endoscopic and pathological assessments and was treated with steroids. The results show that EE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with dysphagia and food impingement in the retrosternal area, and the diagnosis should be confirmed through multiple esophageal biopsies. PMID:25249002

  4. Eosinophilic annular erythema: successful response to ultraviolet B therapy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, L; Fatah, S; Nagarajan, S; Natarajan, S

    2015-12-01

    Eosinophilic annular erythema (EAE) is a rare and relatively newly described eosinophil-rich dermatosis. Debate still exists as to whether it represent a subtype of Well syndrome or a separate disease entity. We report an 8-year-old boy with a 4-year history of recurrent, asymptomatic annular lesions, which were diagnosed after clincopathological correlation as EAE. This condition usually runs a relapsing and remitting course with resistance to multiple treatments. Prednisolone and hydroxychloroquine have been reported as successful but the response to these was limited in this case. Complete resolution occurred after treatment with ultraviolet B (UVB) therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a favourable response of EAE to such therapy. PMID:25958878

  5. Diagnosis and management of eosinophilic esophagitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Timothy; Chan, Edmond S.; Avinashi, Vishal; Ko, Hin Hin; Goldman, Ran D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Question After a few years of difficulty swallowing solids and feeling like food was getting stuck, a 13-year-old boy in my practice with peanut allergy and asthma was recently diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). What is EoE and how is it diagnosed and managed? Answer Eosinophilic esophagitis is an immune-mediated disease resulting in inflammation of the esophagus. It is increasing in prevalence and incidence in countries like Canada, and frequently occurs in children with other allergic conditions. Unexplained feeding difficulties, vomiting, and solid-food dysphagia, especially in boys with atopy, supports the possibility of having EoE. A formal diagnosis is obtained by reviewing esophageal biopsies obtained through upper endoscopy performed while the patient is taking a proton pump inhibitor. Once EoE has been established, management should involve working collaboratively with gastroenterology and allergy specialists. Medical or dietary treatments are acceptable therapeutic approaches. PMID:26505065

  6. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis due to egg allergy presenting as acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Sandra C.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a 25-year-old female with newly diagnosed egg allergy, presenting with both peripheral and duodenal eosinophilia suspicious for eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG). The EG was severe enough to have likely caused acute pancreatitis. Cessation of all egg products lead to resolution of all symptoms. This represents the first report of EG manifesting as pancreatitis due to egg ingestion. PMID:25668683

  7. Melanoma Differentiation Associated Gene-7/Interleukin-24 Potently Induces Apoptosis in Human Myeloid Leukemia Cells through a Process Regulated by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Mohamed; Mayo, Mandy; Dash, Rupesh; Sokhi, Upneet Kaur; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Sarkar, Devanand; Dent, Paul; Curiel, David T.; Fisher, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7)/interleukin-24 (IL-24), a member of the IL-10 cytokine gene family, preferentially induces cell death in neoplastic epithelial cells types while sparing their normal counterparts. The effects of mda-7/IL-24 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells have not been extensively characterized. Treatment with recombinant GST-MDA-7/IL-24 potently induced apoptosis in diverse myeloid leukemia cell types including U937, HL60, MV4-11, EOL-1, and MLL/ENL cells. MDA-7/IL-24 also markedly induced apoptosis in and suppressed the colony-forming capacity of primary AML blasts but exerted minimal toxicity toward normal CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. MDA-7/IL-24 lethality was associated with pronounced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induction in leukemia cell lines and primary AML blasts, manifested by the accumulation of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34 (GADD34), 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78)/BiP, inositol-requiring enzyme 1? (IRE1?), and eukaryotic initiation factor 2? phosphorylation. It is noteworthy that short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of IRE1?, GADD34, or GRP78/BiP significantly enhanced MDA-7/IL-24-mediated apoptosis, indicating a protective role for these molecules against MDA-7/IL-24 lethality. MDA-7/IL-24 also down-regulated the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 and sharply increased expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bim and Noxa. Ectopic Mcl-1 expression or shRNA knockdown of Bim or Noxa significantly attenuated MDA-7/IL-24-mediated leukemia cell death. Finally, knockdown of Bax or Bak significantly reduced MDA-7/IL-24 lethality. Together, these findings indicate that MDA-7/IL-24 potently induces apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells through a process regulated by ER stress induction, Mcl-1 down-regulation, and Bim and Noxa up-regulation. They also suggest that MDA-7/IL-24 warrants further investigation in myeloid leukemia. PMID:20858700

  8. Eosinophilic Endomyocarditis: A Rare Case of Neonatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Allison J.; Hitt, Stacy L.; Stier, Michael A.; Houser, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Background?Eosinophilic endomyocarditis (EEM) is a rare diagnosis that is extremely uncommon in newborns. This case report aimed to present a case of neonatal mortality from acute cardiac failure due to EEM. Case?Our report presents a term male neonate with minor complications in the immediate postnatal course, who was discharged at 48 hours of life, but who developed unexpected respiratory distress, followed by cardiac arrest and death at 3 days of life. One day after discharge, the infant developed respiratory distress and cool skin, and then developed cardiac arrest at the pediatrician's office, undergoing resuscitation with intravenous fluid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, epinephrine, atropine, and failed intubation. Autopsy revealed EEM, an inflammatory infiltrative process involving the endomyocardium. Pathology?Pathogenesis involves three stages: (1) myocarditis with an acute eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate followed by (2) myocyte necrosis and eventually (3) fibrosis in the final stage of the disease. Discussion?The cause of death was acute cardiac failure due to intense eosinophilic infiltration and degranulation with early subendocardial myocyte necrosis but before development of extensive myocyte necrosis. This case appears to be the youngest patient reported with EEM. PMID:26495174

  9. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGF?1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  10. Biodegradation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Eosinophil Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Andón, Fernando T.; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Feng, Weihong; Baygan, Arjang; Chambers, Benedict J.; Hultenby, Kjell; Ye, Fei; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Brandner, Birgit D.; Fornara, Andrea; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) is one of the major oxidant-producing enzymes during inflammatory states in the human lung. The degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) upon incubation with human EPO and H2O2 is reported. Biodegradation of SWCNTs is higher in the presence of NaBr, but neither EPO alone nor H2O2 alone caused the degradation of nanotubes. Molecular modeling reveals two binding sites for SWCNTs on EPO, one located at the proximal side (same side as the catalytic site) and the other on the distal side of EPO. The oxidized groups on SWCNTs in both cases are stabilized by electrostatic interactions with positively charged residues. Biodegradation of SWCNTs can also be executed in an ex vivo culture system using primary murine eosinophils stimulated to undergo degranulation. Biodegradation is proven by a range of methods including transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible-NIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and confocal Raman imaging. Thus, human EPO (in vitro) and ex vivo activated eosinophils mediate biodegradation of SWCNTs: an observation that is relevant to pulmonary responses to these materials. PMID:23447468

  11. [Eosinophilic fasciitis (Shulman's disease): Diagnostic and therapeutic review].

    PubMed

    Sène, D

    2015-11-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) is a rare connective tissue disease characterized by symmetrical and painful swelling with a progressive induration and thickening of the skin and soft tissues. The diagnosis of EF is often based on the association of characteristic skin or subcutaneous abnormalities and a thickened fascia with an inflammatory infiltration, mostly composed of lymphocytes and eosinophils. A peripheral eosinophilia is frequently present (60-90%) but is not mandatory for the EF diagnosis. At the onset, the morphological diagnosis might be helped by a muscle magnetic resonance imaging, which typically may evidence an increased signal intensity within the fascia and marked fascia enhancement after gadolinium administration at the acute phase of the disease. Differential diagnoses include eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome after L-tryprophane ingestion, hypereosinophilic syndromes (HES), systemic sclerosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangeitis, and peripheral T cell lymphomas with cutaneous involvement. There is no consensual therapeutic strategy. However, oral corticosteroids, with or without methylprednisolone pluses, remain the mainstay treatment with a significant improvement for the majority of patients. It might be associated to an immunosuppressive drug, mainly methotrexate, in patients with morphea-like lesions or an unsatisfactory response to corticosteroids alone. PMID:26385125

  12. Eosinophilic Endomyocarditis: A Rare Case of Neonatal Mortality.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Allison J; Hitt, Stacy L; Stier, Michael A; Houser, Laura M

    2015-10-01

    Background?Eosinophilic endomyocarditis (EEM) is a rare diagnosis that is extremely uncommon in newborns. This case report aimed to present a case of neonatal mortality from acute cardiac failure due to EEM. Case?Our report presents a term male neonate with minor complications in the immediate postnatal course, who was discharged at 48 hours of life, but who developed unexpected respiratory distress, followed by cardiac arrest and death at 3 days of life. One day after discharge, the infant developed respiratory distress and cool skin, and then developed cardiac arrest at the pediatrician's office, undergoing resuscitation with intravenous fluid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, epinephrine, atropine, and failed intubation. Autopsy revealed EEM, an inflammatory infiltrative process involving the endomyocardium. Pathology?Pathogenesis involves three stages: (1) myocarditis with an acute eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate followed by (2) myocyte necrosis and eventually (3) fibrosis in the final stage of the disease. Discussion?The cause of death was acute cardiac failure due to intense eosinophilic infiltration and degranulation with early subendocardial myocyte necrosis but before development of extensive myocyte necrosis. This case appears to be the youngest patient reported with EEM. PMID:26495174

  13. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is another rare form of chronic leukemia. The cancer cells are large and have features of either T lymphocytes or another type of lymphocyte called natural killer (NK) cells. Most LGL leukemias are slow- ...

  14. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Pooja Desai

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pooja Desai Genomics & Medicine September 28, 2010 #12;Disease.21 and 9q34.1 · Results in a mutated gene called BCR-ABL (breakpoint cluster region and Ableson leukemia

  15. Anticipation in familial leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.; Jarvik, G.P.; Goode, E.L.

    1996-11-01

    Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. 55 refs., 4 figs.

  16. [Acute myocardial infarction as Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Churg Strauss syndrome) initial presentation].

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Wahinuddin; Seung, Ong Ping; Noor, Sabariah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a rare primary vasculitic disease characterized by hypereosinophilia, late onset asthma and extravascular eosinophil granulomas. We report a case presented initially with acute myocardial infarction which later only proceed with asthma, skin manifestations and peripheral neuropathy. Laboratory parameters showed hypereosinohpilia with negative perinuclear pattern of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (p-ANCA). Skin biopsy showed leucocytoclastic vasculitis with eosinophilic infiltration while coronary angiography was normal. The patient's symptoms improved with IV methylprednisolone, pulse cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. PMID:25627304

  17. Organ-specific eosinophilic disorders of the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Dagmar; Wardlaw, Andrew; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that increase in various tissues in a variety of disorders. Locally, they can be involved in the initiation and propagation of diverse inflammatory responses. In this review, the clinical association of eosinophils with diseases of the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract is summarized. An approach to determining the causal role of eosinophils in these diseases is presented. Recent findings concerning molecular diagnosis, etiology and treatment are discussed. PMID:20392477

  18. Obatoclax, Fludarabine, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  19. Eosinophils promote resolution of acute peritonitis by producing proresolving mediators in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomohiro; Tani, Yukako; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Taguchi, Ryo; Arita, Makoto; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2011-02-01

    Acute inflammation in healthy individuals is self-limiting and has an active termination program. The mechanisms by which acute inflammation is resolved are of interest. In murine zymosan-induced peritonitis, we found that eosinophils are recruited to the inflamed loci during the resolution phase of acute inflammation. In vivo depletion of eosinophils caused a resolution deficit, namely impaired lymphatic drainage with reduced appearance of phagocytes carrying engulfed zymosan in the draining lymph node, and sustained numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in inflamed tissues. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based lipidomics of the resolving exudates revealed that locally activated eosinophils in the resolution phase produced proresolving mediators, including protectin D1 (PD1) from docosahexaenoic acid. The resolution deficit caused by eosinophil depletion was rescued by eosinophil restoration or the administration of PD1. Eosinophils deficient in 12/15-lipoxygenase could not rescue the resolution phenotype. The present results indicate that mouse eosinophils and eosinophil-derived lipid mediators, including PD1, have a role in promoting the resolution of acute inflammation, expanding the roles of eosinophils in host defense and resolution. PMID:20959515

  20. Bronchoalveolar lavage and technetium-99m glucoheptonate imaging in chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Lieske, T.R.; Sunderrajan, E.V.; Passamonte, P.M.

    1984-02-01

    A patient with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia was evaluated using bronchoalveolar lavage, technetium-99m glucoheptonate, and transbronchial lung biopsy. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed 43 percent eosinophils and correlated well with results of transbronchial lung biopsy. Technetium-99m glucoheptonate lung imaging demonstrated intense parenchymal uptake. After eight weeks of corticosteroid therapy, the bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophil population and the technetium-99m glucoheptonate uptake had returned to normal. We suggest that bronchoalveolar lavage, with transbronchial lung biopsy, is a less invasive way than open lung biopsy to diagnose chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. The mechanism of uptake of technetium-99m glucoheptonate in this disorder remains to be defined.

  1. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor-Activated Eosinophils Promote Interleukin-23 Driven Chronic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Griseri, Thibault; Arnold, Isabelle C.; Pearson, Claire; Krausgruber, Thomas; Schiering, Chris; Franchini, Fanny; Schulthess, Julie; McKenzie, Brent S.; Crocker, Paul R.; Powrie, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Summary The role of intestinal eosinophils in immune homeostasis is enigmatic and the molecular signals that drive them from protective to tissue damaging are unknown. Most commonly associated with Th2 cell-mediated diseases, we describe a role for eosinophils as crucial effectors of the interleukin-23 (IL-23)-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) axis in colitis. Chronic intestinal inflammation was characterized by increased bone marrow eosinopoiesis and accumulation of activated intestinal eosinophils. IL-5 blockade or eosinophil depletion ameliorated colitis, implicating eosinophils in disease pathogenesis. GM-CSF was a potent activator of eosinophil effector functions and intestinal accumulation, and GM-CSF blockade inhibited chronic colitis. By contrast neutrophil accumulation was GM-CSF independent and dispensable for colitis. In addition to TNF secretion, release of eosinophil peroxidase promoted colitis identifying direct tissue-toxic mechanisms. Thus, eosinophils are key perpetrators of chronic inflammation and tissue damage in IL-23-mediated immune diseases and it suggests the GM-CSF-eosinophil axis as an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26200014

  2. Circulating Human Eosinophils Share a Similar Transcriptional Profile in Asthma and Other Hypereosinophilic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Barnig, Cindy; Alsaleh, Ghada; Jung, Nicolas; Dembélé, Doulaye; Paul, Nicodème; Poirot, Anh; Uring-Lambert, Béatrice; Georgel, Philippe; de Blay, Fréderic; Bahram, Seiamak

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are leukocytes that are released into the peripheral blood in a phenotypically mature state and are capable of being recruited into tissues in response to appropriate stimuli. Eosinophils, traditionally considered cytotoxic effector cells, are leukocytes recruited into the airways of asthma patients where they are believed to contribute to the development of many features of the disease. This perception, however, has been challenged by recent findings suggesting that eosinophils have also immunomodulatory functions and may be involved in tissue homeostasis and wound healing. Here we describe a transcriptome-based approach-in a limited number of patients and controls-to investigate the activation state of circulating human eosinophils isolated by flow cytometry. We provide an overview of the global expression pattern in eosinophils in various relevant conditions, e.g., eosinophilic asthma, hypereosinophilic dermatological diseases, parasitosis and pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to healthy subjects, circulating eosinophils isolated from asthma patients differed in their gene expression profile which is marked by downregulation of transcripts involved in antigen presentation, pathogen recognition and mucosal innate immunity, whereas up-regulated genes were involved in response to non-specific stimulation, wounding and maintenance of homeostasis. Eosinophils from other hypereosinophilic disorders displayed a very similar transcriptional profile. Taken together, these observations seem to indicate that eosinophils exhibit non-specific immunomodulatory functions important for tissue repair and homeostasis and suggest new roles for these cells in asthma immunobiology. PMID:26524763

  3. Significance of Mouse Models in Dissecting the Mechanism of Human Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Diseases (EGID)

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that eosinophils play a significant role in promoting several gastrointestinal diseases, and animal models are the significant tools to understand the pathogenesis of eosinophil-associatd inflammatory disorders. The focus of this review is on the significance of mouse models that mimic the characteristics of human eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases. Eosinophils are the important leukocytes with diverse functions in the gastrointestinal tract, such as excretion of intestinal parasites and promoting the pathogenesis of a numerous allergic gastrointestinal disorders like food allergy, parasitic infection, allergic gastroenteritis, allergic colitis, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Among these gastrointestinal diseases, the eosinophilic esophagitis is the most recently recognized disease and the mouse models are proven to be an effective tool to understand the pathophysiology of disease and to test novel treatment strategies. Based on patients allergic conditions and the gene overexpressed in human EGID, a number of gene overexpressed and allergen-challenged mouse models of gastrointestinal disorders were developed. These models were utilized to explore the mechanism(s) that promotes the eosinophil-mediated gastrointestinal diseases including the role of the eosinophil responsive cytokines and chemokines. Herein, we have provided a detailed overviews of the mouse models of gastrointestinal disorders that mimic the human eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases and can be utilized as a tool for understanding the diseases pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25866707

  4. Circulating Human Eosinophils Share a Similar Transcriptional Profile in Asthma and Other Hypereosinophilic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barnig, Cindy; Dembélé, Doulaye; Paul, Nicodème; Poirot, Anh; Uring-Lambert, Béatrice; Georgel, Philippe; de Blay, Fréderic; Bahram, Seiamak

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are leukocytes that are released into the peripheral blood in a phenotypically mature state and are capable of being recruited into tissues in response to appropriate stimuli. Eosinophils, traditionally considered cytotoxic effector cells, are leukocytes recruited into the airways of asthma patients where they are believed to contribute to the development of many features of the disease. This perception, however, has been challenged by recent findings suggesting that eosinophils have also immunomodulatory functions and may be involved in tissue homeostasis and wound healing. Here we describe a transcriptome-based approach–in a limited number of patients and controls—to investigate the activation state of circulating human eosinophils isolated by flow cytometry. We provide an overview of the global expression pattern in eosinophils in various relevant conditions, e.g., eosinophilic asthma, hypereosinophilic dermatological diseases, parasitosis and pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to healthy subjects, circulating eosinophils isolated from asthma patients differed in their gene expression profile which is marked by downregulation of transcripts involved in antigen presentation, pathogen recognition and mucosal innate immunity, whereas up-regulated genes were involved in response to non-specific stimulation, wounding and maintenance of homeostasis. Eosinophils from other hypereosinophilic disorders displayed a very similar transcriptional profile. Taken together, these observations seem to indicate that eosinophils exhibit non-specific immunomodulatory functions important for tissue repair and homeostasis and suggest new roles for these cells in asthma immunobiology. PMID:26524763

  5. Work in progress: radionuclide imaging of indium-111-labeled eosinophils in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Rand, T.H.; Clanton, J.A.; Jones, J.P.; Colley, D.G.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1983-05-01

    Eosinophils isolated from peritoneal exudates were labeled with indium-111-oxine and injected intravenously into sensitized mice. They became localized at sites of inflammation produced by intradermal injections of schistosomal antigen or Toxocara canis larvae, whereas labeled neutrophils did not. Intense uptake of eosinophils by normal spleen, liver, and bone marrow was noted, with tracer distribution effectively complete by 5 hours after injection. Indium-111-eosinophil studies appear to be quite sensitive to parasitic inflammatory reactions; in contrast, nonspecific inflammation such as that induced by turpentine causes localization of eosinophils, but to a lesser extent. This technique may be useful in the study of parasitic and allergic disease.

  6. Topoisomerase II and leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, MaryJean; Lindsey, R. Hunter; Felix, Carolyn A.; Grimwade, David; Osheroff, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes that modulate DNA under- and overwinding, knotting, and tangling. Beyond their critical physiological functions, these enzymes are the targets for some of the most widely prescribed anticancer drugs (topoisomerase II poisons) in clinical use. Topoisomerase II poisons kill cells by increasing levels of covalent enzyme-cleaved DNA complexes that are normal reaction intermediates. Drugs such as etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone are frontline therapies for a variety of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Unfortunately, their use is also associated with the development of specific leukemias. Regimens that include etoposide or doxorubicin are linked to the occurrence of acute myeloid leukemias that feature rearrangements at chromosomal band 11q23. Similar rearrangements are seen in infant leukemias and are associated with gestational diets that are high in naturally occurring topoisomerase II–active compounds. Finally, regimens that include mitoxantrone and epirubicin are linked to acute promyelocytic leukemias that feature t(15;17) rearrangements. The first part of this article will focus on type II topoisomerases and describe the mechanism of enzyme and drug action. The second part will discuss how topoisomerase II poisons trigger chromosomal breaks that lead to leukemia and potential approaches for dissociating the actions of drugs from their leukemogenic potential. PMID:24495080

  7. Arsenic in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dent, Paul

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for many years that arsenic trioxide (As2O3; ATO) is an effective therapy for acute promyelocytic leukemia but has little activity against other forms of the disease. ATO has diverse modes of action, but is well known to generate high levels of reactive oxygen species in cells which are believed to be causal in many of its biologic actions.1 ROS can both activate and suppress signaling through multiple intracellular pathways based on the amount and duration of ROS production.2 As the basal activity of the MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathway is often high in acute myeloid leukemias, and that ATO is known to stimulate MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling in leukemia, the authors investigated whether knock down of the downstream effector of ERK1/2, RSK1, could enhance the anti-leukemic activity of ATO.3,4 PMID:24025257

  8. Leukemia in benzene workers

    SciTech Connect

    Rinsky, R.A.; Young, R.J.; Smith, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    To evaluate the possible association between occupational exposure to benzene and subsequent death from leukemia, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a retrospective cohort mortality study of workers who had been exposed to benzene in the manufacture of rubber hydrochloride at two locations in Ohio. Ascertainment of vital status was accomplished for 98% of the cohort. Among 748 workers who had at least one day of exposure to benzene between 1940 and 1950, seven deaths from leukemia occurred; from United States death rates standardized for sex, age, and calendar time period, only 1.25 leukemia deaths would have been expected (standardized mortality ratio . 560; p less than 0.001). Mean duration of exposure to benzene was brief, and 437 (58%) of the cohort were exposed for less than 1 year. Evaluation of leukemia mortality for those workers exposed five or more years showed an SMR of 2100. All leukemia deaths were myelocytic or monocytic in cell type. Four additional cases of leukemia have been reorganized in workers at the study locations, but occurred in persons not encompassed by the strict definition of the cohort. Reconstruction of past exposures to benzene at the two locations indicates that in some areas of the plant airborne benzene concentrations rose occasionally to several hundred parts per million (ppm), but that for the most part, employee eight-hour time-weighted averages (TWA) fell within the limits considered permissible at the time of exposure. These data corroborate an initial analysis of the same cohort by Infante et al, and indicate that benzene is a human carcinogen at a range of exposures not greatly above the current legal standard.

  9. Successful early diagnosis and treatment in a case of Toxocara canis-induced eosinophilic myocarditis with eosinophil-rich pericardial effusion.

    PubMed

    Sangen, Hideto; Tanabe, Jun; Takano, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Fulminant myocarditis can become fatal if left untreated. Treatments for most types of myocarditis, including mechanical support, are limited. However, immediate systemic corticosteroids are known to be effective against eosinophilic myocarditis; therefore, prompt diagnosis of this disease is crucial. Unfortunately, the standard diagnostic tool for myocarditis, endomyocardial biopsy, does not provide immediate histopathological findings. Thus, a rapid diagnostic tool for identifying types of myocarditis is urgently required. We report here the first case of Toxocara canis-induced eosinophilic fulminant myocarditis which was diagnosed based on eosinophil-rich pericardial effusion where the patient recovered with early corticosteroid therapy. PMID:26338242

  10. Re-defining the Unique Roles for Eosinophils in Allergic Respiratory Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The role of eosinophils in the progression and resolution of allergic respiratory inflammation is poorly defined despite the commonality of their presence and in some cases their use as a biomarker for disease severity and/or symptom control. However, this ambiguity belies the wealth of insights that have recently been gained through the use of eosinophil-deficient/attenuated strains of mice that have demonstrated novel immunoregulatory and remodeling/repair functions for these cells in the lung following allergen provocation. Specifically, studies of eosinophil-deficient mice suggest that eosinophils contribute to events occurring in the lungs following allergen provocation at several key moments: (i) The initiating phase of events leading to Th2-polarized pulmonary inflammation, (ii) The suppression Th1/Th17 pathways in lung draining lymph nodes, (iii) The recruitment of effector Th2 T cells to the lung, and finally (iv) Mechanisms of inflammatory resolution that re-establish pulmonary homeostasis. These suggested functions have recently been confirmed and expanded upon using allergen provocation of an inducible eosinophil-deficient strain of mice (iPHIL) that demonstrated an eosinophil-dependent mechanism(s) leading to Th2 dominated immune responses in the presence of eosinophils in contrast to neutrophilic as well as mixed Th1/Th17/Th2 variant phenotypes in the absence of eosinophils. These findings highlighted that eosinophils are not exclusively downstream mediators controlled by T cells, dendritic cells (DC), and/or innate lymphocytic cells (ILC2). Instead, eosinophils appear to be more aptly described as significant contributors in complex interrelated pathways that lead to pulmonary inflammation and subsequently promote resolution and the re-establishment of homeostatic baseline. In this review we summarize and put into the context the evolving hypotheses that are now expanding our understanding of the roles eosinophils likely have in the lung following allergen provocation. PMID:24961290

  11. The interaction of human peripheral blood eosinophils with bacterial lipopolysaccharide is CD14 dependent.

    PubMed

    Plötz, S G; Lentschat, A; Behrendt, H; Plötz, W; Hamann, L; Ring, J; Rietschel, E T; Flad, H D; Ulmer, A J

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) is a ubiquitous component of dust and air pollution and is suspected to contribute after inhalation to an activation of eosinophils in bronchial tissues of asthmatic patients, provoking inflammatory and allergic processes. We were therefore interested in the interaction of eosinophil granulocytes with LPS and have examined the activation of and uptake to human peripheral blood eosinophils by LPS. Eosinophils were stimulated by LPS and the endotoxic component lipid A and the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and of the eosinophil-specific granule protein eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) was estimated. The results show induction of TNF-alpha and ECP-release by LPS and lipid A in a dose-dependent manner. Anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody (moAb) (clone MEM-18) and the synthetic lipid A partial structure 406 blocked the release of TNF-alpha and ECP by LPS-stimulated eosinophils. Studies with radioactively labeled LPS showed dose-dependent uptake of (3)H-LPS to eosinophils. The (3)H-LPS uptake was found to be specific because preincubation with unlabeled LPS, compound 406 and also anti-CD14 antibodies inhibited uptake of (3)H-LPS to eosinophil granulocytes. By flow cytometry using anti-CD14 moAb and by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique, CD14 expression was detectable. Furthermore, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and TLR 4 was detected, indicating the presence of these CD14 coreceptors. The results indicate that eosinophils can take up LPS and can be stimulated by LPS in a CD14-dependent manner. Hence, in addition to allergens, eosinophils interact with endotoxin, a process that possibly exacerbates ongoing inflammatory and allergic processes. PMID:11133766

  12. Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells’ syndrome) caused by a temporary henna tattoo

    PubMed Central

    Celegen, Mehmet; Kark?ner, Canan Sule Unsal; Günay, Ilker; Diniz, Güllden; Can, Demet

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells’ syndrome) is an uncommon condition of unknown etiology. Wells’ syndrome is usually seen in adulthood but very rare in childhood. Although pathogenesis of the disease is not very clear, it is a hypersensitivity reaction developing against a variety of exogenous and endogenous antigenic stimuli. Paraphenylenediamine is a strong allergen frequently used as a temporary henna tattoo, which makes the color darker. Here, a 9-year-old male patient with Wells’ syndrome is presented, which developed following a temporary henna tattoo and shown by the patch test sensitivity to paraphenylenediamine. PMID:25395929

  13. Reversible Severe Eosinophilic Endomyocardial Fibrosis During Pregnancy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Pineton de Chambrun, Marc; Charron, Philippe; Vauthier-Brouzes, Danièle; Cluzel, Philippe; Haroche, Julien; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Amoura, Zahir; Aubart, Fleur Cohen

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a condition of unknown origin characterized by clinical manifestations attributable to eosinophilia and eosinophilic infiltration of tissues. Cardiac involvement is rare and threatening accounting for 33% to 43% of death in HES. Management of pregnant patients with HES is challenging and have rarely been reported, particularly in the setting of heart failure.We here report on the case of a 29-year-old woman with HES who developed severe endomyocardial fibrosis with heart failure during pregnancy. Outcome was favorable under treatment with prednisone and azathioprine.This case illustrates a favorable outcome of endomyocardial fibrosis during pregnancy. PMID:26266372

  14. Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis and diffuse gastrointestinal involvement.

    PubMed

    Franco, Diana L; Ruff, Kevin; Mertz, Lester; Lam-Himlin, Dora M; Heigh, Russell

    2014-09-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), formerly named Churg-Strauss syndrome, is a rare systemic small- and medium-sized-vessel vasculitis, characterized by the presence of severe asthma as well as blood and tissue eosinophilia. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, like diarrhea and abdominal pain, are common; however, there are few reports of histologic evidence of GI involvement. We report the case of a patient on treatment for EGPA who presented with recurrent small bowel obstruction and choledocholithiasis. Biopsies of the esophagus, small bowel and common bile duct showed diffuse eosinophilia, with clear EGPA in the GI tract. Improved awareness of GI EGPA may allow for timely management of this disorder. PMID:25473392

  15. Leukemia Steering Committee Roster

    Cancer.gov

    Co-chairs Jerry Radich, M.D. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center Seattle, WA Wendy Stock, M.D. University of Chicago Chicago, IL Members John C. Byrd, M.D. Ohio State University Columbus, OH Laura Cleveland Leukemia Patient Advocate Powell, OH Stephen Couban,

  16. The usefulness of 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxime white blood cell scintigraphy in a patient with eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Imai, Erika; Kaminaga, Tatsuro; Kawasugi, Kazuo; Yokokawa, Tokuzo; Furui, Shigeru

    2003-10-01

    White blood cell (WBC) 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxime (HMPAO) scintigraphy was performed in a patient with eosinophilic gastroenteritis. WBC accumulation was detected in the terminal ileum to descending colon, and pathological studies demonstrated eosinophilic infiltration at the same region. 99mTc-HMPAO-WBC scintigraphy was proved to be a useful tool for the detection of eosinophilic infiltration in eosinophilic gastroenteritis. PMID:14651361

  17. Evolution of the rodent eosinophil-associated RNase gene family by rapid gene sorting and

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    Evolution of the rodent eosinophil-associated RNase gene family by rapid gene sorting and positive functional genes and 23 pseudogenes of the eosinophil-associated RNase (EAR) family from 5 rodent species physiological function of the rodent EARs. The discovery of a large number of divergent EARs suggests

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of a human eotaxin receptor expressed selectively on eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The chemokine eotaxin is unusual in that it appears to be a highly specific chemoattractant for eosinophils. Ligand-binding studies with radiolabeled eotaxin demonstrated a receptor on eosinophils distinct from the known chemokine receptors CKR-1 and -2. The distinct eotaxin binding site on human eosinophils also bound RANTES (regulated on activation T expressed and secreted) and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)3. We have now isolated a cDNA from eosinophils, termed CKR-3, with significant sequence similarity to other well characterized chemokine receptors. Cells transfected with CKR-3 cDNA bound radiolabeled eotaxin specifically and with high affinity, comparable to the binding affinity observed with eosinophils. This receptor also bound RANTES and MCP-3 with high affinity, but not other CC or CXC chemokines. Furthermore, receptor transfectants generated in a murine B cell lymphoma cell line migrated in transwell chemotaxis assays to eotaxin, RANTES, and MCP-3, but not to any other chemokines. A monoclonal antibody recognizing CKR-3 was used to show that eosinophils, but not other leukocyte types, expressed this receptor. This pattern of expression was confirmed by Northern blot with RNA from highly purified leukocyte subsets. The restricted expression of CKR-3 on eosinophils and the fidelity of eotaxin binding to CKR-3, provides a potential mechanism for the selective recruitment and migration of eosinophils within tissues. PMID:8676064

  19. Functional Analysis of Free Fatty Acid Receptor GPR120 in Human Eosinophils: Implications in Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Yasunori; Ueki, Shigeharu; Takeda, Masahide; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Tamaki, Mami; Moritoki, Yuki; Oyamada, Hajime; Itoga, Masamichi; Kayaba, Hiroyuki; Omokawa, Ayumi; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that eosinophils play an important role in metabolic homeostasis through Th2 cytokine production. GPR120 (FFA4) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for long-chain fatty acids that functions as a regulator of physiological energy metabolism. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether human eosinophils express GPR120 and, if present, whether it possesses a functional capacity on eosinophils. Eosinophils isolated from peripheral venous blood expressed GPR120 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation with a synthetic GPR120 agonist, GW9508, induced rapid down-regulation of cell surface expression of GPR120, suggesting ligand-dependent receptor internalization. Although GPR120 activation did not induce eosinophil chemotactic response and degranulation, we found that GW9508 inhibited eosinophil spontaneous apoptosis and Fas receptor expression. The anti-apoptotic effect was attenuated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors and was associated with inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Eosinophil response investigated using ELISpot assay indicated that stimulation with a GPR120 agonist induced IL-4 secretion. These findings demonstrate the novel functional properties of fatty acid sensor GPR120 on human eosinophils and indicate the previously unrecognized link between nutrient metabolism and the immune system. PMID:25790291

  20. Leukemia and benzene.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Robert

    2012-08-01

    Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called "second cancer" that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called "niches" that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these "niches" may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

  1. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia in a New York City firefighter exposed to World Trade Center dust.

    PubMed

    Rom, William N; Weiden, Michael; Garcia, Roberto; Yie, Ting An; Vathesatogkit, Pratan; Tse, Doris B; McGuinness, Georgeann; Roggli, Victor; Prezant, David

    2002-09-15

    We report a sentinel case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia in a firefighter exposed to high concentrations of World Trade Center dust during the rescue effort from September 11 to 24. The firefighter presented with a Pa(O2) of 53 mm Hg and responded to oxygen and corticosteroids. Computed tomography scan showed patchy ground glass density, thickened bronchial walls, and bilateral pleural effusions. Bronchoalveolar lavage recovered 70% eosinophils, with only 1% eosinophils in peripheral blood. Eosinophils were not degranulated and increased levels of interleukin-5 were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum. Mineralogic analysis counted 305 commercial asbestos fibers/10(6) macrophages including those with high aspect ratios, and significant quantities of fly ash and degraded fibrous glass. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is a rare consequence of acute high dust exposure. World Trade Center dust consists of large particle-size silicates, but fly ash and asbestos fibers may be found in bronchoalveolar lavage cells. PMID:12231487

  2. The lactoferrin receptor may mediate the reduction of eosinophils in the duodenum of pigs consuming milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Caitlin; Nonnecke, Eric; Lönnerdal, Bo; Murray, James

    2014-10-01

    Lactoferrin is part of the immune system and multiple tissues including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, liver, and lung contain receptors for lactoferrin. Lactoferrin has many functions, including antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and iron binding. Additionally, lactoferrin inhibits the migration of eosinophils, which are constitutively present in the GI tract, and increase during inflammation. Lactoferrin suppresses eosinophil infiltration into the lungs and eosinophil migration in -vitro. Healthy pigs have a large population of eosinophils in their small intestine and like humans, pigs have small intestinal lactoferrin receptors (LFR); thus, pigs were chosen to investigate the effects of consumption of milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF-milk) on small intestinal eosinophils and expression of eosinophilic cytokines. In addition, LFR localization was analyzed in duodenum and circulating eosinophils to determine if the LFR could play a role in lactoferrin's ability to inhibit eosinophil migration. In the duodenum there were significantly fewer eosinophils/unit area in pigs fed rhLF-milk compared to pigs fed control milk (p = 0.025); this was not seen in the ileum (p = 0.669). In the duodenum, no differences were observed in expression of the LFR, or any eosinophil migratory cytokines, and the amount of LFR protein was not different (p = 0.386). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed that within the duodenum the LFR localized on the brush border of villi, crypts, and within the lamina propria. Circulating eosinophils also contained LFRs, which may be a mechanism allowing lactoferrin to directly inhibit eosinophil migration. PMID:25085595

  3. Leukemia -- Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic: Overview Print to PDF Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic: Overview Approved by the ... as a roadmap to this full guide. About leukemia Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ...

  4. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Robert Irvine Pregnant? What to Expect Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Juvenile ... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  5. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Robert Irvine Pregnant? What to Expect Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Acute ... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  6. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Robert Irvine Pregnant? What to Expect Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Chronic ... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  7. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-07

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  10. Update on Eosinophilic Meningoencephalitis and Its Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; da Silva, Ana Cristina Arámburu; Yoshimura, Kentaro

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis is caused by a variety of helminthic infections. These worm-specific infections are named after the causative worm genera, the most common being angiostrongyliasis, gnathostomiasis, toxocariasis, cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, baylisascariasis, and paragonimiasis. Worm parasites enter an organism through ingestion of contaminated water or an intermediate host and can eventually affect the central nervous system (CNS). These infections are potentially serious events leading to sequelae or death, and diagnosis depends on currently limited molecular methods. Identification of parasites in fluids and tissues is rarely possible, while images and clinical examinations do not lead to a definitive diagnosis. Treatment usually requires the concomitant administration of corticoids and anthelminthic drugs, yet new compounds and their extensive and detailed clinical evaluation are much needed. Eosinophilia in fluids may be detected in other infectious and noninfectious conditions, such as neoplastic disease, drug use, and prosthesis reactions. Thus, distinctive identification of eosinophils in fluids is a necessary component in the etiologic diagnosis of CNS infections. PMID:19366917

  11. Perforated duodenal ulcer: An unusual manifestation of allergic eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Riggle, Kevin M; Wahbeh, Ghassan; Williams, Elizabeth M; Riehle, Kimberly J

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous perforation of a duodenal ulcer secondary to allergic eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) has not been previously reported. We present such a case in a teenager who presented with peritonitis. After exploration and operative repair of his ulcer, he continued to experience intermittent abdominal pain, and further evaluation revealed eosinophilic gastroenteritis in the setting of multiple food allergies. His EGE resolved after adhering to a restrictive diet. Both duodenal ulcers and EGE are very rarely seen in pediatric patients. EGE has a variable presentation depending on the layer(s) of bowel wall affected and the segment of the gastrointestinal tract that is involved. Once diagnosed, it may respond to dietary changes in patients with recognized food allergies, or to steroids in patients in whom an underlying cause is not identified. Our case highlights the need to keep EGE in the differential diagnosis when treating pediatric patients with duodenal ulcers. The epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of EGE are also discussed, along with a review of the current literature. PMID:26640348

  12. Elimination diets in the management of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Schwartz, Sally; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis, an increasingly recognized chronic inflammatory disorder isolated to the esophagus, is triggered by an abnormal allergic response to dietary antigens. Current treatment includes swallowed topical steroids and dietary modification, which aim to resolve symptoms and prevent long-term complications such as formation of strictures. The dietary approach has become more widely accepted because long-term steroid therapy is associated with potential risks. Dietary treatment includes elemental and elimination diets. An exclusive elemental diet, which requires replacement of all intact protein with amino acid-based formula, offers the best response of all available therapies, with remission in up to 96% of subjects proving it to be superior to all other available therapies including topical steroids. However, compliance with this approach is challenging because of poor taste and monotony. The high cost of formula and the associated psychosocial problems are additional drawbacks of this approach. Empiric and allergy test-directed elimination diets have gained popularity given that elimination of a limited number of foods is much easier and as such is more readily acceptable. There is a growing body of literature supporting this type of therapy in both children and adults. This paper reviews the evidence for all types of dietary therapy in eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:24920928

  13. Immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinical pathologic disease characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilia of the esophagus. When the diagnosis is confirmed, it is important to treat the eosinophilic inflammation not only to control the presenting symptoms, but also to prevent acute and chronic complications. The pathogenesis of EoE is most likely a mixed IgE and non-IgE food-mediated reaction, where Th2 cytokines drive esophageal eosinophilia as in other atopic diseases. Hence, it is not surprising that therapy is based on inflammation control, with steroids (oral or topical) and/or food antigen avoidance. However, these treatment options are not specific, reduce the quality of life of patients and have significant side effects, therefore, there is an ongoing effort to design more specific immunotherapies. In this review, we review standard and immunotherapeutic options for EoE treatment, such as anti-IL-5, anti-TNF?, anti-IgE, anti-CRTH, oral allergy desensitization and environmental immunotherapy. PMID:24762076

  14. Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-01-29

    Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

  15. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of white blood cells, the cells in the body that normally fight infection. It is the most common cancer in children. Over the last several decades, advances in the treatment and supportive care of pediatric ALL have dramatically increased its 5-year survival rate to almost 90%. Despite these improvements, a considerable number of children with ALL continue to relapse following standardized treatment.

  17. Severe Rhabdomyolysis without Systemic Involvement: A Rare Case of Idiopathic Eosinophilic Polymyositis

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Ayesha; Choksi, Vivek; Chu, Andrew; Mankodi, Dhruti; Shaharyar, Sameer; O'Brien, Keith; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Eosinophilic polymyositis (EPM) is a rare cause of rhabdomyolysis characterized by eosinophilic infiltrates in the muscle. We describe the case of a young patient with eosinophilic polymyositis causing isolated severe rhabdomyolysis without systemic involvement. Case Presentation. A 22-year-old Haitian female with no past medical history presented with progressive generalized muscle aches without precipitating factors. Examination of the extremities revealed diffuse muscle tenderness. Laboratory findings demonstrated peripheral eosinophilia and high creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) and transaminase levels. Workup for the common causes of rhabdomyolysis were negative. Her CPK continued to rise to greater than 100,000 units/L so a muscle biopsy was performed which showed widespread eosinophilic infiltrate consistent with eosinophilic polymyositis. She was started on high dose systemic corticosteroids with improvement of her symptoms, eosinophilia, and CPK level. Discussion. This case illustrates a systematic workup of rhabdomyolysis in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Many differential diagnoses must be considered before establishing a diagnosis of idiopathic eosinophilic polymyositis. To our knowledge, our case of eosinophilic polymyositis is unique as it presented with severe rhabdomyolysis without another organ involvement. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for this physically debilitating disease to aid in prompt diagnosis. PMID:26229703

  18. Epigenetic mechanisms in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Trombly, Daniel J; Dowdy, Christopher R; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; van Wijnen, Andre J; Stein, Gary S

    2012-09-01

    Focal organization of regulatory machinery within the interphase nucleus is linked to biological responsiveness and perturbed in cancer. Lineage determinant Runx proteins organize and assemble multi-protein complexes at sites of transcription within the nucleus and regulate both RNA polymerase II- and I-mediated gene expression. In addition, Runx proteins epigenetically control lineage determining transcriptional programs including: 1) architectural organization of macromolecular complexes in interphase, 2) regulation of gene expression through bookmarking during mitosis, and 3) microRNA-mediated translational control in the interphase nucleus. These mechanisms are compromised with the onset and progression of cancer. For example, the oncogenic AML1-ETO protein, which results from a chromosomal translocation between chromosomes 8 and 21, is expressed in nearly 25% of all acute myelogenous leukemias, disrupts Runx1 subnuclear localization during interphase and compromises transcriptional regulation. Epigenetically, the leukemic protein redirects the Runx1 DNA binding domain to leukemia-specific nuclear microenvironments, modifies regulatory protein accessibility to Runx1 target genes by imprinting repressive chromatin marks, and deregulates the microRNA (miR) profile of diseased myeloid cells. Consequently, the entire Runx1-dependent transcriptional program of myeloid cells is deregulated leading to onset and progression of acute myeloid leukemia and maintenance of leukemic phenotype. We discuss the potential of modified epigenetic landscape of leukemic cells as a viable therapeutic target. PMID:22884030

  19. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis: Review of a Rare and Treatable Disease of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Amit; Enweluzo, Chijioke; Grier, David; Badireddy, Madhu

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare disease of the gastrointestinal tract characterized by crampy abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, gastrointestinal bleeding, and weight loss associated with peripheral eosinophilia leading to eosinophilic infiltrates in stomach and intestine, usually in a patient with a prior history of atopy. In this article, we describe our encounter with a 59-year-old female presenting with severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss with an extensive evaluation including an upper endoscopy with biopsies resulting in a diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis. The patient was eventually treated with oral prednisone for three weeks with complete resolution of her symptoms. PMID:23904840

  20. A Rare Case of Ibuprofen-Induced Eosinophilic Meningitis in a 13-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Sharad; Gupta, Mukesh; Sharma, Deepak; Bansal, Shweta

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis is based on clinical manifestations and microscopic identification of eosinophils present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). It is caused by a variety of helminthic infections with most common being angiostrongyliasis, gnathostomiasis, toxocariasis, cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, baylisascariasis, and paragonimiasis. Many case reports are there in which parasites have been found responsible, but there are rare reports of CSF eosinophilia associated with the use of drugs. We report a case of drug-induced (ibuprofen) eosinophilic meningitis in a healthy female who presented to us with severe headache and improved dramatically after drug withdrawal. PMID:24596473

  1. Eosinophilic and granular cell tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Damiani, S; Dina, R; Eusebi, V

    1999-05-01

    Eosinophilic and granular cell tumors of the breast are a heterogeneous group encompassing both epithelial and mesenchymal lesions. A granular appearance of the cytoplasm may be caused by the accumulation of secretory granules, mitochondria, or lysosomes. In the breast, mucoid carcinomas, carcinomas showing apocrine differentiation, and neuroendocrine carcinomas are well known entities, while tumors with oncocytic and acinic cell differentiation have been only recently recognized. An abundance of lysosomes is characteristic of Schwannian granular cell neoplasms, but smooth muscle cell tumors also may have this cytoplasmic feature. Awareness of all these possibilities when granular cells are found in breast lesions improves diagnostic accuracy and helps to avoid misdiagnosis of both benign lesions and malignant tumors. PMID:10452577

  2. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia associated with glyphosate-surfactant exposure.

    PubMed

    De Raadt, Wanda M; Wijnen, Petal A; Bast, Aalt; Bekers, Otto; Drent, Marjolein

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient who developed acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP) after recent onset of smoking and exposure to glyphosate-surfactant.The additional exposure associated with the recent start of smoking may have contributed to the development and/or severity of AEP.A clinical relapse after re-challenge four years later both with smoking and glyphosate-surfactant made the association highly likely.Respiratory distress is a factor of poor outcome and mortality after ingestion of glyphosate-surfactant.This case highlights the importance of a thorough exposure history e.g., possible occupational and environmental exposures together with drug-intake.Genotyping should be considered in cases of severe unexplained pulmonary damage. PMID:26278698

  3. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Another Atopy-Related Alopecia Areata Trigger?

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Omer; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Piliang, Melissa

    2015-11-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is associated with atopy in 10-22% of patients, twice the prevalence in the general population. Patients can present with concomitant atopic dermatitis, hay fever, asthma, and even allergies to dust mites. In many cases, severity and flares of these atopic diatheses correlate with severity of AA. Herein we present a patient with AA affected by contemporaneous eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). EoE is a recently recognized allergic disorder, mediated by eosiniphils and histamine. It is characterized by esophageal dysfunction and intraepithelial microabscesses. We propose that EoE be considered as a condition falling within the realm of atopic diseases, and a potential trigger of AA in affected patients. PMID:26551950

  4. An allergist's perspective to the evaluation of Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a classic atopic disease as it shares features with other atopic disease on all levels including pathogenesis, genetics, epidemiology, and treatment options. EoE has elements of Th2 pathogenesis with increase levels of Th2 cytokines (IL4, 5, and 13). In addition, it shares atopic genetic risk factors including thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) loci as a risk factor in genome wide association studies. EoE patients have a higher rate of other atopic disease (asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy) compared to the general population indicating their atopic phenotype. Like asthma, atopic dermatitis or food allergy, EoE has increased in the last 20 years. Treatment options include the basic principle of other atopic diseases include using topical steroids or avoidance of the triggers (food or pollen). An allergist provides a critical role as they are experts in the treatment of atopic disease including avoidance strategies. PMID:26552776

  5. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Due to Rhus Ingestion Presenting with Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wonsuk; Choi, Chan; Cho, Kyuman; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Rhus-related illnesses in Korea are mostly caused by ingestion of parts of the Rhus tree. Contact dermatitis occurrence after ingestion of Rhus-related food is very common in Korea. However, Rhus-related gastrointestinal disease is very rare. Herein, we present a case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis caused by Rhus ingestion. A 75-year-old woman was admitted with hematemesis and hematochezia after Rhus extract ingestion. Routine laboratory tests revealed leukocytosis without eosinophilia. Endoscopy showed friable and granular mucosal changes with touch bleeding in the second portion of the duodenum. Abdominal computed tomography revealed edematous wall thickening of the duodenum and proximal jejunal loops. Patch testing with Rhus extracts showed a strong positive reaction, suggesting Rhus as the allergen. Her symptoms improved after avoidance of the allergen. PMID:25844348

  6. Eosinophil-associated ribonuclease 11 is a macrophage chemoattractant.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kelsey J; Barker, Tolga; Dyer, Kimberly D; Rice, Tyler A; Percopo, Caroline M; Garcia-Crespo, Katia E; Cho, Soochin; Lee, James J; Druey, Kirk M; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2015-04-01

    RNase A is the prototype of an extensive family of divergent proteins whose members share a unique disulfide-bonded tertiary structure, conserved catalytic motifs, and the ability to hydrolyze polymeric RNA. Several members of this family maintain independent roles as ribonucleases and modulators of innate immunity. Here we characterize mouse eosinophil-associated RNase (Ear) 11, a divergent member of the eosinophil ribonuclease cluster, and the only known RNase A ribonuclease expressed specifically in response to Th2 cytokine stimulation. Mouse Ear 11 is differentially expressed in somatic tissues at baseline (brain ? liver < lung < spleen); systemic stimulation with IL-33 results in 10-5000-fold increased expression in lung and spleen, respectively. Ear 11 is also expressed in response to protective priming of the respiratory mucosa with Lactobacillus plantarum; transcripts are detected both locally in lung as well as systemically in bone marrow and spleen. Mouse Ear 11 is enzymatically active, although substantially less so than mEar 1 and mEar 2; the relative catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of mEar 11 is diminished ?1000-1500-fold. However, in contrast to RNase 2/EDN and mEar 2, which have been characterized as selective chemoattractants for CD11c(+) dendritic cells, mEar 11 has prominent chemoattractant activity for F4/80(+)CD11c(-) tissue macrophages. Chemoattractant activity is not dependent on full enzymatic activity, and requires no interaction with the pattern recognition receptor, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Taken together, this work characterizes a divergent RNase A ribonuclease with a unique expression pattern and function, and highlights the versatility of this family in promoting innate immunity. PMID:25713137

  7. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE. PMID:25548504

  8. Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

  9. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Bendamustine Plus Alemtuzumab for Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-20

    Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  11. Elevated IL-33 expression is associated with pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis, and exogenous IL-33 promotes eosinophilic esophagitis development in mice.

    PubMed

    Judd, L M; Heine, R G; Menheniott, T R; Buzzelli, J; O'Brien-Simpson, N; Pavlic, D; O'Connor, L; Al Gazali, K; Hamilton, O; Scurr, M; Collison, A M; Mattes, J; Allen, K J; Giraud, A S

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether the T helper (Th) type 2 (Th2) cell agonist and allergenic ligand IL-33 was associated with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) development in a pediatric cohort and whether IL-33 protein could induce disease symptoms in mice. Biopsies from EoE patients or controls were used to measure IL-33 mRNA and protein expression. Increased expression of IL-33 mRNA was found in the esophageal mucosa in EoE. IL-33 protein was detected in cells negative for CD45, mast cells, and epithelial cell markers near blood vessels. Circulating levels of IL-33 were not increased. The time course for IL-33 gene expression was quantified in an established Aspergillus fumigatus allergen mouse model of EoE. Because IL-33 induction was transient in this model and chronicity of IL-33 expression has been demonstrated in humans, naive mice were treated with recombinant IL-33 for 1 wk and esophageal pathology was evaluated. IL-33 application produced changes consistent with phenotypically early EoE, including transmural eosinophilia, mucosal hyperproliferation, and upregulation of eosinophilic genes and chemokines. Th2 cytokines, including IL-13, along with innate lymphoid cell group 2, Th1/17, and M2 macrophage marker genes, were increased after IL-33 application. IL-33-induced eosinophilia was ablated in IL-13 null mice. In addition, IL-33 induced a profound inhibition of the regulatory T cell gene signature. We conclude that IL-33 gene expression is associated with pediatric EoE development and that application of recombinant protein in mice phenocopies the early clinical phase of the human disease in an IL-13-dependent manner. IL-33 inhibition of esophageal regulatory T cell function may induce loss of antigenic tolerance, thereby providing a mechanistic rationale for EoE development. PMID:26514775

  12. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Expect the Unexpected: A Case of Isolated Eosinophilic Meningitis in Toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Sick, Christian; Hennerici, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young police officer suffering from headache without other neurological symptoms caused by isolated eosinophilic meningitis, which resulted from an infection with Toxocara cati, along with a discussion of the differential diagnosis. PMID:25535488

  14. Eosinophilic cystitis in a patient with hypereosinophila syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, PENG; WANG, CHAOJUN; JIN, BAIYE; LIN, YIWEI; CHEN, SHANWEN

    2014-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a rare disorder that is characterized by hypereosinophilia and organ damage, caused by the infiltration of eosinophils. In rare cases, the urinary bladder may also be involved. The current case report presented a 56-year-old male with gross hematuria and hypereosinophilia. The diagnosis of eosinophilic cystitis associated HES was established. Oral prednisone with a slow tapering regimen was administered as the primary treatment for the patient, which achieved partial hematological remission and complete relief of cystitis during a six-month follow-up period. Although eosinophilic cystitis is not commonly the primary manifestation of HES, eosinophilic cystitis should be taken into consideration following the onset of urinary symptoms in patients with HES. PMID:24944595

  15. Effects of isozyme-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors on eosinophil infiltration in the guinea-pig lung.

    PubMed

    Lagente, V; Moodley, I; Perrin, S; Mottin, G; Junien, J L

    1994-04-01

    The effects of selective phosphodiesterase isozyme inhibitors on eosinophil infiltration induced by antigen challenge or by exposure to an aerosol of platelet-activating factor (PAF) were investigated in the guinea-pig. Pretreatment 24 h and 3 h before antigen challenge or PAF exposure with theophylline (100 mg/kg), rolipram (5 mg/kg) and Ro 20-1724 (30 mg/kg) significantly reduced the increase in eosinophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In contrast, milrinone, SK&F 94-120 and zaprinast were ineffective against antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment. Theophylline, rolipram and Ro 20-1724 also significantly reduced the release of eosinophil peroxidase into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. It is suggested that inhibitors of type IV phosphodiesterase have anti-inflammatory effects in the airways and may be useful in the treatment of asthma. PMID:8026552

  16. EOSINOPHIL INFLUX TO THE NASAL AIRWAY FOLLOWING LOCAL, LOW-LEVEL LPS CHALLENGE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Recent obervations show that atopic asthmatic subjects have increased sensitivity to respirable endotoxin (or LPS) compared with normal persons. In vitro studies demonstrate that LPS enchances eosinophil survival. These obervations suggest that the effects of inhal...

  17. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

  18. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Satwani, Prakash; Kahn, Justine; Dvorak, Christopher C

    2015-02-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), a rare myeloid malignancy that occurs in young children, is considered a clonal disease originating in pluripotent stem cells of the hematopoietic system. The pathogenesis of JMML involves disruption of signal transduction through the RAS pathway, with resultant selective hypersensitivity of JMML cells to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Progress has been made in understanding aspects of the molecular basis of JMML. How these molecular mechanisms may lead to targeted therapeutics and improved outcomes remains to be elucidated. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant is the only curative option for children with JMML, and it is fraught with frequent relapse and significant toxicity. PMID:25435114

  19. Enhanced Tissue Factor Expression by Blood Eosinophils from Patients with Hypereosinophilia: A Possible Link with Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Cugno, Massimo; Marzano, Angelo V.; Lorini, Maurizio; Carbonelli, Vincenzo; Tedeschi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic risk is increased in eosinophil-mediated disorders, and several hypotheses have been proposed to link eosinophilia and thrombosis. In particular, eosinophils have been described as source of tissue factor (TF), the main initiator of blood coagulation; however, this aspect is still controversial. This study was aimed to evaluate whether TF expression varies in eosinophils isolated from normal subjects and patients with different hypereosinophilic conditions. Eosinophils were immunologically purified from peripheral blood samples of 9 patients with different hypereosinophilic conditions and 9 normal subjects. Western blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed to test eosinophil TF expression. For comparison, TF expression was evaluated in monocytes from blood donors and in human endothelial (ECV304) and fibroblast (IMR90) cell lines. Western blot analysis revealed a major band of 47,000 corresponding to native TF in homogenates of purified eosinophils with a higher intensity in the 9 patients than in the 9 controls (p<0.0001). According to RT-PCR cycle threshold (Ct), TF gene expression was higher in eosinophils from patients than in those from controls, median (range) 35.10 (19.45–36.50) vs 37.17 (35.33–37.87) (p?=?0.002), and was particularly abundant in one patient with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and ischemic heart attacks (Ct: 19.45). TF gene expression was moderate in monocytes, Ct: 31.32 (29.82–33.49) and abundant in endothelial cells, Ct: 28.70 (27.79–29.57) and fibroblasts, Ct: 22.77 (19.22–25.05). Our results indicate that human blood eosinophils contain variable amounts of TF. The higher TF expression in patients with hypereosinophilic disorders may contribute to increase the thrombotic risk. PMID:25375118

  20. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a young girl – long term remission under Montelukast

    PubMed Central

    Quack, Ivo; Sellin, Lorenz; Buchner, Nikolaus J; Theegarten, Dirk; Rump, Lars C; Henning, Bernhard F

    2005-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders are an emerging disease entity characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the intestinal wall. Oral steroids can be still considered as first line treatment. Unfortunately relapses are quite common. Usually long term low-dose prednisone or immunosuppressive therapy is required, which is especially problematic in young patients. Thus a reliable steroid sparing agent with low side effects suitable for long term use is needed. There are strong hints to a similar pathophysiology of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders to that of asthma. Indeed leukotriene D4 plays an important role in the recruitment of eosinophils into the intestinal tissue causing damage. This patho-mechanism provides the rationale for the treatment with a leukotriene D4 receptor antagonist. Recently there have been first reports about successful short term use of Montelukast in eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. Case presentation We report the case of a 17 year old girl with a long history of severe abdominal complaints leading to several hospitalizations in the past. Mimicking the picture of an intestinal tuberculosis she received an anti mycobacterial treatment without any success. Marked eosinophilia in blood, ascites and tissue samples of the intestinal tract finally lead to the diagnosis eosinophilic gastroenteritis. Tapering off prednisone caused another severe episode of abdominal pain. At that point leukotriene antagonist Montelukast was started at a dose of 10 mg once daily. Steroids could be tapered off completely within six weeks. The patient has been free of symptoms for over two years by now. Routine examinations, blood tests and endoscopy have rendered regular results. So far no side effects were noted. Conclusion Here report about successful long term remission of eosinophilic gastroenteritis under Montelukast. Further randomized control trials are required to asses the full benefits of Montelukast therapy in the whole spectrum of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:16026609

  1. Ultrastructural morphology, cytochemistry, and morphometry of eosinophil granules in Chédiak-Higashi syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, S. C.; Gilbert, C. S.; White, D. A.; Parmley, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    Lysosomal enlargement in Chédiak-Higashi Syndrome (CHS) occurs to varying degrees in different cell types and has provided insight into the pathophysiology of lysosomal granules. This study was undertaken to determine the extent of involvement of eosinophil crystalloid granules (CGs) and smaller non-crystalloid granules (NCGs) in giant granule formation. Eosinophils from two CHS patients were evaluated after glutaraldehyde fixation and staining for morphologic examination, peroxidase, and complex carbohydrate using uranyl acetate-lead citrate, diaminobenzidine-lead citrate, and periodate-thiocarbohydrazide-silver proteinate (PA-TCH-SP) methods, respectively. Although many CGs appeared normal in shape and size, several CGs appeared enlarged and a few measured over 5 microns in diameter, consistent with giant granule formation in CHS. These giant granules either occasionally contained a single large crystalloid or, more frequently, contained numerous normal-size crystalloids. Enlargement of granules was also observed in some precursor CGs of bone marrow early eosinophils, indicating that giant granule formation was initiated during granule genesis. Almost all NCGs in late eosinophils were small granules and stained strongly with PA-TCH-SP in contrast to CGs. Most, but not all small granules were peroxidase-positive in eosinophil precursors, whereas the percentage of peroxidase-negative small granules increased in late eosinophils. This indicated the presence of at least two small granule populations. Morphometric studies indicated CHS selectively involved CGs and demonstrated that neither the average size nor numbers of NCGs were significantly different from normal eosinophils. Thus, these studies indicate that CHS selectively involves CGs, and demonstrate preservation of normal granule size and heterogeneity for NCGs in late eosinophils. These observations suggest that the underlying CHS pathophysiology does not involve all lysosomal subpopulations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7688187

  2. Enhanced tissue factor expression by blood eosinophils from patients with hypereosinophilia: a possible link with thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cugno, Massimo; Marzano, Angelo V; Lorini, Maurizio; Carbonelli, Vincenzo; Tedeschi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic risk is increased in eosinophil-mediated disorders, and several hypotheses have been proposed to link eosinophilia and thrombosis. In particular, eosinophils have been described as source of tissue factor (TF), the main initiator of blood coagulation; however, this aspect is still controversial. This study was aimed to evaluate whether TF expression varies in eosinophils isolated from normal subjects and patients with different hypereosinophilic conditions. Eosinophils were immunologically purified from peripheral blood samples of 9 patients with different hypereosinophilic conditions and 9 normal subjects. Western blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed to test eosinophil TF expression. For comparison, TF expression was evaluated in monocytes from blood donors and in human endothelial (ECV304) and fibroblast (IMR90) cell lines. Western blot analysis revealed a major band of 47,000 corresponding to native TF in homogenates of purified eosinophils with a higher intensity in the 9 patients than in the 9 controls (p<0.0001). According to RT-PCR cycle threshold (Ct), TF gene expression was higher in eosinophils from patients than in those from controls, median (range) 35.10 (19.45-36.50) vs 37.17 (35.33-37.87) (p?=?0.002), and was particularly abundant in one patient with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and ischemic heart attacks (Ct: 19.45). TF gene expression was moderate in monocytes, Ct: 31.32 (29.82-33.49) and abundant in endothelial cells, Ct: 28.70 (27.79-29.57) and fibroblasts, Ct: 22.77 (19.22-25.05). Our results indicate that human blood eosinophils contain variable amounts of TF. The higher TF expression in patients with hypereosinophilic disorders may contribute to increase the thrombotic risk. PMID:25375118

  3. An unusual cause of terminal hematuria in a child: Eosinophilic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Özdo?an, Elif Bahat; Arslansoyu Çamlar, Seçil; Bilen, Sevcan; ?mamo?lu, Mustafa; T?ra?, ?ükran; Cansu, Ay?egül; Özoran, Yavuz

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the bladder; it rarely occurs in children. Patients typically show irritative urination symptoms frequently, with a possible need for urgency, alongside dysuria, gross haematuria, suprapubic pain and painful urination. Sometimes bladder mass accumulation with the possibility of malignancy is also observed. We present an 8-year-old male patient who gained admission for terminal hematuria and discuss the management of eosinophilic cystitis. PMID:25485018

  4. Characterization of the relationship between dose and blood eosinophil response following subcutaneous administration of mepolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Pouliquen, Isabelle J.; Kornmann, Oliver; Barton, Sharon V.; Price, Jeffrey A.; Ortega, Hector G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Mepolizumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that blocks human IL-5 from binding to the IL-5 receptor, which is mainly expressed on eosinophils. Eosinophils are key cells in the inflammatory cascade of various diseases, including asthma. This study investigated the pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) relationship between exposure of mepolizumab subcutaneous (SC) administration and blood eosinophil reduction compared with intravenous (IV) administration in adult subjects with asthma. Methods: In this multi-center, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, repeat-dose study, 70 adult subjects received one of four possible treatment regimens: mepolizumab 12.5, 125, or 250 mg SC or 75 mg IV. In addition to analyzing the dose and PK/PD relationship, absolute bioavailability, safety, tolerability, and incidence of anti-mepolizumab antibodies were evaluated. Results: Blood eosinophil levels decreased in a dose-dependent manner with the lowest (12.5 mg) dose clearly differentiating from the other doses. A non-linear inhibition Imax model based on blood eosinophil levels at week 12 identified that the SC doses providing 50% and 90% of maximal blood eosinophil inhibition were 11 mg (95% confidence interval (CI): 5.19 – 16.85) and 99 mg (95% CI: 47 – 152), respectively. The route of administration did not affect the exposure-response relationship. The estimated mepolizumab SC absolute bioavailability (arm) was 74% (90% CI: 54 – 102%). The safety profile of mepolizumab was favorable. Conclusions: A dose-dependent reduction in blood eosinophils across all mepolizumab doses investigated was observed. The subcutaneous absolute bioavailability was 74%. The route of administration did not affect the mepolizumab exposure eosinophil response relationship. PMID:26445140

  5. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Toxicity of eosinophil MBP is repressed by intracellular crystallization and promoted by extracellular aggregation.

    PubMed

    Soragni, Alice; Yousefi, Shida; Stoeckle, Christina; Soriaga, Angela B; Sawaya, Michael R; Kozlowski, Evelyne; Schmid, Inès; Radonjic-Hoesli, Susanne; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Cascio, Duilio; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Burghammer, Manfred; Riekel, Christian; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Riek, Roland; Eisenberg, David S; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2015-03-19

    Eosinophils are white blood cells that function in innate immunity and participate in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and neoplastic disorders. Their secretory granules contain four cytotoxic proteins, including the eosinophil major basic protein (MBP-1). How MBP-1 toxicity is controlled within the eosinophil itself and activated upon extracellular release is unknown. Here we show how intragranular MBP-1 nanocrystals restrain toxicity, enabling its safe storage, and characterize them with an X-ray-free electron laser. Following eosinophil activation, MBP-1 toxicity is triggered by granule acidification, followed by extracellular aggregation, which mediates the damage to pathogens and host cells. Larger non-toxic amyloid plaques are also present in tissues of eosinophilic patients in a feedback mechanism that likely limits tissue damage under pathological conditions of MBP-1 oversecretion. Our results suggest that MBP-1 aggregation is important for innate immunity and immunopathology mediated by eosinophils and clarify how its polymorphic self-association pathways regulate toxicity intra- and extracellularly. PMID:25728769

  7. Activated Eosinophils in Association with Enteric Nerves in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Claire M.; Akasheh, Nadim; Woods, Sara; Kay, Elaine; Morgan, Ross K.; Thornton, Margaret A.; O’Grady, Anthony; Cummins, Robert; Sheils, Orla; Smyth, Peter; Gleich, Gerald J.; Murray, Frank M.; Costello, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Enteric neural dysfunction leads to increased mucous production and dysmotility in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Prior studies have shown that tissue eosinophilia is related to disease activity. We hypothesized that interactions between eosinophils and nerves contribute to neural dysfunction in IBD. Tissue from patients with intractable IBD, endoscopic biopsies from patients with steroid responsive IBD, both when active and quiescent, and control tissue were studied. Immunohistochemical studies showed that eosinophils localize to nerves in the mucosal layer of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) (p<0.001) and ulcerative colitis (UC), (p<0.01). Eosinophils localized to substance P and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunostained nerves. Real time PCR of laser capture micro-dissected enteric ganglia demonstrated Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM-1) mRNA was increased 7-fold in UC (n?=?4), (p?=?0.03), and 10-fold in CD (n?=?3), (p?=?0.05). Compared with controls, eotaxin-3 (CCL-26) mRNA was increased 9-fold in UC (p?=?0.04) and 15-fold in CD (p?=?0.06). Eosinophil numbers correlated with disease activity, while deposition of major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil Transforming Growth Factor ? -1 (TGF?-1) expression were seen in therapeutically responsive disease. These data indicate a significant localization of eosinophils to nerves in IBD, mediated through neurally expressed ICAM-1 and eotaxin-3. This cell/neural interaction may influence the function of nerves and contribute to symptoms in IBD. PMID:23717571

  8. Significance of fractional exhaled nitric oxide in chronic eosinophilic pneumonia: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) is characterized by chronic eosinophilic infiltration of the lung. It is dramatically responsive to corticosteroid treatment, but symptoms and radiopacities recur frequently after tapering or discontinuing the medication. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a well-known noninvasive marker of eosinophilic airway inflammation. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to investigate the relationships of FeNO with peripheral eosinophilia and the clinical state of CEP and its validity for predicting exacerbation of CEP. Methods Standard clinical and laboratory parameters, peripheral eosinophil percentage and count, and FeNO level were measured in 18 patients with CEP at several assessment points over 1 year. Results FeNO level was positively correlated with peripheral eosinophil count (r?=?0.341, P?=?0.005) and percentage (r?=?0.362, P?=?0.003). The median (IQR) FeNO levels were 79 (41–88) and 35 (26–49) ppb in uncontrolled (13/74 measurements) and controlled (61/74 measurements) CEP, respectively (P?=?0.010). The FeNO level of 66.0 ppb showed the largest area under the curve (0.835) for predicting exacerbation of CEP (sensitivity?=?0.80, specificity?=?0.84). Conclusion FeNO may be useful for monitoring eosinophilic parenchymal inflammation and determining the appropriate corticosteroid dose in CEP. PMID:24885379

  9. From allergy to schistosomes: role of Fc receptors and adhesion molecules in eosinophil effector function.

    PubMed

    Nutten, S; Trottein, F; Gounni, A S; Papin, J P; Capron, A; Capron, M

    1997-01-01

    The dual function of eosinophils has been evidenced in protective immunity against parasites as well as in pathological manifestations during allergic disorders. We have demonstrated that a new class of IgE receptors, Fc epsilon RII/CD23, was involved in the functional duality of eosinophils and other proinflammatory cells. More recently, we have shown that Fc epsilon RI, the high affinity IgE receptor thought to be only expressed by basophils and most cells, was involved in eosinophil-mediated cytotoxicity against schistosomes as well as in mediator release. These results favour the view that both IgE and its receptors have been primarily associated to a protective immune response, rather than to pathology. Not only IgE receptors but also members belonging to the family of adhesion molecules can participate as co-receptors in eosinophil effector function. The inhibitory role of monoclonal antibodies to Lewis(X) (Le(X) CD15) or to selectins in eosinophil-mediated cytotoxicity towards schistosomes and the detection of Le(X) and selectin-like molecules on schistosomula surface indicate a double interaction mediated by selectins and their carbohydrate ligands between eosinophils and schistosomula. These results suggest new functions for these adhesion molecules, previously known to be involved mainly in cell infiltration. PMID:9698910

  10. An experimental study of inner ear injury in an animal model of eosinophilic otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Hisanori; Kurose, Akira; Nakagawa, Takashi; Takahata, Junko; Sasaki, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: As the periods of intratympanic injection of ovalbumin (OVA) to the middle ear became longer, marked eosinophil infiltration in the perilymphatic space was observed. Moreover severe morphological damage of the organ of Corti was observed in the 28-day antigen-stimulation side. These results indicate that eosinophilic inflammation occurred in the inner ear and caused profound hearing loss. Objective: The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the inner ear damage in a new animal model of eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) which we recently constructed. Methods: We constructed the animal model of EOM by intraperitoneal and intratympanic injection of OVA. Infiltrating cells and the inner ear damage were examined by histological study. Results: In the inner ear, a few eosinophils were seen in the scala tympani of the organ of Corti and the dilation of capillaries of the stria vascularis was observed in the 7-day stimulation side. In the 14-day antigen stimulation side, some eosinophils and macrophages were seen in not only the scala tympani but also the scala vestibule. In the 28-day antigen-stimulation side, severe morphological damage of the organ of Corti and many eosinophils, red blood cells, and plasma cells infiltrating the perilymph were observed. PMID:24359096

  11. Eosinophilic myocarditis in CBA/J mice infected with Toxocara canis.

    PubMed Central

    Cookston, M.; Stober, M.; Kayes, S. G.

    1990-01-01

    In humans, chronic eosinophilia has been associated clinically with endomyocardial fibrosis and myocardial damage. Mice infected with Toxocara canis have a marked eosinophilia, and develop eosinophil-rich granulomatous lesions in the soft tissues of the body, especially the lungs, liver, brain, and skeletal muscle. Few reports have described myocardial lesions associated with T. canis infections in mice. We examined the hearts of CBA/J mice killed at weekly intervals over an 8-week period for evidence of myocardial damage that might be attributable to eosinophils. Total white blood cell counts and eosinophil counts were obtained during this period, and revealed a peak white blood cell count of approximately 28,000 cells/mm3 at day 7 after infection and a peak eosinophil count of approximately 4,000 cells/mm3 at day 14 after infection. Myocardial lesions in the ventricular wall began as focal infiltrates of eosinophils and histiocytes, then progressed into granulomata containing necrotic debris. Collagen deposition was noted by day 21 after infection. By day 42 after infection, the lesions had contracted greatly because of a loss of cellularity, and consisted mainly of fibroblasts and hemosiderin-laden macrophages. Myocyte damage, characterized by increased eosinophilia and necrosis, was observed. T. canis-infected CBA/J mice thus offer a useful model to study eosinophil-dependent myocardial damage. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:2349964

  12. Management of prolymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dearden, Claire

    2015-12-01

    B-cell (B-PLL) and T-cell (T-PLL) prolymphocytic leukemias are rare, poor-prognosis lymphoid neoplasms with similar presentation characterized by symptomatic splenomegaly and lymphocytosis. They can be distinguished from each other and from other T- and B-cell leukemias by careful evaluation of morphology, immunophenotyping, and molecular genetics. The clinical behavior is typically aggressive, although a subset of patients may have an indolent phase of variable length. First-line therapy for T-PLL is with intravenous alemtuzumab and for B-PLL is with combination purine analog-based chemo-immunotherapy. New B-cell receptor inhibitors, such as ibrutinib and idelalisib, may have a role in the management of B-PLL, especially for the patients harboring abnormalities of TP53. Allogenic stem cell transplantation should still be considered for eligible patients and may be the only current therapy capable of delivering a cure. In the past few years, many of the molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis and progression have been revealed and are likely to lead to the development of novel targeted approaches. PMID:26637744

  13. What Are the Key Statistics for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lymphocytic leukemia? What are the key statistics for chronic lymphocytic leukemia? The American Cancer Society's estimates for leukemia in ... all kinds) About 14,620 new cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) About 4,650 deaths from CLL CLL ...

  14. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  18. Recent advances in understanding/managing eosinophilic esophagitis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Katzka, David A.

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting time for research in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). As a new and increasingly prevalent disease, it is receiving considerable attention in the medical world, resulting in a flood of new insights. Clearly, a genetic predisposition seems likely with the identification of abnormalities in thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), calpain14, and eotaxin-3 genes. There are also well-defined abnormalities described in esophageal epithelial barrier function in these patients. The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and EoE remains unclear, but emerging data suggest that the concept of proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPIREE) may retain less importance, as this subset of patients becomes a likely subset of EoE in general. Finally, we approach the looming issue of long-term maintenance therapy. Although we lack adequate specific data on how to provide long-term pharmacologic treatment, studies clearly show that for most patients, this is a progressive disease that warrants such consideration. PMID:26339483

  19. Clinical features of Eosinophilic esophagitis in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Miehlke, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) may affect humans at any age with a predominance for Caucasian males. The clinical manifestation of EoE varies depending on the patient's age. Infants and young children may primarily present with unspecific symptoms such as feeding problems, vomiting and abdominal pain. In adolescents and adults, dysphagia and food impactation become the predominant symtoms. EoE should also be considered in cases of refractory heartburn in both children and adults. Concomitant allergic diseases such as asthma, rhinitis and eczema, as well as peripheral eosinophilia and elevated total serum IgE values are common in pediatric and adult EoE patients. EoE seems to be primarily a food antigen-driven disease, whereas in adults, aeroallergen sensitization may dominate. Endoscopic features of EoE include mucosal edema, furrows, exudates, corrugated rings, strictures, and the so-called crepe paper sign. There appears to be a shift from an inflammtory-predominant phenotype in young childhood towards a more fibrotic phenotype in adolescents and adults. Long-term follow studies suggest that EoE is a chronic and protentially progessive disease causing recurring dysphagia in the majority of cases. The prevalence of strictures significantly increases with the duration of untreated disease, stressing the importance of early diagnosis and consequent treatment of EoE. PMID:26552773

  20. Finger stiffness or edema as presenting symptoms of eosinophilic fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shingo; Noda, Kazutaka; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Shikino, Kiyoshi; Ikusaka, Masatomi

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the clinical features and finger symptoms of eosinophilic fasciitis (EF), we reviewed five patients with EF. The chief complaint was pain, edema and/or stiffness of the extremities. The distal extremities were affected in all patients, and there was also proximal involvement in one patient. One patient had asymmetrical symptoms. All four patients with upper limb involvement had limited range of motion of the wrist joints, and three of them complained of finger symptoms. Two of these three patients showed slight non-pitting edema of the hands, and the other one had subcutaneous induration of the forearm. All four patients with lower limb symptoms had limited range of motion of the ankle joints, and two showed edema or induration of the legs. Inflammatory changes in the joints were not detected in any of the patients. Two patients displayed neither objective induration nor edema, and two patients had muscle tenderness. In conclusion, finger symptoms of patients with EF might be caused by fasciitis of the forearms, which leads to dysfunction of the long finger flexors and extensors as well as slight edema of hands. Limited range of motion of wrist and/or ankle joints indicates sensitively distal muscle dysfunction caused by fasciitis. PMID:26248532

  1. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce eosinophilic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Liang; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Hau-Inh; Liao, Huang-Shen; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2015-10-30

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have been widely used in industry. The metal composition of PM2.5 might contribute to the higher prevalence of asthma. To investigate the effects of ZnO NPs on allergic airway inflammation, mice were first exposed to different concentrations of ZnO NPs (0.1 mg/kg, 0.5 mg/kg) or to a combination of ZnO NPs and chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA) by oropharyngeal aspiration on day 0 and day 7 and then were sacrificed 5 days later. The subsequent time course of airway inflammation in the mice after ZnO NPs exposure was evaluated on days 1, 7, and 14. To further determine the role of zinc ions, ZnCl2 was also administered. The inflammatory cell count, cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung histopathology were examined. We found significant neutrophilia after exposure to high-dose ZnO NPs on day 1 and significant eosinophilia in the BALF at 7 days. However, the expression levels of the T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 increased significantly after 24h of exposure to only ZnO NPs and then decreased gradually. These results suggested that ZnO NPs could cause eosinophilic airway inflammation in the absence of allergens. PMID:26010476

  2. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-30

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. The causes of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Severson, R K; Ross, J A

    1999-01-01

    Although impressive biologic advances have increased understanding of leukemogenesis, we know little about the causes of the acute leukemias. Epidemiologic studies have focused primarily on children. Higher birth weight is associated with an increased risk of childhood acute leukemia. Several theories have been advanced that may account for these observations, and additional biologic studies are needed. Some epidemiologic studies suggest that the acute leukemias in children may have an infectious component. Again, further work, especially in the area of specific causative agents, is necessary. Another area for future epidemiologic study includes investigation of exposure to natural and synthetic DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors. Preliminary evidence suggests that exposure to these agents, which are found in certain foods and medications, may be related to the subsequent development of acute leukemia in infants. PMID:9914873

  4. Social Factors Affect Leukemia Survival

    MedlinePLUS

    ... patients' age and the progression of their disease, socioeconomic factors not directly related to their medical care played ... Living with Cancer Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cancer--Living with Cancer ...

  5. How Is Childhood Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in immature forms of cells that make platelets. World Health Organization (WHO) classification of AML The FAB ... phases, but a common system (proposed by the World Health Organization) is described below. If the leukemia ...

  6. What Is Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... In this way CMML is more like a myeloproliferative disease ( myelo -- bone marrow, proliferative -- excessive growth). Chronic myeloid leukemia is an example of a myeloproliferative disease where there is an overproduction of white ...

  7. Major basic protein from eosinophils and myeloperoxidase from neutrophils are required for protective immunity to Strongyloides stercoralis in mice.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Amy E; Hess, Jessica A; Santiago, Gilberto A; Nolan, Thomas J; Lok, James B; Lee, James J; Abraham, David

    2011-07-01

    Eosinophils and neutrophils contribute to larval killing during the primary immune response, and neutrophils are effector cells in the secondary response to Strongyloides stercoralis in mice. The objective of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms used by eosinophils and neutrophils to control infections with S. stercoralis. Using mice deficient in the eosinophil granule products major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), it was determined that eosinophils kill the larvae through an MBP-dependent mechanism in the primary immune response if other effector cells are absent. Infecting PHIL mice, which are eosinophil deficient, with S. stercoralis resulted in development of primary and secondary immune responses that were similar to those of wild-type mice, suggesting that eosinophils are not an absolute requirement for larval killing or development of secondary immunity. Treating PHIL mice with a neutrophil-depleting antibody resulted in a significant impairment in larval killing. Naïve and immunized mice with neutrophils deficient in myeloperoxidase (MPO) infected with S. stercoralis had significantly decreased larval killing. It was concluded that there is redundancy in the primary immune response, with eosinophils killing the larvae through an MBP-dependent mechanism and neutrophils killing the worms through an MPO-dependent mechanism. Eosinophils are not required for the development or function of secondary immunity, but MPO from neutrophils is required for protective secondary immunity. PMID:21482685

  8. Effects of prednisone on eosinophilic bronchitis in asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis*,**

    PubMed Central

    Sakae, Thiago Mamôru; Maurici, Rosemeri; Trevisol, Daisson José; Pizzichini, Marcia Margaret Menezes; Pizzichini, Emílio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect size of oral corticosteroid treatment on eosinophilic bronchitis in asthma, through systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: We systematically reviewed articles in the Medline, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, and LILACS databases. We selected studies meeting the following criteria: comparing at least two groups or time points (prednisone vs. control, prednisone vs. another drug, or pre- vs. post-treatment with prednisone); and evaluating parameters before and after prednisone use, including values for sputum eosinophils, sputum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and sputum IL-5-with or without values for post-bronchodilator FEV1-with corresponding 95% CIs or with sufficient data for calculation. The independent variables were the use, dose, and duration of prednisone treatment. The outcomes evaluated were sputum eosinophils, IL-5, and ECP, as well as post-bronchodilator FEV1. RESULTS: The pooled analysis of the pre- vs. post-treatment data revealed a significant mean reduction in sputum eosinophils (?8.18%; 95% CI: 7.69-8.67; p < 0.001), sputum IL-5 (?83.64 pg/mL; 95% CI: 52.45-114.83; p < 0.001), and sputum ECP (?267.60 µg/L; 95% CI: 244.57-290.63; p < 0.0001), as well as a significant mean increase in post-bronchodilator FEV1 (?8.09%; 95% CI: 5.35-10.83; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with moderate-to-severe eosinophilic bronchitis, treatment with prednisone caused a significant reduction in sputum eosinophil counts, as well as in the sputum levels of IL-5 and ECP. This reduction in the inflammatory response was accompanied by a significant increase in post-bronchodilator FEV1. PMID:25410844

  9. Immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arpinati, Mario; Curti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with current chemotherapy regimens is still disappointing, with overall survival rates of ? 40% at 5 years. It is now well established that AML cells can evade the immune system through multiple mechanisms, including the expression of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase. Immunotherapeutic strategies, including both active, such as vaccination with leukemia-associated antigens, and passive, such as adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer cells, may overcome leukemia escape and lead to improved cure. Allogeneic hemopoeitic stem cell transplantation, the most effective treatment of AML, is the best known model of immunotherapy. Following transplant, recipient AML cells are eradicated by donor immune cells through the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. However, GVL is clinically associated with graft-versus-host disease, the major cause of mortality after transplant. GVL is mediated by donor T cells recognizing either leukemia-associated antigens or minor as well as major histocompatibility antigens. Several innovative strategies have been devised to generate leukemia reactive T cells so as to increase GVL responses with no or little graft-versus-host disease. PMID:24341888

  10. Molecular diagnosis of lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Goud, Kalal Iravathy; Dayakar, Seetha; Prasad, S V S S; Rao, Koteshwar N; Shaik, Amina; Vanjakshi, S

    2013-01-01

    The mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene at chromosome band 11q23 is commonly involved in reciprocal translocations that is detected in acute leukemia. The MLL gene, commonly known as mixed lineage leukemia or myeloid lymphoid leukemia, has been independently identified and cloned from the 11q23 breakpoint of acute leukemia. We describe a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia whose cells had shown reciprocal translocation between short arm (p21) of chromosome 2 and long arm (q23) of chromosome number 11 [t(2;11) (p21;q23)] by cytogenetic analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) was also performed for reconfirmation with a probe for MLL which showed split signals, hybridizing to both the derivative 2 and 11 chromosomes. Our study confirmed FISH as the most suitable assay for detecting MLL rearrangements because of its sensitivity and speed. It recommended that FISH should be used as complementary to conventional cytogenetic analysis. In conclusion, evaluation of the t(2;11)(p21;q23) was done by molecular clarification and flow cytometry. PMID:24125990

  11. Phase I/II Study of Nilotinib/Ruxolitinb Therapy for TKI Resistant Ph-Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Chronic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Philadelphia Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Resistant to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy

  12. IL-5 Induces Suspended Eosinophils to Undergo Unique Global Reorganization Associated with Priming

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shih-Tsung

    2014-01-01

    The experiments described herein define a unique program of polarization of suspended human eosinophils stimulated with IL-5 family cytokines. We found that eosinophil granules and the nucleus move in opposite directions to form, respectively, a granular compartment and the nucleopod, a specialized uropod occupied by the nucleus and covered with adhesion receptors, including P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, CD44, and activated ?M?2 integrin. Ligated IL-5 family receptors localize specifically at the tip of the nucleopod in proximity to downstream signaling partners Janus tyrosine kinase 2, signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 and -5, and extracellular signal–regulated kinase. Microscopy and effects of cytochalasin B and nocodazole indicate that remodeling of filamentous actin and reorientation of the microtubule network are required for eosinophil polarization and nucleopod formation. IL-5 induces persistent polarization and extracellular signal–regulated kinase redistribution that are associated with eosinophil priming, a robust response on subsequent stimulation with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. Global reorganization of cytoskeleton, organelles, adhesion receptors, and signaling molecules likely facilitates vascular arrest, extravasation, migration, granule release, and survival of eosinophils entering inflamed tissues from the bloodstream. PMID:24156300

  13. Adhesion of eosinophils to endothelial cells or substrates under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Konya, Viktoria; Peinhaupt, Miriam; Heinemann, Akos

    2014-01-01

    Recruitment of eosinophils into the lung tissue is a critical event in allergic inflammatory reactions. Extravasation of eosinophils from the bloodstream is a highly dynamic multistep process that involves capture, rolling, activation, firm adhesion, and transendothelial and subendothelial migration of the cells. It is assumed that the rate-limiting step in this cascade is the capture and firm adhesion of cells to the endothelium. As such it is most critical to study endothelial-leukocyte interaction using assays which are capable of mimicking physiological flow conditions. Previously, various parallel flow chamber setups had been used for studying leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Here we describe a highly reproducible technique for investigating eosinophil adhesion to endothelial cell layer or adhesion molecule/extracellular matrix protein coating in biochips by using a semiautomated microfluidic platform and live-cell imaging. In detail, we show eosinophil adhesion to endothelial cells activated by tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, and adhesion to fibronectin of eosinophils stimulated by prostaglandin (PG) D2. PMID:24986614

  14. High Fat Diet Causes Depletion of Intestinal Eosinophils Associated with Intestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Andrew M. F.; Costanzo, Anne; Gareau, Melanie G.; Armando, Aaron M.; Quehenberger, Oswald; Jameson, Julie M.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2015-01-01

    The development of intestinal permeability and the penetration of microbial products are key factors associated with the onset of metabolic disease. However, the mechanisms underlying this remain unclear. Here we show that, unlike liver or adipose tissue, high fat diet (HFD)/obesity in mice does not cause monocyte/macrophage infiltration into the intestine or pro-inflammatory changes in gene expression. Rather HFD causes depletion of intestinal eosinophils associated with the onset of intestinal permeability. Intestinal eosinophil numbers were restored by returning HFD fed mice to normal chow and were unchanged in leptin-deficient (Ob/Ob) mice, indicating that eosinophil depletion is caused specifically by a high fat diet and not obesity per se. Analysis of different aspects of intestinal permeability in HFD fed and Ob/Ob mice shows an association between eosinophil depletion and ileal paracelullar permeability, as well as leakage of albumin into the feces, but not overall permeability to FITC dextran. These findings provide the first evidence that a high fat diet causes intestinal eosinophil depletion, rather than inflammation, which may contribute to defective barrier integrity and the onset of metabolic disease. PMID:25837594

  15. Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis of Sinonasal Region: A Rare & Under Reported Entity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aminder; Selhi, Pavneet Kaur; Munjal, Manish; Sood, Neena

    2015-11-01

    Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis is a rare pathology of the sinonasal tract and the upper respiratory system characterised by fibrosis with poorly understood pathogenesis. A 47-year-old male presented with a swelling over the dorsum of the nose. The possibility of fungal granuloma was being suggested on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Histopathology showed thick collagen bundles whorling around vessels giving an onion skin appearance with focal area of vasculitis. An inflammatory reaction rich in eosinophils along with a fibrotic stroma was seen which was highly characteristic of eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis. Clinically & microscopically it mimics Granuloma faciale, Wegener's Granulomatosis, Churg-Strauss Syndrome, Kimura's disease and few other granulomatous conditions thus making diagnosis difficult. A probable allergic origin is being suggested because of the typical eosinophil-rich inflammatory reaction. Finally the diagnosis of Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis was given. It is a diagnosis of exclusion having characteristic histomorphological findings thus biopsy is always required to distinguish it from other lesions whose treatment differs. PMID:26674883

  16. The complex relationship between eosinophilic esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Katzka, David A

    2014-01-01

    That gastroesophageal reflux and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) may both lead to esophageal eosinophilia is well known. What is not known is how, if at all, these entities interact to contribute to this pathologic entity in specific patients and how often they occur in patients as synergistic contributors to the disease as opposed to distinct processes. There are several hypotheses by which gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and EoE might interact to cause esophageal eosinophilia. These include (1) reflux of food from the stomach with increased antigenic exposure to esophageal epithelium; (2) reflux-induced dilation of intercellular spaces in the epithelium facilitating dendritic cell and antigen movement through the mucosa, and (3) a common inflammatory pathway activated by both GERD and EoE. Although these hypotheses appear plausible, supporting clinical data is not readily available. For example, it is unclear if the beneficial effect of proton pump inhibitors on esophageal eosinophilia is mediated through control of acid exposure to esophageal mucosa or independent anti-inflammatory effects. There is also a lack of definitive evidence to support an increased incidence of GERD in the pediatric population in the absence of evident risk factors such as obesity. One would think if GERD were an important cofactor in this disease, the incidence of GERD would rise similarly to EoE. It is speculated that GERD and EoE coexist and in some patients interact to facilitate esophageal eosinophilia and its sequelae. However, the presence and degree of this interaction likely varies remarkably. Their presence could be influenced by other factors such as age of the patient and genetic predisposition to EoE. PMID:24603388

  17. Interleukin-5 modulates interleukin-8 secretion in eosinophilic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Faccioli, L H; Medeiros, A I; Malheiro, A; Pietro, R C; Januário, A; Vargaftig, B B

    1998-01-01

    Serum and BALF (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) IL-8 levels and serum levels were investigated in Toxocara canis infected guinea-pigs and the role of IL-5 as a modulator of cytokine secretion was studied. Serum levels increased early in infected animals, exceeding control levels 4 h after infection, peaked between days 6 and 18, and continued to exceed control levels after 48 days of infection. Serum and BALF IL-8 levels showed the same profile as blood eosinophilia, increasing 6 days post-infection and peaking between days 18 and 24. Treatment of infected animals with anti-IL-5 Ab suppressed eosinophilia with a parallel increase in blood IL-8 levels, whereas no change was found in levels. To support our in vivo observation we carried out experiments in vitro using guinea-pig LPS-stimulated adherent peritoneal cells which release large amounts of IL-8 into the supernatants. When rIL-5 was added to LPS-stimulated cells, 65% inhibition of IL-8 release into the supernatants was observed. Pre-incubation of cells with anti-IL-5 Ab prevented the inhibition of IL-8 release into the supernatants induced by rIL-5. Our results demonstrate for the first time that TNF-alpha and IL-8 are released concomitant with or after IL-5 in the eosinophilic inflammation induced by T. canis. Moreover, in addition to showing that IL-5 is fundamental for the induction of blood eosinophilia, the present results suggest that this cytokine may play a new biological role by acting as modulator of IL-8 secretion. PMID:9839698

  18. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Print A A A Text Size What's in ...

  19. Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase

    MedlinePLUS

    ... myeloid leukemia is working? ”) How often is treatment successful? Up to about 70% of people have a ... see Leukemia: Acute Lymphocytic . Allogeneic SCT is less successful for blast phase CML than for earlier phases, ...

  20. Childhood leukemia in Woburn, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, J.J.; Parker, G.S.; Rosen, S.; Prenney, B.; Healey, R.; Caldwell, G.G.

    1986-03-01

    Possible associations between environmental hazards and the occurrence of childhood leukemia were investigated in Woburn, MA, for the period 1969-79. Residents of Woburn were concerned over what they perceived to be a large number of childhood leukemia cases; at the same time there was extensive publicity about uncontrolled hazardous waste sites in Woburn, which resulted in its being placed on the Superfund list. Many believed that the elevated rate of childhood leukemia was related to these sites or to two city water wells that had been closed in 1979 when they were found to be contaminated by organic chemicals. An occurrence was defined as childhood leukemia when it was diagnosed in a Woburn resident less than 20 years old between 1969 and 1979 and confirmed by review of hospital and pathology records. This investigation confirmed an increase in incidence which was distributed uniformly over the 11-year period. Six of the persons with leukemia were located close to each other in one census tract, 7.5 times the expected number. Parents of the children and of two matched control groups were interviewed about medical history, mother's pregnancy history, school history, and environmental exposures. There were no significant differences between the leukemia victims and persons in the control groups. No leukemia sufferer had contact with a hazardous waste site. While the contaminants of Wells G and H, which had been closed, are not known leukemogens, it is not possible to rule out exposure to this water as a factor, particularly in the eastern Woburn residents.

  1. The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Clavel, Jacqueline; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Petridou, Eleni; Taylor, Malcolm; Schüz, Joachim; Spector, Logan G.; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Sinnett, Daniel; Murphy, Michael; Roman, Eve; Monge, Patricia; Ezzat, Sameera; Mueller, Beth A.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Birch, Jill; Kaatsch, Peter; Koifman, Sergio; Lightfoot, Tracy; Bhatti, Parveen; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rudant, Jérémie; O’Neill, Kate; Miligi, Lucia; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case–control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene–environment interactions. Objectives The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene–environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962–present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31 000 cases and 50 000 controls. Of these, 19 case–control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child–parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene–environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic groups. PMID:23403126

  2. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  3. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome): ultrastructural study of a case with circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, M C; Janin-Mercier, A; Souteyrand, P; Bourges, M; Hermier, C

    1988-01-01

    A 42-year-old woman was observed during 3 bouts of eosinophilic cellulitis over a 6-year-period. Skin biopsies were taken at each relapse and processed for histological, immunofluorescent and ultrastructural studies. Histologically the eosinophilic infiltrate extended to the deep dermis and the subcutaneous fat. High levels of circulating immune complexes, and complement and IgG deposits around the vessels were detected for as long as the cutaneous lesions lasted. Under the electron microscope eosinophils were numerous, half of them degranulated and some granules had a double cristal core. No injury to the vessel walls was observed. The 3 recurrences occurred respectively after lincomycin, nesdonal, acetyl salicylic acid and pholcodin ingestion and responded to sulfone and steroid therapy. PMID:2969834

  6. Sarcocystis fayeri-Induced Granulomatous and Eosinophilic Myositis in 2 Related Horses.

    PubMed

    Herd, H R; Sula, M M; Starkey, L A; Panciera, R J; Johnson, E M; Snider, T A; Holbrook, T C

    2015-11-01

    This report describes 2 genetically related paint mares, case Nos. 1 and 2, presented to the Oklahoma State University Boren Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital for chronic weight loss and abnormal gait, respectively. Notable findings in both cases included marked persistent eosinophilia and multiple intramuscular lateral thoracic masses. Histologic examination of masses revealed eosinophilic, centrally necrotic granulomas and marked eosinophilic myositis. Granulomas in case No. 1 also contained intralesional Sarcocystis sp material, and adjacent muscle fibers contained intact protozoal cysts. Case No. 1 developed severe refractory muscle pain and recurrent esophageal dysphagia. At necropsy, disseminated, grossly visible granulomas were present throughout all examined striated muscles. Nested polymerase chain reaction of the 18S rRNA gene revealed >99% homology with Sarcocystis fayeri. Sarcocystis spp are apicomplexan protozoa that infect striated muscle of many omnivorous species, typically without inciting clinical disease. Sarcocystosis should be considered a rare cause of granulomatous eosinophilic myositis and choke in horses. PMID:25957356

  7. Deterministic Model for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Classification

    E-print Network

    Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    Deterministic Model for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Classification Monica Madhukar-- Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects the blood and the bone marrow. Manual data analysis is time that the proposed system robustly segments and classifies Acute Myelogenous Leukemia based on complete microscopic

  8. www.yalecancercenter.org Treatment of Leukemia

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    www.yalecancercenter.org Treatment of Leukemia Guest Expert: Peter Marks, MD Associate Professor of Medicine and Hematology, and Director of the Leukemia Service at Yale-New Haven Hospital and Chief Clinical and Hematology, and Director of the Leukemia Service at Yale-New Haven Hospital and Chief Clinical Officer

  9. Non-Eosinophilic Nasal Polyps Shows Increased Epithelial Proliferation and Localized Disease Pattern in the Early Stage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Kyu; Jin, Hong Ryul; Eun, Kyoung Mi; Mutusamy, Somasundran; Cho, Seong H.; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Dae Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-eosinophilic nasal polyps (NPs) show less inflammatory changes and are less commonly associated with lower airway inflammatory disorders such as asthma, compared with eosinophilic NPs. However, the development of non-eosinophilic NPs which is a predominant subtype in Asian population still remains unclear. Methods A total of 81 patients (45 with non-eosinophilic NPs and 36 with eosinophilic NPs) were enrolled. Clinical information and computed tomography (CT), endoscopic, and histological findings were investigated. Tissue samples were analyzed for total IgE levels and for mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL–5, IL–13, interferon (IFN)-?, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, IL-17A, IL–22, IL-23p19, transforming growth factor (TGF)-?1, TGF-?2, TGF-?3, and periostin. Immunostaining assessment of Ki–67 as a proliferation marker was performed. Results We found that epithelial in-growing patterns such as pseudocysts were more frequently observed in histological and endoscopic evaluations of non-eosinophilic NPs, which was linked to increase epithelial staining of Ki–67, a proliferating marker. Eosinophilic NPs were characterized by high infiltration of inflammatory cells, compared with non-eosinophilic NPs. To investigate the developmental course of each subtype, CT was analyzed according to CT scores and subtypes. Non-eosinophilic NPs showed more localized pattern and maxillary sinus involvement, but lesser olfactory involvement in early stage whereas eosinophilic NPs were characterized by diffuse ethmoidal and olfactory involvement. In addition, high ethmoidal/maxillary (E/M) CT scores, indicating ethmoidal dominant involvement, were one of surrogate markers for eosinophilic NP. E/M CT scores was positively correlated with levels of TH2 inflammatory markers, including IL–4, IL–5, periostin mRNA expression and total IgE levels in NPs, whereas levels of the TH1 cytokine, IFN- ? were inversely correlated. Moreover, if the combinatorial algorithm meet the three of the four markers, including IL–5 (<2.379), periostin (<3.889), IFN-? (>0.316), and E/M ratio (<2.167), non-eosinophilic CRSwNP are diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.4% and a specificity of 84.8%. Conclusion Histologic, immunologic and clinical data suggest that non-eosinophilic NPs showed enhanced epithelial alteration and more localized maxillary involvement. Combination of cutoff value on IL–5, periostin, IFN-?, and E/M scores may be one of surrogate markers for non-eosinophil NP subtype. PMID:26439628

  10. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (? 20%) and absolute number (? 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  11. Eosinophilic Fasciitis: What Matters in Management in a Developing Country—A Case Report with Two and a Half-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Ariful; Abdal, Syed Jamil; Azad, Mohammad Abul Kalam; Ahmedullah, Abul Khair; Haq, Syed Atiqul

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis is an uncommon disorder of unknown aetiology and poorly-understood pathogenesis. Since 1974, over 250 cases of eosinophilic fasciitis have been reported worldwide. The first case of eosinophilic fasciitis from Bangladesh is reported here. The challenges of diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up, including family and social support, are discussed. PMID:22524129

  12. Pharmacological and immunohistochemical evidence for a functional nitric oxide synthase system in rat peritoneal?eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Zanardo, Renata C. O.; Costa, Edmar; Ferreira, Heloisa H. A.; Antunes, Edson; Martins, Antonio R.; Murad, Ferid; De Nucci, Gilberto

    1997-01-01

    Eosinophil migration in vivo is markedly attenuated in rats treated chronically with the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor N?-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). In this study, we investigated the existence of a NOS system in eosinophils. Our results demonstrated that rat peritoneal eosinophils strongly express both type II (30.2 ± 11.6% of counted cells) and type III (24.7 ± 7.4% of counted cells) NOS, as detected by immunohistochemistry using affinity purified mouse mAbs. Eosinophil migration in vitro was evaluated by using 48-well microchemotaxis chambers and the chemotactic agents used were N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP, 5 × 10?8 M) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4, 10?8 M). l-NAME (but not d-NAME) significantly inhibited the eosinophil migration induced by both fMLP (54% reduction for 1.0 mM; P < 0.05) and LTB4 (61% reduction for 1.0 mM; P < 0.05). In addition, the type II NOS inhibitor 2-amino-5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-4H-1,3-thiazine and the type I/II NOS inhibitor 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl) imidazole also markedly (P < 0.05) attenuated fMLP- (52% and 38% reduction for 1.0 mM, respectively) and LTB4- (52% and 51% reduction for 1.0 mM, respectively) induced migration. The inhibition of eosinophil migration by l-NAME was mimicked by the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3,-a] quinoxalin-1-one (0.01 and 0.1 mM) and reversed by either sodium nitroprusside (0.1 mM) or dibutyryl cyclic GMP (1 mM). We conclude that eosinophils do express NO synthase(s) and that nitric oxide plays an essential role in eosinophil locomotion by acting through a cyclic GMP transduction mechanism. PMID:9391161

  13. Role of Endoscopy in Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Muir, Amanda B; Merves, Jamie; Liacouras, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic allergic (immune-mediated) disease that leads to esophageal dysfunction and feeding disorders in children. Foods, and possibly environmental triggers, cause an inflammatory response in the esophagus, leading to esophageal inflammation, eosinophilic infiltration, and esophageal dysmotility, which may progress to dysphagia, food impaction, and esophageal stricture. Endoscopy with biopsy and histologic evaluation is currently the only method to diagnose EoE. Once diagnosed with EoE, children undergo follow-up endoscopy after therapy initiation and adjustments to ensure remission. Furthermore, children with food impactions or strictures may require endoscopic intervention such as foreign body removal and/or esophageal dilation. PMID:26616904

  14. Milk-sensitive eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 2-month-old boy.

    PubMed

    Costa, Conceição; Pinto Pais, Isabel; Rios, Elisabete; Costa, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare disease of unknown aetiology, characterised by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal wall with various gastrointestinal manifestations. Clinical presentation and radiological findings are non-specific and there is an overlap with more frequent childhood diseases requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion for accurate diagnosis. We describe a 2-month-old boy with prolonged diarrhoea, vomiting and food refusal. Diagnosis was settled by histology. The treatment with elemental diet was successful, with clinical resolution and catch-up growth. PMID:26272958

  15. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-31

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. PedsQL™ Eosinophilic Esophagitis Module: Feasibility, Reliability and Validity

    PubMed Central

    Franciosi, James P.; Hommel, Kevin A.; Bendo, Cristiane B.; King, Eileen C.; Collins, Margaret H.; Eby, Michael D.; Marsolo, Keith; Abonia, J. Pablo; von Tiehl, Karl F.; Putnam, Philip E.; Greenler, Alexandria J.; Greenberg, Allison B.; Bryson, Ronald A.; Davis, Carla M.; Olive, Anthony P.; Gupta, Sandeep K.; Erwin, Elizabeth A.; Klinnert, Mary D.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Denham, Jolanda M.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Varni, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic esophageal inflammatory condition with a paucity of information on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The objective of the study was to report on the measurement properties of the PedsQL™ EoE Module. Methods The PedsQL™ EoE Module was completed in a multisite study by 196 pediatric EoE patients and 262 EoE parents. Results The PedsQL™ EoE Module scales evidenced excellent feasibility (0.6%–3.1% missing), excellent group comparison reliability across total scale scores (patient ? = 0.93; parent proxy ? = 0.94), good reliability for the seven individual scales (patient ? = 0.75–0.87; parent proxy ? = 0.81–0.92), excellent test-retest reliability (patient ICC = 0.88; parent ICC= 0.82), demonstrated no floor effects and low ceiling effects, and demonstrated a high percentage of scaling success for most scales. Intercorrelations with the PedsQL™ Generic Core Scales were in the medium (0.30) to large (0.50) range. PedsQL™ EoE Module scores were worse among patients with active histologic disease (> 5 eos/hpf) compared to those in remission (patient self-report: 63.3 vs. 69.9 [p<0.05]; parent proxy-report: 65.1 vs. 72.3 [p<0.01]), and those treated with dietary restrictions compared to those with no restrictions (patient self-report: 61.6 vs. 74.3 [p< 0.01]; parent proxy-report: 65.5 vs. 74.7 [p<0.01]). Conclusions The results demonstrate excellent measurement properties of the PedsQL™ EoE Module. Patients with active histologic disease and those treated with dietary restrictions demonstrated worse PedsQL™ scores. The PedsQL™ EoE Module may be utilized in evaluation of pediatric EoE disease-specific HRQOL in clinical research and practice. PMID:23478422

  17. Acute leukemia in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Emerenciano, M; Koifman, S; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S

    2007-06-01

    Acute leukemia in early childhood is biologically and clinically distinct. The particular characteristics of this malignancy diagnosed during the first months of life have provided remarkable insights into the etiology of the disease. The pro-B, CD10 negative immunophenotype is typically found in infant acute leukemia, and the most common genetic alterations are the rearrangements of the MLL gene. In addition, the TEL/AML1 fusion gene is most frequently found in children older than 24 months. A molecular study on a Brazilian cohort (age range 0-23 months) has detected TEL/AML1+ve (N = 9), E2A/PBX1+ve (N = 4), PML/RARA+ve (N = 4), and AML1/ETO+ve (N = 2) cases. Undoubtedly, the great majority of genetic events occurring in these patients arise prenatally. The environmental exposure to damaging agents that give rise to genetic changes prenatally may be accurately determined in infants since the window of exposure is limited and known. Several studies have shown maternal exposures that may give rise to leukemogenic changes. The Brazilian Collaborative Study Group of Infant Acute Leukemia has found that mothers exposed to dipyrone, pesticides and hormones had an increased chance to give birth to babies with infant acute leukemia [OR = 1.48 (95%CI = 1.05-2.07), OR = 2.27 (95%CI = 1.56-3.31) and OR = 9.08 (95%CI = 2.95-27.96)], respectively. This review aims to summarize recent clues that have facilitated the elucidation of the biology of early childhood leukemias, with emphasis on infant acute leukemia in the Brazilian population. PMID:17581672

  18. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  19. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-20

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Very late recurrences of leukemia: why does leukemia awake after many years of dormancy?

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Uberti, Joseph P; Schiffer, Charles A

    2011-02-01

    We report a heterogeneous group of very late recurrences of leukemia occurring more than 10 years after initial treatment including 2 cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) which recurred after more than 20 years of remission, 2 cases of donor cell leukemia which developed more than 10 years after allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and high risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 2 cases of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) relapsing 13 and 17 years after allograft. Case descriptions are followed by a discussion regarding possible mechanisms leading to leukemia recurrence and a review of the literature. PMID:20970853

  2. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-23

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Transcriptional regulation of human eosinophil RNases by an evolutionary- conserved sequence motif in primate genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiu-Yu; Chang, Hao-Teng; Pai, Tun-Wen; Wu, Chung-I; Lee, Yuan-Hung; Chang, Yen-Hsin; Tai, Hsiu-Ling; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Chou, Wei-Yao; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2007-01-01

    Background Human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (edn) and eosinophil cationic protein (ecp) are members of a subfamily of primate ribonuclease (rnase) genes. Although they are generated by gene duplication event, distinct edn and ecp expression profile in various tissues have been reported. Results In this study, we obtained the upstream promoter sequences of several representative primate eosinophil rnases. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a shared 34-nucleotide (nt) sequence stretch located at -81 to -48 in all edn promoters and macaque ecp promoter. Such a unique sequence motif constituted a region essential for transactivation of human edn in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay, transient transfection and scanning mutagenesis experiments allowed us to identify binding sites for two transcription factors, Myc-associated zinc finger protein (MAZ) and SV-40 protein-1 (Sp1), within the 34-nt segment. Subsequent in vitro and in vivo binding assays demonstrated a direct molecular interaction between this 34-nt region and MAZ and Sp1. Interestingly, overexpression of MAZ and Sp1 respectively repressed and enhanced edn promoter activity. The regulatory transactivation motif was mapped to the evolutionarily conserved -74/-65 region of the edn promoter, which was guanidine-rich and critical for recognition by both transcription factors. Conclusion Our results provide the first direct evidence that MAZ and Sp1 play important roles on the transcriptional activation of the human edn promoter through specific binding to a 34-nt segment present in representative primate eosinophil rnase promoters. PMID:17927842

  4. Eosinophilic Pustular Folliculitis Post Chemotherapy in a Patient of Non-Hogkins Lymphoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bhandare, Prachi C; Ghodge, Rakhi R; Bhobe, Mayur R; Shukla, Pankaj R

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF) was originally described by Ofuji in Japanese patients without any systemic disease. Later it was widely associated with HIV. Lately a large number of hematological malignancies have been associated with EPF. We hereby report an association of non-Hogkins lymphoma with EPF, probably the first in Indian context. PMID:26538725

  5. Eosinophils in the Lung – Modulating Apoptosis and Efferocytosis in Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Felton, Jennifer M.; Lucas, Christopher D.; Rossi, Adriano G.; Dransfield, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Due to the key role of the lung in efficient transfer of oxygen in exchange for carbon dioxide, a controlled inflammatory response is essential for restoration of tissue homeostasis following airway exposure to bacterial pathogens or environmental toxins. Unregulated or prolonged inflammatory responses in the lungs can lead to tissue damage, disrupting normal tissue architecture, and consequently compromising efficient gaseous exchange. Failure to resolve inflammation underlies the development and/or progression of a number of inflammatory lung diseases including asthma. Eosinophils, granulocytic cells of the innate immune system, are primarily involved in defense against parasitic infections. However, the propagation of the allergic inflammatory response in chronic asthma is thought to involve excessive recruitment and impaired apoptosis of eosinophils together with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis). In terms of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of asthma, the widespread use of glucocorticoids is associated with a number of adverse health consequences after long-term use, while some patients suffer from steroid-resistant disease. A new approach for therapeutic intervention would be to promote the resolution of inflammation via modulation of eosinophil apoptosis and the phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. This review focuses on the mechanisms underpinning eosinophil-mediated lung damage, currently available treatments and therapeutic targets that might in future be harnessed to facilitate inflammation resolution by the manipulation of cell survival and clearance pathways. PMID:25071763

  6. Endothelin A receptor antagonist modulates lymphocyte and eosinophil infiltration, hyperreactivity and mucus in murine asthma.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Richardt G; Jancar, Sonia

    2008-12-20

    Levels of endothelins are particularly high in the lung, and there is evidence that these peptides are involved in asthma. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with lymphocyte infiltration. In the present study, we used a murine model of asthma to investigate the role of endothelins in lymphocyte and eosinophil infiltration into the airway hyperreactivity and mucus secretion. Sensitized C57Bl/6 mice were treated with endothelin ETA receptor antagonist (BQ123) or endothelin ETB receptor antagonist (BQ788) 30 min before an antigen aerosol challenge. After 24 h, dose response curves to methacholine were performed in isolated lungs, FACS analysis of lymphocytes and eosinophil counts were performed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and mucus index was determined by histopathology. In sensitized and antigen-challenged mice there is a marked increase in the T CD4+, T CD8+, B220+, Tgammadelta+ and NK1.1+ lymphocyte subsets. Treatment with BQ123 further increased these cell populations. The number of eosinophils, airway hyperreactivity and mucus were all reduced by BQ123 treatment. The BQ 788 had no significant effect on the parameters analyzed. Treatment with BQ123 reduced the endothelin concentration in lung homogenates, suggesting that endothelins exert a positive feedback on their synthesis. We show here that in murine asthma the ETA receptor antagonist up-regulates lymphocyte infiltration and reduces eosinophils, hyperreactivity and mucus. PMID:18793757

  7. Best On-Farm Food Safety Practices: Risks Associated with Rat Lungworm and Human Eosinophilic Meningitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent cases of eosinophilic meningitis in Hawai’i have drawn attention to a food-borne parasitic infection that occurs in Hawai‘i, the Pacific Islands, southern and eastern Asia, and elsewhere. In late 2008, the Hawai‘i Department of Health reported that four people on the island of Hawai‘i had bee...

  8. Histamine 1 Receptor Blockade Enhances Eosinophil-Mediated Clearance of Adult Filarial Worms

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ellen Mueller; Morris, Christopher P.; Hübner, Marc P.; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filariae are tissue-invasive nematodes that cause diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness. The goal of this study was to characterize the role of histamine during Litomosoides sigmodontis infection of BALB/c mice, a murine model of filariasis. Time course studies demonstrated that while expression of histidine decarboxylase mRNA increases throughout 12 weeks of infection, serum levels of histamine exhibit two peaks—one 30 minutes after primary infection and one 8 weeks later. Interestingly, mice treated with fexofenadine, a histamine receptor 1 inhibitor, demonstrated significantly reduced worm burden in infected mice compared to untreated infected controls. Although fexofenadine-treated mice had decreased antigen-specific IgE levels as well as lower splenocyte IL-5 and IFN? production, they exhibited a greater than fourfold rise in eosinophil numbers at the tissue site where adult L. sigmodontis worms reside. Fexofenadine-mediated clearance of L. sigmodontis worms was dependent on host eosinophils, as fexofenadine did not decrease worm burdens in eosinophil-deficient dblGATA mice. These findings suggest that histamine release induced by tissue invasive helminths may aid parasite survival by diminishing eosinophilic responses. Further, these results raise the possibility that combining H1 receptor inhibitors with current anthelmintics may improve treatment efficacy for filariae and other tissue-invasive helminths. PMID:26204515

  9. EOSINOPHIL CYSTEINYL LEUKOTRIENE SYNTHESIS MEDIATED BY EXOGENOUS SECRETED PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 GROUP X

    E-print Network

    Gelb, Michael

    PLA2-X-mediated generation of plasmenyl lysophospholipids and lyso-platelet activating factorPC species (A), plasmenyl LysoPE species (B), and lyso- platelet activating factor (LysoPAF) species (C. Supplemental Figure 2. Additional details of the activation of CysLT synthesis in fMLP stimulated eosinophils

  10. ROLE OF MONOCYTES AND EOSINOPHILS IN RESPIRATORY SYNCTIAL VIRUS (RSV) INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Role of Monocytes and Eosinophils
    in Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection

    Joleen M. Soukup and Susanne Becker

    US Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental
    Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711;
    ...

  11. Feline eosinophilic keratoconjunctivitis: a retrospective study of 45 cases (56 eyes).

    PubMed

    Dean, Eric; Meunier, Valerie

    2013-08-01

    The medical records of 45 cases (56 eyes) of feline eosinophilic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) diagnosed between 2005 and 2011 were reviewed. Cats were included if a clinical diagnosis of EKC was recorded and eosinophils were found on corneal cytology. Median age at presentation was 5 years (interquartiles 5-9 years) for both males and females. Domestic shorthair was the predominant breed, accounting for 77.8% of the cats. The condition was unilateral in 75.6% of cases, with the superotemporal quadrant of the cornea the most frequently affected position (76.8% of eyes). A history of corneal ulceration was recorded in 37.8% of cases, and corneal ulcers were present at or before diagnosis in 66.7% of the cats. Eosinophils were found in 92.0% of conjunctival scrapings. We performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) for 33/45 cats. Viral DNA was detected in 54.5% of these cats. FHV-1 DNA was detected by PCR in 66.7% of cats with a history and/or presence of a corneal ulcer at first presentation, which is significantly more than those with no corneal ulcer at any time (22.2% FHV-1 DNA detected). Our findings suggest that a corneal ulcer can be present prior to the development of eosinophilic keratitis. Further studies are mandatory to explore the role that FHV-1 could play in EKC-associated corneal ulceration. PMID:23321693

  12. A Patient with Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting with Acute Pancreatitis and Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Moon Seong; Mok, Young Mi; Han, Weon-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) is a rare disease characterized by focal or diffuse eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract, especially the stomach and duodenum. EGE has vague, nonspecific symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, ascites, and malabsorption. Here, we report a patient with EGE presenting with concurrent acute pancreatitis and ascites. A 68-year-old woman was admitted with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and watery diarrhea. Laboratory findings revealed elevated serum titers of amylase, lipase, and peripheral blood eosinophil count. An abdominopelvic computed tomography scan showed a normal pancreas, moderate amount of ascites, and duodenal thickening. A esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed patchy erythematous mucosal lesions in the 2nd portion of the duodenum. Biopsies from the duodenum indicated eosinophilic infiltration in the lamina propria. The patient was successfully treated with prednisolone and montelukast. Despite its unusual occurrence, EGE may be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained acute pancreatitis, especially in a patient with duodenal edema on imaging or peripheral eosinophilia. PMID:24672666

  13. Eosinophils contribute to killing of adult Onchocerca ochengi within onchocercomata following elimination of Wolbachia.

    PubMed

    Nfon, Charles K; Makepeace, Benjamin L; Njongmeta, Leo M; Tanya, Vincent N; Bain, Odile; Trees, Alexander J

    2006-10-01

    Many filarial nematodes, including Onchocerca volvulus (the cause of human 'River Blindness'), have a mutually dependent relationship with Wolbachia bacteria. There has been much interest in Wolbachia as a chemotherapeutic target, since there are no macrofilaricidal drugs (i.e., lethal to adult worms) of low toxicity. Using the bovine parasite O. ochengi, we previously demonstrated that combined intensive and intermittent (COM) oxytetracycline treatment induces a sustained depletion of Wolbachia and is macrofilaricidal, whereas a short intensive regimen (SIR) is non-macrofilaricidal. To understand how targeting Wolbachia with oxytetracycline can lead to worm death, O. ochengi nodules (onchocercomata) were sequentially excised from cattle administered COM or SIR therapy, and cell infiltrates were microscopically quantified. Pre-treatment, worms were surrounded by neutrophils, with eosinophils rare or absent. At 8-12weeks after either regimen, eosinophils increased around worms and were observed degranulating on the cuticle. However, with the SIR treatment, neutrophils returned to predominance by 48weeks, while in the COM group, eosinophilia persisted. These observations suggest that accumulation of degranulating eosinophils over a prolonged period is a cause rather than an effect of parasite death, and the macrofilaricidal mechanism of antibiotics may relate to facilitation of eosinophil infiltration around worms by ablation of Wolbachia-mediated neutrophilia. PMID:16962357

  14. Immunoregulatory properties of childhood leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Banker, D.S.; Pahwa, R.N.; Miller, D.R.; Hilgartner, M.W.; Good, R.A.; Pahwa, S.G.

    1982-07-01

    Investigation of in vitro humoral immune responses and immunoregulatory properties of leukemic cell was carried out in 17 children with acute leukemia prior to therapy. Leukemias were of the non-T, non-B-cell type in 13 patients and of T-cell origin in four. Bone marrow and peripheral blood cells consisted of 24-96% lymphoblasts and were generally deficient in surface Ig-positive cells. Induction of Ig secreting cells in response to pokeweed mitogen was markedly decreased in marrow and peripheral mononuclear cell cultures of leukemic patients. Co-culture of leukemic cells with normal lymphocytes led to marked deviations from the expected Ig secreting-cell response of the cell mixtures. The predominant effect was enhancement, as was the case with eight non-T, non-B-cell and one T-cell leukemia samples. Suppression of the Ig secreting-cell response was observed in only three instances, two with non-T, non-B-cell and one with T-cell leukemia samples. These findings implicate non-T, non-B as well as more differentiated leukemic cells in having the potential for modifying Ig production by B cells.

  15. Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Vesicle Proteins Induce Human Eosinophil Degranulation via a ?2 Integrin CD11/CD18- and ICAM-1-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Su Hyuk; Jeon, Jong Ik; Kim, Young-Jeon; Yoon, Ho Joo; Kim, Hyeyoung; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Joo Sung; Kim, Jung Mogg

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), a cytotoxic protein contained in eosinophils granules, can contribute to various inflammatory responses. Although Helicobacter pylori infection increases infiltration of eosinophils, the mechanisms of eosinophil degranulation by H. pylori infection are largely unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of H. pylori outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in modulating eosinophil degranulation. We found that eosinophils treated with H. pylori OMVs released significantly more ECP compared with untreated controls. In addition, eosinophils cocultured with OMV-preexposed primary gastric epithelial cells exhibited significantly increased ECP release. Similarly, eosinophils cocultured with culture supernatant (CM) from primary gastric epithelial cells exposed to OMVs (OMV-CM) released significantly higher amounts of ECP compared with eosinophils cocultured with CM from unexposed control cells. Furthermore, OMVs and OMV-CM both induced the upregulation of ICAM-1 on gastric epithelial cells and ?2 integrin CD11b on eosinophils. In addition, both transduction of ICAM-1 shRNA into gastric epithelial cells and treatment with neutralizing mAbs to CD18 significantly decreased OMV-mediated or OMV-CM-mediated release of ECP. These results suggest that the eosinophil degranulation response to H. pylori OMVs occurs via a mechanism that is dependent on both ?2 integrin CD11/CD18 and ICAM-1. PMID:25821353

  16. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Pneumoviruses infect eosinophils and elicit MyD88-dependent release of chemoattractant cytokines and interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Kimberly D; Percopo, Caroline M; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2009-09-24

    Eosinophils are recruited to the lung in response to infection with pneumovirus pathogens and have been associated with both the pathophysiologic sequelae of infection and, more recently, with accelerated virus clearance. Here, we demonstrate that the pneumovirus pathogens, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), can infect human and mouse eosinophils, respectively, and that virus infection of eosinophils elicits the release of disease-related proinflammatory mediators from eosinophils. RSV replication in human eosinophils results in the release of infectious virions and in the release of the proinflammatory mediator, interleukin-6 (IL-6). PVM replication in cultured bone marrow eosinophils (bmEos) likewise results in release of infectious virions and the proinflammatory mediators IL-6, IP-10, CCL2, and CCL3. In contrast to the findings reported in lung tissue of RSV-challenged mice, PVM replication is accelerated in MyD88 gene-deleted bmEos, whereas release of cytokines is diminished. Interestingly, exogenous IL-6 suppresses virus replication in MyD88 gene-deleted bmEos, suggesting a role for a MyD88-dependent cytokine-mediated feedback circuit in modulating this response. Taken together, our findings suggest that eosinophils are targets of virus infection and may have varied and complex contributions to the pathogenesis and resolution of pneumovirus disease. PMID:19652202

  18. Pneumoviruses infect eosinophils and elicit MyD88-dependent release of chemoattractant cytokines and interleukin-6

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophils are recruited to the lung in response to infection with pneumovirus pathogens and have been associated with both the pathophysiologic sequelae of infection and, more recently, with accelerated virus clearance. Here, we demonstrate that the pneumovirus pathogens, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), can infect human and mouse eosinophils, respectively, and that virus infection of eosinophils elicits the release of disease-related proinflammatory mediators from eosinophils. RSV replication in human eosinophils results in the release of infectious virions and in the release of the proinflammatory mediator, interleukin-6 (IL-6). PVM replication in cultured bone marrow eosinophils (bmEos) likewise results in release of infectious virions and the proinflammatory mediators IL-6, IP-10, CCL2, and CCL3. In contrast to the findings reported in lung tissue of RSV-challenged mice, PVM replication is accelerated in MyD88 gene-deleted bmEos, whereas release of cytokines is diminished. Interestingly, exogenous IL-6 suppresses virus replication in MyD88 gene-deleted bmEos, suggesting a role for a MyD88-dependent cytokine-mediated feedback circuit in modulating this response. Taken together, our findings suggest that eosinophils are targets of virus infection and may have varied and complex contributions to the pathogenesis and resolution of pneumovirus disease. PMID:19652202

  19. A simple reliable assay for myeloperoxidase activity in mixed neutrophil-eosinophil cell suspensions: application to detection of myeloperoxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cramer, R; Soranzo, M R; Dri, P; Menegazzi, R; Pitotti, A; Zabucchi, G; Patriarca, P

    1984-05-11

    Quantitation of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity by guaiacol peroxidation (GP) assay is profoundly affected by the peroxidase present in eosinophils (EPO) that contaminate the granulocyte suspensions. Inclusion of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AMT) in the GP assay permits quantitation of MPO activity in mixed neutrophil-eosinophil suspension because of the differential inhibition of EPO and MPO by AMT. Results show that: (1) the peroxidase activity of eosinophil-free granulocyte suspensions is not appreciably affected by AMT; (2) in the presence of AMT the peroxidase activities of granulocyte preparations containing different numbers of eosinophils are similar on a neutrophil basis, regardless of the number of eosinophils and correspond with the activity of eosinophil-free granulocyte suspensions; (3) AMT almost completely inhibits the activity of partially purified EPO, only slightly affecting the catalytic activity of partially purified MPO; (4) AMT completely inhibits the residual peroxidase activity of granulocyte suspensions from MPO-deficient subjects contributed by contaminating eosinophils. The GP assay in the presence of AMT was used to study the pattern of hereditary transmission of MPO deficiency. The genealogy derived on the basis of this assay was compatible with an autosomal recessive inheritance, in agreement with previously reported results, while no definite pattern of inheritance could be established by use of the GP assay without AMT. We suggest that the GP assay supplemented with AMT is the method of choice for detection of MPO deficiency, particularly partial deficiency. PMID:6325545

  20. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-05

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  1. Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Prevalence of eosinophilic oesophagitis in adults presenting with oesophageal food bolus obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Heerasing, Neel; Lee, Shok Yin; Alexander, Sina; Dowling, Damian

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To look at the relationship between eosinophilic oesophagitis (EO) and food bolus impaction in adults. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed medical records of 100 consecutive patients who presented to our hospital with oesophageal food bolus obstruction (FBO) between 2012 and 2014. In this cohort, 96 were adults (64% male), and 4 paediatric patients were excluded from the analysis as our centre did not have paediatric gastroenterologists. Eighty-five adult patients underwent emergency gastroscopy. The food bolus was either advanced into the stomach using the push technique or retrieved using a standard retrieval net. Biopsies were obtained in 51 patients from the proximal and distal parts of the oesophagus at initial gastroscopy. All biopsy specimens were assessed and reviewed by dedicated gastrointestinal pathologists at the Department of Pathology, University Hospital Geelong. The diagnosis of EO was defined and established by the presence of the following histological features: (1) peak eosinophil counts > 20/hpf; (2) eosinophil microabscess; (3) superficial layering of eosinophils; (4) extracellular eosinophil granules; (5) basal cell hyperplasia; (6) dilated intercellular spaces; and (7) subepithelial or lamina propria fibrosis. The histology results of the biopsy specimens were accessed from the pathology database of the hospital and recorded for analysis. RESULTS: Our cohort had a median age of 60. Seventeen/51 (33%) patients had evidence of EO on biopsy findings. The majority of patients with EO were male (71%). Classical endoscopic features of oesophageal rings, furrows or white plaques and exudates were found in 59% of patients with EO. Previous episodes of FBO were present in 12/17 patients and 41% had a history of eczema, hay fever or asthma. Reflux oesophagitis and benign strictures were found in 20/34 patients who did not have biopsies. CONCLUSION: EO is present in approximately one third of patients who are admitted with FBO. Biopsies should be performed routinely at index endoscopy in order to pursue this treatable cause of long term morbidity. PMID:26558158

  3. Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for childhood leukemias Prognostic factors in childhood leukemia (ALL or AML) Certain factors that can affect a ... myelogenous leukemia (AML). Prognostic factors for children with ALL Children with ALL are often divided into risk ...

  4. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... leukemia? What should you ask your doctor about acute lymphocytic leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... answer many of your questions. What kind of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) do I have? Do I have any ...

  5. Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia by Risk Group

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Treating hairy cell leukemia Typical treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia Treatment options for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) vary ... SCT) early in treatment. Second-line treatment of CLL If the initial treatment is no longer working ...

  6. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... leukemia? What should you ask your doctor about chronic lymphocytic leukemia? As you cope with cancer and cancer treatment, ... top » Guide Topics What Is Leukemia - Chronic Lymphocytic (CLL)? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, ...

  7. What's New in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Additional resources for chronic lymphocytic leukemia What`s new in chronic lymphocytic leukemia research and treatment? Many ... person's outlook and whether they will need treatment. New drugs for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Dozens of new ...

  8. ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia

    E-print Network

    Gu, Xun

    ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia and mouse brain the experimental-wise false discovery rate. A human acute leukemia dataset corrected from 38 leukemia patients

  9. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Blast Crisis Arises from Progenitors FRANZISKA MICHOR

    E-print Network

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Blast Crisis Arises from Progenitors FRANZISKA MICHOR Society of Fellows, USA Key Words. Chronic myeloid leukemia · Hematopoietic stem cells · Hematopoietic progenitor cells · Differentiation ABSTRACT Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progresses through three distinct clinical stages: chronic

  10. New Decision Support Tool for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Classification

    E-print Network

    Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    New Decision Support Tool for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Classification Monica Madhukar affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. The results show that the proposed system robustly segments and classifies acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on complete microscopic blood images. Keywords: Classification

  11. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  12. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-20

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Diagnosis of Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia in a Patient Previously Treated for Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bozdag, Sinem Civriz; Namdaroglu, Sinem; Kayikci, Omur; Kaygusuz, Gülsah; Demiriz, Itir; Cinarsoy, Murat; Tekgunduz, Emre; Altuntas, Fevzi

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by the clonal expansion of cytotoxic T or natural killer cells. We report on a patient diagnosed with T-cell LGL leukemia two years after the achievement of hematologic remission for acute myeloblastic leukemia. PMID:24416499

  16. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Atypical plasma lipid profiles in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Areeb; Zaid, Muhammad; Munir, Rimsha; Usman, Hina; Kalbacher, Hubert; Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Zaidi, Nousheen

    2016-01-15

    Numerous studies have reported alterations in the plasma lipid profiles of leukemia patients. However, there are several inconsistencies in these reports. The present review highlights and compiles findings from different research groups regarding association of plasma lipoprotein levels with the risk of developing leukemia. We have also discussed the clinical significance of plasma lipid profiles in management of leukemia. Furthermore, the potential role of plasma lipids in promoting leukemogenesis is also highlighted. PMID:26549657

  19. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-10

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Regulation of human eosinophil degranulation and activation by endogenous phospholipase A2.

    PubMed Central

    White, S R; Strek, M E; Kulp, G V; Spaethe, S M; Burch, R A; Neeley, S P; Leff, A R

    1993-01-01

    The unique granular proteins of eosinophils may have a pathogenetic role in asthma and in the defense against parasitic infestations. However, the mechanisms regulating eosinophil degranulation are largely unknown. We examined the hypothesis that release of these proteins is regulated by endogenous activation of phospholipase A2. Human eosinophils (HE) were isolated from the peripheral blood of 42 subjects either by Percoll density separation or by negative-selection immunomagnetic fractionation. Eosinophil activation was initiated in vitro with 10(-6) M FMLP and 5 micrograms/ml cytochalasin B and was assessed by measurement of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and superoxide radical (.O2-) secretion. Treatment of HE with 100 microM mepacrine before activation blocked EPO release (2.0 +/- 0.2 vs 10.2 +/- 2.1% cell content for activated HE, P < 0.004, n = 9), .O2- generation (2.6 +/- 0.9 vs 44.2 +/- 10.8 nmol/ml per 10(6) HE, P < 0.002, n = 5), and LTC4 secretion (68.2 +/- 32.2 vs 1,125.2 +/- 526.8 pg/ml per 10(6) HE, P < 0.04, n = 8). Pretreatment of HE with 100 microM 4-bromophenacyl bromide before activation similarly blocked EPO release, .O2- generation and LTC4 secretion. Addition of AA to HE after treatment with 100 microM mepacrine and before subsequent activation reversed the inhibition of both EPO (10.4 +/- 2.2% with 1 microM AA vs 2.0 +/- 0.2% for mepacrine, n = 5, P < 0.02) and LTC4 secretion (695.1 +/- 412.9 with 10 microM AA vs 68.2 +/- 32.2 pg/ml per 10(6) HE for mepacrine, n = 8, P < 0.04), but did not reverse inhibition of .O2- generation by mepacrine. We demonstrate that secretion of preformed cytotoxic proteins and .O2- by eosinophils is regulated endogenously by phospholipase A2. PMID:8387540

  1. CD4+ Depletion Selectively Inhibits Eosinophil Recruitment to the Cornea and Abrogates Onchocerca volvulus Keratitis (River Blindness)

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Laurie R.; Kaifi, Jussuf T.; Diaconu, Eugenia; Pearlman, Eric

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that in the murine model of Onchocerca volvulus keratitis, neutrophils and eosinophils are recruited into the cornea in a biphasic manner in response to intrastromal injection. To determine if CD4+ T cells regulate migration of neutrophils and eosinophils into the cornea, CD4+ cells were depleted using monoclonal antibody GK1.5 before intrastromal injection of parasite antigens. Depletion of CD4+ cells abrogated corneal opacification at later but not early stages of disease. Consistent with this observation, CD4 depletion significantly impaired recruitment of eosinophils to the cornea but had no effect on neutrophils. These data indicate that CD4+ T cells mediate sustained O. volvulus keratitis by regulating eosinophil recruitment to the cornea. PMID:10948184

  2. Isolation and partial characterization of an eosinophil chemotactic factor from metacestodes of Taenia taeniaeformis (ECF-Tt).

    PubMed

    Potter, K A; Leid, R W

    1986-03-01

    Eosinophil chemotactic activity associated with protein extracts of Taenia taeniaeformis metacestodes was investigated. Chemotactic activity was associated with the nonbound protein after QAE cellulose chromatography of a 3 M KCl extract of homogenized larvae. When this material was precipitated with ammonium sulfate, activity was present in the 40 to 80% precipitate. Upon rechromatography on QAE cellulose equilibrated in a low ionic strength buffer, eosinophil chemotactic activity was retained by the gel and eluted after application of the NaCl gradient. Gel filtration of Sephacryl S-300 yielded an estimated m.w. of 91,000. Chromatofocusing revealed a broad peak of activity with a pI of 4.5 to 5.0. SDS-PAGE showed the active fraction migrated as a protein with a m.w. of 10,400. ECF-Tt had chemotactic and chemokinetic activity for equine eosinophils and murine eosinophils, but not for equine and murine neutrophils. PMID:3512706

  3. Selective T-Cell Depletion to Reduce GVHD (Patients) Receiving Stem Cell Tx to Treat Leukemia, Lymphoma or MDS

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-09

    Graft vs Host Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Leukemia; Leukemia, Myeloid; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic; Leukemia, Lymphocytic; Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Mantle-cell; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Hodgkin Disease

  4. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  5. Lenalidomide and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Early-Stage Asymptomatic Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-03

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  6. Chronic intestinal nematode infection induces Stat6-independent interleukin-5 production and causes eosinophilic inflammatory responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yukiko; Hiromatsu, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kenji; Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko; Ikeda, Takuto; Nakamura-Uchiyama, Fukumi; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2004-01-01

    The role of Stat6 (signal transducers and activators of transcription) in the recruitment and activation of eosinophils has been studied in detail in asthma and other allergic diseases. In this study, we demonstrated that eosinophil responses occur in a Stat6-independent manner in mice infected with the intestinal nematode, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Stat6-deficient (Stat6–/–) mice cannot expel N. brasiliensis and establish chronic infections. Prominent blood and intestinal eosinophilia were induced after day 14 postinfection (p.i.) and maintained at this level in Stat6–/– mice, whereas in wild-type mice eosinophil responses reached a peak on day 10 p.i. and declined thereafter. The introduction of a secondary infection of N. brasiliensis into wild-type mice induced rapid and exaggerated eosinophilia, whereas secondary infection in Stat6–/– mice resulted in almost the same eosinophil responses as those of the primary infection, suggesting a lack of memory responses. Blood eosinophilia was also induced in Stat6–/– mice implanted with N. brasiliensis in the small intestine, suggesting that intestinal exposure to parasitic antigen is sufficient to induce eosinophil responses. Furthermore, this prominent eosinophil response of Stat6–/– mice after day 14 was closely associated with an increase of interleukin (IL)-5 production in serum and intestine. Neither IL-4 nor eotaxin were significantly induced in Stat6–/– mice after infection with N. brasiliensis. We also found that mRNA for IL-5, GATA-3 and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are induced in the intestine of Stat6–/– mice on day 14 p.i. Taken together, these results provide evidence for Stat6-independent IL-5 production and subsequent eosinophil responses after chronic infection with N. brasiliensis. PMID:15270733

  7. Eosinophils Reduce Chronic Inflammation in Adipose Tissue by Secreting Th2 Cytokines and Promoting M2 Macrophages Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Peng; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Manna; Li, Hong; Qian, Chunhua; Sheng, Chunjun; Qu, Shen; Bu, Le

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is now recognized as a low-grade, chronic inflammatory disease that is linked to a myriad of disorders including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, and liver diseases. Recently it is found that eosinophils accelerate alternative activation macrophage (AAM) polarization by secreting Th2 type cytokines such as interleukin-4 and interleukin-13, thereby reducing metainflammation in adipose tissue. In this review, we focused on the role of eosinophils in regulating metabolic homeostasis and obesity. PMID:26688684

  8. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, T.W.

    1985-06-01

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

  9. Severe congestive heart failure as the main symptom of eosinophilic granulomatosis and polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss syndrome).

    PubMed

    Za??ska, Jolanta; Wiatr, El?bieta; Zych, Jacek; Szopi?ski, Janusz; Oniszh, Karina; Kober, Jaros?aw; Piotrowska-Kownacka, Dorota; Roszkowski-?li?, Kazimierz

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cardiovascular symptoms are mainly diagnosed in cardiological wards. However, sometimes the other reasons for acute coronary syndrome and heart failure are found. One of such reasons is hypereosinophilia which can be recognized if number of blood eosinophils exceeds 1500/mm3. High eosinophilia is connected with production of cytotoxic eosinophilic proteins which can cause eosinophilic vasculitis or eosinophilic myocarditis. One of the better known hypereosinophilic syndromes is EGPA described by the pathomorphologists Churg and Strauss. The further research works allowed for the clinical characteristics of patients with EGPA. In the course of this disease the following three phases were recognized : prodromal-allergic, eosinophilic, vasculitic. The definitive diagnosis can be established only in the third phase, when vasculitis causes organ involvement. Besides symptoms of the respiratory tract (asthma, nasal polyps, eosinophilic lung infiltrations) also cardiovascular symptoms, gastrointestinal tract symptoms, as well as skin lesions and kidneys involvement can appear. The most dangerous for patients is involvement of the nervous and cardiovascular systems. We present a patient with asthma and eosinophilia in whom EGPA was diagnosed in the course of acute recurrent substernal chest pain, with subsequent signs of cardiac insufficiency. PMID:25339570

  10. Resonance Raman characterization of the heme prosthetic group in eosinophil peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sibbett, S S; Klebanoff, S J; Hurst, J K

    1985-09-23

    The resonance-enhanced Raman spectrum of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) from horse and human eosinophils is reported. Based upon the spectral energies, distribution and depolarization ratios of the high-frequency skeletal modes and upon the presence of weak bands assignable to vinyl substituent groups, we conclude that the heme prosthetic group is high-spin, 6 coordinate protoporphyrin. The Raman spectrum reveals clear differences from lactoperoxidase (LPO), an enzyme which appears nearly structurally isomorphous by other physical techniques; the data indicate a stronger axial 6th ligand in EPO. Mechanistic implications are discussed in relation to LPO and myeloperoxidase, an enzyme present in neutrophils and monocytes which contains a unique functional active-site chlorin. PMID:4043384

  11. Three cases of idiopathic eosinophilic enteritis with chronic obstinate diarrhea in Japanese Black fattening cattle

    PubMed Central

    FUSHIMI, Yasuo; TAKAGI, Mitsuhiro; KAWAGUCHI, Hiroaki; MIYOSHI, Noriaki; TSUKA, Takeshi; DEGUCHI, Eisaburo

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic enteritis (EOE) is a type of inflammatory bowel disease and is characterized clinically by chronic obstinate diarrhea. Three Japanese Black (JB) fattening cattle (2 males and 1 female) on different cattle farms presented with chronic episodic diarrhea without fever or dehydration. Soft reddish spherical carneous tissues (1?3 cm) were occasionally excreted within the diarrheic feces. Administration of antibiotics, antidiarrheal drugs and vermicides had no therapeutic effect, but dexamethasone improved the fecal characteristics. The symptoms persisted until the animals were slaughtered at 27–30 months of age. Histopathological examination of the intestines revealed marked eosinophilic infiltration in the lamina propria and submucosa. From these findings, we diagnosed these cattle as the first cases of EOE in JB cattle. PMID:25391396

  12. Clinical Aspects of Eosinophilic Meningitis and Meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the Rat Lungworm

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Angiostrongylus Eosinophilic Meningitis is caused by human infection with larvae of the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The clinical presentation includes a spectrum of disease, from meningitis through radiculitis, cranial nerve abnormalities, ataxia, encephalitis, coma, and rarely death. The condition is diagnosed by recognizing the triad of: the clinical syndrome, eosinophils in the cerebrospinal fluid or blood, and exposure history. A history of eating raw or poorly cooked snails is classic, but ingestion of other intermediate hosts or unwashed produce (such as lettuce) harboring hosts is not uncommon. Several serologic tests exist but none has yet been fully validated. There is good evidence that a 2 week course of high dose corticosteroids shortens the duration and severity of symptoms. There is somewhat weaker evidence that albendazole reduces symptoms. The combination of prednisolone and albendazole is being used more commonly for treatment. Some suggestions for future research are given. PMID:23901382

  13. Three cases of idiopathic eosinophilic enteritis with chronic obstinate diarrhea in Japanese Black fattening cattle.

    PubMed

    Fushimi, Yasuo; Takagi, Mitsuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Noriaki; Tsuka, Takeshi; Deguchi, Eisaburo

    2015-03-01

    Eosinophilic enteritis (EOE) is a type of inflammatory bowel disease and is characterized clinically by chronic obstinate diarrhea. Three Japanese Black (JB) fattening cattle (2 males and 1 female) on different cattle farms presented with chronic episodic diarrhea without fever or dehydration. Soft reddish spherical carneous tissues (1-3 cm) were occasionally excreted within the diarrheic feces. Administration of antibiotics, antidiarrheal drugs and vermicides had no therapeutic effect, but dexamethasone improved the fecal characteristics. The symptoms persisted until the animals were slaughtered at 27-30 months of age. Histopathological examination of the intestines revealed marked eosinophilic infiltration in the lamina propria and submucosa. From these findings, we diagnosed these cattle as the first cases of EOE in JB cattle. PMID:25391396

  14. A 78-year-old woman with an acute eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Javelle, Emilie; Gasperini, Guillaume; Mercier, Jean; Luciano, Laure; Sagui, Emmanuel; Soulier, Marie; Kerebel, Sebastien; Lebougeant, Patrick; Molinier, Sylvain; Guisset, Michel; Coton, Thierry; Morand, Jean-Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Eosinophil accumulation in the gastrointestinal tract is a common feature of numerous disorders including mainly parasitic infection, drug-induced allergic reactions, inflammatory bowel disease, and various connective tissue disorders. Digestive tissue eosinophilia requires thorough searching for secondary causes that may be specifically treated with antibiotics, dietary and drug elimination or immunosuppressive therapy. Frequency, prognosis and therapeutic implications must guide the diagnostic course. An acute eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 78-year-old asthmatic woman receiving celecoxib is reported. She presented later with neurologic and cutaneous features and was finally treated by methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. The diagnostic approach leading to a Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) assertion is described. We discuss the pathogenesis, the management and the potential enhancing role of celecoxib in CSS gastrointestinal involvement. PMID:21820380

  15. Successful use of Rituximab in a patient with recalcitrant multisystemic eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Najem, Catherine E; Yadav, Rajwardhan; Carlson, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) is a rare eosinophil-rich disorder characterised by necrotising granulomatous inflammation affecting small to medium sized vessels. Extrapulmonary manifestations can be life-threatening when heart, central nervous system (CNS), gastrointestinal tract or kidneys are affected. We describe a case of a 56-year-old woman with a long-standing history of asthma, who presented with an acute sudden painless loss of vision after she had been recently diagnosed with EGPA and induced with pulse steroids and cyclophosphamide. The patient had a complicated hospital course with multisystemic involvement of active vasculitis, involving heart, kidneys, muscles, eyes and CNS. The patient's devastating condition responded remarkably to Rituximab. The role of Rituximab in EGPA is not yet proven. Few cases are reported in the literature about the role of Rituximab in EGPA, of which only one described retinal artery occlusion as a presentation of a recently treated patient with EGPA. PMID:25979957

  16. Changes in eosinophil and corticosterone levels and catecholamine metabolism during emotionalpainful stress

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, V.V.; Manukhin, B.N.; Petrova, V.A.

    1985-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study blood levels of eosinophils, corticosterone (CS), adrenalin, noradrenalin (NA), and dopamine (DA) during the development of the stress reaction, and also to study neuronal uptake and synthesis of catecholamines in the adrenals and heart. In some animal groups, the neuronal uptake of /sup 3/H-NA and the intensity of /sup 3/H-Na and /sup 3/H-DA synthesis from /sup 3/H-tyrosine were investigated by a method described previously, 2 h after the end of induction of emotional-painful stress (EPS). Radioactivity was measured on an SL-30 liquid scintillation counter. A regular relationship was found between changes in blood eosinophil level, the CH concentration, and catecholamine metabolism in the course of EPS.

  17. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis: Case Report and Review in Search for Diagnostic Key Points

    PubMed Central

    López-Medina, Guillermo; Gallo, Manuel; Prado, Alejandro; Vicuña-Honorato, Iliana; Castillo Díaz de León, Roxana

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is considered an uncommon disease with a low incidence rate that remains as a diagnostic challenge for the clinician, in spite of the fact that seventy years have passed since its original description. Hereby we present the case of a 29-year-old male without history of allergies who was evaluated for unspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, without relevant findings on physical examination and presenting an initial complete blood count (CBC) with severe eosinophilia. The patient was evaluated and the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis was confirmed by histopathological findings. The relevance of the case resides in highlighting the lack of guidelines or consensus for histological diagnosis being virtually the only one available. To a similar extent, treatment evidence is based on case series with a reasonable number of patients and case reports. PMID:26075112

  18. The mast cell and eosinophil response of young lambs to a primary infection with Nematodirus battus.

    PubMed

    Winter, M D; Wright, C; Lee, D L

    1997-02-01

    Helminthologically naive 8-week-old lambs were administered 50,000 infective-stage larvae of the trichostrongyle nematode Nematodirus battus. Initial mean adult worm burdens were significantly reduced (P < 0.01) at day 21 post-infection (p.i.). Peripheral blood eosinophil counts showed a significant increase (P < 0.001) by day 25 p.i. when compared with uninfected control animals. Sections of small intestine taken at post-mortem from the area of adult worm establishment over the course of infection showed a significant increase in mucosal eosinophil and mast cell numbers during the period of adult worm rejection, when compared with uninfected control animals. These results show that young lambs develop significant increases in the numbers of cells associated with an inflammatory reaction in the intestine during the development of a partially protective immune response to this parasitic nematode. PMID:9051925

  19. Severe Eosinophilic Syndrome Associated with the Use of Probiotic Supplements: A New Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Fabian A.; Purohit, Shivani; Kenyon, Lawrence; Jimenez, Sergio A.

    2012-01-01

    Severe eosinophilic syndromes related to the administration or use of unsuspected immunogenic substances have been described previously. Many of these diseases presented initially as clusters or isolated cases. The spanish toxic oil syndrome, the eosinophilia myalgia syndrome, and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis are examples of such diseases. We describe 2 cases of a severe eosinophilic syndrome characterized by marked peripheral blood eosinophilia (>15,000?cells/ml), mononeuritis multiplex, and necrotizing vasculitis which developed in a close temporal association with the recent onset use of nonprescription probiotics. There was no history of a prior autoimmune disease. Although both cases had prompt response to immunosuppression with rapid resolution of peripheral blood eosinophilia and accompanying constitutional symptoms, they remained with permanent neurological deficits. PMID:23259129

  20. A randomised controlled trial of small particle inhaled steroids in refractory eosinophilic asthma (SPIRA)

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, David; Anderson, John; Reynolds, Catherine; Meakin, Garry; Bailey, Helen; Pavord, Ian; Shaw, Dominick; Harrison, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Background Some patients with refractory asthma have evidence of uncontrolled eosinophilic inflammation in the distal airways. While traditional formulations of inhaled steroids settle predominantly in the large airways, newer formulations with an extra-fine particle size have a more peripheral pattern of deposition. Specifically treating distal airway inflammation may improve asthma control. Methods 30 patients with refractory asthma despite high dose inhaled corticosteroids were identified as having persistent airway eosinophilia. Following 2?weeks of prednisolone 30?mg, patients demonstrating an improvement in asthma control were randomised to receive either ciclesonide 320?µg twice daily or placebo in addition to usual maintenance therapy for 8?weeks. The primary outcome measure was sputum eosinophil count at week 8. Alveolar nitric oxide was measured as a marker of distal airway inflammation. Results There was continued suppression of differential sputum eosinophil counts with ciclesonide (median 2.3%) but not placebo (median 4.5%) though the between-group difference was not significant. When patients who had changed their maintenance prednisolone dose during the trial were excluded the difference between groups was significant (1.4% vs 4.5%, p=0.028). Though alveolar nitric oxide decreased with ciclesonide the value did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions These data demonstrate that patients with ongoing eosinophilic inflammation are not truly refractory, and that suppression of airway eosinophilia may be maintained with additional inhaled corticosteroid. Further work is needed with a focus on patient-orientated outcome measures such as exacerbation rate, with additional tests of small airway function. Trial registration number NCT01171365. Protocol available at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:25858909

  1. Gene structure and enzymatic activity of mouse eosinophil-associated ribonuclease 2.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, A L; Deming, M S; Rosenberg, H F; Dyer, K D

    2001-04-01

    Mouse eosinophil-associated ribonuclease-2 (mEAR-2) is one of a cluster of genes identified in the genome of the mouse Mus musculus that are highly divergent orthologs of the primate ribonucleases, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP). Northern analysis revealed expression of genes hybridizing to mEAR-2 in mouse lung, liver and spleen tissues. We obtained full-length cDNA by hybridization screening of mouse eosinophil and lung cDNA libraries and by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) from liver, spleen and lung RNA. Using these methods we have isolated the 195 base pair (bp) 3' untranslated region (UTR) that includes a typical polyadenylation signal preceding a poly A tail and the 5' UTR which includes 63-71 bp and three distinct transcriptional start sites. Using unidirectional PCR we isolated a 361-bp 5' promoter region and delineated the intronic / exonic boundaries which include a non-coding exon 1, a single intron, and a coding exon 2, a structure that is typical of genes of the RNase A superfamily. Consensus sites for PU.1 and EoTF, both active as intronic enhancer elements of the gene encoding EDN, are also present in the intron of the gene encoding mEAR-2. The catalytic activity of recombinant baculovirus-derived mEAR-2 is similar to that of rhEDN from this source, with catalytic constants k(cat)/K(m)=5.6x10(6) M(-1) s(-1) and 10.5x10(6) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, against a standard yeast tRNA substrate. Sequence analysis of the non-coding regions and enzymatic characterization of the gene product provide further evidence indicating that mEAR-2 is a structural and functional ortholog of primate EDNs and ECPs. PMID:11311552

  2. Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis: the transition in sex differences and interracial characteristics between 1965 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Takashi; Katoh, Mayumi; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Kabashima, Kenji; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2015-04-01

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF) is characterized by a non-infectious infiltration of eosinophils in the hair follicles. It has three variants: (i) classic EPF; (ii) immunosuppression-associated EPF, which herein is subdivided into HIV-associated (IS/HIV) and non-HIV-associated (IS/non-HIV); and (iii) infancy-associated EPF (I-EPF). The rarity of EPF has hindered our understanding of this entity. To examine the characteristics of EPF, with respect to age, sex, race, and chronology, published in case reports to date, we queried PubMed using the following terms: ("eosinophilic pustular folliculitis" [All Fields] OR "eosinophilic folliculitis" [All Fields]) AND ("1965/1/1" [PDAT]: "2013/12/31" [PDAT]). Additional Japanese cases were collected from Igaku Chuo Zasshi through Ichushi-Web, JDream III, and secondhand quotations from domestic periodicals published in Japan. Proceedings were excluded. The PubMed search produced 275 citations containing 358 cases of EPF (224 men, 132 women, and two of unspecified sex); these cases involved classic EPF (101 Japanese and 81 non-Japanese), IS/HIV (4 Japanese and 85 non-Japanese), IS/non-HIV (4 Japanese and 20 non-Japanese), and I-EPF (4 Japanese and 59 non-Japanese). Ichushi generated an additional 148 citations containing 207 cases of Japanese (148 men and 59 women), which included cases of classic EPF (181 cases), IS/HIV (14 cases), IS/non-HIV (9 cases), and I-EPF (3 cases). There was no sex difference in the classic EPF cases reported between 2003 and 2013, whereas IS/HIV, IS/non-HIV, and I-EPF were predominated by men. There is room for reconsideration of sex differences, particularly with regard to classic EPF. The rarity and specificity of I-EPF in Japan may reflect a state of uncertainty about this entity. PMID:25675987

  3. Dual Proinflammatory and Antiviral Properties of Pulmonary Eosinophils in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine-Enhanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yung-Chang; Townsend, Dijana; Herrero, Lara J.; Zaid, Ali; Rolph, Michael S.; Gahan, Michelle E.; Nelson, Michelle A.; Rudd, Penny A.; Matthaei, Klaus I.; Foster, Paul S.; Dent, Lindsay; Tripp, Ralph A.; Lee, James; Simson, Ljubov

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of morbidity and severe lower respiratory tract disease in the elderly and very young, with some infants developing bronchiolitis, recurrent wheezing, and asthma following infection. Previous studies in humans and animal models have shown that vaccination with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) leads to prominent airway eosinophilic inflammation following RSV challenge; however, the roles of pulmonary eosinophilia in the antiviral response and in disease pathogenesis are inadequately understood. In vivo studies in mice with eotaxin and/or interleukin 5 (IL-5) deficiency showed that FI-RSV vaccination did not lead to enhanced pulmonary disease, where following challenge there were reduced pulmonary eosinophilia, inflammation, Th2-type cytokine responses, and altered chemokine (TARC and CCL17) responses. In contrast to wild-type mice, RSV was recovered at high titers from the lungs of eotaxin- and/or IL-5-deficient mice. Adoptive transfer of eosinophils to FI-RSV-immunized eotaxin- and IL-5-deficient (double-deficient) mice challenged with RSV was associated with potent viral clearance that was mediated at least partly through nitric oxide. These studies show that pulmonary eosinophilia has dual outcomes: one linked to RSV-induced airway inflammation and pulmonary pathology and one with innate features that contribute to a reduction in the viral load. IMPORTANCE This study is critical to understanding the mechanisms attributable to RSV vaccine-enhanced disease. This study addresses the hypothesis that IL-5 and eotaxin are critical in pulmonary eosinophil response related to FI-RSV vaccine-enhanced disease. The findings suggest that in addition to mediating tissue pathology, eosinophils within a Th2 environment also have antiviral activity. PMID:25410867

  4. Asian sand dust enhances ovalbumin-induced eosinophil recruitment in the alveoli and airway of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hiyoshi, Kyoko; Ichinose, Takamichi; Sadakane, Kaori; Takano, Hirohisa; Nishikawa, Masataka; Mori, Ikuko; Yanagisawa, Rie; Yoshida, Seiichi; Kumagai, Yoshito; Tomura, Shigeo; Shibamoto, Takayuki . E-mail: tshibamoto@ucdavis.edu

    2005-11-15

    Asian sand dust (ASD) containing sulfate (SO{sub 4} {sup 2-}) reportedly causes adverse respiratory health effects but there is no experimental study showing the effect of ASD toward allergic respiratory diseases. The effects of ASD and ASD plus SO{sub 4} {sup 2-} toward allergic lung inflammation induced by ovalbumin (OVA) were investigated in this study. ICR mice were administered intratracheally with saline; ASD alone (sample from Shapotou desert); and ASD plus SO{sub 4} {sup 2-} (ASD-SO{sub 4}); OVA+ASD; OVA+ASD-SO{sub 4}. ASD or ASD-SO{sub 4} alone caused mild nutrophilic inflammation in the bronchi and alveoli. ASD and ASD-SO{sub 4} increased pro-inflammatory mediators, such as Keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). ASD and ASD-SO{sub 4} enhanced eosinophil recruitment induced by OVA in the alveoli and in the submucosa of the airway, which has a goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium. However, a further increase of eosinophils by addition of SO{sub 4} {sup 2-} was not observed. The two sand dusts synergistically increased interleukin-5 (IL-5) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), which were associated with OVA, in BALF. However, the increased levels of IL-5 were lower in the OVA+ASD-SO{sub 4} group than in the OVA+ASD group. ASD caused the adjuvant effects to specific-IgG1 production by OVA, but not to specific-IgE. These results suggest that the enhancement of eosinophil recruitment in the lung is mediated by synergistically increased IL-5 and MCP-1. IgG1 antibodies may play an important role in the enhancement of allergic reaction caused by OVA and sand dust. However, extra sulfate may not contribute to an increase of eosinophils.

  5. Gastric pneumatosis with associated eosinophilic gastritis in four black and white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata variegata).

    PubMed

    Niederwerder, Megan C; Stalis, Ilse H; Campbell, Gregory A; Backues, Kay A

    2013-03-01

    Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) with associated eosinophilic inflammation was documented in the gastric tissues of four black and white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata variegata). Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis is an uncommon disease described in humans and characterized by multilocular gas-filled cystic spaces located within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. These cystic spaces can occur in any location along the gastrointestinal tract as well as within the associated connective and lymphatic tissues. The exact cause of this disease is unknown. The four black and white ruffed lemurs described in this case series were captive born and had been housed in zoological institutions at two separate locations. Three of the four cases were female lemurs, and two of the affected lemurs were directly related. The individual disease presentations spanned a 5-yr time period. Two lemurs presented dead with no premonitory signs, whereas the other two lemurs presented with clinical signs of gastrointestinal disease and nonspecific signs of weakness. Gastric pneumatosis, diagnosed either grossly or histopathologically in each of these four lemurs, is described as a subset of PCI in which cystic spaces are localized to the stomach wall. Significant eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate was identified on histopathology of gastric tissues and found to be associated with the cystic lesions in each lemur. No classic etiology, such as a fungal infection or a parasitic infection, was identified as the cause of the eosinophilic gastritis. This case series demonstrates that gastric pneumatosis with associated eosinophilic gastritis may be a significant gastrointestinal disease in black and white ruffed lemurs. PMID:23505706

  6. Fungal extracts detected in eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis induced cytokines from the nasal polyp cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirotsu, Mikio; Shiozawa, Akihito; Ono, Noritsugu; Miwa, Masato; Kikuchi, Ken; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The role of fungi in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is still controversial. The present study was conducted to detect and identify fungal species from the nasal polyp tissues of eosinophilic and noneosinophilic CRS, and to determine the role of fungal antigens in cytokine production. Study Design Prospective study. Methods Thirty-five specimens of nasal polyps were collected from patients with CRS and examined for fungus using culture, histology, and polymerase chain reaction analysis. The secretion of 14 cytokines stimulated by fungal extracts using dispersed nasal polyp cells (DNPCs) was determined by multiplex immunoassay. Results There was no microbiological growth (including fungus) in the cultures of homogenized nasal polyps. Furthermore, Grocott methanamine silver staining for all nasal polyps showed no fungal bodies. Sixteen of 35 samples of the nasal polyps showed amplification of fungal DNA. In none of the mucosa of the sphenoid sinus was fungal DNA detected. The number of eosinophils in the nasal polyps in which fungal DNA was detected was significantly higher than in the nasal polyps in which fungal DNA was not detected (P?eosinophil-associated cytokines such as interleukine (IL)-5, IL-13, IL-17A, and RANTES (regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted), and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-?, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor from DNPCs. Conclusions The present study offers direct evidence supporting that fungal elements modify the inflammatory response in the nasal polyps of eosinophilic CRS. Level of Evidence: NA PMID:24615892

  7. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine mechanisms involve inhibition of Ca{sup 2+} influx, and IL-13 and eotaxin secretion. • No significant toxicity was observed in mice orally treated with curine for 7 days. • Curine has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs.

  8. Eosinophil cationic protein mRNA expression in children with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Yu, H Y; Li, X Y; Cai, Z F; Li, L; Shi, X Z; Song, H X; Liu, X J

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that eosinophils are closely related to pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Eosinophils release eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), which plays an important role in infection and allergic reactions. Serum ECP mRNA expression in children with bronchial asthma has not been adequately investigated. We analyzed serum ECP mRNA expression in 63 children with bronchial asthma and 21 healthy children by using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to understand the role of ECP in children with bronchial asthma. The children with bronchial asthma were segregated into acute-phase and stable-phase groups, based on the severity of the illness. Serum ECP mRNA expression in children with bronchial asthma (0.375 ± 0.04) was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (0.20 ± 0.02; P < 0.05). Additionally, children in the acute-phase group showed higher ECP mRNA expression level (0.44 ± 0.06) than those in the stable-phase (0.31 ± 0.03) and healthy control groups (0.20 ± 0.02; P < 0.05), while the level in the stable-phase (0.31 ± 0.03) was markedly higher than that in the healthy control group (0.20 ± 0.02; P < 0.05). Detection of serum ECP mRNA expression level has possible applications in the diagnosis and treatment of children with bronchial asthma. PMID:26600485

  9. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, eosinophilic variant with papillary growth: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Karashima, Takashi; Kuroda, Naoto; Taguchi, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Manabu; Hiroi, Makoto; Nao, Tomoya; Fukata, Satoshi; Inoue, Keiji; Shuin, Taro

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of an 80-year-old man who presented with pathologically diagnosed chromophobe renal cell carcinoma composed of eosinophilic cells with partial papillary growth. The patient had a 2.5 cm diameter renal mass incidentally detected by abdominal ultrasound examination. Laparoscopic left partial nephrectomy was performed under a diagnosis of left renal tumor. Histopathology demonstrated uniform eosinophilic cuboidal cells growing with a partially papillary pattern: differential diagnosis of oncocytoma, papillary renal cell carcinoma, or oncocytic papillary renal cell carcinoma was necessary. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-monoclonal antibody 31 and -CD82 antibody, and choroid iron staining, were positive. Cytogenetic analysis by comparative genomic hybridization showed gains of chromosomes 1p, 9q, 19q, 20, and 21q, and losses of chromosomes 1p and q, 2q, 6q and 7q, leading to diagnosis of chromophobe RCC. We describe differential diagnosis for chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, eosinophilic variant, growing in a papillary fashion in the kidney. PMID:26722580

  10. The diagnostic value of transthoracic echocardiography for eosinophilic myocarditis: A single center experience from China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingxing; Cheng, Tsung O; Fei, Hongwen; Ren, Pingping; He, Yale; Wang, Xinfang; Lu, Qing; Han, Wei; Li, Ke; Li, Ling; Yang, Yali; Chen, Oudi

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study is to explore the value of transthoracic echocardiography in the diagnosis of eosinophilic myocarditis. The echocardiographic characteristics of nine patients with eosinophilic myocarditis in our hospital between January 2004 and January 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. In our study, four of the nine patients were diagnosed to have small pericardial effusion. The obliteration of the apical cavity was observed in five of the nine patients. There were six patients with both mitral and tricuspid regurgitation, one patient with only mitral regurgitation, and one patient with only tricuspid regurgitation. Transthoracic echocardiography showed that the diameters of the left and right atria were both increased in eight of the nine patients. The diameter of the left ventricle was increased in five patients, and the right ventricular diameter was increased in four patients. The left ventricular ejection fraction was decreased in two of the nine patients. Five of the nine patients had pulmonary hypertension, and one patient had severe pulmonary hypertension. Transthoracic echocardiography is the primary method for the diagnosis of eosinophilic myocarditis and is also useful in follow-up of the disease. PMID:26301679

  11. Aggressive eosinophilic granuloma of the parietal bone. An immunohystochemical study of Ki-67 expression.

    PubMed

    Bruno, M C; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Panagiotopoulos, K; Elefante, A; Tortora, F; De Notaris, M G; Colella, A; Ginguenè, C; Cerillo, A

    2006-12-01

    Solitary eosinophilic granuloma (EG) of the skull is a rare lesion, the natural history of which is still to be defined. We report a case of a 26-year-old female who presented with progressive headache and nausea accompanied by a painful firm mass in her left parietal region, which grew very rapidly during the last two weeks before admission. Computed tomography scan showed an osteolytic lesion, which on magnetic resonance imaging appeared hyperintense on both T1- and T2-weighted images, with marked and heterogeneous enhancement after gadolinium administration. Total surgical excision of the lesion was performed and histopathological diagnosis was compatible with eosinophilic granuloma. Immuno-histochemical study of Ki-67 antigen expression was also performed with a labelling index of 10%. In a review of the pertinent literature, we found one case report showing a Ki-67 labelling index of 6.2% in a patient harboring EG of the occipital bone. These two relatively high percentages of proliferative activity suggest a role of local Langerhans'cell proliferation, along with that of inflammatory response, in the aggressive clinical course and rapid expansion observed in some rare cases of solitary eosinophilic granuloma. PMID:17108889

  12. Acute Eosinophilic Myocarditis and Hyper IgE in HIV Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Thawabi, Mohammad; Habib, Mirette; Shaaban, Hamid; Shamoon, Fayez

    2014-01-01

    Context: Eosinophilic myocarditis is a rare cause of myocarditis. It is manifested histopathologically by diffuse or focal myocardial inflammation with eosinophilic infiltration, often in association with peripheral blood eosinophilia. Patients infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), especially those with lower CD4 counts, can occasionally have hyperimmunoglobulinemia E (Hyper IgE) and eosinophilia. Case Report: We report a case of a 29-year-old patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) who had a persistent elevation of eosinophil counts and elevated IgE levels for a year prior to admission. He was presented to our emergency department with chest pain and laboratory tests revealed peripheral blood eosinophilia and elevated troponins. Coronary angiogram showed nonobstructive coronary artery disease. He then underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging which was consistent with an infiltrative myocarditis. After being put on steroid therapy, his peripheral eosinophilia resolved and his cardiac symptoms improved. Conclusion: Our case highlights that eosinophilia and Hyper IgE in HIV patients has the potential to contribute to end-organ damage. PMID:25077083

  13. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia with persistent decreased diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Sibylle; Albertini, Marc; Leroy, Sylvie; Giovannini-Chami, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    We report a 15-year-old girl presenting with dry cough, exertional dyspnoea, weight loss, fever and night sweats for over 1?month. Blood tests revealed hypereosinophilia, high IgE and antinuclear antibodies levels. Chest x-rays showed bilateral peripheral infiltrates mostly in the right upper lobe which was confirmed by a chest CT. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed hypercellularity with 28% of eosinophils. Idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia was confirmed after exclusion of other causes of eosinophilic pneumonia and systemic disease. The patient responded dramatically to oral corticosteroids. Oral corticotherapy was stopped after 4?months. At 8?months of follow-up, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) remained moderately low (58%) with persistent mild exertional dyspnoea. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing showed muscular peripheral limitation. Even if in our patient, mild exertional dyspnoea can be partly correlated to peripheral deconditioning, DLCO should be systematically evaluated to determine follow-up studies standards, to correlate with subclinical disease, relapse risk and to codify therapeutic options. PMID:23417937

  14. Dasatinib, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Activation of Eosinophils Interacting with Dermal Fibroblasts by Pruritogenic Cytokine IL-31 and Alarmin IL-33: Implications in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Huai-Na; Chow, Joyce Yin-Sau; Choi, Angela On Kei; Lam, Christopher Wai-Kei

    2012-01-01

    Background IL-31 is a pruritogenic cytokine, and IL-33 is an alarmin for damaging inflammation. They together relate to the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD). Eosinophil infiltration into the inner dermal compartment is a predominant pathological feature of AD. We herein investigated the in vitro inflammatory effects of IL-31 and IL-33 on the activation of human eosinophils and dermal fibroblasts. Methodology/Principal Findings Receptors, adhesion molecules and signaling molecules were assessed by Western blot or flow cytometry. Chemokines and cytokine were quantitated by multiplex assay. Functional IL-31 receptor component IL-31RA, OSMR-? and IL-33 receptor component ST2 were constitutively expressed on the surface of eosinophils. Co-culture of eosinophils and fibroblasts significantly induced pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and AD-related chemokines CXCL1, CXCL10, CCL2 and CCL5. Such inductions were further enhanced with IL-31 and IL-33 stimulation. IL-31 and IL-33 could significantly provoke the release of CXCL8 from eosinophils and fibroblasts, respectively, which was further enhanced upon co-culture. In co-culture, eosinophils and fibroblasts were the main source for the release of CCL5, and IL-6, CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL10 and CCL2, respectively. Direct interaction between eosinophils and fibroblasts was required for CXCL1, CXCL10, CXCL8 and CCL5 release. Cell surface expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on eosinophils and fibroblasts was up-regulated in co-culture upon IL-31 and IL-33 stimulation. The interaction between eosinophils and fibroblasts under IL-31 and IL-33 stimulation differentially activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-?B and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–Akt pathways. Using specific signaling molecule inhibitors, the differential induction of IL-31 and IL-33-mediated release of cytokines and chemokines such as IL-6 and CXCL8 from co-culture should be related to their distinct activation profile of intracellular signaling pathways. Conclusions/Significance The above findings suggest a crucial immunopathological role of IL-31 and IL-33 in AD through the activation of eosinophils-fibroblasts interaction via differential intracellular signaling mechanisms. PMID:22272250

  16. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-07

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  18. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  19. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  20. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Molecular recognition of acute myeloid leukemia using aptamers

    E-print Network

    Tan, Weihong

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Molecular recognition of acute myeloid leukemia using aptamers K Sefah1,2 , ZW live acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells to select a group of DNA aptamers, which can recognize AML molecular analysis of leukemia and its subcategories. Leukemia (2009) 23, 235­244; doi:10.1038/leu.2008

  2. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or more probability of causation estimates from up to three of the four alternate leukemia risk models included...

  3. Increased CCL24/eotaxin-2 with postnatal ozone exposure in allergen-sensitized infant monkeys is not associated with recruitment of eosinophils to airway mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Debbie L.; Gerriets, Joan E.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Cell Biology, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA 95616 ; Miller, Lisa A.

    2011-12-15

    Epidemiology supports a causal link between air pollutant exposure and childhood asthma, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have previously reported that ozone exposure can alter the anatomic distribution of CD25+ lymphocytes in airways of allergen-sensitized infant rhesus monkeys. Here, we hypothesized that ozone may also affect eosinophil trafficking to allergen-sensitized infant airways. To test this hypothesis, we measured blood, lavage, and airway mucosa eosinophils in 3-month old monkeys following cyclical ozone and house dust mite (HDM) aerosol exposures. We also determined if eotaxin family members (CCL11, CCL24, CCL26) are associated with eosinophil location in response to exposures. In lavage, eosinophil numbers increased in animals exposed to ozone and/or HDM. Ozone + HDM animals showed significantly increased CCL24 and CCL26 protein in lavage, but the concentration of CCL11, CCL24, and CCL26 was independent of eosinophil number for all exposure groups. In airway mucosa, eosinophils increased with exposure to HDM alone; comparatively, ozone and ozone + HDM resulted in reduced eosinophils. CCL26 mRNA and immunofluorescence staining increased in airway mucosa of HDM alone animals and correlated with eosinophil volume. In ozone + HDM animal groups, CCL24 mRNA and immunofluorescence increased along with CCR3 mRNA, but did not correlate with airway mucosa eosinophils. Cumulatively, our data indicate that ozone exposure results in a profile of airway eosinophil migration that is distinct from HDM mediated pathways. CCL24 was found to be induced only by combined ozone and HDM exposure, however expression was not associated with the presence of eosinophils within the airway mucosa. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ozone can modulate the localization of eosinophils in infant allergic airways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of eotaxins within the lung is affected by ozone and allergen exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CCL24 induction by ozone and allergen exposure is not linked to eosinophilia.

  4. Midostaurin and Azacitidine in Treating Elderly Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-11

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Vorinostat and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  6. 14-3-3? protein expression in eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a parasite endemic in the Southeast Asian and Pacific regions. Humans are incidentally infected either by eating uncooked intermediate hosts or by consuming vegetables containing the living third-stage larvae. The 14-3-3? protein is a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) marker of neuronal damage during the development of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. In addition, increased 14-3-3? protein is also found in CSF from patients with a variety of neurological disorders. The goal of this study is to determine the roles of serum/CSF14-3-3? protein in patients with eosinophilic meningitis. Methods In a cohort study among nine Thai laborers with eosinophilic meningitis due to eating raw snails (Pomacea canaliculata), we examined the CSF weekly while patients were still hospitalized and followed up the serum for 6 months. The levels of 14-3-3? protein in CSF were analyzed by western blot and an in-house 14-3-3? enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measurement was established and tested in an animal model of eosinophilic meningitis. Results The elevated 14-3-3? level was detected in the CSF from eight out of nine (81%) patients After 2 weeks of treatment, all patients showed a declined level or cleared of 14-3-3? protein in the CSF. By developing an in-house ELISA for measurement of 14-3-3? protein, it was found that the serum 14-3-3? level was significantly increased in patients during initial visit. . This finding was consistent to the animal experiment result in which there was severe blood brain barrier damage three weeks after infection and increased 14-3-3? protein expression in the CSF and serum by western blot and in house ELISA. After treatment, the serum 14-3-3? level in meningitis patients was rapidly returned to normal threshold. There was a correlation between initial CSF 14-3-3? level with severity of headache (r?=?0.692, p?=?0.039), CSF pleocytosis (r?=?0.807, p?=?0.009) and eosinophilia (r?=?0.798, p?=?0.01) in the CSF of patients with eosinophilic meningitis (Spearman’s correlation test). Conclusions The serum 14-3-3? concentrations may constitute a useful marker for blood brain barrier damage severity and follow up in patients with eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis. PMID:24555778

  7. Perspectives on the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children but the causes of the disease in the majority of cases are not known. About 80% are precursor-B cell in origin (CD19+, CD10+), and this immunophenotype has increased in incidence over the past several decades in the Western world. Part of this increase may be due to the introduction of new chemical exposures into the child's environment including parental smoking, pesticides, traffic fumes, paint and household chemicals. However, much of the increase in leukemia rates is likely linked to altered patterns of infection during early childhood development, mirroring causal pathways responsible for a similarly increased incidence of other childhood-diagnosed immune-related illnesses including allergy, asthma, and type 1 diabetes. Factors linked to childhood leukemia that are likely surrogates for immune stimulation include exposure to childcare settings, parity status and birth order, vaccination history, and population mixing. In case-control studies, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is consistently inversely associated with greater exposure to infections, via daycare and later birth order. New evidence suggests also that children who contract leukemia may harbor a congenital defect in immune responder status, as indicated by lower levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 at birth in children who grow up to contract leukemia, as well as higher need for clinical care for infections within the first year of life despite having lower levels of exposure to infections. One manifestation of this phenomenon may be leukemia clusters which tend to appear as a leukemia “outbreak” among populations with low herd immunity to a new infection. Critical answers to the etiology of childhood leukemia will require incorporating new tools into traditional epidemiologic approaches – including the classification of leukemia at a molecular scale, better exposure assessments at all points in a child's life, a comprehensive understanding of genetic risk factors, and an appraisal of the interplay between infectious exposures and the status of immune response in individuals. PMID:22326931

  8. Biosampling Case Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic and Myelocytic Leukemia) and a Reference Population in Sierra Vista, Arizona

    E-print Network

    Biosampling Case Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic and Myelocytic Leukemia) and a Reference. Statistical methods E. Investigation Protocol, Biosampling of case Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic and Acute Myelocytic Leukemia) and a Reference Population in Sierra Vista, Arizona 2 #12;Tables 1. Selected

  9. Anti–IL-5 (mepolizumab) therapy reduces eosinophil activation ex vivo and increases IL-5 and IL-5 receptor levels

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Miguel L.; Villanueva, Joyce M.; Buckmeier, Bridget K.; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Assa’ad, Amal H.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Anti–IL-5 might be a useful therapeutic agent for eosinophilic disorders, yet its immunologic consequences have not been well characterized. Objective We sought to characterize the hematologic and immunologic effects of anti-IL-5 in human subjects. Methods The effects of 3-month infusions of mepolizumab were assessed in 25 patients with a variety of eosinophilic syndromes. Samples with increased IL-5 levels after therapy were analyzed by using size exclusion filtration. Immunoreactive IL-5 fraction and plasma samples were subsequently precipitated with saturating concentrations of protein A/G. Results Twenty-three patients responded to anti–IL-5 therapy with a decrease in blood eosinophil counts and a reduced percentage of CCR3+ cells by 20- and 13-fold, respectively (P < .0001). Responsiveness was not related to the levels of baseline plasma IL-5 or the presence of FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene. Persistently decreased blood eosinophilia remained for 3 months after final infusion in76%of subjects. Therapy was associated with a large increase in blood IL-5 levels, likely because of a circulating IL-5/mepolizumab complex precipitated with protein A/G, a significant increase in eosinophil IL-5 receptor ? expression, and increased percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells producing intracellular IL-5 (P <.05). Additionally, anti-IL-5 therapy decreased eotaxin-stimulated eosinophil shape change ex vivo. Conclusions Anti–IL-5 therapy induces a dramatic and sustained decrease in blood eosinophilia (including CCR3+ cells), decreased eosinophil activation, and increased circulating levels of IL-5 in a variety of eosinophilic disorders. Increased levels of IL-5 receptor ? and lymphocyte IL-5 production after anti–IL-5 therapy suggest an endogenous IL-5 autoregulatory pathway. PMID:18410960

  10. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, CNS Tumors, Lymphoma, or T-Cell Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-04

    Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Choriocarcinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Teratoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Gonadotroph Adenoma; Pituitary Basophilic Adenoma; Pituitary Chromophobe Adenoma; Pituitary Eosinophilic Adenoma; Prolactin Secreting Adenoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent Pituitary Tumor; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; TSH Secreting Adenoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2005-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

  13. Eosinophils Contribute to IL-4 Production and Shape the T-Helper Cytokine Profile and Inflammatory Response in Pulmonary Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Piehler, Daniel; Stenzel, Werner; Grahnert, Andreas; Held, Josephin; Richter, Lydia; Köhler, Gabriele; Richter, Tina; Eschke, Maria; Alber, Gottfried; Müller, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility to infection with Cryptococcus neoformans is tightly determined by production of IL-4. In this study, we investigated the time course of IL-4 production and its innate cellular source in mice infected intranasally with C. neoformans. We show that pulmonary IL-4 production starts surprisingly late after 6 weeks of infection. Interestingly, in the lungs of infected mice, pulmonary T helper (Th) cells and eosinophils produce significant amounts of IL-4. In eosinophil-deficient ?dblGATA mice, IL-33 receptor–expressing Th2s are significantly reduced, albeit not absent, whereas protective Th1 and Th17 responses are enhanced. In addition, recruitment of pulmonary inflammatory cells during infection with C. neoformans is reduced in the absence of eosinophils. These data expand previous findings emphasizing an exclusively destructive effector function by eosinophilic granulocytes. Moreover, in ?dblGATA mice, fungal control is slightly enhanced in the lung; however, dissemination of Cryptococcus is not prevented. Therefore, eosinophils play an immunoregulatory role that contributes to Th2-dependent susceptibility in allergic inflammation during bronchopulmonary mycosis. PMID:21699881

  14. Effects of monoclonal antibodies to adhesion molecules on eosinophilic myocarditis in Toxocara canis-infected CBA/J mice.

    PubMed

    Hokibara, S; Takamoto, M; Isobe, M; Sugane, K

    1998-11-01

    Eosinophilic myocarditis followed by fibrosis of the cardiac muscle was observed in addition to peripheral blood eosinophilia in CBA/J mice infected with Toxocara canis. The infected mice were used as an experimental model of eosinophilic endomyocarditis associated with hypereosinophilic syndrome. Effects of in vivo treatment with MoAbs to adhesion molecules on eosinophilic myocarditis were examined using this experimental model. Expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) on endothelial cells of capillaries in myocardium were increased 1 and 2 weeks after infection. Infiltration of very late antigen (VLA)-4+ and/or CD11a+ cells into the cardiac muscles was also observed 1 and 2 weeks after infection. Infiltration of eosinophils into the heart was significantly suppressed by anti-CD18 MoAb and anti-VLA-4 MoAb, and focal fibrosis of the cardiac muscle was also significantly suppressed by combined administration of anti-CD18 and anti-ICAM-1 MoAbs. These results indicate that adhesion molecules may play important roles in eosinophilic myocarditis, and that blockade of interaction between adhesion molecules and their ligands may help to control it. PMID:9822282

  15. Eosinophil Count and Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Count Ratio as Prognostic Markers in Patients with Bacteremia: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Terradas, Roser; Grau, Santiago; Blanch, Jordi; Riu, Marta; Saballs, Pere; Castells, Xavier; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Knobel, Hernando

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There is scarce evidence on the use of eosinophil count as a marker of outcome in patients with infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether changes in eosinophil count, as well as the neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR), could be used as clinical markers of outcome in patients with bacteremia. Methods We performed a retrospective study of patients with a first episode of community-acquired or healthcare-related bacteremia during hospital admission between 2004 and 2009. A total of 2,311 patients were included. Cox regression was used to analyze the behaviour of eosinophil count and the NLCR in survivors and non-survivors. Results In the adjusted analysis, the main independent risk factor for mortality was persistence of an eosinophil count below 0.0454·103/uL (HR?=?4.20; 95% CI 2.66–6.62). An NLCR value >7 was also an independent risk factor but was of lesser importance. The mean eosinophil count in survivors showed a tendency to increase rapidly and to achieve normal values between the second and third day. In these patients, the NLCR was <7 between the second and third day. Conclusion Both sustained eosinopenia and persistence of an NLCR >7 were independent markers of mortality in patients with bacteremia. PMID:22912753

  16. Hairy Cell Leukemia and Bone Pain.

    PubMed

    Streu, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia is a relatively rare but distinct B-cell lympho-proliferative disorder of the blood, bone marrow, and spleen that accounts for only 2% of all adult leukemia cases. The median age at presentation is 50-55 years, with a 4:1 male to female predominance. Although considered uncommon, a number of unusual clinical presentations have been noted in the literature, including the presence of peripheral lymphadenopathy, lytic bone lesions, skin involvement, organ involvement, and central nervous system involvement. Unlike the clinical management of other hematologic malignancies, no current system is used to stage hairy cell leukemia. PMID:26679440

  17. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Azacitidine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-22

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. S0432 Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Small Molecule that Reverses Dexamethasone Resistance in Tcell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL)

    E-print Network

    Stockwell, Brent R.

    Small Molecule that Reverses Dexamethasone Resistance in Tcell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T are one of the most utilized and effective therapies in treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia lymphoblastic leukemia, dexamethasone, glucocorticoid resistance, NOTCH1 Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL

  5. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-24

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-28

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement for Predicting Treatment Outcome in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-22

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Coeliac disease, eosinophilic oesophagitis and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, an adult population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Aro, Pertti; Walker, Marjorie M; Vieth, Michael; Agreus, Lars; Talley, Nicholas J; Murray, Joseph A; Ronkainen, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    Objective Coeliac disease (CD) has been linked to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), but population-based studies of the prevalence of CD in these conditions are lacking, that is, the aim of this study. Materials and methods An endoscopic study of 1000 randomly selected adults from the general population. CD was defined on the basis of positive serology in parallel with mucosal abnormalities of the small intestine. Any eosinophil infiltration of the oesophageal epithelium was defined as oesophageal eosinophilia and EoE was defined as having at least 15 eosinophils/high power field in biopsies from the distal oesophagus. We used Fisher’s exact test to compare the prevalence of GORD, oesophageal eosinophilia and EoE in subjects with CD vs. controls. Results 400 subjects (40%) had gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms (GORS), 155 (15.5%) had erosive oesophagitis, 16 (1.6%) had Barrett’s oesophagus, 48 (4.8%) had oesophageal eosinophilia and 11 (1.1%) had EoE. CD was diagnosed in 8/400 (2.0%) individuals with GORS (vs. controls: 10/600 (1.7%), p=0.81), in 3/155 (1.9%) with erosive oesophagitis (vs. 15/845 controls (1.8%), p=0.75) and in 2/48 (4.2%) individuals with oesophageal eosinophilia (controls: 16/952 (1.7%) p=0.21), but in none of those 16 with Barrett’s oesophagus (vs. 18/984 controls (1.8%), p=1.0) or of the 11 individuals with EoE (controls: 18/989 (1.8%), p=1.0). Conclusions This population-based study found no increased risk of CD among individuals with GORD, oesophageal eosinophilia or EoE. CD screening of individuals with GORD or EoE of individuals with CD cannot be recommended. PMID:23672638

  10. Eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis--a neglected disease with escalating importance.

    PubMed

    Eamsobhana, P

    2014-12-01

    The rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis, a food-borne zoonotic parasite, has been recognized as the primary pathogen associated with human eosinophilic meningitis or eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. This neurotropic nematode has a definitive rodent host and a molluscan intermediate host. The adult worms live in the pulmonary arteries of rats. Human is a non-permissive, accidental host. Transmission to humans is by eating of infected raw or undercooked snails, poorly cleaned contaminated vegetables or other infected paratenic hosts such as freshwater prawns, crabs, frogs or monitor lizards. Thousands of diagnosed cases of eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis have been reported worldwide. Angiostrongyliasis is of increasing public health importance as globalization contributes to the geographical spread and more international travelers encounter the disease. The parasite is on the move. It has spread from its traditional endemic areas of Asia and the Pacific Basin to the American continent including the USA, Brazil and Caribbean islands. Recently, the incidence of human infections has increased rapidly. Most reports of the disease are from Thailand and Taiwan with increasing reports from mainland China. The rapid global spread of the parasite and the emerging occurrence of the infection pose challenges in clinical and laboratory diagnosis, and in epidemiology and basic biology. Enhanced understanding of the epidemiology of angiostrongyliasis, increased public awareness about the risks associated with eating raw or undercooked food, and enhanced food safety measures are needed. Therefore, current knowledge on various aspects of the parasite and the disease it causes, as well as recent epidemiological status together with significant progress in laboratory investigation of A. cantonensis infection, are overviewed to promote understanding and awareness of this emerging neglected disease. PMID:25776582

  11. Microarray analysis of distinct gene transcription profiles in non-eosinophilic chronic sinusitis with nasal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Spencer C.; Han, Joseph K.; Huyett, Phillip; Negri, Julie; Kropf, Elizabeth Z.; Borish, Larry; Steinke, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent literature has indicated the feasibility of microarray analysis in the characterization of chronic sinusitis. We hypothesized that previously unexplored inflammatory mechanisms would be involved in the pathophysiology of noneosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (NE-CRSwNP) and that this technology could be used to identify the gene expression of these novel and previously known mediators. Methods Patients with CRSwNP failing medical therapy were prospectively enrolled and NP tissue was removed at time of surgery. NE-CRSwNP was diagnosed based on clinical parameters including absence of allergic disease and confirmed with histopathology showing lack of eosinophilic infiltration. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts extracted from study and control patients were then subjected to microarray analysis using Affymatrix based chips. Validation of findings was then confirmed via quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results Microarray analysis revealed activation of pathways involved in antigen presentation, cellular movement, hematopoiesis, carcinogenesis, apoptosis, and cell signaling. Previously unexplored genes of interest were identified and their differential regulation was validated via qRT-PCR. Our data showed up-regulation of innate inflammation genes (IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1), hypoxia-induced inflammation 1?, and fibrosis (tenascin) and lack of up-regulation of genes associated with allergic, eosinophilic inflammation (IL-4 and IL-13). Additionally, the genes for CXCL1 and autocrine motility factor receptor were novelly identified to be up-regulated Conclusion This study explores the utility of gene microarray technology in identifying unexplored targets of immune dysregulation in NE-CRSwNP. Furthermore, the data characterize the immunologic profile of NE-CRSwNP as it differs from other forms of CRSwNP, in particular, those known to be associated with eosinophilic inflammation. PMID:19178793

  12. Inflammatory signatures for eosinophilic vs. neutrophilic allergic pulmonary inflammation reveal critical regulatory checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Pieter; Naessens, Thomas; De Koker, Stefaan; Hennuy, Benoit; Hacha, Jonathan; Smet, Muriel; Cataldo, Didier; Di Valentin, Emmanuel; Piette, Jacques; Tournoy, Kurt G; Grooten, Johan

    2011-05-01

    Contrary to the T-helper (Th)-2 bias and eosinophil-dominated bronchial inflammation encountered in most asthmatic subjects, other patients may exhibit neutrophil-predominant asthma subphenotypes, along with Th-1 and Th-17 cells. However, the etiology of many neutrophil-dominated asthma subphenotypes remains ill-understood, in part due to a lack of appropriate experimental models. To better understand the distinct immune-pathological features of eosinophilic vs. neutrophilic asthma types, we developed an ovalbumin (OVA)-based mouse model of neutrophil-dominated allergic pulmonary inflammation. Consequently, we probed for particular inflammatory signatures and checkpoints underlying the immune pathology in this new model, as well as in a conventional, eosinophil-dominated asthma model. Briefly, mice were OVA sensitized using either aluminum hydroxide (alum) or complete Freund's adjuvants, followed by OVA aerosol challenge. T-cell, granulocyte, and inflammatory mediator profiles were determined, along with alveolar macrophage genomewide transcriptome profiling. In contrast to the Th-2-dominated phenotype provoked by alum, OVA/ complete Freund's adjuvants adjuvant-based sensitization, followed by allergen challenge, elicited a pulmonary inflammation that was poorly controlled by dexamethasone, and in which Th-1 and Th-17 cells additionally participated. Analysis of the overall pulmonary and alveolar macrophage inflammatory mediator profiles revealed remarkable similarities between both models. Nevertheless, we observed pronounced differences in the IL-12/IFN-? axis and its control by IL-18 and IL-18 binding protein, but also in macrophage arachidonic acid metabolism and expression of T-cell instructive ligands. These differential signatures, superimposed onto a generic inflammatory signature, denote distinctive inflammatory checkpoints potentially involved in orchestrating neutrophil-dominated asthma. PMID:21335522

  13. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Decitabine and Midostaurin in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Two cases of esophageal eosinophilia: eosinophilic esophagitis or gastro-esophageal reflux disease?

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Karagol, Hacer Ilbilge Ertoy; Topal, Erdem; Unlusoy, Aysel Aksu; Egritas, Odul; Gonul, Ipek Isik; Bakirtas, Arzu

    2014-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and gastroesophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders). In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts. PMID:24987510

  18. Two Cases of Esophageal Eosinophilia: Eosinophilic Esophagitis or Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Karagol, Hacer Ilbilge Ertoy; Topal, Erdem; Unlusoy, Aysel Aksu; Egritas, Odul; Gonul, Ipek Isik; Bakirtas, Arzu

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and gastroesophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders). In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts. PMID:24987510

  19. Loeffler's endocarditis and bicavity eosinophilic effusions in a dog with visceral mast cell tumour and hypereosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Harris, B J; Constantino-Casas, F; Archer, J; Herrtage, M E

    2013-11-01

    A 9-year-old crossbred dog was presented with a 2-week history of diarrhoea and tachypnoea. Marked circulating eosinophilia was identified. Pleural and abdominal effusions were detected by radiography and ultrasonography and cytological examination of these fluids revealed a predominance of eosinophils. Splenic and hepatic cytology revealed mast cell neoplasia, which was confirmed as visceral mast cell tumour on post-mortem examination. Histological changes of myocardial inflammation, necrosis and fibrosis were found. These findings are consistent with Loeffler's endocarditis. PMID:23809908

  20. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: An Emerging Disease in Childhood – Review of Diagnostic and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Alexandra; Dias, Jorge Amil

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immune/antigen mediated inflammatory disease of the esophagus. It comprises a separate entity of increasing incidence and prevalence in children and adults. The disease is characterized by histological evidence of dense esophageal tissue eosinophilia in the presence of a variety of upper GI symptoms including vomiting, dysphagia, food impaction, and odynophagia. Cornerstone of treatment is dietary intervention and/or the off-label use of swallowed topical corticosteroids. New drug therapies are under investigation. In this review, we focus on the diagnostic approach and the currently available treatment strategies. PMID:25485261

  1. The fine structure of granules in eosinophil leucocytes from aquatic and terrestrial birds.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, M H

    1978-01-01

    The ultrastructure of eosinophil granules from various aquatic and terrestrial birds has been described. Granules of three basic types were found. The first had a crystalline internum and was found only in the order Anseriformes, which included the black-necked screamer, ducks, geese and swans. The crystals occurred in three morphological forms. The second and least common granule examined contained a non-crystalline internum which was either homogeneous or composed of microfilaments or microtubules. The largest and most common group of birds had a homogenous granule with no internum shown. Homogeneous granules occurred less frequently than did those with interna. PMID:566969

  2. De-novo Onset of Eosinophilic Esophagitis After Large Volume Allergen Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, W. Asher; Jerath, Maya R.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated condition believed to have an allergic component, but the timing of the initial allergen triggers that cause the disease is poorly understood. While the clinical presentation of EoE is often of longstanding symptoms, in animal models, acute exposure to an allergen challenge successfully produces EoE. In this report, we present three cases of individuals who developed esophageal eosinophilia and EoE shortly after a clearly identified exposure to aeroallergens. These cases highlight the allergic etiology of EoE, and provide a link from humans to the previously described experimental mechanisms. PMID:23799220

  3. Sacral myeloradiculitis (Elsberg syndrome) secondary to eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jui-Jen; Chuang, Shin-Hung; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Huang, Mao-Hsiung

    2009-01-01

    Elsberg syndrome secondary to eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis is uncommon. Clinicians should consider a wide differential diagnosis including tumour, spinal cord infarction, necrosis, vasculitis, drug induced or other sources of infection. In addition, acute urinary retention is a urological emergency and clinicians should keep in mind the prevention of bladder overdistension. The intervention of rehabilitation programmes and clean intermittent catheterisation education for bladder management, in accordance with the patient’s condition, is also important. Earlier rehabilitation is important to ensure a speedy recovery and to prevent further complications. PMID:21811516

  4. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  5. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  6. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  7. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  8. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  11. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  12. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Cancer.gov

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  13. Eliminating Hairy Cell Leukemia Minimal Residual Disease

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have disease-related symptoms that require treatment will be randomly assigned to receive cladribine with either concurrent rituximab or rituximab at least 6 months after completing cladribine therapy.

  14. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood vessel in the chest. Other drug therapy Arsenic trioxide and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) are ... Intrathecal chemotherapy . All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) plus arsenic trioxide for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ...

  15. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood vessel in the chest. Other drug therapy Arsenic trioxide and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) are ... Intrathecal chemotherapy . All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) plus arsenic trioxide for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood vessel in the chest. Other drug therapy Arsenic trioxide and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) are ... Intrathecal chemotherapy . All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) plus arsenic trioxide for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ...

  17. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood vessel in the chest. Other drug therapy Arsenic trioxide and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) are ... Intrathecal chemotherapy . All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) plus arsenic trioxide for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ...

  18. Could Common Diabetes Drugs Help Fight Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    Could Common Diabetes Drugs Help Fight Leukemia? Combining glitazones with standard treatment improved survival in small study To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. (*this ...

  19. Empowering Preadolescent and Adolescent Leukemia Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Kathy

    1988-01-01

    Describes effects of leukemia diagnosis and treatment for preadolescents and adolescents. Discusses strategies for social workers to assist these cancer patients in participating actively in the day-to-day management of their own care. (ABL)

  20. Oblimersen, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of…

  2. Ofatumumab, Pentostatin, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-30

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  3. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer that originates in the bone marrow from immature white blood cells known as myeloblasts. About 25% of all children with leukemia have AML. Although survival rates have increased since the 1970s, approximately half of all childhood AML cases relapse despite intensive treatment. Additional therapies following relapse are often unsuccessful and can be especially difficult and damaging for children. These patients would clearly benefit from targeted therapeutic approaches.

  5. Chemoimmunotherapy for hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ravandi, Farhad

    2015-12-01

    Success in the treatment of patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL) over the last several decades is largely due to the high efficacy of the nucleoside analogs, cladribine and pentostatin. However, the relapse-free survival curves have not shown a plateau and many patients treated with these agents will eventually relapse. Although better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms in HCL have led to effective and novel options for the treatment of relapse, long term durability of the responses obtained with these agents still remains unclear. Combination of nucleoside analogs with monoclonal antibodies such as rituximab has been shown to be safe and effective and has the potential to supersede the nucleoside analogs as the frontline strategy. Such chemo-immunotherapy approaches are under further investigation and will have to be assessed with socioeconomic considerations in mind. Other novel monoclonal antibodies, approved for the treatment of other lymphoid neoplasms, may also be considered for future studies of chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:26614901

  6. Eosinophils from Murine Lamina Propria Induce Differentiation of Naïve T Cells into Regulatory T Cells via TGF-?1 and Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Ojcius, David M.; Hu, Wei-Lin; Ge, Yu-Mei; Lin, Xu’ai; Li, Lan-Juan; Pan, Jian-Ping; Yan, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Treg cells play a crucial role in immune tolerance, but mechanisms that induce Treg cells are poorly understood. We here have described eosinophils in lamina propria (LP) that displayed high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, a rate-limiting step during all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) synthesis, and expressed TGF-?1 mRNA and high levels of ATRA. Co-incubation assay confirmed that LP eosinophils induced the differentiation of naïve T cells into Treg cells. Differentiation promoted by LP eosinophils were inhibited by blocked either TGF-?1 or ATRA. Peripheral blood (PB) eosinophils did not produce ATRA and could not induce Treg differentiation. These data identifies LP eosinophils as effective inducers of Treg cell differentiation through a mechanism dependent on TGF-?1 and ATRA. PMID:26587591

  7. Isoniazid-induced Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) Syndrome Presenting as Acute Eosinophilic Myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sai-Nan; He, Qiu-Xiang; Yang, Nai-Bin; Ni, Shun-Lan; Lu, Ming-Qin

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that hypereosinophilic syndrome may be induced by antituberculosis drugs. We herein report the case of a 43-year-old man who had been on antituberculosis drugs for two months to treat tuberculous meningitis. During therapy, he suffered from drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) presenting as acute eosinophilic myocarditis, as confirmed on a histopathologic examination. According to the patient's medication history, clinical features and accessory examination findings, the eosinophilic myocarditis was thought to be possibly induced by isoniazid. Although further investigations are needed to confirm causality, isoniazid may be added to the list of drugs with the potential to cause DRESS syndrome. PMID:25986261

  8. Work-related leukemia: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Leukemia is a complex disease, which only became better understood during the last decades following the development of new laboratory techniques and diagnostic methods. Despite our improved understanding of the physiology of the disease, little is yet known about the causes of leukemia. A variety of potential risk factors have been suggested so far, including personal habits and lifestyle, and a wide range of occupational or environmental exposures. A causal association with leukemia has only been documented to date for ionizing radiation, benzene and treatment with cytostatic drugs, but there is an ongoing scientific debate on the possible association of leukemia with a number of other work-related hazards. In this article, we have reviewed scientific studies, published over the past 5 years, which investigated potential associations between leukemia and exposure to occupational risk factors. The systematic literature review took place via electronic databases, using specific search criteria, and independent reviewers have further filtered the search results to identify the number of articles, presented in our paper. A large number of studies included in the review referred to the effects of ionizing radiation, where new data suggest that the effects of exposure to small doses of ionizing radiation should probably be reevaluated. Some other works appear to substantiate a potential association of the disease with certain pesticides. Further research is also suggested regarding the role of infectious agents or exposure to certain chemicals like formaldehyde or butadiene in the pathogenesis of leukemia. PMID:23697536

  9. Cannabis extract treatment for terminal acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a Philadelphia chromosome mutation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yadvinder; Bali, Chamandeep

    2013-09-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of the white blood cells and is typically well treated with combination chemotherapy, with a remission state after 5 years of 94% in children and 30-40% in adults. To establish how aggressive the disease is, further chromosome testing is required to determine whether the cancer is myeloblastic and involves neutrophils, eosinophils or basophils, or lymphoblastic involving B or T lymphocytes. This case study is on a 14-year-old patient diagnosed with a very aggressive form of ALL (positive for the Philadelphia chromosome mutation). A standard bone marrow transplant, aggressive chemotherapy and radiation therapy were revoked, with treatment being deemed a failure after 34 months. Without any other solutions provided by conventional approaches aside from palliation, the family administered cannabinoid extracts orally to the patient. Cannabinoid resin extract is used as an effective treatment for ALL with a positive Philadelphia chromosome mutation and indications of dose-dependent disease control. The clinical observation in this study revealed a rapid dose-dependent correlation. PMID:24474921

  10. Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment of Adolescents and Treatment of Adolescents and Young Adults with ALL Young Adults with ALL with an Asparaginase with an Asparaginase - -Intensive Intensive Pediatric Regimen Pediatric Regimen Lewis Silverman, M.D. Lewis Silverman, M.D. Dana

  11. IgE-activated basophils regulate eosinophil tissue entry by modulating endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Laurence E.; Sullivan, Brandon M.; Retana, Lizett E.; Allen, Christopher D.C.; Liang, Hong-Erh

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate immunity has evolved a modular architecture in response to perturbations. Allergic inflammation represents such a module, with signature features of antigen-specific IgE and tissue eosinophilia, although the cellular and molecular circuitry coupling these responses remains unclear. Here, we use genetic and imaging approaches in models of IgE-dependent eosinophilic dermatitis to demonstrate a requisite role for basophils. After antigenic inflammation, basophils initiate transmigration like other granulocytes but, upon activation via their high-affinity IgE receptor, alter their migratory kinetics to persist at the endothelium. Prolonged basophil–endothelial interactions, in part dependent on activation of focal adhesion kinases, promote delivery of basophil-derived IL-4 to the endothelium and subsequent induction of endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), which is required for eosinophil accumulation. Thus, basophils are gatekeepers that link adaptive immunity with innate effector programs by altering access to tissue sites by activation-induced interactions with the endothelium. PMID:25779634

  12. The past, present, and future of monoclonal antibodies to IL-5 and eosinophilic asthma: a review

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Megan F; Borish, Larry; Kennedy, Joshua L

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous syndrome that might be better described as a constellation of phenotypes or endotypes, each with distinct cellular and molecular mechanisms, rather than as a singular disease. One of these phenotypes is eosinophilic asthma. As the development of eosinophilic inflammation is categorically dependent on the biological activity of Interleukin (IL)-5, IL-5 antagonism became an obvious target for therapy in this phenotype. Early trials of monoclonal antibodies targeting the biological activity of IL-5, including reslizumab, mepolizumab, and benralizumab, were performed on asthmatics with no concern for evidence of eosinophilia. These trials were largely unsuccessful. However, during these trials, researchers recognized the need to quantify eosinophilia in asthma subjects in order to identify those asthmatics in whom these medications would be more likely to improve symptoms and lung function. Using biomarkers, such as sputum and blood eosinophilia, recent studies of these medications have shown improvements in blood and sputum eosinophilia, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and quality of life assessments as well as reducing occurrences of exacerbations. Moving forward, better and less invasive biomarkers of eosinophilia are necessary to ensure that the correct patients are chosen to receive these medications to receive maximal benefit. PMID:26604804

  13. Serum Biomarkers in Patients with Relapsing Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss)

    PubMed Central

    Dejaco, Christian; Oppl, Bastian; Monach, Paul; Cuthbertson, David; Carette, Simon; Hoffman, Gary; Khalidi, Nader; Koening, Curry; Langford, Carol; McKinnon-Maksimowicz, Kathleen; Seo, Philip; Specks, Ulrich; Ytterberg, Steven; Merkel, Peter A.; Zwerina, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies suggest a role for eotaxin-3, TARC/CCL17 and IgG4 in newly- diagnosed patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, Churg-Strauss) with highly active disease. The role of these biomarkers in relapsing disease is unclear. Methods Serum levels of TARC/CCL17, eotaxin-3, IgG4, and IgG4/IgG ratio were determined in serum samples from a longitudinal cohort of patients with EGPA (105 visits of 25 patients). Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory data were available for all visits. Results At the first visit, 80% of patients were using glucocorticoids and 68% additional immunosuppressive drugs. Disease flares were seen at 18 visits. The median BVAS and BVAS/WG scores at time of relapse were 4 and 2, respectively. None of the biomarkers tested were useful to discriminate between active disease and remission. Patients treated with prednisone had lower eotaxin-3 and eosinophil levels compared to patients not taking glucocorticoids irrespective of disease activity. Use of immunosuppressive agents was not associated with biomarker levels. Conclusions Serum levels of TARC/CCL17, eotaxin-3, IgG4, and IgG4/IgG ratio do not clearly differentiate active and inactive disease in established EGPA. Defining biomarkers in EGPA remains a challenge especially during times of glucocorticoid use. PMID:25812008

  14. Eosinophil and neutrophil granulocyte exudation in the Chediak-Higashi (beige) mouse.

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, M. P.; Brandt, E. J.; Swank, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Humans with Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) and mice carrying the beige mutation have a heritable defect which results in the presence of giant inclusion granules in the cytoplasm in a wide variety of cells and a markedly increased susceptibility to infections. To test whether this increased susceptibility to infection might be a consequence of impaired accumulation of granulocytes at sites of inflammatory-immune stimulation, we quantitated the exudation of granulocytes into the peritoneum in response to secondary tetanus toxoid challenge in normal mice and in two inbred mouse strains with the beige mutation. Neutrophil and eosinophil granulocyte responses in the peritoneal cavity were not diminished in the beige mice as compared to normal mice when previously sensitized animals were challenged intraperitoneally with tetanus toxoid. Since accumulation of cells at the in vivo site of inflammatory immune stimulation did not seem impaired in the mutant beige mice, it would appear that their increased susceptibility to infections is not due to impairment of cellular exudative responses, including the immune components of the eosinophil response. PMID:998737

  15. Diagnosis and classification of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly named Churg-Strauss syndrome).

    PubMed

    Mouthon, Luc; Dunogue, Bertrand; Guillevin, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a group of experts in the field suggested to rename Churg-Strauss syndrome as eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). This condition, first described in 1951, is a rare small- and medium-sized-vessel vasculitis characterized by an almost constant association with asthma and eosinophilia, and, by the presence of anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) in 30-38% of the patients. Vasculitis typically develops in a previously asthmatic and eosinophilic middle-aged patient. Asthma is severe, associated with eosinophilia and extrapulmonary symptoms. Most frequently EGPA involves the peripheral nerves and skin. Other organs, however, may be affected and must be screened for vasculitis, especially those associated with a poorer prognosis, such as the heart, kidney and gastrointestinal tract, as assessed by the recently revised Five-Factor Score (FFS). Recent insights, particularly concerning clinical differences associated with ANCA status, showed that EGPA patients might constitute a heterogeneous group. Thus, EGPA patients with anti-MPO ANCA suffered more, albeit not exclusively, from vasculitis symptoms, such as glomerulonephritis, mononeuritis multiplex and alveolar hemorrhage, whereas ANCA-negative patients more frequently develop heart involvement. This observation led to the hypothesis that EGPA might be divided into different clinical and pathophysiological subtypes, which could be managed better with more specifically adapted therapies. For now, EGPA treatment still relies mainly on corticosteroids and, when necessary for patients with poorer prognoses, combined immunosuppressant drugs, especially cyclophosphamide. Overall survival of EGPA patients is good, despite not uncommon relapses. PMID:24530234

  16. Neutrophil and eosinophil involvement of the small bowel affected by chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Colombel, J F; Hällgren, R; Venge, P; Mesnard, B; Rambaud, J C

    1988-01-01

    Excessive ethanol intake may affect the intestinal mucosa functionally and morphologically. The ethanol effect could partly be the result of inflammatory mechanisms, possibly reflected by an enhanced local granulocyte turnover. This study investigated habitual alcoholics by segmental perfusion of the jejunum and analysed the perfusion fluid content of granulocyte granule constituents. The mean jejunal secretion rate of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a neutrophil granule constituent, was 152 (26) (SE) ng/min/40 cm jejunal segment in the controls (n = 16). The MPO secretion rate in non-cirrhotic habitual alcoholics (n = 7) was on average 450 (103) ng/min and significantly increased compared with controls (p less than 0.001). In contrast alcoholics with cirrhosis (n = 6) had normal MPO secretion rate. The mean secretion rate of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), an eosinophil granule constituent, was in the controls 77 (15) ng/min/40 cm jejunal segment. Corresponding values in non-cirrhotic and cirrhotic alcoholics were 141 (38) and 130 (93) ng/min, respectively (ns). The data suggest an enhanced neutrophil granulocyte turnover in the jejunum in alcoholics, possibly contributing to the ethanol induced affection of the small bowel. The lack of increased neutrophil activity in cirrhotic alcoholics may reflect a role of the liver for granulocyte activity. PMID:2851504

  17. Excretory-secretory products from Fasciola hepatica induce eosinophil apoptosis by a caspase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Serradell, Marianela C; Guasconi, Lorena; Cervi, Laura; Chiapello, Laura S; Masih, Diana T

    2007-06-15

    Eosinophils (Eo) are known to be important effector cells in the host defense against helminth parasites. Excretory-secretory products (ESP) released by helminths have shown wide immunomodulatory properties, such as the induction of cellular apoptosis. We investigated the ability of ESP from Fasciola hepatica to induce Eo apoptosis. In this work, we observed that ESP induced an early apoptosis of rat peritoneal eosinophils and that this phenomenon was time- and concentration-dependent. Furthermore, we demonstrated that activation of protein tyrosine kinases (TyrK) and caspases were necessary to mediate the Eo apoptosis induced by the ESP, and that carbohydrate components present in these antigens were involved in this effect. We have described for the first time the ability of ESP from F. hepatica to modify the viability of Eo by apoptosis induction. Besides that, we have observed Eo apoptosis in the liver of rats 21 days after F. hepatica infection. The diminution in Eo survival in early infection could be a parasite strategy in order to prevent a host immune response. PMID:17449115

  18. Eosinophil peroxidase induces expression of cholinergic genes via cell surface neural interactions.

    PubMed

    Akasheh, Nadim; Walsh, Marie-Therese; Costello, Richard W

    2014-11-01

    Eosinophils localize to and release their granule proteins in close association with nerves in patients with asthma and rhinitis. These conditions are associated with increased neural function. In this study the effect of the individual granule proteins on cholinergic neurotransmitter expression was investigated. Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) upregulated choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) gene expression. Fluorescently labeled EPO was seen to bind to the IMR-32 cell surface. Both Poly-L-Glutamate (PLG) and Heparinase-1 reversed the up-regulatory effect of EPO on ChAT and VAChT expression and prevented EPO adhesion to the cell surface. Poly-L-arginine (PLA) had no effect on expression of either gene, suggesting that charge is necessary but insufficient to alter gene expression. EPO induced its effects via the activation of NF-?B. MEK inhibition led to reversal of all up-regulatory effects of EPO. These data indicate a preferential role of EPO signaling via a specific surface receptor that leads to neural plasticity. PMID:24937179

  19. Transcriptional Changes of Blood Eosinophils After Methacholine Inhalation Challenge in Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Tebbutt, Scott J; He, Jian-Qing; Singh, Amrit; Shannon, Casey P; Ruan, Jian; Carlsten, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Background Methacholine challenge is commonly used within the asthma diagnostic algorithm. Methacholine challenge has recently been shown to induce airway remodelling in asthma via bronchoconstriction, without additional airway inflammation. We evaluated the effect of methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction on the peripheral whole-blood transcriptome. Methods Fourteen males with adult-onset, occupational asthma, 26–77 years of age, underwent methacholine inhalation challenges. The concentration of methacholine eliciting a ?20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) was determined. Blood was collected immediately prior to and two hours after challenge. Complete blood counts and leukocyte differentials were obtained. Transcriptome analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Gene 1.0 ST arrays. Data were analyzed using robust LIMMA and SAM. The cell-specific Significance Analysis of Microarrays (csSAM) algorithm was used to deconvolute the gene expression data according to cell type. Results Microarray pathway analysis indicated that inflammatory processes were differentially affected. CsSAM identified 1,559 transcripts differentially expressed (all down-regulated) between pre- and post-methacholine in eosinophils at a false discovery cutoff of 10%. Notable changes included the GOLGA5 and METTL2B genes and the protein ubiquitination and CCR3 pathways. Conclusions We demonstrated significant changes in the peripheral blood eosinophil-specific transcriptome of asthmatics two hours after methacholine challenge. CCR3 and protein ubiquitination pathways are both significantly down-regulated. PMID:26217105

  20. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  1. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-19

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lymphocytic leukemia? What are the risk factors for acute lymphocytic leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects your ... this is unknown. Having an identical twin with ALL Someone who has an identical twin who develops ...

  5. What Are the Key Statistics about Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

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    ... the key statistics about chronic myeloid leukemia? The American Cancer Society's estimates for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the ... Health On The Net National Health Council © 2015 American Cancer Society, Inc. All rights reserved. The American Cancer Society ...

  6. Do We Know What Causes Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Can chronic myelomonocytic leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes chronic myelomonocytic leukemia? Some cases ... the instructions for nearly everything our cells do. We usually look like our parents because they are ...

  7. The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    Published on Office of Cancer Genomics (https://ocg.cancer.gov) Home > The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia [1] Mullighan CG Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program December

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    Cancer.gov

    Published on Office of Cancer Genomics (http://ocg.cancer.gov) Home > The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia [1] Mullighan CG Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program December

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    ... Topic Additional resources for acute myeloid leukemia What’s new in acute myeloid leukemia research and treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

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    Symptoms may include: Bone pain or tenderness Carpal tunnel syndrome Muscle weakness Tenderness and swelling of the skin on the arms, legs, or sometimes the joints (most often on both sides of the ...

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    ... Version Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ... students Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ...

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    ... Version Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ... students Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ...

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    MedlinePLUS

    ... Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity Digestive Health Topics Abdominal Pain Syndrome ... Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity ©2015 American College of Gastroenterology 6400 ...

  16. Brief Report: Eosinophilic Esophagitis as a Cause of Feeding Problems in Autistic Boy. The First Reported Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarocka-Cyrta, Elzbieta; Wasilewska, Jolanta; Kaczmarski, Maciej Gustaw

    2011-01-01

    Unrecognized gastrointestinal disorders may contribute to the behavioral problems in non-verbal patients, but they are often overlooked since the clinical symptoms are nonspecific. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is a chronic inflammatory disorder manifesting itself predominantly in reflux-type symptoms that do not respond to standard anti-reflux…

  17. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-02

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia