Science.gov

Sample records for eosinophilic leukemia eol-1

  1. Leukemia -- Eosinophilic

    MedlinePlus

    ... your screen to choose another section to continue reading this guide. ‹ Leukemia - Eosinophilic up Leukemia - Eosinophilic - Statistics › f t g e P + H Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Leukemia - Eosinophilic ...

  2. Leukemia -- Eosinophilic

    MedlinePlus

    ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Leukemia - Eosinophilic Overview Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Stages Treatment Options About Clinical Trials Latest Research Coping with Side Effects Follow-Up Care Survivorship Questions to Ask the ...

  3. Myeloprolipherative disorder type chronic myeloid leukemia--eosinophilic form.

    PubMed

    Arnautovic-Custovic, Aida; Hasic, Samira; Kopic, Emina; Jahic, Azra; Jovic, Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL) is a very rare form of leucemia in the western world. Adequate response is seldomly achieved after treatment with corticosteroids, interferon-alfa (INF-alfa) and medications containing hydroxi-urea (Litalir). The study presents a patient with CEL with no initial therapeutic response to the use of corticosteroids, INF-alfa and hydroxy-urea, and with neither clinical nor hematological response. After setting a diagnosis of CEL, patient was ordinated Imatinib (Glivec tabbletes) in a daily dose of 200 mg. Two days afterwards there was an evident withdrawal of subjective and clinical symptoms of disease, and the complete blood count showed significant amendment. PMID:21776882

  4. EOL-1, the homolog of the mammalian Dom3Z, regulates olfactory learning in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Zhang, Jiangwen; Calarco, John A; Zhang, Yun

    2014-10-01

    Learning is an essential function of the nervous system. However, our understanding of molecular underpinnings of learning remains incomplete. Here, we characterize a conserved protein EOL-1 that regulates olfactory learning in Caenorhabditis elegans. A recessive allele of eol-1 (enhanced olfactory learning) learns better to adjust its olfactory preference for bacteria foods and eol-1 acts in the URX sensory neurons to regulate learning. The mammalian homolog of EOL-1, Dom3Z, which regulates quality control of pre-mRNAs, can substitute the function of EOL-1 in learning regulation, demonstrating functional conservation between these homologs. Mutating the residues of Dom3Z that are critical for its enzymatic activity, and the equivalent residues in EOL-1, abolishes the function of these proteins in learning. Together, our results provide insights into the function of EOL-1/Dom3Z and suggest that its activity in pre-mRNA quality control is involved in neural plasticity. PMID:25274815

  5. Case of chronic eosinophilic leukemia with deletion of chromosome 16 and hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Kamineni, Padma; Baptiste, Ayanna; Hassan, Mukhtar; Dawkins, Fitzroy W; Zaidi, Syed; Tefferi, Ayalew; Lindsey, Mercedes; Taddesse-Heath, Lekidelu

    2006-08-01

    Chronic eosinophilic leukemia is a rare entity, characterized by eosinophilia of >1.5 x 10(9)/L, persisting for >6 months after exclusion of other reactive and neoplastic causes of eosinophilia, and occurring in association with a clonal cytogenetic abnormality. Various chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with chronic eosinophilic leukemia. Partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 16 is a cytogenetic abnormality first reported 20 years ago in patients with acute myeloid leukemia associated with bone marrow eosinophilia (AML-M4Eo). We report a case of a 45-year-old African-American male with hepatitis C and sustained peripheral blood eosinophilia who presented with gross hematuria, dyspnea on exertion, chills, decreased appetite and weight loss of 40 pounds associated with hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow biopsy showed clonal cytogenetic abnormality consisting of deletion of the long arm of chromosome 16 (16q22). Philadelphia chromosome t (9;22) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for C-kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFRA) mutations were negative. The patient was treated with imatinib at 400 mg/d with improvement of symptoms, reduction of lymphadenopathy and normalization of the eosinophil count. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of isolated del (16) (q22), a cytogenetic abnormality associated with AML-M4Eo, occurring in chronic eosinophilic leukemia. Whether this cytogenetic abnormality might represent a prodromal phase of AML-M4Eo is not known. In addition, the role of hepatitis C in inducing clonal proliferation of eosinophils is unclear. PMID:16916138

  6. Eosinophilic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... parasites , particularly ones that invade tissue, cause eosinophilia. Cancers that cause eosinophilia include Hodgkin lymphoma , leukemia , and myeloproliferative disorders . If the number of eosinophils is only ...

  7. The Spectrum of FIP1L1-PDGFRA-Associated Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Fanny; Renneville, Aline; MacIntyre, Elizabeth; Mastrilli, Samuel; Ackermann, Felix; Cayuela, Jean Michel; Rousselot, Philippe; Schmidt-Tanguy, Aline; Fain, Olivier; Michel, Marc; de Jaureguiberry, Jean-Pierre; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Cony-Makhoul, Pascale; Lefranc, Didier; Sne, Damien; Cottin, Vincent; Hamidou, Mohamed; Lidove, Olivier; Baruchel, Andr; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Bletry, Olivier; Preudhomme, Claude; Capron, Monique; Prin, Lionel; Kahn, Jean Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Imatinib is the treatment of choice for FIP1L1/PDGFRA (F/P)-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia (F/P+ CEL), but its optimal dosing, duration, and possibility of discontinuation are still a matter of debate. A retrospective multicenter study was conducted with 44 F/P+ CEL patients identified in the French Eosinophil Network and treated with imatinib. The most frequently involved systems were skin (57%), spleen (52%), and lung (45%), and eosinophilic heart disease was observed in 15 patients (34%). Complete hematologic response (CHR) was obtained in all patients, and complete molecular response (CMR) in 95% of patients (average initial imatinib dose, 165 mg/d). For 29 patients the imatinib dose was tapered with a maintenance dose of 58 mg/d (34 mg/d), allowing sustained CHR and CMR. None of the patients developed resistance during a median follow-up of 52.3 months (range, 1.497.4 mo). Imatinib was stopped in 11 patients; 6 of the patients subsequently relapsed, but 5 remained in persistent CHR or CMR (range, 988 mo). These results confirm that an initial low-dose regimen of imatinib (100 mg/d) followed by a lower maintenance dose can be efficient for obtaining long-term CHR and CMR. Our data also suggest that imatinib can be stopped in some patients without molecular relapse. PMID:23982058

  8. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certain fungus infections Asthma Autoimmune diseases Eczema Hay fever Leukemia and other blood disorders A lower-than-normal eosinophil count may be due to: Alcohol intoxication Overproduction of certain steroids in the body (such as cortisol)

  9. Novel Association between Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide and CRTH2 Receptor in Recruiting Eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    El-Shazly, Amr E.; Begon, Dominique Y.; Kustermans, Gaelle; Arafa, Mohammad; Dortu, Estelle; Henket, Monique; Lefebvre, Philippe P.; Louis, Renaud; Delvenne, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We explored the relation between vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), CRTH2, and eosinophil recruitment. It is shown that CRTH2 expression by eosinophils from allergic rhinitis (AR) patients and eosinophil cell line (Eol-1 cells) was up-regulated by VIP treatment. This was functional and resulted in exaggerated migratory response of cells against PGD2. Nasal challenge of AR patients resulted in a significant increase of VIP contents in nasal secretion (ELISA), and the immunohistochemical studies of allergic nasal tissues showed significant expression of VIP in association with intense eosinophil recruitment. Biochemical assays showed that VIP-induced eosinophil chemotaxis from AR patients and Eol-1 cells was mediated through the CRTH2 receptor. Cell migration against VIP was sensitive to protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition but not to tyrosine kinase or p38 MAPK inhibition or calcium chelation. Western blot demonstrated a novel CRTH2-mediated cytosol-to-membrane translocation of PKC-?, PKC-?, and PKA-?, -?, and -II?reg in Eol-1 cells upon stimulation with VIP. Confocal images and FACS demonstrated a strong association and co-localization between VIP peptide and CRTH2 molecules. Further, VIP induced PGD2 secretion from eosinophils. Our results demonstrate the first evidence of association between VIP and CRTH2 in recruiting eosinophils. PMID:23168411

  10. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... two are acute, meaning they get worse quickly. chronic lymphocytic leukemia chronic myeloid leukemia acute myeloid leukemia acute lymphocytic leukemia Chronic and Acute Leukemia Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and acute myeloid leukemia are ...

  11. The FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene cooperates with IL-5 to induce murine hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES)/chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL)-like disease.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Rothenberg, Marc E; Lee, Andrew W; Akei, Hiroko Saito; Brandt, Eric B; Williams, David A; Cancelas, Jose A

    2006-05-15

    Dysregulated tyrosine kinase activity by the Fip1-like1 (FIP1L1)-platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) (F/P) fusion gene has been identified as a cause of clonal hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES), called F/P-positive chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL) in humans. However, transplantation of F/P-transduced hematopoietic stem cells/progenitors (F/P(+) HSCs/Ps) into mice results in a chronic myelogenous leukemia-like disease, which does not resemble HES. Because a subgroup of patients with HES show T-cell-dependent interleukin-5 (IL-5) overexpression, we determined if expression of the F/P fusion gene in the presence of transgenic T-cell IL-5 overexpression in mice induces HES-like disease. Mice that received a transplant of CD2-IL-5-transgenic F/P(+) HSC/Ps (IL-5Tg-F/P) developed intense leukocytosis, strikingly high eosinophilia, and eosinophilic infiltration of nonhematopoietic as well as hematopoietic tissues, a phenotype resembling human HES. The disease phenotype was transferable to secondary transplant recipients of a high cell dose, suggesting involvement of a short-term repopulating stem cell or an early myeloid progenitor. Induction of significant eosinophilia was specific for F/P since expression of another fusion oncogene, p210-BCR/ABL, in the presence of IL-5 overexpression was characterized by a significantly lower eosinophilia than IL-5Tg-F/P recipients. These results suggest that F/P is not sufficient to induce a HES/CEL-like disease but requires a second event associated with IL-5 overexpression. PMID:16418325

  12. The FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene cooperates with IL-5 to induce murine hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES)/chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL)–like disease

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Lee, Andrew W.; Akei, Hiroko Saito; Brandt, Eric B.; Williams, David A.; Cancelas, Jose A.

    2006-01-01

    Dysregulated tyrosine kinase activity by the Fip1-like1 (FIP1L1)–platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) (F/P) fusion gene has been identified as a cause of clonal hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES), called F/P-positive chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL) in humans. However, transplantation of F/P-transduced hematopoietic stem cells/progenitors (F/P+ HSCs/Ps) into mice results in a chronic myelogenous leukemia–like disease, which does not resemble HES. Because a subgroup of patients with HES show T-cell–dependent interleukin-5 (IL-5) overexpression, we determined if expression of the F/P fusion gene in the presence of transgenic T-cell IL-5 overexpression in mice induces HES-like disease. Mice that received a transplant of CD2-IL-5–transgenic F/P+ HSC/Ps (IL-5Tg-F/P) developed intense leukocytosis, strikingly high eosinophilia, and eosinophilic infiltration of nonhematopoietic as well as hematopoietic tissues, a phenotype resembling human HES. The disease phenotype was transferable to secondary transplant recipients of a high cell dose, suggesting involvement of a short-term repopulating stem cell or an early myeloid progenitor. Induction of significant eosinophilia was specific for F/P since expression of another fusion oncogene, p210-BCR/ABL, in the presence of IL-5 overexpression was characterized by a significantly lower eosinophilia than IL-5Tg-F/P recipients. These results suggest that F/P is not sufficient to induce a HES/CEL-like disease but requires a second event associated with IL-5 overexpression. PMID:16418325

  13. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis with Eosinophilic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joung Il; Joo, Kwang Ro; Shin, Hyun Phil

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the bowel wall and variable gastrointestinal manifestations. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for EG when faced with gastrointestinal symptoms and peripheral eosinophilia to avoid incorrect diagnosis and inappropriate treatments. A 24-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of acute right lower quadrant abdominal pain and a laparoscopic appendectomy performed for a presumed diagnosis of an acute appendicitis. However, the procedure revealed bowel edema and a moderate amount of ascites without evidence of a suppurative appendicitis. Postoperatively, she showed persistent and progressive eosinophilia, exudative eosinophilic ascites, eosinophilic infiltration of the resected appendix wall, and eosinophilic infiltration of gastroduodenal mucosa. A punch biopsy of the abdominal skin also revealed inflammation with marked eosinophilic infiltration of the skin. She recovered after the treatment with a low dose of steroid for the EG with eosinophilic dermatitis. EG with eosinophilic dermatitis has not been reported yet and is considered fortuitous in this case. PMID:20046530

  15. FIP1L1/PDGFRalpha synergizes with SCF to induce systemic mastocytosis in a murine model of chronic eosinophilic leukemia/hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Sanchez-Aguilera, Abel; Brandt, Eric B; McBride, Melissa; Al-Moamen, Nabeel J H; Finkelman, Fred D; Williams, David A; Cancelas, Jose A; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2008-09-15

    Expression of the fusion gene FIP1-like 1/platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (FIP1L1/PDGFRalpha, F/P) and dysregulated c-kit tyrosine kinase activity are associated with systemic mastocytosis (SM) and chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL)/hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). We analyzed SM development and pathogenesis in a murine CEL model induced by F/P in hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors (HSCs/Ps) and T-cell overexpression of IL-5 (F/P-positive CEL mice). These mice had more mast cell (MC) infiltration in the bone marrow (BM), spleen, skin, and small intestine than control mice that received a transplant of IL-5 transgenic HSCs/Ps. Moreover, intestinal MC infiltration induced by F/P expression was severely diminished, but not abolished, in mice injected with neutralizing anti-c-kit antibody, suggesting that endogenous stem cell factor (SCF)/c-kit interaction synergizes with F/P expression to induce SM. F/P-expressing BM HSCs/Ps showed proliferation and MC differentiation in vitro in the absence of cytokines. SCF stimulated greater migration of F/P-expressing MCs than mock vector-transduced MCs. F/P-expressing bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) survived longer than mock vector control BMMCs in cytokine-deprived conditions. The increased proliferation and survival correlated with increased SCF-induced Akt activation. In summary, F/P synergistically promotes MC development, activation, and survival in vivo and in vitro in response to SCF. PMID:18539901

  16. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... FR. The acute leukemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: ... Brien S. The chronic leukemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: ...

  17. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  18. Eosinophilic colitis.

    PubMed

    Dionísio de Sousa, Isabel José; Bonito, Nuno; Pais, Ana; Gervásio, Helena

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man, diagnosed with colon cancer stage III in July/2010, underwent surgery and received adjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX 4 (5-fluorouracil; calcium folinate and oxaliplatin), which ended in March/2011 after 12-cycles. It was then decided to maintain periodical surveillance. About 1 year later, the patient developed several episodes of diarrhoea, mainly during the night, and presented persistent peripheral eosinophilia in the blood count (range 585-1300 eosinophils/µL). Colonoscopy was performed, with the histological result showing eosinophilic infiltration of the colon, compatible with eosinophilic colitis. The patient was treated with a short course of budesonide, achieving resolution of symptoms, and has remained asymptomatic. PMID:26957036

  19. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Merves, Jamie; Muir, Amanda; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna Modayur; Cianferoni, Antonella; Wang, Mei-Lun; Spergel, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review the understanding of the pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and the role of the immune system in the disease process. Data Sources Peer-reviewed articles on EoE from PubMed searching for “Eosinophilic Esophagitis and fibrosis” in the period of 1995 to 2013. Study Selection Studies on the clinical and immunologic features, pathogenesis, and management of EoE. Results Recent work has revealed that thymic stromal lymphopoietin and basophil have an increased role in the pathogenesis of disease. Additional understanding on the role of fibrosis in EoE is emerging. Conclusion The incidence of EoE is increasing like most atopic disease. Similar to other allergic diseases, EoE is treated with topical steroids and/or allergen avoidance. PMID:24566295

  20. Eosinophilic Lung Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here: Health Information > Condition Information Eosinophilic Lung Disorders Eosinophilic lung disorders are a category of ... of Programs and Services Doctors Who Treat Eosinophilic Lung Disorders Rohit K. Katial Rafeul Alam Joshua J. ...

  1. Induction of eosinophil apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide promotes the resolution of allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Reis, A C; Alessandri, A L; Athayde, R M; Perez, D A; Vago, J P; Ávila, T V; Ferreira, T P T; de Arantes, A C S; Coutinho, D de Sá; Rachid, M A; Sousa, L P; Martins, M A; Menezes, G B; Rossi, A G; Teixeira, M M; Pinho, V

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are effector cells that have an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. Defective removal of these cells likely leads to chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the elimination of eosinophils from inflammatory sites. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for certain mediators and molecular pathways responsible for the survival and death of leukocytes at sites of inflammation. Reactive oxygen species have been described as proinflammatory mediators but their role in the resolution phase of inflammation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reactive oxygen species in the resolution of allergic inflammatory responses. An eosinophilic cell line (Eol-1) was treated with hydrogen peroxide and apoptosis was measured. Allergic inflammation was induced in ovalbumin sensitized and challenged mouse models and reactive oxygen species were administered at the peak of inflammatory cell infiltrate. Inflammatory cell numbers, cytokine and chemokine levels, mucus production, inflammatory cell apoptosis and peribronchiolar matrix deposition was quantified in the lungs. Resistance and elastance were measured at baseline and after aerosolized methacholine. Hydrogen peroxide accelerates resolution of airway inflammation by induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils and decrease remodeling, mucus deposition, inflammatory cytokine production and airway hyperreactivity. Moreover, the inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by apocynin or in gp91(phox-/-) mice prolonged the inflammatory response. Hydrogen peroxide induces Eol-1 apoptosis in vitro and enhances the resolution of inflammation and improves lung function in vivo by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils. PMID:25675292

  2. Induction of eosinophil apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide promotes the resolution of allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, A C; Alessandri, A L; Athayde, R M; Perez, D A; Vago, J P; Ávila, T V; Ferreira, T P T; de Arantes, A CS; de Sá Coutinho, D; Rachid, M A; Sousa, L P; Martins, M A; Menezes, G B; Rossi, A G; Teixeira, M M; Pinho, V

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are effector cells that have an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. Defective removal of these cells likely leads to chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the elimination of eosinophils from inflammatory sites. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for certain mediators and molecular pathways responsible for the survival and death of leukocytes at sites of inflammation. Reactive oxygen species have been described as proinflammatory mediators but their role in the resolution phase of inflammation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reactive oxygen species in the resolution of allergic inflammatory responses. An eosinophilic cell line (Eol-1) was treated with hydrogen peroxide and apoptosis was measured. Allergic inflammation was induced in ovalbumin sensitized and challenged mouse models and reactive oxygen species were administered at the peak of inflammatory cell infiltrate. Inflammatory cell numbers, cytokine and chemokine levels, mucus production, inflammatory cell apoptosis and peribronchiolar matrix deposition was quantified in the lungs. Resistance and elastance were measured at baseline and after aerosolized methacholine. Hydrogen peroxide accelerates resolution of airway inflammation by induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils and decrease remodeling, mucus deposition, inflammatory cytokine production and airway hyperreactivity. Moreover, the inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by apocynin or in gp91phox−/− mice prolonged the inflammatory response. Hydrogen peroxide induces Eol-1 apoptosis in vitro and enhances the resolution of inflammation and improves lung function in vivo by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils. PMID:25675292

  3. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. Eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Heine, Ralf G; Allen, Katrina J

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is an antigen-driven pan-oesophagitis that is defined by the presence of at least 15 eosinophils per high power field on oesophageal histology in conjunction with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. EoE is closely associated with atopic disorders, in particular with food allergy, and as for other atopic diseases in childhood, there is a strong preponderance of male patients who have this disorder. The mechanisms leading to EoE have been characterised at the molecular level. Eotaxin-3, interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 are the key effector molecules in EoE pathogenesis. EoE presents with a diverse range of gastrointestinal symptoms, including regurgitation, vomiting, feeding difficulties or feeding refusal in infancy, as well as heartburn, dysphagia and food bolus impaction in older children and adults. The diagnosis may also be ascertained as an incidental finding in patients undergoing gastroscopy for other suspected conditions, including coeliac disease. EoE is different from gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and does not improve in response to proton pump inhibitors. Therefore, EoE needs to be distinguished from so-called PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia. The long-term prognosis of EoE remains poorly defined, and complications mainly relate to subepithelial remodelling and fibrosis that may result in dysmotility, dysphagia and oesophageal strictures. The treatment of EoE involves elimination diets and topical swallowed aerosolised corticosteroids, while biological therapies targeting molecular mechanisms have so far been unsuccessful. In children, elemental diets have proved highly effective, but multiple food elimination diets are more sustainable in the long term. Further randomised, controlled trials on dietary or pharmacological interventions are needed to inform the optimal long-term management of EoE. PMID:26022880

  5. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  6. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. 3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-16

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  8. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Cilengitide in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b)

  11. Increased radiation sensitivity of an eosinophilic cell line following treatment with epigallocatechin-gallate, resveratrol and curcuma.

    PubMed

    Baatout, Sarah; Derradji, Hanane; Jacquet, Paul; Mergeay, Max

    2005-02-01

    Ionizing radiation is widely used in radiotherapy, in order to promote an apoptotic response in cancerous cells. Since the need to find new substances that would enhance the radiation-induced apoptosis in cancerous cells is great, we studied the effect of epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG, a tea component), resveratrol (a wine component) and curcuma on cell proliferation and radiation-induced apoptosis in the human leukaemic cell line, EOL-1, derived from a patient with eosinophilic leukaemia. Cells were X-irradiated with 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8 Gy and cultured in the presence of EGCG, resveratrol or curcuma (concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 microM) for 1, 2 or 3 days of culture. Cell proliferation was measured using trypan blue exclusion. Apoptosis was evaluated using light microscopy (morphology study after May-Grunwald Giemsa staining) and flow cytometry (annexin-V staining). Irradiation alone induced a dose-related reduction in cell proliferation and the appearance of polyploid cells in EOL-1 cells. Additionally, EOL-1 cells underwent a dose-related increase of apoptosis which, from the second day on, was accompanied by a dose-related increase of necrosis. When cells were exposed to EGCG, resveratrol or curcuma alone, a decrease in cell proliferation was observed, beginning from 25 microM EGCG and 50 microM resveratrol and curcuma, while an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells was noted from 50 microM EGCG, 100 microM resveratrol and curcuma in EOL-1 cells, after only one day of culture. Simultaneous exposure to X-irradiation and, EGCG, resveratrol or curcuma resulted in a synergistic decrease of cell proliferation as well as in a synergistic increase of apoptosis and necrosis. These results suggest that, depending on the concentration, EGCG, resveratrol and curcuma enhance radiation-induced apoptosis in the leukaemic cell line, EOL-1 (EGCG >resveratrol >curcuma). In order to further characterise the radiation-induced apoptosis of this leukaemic cell line, other flow cytometrical analyses are in progress. PMID:15647852

  12. [Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Vivero, F; Ciocchini, C; Gandini, M J; Wehbe, L

    2012-03-01

    Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. The chronic eosinophilic pneumonia is part of Pulmonary Eosinophilic Syndroms. It is presented a 33-years old man, Asmathic, with dry cough, fever, night sweats and fatigue of several weeks. The chest X-ray showed opacity in the right hemithorax. He was treated with antibiotics without response. A chest TC showed multifocal involvement. The patient refused bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) so treatment antituberculostatic was started. Despite treatment the symptoms worsened. The Chest X-ray showed migration of the infiltrates and the blood smear marked eosinophilia. Finally, bronchoalveolar lavage was carried out and it showed a high percentage of eosinophils (over 50%). The patient was treated with inmmunosuppresive doses of corticosteroids with excellent response. The blood smear in Nonresolving pneumonia is key to consider eosinophilic pneumonia, an uncommon pathology but amenable to treatment. PMID:22917072

  13. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. [Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Cerri, D; Carabelli, A; Bertani, E; Portaluppi, F; Novi, C; Gianotti, R; Gelmetti, C

    1990-09-01

    The Authors report a case of eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome). The patient was a 61 year old woman, diabetic, with a cardio-respiratory insufficiency and a maniaco-depressive psycosis. She presented, on the upper arms and trunk, a cutaneous eruption of erythematous-urticarial plaques, that histopathologically were characterized by a dermic leukocyte population, with a prevalence of eosinophils, distributed in the perivascular site. Laboratory tests revealed eosinophilia and circulating immune complexes. The etiopathogenesis of the disease is discussed as is the possible role of immune complexes in eosinophilic cellulitis. PMID:2079351

  17. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. About Eosinophilic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the immune system and there are always small quantities in the blood and intestine fighting parasites and ... eosinophils cause problems when they appear in high quantities in areas other than the blood and intestine. ...

  19. The Eosinophil in Infection.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Karen A; Loy, Michael

    2016-04-01

    First described by Paul Ehrlich in 1879, who noted its characteristic staining by acidophilic dyes, for many years, the eosinophil was considered to be an end-effector cell associated with helminth infections and a cause of tissue damage. Over the past 30 years, research has helped to elucidate the complexity of the eosinophil's function and establish its role in host defense and immunity. Eosinophils express an array of ligand receptors which play a role in cell growth, adhesion, chemotaxis, degranulation, and cell-to-cell interactions. They play a role in activation of complement via both classical and alternative pathways. Eosinophils synthesize, store and secrete cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. They can process antigen, stimulate T cells, and promote humoral responses by interacting with B cells. Eosinophils can function as antigen presenting cells and can regulate processes associated with both T1 and T2 immunity. Although long known to play a role in defense against helminth organisms, the interactions of eosinophils with these parasites are now recognized to be much more complex. In addition, their interaction with other pathogens continues to be investigated. In this paper, we review the eosinophil's unique biology and structure, including its characteristic granules and the effects of its proteins, our developing understanding of its role in innate and adaptive immunity and importance in immunomodulation, and the part it plays in defense against parasitic, viral, fungal and bacterial infections. Rather than our worst enemy, the eosinophil may, in fact, be one of the most essential components in host defense and immunity. PMID:26690368

  20. P2Y12 antagonist attenuates eosinophilic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong-Hyeon; Trinh, Hoang Kim Tu; Liu, Jing-Nan; Pham, Le Duy; Park, Sang Myun; Park, Hae-Sim; Shin, Yoo Seob

    2016-02-01

    Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) that plays a key role in airway inflammation is expressed on platelets and eosinophils. We investigated whether blocking of the P2Y12 receptor can suppress eosinophilic inflammation in a mouse model of asthma because platelets and eosinophils share this receptor to be activated. BALB/c mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA), followed by OVA nebulization. On each challenge day, clopidogrel, a P2Y12 antagonist was administered 30 min. before each challenge. Forty-eight hours after the last OVA challenge, mice were assessed for airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), cell composition and cytokine levels, including chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5), in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. EOL cells were treated with LTE4, with or without clopidogrel treatment, and intracellular and extracellular eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) expressions were measured to find the inhibiting function of P2Y12 antagonist on eosinophilic activation. The levels of P2Y12 expression were increased markedly in the lung homogenates of OVA-sensitized and -challenged mice after platelet depletion. Administration of clopidogrel decreased AHR and the number of airway inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, in BAL fluid following OVA challenge. These results were associated with decreased levels of Th2 cytokines and CCL5. Histological examination showed that inflammatory cells as well as mucus-containing goblet cells were reduced in clopidogrel-administered mice compared to vehicle-treated mice. Clopidogrel inhibited extracellular ECP secretion after LTE4 stimulation in EOL-1 cells. Clopidogrel could prevent development of AHR and airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. P2Y12 can be a novel therapeutic target to the suppression of eosinophils in asthma. PMID:26612496

  1. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  2. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. Eltrombopag Olamine in Improving Platelet Recovery in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Eosinophilic Liver Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa Rivera, Ivonne; Toro, Doris H.; Gutierrez, Jose; Acosta, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic liver infiltration is a commonly encountered focal eosinophil-related inflammation with or without necrosis, which can be seen on computed tomography (CT) in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Although this entity has a relatively benign course, it is related to numerable conditions for which diagnosis may be challenging and requires substantial diagnostic work-up for proper management and care of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a 1-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain with multiple ill-defined liver hypodensities associated with significant eosinophilia. PMID:26504883

  5. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  6. Eosinophilic Drug Allergy.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Merin; Khan, David A

    2016-04-01

    While peripheral or tissue eosinophilia may certainly characterize drug eruptions, this feature is hardly pathognomonic for a medication-induced etiology. While delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions with prominent eosinophilic recruitment have been typically classified as type IVb reactions, their pathophysiology is now known to be more complex. Eosinophilic drug reactions have a diversity of presentations and may be benign and self-limited to severe and life-threatening. The extent of clinical involvement is also heterogeneous, ranging from isolated peripheral eosinophilia or single organ involvement (most often the skin and lung) to systemic disease affecting multiple organs, classically exemplified by drug-reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). The spectrum of implicated medications in the causation of DRESS is ever expanding, and multiple factors including drug metabolites, specific HLA alleles, herpes viruses, and immune system activation have been implicated in pathogenesis. Due to this complex interplay of various factors, diagnostic workup in terms of skin and laboratory testing has not been validated. Similarly, the lack of controlled trials limits treatment options. This review also describes other localized as well as systemic manifestations of eosinophilic disease induced by various medication classes, including their individual pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management. Given the multitude of clinical patterns associated with eosinophilic drug allergy, the diagnosis can be challenging. Considerable deficits in our knowledge of these presentations remain, but the potential for severe reactions should be borne in mind in order to facilitate diagnosis and institute appropriate management. PMID:26006718

  7. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Eosinophilic Cystitis with Eosinophilic Cholecystitis: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Mallat, F.; Hmida, W.; Mestiri, S.; Ziadi, S.; Sriha, B.; Mokni, M.; Mosbah, F.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a rare case of eosinophilic cystitis associated with eosinophilic cholecystitis in a 30-year-old patient who underwent bladder biopsy for irritative voiding symptoms and routine elective cholecystectomy for gallstones. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination. The rarity of this condition prompted us to report this entity in which no specific cause could be found. PMID:24195001

  12. Pachydermatous eosinophilic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Joanna; Bia?ynicki-Birula, Rafa?; Wo?niak, Zdzis?aw; Baran, Eugeniusz

    2011-01-01

    A case is presented of a female Caucasian patient with chronic peripheral blood eosinophilia and unusual skin manifestations. Within a couple of years, the patient developed multiple hyperkeratotic and hyperpigmented papules and plaques all over the body, palmoplantar keratoderma, pachydermia of acral parts of the body, and generalized pruritus. Generalized lymphadenopathy appeared. Other relevant symptoms were persistent peripheral blood hypereosinophilia and increased level of total IgE. The patient was diagnosed with a very rare condition, pachydermatous eosinophilic dermatitis, and was administered combined therapy with dapsone, oral methylprednisolone and fexophenadine. After one month of treatment, the skin changes markedly improved. PMID:21489364

  13. Idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Eric; Cordier, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    Idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (ICEP) is characterized by subacute or chronic respiratory and general symptoms, alveolar and/or blood eosinophilia, and peripheral pulmonary infiltrates on chest imaging. Eosinophilia is present in most cases, usually in excess of 1000/mm3. In absence of significant blood eosinophilia, a diagnosis of ICEP is supported by the demonstration of bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophilia. ICEP is typically associated with eosinophil counts higher than lymphocyte counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage. ICEP is a rare disorder of unknown cause. Its exact prevalence remains unknown. ICEP may affect every age group but is rare in childhood. It is twice as frequent in women as in men. One third to one half of the ICEP patients have a history of asthma. The mainstay of treatment of ICEP is systemic corticosteroids. Response to oral corticosteroid therapy is dramatic and has led to the consideration of corticosteroid challenge as a diagnostic test for ICEP. Nevertheless, relapses or development of severe asthma are frequent when tapering or withdrawing treatment. Long-term oral corticosteroid therapy is necessary in up to half of the patients. PMID:16722612

  14. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  15. PLAG (1-Palmitoyl-2-Linoleoyl-3-Acetyl-rac-Glycerol) Modulates Eosinophil Chemotaxis by Regulating CCL26 Expression from Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jinseon; Kim, Young-Jun; Yoon, Sun Young; Kim, Yong-Jae; Kim, Joo Heon; Sohn, Ki-Young; Kim, Heung-Jae; Han, Yong-Hae; Chong, Saeho; Kim, Jae Wha

    2016-01-01

    Increased number of eosinophils in the circulation and sputum is associated with the severity of asthma. The respiratory epithelium produces chemokine (C-C motif) ligands (CCL) which recruits and activates eosinophils. A chemically synthesized monoacetyl-diglyceride, PLAG (1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-3-acetyl-rac-glycerol) is a major constituent in the antlers of Sika deer (Cervus nippon Temminck) which has been used in oriental medicine. This study was aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of PLAG effect on the alleviation of asthma phenotypes. A549, a human alveolar basal epithelial cell, and HaCaT, a human keratinocyte, were activated by the treatment of interleukin-4 (IL-4), and the expression of chemokines, known to be effective on the induction of eosinophil migration was analyzed by RT-PCR. The expression of IL-4 induced genes was modulated by the co-treatment of PLAG. Especially, CCL26 expression from the stimulated epithelial cells was significantly blocked by PLAG, which was confirmed by ELISA. The transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6), activated by IL-4 mediated phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, was down-regulated by PLAG in a concentration-dependent manner. In ovalbumin-induced mouse model, the infiltration of immune cells into the respiratory tract was decreased by PLAG administration. Cytological analysis of the isolated bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells proved the infiltration of eosinophils was significantly reduced by PLAG. In addition, PLAG inhibited the migration of murine bone marrow-derived eosinophils, and human eosinophil cell line, EoL-1, which was induced by the addition of A549 culture medium. PMID:27010397

  16. PLAG (1-Palmitoyl-2-Linoleoyl-3-Acetyl-rac-Glycerol) Modulates Eosinophil Chemotaxis by Regulating CCL26 Expression from Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jinseon; Kim, Young-Jun; Yoon, Sun Young; Kim, Yong-Jae; Kim, Joo Heon; Sohn, Ki-Young; Kim, Heung-Jae; Han, Yong-Hae; Chong, Saeho; Kim, Jae Wha

    2016-01-01

    Increased number of eosinophils in the circulation and sputum is associated with the severity of asthma. The respiratory epithelium produces chemokine (C-C motif) ligands (CCL) which recruits and activates eosinophils. A chemically synthesized monoacetyl-diglyceride, PLAG (1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-3-acetyl-rac-glycerol) is a major constituent in the antlers of Sika deer (Cervus nippon Temminck) which has been used in oriental medicine. This study was aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of PLAG effect on the alleviation of asthma phenotypes. A549, a human alveolar basal epithelial cell, and HaCaT, a human keratinocyte, were activated by the treatment of interleukin-4 (IL-4), and the expression of chemokines, known to be effective on the induction of eosinophil migration was analyzed by RT-PCR. The expression of IL-4 induced genes was modulated by the co-treatment of PLAG. Especially, CCL26 expression from the stimulated epithelial cells was significantly blocked by PLAG, which was confirmed by ELISA. The transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6), activated by IL-4 mediated phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, was down-regulated by PLAG in a concentration-dependent manner. In ovalbumin-induced mouse model, the infiltration of immune cells into the respiratory tract was decreased by PLAG administration. Cytological analysis of the isolated bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells proved the infiltration of eosinophils was significantly reduced by PLAG. In addition, PLAG inhibited the migration of murine bone marrow-derived eosinophils, and human eosinophil cell line, EoL-1, which was induced by the addition of A549 culture medium. PMID:27010397

  17. Angiostrongylus cantonensis eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pien, F D; Pien, B C

    1999-01-01

    In the past 50 years, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis, has spread from Southeast Asia to the South Pacific, Africa, India, the Caribbean, and recently, to Australia and North America, mainly carried by cargo ship rats. Humans are accidental, "dead-end" hosts infected by eating larvae from snails, slugs, or contaminated, uncooked vegetables. These larvae migrate to the brain, spinal cord, and nerve roots, causing eosinophilia in both spinal fluid and peripheral blood. Infected patients present with severe headache, vomiting, paresthesias, weakness, and occasionally visual disturbances and extraocular muscular paralysis. Most patients have a full recovery; however, heavy infections can lead to chronic, disabling disease and even death. There is no proven treatment for this disease. In the authors' experience, corticosteroids have been helpful in severe cases to relieve intracranial pressure as well as neurologic symptoms due to inflammatory responses to migrating and eventually dying worms. PMID:10460929

  18. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  19. Biomarkers of eosinophilic inflammation in asthma.

    PubMed

    Loutsios, Chrystalla; Farahi, Neda; Porter, Linsey; Lok, Laurence S C; Peters, A Michael; Condliffe, Alison M; Chilvers, Edwin R

    2014-04-01

    Eosinophils are mediators of allergic inflammation and are implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous conditions including asthma, parasitic infections, neoplasms, hyper-eosinophilic syndromes, vasculitic disorders, and organ-specific conditions. Assessing eosinophilic inflammation is therefore important in establishing a diagnosis, in monitoring and assessing response to treatment, and in testing novel therapeutics. Clinical markers of atopy and eosinophilic inflammation include indirect tests such as lung function, exhaled breath condensate analysis, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, serum immunoglobulin E levels and serum periostin. Direct measures, which quantify but do not anatomically localise inflammation include blood eosinophil counts, serum or plasma eosinophil cationic protein and sputum eosinophil levels. Cytology from bronchoalveolar lavage and histology from endobronchial and transbronchial biopsies are better at localising inflammation but are more invasive. Novel approaches using radiolabelled eosinophils with single-photon emission computed tomography, offer the prospect of non-invasive methods to localise eosinophilic inflammation. PMID:24460178

  20. MK2206 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Genetics Home Reference: eosinophil peroxidase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... lacking eosinophil peroxidase are smaller and may have structural changes, the loss of eosinophil peroxidase does not ... of a point mutation (D648N) and prediction of structural changes. Hum Mutat. 2001 Mar;17(3):235- ...

  2. Allergic Mechanisms in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Paralleling the overall trend in allergic diseases, Eosinophilic Esophagitis is rapidly increasing in incidence. It is associated with food antigen-triggered, eosinophil-predominant inflammation and the pathogenic mechanisms have many similarities to other chronic atopic diseases, such as eczema and allergic asthma. Studies in animal models and from patients over the last 15 years have suggested that allergic sensitization leads to food-specific IgE and T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells, both of which appear to contribute to the pathogenesis along with basophils, mast cells, and antigen-presenting cells. This review will outline our current understandings of the allergic mechanisms that drive eosinophilic esophagitis, drawing from clinical and translational studies in humans as well as experimental animal models. PMID:24813516

  3. Human eosinophils express functional interleukin 2 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Rand, T H; Silberstein, D S; Kornfeld, H; Weller, P F

    1991-01-01

    Because T cell-derived cytokines may affect the functioning of eosinophils, we have investigated the capacity of human eosinophils to respond to IL-2. IL-2 was a potent chemoattractant with ED50 of 10(-12) M with eosinophils from all normal and eosinophilic donors tested. The monoclonal antibodies anti-Tac and TU27 against p55 (Tac/CD25) and p75 receptor subunits, respectively, each inhibited IL-2-dependent eosinophil migration. The molar potency of IL-2 and the inhibitory activity of each of the above antibodies suggest that high affinity heterodimeric IL-2 receptor complexes mediated the migration responses of eosinophils to IL-2. Binding of monoclonal antibody against p75 was not detectable by flow cytometry, and high affinity binding sites for 125I-IL-2 were below the limits of quantitation on eosinophils from individuals with eosinophilia. Expression of p55 (Tac/CD25) by eosinophils, without requirement for in vitro activation, was demonstrable by flow cytometry, radioimmunoprecipitation, and Northern blotting for mRNA. Surface expression of p55 on eosinophils from normal or eosinophilic individuals increased during culture for 24-48 h with a biologic activity purified from stimulated U937 cells and to a lesser extent with granulocyte-macrophage CSF or lymphocyte chemoattractant factor but not with nine other cytokines. These studies indicate that blood eosinophils respond to IL-2 and identify one mechanism whereby activation of T lymphocytes may influence the function of eosinophils. Images PMID:1885772

  4. Eosinophils in mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Travers, J; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils, multifunctional cells that contribute to both innate and adaptive immunity, are involved in the initiation, propagation and resolution of immune responses, including tissue repair. They achieve this multifunctionality by expression of a diverse set of activation receptors, including those that directly recognize pathogens and opsonized targets, and by their ability to store and release preformed cytotoxic mediators that participate in host defense, to produce a variety of de novo pleotropic mediators and cytokines and to interact directly and indirectly with diverse cell types, including adaptive and innate immunocytes and structural cells. Herein, we review the basic biology of eosinophils and then focus on new emerging concepts about their role in mucosal immune homeostasis, particularly maintenance of intestinal IgA. We review emerging data about their development and regulation and describe new concepts concerning mucosal eosinophilic diseases. We describe recently developed therapeutic strategies to modify eosinophil levels and function and provide collective insight about the beneficial and detrimental functions of these enigmatic cells. PMID:25807184

  5. Human peripheral blood eosinophils induce angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Puxeddu, Ilaria; Alian, Akram; Piliponsky, Adrian Martin; Ribatti, Domenico; Panet, Amos; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2005-03-01

    Eosinophils play a crucial role in allergic reactions and asthma. They are also involved in responses against parasites, in autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, and in fibroses. There is increasing evidence that angiogenesis plays an important role in these processes. Since eosinophils are known to produce angiogenic mediators, we have hypothesized a direct contribution of these cells to angiogenesis. The effect of human peripheral blood eosinophil sonicates on rat aortic endothelial cell proliferation (in vitro), rat aorta sprouting (ex vivo) and angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (in vivo) have been investigated. To determine whether eosinophil-derived vascular endothelial growth factor influences the eosinophil pro-angiogenic activity, eosinophil sonicates were incubated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibodies and then added to the chorioallantoic membrane. Vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor density on the endothelial cells were also evaluated. Eosinophils were found to enhance endothelial cell proliferation and to induce a strong angiogenic response both in the aorta rings and in the chorioallantoic membrane assays. Pre-incubation of eosinophil sonicates with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibodies partially reduced the angiogenic response of these cells in the chorioallantoic membrane. Eosinophils also increased vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA production on endothelial cells. Eosinophils are able to induce angiogenesis and this effect is partially mediated by their pre-formed vascular endothelial growth factor. This strongly suggests an important role of eosinophils in angiogenesis-associated diseases such as asthma. PMID:15618019

  6. Acute acalculous cholecystitis with eosinophilic infiltration.

    PubMed

    Muta, Yuki; Odaka, Akio; Inoue, Seiichiro; Komagome, Masahiko; Beck, Yoshifumi; Tamura, Masanori; Arai, Eiichi

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of acute acalculous cholecystitis with eosinophilic infiltration. A previously healthy 6-year-old boy was referred with right abdominal pain. Imaging demonstrated marked thickening of the gallbladder wall and peri-cholecystic effusion. Acute acalculous cholecystitis was diagnosed. Symptoms persisted despite conservative treatment, therefore cholecystectomy was performed. Pathology indicated infiltration of eosinophils into all layers of the gallbladder wall. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient has had no further symptoms. Eosinophilic cholecystitis is acute acalculous cholecystitis with infiltration of eosinophils. The causes include parasites, gallstones, allergies, and medications. In addition, it may be seen in conjunction with eosinophilic gastroenteritis, eosinophilic pancreatitis, or both. An allergic reaction to abnormal bile is thought to be the underlying cause. The present case did not fulfill the diagnostic criteria of eosinophilic cholecystitis, but this may have been in the process of developing. PMID:26315204

  7. Eosinophilic Gastritis Presenting as Tissue Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yong Min; Jang, Jin Seok; Han, Seung Hee; Kang, Sang Hyun; Kim, Woo Jae; Jeong, Jin Sook

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is very rare disorder that is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of any definite causes of eosinophilia. It is associated with various clinical gastrointestinal manifestations, and depends on the involved layer and site. We report a case of eosinophilic gastritis presenting with severe necrosis. The symptoms disappeared immediately after beginning steroid treatment, and the eosinophil count decreased to the reference range. The patient showed eosinophilic gastritis characterized by necrotic change such as necrotizing gastritis. It is a unique presentation of eosinophilic gastritis. To the best of our knowledge, no case of eosinophilic gastritis characterized by necrotic change such as necrotizing gastritis has been previously reported in Korea. PMID:26668805

  8. Eosinophilic Skin Diseases: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; Zhang, Guiying; Wang, Ling; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophilic skin diseases, commonly termed as eosinophilic dermatoses, refer to a broad spectrum of skin diseases characterized by eosinophil infiltration and/or degranulation in skin lesions, with or without blood eosinophilia. The majority of eosinophilic dermatoses lie in the allergy-related group, including allergic drug eruption, urticaria, allergic contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and eczema. Parasitic infestations, arthropod bites, and autoimmune blistering skin diseases such as bullous pemphigoid, are also common. Besides these, there are several rare types of eosinophilic dermatoses with unknown origin, in which eosinophil infiltration is a central component and affects specific tissue layers or adnexal structures of the skin, such as the dermis, subcutaneous fat, fascia, follicles, and cutaneous vessels. Some typical examples are eosinophilic cellulitis, granuloma faciale, eosinophilic pustular folliculitis, recurrent cutaneous eosinophilic vasculitis, and eosinophilic fasciitis. Although tissue eosinophilia is a common feature shared by these disorders, their clinical and pathological properties differ dramatically. Among these rare entities, eosinophilic pustular folliculitis may be associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or malignancies, and some other diseases, like eosinophilic fasciitis and eosinophilic cellulitis, may be associated with an underlying hematological disorder, while others are considered idiopathic. However, for most of these rare eosinophilic dermatoses, the causes and the pathogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown, and systemic, high-quality clinical investigations are needed for advances in better strategies for clinical diagnosis and treatment. Here, we present a comprehensive review on the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and management of these rare entities, with an emphasis on recent advances and current consensus. PMID:25876839

  9. Current Approach to Diagnosis and Management of Pulmonary Eosinophilic Syndromes: Eosinophilic Pneumonias, Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis, and Hypereosinophilic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sergew, Amen; Fernández Pérez, Evans R

    2016-06-01

    Eosinophils play a key role in orchestrating the complex clinicopathological pulmonary and extrapulmonary disease features in patients with eosinophilic syndromes. Eosinophilic pulmonary syndromes consist of a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of peripheral blood eosinophilia and/or eosinophilic-related pulmonary impairment. These disorders can present with varying degrees of organ involvement, and while their presentation may be similar, it is important to define the disease state, as management and prognosis differ. In this article, we discuss acute and chronic eosinophilic pneumonias, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and the hypereosinophilic syndromes. The mainstay of therapy for these disorders has been corticosteroids; however, recent and ongoing studies have provided strong grounds for optimism for specific targeted treatment approaches. PMID:27231866

  10. [Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia--clinical case].

    PubMed

    Todea, Doina; Florea, Mira; Herescu, Andreea; Roşca, Loredana

    2008-01-01

    Eosinophilic pneumonia (EP) is a rare, heterogeneous group of respiratory diseases, characterized by eosinophilic pulmonary infiltrates, with or without peripheral blood eosinophilia. The hallmark of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) is a massive accumulation of eosinophils in the lungs, and an increased number of eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. We present the case of a 58 years-old female patient who came to the Clinical Hospital of Pneumology "Leon Daniello" from Cluj Napoca, Romania, with the suspicion of a recurrent diffuse interstitial pneumonia, despite of a proper antibiotic and symptomatic treatment. After clinical and paraclinical investigations the patient was diagnosed with idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. Corticosteroid treatment was started, with rapid improvement in both clinical and radiographic abnormalities. PMID:18822874

  11. A Case of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis with Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Caglar, Erkan; Sezgin Caglar, Aslı; Gokturk, Suut; Dobrucali, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare disorder of unknown cause characterized by focal or diffuse eosinophilic infiltration of gastrointestinal tract, especially the stomach and duodenum. Its clinical presentation depends on which segment of gastrointestinal tract is affected and on the depth of eosinophilic infiltration in the affected segment. We present a case of a 35-year-old male with abdominal distention for six months. Laboratory testing revealed elevated eosinophil count and serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels. In abdominal tomography, ascites was observed, and eosinophilic infiltration was detected in duodenum biopsy samples, collected during endoscopic examination of upper gastrointestinal system. Clinical and pathologic findings of the patient responded to steroid dramatically. Even though their comorbidity is rare, eosinophilic gastroenteritis should be considered in differential diagnosis of patients with unspecified ascites. PMID:26819619

  12. Eosinophil secretion of granule-derived cytokines.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Lisa A; Bonjour, Kennedy; Melo, Rossana C N; Weller, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are tissue-dwelling leukocytes, present in the thymus, and gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals at baseline, and recruited, often in large numbers, to allergic inflammatory foci and sites of active tissue repair. The biological significance of eosinophils is vast and varied. In health, eosinophils support uterine and mammary gland development, and maintain bone marrow plasma cells and adipose tissue alternatively activated macrophages, while in response to tissue insult eosinophils function as inflammatory effector cells, and, in the wake of an inflammatory response, promote tissue regeneration, and wound healing. One common mechanism driving many of the diverse eosinophil functions is the regulated and differential secretion of a vast array of eosinophil-derived cytokines. Eosinophils are distinguished from most other leukocytes in that many, if not all, of the over three dozen eosinophil-derived cytokines are pre-synthesized and stored within intracellular granules, poised for very rapid, stimulus-induced secretion. Eosinophils engaged in cytokine secretion in situ utilize distinct pathways of cytokine release that include classical exocytosis, whereby granules themselves fuse with the plasma membrane and release their entire contents extracellularly; piecemeal degranulation, whereby granule-derived cytokines are selectively mobilized into vesicles that emerge from granules, traverse the cytoplasm and fuse with the plasma membrane to release discrete packets of cytokines; and eosinophil cytolysis, whereby intact granules are extruded from eosinophils, and deposited within tissues. In this latter scenario, extracellular granules can themselves function as stimulus-responsive secretory-competent organelles within the tissue. Here, we review the distinctive processes of differential secretion of eosinophil granule-derived cytokines. PMID:25386174

  13. Eosinophil Secretion of Granule-Derived Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Lisa A.; Bonjour, Kennedy; Melo, Rossana C. N.; Weller, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are tissue-dwelling leukocytes, present in the thymus, and gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals at baseline, and recruited, often in large numbers, to allergic inflammatory foci and sites of active tissue repair. The biological significance of eosinophils is vast and varied. In health, eosinophils support uterine and mammary gland development, and maintain bone marrow plasma cells and adipose tissue alternatively activated macrophages, while in response to tissue insult eosinophils function as inflammatory effector cells, and, in the wake of an inflammatory response, promote tissue regeneration, and wound healing. One common mechanism driving many of the diverse eosinophil functions is the regulated and differential secretion of a vast array of eosinophil-derived cytokines. Eosinophils are distinguished from most other leukocytes in that many, if not all, of the over three dozen eosinophil-derived cytokines are pre-synthesized and stored within intracellular granules, poised for very rapid, stimulus-induced secretion. Eosinophils engaged in cytokine secretion in situ utilize distinct pathways of cytokine release that include classical exocytosis, whereby granules themselves fuse with the plasma membrane and release their entire contents extracellularly; piecemeal degranulation, whereby granule-derived cytokines are selectively mobilized into vesicles that emerge from granules, traverse the cytoplasm and fuse with the plasma membrane to release discrete packets of cytokines; and eosinophil cytolysis, whereby intact granules are extruded from eosinophils, and deposited within tissues. In this latter scenario, extracellular granules can themselves function as stimulus-responsive secretory-competent organelles within the tissue. Here, we review the distinctive processes of differential secretion of eosinophil granule-derived cytokines. PMID:25386174

  14. Eosinophilic Fasciitis: A Rare Skin Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Servy, Amandine; Clérici, Thierry; Malines, Caroline; Le Parc, Jean-Marie; Côté, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis (Schulman's syndrome) is a rare disease with specific clinical symptoms such as the groove sign which facilitate diagnosis. We report a typical case of eosinophilic fasciitis in an otherwise healthy 49-year-old man who presented with “prayer and groove signs”. Histological analysis showed sclerosis and eosinophilic infiltration of the fascia. The patient was successfully treated with systemic corticotherapy and Cyclosporine. A short review of the clinicopathological features of the lesions is presented. PMID:21151540

  15. Eosinophils: changing perspectives in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Helene F.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Foster, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils have been traditionally perceived as largely end-stage, cytotoxic effector cells. Recent studies have profoundly altered this simplistic view of eosinophils and their function. New insights into the molecular basis of development, trafficking and degranulation of eosinophils have provided a better understanding of the role of these cells in promoting homeostasis through their immunomodulatory functions. Likewise, recent developments have generated a more sophisticated view of how eosinophils contribute to the pathogenesis of disease, including asthma and primary hypereosinophilic syndromes, and also a more complete appreciation of their activities in parasitic infection. PMID:23154224

  16. Eosinophilic enteritis: a rare cause of diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Lladó, Ana; Oliveira, João; Silva, Pedro; Pinheiro, Sofia

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a healthy young man presenting with 1-week history of diarrhoea, acute abdominal pain and weight loss. Laboratory investigation showed very high peripheral eosinophils levels. After exclusion of the other causes of eosinophilia, a histological bowel sample analysis revealed marked eosinophilic infiltration of a small bowel mucosal layer which confirmed the suspicion of eosinophilic enteritis. Unlike most of the described cases, this patient did not require any specific treatment. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare and heterogeneous disease that is probably underdiagnosed in clinical practice because it requires a high degree of suspicion and an endoscopic biopsy for definite diagnosis. PMID:24081600

  17. The Consequences of Not Having Eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Gleich, G. J.; Klion, A. D.; Lee, J. J.; Weller, P. F.

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that deficiency of eosinophils is not associated with any characteristic abnormality. Patients lacking eosinophils, in the setting of immunodeficiency or as a consequence of IgG-mediated eosinophil precursor destruction, do not display any distinguishing abnormalities related to eosinophil reduction. The observation that eosinophil-deficient mice do not display any distinctive syndrome or failure of their health is evidence that, under ordinary laboratory conditions, the eosinophil does not play a critical role in the well-being of mammals. Observations that monoclonal antibodies to interleukin-5 (IL-5) are well tolerated appear unsurprising in light of these findings. For example, patients with the hypereosinophilic syndrome have received mepolizumab, an anti-IL-5 monoclonal antibody, for as long as 6 years and have not developed any characteristic set of adverse events. Safety data for reslizumab, another anti-IL-5 monoclonal antibody, and benralizumab, a monoclonal antibody to the IL-5 receptor α-chain, are comparatively limited, especially for benralizumab, although reports of administration of these antibodies to humans suggest that they are well tolerated. Thus, data to the present suggest that reduction of eosinophils appears to have no characteristic ill effects on normal health, and monoclonal antibodies that deplete eosinophils have the potential to be widely employed in the treatment of eosinophil-associated diseases. PMID:23742015

  18. Roles of integrin activation in eosinophil function and the eosinophilic inflammation of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Steven R.; Johansson, Mats W.; McNamee, Dawn M.; Mosher, Deane F.

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophilic inflammation is a characteristic feature of asthma. Integrins are highly versatile cellular receptors that regulate extravasation of eosinophils from the postcapillary segment of the bronchial circulation to the airway wall and airspace. Such movement into the asthmatic lung is described as a sequential, multistep paradigm, whereby integrins on circulating eosinophils become activated, eosinophils tether in flow and roll on bronchial endothelial cells, integrins on rolling eosinophils become further activated as a result of exposure to cytokines, eosinophils arrest firmly to adhesive ligands on activated endothelium, and eosinophils transmigrate to the airway in response to chemoattractants. Eosinophils express seven integrin heterodimeric adhesion molecules: alpha4beta1 (CD49d/29), alpha6beta1 (CD49f/29), alphaMbeta2 (CD11b/18), alphaLbeta2 (CD11a/18), alphaXbeta2 (CD11c/18), alphaDbeta2 (CD11d/18), and alpha4beta7 (CD49d/beta7). The role of these integrins in eosinophil recruitment has been elucidated by major advances in the understanding of integrin structure, integrin function, and modulators of integrins. Such findings have been facilitated by cellular experiments of eosinophils in vitro, studies of allergic asthma in humans and animal models in vivo, and crystal structures of integrins. Here, we elaborate on how integrins cooperate to mediate eosinophil movement to the asthmatic airway. Antagonists that target integrins or the effectors that regulate integrins of eosinophils represent potentially promising therapies in the treatment of asthma. PMID:17906117

  19. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging chronic atopic clinical-pathologic disease with an estimated prevalence of 1/1000 similar to the one of Crohn's diseases. Usually, EoE is firstly suspected due to symptoms that are caused by esophageal dysfunction and/or fibrosis. EoE diagnosis is confirmed if the esophageal biopsy shows at least 15 eosinophils per high power field (eos/hpf) as a peak value in one or more of at least four specimens obtained randomly from the esophagus. Most of the patients affected by EoE have other atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, IgE-mediated food allergies, and/or atopic dermatitis. The local inflammation is a T helper type 2 (Th2) flogosis, which most likely is driven by a mixed IgE and non-IgE-mediated reaction to food and/or environmental allergens. Recently published genetic studies showed also that EoE is associated with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on genes which are important in atopic inflammation such as thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) located close to the Th2 cytokine cluster (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) on chromosome 5q22. When the EoE diagnosis is made, it is imperative to control the local eosinophilic inflammation not only to give symptomatic relief to the patient but also to prevent complications such as esophageal stricture and food impaction. EoE is treated like many other atopic diseases with a combination of topical steroids and/or food antigen avoidance. PMID:26194940

  20. Ependymosarcoma with eosinophilic granular cells.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yasuo; Terasaki, Mizuhiko; Morioka, Motohiro; Nakashima, Shinji; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Ohshima, Koichi

    2014-04-01

    Ependymosarcoma is a new entity of malignant gliomas composed of ependymal and sarcomatous components. Were port a rare case of ependymosarcoma with eosinophlic cells which occurred to the right trigon of the lateral ventricle.A 62-year-old man complained of headaches over a 2-month period. A hard, gray mass was found in the right trigon of the lateral ventricle during the operation.Although he received radiation and chemotherapy, the patient died due to tumor disseminating through the whole brain within 7 months after the operation. The histological examination revealed that the anaplastic glial components intermingled with the sarcomatous components. Immunohistochemically, sarcomatous cells were positive for α smooth muscle actin and desmin. However, anaplasticglial cells were not positive for these markers. In addition, Masson trichrome stain showed a plethora of collagen fibers between sarcomatous cells, but no collagen fibers were produced by the glial tumor cells. Solid focal papillary lesions of the glial tumor showed dot-like epithelial membrane antigen and diffuse cytoplasmic D2-40 immunoreactivity. Based on the above findings, these anaplastic glial tumor cells should show focal ependymal differentiation, and sarcomatous cells show myofibroblastic differentiation. In addition, almost 10%of the tumor cells in the neoplasm showed bright eosinophilic granules in the cytoplasm. These cytoplasmic eosinophilic granules and bundles were negative on PAS staining. Intracytoplasmic eosinophilic granules of tumor cells were strongly positive for αB-crystallin, HSP 27 and GFAP, respectively. These findings suggest that the clinicopathological characteristics of the present case should be consistent with the criterion of ependymosarcoma by Rodriguez et al. PMID:24812703

  1. Dietary treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Nirmala; Kagalwalla, Amir F

    2014-06-01

    Emerging evidence supports impaired epithelial barrier function as the key initial event in the development of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and other allergic diseases. Symptom resolution, histologic remission, and prevention of both disease and treatment-related complications are the goals of treatment. Successful dietary treatments include elemental, empirical elimination and allergy test directed diets. Dietary therapy with exclusive elemental diet offers the best response. Cow's milk, wheat, egg, soy, peanut/tree nut, and fish/shellfish are the 6 food antigens most likely to induce esophageal inflammation. PMID:24813522

  2. Roles of integrin activation in eosinophil function and the eosinophilic inflammation of asthma.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Steven R; Johansson, Mats W; McNamee, Dawn M; Mosher, Deane F

    2008-01-01

    Eosinophilic inflammation is a characteristic feature of asthma. Integrins are highly versatile cellular receptors that regulate extravasation of eosinophils from the postcapillary segment of the bronchial circulation to the airway wall and airspace. Such movement into the asthmatic lung is described as a sequential, multistep paradigm, whereby integrins on circulating eosinophils become activated, eosinophils tether in flow and roll on bronchial endothelial cells, integrins on rolling eosinophils become further activated as a result of exposure to cytokines, eosinophils arrest firmly to adhesive ligands on activated endothelium, and eosinophils transmigrate to the airway in response to chemoattractants. Eosinophils express seven integrin heterodimeric adhesion molecules: alpha 4 beta 1 (CD49d/29), alpha 6 beta 1 (CD49f/29), alpha M beta 2 (CD11b/18), alpha L beta 2 (CD11a/18), alpha X beta 2 (CD11c/18), alpha D beta2 (CD11d/18), and alpha 4 beta 7 (CD49d/beta 7). The role of these integrins in eosinophil recruitment has been elucidated by major advances in the understanding of integrin structure, integrin function, and modulators of integrins. Such findings have been facilitated by cellular experiments of eosinophils in vitro, studies of allergic asthma in humans and animal models in vivo, and crystal structures of integrins. Here, we elaborate on how integrins cooperate to mediate eosinophil movement to the asthmatic airway. Antagonists that target integrins represent potentially promising therapies in the treatment of asthma. PMID:17906117

  3. Genetics Home Reference: PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... area? Other Names for This Condition PDGFRA-associated myeloproliferative neoplasm Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes ... Disorders Hanns A. Pielenz Clinical Research Center for Myeloproliferative Neoplasia, MD Anderson Cancer ... Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Idiopathic hypereosinophilic ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: PDGFRB-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene on chromosome 12 , creating the ETV6 - PDGFRB fusion gene. The PDGFRB gene provides instructions for making ... formation . The protein produced from the ETV6 - PDGFRB fusion gene, called ETV6/PDGFRβ, functions differently than the ...

  5. Full recovery from Baylisascaris procyonis eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pai, Poulomi J; Blackburn, Brian G; Kazacos, Kevin R; Warrier, Rajasekharan P; Bégué, Rodolfo E

    2007-06-01

    Infection by Baylisascaris procyonis is an uncommon but devastating cause of eosinophilic meningitis. We report the first case-patient, to our knowledge, who recovered from B. procyonis eosinophilic meningitis without any recognizable neurologic deficits. The spectrum of illness for this organism may be wider than previously recognized. PMID:17553240

  6. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis and Colitis: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Vikas; Kreiger, Portia; Kutsch, Erika

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders, including eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroenteritis, and colitis, refer to a spectrum of clinical diseases that present with variable degrees of infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract by eosinophils in the absence of other known causes of tissue eosinophilia. Clinical symptoms and laboratory findings are usually non-specific and may or may not be accompanied by peripheral blood eosinophilia. The extent of eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal wall varies from mucosal to transmural and serosal involvement. Diagnosis requires presence of gastrointestinal symptoms, demonstration of gastrointestinal eosinophilia by biopsy, and exclusion of other known causes of tissue eosinophilia. Many studies have pointed toward the eosinophil as the major offender; however, the exact functional role of the eosinophil in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders remains unclear. The roles of T-helper-2 cytokines and other mediators, such as eotaxin-1 and interleukin-5, have gained significant importance in the pathobiology of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. Current understanding of treatment is based on case reports and a few case series, as there is a lack of large prospective studies. Steroids are currently the mainstay of therapy, but the roles of other drugs such as leukotriene inhibitors, mast cell stabilizers, interleukin-5 inhibitors, and anti-immunoglobulin E, along with other targets in the immune pathway, are currently being explored. PMID:26054822

  7. Gallium-67 pulmonary uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Morais, J.; Carrier, L.; Gariepy, G.; Le Bel, L.; Chartrand, R.; Picard, D.

    1988-01-01

    Eosinophilic pneumonia is usually diagnosed based on the findings on chest x-ray, white blood count, and transbronchial biopsy. After reporting a case of Ga-67 lung uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia, its histopathology is discussed and the mechanisms of Ga-67 uptake by inflammatory lesions are reviewed.

  8. Eosinophils in hereditary and inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Thomas; Fuchss, Johann; Schneider, Ilka; Stoltenburg-Didinger, Gisela; Hanisch, Frank

    2013-12-01

    It is not known whether eosinophilic myositis is a specific histopathological feature of limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A (LGMD2A). Number and location of eosinophils in skeletal muscle biopsies (n=100) was analysed by Giemsa and modified hematoxylin/eosin staining in patients with genetically confirmed myopathies (LGMD2A, LGMD2B, LGMD2L, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, dystrophinopathy), histologically confirmed idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (neurogenic control), and normal controls. The number of eosinophils/mm² was significantly higher in LGMD2A, PM, DM, and sIBM compared to controls but not significantly higher than other myopathies. A large overlap in the number of eosinophils/mm2 between all groups was seen. In all disease groups eosinophils were mainly found endomysially (46- 88%) and intra- and perivascularly (4-37%). There was no correlation between the numbers of eosinophils/mm² and (i) age at biopsy and (ii) the duration of the disease. The extent of myopathic, fibrotic, and inflammatory changes did not differ in samples with high and low eosinophil count. Eosinophils seem to represent an unspecific histological finding in hereditary and inflammatory myopathies, but also amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:24803842

  9. Eosinophils in innate immunity: an evolving story

    PubMed Central

    Shamri, Revital; Xenakis, Jason J.; Spencer, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are innate immune leukocytes found in relatively low numbers within the blood. Terminal effector functions of eosinophils, deriving from their capacity to release their content of tissue-destructive cationic proteins, have historically been considered primary effector mechanisms against specific parasites, and are likewise implicated in tissue damage accompanying allergic responses such as asthma. However, the past decade has seen dramatic advancements in the field of eosinophil immunobiology, revealing eosinophils to also be key participants in many other facets of innate immunity, from bridging innate and adaptive immune responses to orchestrating tissue remodeling events. Here, we review the multifaceted functions of eosinophils in innate immunity that are currently known, and discuss new avenues in this evolving story. PMID:21042920

  10. β-lactam-associated eosinophilic colitis.

    PubMed

    Mogilevski, Tamara; Nickless, David; Hume, Sam

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old man with a history of childhood asthma presented with a 2-week history of watery diarrhoea and marked peripheral eosinophilia in the setting of recent use of cephalexin. His colonoscopy revealed patchy colitis. Biopsies were consistent with eosinophilic colitis. Two months later he received a course of amoxicillin resulting in recurrence of peripheral eosinophilia. Given the time-frame of β-lactam administration to symptom onset and elimination of all other precipitating causes, he was diagnosed with β-lactam-associated eosinophilic colitis. The patient's symptoms resolved and peripheral eosinophil count decreased with no specific treatment. Eosinophilic colitis is a rare heterogeneous condition, the pathogenesis of which is likely to be an interplay between environmental and genetic factors. It can be secondary to a helminthic infection or a drug reaction and has been associated with ulcerative colitis. If secondary causes of eosinophilic colitis have been excluded, the mainstay of treatment is with corticosteroids. PMID:26106168

  11. Eosinophilic esophagitis: trials and tribulations.

    PubMed

    Allen, Katrina J; Heine, Ralf G

    2011-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is a recently recognized form of pan-esophagitis, which is characterized by the presence of at least 15 eosinophils per high power field on esophageal histology. EE is closely associated with atopic disorders and occurs predominantly in male patients. Young children are more likely to be sensitized to food allergens whilst aeroallergen sensitization predominates in older children and adults--a pattern reminiscent of the "atopic march". EE presents with a diverse range of gastrointestinal symptoms, including regurgitation, vomiting, feeding difficulties or refusal in infancy, in addition to dysphagia and food bolus impaction in older children and adults. The diagnosis may also be ascertained incidentally in patients undergoing gastroscopy for other suspected gastrointestinal conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease or celiac disease. Complications mainly relate to subepithelial remodeling and fibrosis which may result in dysmotility, dysphagia and esophageal strictures. The proportion of EE patients at risk of these complications is unknown due to a paucity of data on the natural history of EE. There are only few randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of treatment modalities for EE, which currently either involve food allergen elimination or use of swallowed aerosolized corticosteroids. This article aims to discuss the complex issues of the diagnosis and long-term management that confront clinicians who care for children with EE. PMID:21415771

  12. Coccidioidomycosis Masquerading as Eosinophilic Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Kourosh; Atla, Pradeep R.; Haq, Tahmina; Sheikh, Muhammad Y.

    2015-01-01

    Endemic to the southwestern parts of the United States, coccidioidomycosis, also known as “Valley Fever,” is a common fungal infection that primarily affects the lungs in both acute and chronic forms. Disseminated coccidioidomycosis is the most severe but very uncommon and usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. It can affect the central nervous system, bones, joints, skin, and, very rarely, the abdomen. This is the first case report of a patient with coccidioidal dissemination to the peritoneum presenting as eosinophilic ascites (EA). A 27-year-old male presented with acute abdominal pain and distention from ascites. He had eosinophilia of 11.1% with negative testing for stool studies, HIV, and tuberculosis infection. Ascitic fluid exam was remarkable for low serum-ascites albumin gradient (SAAG), PMN count >250/mm3, and eosinophils of 62%. Abdominal imaging showed thickened small bowel and endoscopic testing negative for gastric and small bowel biopsies. He was treated empirically for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, but no definitive diagnosis could be made until coccidioidal serology returned positive. We noted complete resolution of symptoms with oral fluconazole during outpatient follow-up. Disseminated coccidioidomycosis can present in an atypical fashion and may manifest as peritonitis with low SAAG EA. The finding of EA in an endemic area should raise the suspicion of coccidioidal dissemination. PMID:26266062

  13. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

  14. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Therapeutic Antibodies in Advanced Eosinophilic Disorders and Systemic Mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gotlib, Jason

    2015-12-01

    World Health Organization-defined myeloproliferative neoplasms share a common pathobiologic theme of constitutive activation of tyrosine kinases (TKs). While myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and rearrangement of PDGFRA or PDGFRB exhibit exquisite responsiveness to imatinib, other eosinophilic disorders such as chronic eosinophilic leukemia--not otherwise specified (CEL-NOS) and idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) lack recurrent gene mutations or known druggable targets. In systemic mastocytosis (SM), KIT D816V is identified in ∼ 90% of patients, but demonstrates imatinib resistance. Recently, the multikinase/KIT inhibitor midostaurin (PKC412) has demonstrated encouraging activity in patients with advanced SM, and selective KIT D816V inhibitors are entering clinical development. Pre-clinical rationale also exists for use of small molecule inhibitors of TK-linked pathways (e.g., BTK, JAK-STAT, PI3K/AKT, and FGFR1) that are implicated in normal or dysregulated signaling in eosinophils or mast cells. A complementary therapeutic approach is the use of naked antibody (e.g., mepolizumab and alemtuzumab) or antibody-based drug immunoconjugates (brentuximab vedotin) against targets expressed on the surface of eosinophils or mastocytes that can block proliferation and/or induce apoptosis of these cells. Ultimately, biologic and molecular characterization of eosinophilia and SM cases will help to optimize selection of TK inhibitors or therapeutic antibodies for individual patients. PMID:26404639

  15. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  16. Medical therapy in eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Straumann, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is a chronic-inflammatory disease of the oesophagus. If left untreated, eosinophilic inflammation induces fibrosis, angiogenesis and stricture formation, resulting finally in a so called remodelling with structural and functional damage of the organ. In addition, patients with untreated EoE are permanently at risk of experiencing food impactions. It is therefore widely accepted that active EoE should be treated. Any treatment applied in EoE should ideally achieve two therapeutic goals: first, resolution of symptoms, and, second, control of inflammation. Avoidance of food allergens by elimination diets as well as anti-inflammatory drugs have both the ability to achieve these goals. Among the pharmacological options, only corticosteroids have documented efficacy, whereas alternatives have shown rather disappointing results or are still under evaluation. Of note, swallowed topical corticosteroids are at least as efficient as systemically administered corticosteroids but have fewer side effects. As such topical corticosteroids are widely used as first-line drug in the treatment of EoE, even though this compound is currently not approved for this indication by regulatory authorities. Unfortunately, complete resolution of symptoms can be achieved with swallowed topical corticosteroids only in approximately 70% of patients despite appropriate dosing and despite correct administration of these compounds. Control of inflammation is even harder to achieve, as only in approximately 50% of patients tissue eosinophilia disappears completely under this anti-inflammatory medication. For this group of "difficult to treat" patients, therapeutic alternatives are urgently needed. Fortunately several anti-allergic drugs and several biologicals are currently under investigation. PMID:26552779

  17. [Dietary and pharmacological aspects of eosinophilic esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Dorottya; Tulassay, Zsolt; Juhász, Márk

    2015-06-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is considered to be a chronic antigen-driven disease whereby food and/or aeroallergens induce a chronic inflammatory infiltrate in the esophagus leading to pathological hyperplasia of the epithelial and muscular layers, fibrosis of the lamina propria and symptoms of dysphagia and food impaction. Eosinophilic esophagitis is often associated with other allergic diseases such as asthma or atopic dermatitis. Current first line treatments of the disease include strict dietary modification and topical anti-inflammatory steroids. In this review the authors summarize currently available treatment strategies of eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:26027600

  18. Novel targeted therapies for eosinophilic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Michael E.; Fulkerson, Patricia C.; Bochner, Bruce S.; Gauvreau, Gail M.; Gleich, Gerald J.; Henkel, Tim; Kolbeck, Roland; Mathur, Sameer K.; Ortega, Hector; Patel, Jatin; Prussin, Calman; Renzi, Paolo; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Roufosse, Florence; Simon, Dagmar; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Wardlaw, Andrew; Weller, Peter F.; Klion, Amy D.

    2013-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HESs) are a diverse group of conditions characterized by clinical manifestations attributable to eosinophilia and eosinophilic infiltration of tissues. HESs are chronic disorders with significant morbidity and mortality. Although the availability of targeted chemotherapeutic agents, including imatinib, has improved quality of life and survival in some patients with HESs, additional agents with increased efficacy and decreased toxicity are sorely needed. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of eosinophil biology with an emphasis on potential targets of pharmacotherapy and to provide a summary of potential eosinophil-targeting agents, including those in development, in clinical trials, or approved for other disorders. PMID:22935585

  19. Idiopathic eosinophilic meningoencephalomyelitis in a Rottweiler dog.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Alicia K; Parkes, Jennifer D; Flaherty, Heather A; Kline, Karen L; Haynes, Joseph S

    2010-07-01

    A 6-month-old, female, intact Rottweiler dog was presented to the Iowa State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for a progressive history of abnormal behavior and generalized ataxia. At necropsy, there was eosinophilic infiltration of the brain and spinal cord, most severe in the medulla oblongata, cerebellum, and cervical spinal cord. Infiltrates of eosinophils were also present in the liver and small intestines. The dog was diagnosed with idiopathic eosinophilic meningoencephalomyelitis based on cerebrospinal fluid analysis, histopathology, and special stains to exclude etiologic agents. PMID:20622243

  20. Eosinophilic follicular reaction induced by Demodex folliculorum mite: a different disease from eosinophilic folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Marco, V; Escutia-Muñoz, B; Botella-Estrada, R

    2015-06-01

    Eosinophilic folliculitis (EF) is an idiopathic dermatitis included in the spectrum of eosinophilic pustular follicular reactions. Demodex folliculorum has been implicated as contributing to the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus-associated EF, but it has not been described outside this context. We present an immunocompetent 65-year-old white man with a 5-year history of recurrent pruritic erythematous and oedematous lesions on his face, neck and scalp. Histopathologically, an eosinophilic microabcess with Demodex folliculorum mite within a pilosebaceous follicle was seen, and considered the causal agent. There were also accumulations of eosinophil granules on collagen bundles, and flame figure formations in the dermis. We believe that 'eosinophilic follicular reaction' is an appropriate term to describe this case of EF induced by D. folliculorum and thus distinguish it from the idiopathic form of EF. Moreover, this case suggests that D. folliculorum can sometimes induce an eosinophilic immune reaction. PMID:25623943

  1. Behavior of eosinophil leukocytes in acute inflammation. II. Eosinophil dynamics during acute inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Bass, D A

    1975-01-01

    The marked diminution in the number of circulating eosinophils, which has been shown to occur during acute bacterial infections, is a distinctive aspect of eosinophil physiology and of the host response to acute infection. The mouse rendered eosinophilic by infection with trichinosis provides a suitable model for study of the eosinopenic response induced by acute inflammation. The alterations in eosinophil dynamics associated with acute inflammatory reactions in trichinous mice were studied with pneumococcal abscesses, with Escherichia coli pyelonephritis, with Coxsackie viral pancreatitis, and with acute subcutaneous inflammation due to turpentine. Each of these stimuli of acute inflammation markedly suppressed the eosinophilia of trichinosis. This suggests that the eosinopenia is a response to the acute inflammatory process rather than the response to a specific type of pathogen. These studies apply quantitative techniques to ascertain the effects of acute inflammation on eosinophil production in bone marrow and on distribution of eosinophils in the peripheral tissues. From these observations, it is apparent that the initial response to acute inflammation includes a rapid drop in numbers of circulating eosinophils, a rapid accumulation of eosinophils at the periphery of the inflammatory site, and an inhibition of egress of eosinophils from the bone marrow. With prolongation of the inflammatory process, inhibition of eosinopoiesis occurs. Images PMID:1099120

  2. Developmental, Malignancy-Related, and Cross-Species Analysis of Eosinophil, Mast Cell, and Basophil Siglec-8 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Sherry A.; Herrmann, Harald; Du, Jian; Cox, Paul; Haddad, El-Bdaoui; Butler, Barbara; Crocker, Paul R.; Ackerman, Steven J.; Valent, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to determine when during hematopoiesis Siglec-8 gets expressed, whether it is expressed on hematologic malignancies, and if there are other non-human species that express Siglec-8. Methods Siglec-8 mRNA and cell surface expression was monitored during in vitro maturation of human eosinophils and mast cells. Flow cytometry was performed on human blood and bone marrow samples, and on blood samples from dogs, baboons, and rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys. Results Siglec-8 is a late maturation marker. It is detectable on eosinophils and basophils from subjects with chronic eosinophilic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and on malignant and non-malignant bone marrow mast cells, as well as the HMC-1.2 cell line. None of the Siglec-8 monoclonal antibodies tested recognized leukocytes from dogs, baboons, and rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys. Conclusions Siglec-8-based therapies should not target immature human leukocytes but should recognize mature and malignant eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils. So far, there is no suitable species for preclinical testing of Siglec-8 monoclonal antibodies. PMID:21938510

  3. Spectrum of Surgical Presentation of Eosinophilic Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Spoorthy Sudhakar; Shetty, Charan Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic enteritis is a rare disorder presenting mostly with diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain, weight loss, and hypersensitivity. Surgical manifestation of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders depends on the site and extent of involvement. In our case series of four patients two of them had ileocaecal masses with recurrent subacute intestinal obstruction with past history of intake of antitubercular drugs for 9 months. On histopathological examination both of them proved to have eosinophilic enterocolitis. Thus it is a clinical dilemma to differentiate between these two conditions. The other two patients presented as acute abdomen with perforation and intussusception. All four patients were treated surgically. Postoperatively they recovered well with no symptoms on one year follow-up. In Indian setup tuberculosis being rampant there may be under reporting or wrongly diagnosed cases of eosinophilic enteritis. Thus a strong clinical suspicion and awareness of this clinical entity are essential among surgical community. PMID:25960910

  4. Spectrum of surgical presentation of eosinophilic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Spoorthy Sudhakar; Shetty, Charan Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic enteritis is a rare disorder presenting mostly with diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain, weight loss, and hypersensitivity. Surgical manifestation of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders depends on the site and extent of involvement. In our case series of four patients two of them had ileocaecal masses with recurrent subacute intestinal obstruction with past history of intake of antitubercular drugs for 9 months. On histopathological examination both of them proved to have eosinophilic enterocolitis. Thus it is a clinical dilemma to differentiate between these two conditions. The other two patients presented as acute abdomen with perforation and intussusception. All four patients were treated surgically. Postoperatively they recovered well with no symptoms on one year follow-up. In Indian setup tuberculosis being rampant there may be under reporting or wrongly diagnosed cases of eosinophilic enteritis. Thus a strong clinical suspicion and awareness of this clinical entity are essential among surgical community. PMID:25960910

  5. Migratory eosinophilic alveolitis caused by radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Hyeok; Nam, Hae-Seong; Kim, Hun Jung; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Park, In-Suh; Cho, Jae Hwa; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Kwak, Seung Min; Lee, Hong Lyeol

    2015-05-01

    Although radiation pneumonitis is usually confined to irradiated areas, some studies have reported that radiation-induced lymphocytic alveolitis can also spread to the non-irradiated lung. However, there have been few reports of radiation-induced eosinophilic alveolitis. We report the case of a 27-year-old female with radiation pneumonitis, occurring 4 months after radiation therapy for cancer of the left breast. Clinical and radiological relapse followed withdrawal of corticosteroids. Examination of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in patchy airspace consolidations revealed increased eosinophil counts. Finally, clinical and radiological signs resolved rapidly after reintroduction of corticosteroids. Eosinophilic alveolitis may be promoted by radiation therapy. In the present case report, possible mechanisms for radiation-induced eosinophilic alveolitis are also reviewed. PMID:26101656

  6. Imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Foong, Kap Sum; Lee, Ashley; Pekez, Marijeta; Bin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Drugs, toxins, and infections are known to cause acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Daptomycin and minocycline are the commonly reported antibiotics associated with acute eosinophilic pneumonia. In this study, we present a case of imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia. The patient presented with fever, acute hypoxic respiratory distress, and diffuse ground-glass opacities on the chest CT a day after the initiation of imipenem/cilastatin. Patient also developed peripheral eosinophilia. A reinstitution of imipenem/cilastatin resulted in recurrence of the signs and symptoms. A bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage showed 780 nucleated cells/mm(3) with 15% eosinophil. The patient's clinical condition improved significantly after the discontinuation of imipenem/cilastatin therapy and the treatment with corticosteroid. PMID:26944380

  7. Recurrent Cutaneous Eosinophilic Vasculitis: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Hazeena, Cherukattil; Aravindan, Karumathil P; Bindu, Chettithodi Sivasankaran; Silpa, Krishnakumari Nair

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent cutaneous necrotizing eosinophilic vasculitis is a rare entity described by Chen et al. It has a benign course without any systemic involvement. However, often long-term treatment with systemic steroids is required. The exact etiopathogenesis remains unknown. We report a female patient, who presented with recurrent pruritic purpuric papules and plaques affecting different body parts of long duration. Disease was well controlled with low dose systemic steroids, but invariably recurred on its withdrawal. Histology revealed the features of eosinophilic vasculitis. Subsequent detailed evaluation ruled out systemic involvement, underlying diseases, and any precipitating factors. Hence, a diagnosis of recurrent cutaneous eosinophilic vasculitis was made. Patient showed excellent response to prednisolone, and on tapering the drug, it was found that she needed a maintenance dose of 5 mg/day. We did not come across any previous reports of recurrent cutaneous eosinophilic vasculitis from India. PMID:27057046

  8. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  9. Allergic mechanisms of Eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Leung, John; Beukema, Koen Robert; Shen, Alice Hangzhou

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is characterized by oesophageal dysfunction and oesophageal eosinophilia refractory to proton-pump-inhibitor treatment. EoE is a food allergy, as elimination of food trigger(s) abrogates the disease, while trigger reintroduction causes recurrence. The allergic mechanism of EoE involves both IgE and non-IgE processes. There is a break in oral tolerance, the immune mechanism allowing enteric exposure to food and micro-organisms without causing deleterious immune responses. Changes in life-style, alterations in gut flora and use of antibiotics may be increasing disease prevalence. Mouse models of EoE and human studies revealed the role of regulatory T-cells and iNKT-cells in the pathogenesis. Th2-cytokines like IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, and other cytokines like TGFβ and TSLP are involved, but perhaps no one cytokine is critically important for driving the disease. Control of EoE may require a pharmaceutical approach that blocks more than one target in the Th2-inflammatory pathway. PMID:26552770

  10. Post-translational Tyrosine Nitration of Eosinophil Granule Toxins Mediated by Eosinophil Peroxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Martina; Petre, Alina; Youhnovski, Nikolay; Prömm, Franziska; Schirle, Markus; Schumm, Michael; Pero, Ralph S.; Doyle, Alfred; Checkel, James; Kita, Hirohito; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Acharya, K. Ravi; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Schwarz, Heinz; Tsutsui, Masato; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Bellon, Gabriel; Lee, James J.; Przybylski, Michael; Döring, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Nitration of tyrosine residues has been observed during various acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanism of tyrosine nitration and the nature of the proteins that become tyrosine nitrated during inflammation remain unclear. Here we show that eosinophils but not other cell types including neutrophils contain nitrotyrosine-positive proteins in specific granules. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the human eosinophil toxins, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), major basic protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and the respective murine toxins, are post-translationally modified by nitration at tyrosine residues during cell maturation. High resolution affinity-mass spectrometry identified specific single nitration sites at Tyr349 in EPO and Tyr33 in both ECP and EDN. ECP and EDN crystal structures revealed and EPO structure modeling suggested that the nitrated tyrosine residues in the toxins are surface exposed. Studies in EPO-/-, gp91phox-/-, and NOS-/- mice revealed that tyrosine nitration of these toxins is mediated by EPO in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and minute amounts of NOx. Tyrosine nitration of eosinophil granule toxins occurs during maturation of eosinophils, independent of inflammation. These results provide evidence that post-translational tyrosine nitration is unique to eosinophils. PMID:18694936

  11. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  12. [Drug induced eosinophilic pleural effusion].

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, Raluca

    2014-01-01

    The hypersensitivity reactions induced by drugs, some widely used, like central nervous system medication, can have various presentations. The lung is a frequent target for such events. We present the case of 40-year-old male patient, non-smoker, with infant encephalopaty, seizures since age of 6 with polimorphic crisis (mainly absences), with anticonvulsivant treatment since 2011 (carbamazepine, sodium valproate, levetiracetam), with no respiratory medical history. Current symptoms started two weeks before, with chest pain, dry cough. He received no antibiotics. Chest X-ray and thoracic CT scan (27 June 2013) showed a left pleral effusion. Left exploratory thoracocentesis extracted 20 ml reddish pleural fluid: eosinophilic exsudate (60%) with normal adenosin deaminase. He also presents moderate blood eosinophilia (13.7%-1780/mm3). Pulmonary infarction with secondary pleurisy, thoracic trauma, acute pancreatitis with secondary pleurisy were excluded. No Loeffler transient infiltrates were documented, serology for Toxocara is IgG positive (historical) and not significant for current episode, no symptoms suggestive for toxocarosis (characteristic to young children, patient had no liver enlargement etc.), no hidatidosis or trichinelosis were found. As an exclusion diagnosis, a hypersensitivity reaction to anticonvulsivant medication was considered (mentioned in literature) carbamazepine and sodium valproate (even if medication was taken for a longer time), with blood and pleural eosinophilia. Together with the neurologist, the mentioned drugs were stopped and he was started on lamotrigine 2 tb/day and levetiracetam 1 tb/day, well tolerated, no absences were noticed. Total remission of blood eosinophilia and partial remission of pleural effusion were noticed. Subsequent follow-ups confirm favourable evolution, with healing of pleurisy and normal blood cell count, which are stable at 7 months after changing anticonvulsivant treatment. PMID:25241560

  13. Does bee pollen cause to eosinophilic gastroenteropathy?

    PubMed

    Güç, Belgin Usta; Asilsoy, Suna; Canan, Oğuz; Kayaselçuk, Fazilet

    2015-09-01

    Bee pollen is given to children by mothers in order to strengthen their immune systems. There are no studies related with the side effects of bee polen in the literature. In this article, the literature was reviewed by presenting a case of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy related with bee polen. A 5-year old child was admitted due to abdominal pain. Edema was detected on the eyelids and pretibial region. In laboratory investigations, pathology was not detected in terms of hepatic and renal causes that would explain the protein loss of the patient diagnosed with hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia. Urticaria was detected during the follow-up visit. When the history of the patient was deepened, it was learned that bee pollen was given to the patient every day. The total eosinophil count was found to be 1 800/mm(3). Allergic gastroenteropathy was considered because of hypereosinophilia and severe abdominal pain and endoscopy was performed. Biopsy revealed abundant eosinophils in the whole gastric mucosa. A diagnosis of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy was made. Bee polen was discontinued. Abdominal pain and edema disappeared in five days. Four weeks later, the levels of serum albumin and total eosinophil returned to normal. PMID:26568697

  14. New Insights into Eosinophilic Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hiromi; Yoshida, Naohiro; Iino, Yukiko

    2015-12-01

    Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is a type of intractable otitis media that occurs mainly in patients with bronchial asthma (BA). In 2011, the diagnostic criteria for EOM were established. EOM is characterized by the presence of a highly viscous yellowish effusion containing eosinophils and immunoglobulin E (IgE), eosinophil chemoattractants, such as eosinophil cationic protein, interleukin-5, and eotaxin. Local sensitization against foreign agents such as fungi or bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus) may result in local IgE production in the middle ear and may be responsible for the severity of EOM. The clinical features of EOM closely resemble localized eosinophilic granulomatosis polyangiitis, therefore it is necessary to be vigilant to the symptoms of mononeuritis, polyneuritis, and skin purpura during diagnosis. Standard treatment for EOM is the instillation of triamcinolone acetonide into the mesotympanum. However, severe cases exhibiting strong inflammation and otorrhea are not easily controlled with antibiotics and/or corticosteroids. We proposed the introduction of a severity score to evaluate the severity of EOM. This score correlated with local IgE levels in middle ear effusion. Clinically, the risk factors associated with this severity score were body mass index, and the duration of bronchial asthma (from the onset of BA to the age of the first consultation of otitis media to our hospital). We emphasize that early diagnosis and adequate treatment are vital in preventing progressive and sudden hearing loss resulting from EOM. PMID:26546407

  15. Does bee pollen cause to eosinophilic gastroenteropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Güç, Belgin Usta; Asilsoy, Suna; Canan, Oğuz; Kayaselçuk, Fazilet

    2015-01-01

    Bee pollen is given to children by mothers in order to strengthen their immune systems. There are no studies related with the side effects of bee polen in the literature. In this article, the literature was reviewed by presenting a case of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy related with bee polen. A 5-year old child was admitted due to abdominal pain. Edema was detected on the eyelids and pretibial region. In laboratory investigations, pathology was not detected in terms of hepatic and renal causes that would explain the protein loss of the patient diagnosed with hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia. Urticaria was detected during the follow-up visit. When the history of the patient was deepened, it was learned that bee pollen was given to the patient every day. The total eosinophil count was found to be 1 800/mm3. Allergic gastroenteropathy was considered because of hypereosinophilia and severe abdominal pain and endoscopy was performed. Biopsy revealed abundant eosinophils in the whole gastric mucosa. A diagnosis of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy was made. Bee polen was discontinued. Abdominal pain and edema disappeared in five days. Four weeks later, the levels of serum albumin and total eosinophil returned to normal. PMID:26568697

  16. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia (CML) Acute lymphocytic (or lymphoblastic) leukemia (ALL) Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) In acute leukemias, the bone marrow cells ... start in those cells. The main difference between lymphocytic leukemias and lymphomas is ... myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is another chronic leukemia that ...

  17. Functional expression of IL-12 receptor by human eosinophils: IL-12 promotes eosinophil apoptosis.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Nutku E; Zhuang Q; Soussi-Gounni A; Aris F; Mazer BD; Hamid Q

    2001-07-15

    In murine models of allergic inflammation, IL-12 has been shown to decrease tissue eosinophilia, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. We evaluated the expression of IL-12R and the effect of IL-12 on eosinophil survival. In situ hybridization demonstrated the presence of mRNA and immunoreactivity for IL-12Rbeta1 and -beta2 subunits in human peripheral blood eosinophils. Surface expression of IL-12Rbeta1 and -beta2 subunits on freshly isolated human eosinophils was optimally expressed after incubation with PMA. To determine the functional significance of IL-12R studies, we studied cell viability and apoptosis. Morphological analysis and propidium iodide staining for cell cycle demonstrated that recombinant human IL-12 increased in vitro human eosinophil apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of IL-5 together with IL-12 abrogated eosinophil apoptosis, suggesting that IL-12 and IL-5 have antagonistic effects. Our findings provide evidence for a novel role for IL-12 in regulating eosinophil function by increasing eosinophil apoptosis.

  18. SOCS3 Silencing Attenuates Eosinophil Functions in Asthma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zafra, Mª Paz; Cañas, Jose A.; Mazzeo, Carla; Gámez, Cristina; Sanz, Veronica; Fernández-Nieto, Mar; Quirce, Santiago; Barranco, Pilar; Ruiz-Hornillos, Javier; Sastre, Joaquín; del Pozo, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are one of the key inflammatory cells in asthma. Eosinophils can exert a wide variety of actions through expression and secretion of multiple molecules. Previously, we have demonstrated that eosinophils purified from peripheral blood from asthma patients express high levels of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3). In this article, SOCS3 gene silencing in eosinophils from asthmatics has been carried out to achieve a better understanding of the suppressor function in eosinophils. SOCS3 siRNA treatment drastically reduced SOCS3 expression in eosinophils, leading to an inhibition of the regulatory transcription factors GATA-3 and FoxP3, also interleukin (IL)-10; in turn, an increased STAT3 phosphorilation was observed. Moreover, SOCS3 abrogation in eosinophils produced impaired migration, adhesion and degranulation. Therefore, SOCS3 might be regarded as an important regulator implicated in eosinophil mobilization from the bone marrow to the lungs during the asthmatic process. PMID:25764157

  19. [FEATURES OF TREATMENT OF EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS IN SCHOOLCHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Horodylovska, M I

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of probiotic L. reuteri into the complex therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis significantly affect the outcomes of children--there was significant decrease in the number of eosinophils in the esophageal mucosa of children. PMID:26118052

  20. SOCS3 silencing attenuates eosinophil functions in asthma patients.

    PubMed

    Zafra, Ma Paz; Cañas, Jose A; Mazzeo, Carla; Gámez, Cristina; Sanz, Veronica; Fernández-Nieto, Mar; Quirce, Santiago; Barranco, Pilar; Ruiz-Hornillos, Javier; Sastre, Joaquín; del Pozo, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are one of the key inflammatory cells in asthma. Eosinophils can exert a wide variety of actions through expression and secretion of multiple molecules. Previously, we have demonstrated that eosinophils purified from peripheral blood from asthma patients express high levels of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3). In this article, SOCS3 gene silencing in eosinophils from asthmatics has been carried out to achieve a better understanding of the suppressor function in eosinophils. SOCS3 siRNA treatment drastically reduced SOCS3 expression in eosinophils, leading to an inhibition of the regulatory transcription factors GATA-3 and FoxP3, also interleukin (IL)-10; in turn, an increased STAT3 phosphorilation was observed. Moreover, SOCS3 abrogation in eosinophils produced impaired migration, adhesion and degranulation. Therefore, SOCS3 might be regarded as an important regulator implicated in eosinophil mobilization from the bone marrow to the lungs during the asthmatic process. PMID:25764157

  1. Systematic review: Eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Oshima, Naoki; Ishihara, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of Asian patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the PubMed and Web of Science databases for original studies, case series, and individual case reports of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries published from January 1980 to January 2015. We found 66 and 80 articles in the PubMed and Web of Science databases, respectively; 24 duplicate articles were removed. After excluding animal studies, articles not written in English, and meeting abstracts, 25 articles containing 217 patients were selected for analysis. RESULTS: Sample size-weighted mean values were determined for all pooled prevalence data and clinical characteristics. The mean age of the adult patients with eosinophilic esophagitis was approximately 50 years, and 73% of these patients were male. They frequently presented with allergic diseases including bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. Bronchial asthma was the most frequent comorbid allergic disease, occurring in 24% of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Dysphagia was the primary symptom reported; 44% of the patients complained of dysphagia. Although laboratory blood tests are not adequately sensitive for an accurate diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, endoscopic examinations revealed abnormal findings typical of this disease, including longitudinal furrows and concentric rings, in 82% of the cases. One-third of the cases responded to proton pump inhibitor administration. CONCLUSION: The characteristics of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian patients were similar to those reported in Western patients, indicating that this disease displays a similar pathogenesis between Western and Asian patients. PMID:26217096

  2. Substrates and products of eosinophil peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    van Dalen, C J; Kettle, A J

    2001-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase has been implicated in promoting oxidative tissue damage in a variety of inflammatory conditions, including asthma. It uses H(2)O(2) to oxidize chloride, bromide and thiocyanate to their respective hypohalous acids. The aim of this study was to establish which oxidants eosinophil peroxidase produces under physiological conditions. By measuring rates of H(2)O(2) utilization by the enzyme at neutral pH, we determined the catalytic rate constants for bromide and thiocyanate as 248 and 223 s(-1) and the Michaelis constants as 0.5 and 0.15 mM respectively. On the basis of these values thiocyanate is preferred 2.8-fold over bromide as a substrate for eosinophil peroxidase. Eosinophil peroxidase catalysed substantive oxidation of chloride only below pH 6.5. We found that when eosinophil peroxidase or myeloperoxidase oxidized thiocyanate, another product besides hypothiocyanite was formed; it also converted methionine into methionine sulphoxide. During the oxidation of thiocyanate, the peroxidases were present as their compound II forms. Compound II did not form when GSH was included to scavenge hypothiocyanite. We propose that the unidentified oxidant was derived from a radical species produced by the one-electron oxidation of hypothiocyanite. We conclude that at plasma concentrations of bromide (20-120 microM) and thiocyanate (20-100 microM), hypobromous acid and oxidation products of thiocyanate are produced by eosinophil peroxidase. Hypochlorous acid is likely to be produced only when substrates preferred over chloride are depleted. Thiocyanate should be considered to augment peroxidase-mediated toxicity because these enzymes can convert relatively benign hypothiocyanite into a stronger oxidant. PMID:11485572

  3. Natural killer cells induce eosinophil activation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Awad, Ali; Yassine, Hanane; Barrier, Mathieu; Vorng, Han; Marquillies, Philippe; Tsicopoulos, Anne; Duez, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are potent inflammatory cells with numerous immune functions, including antigen presentation and exacerbation of inflammatory responses through their capacity to release a range of largely preformed cytokines and lipid mediators. Thus, timely regulation of eosinophil activation and apoptosis is crucial to develop beneficial immune response and to avoid tissue damage and induce resolution of inflammation. Natural Killer (NK) cells have been reported to influence innate and adaptive immune responses by multiple mechanisms including cytotoxicity against other immune cells. In this study, we analyzed the effect of the interaction between NK cells and eosinophils. Co-culture experiments revealed that human NK cells could trigger autologous eosinophil activation, as shown by up-regulation of CD69 and down-regulation of CD62L, as well as degranulation, evidenced by increased CD63 surface expression, secretion of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil derived neurotoxin (EDN). Moreover, NK cells significantly and dose dependently increased eosinophil apoptosis as shown by annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Direct contact was necessary for eosinophil degranulation and apoptosis. Increased expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in cocultured eosinophils and inhibition of eosinophil CD63 expression by pharmacologic inhibitors suggest that MAPK and PI3K pathways are involved in NK cell-induced eosinophil degranulation. Finally, we showed that NK cells increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) expression by eosinophils in co-culture and that mitochondrial inhibitors (rotenone and antimycin) partially diminished NK cell-induced eosinophil apoptosis, suggesting the implication of mitochondrial ROS in NK cell-induced eosinophil apoptosis. Pan-caspase inhibitor (ZVAD-FMK) only slightly decreased eosinophil apoptosis in coculture. Altogether, our results suggest that NK cells regulate eosinophil functions by inducing their activation and their apoptosis. PMID:24727794

  4. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) About PLL and HCL There are other, less common types of leukemia, but they are generally subcategories of one ... both of which are types of chronic B-cell leukemia. B cells are a specific ...

  5. Eosinophilic Pancreatitis Diagnosed With Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Hina; Cabrera, Julio; Chi, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic pancreatitis (EP) is a rare clinical entity, and few cases have been reported. It usually presents on imaging as a pancreatic mass leading to common bile duct obstruction and jaundice. Since it can mimic a malignancy, eosinophilic pancreatitis is often diagnosed after “false positive” pancreatic resections. To our knowledge, we report the only known case of EP in which the diagnosis was made by fine needle aspiration and core biopsy of the pancreas during EUS, sparing the patient a surgical resection. After a steroid course, there was improvement of clinical symptoms. PMID:26203451

  6. Paraneoplastic eosinophilic fasciitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sharon E; Lodha, Rashmi; Cohen, Jonathan J; Romanelli, Paolo; Kirsner, Robert S

    2003-09-01

    A 60-year-old white woman with polycythemia rubra vera post splenectomy in November 2001 was found to have peripheral white blood cell counts increasing over 3 months. Cytogenetics revealed trisomy of chromosomes 8 and 9, and bone marrow biopsy showed hypercellular, fibrotic bone marrow consistent with myelofibrosis of polycythemia rubra vera. Two months later, the patient developed acute swelling and pain in her lower extremities. The clinical symptoms along with confirmatory histology supported the diagnosis of eosinophilic fasciitis. This is the first reported case in the English literature of an association between polycythemia vera and eosinophilic fasciitis. PMID:12734672

  7. EOSINOPHILS: MULTIFACETED BIOLOGIC PROPERTIES AND ROLES IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Hirohito

    2011-01-01

    Summary Eosinophils are leukocytes resident in mucosal tissues. During Th2-type inflammation, eosinophils are recruited from bone marrow and blood to the sites of immune response. While eosinophils have been considered end-stage cells involved in host protection against parasite infection and immunopathology in hypersensitivity disease, recent studies changed this perspective. Eosinophils are now considered multifunctional leukocytes involved in tissue homeostasis, modulation of adaptive immune responses, and innate immunity to certain microbes. Eosinophils are capable of producing immunoregulatory cytokines and are actively involved in regulation of Th2-type immune responses. However, such new information does not preclude earlier observations showing that eosinophils, in particular human eosinophils, are also effector cells with pro-inflammatory and destructive capabilities. Eosinophils with activation phenotypes are observed in biological specimens from patients with disease, and deposition of eosinophil products is readily seen in the affected tissues from these patients. Therefore, it would be reasonable to consider the eosinophil a multifaceted leukocyte that contributes to various physiological and pathological processes depending on their location and activation status. This review summarizes the emerging concept of the multifaceted immunobiology of eosinophils and discusses the roles of eosinophils in health and disease and the challenges and perspectives in the field. PMID:21682744

  8. Eosinophils mediate protective immunity against secondary nematode infection1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lu; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G.; Gagliardo, Lucille F.; Ruyechan, Maura C.; Luber, Kierstin L.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.; Appleton, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are versatile cells that regulate innate and adaptive immunity, influence metabolism and tissue repair, and contribute to allergic lung disease. Within the context of immunity to parasitic worm infections, eosinophils are prominent yet highly varied in function. We have shown previously that when mice undergo primary infection with the parasitic nematode, Trichinella spiralis, eosinophils play an important, immune regulatory role that promotes larval growth and survival in skeletal muscle. In this study, we aimed to address the function of eosinophils in secondary infection with T. spiralis. By infecting eosinophil-ablated mice, we found that eosinophils are dispensable for immunity that clears adult worms or controls fecundity in secondary infection. In contrast, eosinophil ablation had a pronounced effect on secondary infection of skeletal muscle by migratory newborn larvae. Restoring eosinophils to previously infected, ablated mice caused them to limit muscle larvae burdens. Passive immunization of naïve, ablated mice with sera or immunoglobulin from infected donors, together with transfer of eosinophils, served to limit the number of newborn larvae that migrated in tissue and colonized skeletal muscle. Results from these in vivo studies are consistent with earlier findings that eosinophils bind to larvae in the presences of antibodies in vitro. Although our previous findings showed that eosinophils protect the parasite in primary infection, these new data show that eosinophils protect the host in secondary infection. PMID:25429065

  9. Generation of Eosinophils from Cryopreserved Murine Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schollaert, Kaila L.; Stephens, Michael R.; Gray, Jerilyn K.; Fulkerson, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are produced in the bone marrow from CD34+ eosinophil lineagecommitted progenitors, whose levels in the bone marrow are elevated in a variety of human diseases. These findings suggest that increased eosinophil lineagecommitted progenitor production is an important process in disease-associated eosinophilia. The pathways central to the biology of the eosinophil lineagecommitted progenitor remain largely unknown. Thus, developing new methods to investigate the regulators of eosinophil lineagecommitted progenitor differentiation is needed to identify potential therapeutic targets to specifically inhibit eosinophil production. We tested cytokine regimens to optimize liquid cultures for the study of eosinophil lineagecommitted progenitor and eosinophil precursor differentiation into mature eosinophils. Stem cell factor (but not fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand) was required for optimal yield of eosinophils. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of cell preservation and scale on the culture, successfully culturing functional eosinophils from fresh and frozen murine bone marrow cells and in a standard-sized and 96-well culture format. In summary, we have developed an adaptable culture system that yields functionally competent eosinophils from murine low-density bone marrow cells and whose cytokine regime includes expansion of progenitors with stem cell factor alone with subsequent differentiation with interleukin 5. PMID:25551463

  10. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a domestic ferret.

    PubMed Central

    Fazakas, S

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis without peripheral eosinophilia was diagnosed histologically in a 5-year-old neutered male ferret showing acute signs of projectile vomiting, dark mucoid diarrhea, and chronic weight loss for 2 mo. The ferret was clinically normal after 4 days of treatment with parenteral fluids, antibiotics, and corticosteroids. PMID:10992990

  11. Participation of eosinophils in the toxic oil syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ten, R M; Kephart, G M; Posada, M; Abaitua, I; Soldevilla, L; Kilbourne, E M; Dunnette, S L; Gleich, G J

    1990-01-01

    The participation of eosinophils in the Spanish toxic oil syndrome (TOS) was investigated. Eosinophil infiltration and degranulation in tissues from 52 patients with the TOS were examined by immunofluorescence staining for the eosinophil granule major basic protein (MBP). Serum MBP levels were determined in sera from 323 patients. Eosinophil infiltration and degranulation were found in several tissues, especially during the acute phase of the TOS, and serum MBP was significantly elevated during all phases of the disease, suggesting that eosinophils play a role in the pathogenesis of the TOS. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2242612

  12. Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gioffredi, Andrea; Maritati, Federica; Oliva, Elena; Buzio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) is a multisystemic disorder, belonging to the small vessel anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, defined as an eosinophil-rich and necrotizing granulomatous inflammation often involving the respiratory tract, and necrotizing vasculitis predominantly affecting small to medium-sized vessels, associated with asthma and eosinophilia. EGPA pathogenesis is not well known: HLA-DRB1*04 and *07, HLA-DRB4 and IL10.2 haplotype of the IL-10 promoter gene are the most studied genetic determinants. Among the acquired pathogenetic factors, the exposure to different allergens, infections, vaccinations, drugs, and silica exposure have been involved. Eosinophils are the most characteristic cells in EGPA and different studies have demonstrated their role as effector and immunoregulatory cells. EGPA is considered as a disease with a prevalent activation of the Th-2 cellular-mediated inflammatory response and also humoral immunity plays an important role. A link between B and T inflammatory responses may explain different disease features. EGPA typically develops into three sequential phases: the allergic phase, distinguished by the occurrence of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and sinusitis, the eosinophilic phase, in which the main pathological finding is the eosinophilic organ infiltrations (e.g., lungs, heart, and gastrointestinal system), and the vasculitic phase, characterized by purpura, peripheral neuropathy, and constitutional symptoms. ANCA (especially pANCA anti-myeloperoxidase) are present in 40-60% of the patients. An elevation of IgG4 is frequently found. Corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide are classically used for remission induction, while azathioprine and methotrexate are the therapeutic options for remission maintenance. B-cell depletion with rituximab has shown promising results for remission induction. PMID:25404930

  13. The early history of the eosinophil.

    PubMed

    Kay, A B

    2015-03-01

    In 1879 Paul Ehrlich published his technique for staining blood films and his method for differential blood cell counting using coal tar dyes and mentions the eosinophil for the first time. Eosin is a bright red synthetic dye produced by the action of bromine on fluorescein and stains basic proteins due to its acidic nature. It was discovered in 1874 by Heinrich Caro, Director of the German chemical company Badische Anilin- und Soda-Fabrik. Ehrlich introduced the term 'eosinophil' to describe cells with granules (which he called alpha-granules) having an affinity for eosin and other acid dyes. He also observed black-staining, indulinophilic, beta-granules in bone marrow-derived eosinophils, which were probably immature crystalloid granules in eosinophil myelocytes. Ehrlich described the features of the alpha-granule and the cell's distribution in various species and tissues. He speculated correctly that the alpha-granule contents were secretory products and described several causes of eosinophilia including asthma, various skin diseases, helminths and reactions to medications. However, the cell was almost certainly observed by others before Ehrlich. In 1846 Thomas Wharton Jones (1808-1891) described 'granule blood cells' in the lamprey, frog, fowl, horse, elephant and man. He 'borrowed' the term granule cell from Julius Vogel (1814-1880) who had observed similar cells in inflammatory exudates. Vogel in turn was aware of the work of the Gottlieb (Théophile) Gluge (1812-1898) who used the term 'compound inflammatory globules' to describe cells in pus and serum. Almost 20 years before Ehrlich developed his staining methods, Max Johann Sigismund Schultze (1825-1874) performed functional experiments on coarse granular cells using a warm stage microscopic technique and showed they had amoeboid movement and phagocytic abilities. Although these early investigators recognised distinct granular cells Ehrlich's use of stains was a landmark contribution, which heralded modern studies on eosinophils and other blood leucocytes. PMID:25544991

  14. Eosinophils in vasculitis: characteristics and roles in pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Paneez; Grayson, Peter C.; Klion, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granular leukocytes that are implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders, including asthma, helminth infection, and rare hypereosinophilic syndromes. Although peripheral and tissue eosinophilia can be a feature of many types of small-vessel and medium-vessel vasculitis, the role of eosinophils has been best studied in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), where eosinophils are a characteristic finding in all three clinical stages of the disorder. Whereas numerous studies have demonstrated an association between the presence of eosinophils and markers of eosinophil activation in the blood and tissues of patients with EGPA, the precise role of eosinophils in disease pathogenesis has been difficult to ascertain owing to the complexity of the disease process. In this regard, results of clinical trials using novel agents that specifically target eosinophils are providing the first direct evidence of a central role of eosinophils in EGPA. This Review focuses on the aspects of eosinophil biology most relevant to the pathogenesis of vasculitis and provides an update of current knowledge regarding the role of eosinophils in EGPA and other vasculitides. PMID:25003763

  15. Cystatin F Ensures Eosinophil Survival by Regulating Granule Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Stephen P.; McMillan, Sarah J.; Colbert, Jeff D.; Lawrence, Rachel A.; Watts, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Eosinophils are now recognized as multifunctional leukocytes that provide critical homeostatic signals to maintain other immune cells and aid tissue repair. Paradoxically, eosinophils also express an armory of granule-localized toxins and hydrolases believed to contribute to pathology in inflammatory disease. How eosinophils deliver their supporting functions while avoiding self-inflicted injury is poorly understood. We have demonstrated that cystatin F (CF) is a critical survival factor for eosinophils. Eosinophils from CF null mice had reduced lifespan, reduced granularity, and disturbed granule morphology. In vitro, cysteine protease inhibitors restored granularity, demonstrating that control of cysteine protease activity by CF is critical for normal eosinophil development. CF null mice showed reduced pulmonary pathology in a model of allergic lung inflammation but also reduced ability to combat infection by the nematode Brugia malayi. These data identify CF as a “cytoprotectant” that promotes eosinophil survival and function by ensuring granule integrity. Video Abstract PMID:27067058

  16. ATP drives eosinophil effector responses through P2 purinergic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takehito; Soma, Tomoyuki; Noguchi, Toru; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Nakamoto, Hidetomo; Kita, Hirohito; Nagata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophils recognize various stimuli, such as cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulins, complement, and external pathogens, resulting in their accumulation in mucosal tissues and the progression of inflammation. Eosinophils are also involved in innate Th2-type immune responses mediated through endogenous danger signals, including IL-33, uric acid (UA), or ATP, in non-sensitized mice exposed to environmental allergens. However, the mechanism involved in eosinophil responses to these danger signals remains insufficiently understood. Methods We examined migration, adhesion, superoxide production and degranulation of human eosinophils. Isolated eosinophils were incubated with monosodium urate (MSU) crystals and ATPγS, a nonhydrolysable ATP analogue. To determine the involvement of P2 or P2Y2 receptors in eosinophil responses to UA and ATP, eosinophils were preincubated with a pan-P2 receptor inhibitor, oxidized ATP (oATP), or anti-P2Y2 antibody before incubation with MSU crystals or ATPγS. Results MSU crystals induced adhesion of eosinophils to recombinant human (rh)-ICAM-1 and induced production of superoxide. oATP abolished eosinophil responses to MSU crystals, suggesting involvement of endogenous ATP and its receptors. Furthermore, exogenous ATP, as ATPγS, induced migration of eosinophils through a model basement membrane, adhesion to rh-ICAM-1, superoxide generation, and degranulation of eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). oATP and anti-P2Y2 significantly reduced these eosinophil responses. Conclusions ATP serves as an essential mediator of functional responses in human eosinophils. Eosinophil responses to ATP may be implicated in airway inflammation in patients with asthma. PMID:26344078

  17. Leukemia Cutis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Angoori G; Danturty, Indira

    2012-01-01

    Leukemia cutis is the infiltration of neoplastic leukocytes or their precursors into the epidermis, the dermis, or the subcutis, resulting in clinically identifiable cutaneous lesions. Leukemia cutis may follow, precede or occur concomitantly with the diagnosis of systemic leukemia. A 50-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic multiple cutaneous nodules all over the body of 4 months duration. Cutaneous examination showed multiple hyperpigmented nodules and plaques involving face, trunk, and extremities. Peripheral smear showed abnormally elevated leucocyte count (TLC-70,000) with abnormal cells: myeloblasts 40%, promyelocytes 8% and myelocytes 39%. Auer rods were present in few myeloblasts. Bone marrow aspiration showed increased cellularity, erythroid hyperplasia with megaloblastic change, increased myeloblasts with maturation arrest. Immunohistochemistry showed strongly positive myeloperoxidase infiltrating cells and negative for CD20 and CD3 consistent with the diagnosis of AML–M 2 with leukemia cutis. This case is reported for its rarity. PMID:23248383

  18. Eosinophil-Cryptococcus neoformans interactions in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Feldmesser, M; Casadevall, A; Kress, Y; Spira, G; Orlofsky, A

    1997-01-01

    Eosinophils are components of inflammatory responses to a variety of pathogens. Although a variety of beneficial and harmful functions have been ascribed to these cells, their role in protection against infectious agents remains uncertain. Previous studies have reported eosinophilic pneumonia in mice infected intratracheally with Cryptococcus neoformans. We confirmed this observation and studied the inflammatory response in the lung at day 14 by light and electron microscopy. Immunostaining for glucuronoxylomannan showed isolated cryptococci inside the eosinophilic cuffs. Eosinophils were found to be in close association with C. neoformans in vivo. Cryptococci were associated with eosinophils within eosinophilic perivascular cuffs, within granulomas, and lining the alveolar space. To further investigate this phenomenon in vitro, we isolated rat peritoneal eosinophils and studied cryptococcus-eosinophil interactions in the presence and absence of anti-capsular immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and IgE monoclonal antibody (MAb). Eosinophils phagocytosed C. neoformans only in the presence of specific antibody. Phagocytosis was rapid, and dense rings that appeared to consist of granule contents were formed around the organisms. Mast cells were observed to occasionally phagocytose C. neoformans in vitro in the presence of IgE MAb. Our observations suggest that eosinophils may be effector cells against C. neoformans. PMID:9125578

  19. Into the wild world of eosinophilic granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Dhull, Anil Kumar; Aggarwal, Sumeet; Kaushal, Vivek; Singh, Sunita

    2013-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a group of relatively rare disease processes of reticuloendothelial system with an abnormal proliferation of Langerhans cells or their precursors. A wide spectrum of treatment modalities is available for LCH which includes surgery, curettage, steroids, radiation, various chemotherapy regimens, either in combination or alone have so far been adopted. There are several case reports of eosinophilic granuloma but for recurrent cases very few have discussed on treatment of LCH in adults. We report a case of a 21-year-old man presented with eosinophilic granuloma with recurrence of the lesions after 6?years of the initial treatment. Patient was treated with combination chemotherapy with three weekly CHOP regimen and the patient is disease free after 6?months of follow-up. Contrary to other reports, this case demonstrates that a good response with standard therapy is possible. PMID:24252836

  20. GWAS identifies four novel eosinophilic esophagitis loci

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Patrick MA; Wang, Mei-Lun; Cianferoni, Antonella; Aceves, Seema; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Nadeau, Kari; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic disorder characterized by infiltration of the esophagus with eosinophils. We had previously reported association of the TSLP/WDR36 locus with EoE. Here we report genome-wide significant associations at four additional loci; c11orf30 and STAT6, which have been previously associated with both atopic and autoimmune disease, and two EoE-specific loci, ANKRD27 that regulates the trafficking of melanogenic enzymes to epidermal melanocytes and CAPN14, that encodes a calpain whose expression is highly enriched in the esophagus. The identification of five EoE loci, not only expands our etiological understanding of the disease but may also represent new therapeutic targets to treat the most debilitating aspect of EoE, esophageal inflammation and remodeling. PMID:25407941

  1. Significance of feeding dysfunction in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Menard-Katcher, Calies; Henry, Michelle; Furuta, Glenn T; Atkins, Dan; Maune, Nancy Creskoff; Haas, Angela M

    2014-08-21

    Feeding dysfunction is a frequent presenting symptom of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Here we present 3 children of various ages whose manifestations of EoE associated feeding dysfunction led to significant and life altering impact on their growth and development. Early identification of presenting symptoms of EoE will allow for prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatments. Recognition of salient features of dysfunction and treatment by feeding therapists and nutritionists led to symptom resolution and growth. PMID:25152606

  2. Mechanisms of Disease of Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Benjamin P; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2016-05-23

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a recently recognized inflammatory disease of the esophagus with clinical symptoms derived from esophageal dysfunction. The etiology of EoE is now being elucidated, and food hypersensitivity is emerging as the central cornerstone of disease pathogenesis. Herein, we present a thorough picture of the current clinical, pathologic, and molecular understanding of the disease with a focus on disease mechanisms. PMID:26925500

  3. Eyelid eosinophilic granuloma in a Siberian husky.

    PubMed

    Vercelli, A; Cornegliani, L; Portigliotti, L

    2005-01-01

    Canine eosinophilic granuloma (CEG) is a rare skin disease of unknown origin. It has been reported in Siberian huskies, Cavalier King Charles spaniels and occasionally in other breeds. The lesions comprise nodules or plaques, mostly localised in the oral cavity. A case of a single cutaneous nodular lesion of CEG on the eyelid of a Siberian husky is described. Complete remission was achieved with oral glucocorticoid treatment. PMID:15682738

  4. Significance of feeding dysfunction in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Menard-Katcher, Calies; Henry, Michelle; Furuta, Glenn T; Atkins, Dan; Maune, Nancy Creskoff; Haas, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Feeding dysfunction is a frequent presenting symptom of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Here we present 3 children of various ages whose manifestations of EoE associated feeding dysfunction led to significant and life altering impact on their growth and development. Early identification of presenting symptoms of EoE will allow for prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatments. Recognition of salient features of dysfunction and treatment by feeding therapists and nutritionists led to symptom resolution and growth. PMID:25152606

  5. Treatment Adherence in Pediatric Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Franciosi, James P.; Hente, Elizabeth A.; Ahrens, Annette; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Examine treatment adherence rates in pediatric eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGID). Methods Participants were children aged 2.5–18 years with eosinophilic esophagitis or eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) and their caregivers. A multimethod, multi-informant assessment including parent report and electronic monitoring was utilized, with a 90% cut point for nonadherence. Results Medication nonadherence prevalence was 30%. Adherence frequency was 91% ± 14% (0–100%) per parent report and 100% ± 69% (0–194%) per electronic monitors. Tube-feeding adherence was 99% ± 3%. Food allergen exposures were less than 1 per 2 weeks, with 33% nonadherence prevalence. Patients with EGE and toddlers with both conditions demonstrated poorer medication adherence (p’s < .05). Caregivers reported higher number of missed medication doses than food exposures (p < .05). Conclusions The prevalence and range of nonadherence demonstrates that subsets of these patients are nonadherent. Adherence to treatment in EGID is complex and multifaceted, with nonadherence varying across treatments. PMID:22080457

  6. Association of eosinophilic fasciitis with morphea.

    PubMed

    Zisova, Lilia G; Abadjieva, Tsvetana I; Abadjieva, Cvetana I; Obreshkova, Elena V; Tchernev, Georgi K; Chernev, Georgi K; Vutova, Nina I

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis is a rare inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, described for the first time by Shulman in 1974. The disease presents with induration of the skin, connective tissue and the underlying muscle fascia, sometimes accompanied by myalgia, most commonly in the lower extremities. Unlike scleroderma, it presents with absence of visceral organ involvement and Raynaud's phenomenon. Hypergammaglobulinemia and eosinophilia have been reported. Eosinophilic fasciitis is often associated with hematological disorders--there are reports of combinations with other autoimmune diseases such as systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Hashimoto thyroiditis, Sjogren syndrome, vitiligo, etc. Occurrence of morphea, in the course of eosinophil fasciitis is considered a rarity. We have observed such a case with the simultaneous presence of both types of lesions. A 20-year-old female patient is reported, wherein the clinical picture developed for 6 months. The initial erythematous edema and subsequently the livedo-like painful plaques in both lower legs gradually swell, thicken and hyperpigment. Almost simultaneously with these complaints small brown livid body plaques emerged. The patient was diagnosed based on history, clinical picture, peripheral eosinophilia and histological findings from the affected areas. There was no systemic involvement and accompanying hematologic or other disease. Therapeutic management and significant clinical improvement were achieved using systemic corticosteroid therapy combined with methotrexate. PMID:25434081

  7. Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis of the Nasal Septum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunchuan; Liu, Honggang; Zang, Hongrui; Wang, Tong; Hu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Background. Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis (EAF) is a rare benign condition of unknown aetiology that causes stenosis of the upper respiratory tract. It is most commonly found at the nasal septum and sinus mucosa causing mucosal thickening and nasal obstructive symptoms. The diagnosis is mainly based on characteristic histologic findings. Case Report. A 27-year-old young woman presented with a slow growing mass at her anterior nasal septum for over eight years. She complained of persistent nasal obstruction, epistaxis, sometimes diffused facial pain, and chronic headache. 3 years ago, the tumor was partially resected for ventilation and a nasal septum perforation was left. Imaging findings indicated soft-tissue thickening of the anterior part of septum and adjacent lateral nasal walls. Pathological examination showed numerous inflammatory cells infiltrates containing eosinophils, fibroinflammatory lesion with a whorled appearance fibrosis which typically surrounded vessels. A diagnosis of eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis was made. All laboratory tests were unremarkable. Skin prick test was positive. The tumor-like lesion was totally resected. Conclusions. EAF is a rare benign and progressive disorder causing destruction. Combined with radiological imaging of EAF historical findings contribute to the diagnosis. It is important to prevent tumor from recurrence by total resection of the lesion. PMID:23634315

  8. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: clinical presentation and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bystrom, Jonas; O'Shea, Nuala R

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disorder of the oesophagus which has become increasingly recognised over recent years, although it remains underdiagnosed in many centres. It is characterised histologically by a significant eosinophilic infiltration of the oesophageal mucosa (>15 eosinophils per high powered field), and clinically with features of oesophageal dysfunction such a dysphagia, food impaction, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) resistant dyspepsia. Fibrosis and oesophageal remodelling may occur and lead to oesophageal strictures. An allergic predisposition is common in the EoE population, which appears to be primarily food antigen driven in children and aeroallergen driven in adults. Evidence suggests that the pathogenesis of EoE is due to a dysregulated immunological response to an environmental allergen, resulting in a T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammatory disease and remodelling of the oesophagus in genetically susceptible individuals. Allergen elimination and anti-inflammatory therapy with corticosteroids are currently the mainstay of treatment; however, an increasing number of studies are now focused on targeting different stages in the disease pathogenesis. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms resulting in EoE will allow us to improve the therapeutic options available. PMID:24647582

  9. Eosinophils are necessary for pulmonary arterial remodeling in a mouse model of eosinophilic inflammation-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Weng, M.; Baron, D. M.; Bloch, K. D.; Luster, A. D.; Lee, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of some forms of pulmonary hypertension (PH). We recently demonstrated that deficiency of adiponectin (APN) in a mouse model of PH induced by eosinophilic inflammation increases pulmonary arterial remodeling, pulmonary pressures, and the accumulation of eosinophils in the lung. Based on these data, we hypothesized that APN deficiency exacerbates PH indirectly by increasing eosinophil recruitment. Herein, we examined the role of eosinophils in the development of inflammation-induced PH. Elimination of eosinophils in APN-deficient mice by treatment with anti-interleukin-5 antibody attenuated pulmonary arterial muscularization and PH. In addition, we observed that transgenic mice that are devoid of eosinophils also do not develop pulmonary arterial muscularization in eosinophilic inflammation-induced PH. To investigate the mechanism by which APN deficiency increased eosinophil accumulation in response to an allergic inflammatory stimulus, we measured expression levels of the eosinophil-specific chemokines in alveolar macrophages isolated from the lungs of mice with eosinophilic inflammation-induced PH. In these experiments, the levels of CCL11 and CCL24 were higher in macrophages isolated from APN-deficient mice than in macrophages from wild-type mice. Finally, we demonstrate that the extracts of eosinophil granules promoted the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells in vitro. These data suggest that APN deficiency may exacerbate PH, in part, by increasing eosinophil recruitment into the lung and that eosinophils could play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammation-induced PH. These results may have implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of PH caused by vascular inflammation. PMID:21908591

  10. Eosinophils are necessary for pulmonary arterial remodeling in a mouse model of eosinophilic inflammation-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Weng, M; Baron, D M; Bloch, K D; Luster, A D; Lee, J J; Medoff, B D

    2011-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of some forms of pulmonary hypertension (PH). We recently demonstrated that deficiency of adiponectin (APN) in a mouse model of PH induced by eosinophilic inflammation increases pulmonary arterial remodeling, pulmonary pressures, and the accumulation of eosinophils in the lung. Based on these data, we hypothesized that APN deficiency exacerbates PH indirectly by increasing eosinophil recruitment. Herein, we examined the role of eosinophils in the development of inflammation-induced PH. Elimination of eosinophils in APN-deficient mice by treatment with anti-interleukin-5 antibody attenuated pulmonary arterial muscularization and PH. In addition, we observed that transgenic mice that are devoid of eosinophils also do not develop pulmonary arterial muscularization in eosinophilic inflammation-induced PH. To investigate the mechanism by which APN deficiency increased eosinophil accumulation in response to an allergic inflammatory stimulus, we measured expression levels of the eosinophil-specific chemokines in alveolar macrophages isolated from the lungs of mice with eosinophilic inflammation-induced PH. In these experiments, the levels of CCL11 and CCL24 were higher in macrophages isolated from APN-deficient mice than in macrophages from wild-type mice. Finally, we demonstrate that the extracts of eosinophil granules promoted the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells in vitro. These data suggest that APN deficiency may exacerbate PH, in part, by increasing eosinophil recruitment into the lung and that eosinophils could play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammation-induced PH. These results may have implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of PH caused by vascular inflammation. PMID:21908591

  11. Eosinophils and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Short Review

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli-Kläy, C. P.; Mendis, B. R. R. N.; Lombardi, T.

    2009-01-01

    The eosinophil cell has been related as a prognostic indicator for cancers. However, its exact function in tumour behaviour is still not clearly defined. In the oral cavity the presence of eosinophils can be a favourable prognostic indicator as well as it may be associated with a poor prognosis. In this short review, we briefly summarize the role of the eosinophils in the general context of immunoregulation and its relation to oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:20049171

  12. Eosinophilic myositis in a slaughtered Korean native cattle

    PubMed Central

    Do, Sun Hee; Jeong, Da-Hee; Chung, Jae-Yong; Park, Jin-Kyu; Yang, Hai-Jie; Yuan, Dong-Wei

    2008-01-01

    Histopathological findings of eosinophilic myositis in the carcass of a slaughtered Korean native cow are presented. Lesions contained massive fibrous septae with vacuolar changes in some lesions, and the hypercontraction and rupturing of muscle bundles, with replacement by eosinophils. Necrosis and severe eosinophil infiltration were observed. Sarcoplasmic fragmentation and atrophy developed. Typical of granuloma, calcified myofibers were focally surrounded by macrophages and numerous inflammatory cells, and multinucleated giant cell formation was evident. PMID:19043319

  13. [Eosinophilic granuloma of the oral cavity in a Siberian husky].

    PubMed

    Vermond, J F; Koedam, M A

    1989-01-15

    An ulcerative sublingual inflammation was found to be present in a Siberian Husky dog. Histological examination revealed an eosinophilic granuloma. Treatment with corticosteroids was successful. PMID:2919392

  14. Chemokine and cytokine cooperativity: eosinophil migration in the asthmatic response.

    PubMed

    Simson, L; Foster, P S

    2000-08-01

    Eosinophils play a central role in the pathophysiology of allergic disease. The mechanisms that regulate eosinophil migration are complex; however, chemokines and cytokines produced in both the early and late phases of the asthmatic response appear to cooperate in eosinophil recruitment. In particular, there exists a unique synergy between eotaxin and IL-5. The role of chemokine/cytokine cooperativity has been investigated in the extracellular matrix, adhesion molecule/integrin interactions, receptor polarization and aggregation and the convergence and divergence of intracellular signalling pathways. Understanding the mechanisms whereby eosinophils migrate will allow the development of specific therapeutic strategies aimed at attenuating specific components of the allergic response. PMID:10947867

  15. Diagnosing Eosinophilic Colitis: Histopathological Pattern or Nosological Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Alan W. H.

    2012-01-01

    Reports of  “eosinophilic colitis”—raised colonic mucosal eosinophil density in patients with lower gastrointestinal symptoms—have increased markedly over the last fifteen years, though it remains a rarity. There is no consensus over its diagnosis and management, and uncertainty is compounded by the use of the same term to describe an idiopathic increase in colonic eosinophils and an eosinophilic inflammatory reaction to known aetiological agents such as parasites or drugs. In patients with histologically proven colonic eosinophilia, it is important to seek out underlying causes and careful clinicopathological correlation is advised. Because of the variability of eosinophil density in the normal colon, it is recommended that histological reports of colonic eosinophilia include a quantitative morphometric assessment of eosinophil density, preferably across several sites. Few reported cases of “eosinophilic colitis” meet these criteria. As no correlation has been shown between colonic eosinophil density and symptoms in older children or adults, it is suggested that treatment should be directed towards alleviation of symptoms and response to treatment assessed clinically rather than by histological estimates of intramucosal eosinophils. PMID:24278727

  16. Wogonin Induces Eosinophil Apoptosis and Attenuates Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dorward, David A.; Sharma, Sidharth; Rennie, Jillian; Felton, Jennifer M.; Alessandri, Ana L.; Duffin, Rodger; Schwarze, Jurgen; Haslett, Christopher; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Eosinophils are key effector cells in allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, eczema, and asthma. Their tissue presence is regulated by both recruitment and increased longevity at inflamed sites. Objectives: To investigate the ability of the flavone wogonin to induce eosinophil apoptosis in vitro and attenuate eosinophil-dominant allergic inflammation in vivo in mice. Methods: Human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in response to wogonin was investigated by cellular morphology, flow cytometry, mitochondrial membrane permeability, and pharmacological caspase inhibition. Allergic lung inflammation was modeled in mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were examined for inflammation, mucus production, and inflammatory mediator production. Airway hyperresponsiveness to aerosolized methacholine was measured. Measurements and Main Results: Wogonin induced time- and concentration-dependent human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in vitro. Wogonin-induced eosinophil apoptosis occurred with activation of caspase-3 and was inhibited by pharmacological caspase inhibition. Wogonin administration attenuated allergic airway inflammation in vivo with reductions in BAL and interstitial eosinophil numbers, increased eosinophil apoptosis, reduced airway mucus production, and attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness. This wogonin-induced reduction in allergic airway inflammation was prevented by concurrent caspase inhibition in vivo. Conclusions: Wogonin induces eosinophil apoptosis and attenuates allergic airway inflammation, suggesting that it has therapeutic potential for the treatment of allergic inflammation in humans. PMID:25629436

  17. Emerging Therapeutic Options for Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Timothy; Stephen, Sindu; Borum, Marie L.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the esophagus that often occurs in atopic persons. Management strategies include pharmacotherapy, dietary modification, and endoscopic therapy, although patients will often have a relapsing and remitting course. Currently, the primary pharmacotherapy for EoE consists of corticosteroids. Immuno-modulators, leukotriene antagonists, biologies, and monoclonal antibodies are currently under study for treatment of EoE. The role of immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic reactions has been well documented and may provide insight into the etiology and effective therapy of EoE. PMID:24803874

  18. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus. In the last decade, there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world. Mostly seen in children and young adults, patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room. Characteristic endoscopic findings, esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis. Avoidance of food allergens, administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment. Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment. PMID:27158535

  19. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus. In the last decade, there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world. Mostly seen in children and young adults, patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room. Characteristic endoscopic findings, esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis. Avoidance of food allergens, administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment. Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment. PMID:27158535

  20. Bronchial involvement in chronic eosinophilic pneumonia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Hee; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Jae Hwa; Kim, Lucia; Kim, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) is an idiopathic chronic condition characterized by alveolar filling with mixed inflammatory infiltrate consisting largely of eosinophils. On CT, it is usually observed as consolidation, often peripheral and patchy in distribution, with upper lobe dominance. Airway involvement in CEP is very rare. We report on a case of bronchial involvement in CEP. PMID:25973261

  1. Steroid responsive eosinophilic gastric outlet obstruction in a child

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric outlet obstruction is a rare complication of eosinophilic gastroenteritis, most commonly treated surgically. We report a case of eosinophilic gastric outlet obstruction in a child that responded to conservative medical management. A brief review of this clinical entity is also provided....

  2. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia accompanied by mediastinal lymphadenopathy and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Esme, Hidir; Sahin, Onder; Sezer, Murat; Fidan, Fatma; Unlu, Mehmet

    2006-11-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia, which was described in 1989, is thought to represent a hypersensitivity reaction to unidentified inhaled antigens. Here, we present a case of a marble mine worker with acute eosinophilic pneumonia complicated with mediastinal lymphadenopathy, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:17128696

  3. EOSINOPHILIC MYOSITIS DUE TO SARCOCYSTIS HOMINIS IN A BEEF COW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of eosinophilic myositis in an eight-year-old beef cow was investigated. The cow originated from a herd that had a high incidence of eosinophilic myositis in slaughtered adult females during a period of two years. Histologically, the lesions in the muscles were characterized as granulomas wit...

  4. Intranuclear crystalloids associated with abnormal granules in eosinophilic leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Parmley, R.T.; Crist, W.M.; Roper, M.; Takagi, M.; Austin, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    Ultrastructural evaluation of eosinophilic leukocytes from a 2-yr-old asymptomatic girl with chronic benign neutropenia (CBN) revealed a variety of morphological abnormalities. All eosinophils obtained from blood and marrow specimens contained multiple microcrystalloids in most of the mature cytoplasmic granules. An increase in crystalloid-free, immature granules in late (bilobed nuclei) eosinophils suggested a delay in granule maturation. The eosinophil granules appeared to be of normal size and demonstrated normal acid phosphatase reactivity. Eosinophilic myelocytes contained abnormal cisternae of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and lacked abundant elongated RER cisternae seen in normal cells. A few eosinophilic myelocytes in specimens of bone marrow from the child contained large intranuclear crystalloids measuring up to 3 mu in length. The intranuclear crystalloid contained as cubic lattice of dense material with a periodicity similar to that described for cytoplasmic crystalloids. The ultrastructural morphology of marrow neutrophils was normal, as described in other cases of CBN. Ultrastructural examination of blood eosinophils from the father demonstrated microcrystalloids in cytoplasmic granules identical to those seen in the child. The father was asymptomatic and had normal leukocyte counts. Thus, anomalous crystalloid granule genesis occurred in the father and daughter and was not necessarily associated with neutropenia or clinical symptomatology. This anomaly is associated with the accumulation of intranuclear crystalloid material in eosinophilic myelocytes, which do not appear to be released from the marrow compartment.

  5. The surface phenotype of swine blood and tissue eosinophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Magyar, A; Mihalik, R; Oláh, I

    1995-08-01

    Cell surface antigens of swine eosinophil granulocytes were studied with flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. The monoclonal antibody 335-2, specific for swine differentiation antigen swC1a, originally described to be present on swine T and myeloid cells, is able to distinguish swine eosinophils (swC1a negative) from neutrophils (swC1a positive). This monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used in two-colour fluorescence measurements in combination with anti-swine -CD2, -CD4, -CD8, -MHC class II, -LFA-1 or -swC3 mAbs. All of the blood eosinophils proved to be positive for LFA-1 and swC3, a common marker of swine monocytes, granulocytes and macrophages. However, they do not react with antibodies recognizing swine CD2, CD4, CD8 or MHC class II cell surface molecules. The reactivity pattern of tissue eosinophils with these mAbs was determined on cryostat sections of different tissues of swine. Tissue eosinophils were negative for swC1a, CD2, CD8, while all of them reacted with swC3. In contrast with blood eosinophils, 10-30% of tissue eosinophils were demonstrated to be negative for LFA-1. In some cases, a few tissue eosinophils were found to be stained weakly by antibodies to swine CD4 or MHC class II antigens. PMID:8571546

  6. Eosinophilic panniculitis in a female child: An unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sonia; Jain, Pramod; Jakhar, Preeti; Shivkumar, V. B.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic panniculitis (EP) is characterized by prominent infiltration of subcutaneous fat with eosinophils. The etiology is diverse. This is not a disease but represents a reaction pattern that may occur in a variety of circumstances. The exact pathogenesis of the disease is still unclear. We present the case of a 6-year-old girl child who was diagnosed with EP. PMID:25657915

  7. Mepolizumab for the reduction of exacerbations in severe eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    Russell, Richard; Brightling, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Asthma affects over 300 million people worldwide and is severe in 10% of sufferers. Severe asthma is associated with greater morbidity and mortality particularly as a consequence of frequent exacerbations. Advances in approaches to phenotype the heterogeneity of severe asthma has established the importance of eosinophilic inflammation and emerging new therapies are broadly designed to target T2-mediated eosinophilic inflammation with the aim to reduce exacerbation frequency. Here, we summarize the evidence that eosinophilic asthma is an important pheno(endo)type and identifies a group at risk of exacerbations; that established therapies reduce exacerbations, particularly in eosinophilic severe asthma; and discuss the role of mepolizumab, an IL-5 neutralising monoclonal antibody therapy, in reducing exacerbations in severe eosinophilic asthma compared to established and other emerging therapies. PMID:27058452

  8. An Atypical Case of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting as Hypovolemic Shock.

    PubMed

    Martillo, Miguel; Abed, Jean; Herman, Michael; Abed, Elie; Shi, Wenjing; Munot, Khushboo; Mankal, Pavan Kumar; Gurunathan, Rajan; Ionescu, Gabriel; Kotler, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition characterized by focal or diffuse infiltration of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of secondary causes. The pathogenesis of this condition is not well understood and its clinical presentation depends on the segment and layer of the gastrointestinal tract affected. The definition of eosinophilic gastroenteritis may be difficult, as the normal ranges of eosinophil numbers in normal and abnormal gastric and intestinal mucosa are not standardized. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who came to the hospital with hypovolemic shock and lethargy secondary to severe diarrhea. Laboratory analysis was significant for peripheral eosinophilia, and pathology from both the duodenum and colon showed marked eosinophilic infiltration. PMID:26078733

  9. An Atypical Case of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting as Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Martillo, Miguel; Abed, Jean; Herman, Michael; Abed, Elie; Shi, Wenjing; Munot, Khushboo; Mankal, Pavan Kumar; Gurunathan, Rajan; Ionescu, Gabriel; Kotler, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition characterized by focal or diffuse infiltration of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of secondary causes. The pathogenesis of this condition is not well understood and its clinical presentation depends on the segment and layer of the gastrointestinal tract affected. The definition of eosinophilic gastroenteritis may be difficult, as the normal ranges of eosinophil numbers in normal and abnormal gastric and intestinal mucosa are not standardized. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who came to the hospital with hypovolemic shock and lethargy secondary to severe diarrhea. Laboratory analysis was significant for peripheral eosinophilia, and pathology from both the duodenum and colon showed marked eosinophilic infiltration. PMID:26078733

  10. Eosinophils and their Interactions with Respiratory Virus Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Helene F.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophils are implicated in the pathophysiology of respiratory virus infection, most typically in negative roles, such as promoting wheezing and bronchoconstriction in conjunction with virus-induced exacerbations of reactive airways disease and in association with aberrant hypersensitivity responses to antiviral vaccines. However, experiments carried out in vitro and in vivo suggest positive roles for eosinophils, as they have been shown to reduce virus infectivity in tissue culture and promote clearance of the human pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a mouse challenge model. The related natural rodent pathogen, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) is highly virulent in mice, and is not readily cleared by eosinophils in vivo. Interestingly, PVM replicates in eosinophils and promotes cytokine release. The molecular basis of virus infection in eosinophils and its relationship to disease outcome is currently under study. PMID:18818885

  11. 2013 Update on Celiac Disease and Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Pellicano, Rinaldo; De Angelis, Claudio; Ribaldone, Davide Giuseppe; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Astegiano, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder, characterized by small intestinal inflammation and villous atrophy after the ingestion of gluten by genetically susceptible individuals. Several extraintestinal manifestations have been associated to celiac disease. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a primary disorder of the esophagus characterized by upper gastrointestinal symptoms, absence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field in biopsy specimens. Both celiac disease and eosinophilic esophagitis are caused by aberrant, but distinct, immune responses to ingested antigens and can be responsive to restricted food intake. The aim of this review is to assess whether there is an association between these two pathologies. In the majority of the studies examined, including the studies in pediatric population, the prevalence of eosinophilic esophagitis in subjects with celiac disease was about 10-times that of the general population. We suggest searching for eosinophilic esophagitis in all children undergoing endoscopy for suspicious celiac disease. PMID:23974065

  12. HIV-associated eosinophilic folliculitis in an infant.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, P K; Morar, N; Dlova, N C; Aboobaker, J

    1999-06-01

    HIV-associated eosinophilic folliculitis (HIV-EF), which is a well-known entity in adults, has not been described in children. Although Ofuji's disease (OD) or eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF) has been described in children and shares histopathologic features with HIV-EF, it is a distinct entity with characteristic clinical features. We report the occurrence of eosinophilic folliculitis in an 8-month-old HIV-positive patient and discuss the clinical, pathologic and possible pathogenetic aspects thereof. In addition, differences in the clinical manifestations of the present case and that of I-EPF are addressed. Because of clinicopathologic similarities between the present case and HIV-associated eosinophilic folliculitis (HIV-EF) in adults, we believe that eosinophilic folliculitis in this patient represents a cutaneous manifestation of HIV infection, rather than co-incidental occurrence of the infantile form of Ofuji's disease in an HIV-positive patient. PMID:10380045

  13. Eosinophilic esophagitis: From pathophysiology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Esposito, Dario; Pesce, Marcella; Cuomo, Rosario; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune disease, characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophagus, leading to bolus impaction and reflux-like symptoms. Traditionally considered a pediatric disease, the number of adult patients with EoE is continuously increasing, with a relatively higher incidence in western countries. Dysphagia and food impaction represent the main symptoms complained by patients, but gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms may also be present. Esophageal biopsies are mandatory for the diagnosis of EoE, though clinical manifestations and proton pump inhibitors responsiveness must be taken into consideration. The higher prevalence of EoE in patients suffering from atopic diseases suggests a common background with allergy, however both the etiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. Elimination diets are considered the first-line therapy in children, but this approach appears less effective in adults patients, who often require steroids; despite medical treatments, EoE is complicated in some cases by esophageal stricture and stenosis, that require additional endoscopic treatments. This review summarizes the evidence on EoE pathophysiology and illustrates the safety and efficacy of the most recent medical and endoscopic treatments. PMID:26600973

  14. Current Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis 2015.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltrate (≥15/hpf) in the esophageal epithelium and the absence of other potential causes of eosinophilia. The prevalence is increasing and is the most common cause of solid food dysphagia in children and young adults. This article will review the diagnosis and management of EoE based on consensus conferences, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis and highlights seminal studies in our evolving treatment of this disease. However, all answers are not available and I will remark about the lessons learned in my clinical practice seeing EoE patients over the last 25 years. The complicated etiology of the complaint of dysphagia in EoE patients will be reviewed. The importance of utilizing endoscopy, biopsies, and barium esophagram to help define the 2 phenotypes (inflammatory, fibrostenosis) of EoE will be highlighted. The controversy about PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia will be discussed and contrasted with idiopathic EoE. Finally, the 3 treatment options for EoE (drugs, diet, dilation) will be reviewed in detail and a useful clinical management algorithm presented. PMID:26485101

  15. Effects of Corticosteroids on Eosinophil Chemotaxis and Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Leonard C.; Hill, John S.; Hairfield, William M.; Mullarkey, Michael F.

    1981-01-01

    Therapeutic doses of corticosteroids frequently induce eosinopenia; however, the mechanism(s) involved remain obscure. To investigate this question, we studied the effects of corticosteroids on eosinophil adherence and migration. Eosinophils from normal donors were prepared by dextran sedimentation and Hypaque gradient centrifugation to 45-96% purity. Adherence was measured by filtration of whole blood and isolated eosinophils through nylon wool columns. Before prednisone administration, adherence was 83.8±3.2% for eosinophils in heparinized blood and 82.1±3.2% for isolated eosinophils. 4 h after oral prednisone administration whole blood eosinophil adherence was reduced to 53.9±10.7%; at 24 and 48 h adherence was normal. In contrast, isolated eosinophils showed no decrease in adherence 4, 24, or 48 h after corticosteroid administration. Similarly, in vitro addition of hydrocortisone to isolated eosinophils at 0.01 and 2.0 mg/ml did not reduce adherence. Eosinophil migration was tested in modified Boyden chambers by “lower-surface” and “leading-front” methods, using zymosan-activated serum and buffered saline to assess chemotactic and random migration, respectively. In vitro incubation of eosinophils with hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone produced a dose-dependent inhibition of chemotaxis. Using lower-surface methods the minimal concentration effecting substantial inhibition was 0.01 mg/ml for both drugs. At 2.0 mg/ml hydrocortisone and methylprednisolone inhibited eosinophil chemotaxis 82.6±4.4% and 85.0±3.5%, respectively. Using leading-front chemotaxis techniques significant inhibition was detected at 0.001 mg/ml hydrocortisone. Eosinophils incubated and washed free of corticosteroids responded normally to chemoattractants, indicating that the inhibitory effect of these drugs was reversible. Hydrocortisone at 2 mg/ml inhibited random eosinophil migration, although this effect was not apparent at lower concentrations. Corticosteroids did not act as chemotactic factor inactivators and were not toxic as measured by trypan blue exclusion. Eosinophils obtained from donors who had received 40 mg of prednisone orally for four days showed normal chemotactic responses, probably reflecting the fact that the cells were washed free of plasma before testing. In contrast, incubation of eosinophils in plasma from donors who had received a 300-mg bolus of hydrocortisone induced 46.1±4.5% more inhibition of chemotaxis than did incubation in normal plasma. These results indicate that: (a) eosinophil adherence is transiently reduced following in vivo corticosteroid administration, (b) eosinophil chemotaxis is inhibited by both in vitro and in vivo administration of corticosteroids, and (c) the chemotaxis inhibiting effect is nontoxic, cell-directed, dose-dependent and reversible. Inhibition of eosinophil adherence and chemotaxis may in part explain how corticosteroids produce eosinopenia and decrease the local accumulation of eosinophils. PMID:7005265

  16. Integrin Activation States and Eosinophil Recruitment in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Mats W.; Mosher, Deane F.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophil arrest and recruitment to the airway in asthma are mediated, at least in part, by integrins. Eosinophils express α4β1, α6β1, αLβ2, αMβ2, αXβ2, αDβ2, and α4β7 integrins, which interact with counter-receptors on other cells or ligands in the extracellular matrix. Whether a given integrin-ligand pair mediates cell adhesion and migration depends on the activation state of the integrin. Integrins exist in an inactive bent, an intermediate-activity extended closed, and a high-activity extended open conformation. Integrin activation states can be monitored by conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Studies in mice indicate that both β1 and β2 integrins mediate eosinophil recruitment to the lung. In vitro studies indicate that α4β1 and αMβ2 are the principal integrins mediating eosinophil adhesion, including to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and the novel αMβ2 ligand periostin. In vivo, blood eosinophils have intermediate-activity β1 integrins, as judged by mAb N29, apparently resulting from eosinophil binding of P-selectin on the surface of activated platelets, and have a proportion of their β2 integrins in the intermediate conformation, as judged by mAb KIM-127, apparently due to exposure to low concentrations of interleukin-5 (IL-5). Airway eosinophils recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after segmental antigen challenge have high-activity β1 integrins and high-activity αMβ2 that does not require IL-5. Here we review information on how the activation states of eosinophil β1 and β2 integrins correlate with measurements of eosinophil recruitment and pulmonary function in asthma. Blood eosinophil N29 reactivity is associated with decreased lung function under various circumstances in non-severe asthma and KIM-127 with BAL eosinophil numbers, indicating that intermediate-activity α4β1 and αMβ2 of blood eosinophils are important for eosinophil arrest and consequently for recruitment and aspects of asthma. PMID:23554594

  17. Therapeutic Targeting of Eosinophil Adhesion and Accumulation in Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Baiula, Monica; Bedini, Andrea; Carbonari, Gioia; Dattoli, Samantha Deianira; Spampinato, Santi

    2012-01-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that eosinophils are important effectors of ocular allergy. Increased worldwide prevalence of allergic eye pathologies has stimulated the identification of novel drug targets, including eosinophils and adhesion molecules. Accumulation of eosinophils in the eye is a key event in the onset and maintenance of allergic inflammation and is mediated by different adhesion molecules. Antihistamines with multiple mechanisms of action can be effective during the early and late phases of allergic conjunctivitis by blocking the interaction between β1 integrins and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. Small molecule antagonists that target key elements in the process of eosinophil recruitment have been identified and reinforce the validity of α4β1 integrin as a therapeutic target. Glucocorticoids are among the most effective drugs for ocular allergy, but their use is limited by adverse effects. Novel dissociated glucocorticoids can prevent eosinophil accumulation and induce apoptosis of eosinophils, making them promising candidates for ophthalmic drugs. This article reviews recent understanding of the role of adhesion molecules in eosinophil recruitment in the inflamed conjunctiva along with effective treatments for allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:23271999

  18. Production of eosinophil chemoattractant activity by ovine gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Wildblood, Louise A; Kerr, Karen; Clark, Douglas A S; Cameron, Alisdair; Turner, Darryl G; Jones, Douglas G

    2005-08-15

    Eosinophilia is a well documented feature of helminth infections but the precise nature of the interaction between parasite and eosinophil remains an enigma. This paper describes experiments demonstrating that ruminant gastrointestinal trichostrongyles produce potent chemoattractant activity for ovine bone marrow-derived eosinophils in vitro. This activity was initially identified as a constituent of whole worm extracts of third and fourth larval (L3, L4), and adult stages of Teladorsagia circumcincta, and adult Haemonchus contortus. Similar activity was detected in excretory/secretory (E/S) material derived from live T. circumcincta L3. Subsequently, by adapting the assay technique to incorporate live worms directly into the system, it was shown that L3 of both T. circumcincta and H. contortus produced eosinophil chemoattractant activity. In contrast, neither whole worm extracts, or E/S preparations from mixed stages of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contained eosinophil chemoattractant activity, and there was no evidence of chemoattractant production by live C. elegans. The results described are challenging to the traditional dogma that eosinophils are host-protective effector cells, and raise the intriguing possibility that ovine nematodes actively encourage recruitment of eosinophils. Local eosinophil-mediated mucosal damage, comparable to that seen in the asthmatic lung, may then provide a permissive local microenvironment for the parasite. Moreover, if they prove important for pathogenicity, nematode chemoattractants could offer future potential as novel therapeutic targets. PMID:15982478

  19. Eosinophils In Health and Disease: The LIAR Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James J.; Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; McGarry, Michael P.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Lee, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    Discussions of eosinophils are often descriptions of end-stage effector cells with destructive capabilities mediated predominantly by released cytotoxic cationic granule proteins. Moreover, eosinophils in the medical literature are invariably associated with the pathologies linked with helminth infections or allergic diseases such as asthma. This has led to an almost fatalist view of eosinophil effector functions and associated therapeutic strategies targeting these cells that would make even William of Ockham proud - eosinophil effector functions have physiological consequences that increase patient morbidity/mortality and “the only good eosinophils are dead eosinophils”. Unfortunately, the strengths of dogmas are also their greatest weaknesses. Namely, while the repetitive proclamation of dogmatic concepts by authoritative sources (i.e., reviews, meeting proceedings, textbooks, etc.) builds consensus within the medical community and lower the entropies surrounding difficult issues, they often ignore not easily explained details and place diminished importance on alternative hypotheses. The goal of this perspective is two fold: (i) We will review recent observations regarding eosinophils and their activities as well as reinterpret earlier data as part of the synthesis of a new paradigm. In this paradigm, we hypothesize that eosinophils accumulate at unique sites in response to cell turnover or in response to local stem cell activity(ies). We further suggest that this accumulation is part of one or more mechanisms regulating tissue homeostasis. Specifically, instead of immune cells exclusively mediating innate host defense, we suggest that accumulating tissue eosinophils are actually regulators of Local Immunity And/or Remodeling/Repair in both health and disease - The LIAR Hypothesis; (ii) We want to be inflammatory (pun intended!) and challenge the currently common perspective of eosinophils as destructive end-stage effector cells. Our hope is to create more questions than we answer and provoke everyone to spend countless hours simply to prove us wrong! PMID:20447076

  20. Multidetector CT findings of calvarial eosinophilic granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Inci, Mehmet Fatih; Inci, Rahime; Ozkan, Fuat

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) is a well-recognised benign form of Langerhans-cell histiocytosis. The estimated incidence of EG is 3–4 per million of the population. More patients are children and adolescents between the ages of 1 and 15 years. The value of plain films in the diagnosis of the EG is limited and the extent of the disease is better defined by multidetector CT (MDCT) scanning. MDCT scan with multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstruction image of the skull and brain clearly demonstrates bone destruction and soft-tissue involvement of the tumour. In this article we present the MDCT imaging characteristics of EG of the skull and discuss the differential diagnosis of this rare lesion with reference to recent literatures. PMID:23704451

  1. Chronic eosinophilic pancreatitis and ulcerative colitis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Breider, M A; Kiely, R G; Edwards, J F

    1985-04-15

    A generalized debilitating disease in a horse was believed to be related to hypersensitivity to migrating strongyle larvae. The clinical signs included weight loss, diarrhea, and ulcers on all 4 coronary bands. The mare's condition deteriorated rapidly, so the mare was euthanatized and necropsied. The major histopathologic findings were chronic multifocal eosinophilic pancreatitis, hepatic portal fibrosis, biliary hyperplasia, and chronic ulcerative eosinophilic colitis. This case was similar to previously reported cases of chronic eosinophilic gastroenteritis in horses. Although the etiologic agent was not evident, the distribution and character of the lesions were consistent with a hypersensitivity response to migrating parasitic larvae, most probably Strongylus equinus. PMID:3997643

  2. An Overview of the Diagnosis and Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Manish B; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. The diagnosis requires esophageal biopsies demonstrating at least 15 eosinophils per high-powered field following a course of high-dose proton pump inhibitors. Management of EoE consists of the three Ds: drugs, dietary therapy, and esophageal dilation. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of EoE to include the role of emerging therapies. PMID:26986655

  3. Eosinophil granule cationic proteins regulate the classical pathway of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, J M; Edens, R E; Bell, C S; Gleich, G J

    1995-01-01

    Major basic protein, the primary constituent of eosinophil granules, regulates the alternative and classical pathways of complement. Major basic protein and other eosinophil granule cationic proteins, which are important in mediating tissue damage in allergic disease, regulate the alternative pathway by interfering with C3b interaction with factor B to assemble an alternative pathway C3 convertase. In the present study, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, as well as major basic protein, were examined for capacity to regulate the classical pathway. Eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and major basic protein inhibited formation of cell-bound classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a), causing 50% inhibition of complement-mediated lysis at about 0.19, 0.75 and 0.5 micrograms/10(7) cellular intermediates, respectively. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin had no activity on this pathway of complement. The eosinophil granule proteins were examined for activity on the formation of the membrane attack complex. Major basic protein and eosinophil cationic protein had no activity on terminal lysis. In contrast, eosinophil peroxidase inhibited lysis of EAC1,4b,2a,3b,5b, but had only minimal activity on later events in complement lysis. These polycations were then examined to determine the site(s) at which they regulated the early classical pathway. Eosinophil granule polycationic proteins: (1) reduced the Zmax at all time points but had only minimal effect on the Tmax during the formation of the classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a); (2) inhibited formation of EAC1,4b,2a proportional to C4 but independent of C2 concentration; (3) inhibited fluid phase formation of C1,4b,2a, as reflected by a decrease in C1-induced consumption of C2 over time; and (4) inhibited C1 activity over time without a direct effect on either C4 or C2. These observations suggest that polycations regulate the early classical pathway by interfering with C1 and may exert this activity in vivo. PMID:7750997

  4. Leukemia revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E P

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

  5. The leukemias: Epidemiologic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Linet, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Particularly geared to physicians and cancer researchers, this study of the epidemiology and etiology of leukemia analyzes the four major leukemia subtypes in terms of genetic and familial determinant factors and examines the incidence, distribution and frequency of reported leukemia clusters. Linet discusses the connection between other types of malignancies, their treatments, and the subsequent development of leukemia and evaluates the impact on leukemia onset of such environmental factors as radiation therapy, drugs, and occupational hazards.

  6. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Eosinophilic and Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Vatrella, Alessandro; Busceti, Maria Teresa; Gallelli, Luca; Calabrese, Cecilia; Terracciano, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous chronic disease of the airways, characterized by either predominant eosinophilic or neutrophilic, or even mixed eosinophilic/neutrophilic inflammatory patterns. Eosinophilic inflammation can be associated with the whole spectrum of asthma severity, ranging from mild-to-moderate to severe uncontrolled disease, whereas neutrophilic inflammation occurs mostly in more severe asthma. Eosinophilic asthma includes either allergic or nonallergic phenotypes underlying immune responses mediated by T helper (Th)2 cell-derived cytokines, whilst neutrophilic asthma is mostly dependent on Th17 cell-induced mechanisms. These immune-inflammatory profiles develop as a consequence of a functional impairment of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes, which promotes the activation of dendritic cells directing the differentiation of distinct Th cell subsets. The recent advances in the knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying asthmatic inflammation are contributing to the identification of novel therapeutic targets, potentially suitable for the implementation of future improvements in antiasthma pharmacologic treatments. PMID:25878402

  8. Time course of eosinophilic myocarditis visualized by CMR

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Kurt; Djavidani, Behrus; Buchner, Stefan; Poschenrieder, Florian; Heinicke, Norbert; Feuerbach, Stefan; Riegger, Günter; Luchner, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    We report the diagnostic potential of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) to visualize the time course of eosinophilic myocarditis upon successful treatment. A 50-year-old man was admitted with a progressive heart failure. Endomyocardial biopsies were taken from the left ventricle because of a white blood cell count of 17000/mm3 with 41% eosinophils. Histological evaluation revealed endomyocardial eosinophilic infiltration and areas of myocyte necrosis. The patient was diagnosed with hypereosinophilic myocarditis due to idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome. CMR-studies at presentation and a follow-up study 3 weeks later showed diffuse subendocardial LGE in the whole left ventricle. Upon treatment with steroids, CMR-studies revealed marked reduction of subendocardial LGE after 3 months in parallel with further clinical improvement. This case therefore highlights the clinical importance of CMR to visualize the extent of endomyocardial involvement in the diagnosis and treatment of eosinophilic myocarditis. PMID:18466607

  9. Diagnosis and management of eosinophilic asthma: a US perspective

    PubMed Central

    Walford, Hannah H; Doherty, Taylor A

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic asthma is now recognized as an important subphenotype of asthma based on the pattern of inflammatory cellular infiltrate in the airway. Eosinophilic asthma can be associated with increased asthma severity, atopy, late-onset disease, and steroid refractoriness. Induced sputum cell count is the gold standard for identifying eosinophilic inflammation in asthma although several noninvasive biomarkers, including fractional exhaled nitric oxide and periostin, are emerging as potential surrogates. As novel therapies and biologic agents become increasingly available, there is an increased need for specific phenotype-directed treatment strategies. Greater recognition and understanding of the unique immunopathology of this asthma phenotype has important implications for management of the disease and the potential to improve patient outcomes. The present review provides a summary of the clinical features, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of eosinophilic asthma. PMID:24748808

  10. UNUSUAL EOSINOPHILIC GRANULE CELL PROLIFERATION IN COHO SALMON (ONCHORHYNCHUS KISUTCH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proliferative lesions comprised of eosinophilic granule cells (EGCs) extended throughout the gastrointestinal tract of several mature, spawning coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum). istological examination of the tumour showed extensive proliferation and infiltration of EGC...

  11. Role of tissue eosinophils in oral Leukoplakia: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Madhura, MG; Gajalakshmi, S; Kumar, B Veerendra; Suma, S; Sarita, Y; Shweta, RD

    2015-01-01

    Context: Tissue eosinophilia in oral squamous cell carcinoma has been well - recognized. Studies have reported both favorable and unfavorable prognoses associated with tissue eosinophils in oral squamous cell carcinoma. However, the role of eosinophils in the development of tumor is still unclear. Aims: The present study was an attempt to elucidate the potential role of tissue eosinophils in oral leukoplakia, a potentially malignant lesion. Settings and Design: To count eosinophils in tissues of normal subjects and oral leukoplakia cases. To compare tissue eosinophil count (TEC) between normal and oral leukoplakia cases. To compare TEC between dysplastic and non-dysplastic cases of oral leukoplakia and to correlate with degree of epithelial dysplasia. Materials and Methods: A total of 85 cases (59 cases of oral leukoplakia and 26 normal oral tissues) constituted the study material. Tissue eosinophils were counted in 10 different high- power fields. Statistical Analysis Used: Non-parametric tests (Mann-Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney post hoc analysis and Spearman's correlation statistics). Results: Mean eosinophil count (MEC) in oral leukoplakia cases was significantly more when compared to normal subjects. MEC in dysplastic cases of oral leukoplakia was significantly more when compared to those without epithelial dysplasia (Mann-Whitney U-test). Furthermore, MEC was directly proportional to the degree of epithelial dysplasia (Spearman's correlation statistics). Conclusions: TEC may be used as an adjunct to predict the malignant transformation of dysplastic cases of oral leukoplakia. Eosinophilic infiltration in oral dysplastic cases should prompt a thorough evaluation for invasiveness, especially when features of invasion are absent or suspected in smaller biopsy specimens. Use of TEC as a prognostic indicator demands larger sample size and mandates long-term follow-up. PMID:26980954

  12. [Eosinophilic gastroenteritis and colitis in pediatric patients: Increasingly frequent diseases].

    PubMed

    Lemale, J; Dainese, L; Tounian, P

    2015-07-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by no specific digestive symptoms associated with dense eosinophilic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of known causes for such tissue eosinophilia. Among these diseases, eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) and colitis (EC) are less common than esophagitis, but their incidence and prevalence have been increasing over the past decade due in part to increased disease recognition. The exact pathophysiology is not clear: EGE and EC are immune-mediated diseases implicating adaptive T-helper cell type 2 immunity. According to the site of eosinophilic infiltration, there is a wide spectrum of digestive symptoms ranging from food refusal, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, weight loss, gastrointestinal bleeding (anemia), protein loosing enteropathy, ascites, bowel obstruction or perforation for EGE and diarrhea ± bleeding for CE. Endoscopic lesions are not specific: friability, erythematous mucosa with superficial erosions, or ulceration is often observed. Histologically, markedly increased numbers of mucosal eosinophils are seen in biopsy specimens. However, no standards for the diagnosis of EGE or CE exist and few findings support the diagnosis: intraepithelial eosinophils, eosinophil crypt abscesses, and eosinophils in muscularis mucosa and/or submucosa. Other organs are not involved. The other causes of tissue eosinophilia (infections, inflammatory bowel diseases) should be excluded. Food allergy appears to play a central role in driving inflammation in EGE and CE, as evidenced by symptomatic improvement with initiation of food exclusion or elemental diets. Dietary treatment should be the first therapeutic option in children. If the elimination diet fails, corticosteroids are currently the best characterized treatment but appropriate duration is unknown and relapses are frequent. In severe forms, immunomodulators or biologic agents (anti-IL5, anti-IgE, or anti-TNFa) can potentially play a role in the treatment of EGE and CE. PMID:26051270

  13. Bactericidal Activity of Human Eosinophilic Granulocytes against Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Terese; Andersson, Pia; Bodelsson, Mikael; Laurell, Martin; Malm, Johan; Egesten, Arne

    2001-01-01

    Eosinophils participate in allergic inflammation and may have roles in the body's defense against helminthic infestation. Even under noninflammatory conditions, eosinophils are present in the mucosa of the large intestine, where large numbers of gram-negative bacteria reside. Therefore, roles for eosinophils in host defenses against bacterial invasion are possible. In a system for bacterial viable counts, the bactericidal activity of eosinophils and the contribution of different cellular antibacterial systems against Escherichia coli were investigated. Eosinophils showed a rapid and efficient killing of E. coli under aerobic conditions, whereas under anaerobic conditions bacterial killing decreased dramatically. In addition, diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), an inhibitor of the NADPH oxidase and thereby of superoxide production, also significantly inhibited bacterial killing. The inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) production l-N5-(1-iminoethyl)-ornithine dihydrochloride did not affect the killing efficiency, suggesting that NO or derivatives thereof are of minor importance under the experimental conditions used. To investigate the involvement of superoxide and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) in bacterial killing, EPO was blocked by azide. The rate of E. coli killing decreased significantly in the presence of azide, whereas addition of DPI did not further decrease the killing, suggesting that superoxide acts in conjunction with EPO. Bactericidal activity was seen in eosinophil extracts containing granule proteins, indicating that oxygen-independent killing may be of importance as well. The findings suggest that eosinophils can participate in host defense against gram-negative bacterial invasion and that oxygen-dependent killing, i.e., superoxide acting in conjunction with EPO, may be the most important bactericidal effector function of these cells. PMID:11349018

  14. Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Leukemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Leukemia Print A A A ... Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Leucemia About Leukemia The term leukemia refers to cancers of the ...

  15. Inhibitory action of quercetin on eosinophil activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sakai-Kashiwabara, Misako; Asano, Kazuhito

    2013-01-01

    The influence of quercetin on eosinophil functions was examined in vitro and in vivo. The first set of experiments was undertaken to examine whether quercetin could suppress eosinophilia and IgE hyperproduction induced by Mesocestoides corti infection in BALB/c mice. The number of peripheral blood eosinophils and IgE levels were examined 21 days after infection. Oral administration of quercetin for 21 days could not suppress both peripheral blood eosinophilia and IgE hyperproduction, even when 20.0 mg/kg quercetin was used for treatment. The second part of the experiment was designed to examine the influence of quercetin on eosinophil activation induced by SCF stimulation in vitro. Eosinophils were obtained from M. corti-infected mice and stimulated with SCF in the presence of various concentrations of quercetin for 24 h. The addition of quercetin into cell cultures could suppress eosinophil activation induced by SCF stimulation as assessed by measuring the contents of RANTES, MIP-1 β , ECP, and MBP in culture supernatants. The minimum concentration of quercetin which caused significant suppression of factor secretion was 5.0  μ M. These results may suggest that quercetin will be a good candidate for the supplement on the management of eosinophil-mediated diseases, such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. PMID:23840245

  16. Radiogenic leukemia revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Moloney, W.C.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced leukemia is considered to be similar to the de novo disease. However, following an analysis of clinical and hematological findings in leukemia occurring in irradiated cervical cancer patients, adult Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, and spondylitics treated with x-ray, striking differences were noted. Acute leukemias in cervical cancer patients and Japanese survivors were similar in type to acute de novo leukemias in adults. Cell types among spondylitics were very dissimilar; rare forms, eg, acute erythromyelocytic leukemia (AEL) and acute megakaryocytic leukemia, were increased. Pancytopenia occurred in 25 of 35 cases and erythromyelodysplastic disorders were noted in seven of 35 acute cases. The leukemias and myelodysplastic disorders closely resembled those occurring in patients treated with alkylating agents. This similarity suggests a common pathogenesis involving marrow stem cell injury and extra-medullary mediators of hematopoiesis. Investigation of early acute leukemias and myelodysplastic disorders with newer techniques may provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of leukemia in humans.

  17. Human vs. Mouse Eosinophils: “That which we call an eosinophil, by any other name would stain as red”

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James J.; Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; Ochkur, Sergei I; McGarry, Michael P.; Condjella, Rachel M.; Doyle, Alfred D.; Luo, Huijun; Zellner, Katie R.; Protheroe, Cheryl A.; Willetts, Lian; LeSuer, William E.; Colbert, Dana C.; Helmers, Richard A.; Lacy, Paige; Moqbel, Redwan; Lee, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    The respective life histories of humans and mice are well defined and describe a unique story of evolutionary conservation extending from sequence identity within the genome to the underpinnings of biochemical, cellular, and physiological pathways. As a consequence, the hematopoietic lineages of both species are invariantly maintained, each with identifiable eosinophils. This canonical presence nonetheless does not preclude disparities between human and mouse eosinophils and/or their effector functions. Indeed, many books and reviews dogmatically highlight differences, providing a rationale to discount the use of mouse models of human eosinophilic diseases. We suggest that this perspective is parochial and ignores the wealth of available studies and the consensus of the literature that overwhelming similarities (and not differences) exist between human and mouse eosinophils. The goal of this review is to summarize this literature and in some cases provide the experimental details, comparing and contrasting eosinophils and eosinophil effector functions in humans vs. mice. In particular, our review will provide a summation and an easy to use reference guide to important studies demonstrating that while differences exist, more often than not their consequences are unknown and do not necessarily reflect inherent disparities in eosinophil function, but instead, species-specific variations. The conclusion from this overview is that despite nominal differences, the vast similarities between human and mouse eosinophils provide important insights as to their roles in health and disease and, in turn, demonstrate the unique utility of mouse-based studies with an expectation of valid extrapolation to the understanding and treatment of patients. PMID:22935586

  18. RECOGNITION OF FUNGAL PROTEASE ACTIVITIES INDUCES CELLULAR ACTIVATION AND EOSINOPHIL-DERIVED NEUROTOXIN RELEASE IN HUMAN EOSINOPHILS1

    PubMed Central

    Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Wada, Kota; White, Thomas A.; Benson, Linda M.; Charlesworth, M. Cristine; Checkel, James L.; Inoue, Yoshinari; Hotta, Kyoko; Ponikau, Jens U; Lawrence, Christopher B.; Kita, Hirohito

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma and in immunity to certain organisms. Associations between exposure to an environmental fungus, such as Alternaria, and asthma have been recognized clinically. Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein-coupled receptors that are cleaved and activated by serine proteases, but their roles in innate immunity remain unknown. We previously found that human eosinophils respond vigorously to Alternaria organisms and to the secretory product(s) of Alternaria with eosinophils releasing their pro-inflammatory mediators. Herein, we investigated the roles of protease(s) produced by Alternaria and of PARs expressed on eosinophils in their immune responses against fungal organisms. We found that Alternaria alternata produces aspartate protease(s) and that human peripheral blood eosinophils degranulate in response to the cell-free extract of A. alternata. Eosinophils showed an increased intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in response to Alternaria that was desensitized by peptide and protease ligands for PAR-2 and inhibited by a PAR-2 antagonistic peptide. Alternaria-derived aspartate protease(s) cleaved PAR-2 to expose “neo-ligands”; these neo-ligands activated eosinophil degranulation in the absence of proteases. Finally, treatment of Alternaria extract with aspartate protease inhibitors, which are conventionally used for HIV-1 and other microbes, attenuated the eosinophils’ responses to Alternaria. Thus, fungal aspartate protease and eosinophil PAR-2 appear critical for the eosinophils’ innate immune response to certain fungi, suggesting a novel mechanism for pathologic inflammation in asthma and for host-pathogen interaction. PMID:19864598

  19. Diagnosis and classification of eosinophilic fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Pinal-Fernandez, I; Selva-O' Callaghan, A; Grau, J M

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) is a rare scleroderma-like syndrome with an unknown etiology and pathogenesis that should be considered an immune-allergic disorder. Painful swelling with progressive induration and thickening of the skin and soft tissues of the limbs and trunk are the clinical hallmarks of the disease. Peripheral blood eosinophilia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate are the main laboratory findings. Full-thickness wedge biopsy of the clinically affected skin showing inflammation and thickening of deep fascia is essential to establish the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes systemic sclerosis and other scleroderma subsets such as morphea, and epidemic fasciitis syndromes caused by toxic agents such as the myalgia-eosinophilia syndrome and toxic oil syndrome. Peripheral T cell lymphomas should also be ruled out. The diagnosis of EF can be established by clinical, laboratory and histological findings, but universally accepted international diagnostic criteria are lacking. Corticosteroids are efficacious and remain the standard therapy for EF, although some patients may improve spontaneously. PMID:24424187

  20. Eosinophils and mast cells in leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Nilda E; Wilson, Mary E

    2014-08-01

    Leishmania spp. are parasitic protozoa endemic in tropical and subtropical regions and the causative agent of leishmaniasis, a collection of syndromes whose clinical manifestations vary according to host and pathogen factors. Leishmania spp. are inoculated into the mammalian host by the bite of an infected sand fly, whereupon they are taken up by phagocytosis, convert into the replicative amastigote stage within macrophages, reproduce, spread to new macrophages and cause disease manifestations. A curative response against leishmaniasis depends in the classical activation of macrophages and the IL-12-dependent onset of an adaptive type 1 response characterized by the production of IFN-γ. Emerging evidence suggests that neutrophils, dendritic cells and other immune cells can serve as either temporary or stable hosts for Leishmania spp. Furthermore, it is becoming apparent that the initial interactions of the parasite with resident or early recruited immune cells can shape both the macrophage response and the type of adaptive immune response being induced. In this review, we compile a growing number of studies demonstrating how the earliest interactions of Leishmania spp. with eosinophils and mast cells influence the macrophage response to infection and the development of the adaptive immune response, hence, determining the ultimate outcome of infection. PMID:24838146

  1. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: An Evidence-Based Approach to Therapy.

    PubMed

    González-Cervera, J; Lucendo, A J

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses have evaluated the efficacy of the various therapeutic options available for treating patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, including dietary modifications, proton pump inhibitors, topical corticosteroids, and endoscopic esophageal dilation. Proton pump inhibitors are currently considered the first-line treatment for eosinophilic esophagitis, achieving histological remission and improvement of symptoms in 50.5% and 60.8% of patients, respectively. The efficacy of topical corticosteroids in eosinophilic esophagitis has been assessed in several trials. Meta-analyses summarizing results indicate that budesonide and fluticasone propionate are significantly superior to placebo, both in decreasing eosinophil densities in the esophageal mucosa and in relieving symptoms. However, owing to differences in drug delivery, viscous budesonide seems to be the best pharmacological therapy for eosinophilic esophagitis. Results for dietary modifications have been mixed depending on the type of diet prescribed. Thus, while exclusive amino acid-based elemental diets are the most effective in inducing histological remission of eosinophilic esophagitis (90.8%), their severe drawbacks limit their implementation in clinical practice. Allergy testing-based food elimination provides a suboptimal remission rate of 45.5%, although this is lower in adults than in children (32.2% vs 47.9%, respectively). In addition, the various available studies are highly heterogeneous. Empirical 6-food elimination diets were shown to be the best diet-based therapy, with a homogeneous remission rate of 72%. Simpler, more convenient empirical schemes have also been evaluated. The aim of this review is to provide an evidence-based overview on the efficacy of the options available for treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis along with a practical management algorithm. PMID:27012011

  2. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  3. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Message from Louis J. DeGennaro, PhD President and CEO of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society The Leukemia & Lymphoma ... While it is clear that FCR is the best treatment for CLL patients with del(11q), the ...

  4. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

    MedlinePlus

    CLL; Leukemia - chronic lymphocytic (CLL) ... Byrd JC, Flynn JM. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  5. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  6. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  7. An overview of chronic myeloid leukemia and its animal models.

    PubMed

    Ma, WeiXu; Ma, Ning; Chen, XiaoHui; Zhang, YiYue; Zhang, WenQing

    2015-12-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a form of leukemia characterized by the presence of clonal bone marrow stem cells with the proliferation of mature granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) and their precursors. CML is a type of myeloproliferative disease associated with a characteristic chromosomal translocation called the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome or t (9;22) translocation (BCR-ABL). CML is now usually treated with targeted drugs called tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The mechanism and natural history of CML is still unclear. Here, we summarize the present CML animal disease models and compare them with each other. Meanwhile, we propose that it is a very wise choice to establish zebrafish (Danio rerio) CML model mimics clinical CML. This model could be used to learn more about the mechanism of CML, and to aid in the development of new drugs to treat CML. PMID:26582013

  8. Tribbles in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kai Ling; Rishi, Loveena; Keeshan, Karen

    2013-05-23

    There is growing research interest in the mammalian Tribbles (Trib) family of serine/threonine pseudokinases and their oncogenic association with acute leukemias. This review is to understand the role of Trib genes in hematopoietic malignancies and their potential as targets for novel therapeutic strategies in acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We discuss the role of Tribs as central signaling mediators in different subtypes of acute leukemia and propose that inhibition of dysregulated Trib signaling may be therapeutically beneficial. PMID:23550039

  9. Does eosinophilic COPD exacerbation have a better patient outcome than non-eosinophilic in the intensive care unit?

    PubMed Central

    Saltürk, Cüneyt; Karakurt, Zuhal; Adiguzel, Nalan; Kargin, Feyza; Sari, Rabia; Celik, M Emin; Takir, Huriye Berk; Tuncay, Eylem; Sogukpinar, Ozlem; Ciftaslan, Nezihe; Mocin, Ozlem; Gungor, Gokay; Oztas, Selahattin

    2015-01-01

    Background COPD exacerbations requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission have a major impact on morbidity and mortality. Only 10%–25% of COPD exacerbations are eosinophilic. Aim To assess whether eosinophilic COPD exacerbations have better outcomes than non-eosinophilic COPD exacerbations in the ICU. Methods This retrospective observational cohort study was conducted in a thoracic, surgery-level III respiratory ICU of a tertiary teaching hospital for chest diseases from 2013 to 2014. Subjects previously diagnosed with COPD and who were admitted to the ICU with acute respiratory failure were included. Data were collected electronically from the hospital database. Subjects’ characteristics, complete blood count parameters, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), delta NLR (admission minus discharge), C-reactive protein (CRP) on admission to and discharge from ICU, length of ICU stay, and mortality were recorded. COPD subjects were grouped according to eosinophil levels (>2% or ≤2%) (group 1, eosinophilic; group 2, non-eosinophilic). These groups were compared with the recorded data. Results Over the study period, 647 eligible COPD subjects were enrolled (62 [40.3% female] in group 1 and 585 [33.5% female] in group 2). Group 2 had significantly higher C-reactive protein, neutrophils, NLR, delta NLR, and hemoglobin, but a lower lymphocyte, monocyte, and platelet count than group 1, on admission to and discharge from the ICU. Median (interquartile range) length of ICU stay and mortality in the ICU in groups 1 and 2 were 4 days (2–7 days) vs 6 days (3–9 days) (P<0.002), and 12.9% vs 24.9% (P<0.034), respectively. Conclusion COPD exacerbations with acute respiratory failure requiring ICU admission had a better outcome with a peripheral eosinophil level >2%. NLR and peripheral eosinophilia may be helpful indicators for steroid and antibiotic management. PMID:26392758

  10. Advances in Clinical Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.; Liacouras, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    EoE is a chronic immune/antigen-mediated clinicopathologic condition that has become an increasingly important cause of upper gastrointestinal morbidity in adults and children over the past 2 decades. It is diagnosed based on symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, the presence of at least 15 eosinophils/high-power field in esophageal biopsies, and exclusion of competing causes of esophageal eosinophilia, including proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). We review what we have recently learned about the clinical aspects of EoE, discussing the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of EoE in adults and children. We explain the current diagnostic criteria and challenges to diagnosis, including the role of gastroesophageal reflux disease and PPI-REE. It is also important to consider the epidemiology of EoE (current incidence of 1/10,000 new cases per year and prevalence of 0.5-1/1,000 cases per year) and disease progression. We review the main treatment approaches and new treatment options; EoE can be treated with topical corticosteroids such as fluticasone and budesonide, or dietary strategies, such as amino acid-based formulas, allergy test-directed elimination diets, and non-directed empiric elimination diets. Endoscopic dilation has also become an important tool for treatment of fibrostenostic complications of EoE. There are number of unresolved issues in EoE, including phenotypes, optimal treatment endpoints, the role of maintenance therapy, and treatment of refractory EoE. The care of patients with EoE and the study of the disease span many disciplines—EoE is ideally managed by a multidisciplinary team of gastroenterologists, allergists, pathologists, and dieticians. PMID:25109885

  11. Integrins are Mechanosensors That Modulate Human Eosinophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzai, Mustafa; Small, Mike; Sehmi, Roma; Gauvreau, Gail; Janssen, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophil migration to the lung is primarily regulated by the eosinophil-selective family of eotaxin chemokines, which mobilize intracellular calcium (Ca2+) and orchestrate myriad changes in cell structure and function. Eosinophil function is also known to be flow-dependent, although the molecular cognate of this mechanical response has yet to be adequately characterized. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy, we determined the effects of fluid shear stress on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human peripheral blood eosinophils by perfusing cells in a parallel-plate flow chamber. Our results indicate that fluid perfusion evokes a calcium response that leads to cell flattening, increase in cell area, shape change, and non-directional migration. None of these changes are seen in the absence of a flow stimulus, and all are blocked by chelation of intracellular Ca2+ using BAPTA. These changes are enhanced by stimulating the cells with eotaxin-1. The perfusion-induced calcium response (PICR) could be blocked by pre-treating cells with selective (CDP-323) and non-selective (RGD tripeptides) integrin receptor antagonists, suggesting that α4β7/α4β1 integrins mediate this response. Overall, our study provides the first pharmacological description of a molecular mechanosensor that may collaborate with the eotaxin-1 signaling program in order to control human eosinophil activation. PMID:26539194

  12. Eosinophilic Colitis: University of Minnesota Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B.; MacDonald, Jennifer E.; Kwaan, Mary R.; Shepela, Christopher; Madoff, Robert; Jessurun, Jose; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophilic colitis is a rare form of primary eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease that is poorly understood. Neonates and young adults are more frequently affected. Clinical presentation is highly variable depending on the depth of inflammatory response (mucosal, transmural, or serosal). The pathophysiology of eosinophilic colitis is unclear but is suspected to be related to a hypersensitivity reaction given its correlation with other atopic disorders and clinical response to corticosteroid therapy. Diagnosis is that of exclusion and differential diagnoses are many because colonic tissue eosinophilia may occur with other colitides (parasitic, drug-induced, inflammatory bowel disease, and various connective tissue disorders). Similar to other eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders, steroid-based therapy and diet modification achieve very good and durable responses. In this paper, we present our experience with this rare pathology. Five patients (3 pediatric and 2 adults) presented with diarrhea and hematochezia. Mean age at presentation was 26 years. Mean duration of symptoms before pathologic diagnosis was 8 months. Mean eosinophil count per patient was 31 per high-power field. The pediatric patients responded very well to dietary modifications, with no recurrences. The adult patients were treated with steroids and did not respond. Overall mean followup was 22 (range, 248) months. PMID:21837236

  13. Eosinophilic esophagitis: New insights in pathogenesis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cicala, Michele; Behar, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinico-pathological entity with esophageal symptoms and dense esophageal eosinophilic infiltration throughout the esophagus that may persist despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. This eosinophilic infiltration is usually absent in the stomach, small intestine and colon, although there are a number of reports of patients with a multi-organ involvement. EoE is associated with abnormalities involving TH2-dependent immunity, with multiple environmental factors strongly contributing to disease expression. The layer of the esophagus affected by the eosinophilic infiltration causes the specific symptoms. Esophageal involvement results mostly in dysphagia for solids that can be severe enough to cause recurrent esophageal obstruction with typical endoscopic features suggesting esophageal remodeling and pathological changes of eosinophilic infiltration of the mucosa, sub-epithelial fibrosis and muscle hypertrophy. This disease is frequently associated with other allergic conditions such as allergic asthma, allergic dermatitis and eosinophilia. The treatment of patients with EoE depends on the severity of the symptoms and of the inflammatory process as well as to their response to a gradual step-up treatment. The first line of treatment consists of steroid containing local inhalers. If unresponsive they are then treated with oral steroids. Intravenous interleukin blockers seem to have a consistent positive therapeutic effect. PMID:26855813

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis: A newly established cause of dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Brian M; Shaffer, Eldon A

    2006-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis has rapidly become a recognized entity causing dysphagia in young adults. This review summarizes the current knowledge of eosinophilic esophagitis including the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, treatment, and prognosis. An extensive search of PubMed/Medline (1966-December 2005) for available English literature in humans for eosinophilic esophagitis was completed. Appropriate articles listed in the bibliographies were also attained. The estimated incidence is 43/105 in children and 2.5/105 in adults. Clinically, patients have a long history of intermittent solid food dysphagia or food impaction. Some have a history of atopy. Subtle endoscopic features may be easily overlooked, including a “feline” or corrugated esophagus with fine rings, a diffusely narrowed esophagus that may have proximal strictures, the presence of linear furrows, adherent white plaques, or a friable (crepe paper) mucosa, prone to tearing with minimal contact. Although no pathologic consensus has been established, a histologic diagnosis is critical. The accep-ted criteria are a dense eosinophilic infiltrate (>20/high power field) within the superficial esophageal mucosa. In contrast, the esophagitis associated with acid reflux disease can also possess eosinophils but they are fewer in number. Once the diagnosis is established, treatment options may include specific food avoidance, topical corticosteroids, systemic corticosteroids, leukotriene inhibitors, or biologic treatment. The long-term prognosis of EE is uncertain; however available data suggests a benign, albeit inconvenient, course. With increasing recognition, this entity is taking its place as an established cause of solid food dysphagia. PMID:16688820

  15. Eosinophilic Myocarditis due to Toxocariasis: Not a Rare Cause

    PubMed Central

    Shibazaki, Shunichi; Eguchi, Shunsuke; Endo, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Tadamasa; Araki, Makoto; Gu, Yoshiaki; Imai, Taku; Asano, Kouji; Taniuchi, Norihide

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is a clinically important disease because of the high mortality. From the perspective of treatment strategy, eosinophilic myocarditis should be distinguished from other types of myocarditis. Toxocariasis, caused by Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati, is known as a cause of eosinophilic myocarditis but is considered rare. As it is an unpopular disease, eosinophilic myocarditis due to toxocariasis may be underdiagnosed. We experienced two cases of eosinophilic myocarditis due to toxocariasis from different geographical areas in quick succession between 2013 and 2014. Case 1 is 32-year-old man. Case 2 is 66-year-old woman. In both cases, diagnosis was done by endomyocardial biopsy and IgG-ELISA against Toxocara excretory-secretory antigen. Only a corticosteroid was used in Case  1, whereas a corticosteroid and albendazole were used in Case  2 as induction therapy. Both patients recovered. Albendazole was also used in Case  1 to prevent recurrence after induction therapy. Eosinophilic myocarditis by toxocariasis may in actuality not be a rare disease, and corticosteroid is an effective drug as induction therapy even before use of albendazole. PMID:27123346

  16. Can We Determine Appropriate Foods to Eliminate to Treat Eosinophilic Esophagitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat Eosinophilic Esophagitis? Share | Can we determine appropriate foods to eliminate to treat Eosinophilic Esophagitis? Published Online: ... not normally present. The disease is due to food allergies in almost all pediatric patients, but standard ...

  17. Indigenous enteric eosinophils control DCs to initiate a primary Th2 immune response in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Derek K.; Jimenez-Saiz, Rodrigo; Verschoor, Christopher P.; Walker, Tina D.; Goncharova, Susanna; Llop-Guevara, Alba; Shen, Pamela; Gordon, Melissa E.; Barra, Nicole G.; Bassett, Jennifer D.; Kong, Joshua; Fattouh, Ramzi; McCoy, Kathy D.; Bowdish, Dawn M.; Erjefält, Jonas S.; Pabst, Oliver; Humbles, Alison A.; Kolbeck, Roland; Waserman, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils natively inhabit the small intestine, but a functional role for them there has remained elusive. Here, we show that eosinophil-deficient mice were protected from induction of Th2-mediated peanut food allergy and anaphylaxis, and Th2 priming was restored by reconstitution with il4+/+ or il4−/− eosinophils. Eosinophils controlled CD103+ dendritic cell (DC) activation and migration from the intestine to draining lymph nodes, events necessary for Th2 priming. Eosinophil activation in vitro and in vivo led to degranulation of eosinophil peroxidase, a granule protein whose enzymatic activity promoted DC activation in mice and humans in vitro, and intestinal and extraintestinal mouse DC activation and mobilization to lymph nodes in vivo. Further, eosinophil peroxidase enhanced responses to ovalbumin seen after immunization. Thus, eosinophils can be critical contributors to the intestinal immune system, and granule-mediated shaping of DC responses can promote both intestinal and extraintestinal adaptive immunity. PMID:25071163

  18. Recent Progress in the Research of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Oshima, Naoki; Mikami, Hironobu; Okimoto, Eiko; Jiao, Di Jin; Ishihara, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and gastroenteritis are allergic gastrointestinal diseases mainly caused by food allergens. The number of patients with EoE is rapidly increasing in both Western and Asian countries. Basic knowledge of these diseases has mainly come from studies of EoE and Th2 type allergic reactions, including IL-5, IL-13, and IL-15, thymic stromal protein, and eotaxin 3, which are considered to have important roles. For a diagnosis of EoE, endoscopic abnormalities and histological confirmation of dense eosinophile infiltration in the esophageal epithelial layer are important, in addition to identifying dysphagia symptoms. As for eosinophilic gastroenteritis, blood test findings are more useful and the role of an endoscopic examination is reduced. For both diseases, the infection rate of Helicobacter pylori is lower than in healthy controls. Glucocorticoid administration is standard treatment for these diseases, while proton pump inhibitors are frequently effective for EoE. PMID:26789117

  19. Eosinophilic pancreatitis: Three case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, LIN; FU, PENG; DONG, XIANGHUI; QI, JIPING; ZHU, HONG

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic pancreatitis (EP) is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis characterized by localized or diffuse eosinophilic infiltration of the pancreas and elevated serum immunoglobulin E levels. EP is difficult to distinguish from pancreatic cancer on the basis of clinical symptoms and the results of auxiliary examination alone. A retrospective analysis of the clinicopathological characteristics and laboratory, imaging, and pathology results of 3 patients with EP, who were initially diagnosed with pancreatic malignancy, was performed. EP is an allergic disease with non-specific clinical manifestations that is difficult to distinguish from pancreatic cancer based exclusively on clinical symptoms and auxiliary examination, resulting in the need for invasive procedures to confirm the diagnosis. An increase in the eosinophil count in the peripheral blood and pathological examination are essential for the diagnosis of EP. PMID:27073662

  20. Eosinophilic ulcer of the tongue--Case report.

    PubMed

    Didona, Dario; Paolino, Giovanni; Donati, Michele; Didona, Biagio; Calvieri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa is a rare, self-limiting, chronic and benign lesion of unknown pathogenesis that affects the oral mucosa. We present the case of a 65 year-old Caucasian female with a five month history of a painful ulcer on the lateral side of her tongue. The ulcer was not adhered to the underlying structures and there was no evidence of regional lymph node involvement. Laboratory examinations and X-rays revealed no abnormalities. Topical treatments had been performed without any improvement. Histopathological examination showed an ulcerated surface and mixed inflammatory infiltrate with several eosinophils extending into the mucosa and submucosa. No cellular atypia was observed. Based on the patient-s history and mucosal biopsy, a final diagnosis of eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa was made. PMID:26312683

  1. Diagnostic approach to eosinophilic oesophagitis: Pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Schoepfer, Alain

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) has first been described a little over 20 years ago. EoE has been defined by a panel of international experts as a "chronic, immune/antigen-mediated, oesophageal disease, characterized clinically by symptoms related to oesophageal dysfunction and histologically by eosinophil-predominant inflammation". A value of ≥ 15 eosinophils has been defined as histologic diagnostic cutoff. Other conditions associated with oesophageal eosinophilia, such as gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia, or Crohn's disease should be excluded before EoE can be diagnosed. This review highlights the latest insights regarding the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of EoE. PMID:26552777

  2. Eosinophilic Coronary Periarteritis with Arterial Dissection: The Mast Cell Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rakesh; Brooks, Erin G; Corliss, Robert F

    2015-07-01

    A subset of coronary arterial dissections is associated with eosinophilic coronary periarteritis (ECPA); however, the pathogenesis of the process remains unclear. Mast cells normally reside in coronary arterial adventitia and are known mediators of eosinophilic inflammatory conditions such as type I hypersensitivity reactions. We report two cases in which coronary arterial dissection with ECPA was detected at autopsy. Tryptase, CD68, CD4, CD8, and CD1a immunohistochemical staining was performed to better characterize inflammation. While eosinophils represented a prominent periadventitial inflammatory cell, there were slightly more lymphocytes: CD4/CD8 ratios were within expected reference ranges. There were moderate numbers of macrophages, and few neutrophils or dendritic cells. Numbers of mast cells in dissected versus nondissected sections were compared: adventitial mast cell densities were threefold higher in dissected portions and showed a trend toward increased degranulation. These findings suggest that mast cells may play a role in orchestrating inflammation in cases of ECPA. PMID:25771824

  3. Childhood-onset eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis: a rare childhood vasculitis mimicking anthrax and eosinophilic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Sezgin; Adrovic, Amra; Barut, Kenan; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy previously misdiagnosed as having cutaneous anthrax was referred with a 2-month history of multiple wide and deep ulceronecrotic lesions in the lower extremities, which occurred after contact with animals. Skin biopsy was compatible with vasculitis. Further examination at our hospital elicited eosinophilia and a history of asthma. On the second day of hospitalisation, he developed deep vein thrombosis. A diagnosis of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) was established and intravenous methylprednisolone was administered. The patient showed remarkable improvement of the cutaneous lesions. Diagnosis of EGPA is challenging in the vasculitic phase and necessitates a detailed history that specifically questions the patient for an asthma background. This case illustrates a severe cutaneous presentation of EGPA and emphasises the difficulty of diagnosis as a result of overlapped signs and symptoms with cutaneous anthrax and leukaemia. EGPA should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions associated with eosinophilia. PMID:26887883

  4. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors on eosinophils. Binding and functional studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yukawa, T.; Ukena, D.; Kroegel, C.; Chanez, P.; Dent, G.; Chung, K.F.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    We have studied the binding characteristics and functional effects of beta-adrenoceptors on human and guinea pig eosinophils. We determined the binding of the beta-antagonist radioligand (125I)pindolol (IPIN) to intact eosinophils obtained from the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs and from blood of patients with eosinophilia. Specific binding was saturable, and Scatchard analysis showed a single binding site with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 24.6 pM and maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 7,166 per cell. ICI 118,551, a beta 2-selective antagonist, inhibited IPIN binding with a Ki value of 0.28 nM and was approximately 5,000-fold more effective than the beta 1-selective antagonist, atenolol. Isoproterenol increased cAMP levels about 5.5-fold above basal levels (EC50 = 25 microM); albuterol, a beta 2-agonist, behaved as a partial agonist with a maximal stimulation of 80%. Binding to human eosinophils gave similar results with a Kd of 25.3 pM and a Bmax corresponding to 4,333 sites per cell. Incubation of both human and guinea pig eosinophils with opsonized zymosan (2 mg/ml) or with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (10(-8) and 10(-6) M) resulted in superoxide anion generation and the release of eosinophil peroxidase; albuterol (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) had no inhibitory effect on the release of these products. Thus, eosinophils from patients with eosinophilia and from the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs possess beta-receptors of the beta 2-subtype that are coupled to adenylate cyclase; however, these receptors do not modulate oxidative metabolism or degranulation. The possible therapeutic consequences of these observations to asthma are discussed.

  5. Unsedated transnasal esophagoscopy for monitoring therapy in pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Joel A.; DeBoer, Emily M.; Soden, Jason S.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Menard-Katcher, Calies D.; Atkins, Dan; Fleischer, David M.; Kramer, Robert E.; Deterding, Robin R.; Capocelli, Kelley E.; Prager, Jeremy D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Unsedated transnasal endoscopy (TNE) is safer and less costly than sedated EGD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of TNE with biopsies in monitoring the esophageal mucosa of pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Methods Patients between 8 and 17 years of age with eosinophilic esophagitis and their parents were enrolled. Unsedated TNE was performed. A 2.8-mm (1.2-mm channel) or a 4-mm flexible bronchoscope (2-mm channel) was used, and esophageal biopsy specimens were obtained. Biopsy specimen analysis, duration, adverse events, and billing charges of TNE were assessed. Immediately after TNE and a minimum of 2 weeks later, a modified Group Health Association of America 9 survey and a preference questionnaire were completed, respectively. Results Twenty-one of 22 enrolled patients underwent TNE. TNE was performed with no serious adverse events. Histopathological analysis revealed 0 eosinophils per high-power field (n = 12), fewer than 15 eosinophils per high-power field (n = 4), and more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field (n = 5). The total epithelial surface area of mucosal biopsy samples from either TNE Forceps (1.2 mm or 2 mm biopsy channel forceps) compared with those obtained during the subject’s previous EGD by using standard endoscopic forceps was not statistically different (P = .308 [1.2 mm]/P = .492 [2 mm]). All parents and 76.2% of subjects would undergo the TNE again. TNE was preferred over EGD by 85.7% of parents and 52.4% of subjects. The modified Group Health Association of America 9 survey revealed a high degree of satisfaction (average, 43.19 ± 2.6; maximum score, 45). Charges associated with TNE were 60.1% lower than for previous EGDs. Conclusions Unsedated TNE is an effective, lower-cost procedure for monitoring the esophageal mucosa of children with eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:26142551

  6. Leukotriene B4 receptors on guinea pig alveolar eosinophils

    SciTech Connect

    Maghni, K.; de Brum-Fernandes, A.J.; Foeldes-Filep, E.G.; Gaudry, M.; Borgeat, P.; Sirois, P. )

    1991-09-01

    The existence of receptors for LTB4 on highly purified guinea pig alveolar eosinophils was investigated. Massive infiltration of eosinophils in alveolar spaces was induced in guinea pigs by i.v. injections of Sephadex beads G50 (16 mg/kg). Alveolar eosinophils (50 {times} 10(6) cells) were purified to approximately 98% by Percoll continuous density gradient centrifugation. The binding studies indicated that alveolar eosinophils bind LTB4 in a saturable, reversible and specific manner. Scatchard analysis indicated the existence of high-affinity binding sites (Kd1 = 1.00 {plus minus} 0.22 nM; Bmax1 = 966 {plus minus} 266 sites/cell) and low-affinity binding sites (Kd2 = 62.5 {plus minus} 8.9 nM; Bmax2 = 5557 {plus minus} 757 sites/cell). The metabolism of LTB4 by alveolar eosinophils in binding conditions was assessed by RP-HPLC and no significant degradation of (3H)LTB4 was observed. LTB4 dose-dependently stimulated eosinophil migration in both chemokinesis and chemotaxis assays with an EC50 value of 1.30 {plus minus} 0.14 and 18.14 {plus minus} 1.57 nM, respectively. LTB4 caused a dose-dependent increase in the production of superoxide anion with an apparent EC50 value of 50 {times} 10(-9) M in the authors experimental conditions. LTB4 also induced a dose-dependent increase in the generation of TxA2 with an EC50 value of 46.2 {times} 10(-9) M. Taken together, their results demonstrated that guinea pig alveolar eosinophils express two classes of specific receptors for LTB4. The high-affinity binding sites seem associated to chemokinesis and chemotaxis whereas the low-affinity binding sites seem associated to superoxide anion production and generation of TxA2. The existence of LTB4 receptors in eosinophils could explain the presence of these cells in hypersensitivity reactions.

  7. Recent advances in the treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Shauna; Atkins, Dan; Furuta, Glenn T

    2013-01-01

    First described nearly 20 years ago, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disease of the esophagus characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal epithelium. Over 50% of the current literature on EoE has been published in the last 3 years, signaling both a rising incidence and increased recognition of this disorder. Treatment options available for patients with EoE include dietary management and/or pharmacologic therapy. An individualized approach to treatment is preferred, with an emphasis on patientparental preference. The objective of this article is to discuss the current and future treatment options for EoE. PMID:20979557

  8. Eosinophilic esophagitis as paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Prader, S; Spalinger, J; Caduff, J; Hürlimann, S; Rischewski, J

    2015-05-01

    A 16-month-old boy presented with failure to thrive despite sufficient caloric intake, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea and blepharitis. An eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was diagnosed by esophageal biopsy. Dietary restrictions and topical steroid treatment lead to no improvement. Further diagnostic work-up revealed an intrathoracal, paraspinal ganglioneuroblastoma. After operative extirpation of the tumour, all initial symptoms resolved. An esophageal control biopsy 4 weeks after tumour resection was normal. This is the first report of eosinophilic esophagitis as part of a paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with a malignant disease other than a carcinoma. PMID:25985452

  9. IgE, Mast Cells, Basophils, and Eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Kelly D.; Prussin, Calman; Metcalfe, Dean D.

    2010-01-01

    IgE, mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils are essential components of allergic inflammation. Antigen-specific IgE production, with subsequent fixation of IgE to Fc?RI receptors on mast cells and basophils, is central to the initiation and propagation of immediate hypersensitivity reactions. Mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils are central effector cells in allergic inflammation, as well as in innate and adaptive immunity. This review highlights what is known about these components and their roles in disease pathogenesis. PMID:20176269

  10. Recent advances in the recognition and management of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Eustace, Gregory; Gui, Xianyong; Iacucci, Marietta

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and recognition of eosinophilic esophagitis is increasing. Pathophysiological understanding of eosinophilic esophagitis is improving and an immunological reaction to ingested food is likely to play a significant role. Patients present with dysphagia and food bolus obstruction. Both histological and endoscopic criteria have been developed and validated. Dietary therapy, topical steroid therapy, proton pump inhibitors and endoscopic dilation are the main approaches to therapy; however, novel targeted therapies are being developed. Among the food items commonly implicated are wheat, dairy, nuts, soy, shellfish and eggs. A multidisciplinary approach to management in dedicated clinics may yield the best results. PMID:26076223

  11. Primary Eosinophilic Gastritis in a Child with Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Richa; Patne, Shashikant C U; Dixit, Vinod Kumar; Sharma, Shiv Prasad

    2016-06-01

    A 3-year-old girl presented with multiple episodes of vomiting, fever, and hematemesis for the past 2 months. Except for hemoglobin, her rests of the laboratory tests were unremarkable. Her barium X-ray showed absence of the duodenal bulb and the C-loop. Her endoscopy showed deformed stomach with multiple ulcers and diverticuli. The gastric outlet was not visualized. Distal gastrectomy with gastro-duodenal anastomosis was performed. Histopathological findings revealed transmural dense infiltrates of eosinophils, consistent with eosinophilic gastritis. PMID:26768007

  12. Eosinophilic Cystitis: A Rare Cause of Hematuria in Children

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, K. S.; Bhat, Shaila

    2012-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy presented with a history of acute onset of hematuria, dysuria, and suprapubic pain. Urine routine and microscopy showed 40–45 red cells/high power field. Urine culture was sterile. Radiological investigations showed a focal mucosal lesion with bladder wall thickening. Biopsy of the lesion revealed an edematous mucosa with florid infiltration by eosinophils into the muscularis propria with focal areas of myonecrosis. He was diagnosed as a case of eosinophilic cystitis. The patient received 6 weeks of tapered prednisone therapy. He was asymptomatic on followup. PMID:24558612

  13. Eosinophilic cystitis: a rare cause of hematuria in children.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, K S; Bhat, Shaila

    2012-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy presented with a history of acute onset of hematuria, dysuria, and suprapubic pain. Urine routine and microscopy showed 40-45 red cells/high power field. Urine culture was sterile. Radiological investigations showed a focal mucosal lesion with bladder wall thickening. Biopsy of the lesion revealed an edematous mucosa with florid infiltration by eosinophils into the muscularis propria with focal areas of myonecrosis. He was diagnosed as a case of eosinophilic cystitis. The patient received 6 weeks of tapered prednisone therapy. He was asymptomatic on followup. PMID:24558612

  14. Spontaneous intramural esophageal dissection: an unusual onset of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Sanz, Gemma; Rodríguez Alonso, Lorena; Romero Martínez, Natalia M

    2016-03-01

    A 35-year-old man, with a history of rhinitis, eczema and a dubious achalasia was admitted due to chest pain and sialorrhea. Upper endoscopy showed a little hole and a narrowing of the distal esophagus. A CT-scan with oral contrast exposed a discontinuity of the lumen of the middle third of the esophagus and a dissection of submucosal space 16 cm long. The patient recovered after parenteral nutrition. After four months, an esophageal endoscopic showed transient whitish exudates, longitudinal furrows and esophageal lacerations. The biopsies illustrated significant eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophilic microabscesses and basal cell hyperplasia. PMID:26949147

  15. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Found?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to get started. What Is Leukemia - Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? What ... acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Treating Leukemia - Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? ...

  16. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Leukemia--Acute Myeloid (Myelogenous) Download Printable Version [PDF] » View ... the topics below to get started. What Is Leukemia - Acute Myeloid (AML)? What is acute myeloid leukemia? ...

  17. Eosinophilic cystitis in a female German wire-haired pointer

    PubMed Central

    Evason, Michelle D.; Carr, Anthony P.

    2007-01-01

    A 7-month-old, intact female, German wire-haired pointer presented with a 3-week history of stranguria, pollakiuria, and dysuria that was nonresponsive to antibiotics. Two prior episodes of dysuria-stranguria appeared to respond to antibiotic therapy. Bladder wall biopsies revealed eosinophilic cystitis and the dog responded well to medical management. PMID:17542370

  18. Unraveling the complexity of lipid body organelles in human eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C. N.; Weller, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid-rich organelles are common in many cell types. In cells, such as adipocytes, these organelles are termed LDs, whereas in other cells, such as leukocytes, they are called LBs. The study of leukocyte LBs has attracted attention as a result of their association with human diseases. In leukocytes, such as eosinophils, LB accumulation has been documented extensively during inflammatory conditions. In these cells, LBs are linked to the regulation of immune responses by compartmentalization of several proteins and lipids involved in the control and biosynthesis of inflammatory mediators (eicosanoids). However, it has been unclear how diverse proteins, including membrane-associated enzymes involved in eicosanoid formation, incorporate into LBs, especially if the internal content of LBs is assumed to consist solely of stores of neutral lipids, as present within adipocyte LDs. Studies of the formation, function, and ultrastructure of LBs in eosinophils have been providing insights pertinent to LBs in other leukocytes. Here, we review current knowledge of the composition and function of leukocyte LBs as provided by studies of human eosinophil LBs, including recognitions of the internal architecture of eosinophil LBs based on 3D electron tomographic analyses. PMID:25210147

  19. Equine eosinophilic keratitis in horses: 28 cases (2003-2013).

    PubMed

    Edwards, Sydney; Clode, Alison B; Gilger, Brian C

    2015-12-01

    This retrospective case series evaluates husbandry and environmental conditions in relation to eosinophilic keratitis in horses. While no associations were found between disease and husbandry practices or specific environmental factors such as humidity or temperature, an increased prevalence of presentation in summer months was identified in this population of horses. PMID:26734136

  20. Eosinophilic meningitis: cause of a chronic pain syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Clouston, P D; Corbett, A J; Pryor, D S; Garrick, R

    1990-01-01

    Three tourists developed eosinophilic meningitis after visiting the Fijian Islands. Two had a severe and long lasting illness with chronic intractable pain. In one patient electrophysiological studies and MRI scan of the brain were abnormal and provided evidence of both radicular and cerebral parenchymal involvement by the most likely causative agent, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Images PMID:2246659

  1. Eosinophilic otitis media: a new middle ear disease entity.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yukiko

    2008-11-01

    Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is intractable otitis media characterized by the presence of a highly viscous yellow effusion containing eosinophils. It occurs mainly in patients with bronchial asthma and is resistant to conventional treatments for otitis media. Here we discuss the clinical features, pathogenesis, and management of EOM. EOM predominantly affects women and presents most often in patients in their 50s. The clinical features of the middle ear in EOM are roughly divided into the otitis media with effusion type and chronic otitis media type. The latter is further divided into two subtypes: simple perforation and granulation tissue formation. EOM is often complicated by rhinosinusitis (eosinophilic sinusitis). High-tone loss is more frequently found and more severe in EOM patients than in chronic otitis media control patients, and EOM patients sometimes become deaf suddenly. Systemic or topical steroid administration is the most effective treatment for patients with EOM. The instillation of triamcinolone acetonide, a suspension of steroids, into the middle ear is very effective for controlling eosinophilic inflammation. It is very important to explain to patients with EOM that the disease may last for a long period and that progressive and sudden hearing loss may occur. PMID:18940145

  2. Eosinophil Recruitment in Type-2 Hypersensitivity Pulmonary Granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Xiao-Zhou; Chiu, Bo-Chin; Stolberg, Valerie; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Kunkel, Steven L.; Murphy, Hedwig S.; Chensue, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3/CCL7) has potent eosinophil chemoattractant properties. The present study determined its relative contribution to the formation of Th2 cytokine-mediated (type-2) eosinophil-rich interstitial lung granulomas induced by antigens of Schistosoma mansoni eggs. Both MCP-3 transcripts and protein levels were more strongly expressed in lungs with type-2 than with type-1 (mycobacterial antigen-elicited Th1-mediated) granulomas. In vivo treatment with neutralizing antibodies demonstrated that MCP-3 abrogated eosinophil accumulation in type-2 lesions by 40 to 50%. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that MCP-3 localized to vessels in or near granulomas suggesting that endothelial cells were an important in situ source of MCP-3. Maximal MCP-3 transcript expression was abrogated by anti-interleukin-4 treatment. Furthermore, cultured mouse lung endothelial cells displayed augmented MCP-3 production in response to interleukin-4. Together, these results suggest that MCP-3 contributes to a significant component of eosinophil recruitment in the type-2 interstitial granuloma formation and Th2 cytokines promote its production. PMID:12107110

  3. Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorder in Coeliac Disease: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dennis N. F.; Wilkins, Annelise; Horton, Laura Elizabeth; Ahmad, Ishfaq; Phillips, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorder is a rare disorder characterised by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. There are various gastrointestinal manifestations with eosinophilic ascites being the most unusual and rare presentation. Diagnosis requires high index of suspicion and exclusion of various disorders associated with peripheral eosinophilia. There are no previous case reports to suggest an association between eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorder and coeliac disease in adults. We report a case of eosinophilic ascites and gastroenteritis in a 30-year-old woman with a known history of coeliac disease who responded dramatically to a course of steroids. PMID:23346427

  4. Eosinophils Contribute to Early Clearance of Pneumocystis murina Infection.

    PubMed

    Eddens, Taylor; Elsegeiny, Waleed; Nelson, Michael P; Horne, William; Campfield, Brian T; Steele, Chad; Kolls, Jay K

    2015-07-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia remains a common opportunistic infection in the diverse immunosuppressed population. One clear risk factor for susceptibility to Pneumocystis is a declining CD4(+) T cell count in the setting of HIV/AIDS or primary immunodeficiency. Non-HIV-infected individuals taking immunosuppressive drug regimens targeting T cell activation are also susceptible. Given the crucial role of CD4(+) T cells in host defense against Pneumocystis, we used RNA sequencing of whole lung early in infection in wild-type and CD4-depleted animals as an unbiased approach to examine mechanisms of fungal clearance. In wild-type mice, a strong eosinophil signature was observed at day 14 post Pneumocystis challenge, and eosinophils were increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of wild-type mice. Furthermore, eosinophilopoiesis-deficient Gata1(tm6Sho)/J mice were more susceptible to Pneumocystis infection when compared with BALB/c controls, and bone marrow-derived eosinophils had in vitro Pneumocystis killing activity. To drive eosinophilia in vivo, Rag1(-/-) mice were treated with a plasmid expressing IL-5 (pIL5) or an empty plasmid control via hydrodynamic injection. The pIL5-treated mice had increased serum IL-5 and eosinophilia in the lung, as well as reduced Pneumocystis burden, compared with mice treated with control plasmid. In addition, pIL5 treatment could induce eosinophilia and reduce Pneumocystis burden in CD4-depleted C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, but not eosinophilopoiesis-deficient Gata1(tm6Sho)/J mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that an early role of CD4(+) T cells is to recruit eosinophils to the lung and that eosinophils are a novel candidate for future therapeutic development in the treatment of Pneumocystis pneumonia in the immunosuppressed population. PMID:25994969

  5. A Pilot Study of Omalizumab in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, Denise; Enav, Benjamin; Komlodi-Pasztor, Edina; Hider, Pamela; Kim-Chang, Julie; Noonan, Laura; Taber, Tabitha; Kaushal, Suhasini; Limgala, Renuka; Brown, Margaret; Gupta, Raavi; Balba, Nader; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Khojah, Amer; Alpan, Oral

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract are an emerging subset of immune pathologies within the spectrum of allergic inflammation. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE), once considered a rare disease, is increasing in incidence, with a rate of over 1 in 10,000 in the US, for unknown reasons. The clinical management of EoE is challenging, thus there is an urgent need for understanding the etiology and pathophysiology of this eosinophilic disease to develop better therapeutic approaches. In this open label, single arm, unblinded study, we evaluated the effects of an anti-IgE treatment, omalizumab, on local inflammation in the esophagus and clinical correlates in patients with EoE. Omalizumab was administered for 12 weeks to 15 subjects with long standing EoE. There were no serious side effects from the treatment. Esophageal tissue inflammation was assessed both before and after therapy. After 3 months on omalizumab, although tissue Immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels were significantly reduced in all but two of the subjects, we found that full remission of EoE, which is defined as histologic and clinical improvement only in 33% of the patients. The decrease in tryptase-positive cells and eosinophils correlated significantly with the clinical outcome as measured by improvement in endoscopy and symptom scores, respectively. Omalizumab-induced remission of EoE was limited to subjects with low peripheral blood absolute eosinophil counts. These findings demonstrate that in a subset of EoE patients, IgE plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease and that anti-IgE therapy with omalizumab may result in disease remission. Since this study is open label there is the potential for bias, hence the need for a larger double blind placebo controlled study. The data presented in this pilot study provides a foundation for proper patient selection to maximize clinical efficacy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01040598 PMID:25789989

  6. Eosinophil degranulation in the allergic lung of mice primarily occurs in the airway lumen.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kristopher; Simson, Ljubov; Newcombe, Nicole; Koskinen, Aulikki M L; Mattes, Joerg; Lee, Nancy A; Lee, James J; Dent, Lindsay A; Matthaei, Klaus I; Foster, Paul S

    2004-06-01

    Eosinophil degranulation is thought to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders. Although mouse models of allergic disorders have been used extensively to identify the contribution of eosinophils to disease, ultrastructural evidence of active granule disassembly has not been reported. In this investigation, we characterized the degree of eosinophil activation in the bone marrow, blood, lung tissue, and airways lumen [bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF)] of ovalbumin-sensitized and aero-challenged wild-type and interleukin-5 transgenic mice. Degranulation was most prominent in and primarily compartmentalized to the airways lumen. Eosinophils released granule proteins by the process of piecemeal degranulation (PMD). Accordingly, recruitment and activation of eosinophils in the lung correlated with the detection of cell-free eosinophil peroxidase in BALF and with the induction of airways hyper-reactivity. As in previous studies with human eosinophils, degranulation of isolated mouse cells did not occur until after adherence to extracellular matrix. However, higher concentrations of exogenous stimuli appear to be required to trigger adherence and degranulation (piecemeal) of mouse eosinophils when compared with values reported for studies of human eosinophils. Thus, mouse eosinophils undergo PMD during allergic inflammation, and in turn, this process may contribute to pathogenesis. However, the degranulation process in the allergic lung of mice is primarily compartmentalized to the airway lumen. Understanding the mechanism of eosinophil degranulation in the airway lumen may provide important insights into how this process occurs in human respiratory diseases. PMID:15020648

  7. Eosinophil differentiation in the bone marrow is promoted by protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2.

    PubMed

    Xia, L-X; Hua, W; Jin, Y; Tian, B-P; Qiu, Z-W; Zhang, C; Che, L-Q; Zhou, H-B; Wu, Y-F; Huang, H-Q; Lan, F; Ke, Y-H; Lee, J J; Li, W; Ying, S-M; Chen, Z-H; Shen, H-H

    2016-01-01

    SHP2 participates in multiple signaling events by mediating T-cell development and function, and regulates cytokine-dependent granulopoiesis. To explore whether and how SHP2 can regulate bone-marrow eosinophil differentiation, we investigate the contribution of SHP2 in the bone-marrow eosinophil development in allergic mice. Blockade of SHP2 function by SHP2 inhibitor PHPS-1 or conditional shp2 knockdown by adenovirus-inhibited bone-marrow-derived eosinophil differentiation in vitro, with no detectable effects on the apoptosis of eosinophils. Furthermore, SHP2 induced eosinophil differentiation via regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway. Myeloid shp2 conditional knockout mice (LysM(cre)shp2(flox/flox)) failed to induce eosinophilia as well as airway hyper-responsiveness. The SHP2 inhibitor PHPS-1 also alleviated eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness, accompanied by significantly reduced levels of systemic eosinophils and eosinophil lineage-committed progenitors in allergic mice. We demonstrate that inhibition of eosinophil development is SHP2-dependent and SHP2 is sufficient to promote eosinophil formation in vivo. Our data reveal SHP2 as a critical regulator of eosinophil differentiation, and inhibition of SHP2 specifically in myeloid cells alleviates allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27054330

  8. Interleukin-5 pathway inhibition in the treatment of eosinophilic respiratory disorders: evidence and unmet needs

    PubMed Central

    Varricchi, Gilda; Bagnasco, Diego; Borriello, Francesco; Heffler, Enrico; Canonica, Giorgio W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Human eosinophils were first identified and named by Paul Ehrlich in 1879 on the basis of the cell's granular uptake of eosin. Although eosinophils represent approximately 1% of peripheral blood leukocytes, they have the propensity to leave the blood stream and migrate into inflamed tissues. Eosinophils and their mediators are critical effectors to asthma and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). Eosinophils are equipped with a large number of cell-surface receptors and produce specific cytokines and chemokines. Recent findings Eosinophils are the major source of interleukin-5 and highly express the interleukin-5Rα on their surface. Clinical trials evaluating monoclonal antibodies to interleukin-5 (mepolizumab and reslizumab) and its receptor interleukin-5Rα (benralizumab) have been or are underway in patients with eosinophilic asthma, EGPA and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Overall, targeting interleukin-5/interleukin-5Rα is associated with a marked decrease in blood and sputum eosinophilia, the number of exacerbations and improvement of some clinical parameters in adult patients with severe eosinophilic asthma. Pilot studies suggest that mepolizumab might be a glucocorticoid-sparing treatment in patients with EGPA. A preliminary study found that benralizumab did not reduce the exacerbations and did modify lung function in patients with eosinophilic COPD. Summary The review examines recent advances in the biology of eosinophils and how targeting the interleukin-5 pathway might offer benefit to some patients with severe asthma, EGPA, and COPD. Interleukin-5/interleukin-5Rα-targeted treatments offer promises to patients with eosinophilic respiratory disorders. PMID:26859368

  9. Eosinophil differentiation in the bone marrow is promoted by protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2

    PubMed Central

    Xia, L-x; Hua, W; Jin, Y; Tian, B-p; Qiu, Z-w; Zhang, C; Che, L-q; Zhou, H-b; Wu, Y-f; Huang, H-q; Lan, F; Ke, Y-h; Lee, J J; Li, W; Ying, S-m; Chen, Z-h; Shen, H-h

    2016-01-01

    SHP2 participates in multiple signaling events by mediating T-cell development and function, and regulates cytokine-dependent granulopoiesis. To explore whether and how SHP2 can regulate bone-marrow eosinophil differentiation, we investigate the contribution of SHP2 in the bone-marrow eosinophil development in allergic mice. Blockade of SHP2 function by SHP2 inhibitor PHPS-1 or conditional shp2 knockdown by adenovirus-inhibited bone-marrow-derived eosinophil differentiation in vitro, with no detectable effects on the apoptosis of eosinophils. Furthermore, SHP2 induced eosinophil differentiation via regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway. Myeloid shp2 conditional knockout mice (LysMcreshp2flox/flox) failed to induce eosinophilia as well as airway hyper-responsiveness. The SHP2 inhibitor PHPS-1 also alleviated eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness, accompanied by significantly reduced levels of systemic eosinophils and eosinophil lineage-committed progenitors in allergic mice. We demonstrate that inhibition of eosinophil development is SHP2-dependent and SHP2 is sufficient to promote eosinophil formation in vivo. Our data reveal SHP2 as a critical regulator of eosinophil differentiation, and inhibition of SHP2 specifically in myeloid cells alleviates allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27054330

  10. Therapeutic Strategies for Harnessing Human Eosinophils in Allergic Inflammation, Hypereosinophilic Disorders, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amini-Vaughan, Zhaleh J.; Martinez-Moczygemba, Margarita; Huston, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The eosinophil is a multifunctional granulocyte best known for providing host defense against parasites. Paradoxically, eosinophils are also implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, asthma, and hypereosinophilic syndromes. Emerging evidence also supports the potential for harnessing the cytotoxic power of eosinophils and redirecting it to kill solid tumors. Central to eosinophil physiology is interleukin-5 (IL-5) and its receptor (IL-5R) which is composed of a ligand-specific alpha chain (IL-5Rα) and the common beta chain (βc). Eosinophil activation can lead to their degranulation, resulting in rapid release of an arsenal of tissue-destructive proinflammatory mediators and cytotoxic proteins that can be both beneficial and detrimental to the host. This review discusses eosinophil immunobiology and therapeutic strategies for targeting of IL-5 and IL-5R, as well as the potential for harnessing eosinophil cytotoxicity as a tumoricide. PMID:22875242

  11. Cigarette Smoking-Induced Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia: A Case Report Including a Provocation Test

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Gene Hyun; Kim, Yang-Ki; Lee, Young Mok; Kim, Ki-Up; Hwang, Jung Hwa; Kim, Dong Won

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism and cause of acute eosinophilic pneumonia are largely unknown. Many factors including the smoking of cigarettes have been suggested, but none have been proven to directly cause acute eosinophilic pneumonia. The authors report a case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia in a young Asian male who recently started smoking. The diagnosis was made based on his clinical course and results of chest radiography, lung spirometry, bronchoalveolar lavage, and transbronchial lung biopsies. After administration of methylprednisolone, his clinical course rapidly improved. A provocation test was designed to establish a connection between cigarette smoking and the development of acute eosinophilic pneumonia. After the provocation test, the patient showed identical symptoms, increase in sputum eosinophils, and worsening of pulmonary function. The results of the provocation test suggest that smoking may directly cause acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and support previous reports of cigarette smoking-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia. PMID:18303214

  12. Expression and characterization of recombinant human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin-anti-transferrin receptor sFv.

    PubMed

    Newton, D L; Nicholls, P J; Rybak, S M; Youle, R J

    1994-10-28

    The gene for the human recombinant eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (rEDN) was synthesized and fused to the gene encoding a single chain antibody (sFv) to the human transferrin receptor (EDNsFv). Both rEDN and EDNsFv were expressed as insoluble proteins in inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Following denaturation and renaturation, EDN and EDNsFv were partially purified by chromatography on heparin-Sepharose. Final purification of EDN was achieved by Sephadex G-100, whereas EDNsFv which contained a 6-histidyl residue carboxyl terminus was highly purified using the metal chelate resin, Ni(2+)-nitriloacetic acid. Whereas the recombinant EDN had ribonuclease activity that was similar to the native protein, the fusion protein had enzymatic activity that was 6-13% that of native EDN. The fusion protein was able to bind to the human transferrin receptor. In contrast to rEDN that had no inherent cytotoxicity to human tumor cells, the EDNsFv fusion protein was cytotoxic to human leukemia cells that express the human transferrin receptor with an IC50, 0.2-1 nM. At 1.3 nM EDNsFv, no cytotoxicity was observed on cells that lack the human transferrin receptor. Free antibody to the human transferrin receptor, E6, inhibited the cytotoxicity of the EDNsFv. Human enzymes may be engineered to acquire cytotoxic properties by fusing them to antibodies. Thus, they may be candidates for the construction of immunofusion proteins that may be less immunogenic than immunotoxins containing bacterial- or plant-derived toxin moieties. PMID:7929408

  13. Vesicle-mediated secretion of human eosinophil granule-derived major basic protein.

    PubMed

    Melo, Rossana C N; Spencer, Lisa A; Perez, Sandra A C; Neves, Josiane S; Bafford, Staci P; Morgan, Ellen S; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F

    2009-07-01

    Major basic protein (MBP), the predominant cationic protein of human eosinophil specific granules, is stored within crystalloid cores of these granules. Secretion of MBP contributes to the immunopathogenesis of varied diseases. Prior electron microscopy (EM) of eosinophils in sites of inflammation noted losses of granule cores in the absence of granule exocytosis and suggested that eosinophil granule proteins might be released through piecemeal degranulation (PMD), a secretory process mediated by transport vesicles. Because release of eosinophil granule-derived MBP through PMD has not been studied, we evaluated secretion of this cationic protein by human eosinophils. Intracellular localizations of MBP were studied within nonstimulated and eotaxin-stimulated human eosinophils by both immunofluorescence and a pre-embedding immunonanogold EM method that enables optimal epitope preservation and antigen access to membrane microdomains. In parallel, quantification of transport vesicles was assessed in eosinophils from a patient with hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). Our data demonstrate vesicular trafficking of MBP within eotaxin-stimulated eosinophils. Vesicular compartments, previously implicated in transport from granules to the plasma membrane, including large vesiculotubular carriers termed eosinophil sombrero vesicles (EoSVs), were found to contain MBP. These secretory compartments were significantly increased in numbers within HES eosinophils. Moreover, in addition to granule-stored MBP, even unstimulated eosinophils contained appreciable amounts of MBP within secretory vesicles, as evidenced by immunonanogold EM and immunofluorescent colocalizations of MBP and CD63. These data suggest that eosinophil MBP, with its multiple extracellular activities, can be mobilized from granules by PMD into secretory vesicles and both granule- and secretory vesicle-stored pools of MBP are available for agonist-elicited secretion of MBP from human eosinophils. The recognition of PMD as a secretory process to release MBP is important to understand the pathological basis of allergic and other eosinophil-associated inflammatory diseases. PMID:19398958

  14. The Family Leukemia Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Eleanor

    1976-01-01

    An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

  15. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Carbonic anhydrase IV (CAR4) is expressed on IL-5 activated murine eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ting; Mingler, Melissa K.; Wahl, Benjamin; Khorki, M. Eyad; Pabst, Oliver; Zimmermann, Nives; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilia and its cellular activation are hallmark features of asthma, as well as other allergic/TH2 disorders, yet there are few, if any, reliable surface markers of eosinophil activation. We have employed a FACS-based genome-wide screening system to identify transcriptional alterations in murine lung eosinophils recruited and activated by pulmonary allergen exposure. Using a relatively stringent screen with false-positive correction, we identified 82 candidate genes that could serve as eosinophil activation markers and/or pathogenic effector markers in asthma. Carbonic anhydrase IV (Car4) was a top dysregulated gene with 36-fold induction in allergen-elicited pulmonary eosinophils, which was validated by quantitative PCR, IHC and by flow cytometry. Eosinophil CAR4 expression was kinetically regulated by IL-5 but not IL-13. IL-5 was both necessary and sufficient for induction of eosinophil CAR4. While CAR4-deficient mice did not have a defect in eosinophil recruitment to the lung nor a change in eosinophil pH-buffering capacity, allergen-challenged chimeric mice that contained Car4?/? hematopoietic cells aberrantly expressed a series of genes enriched in biological processes involved in epithelial differentiation, keratinization, and anion exchange. In conclusion, we have determined that eosinophils express CAR4 following IL-5 or allergen exposure, and that CAR4 is involved in regulating the lung transcriptome associated with allergic airway inflammation; as such, CAR4 has potential value for diagnosing and monitoring eosinophilic responses. PMID:24808371

  17. Small intestinal eosinophils regulate Th17 cells by producing IL-1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Reiko; Lee, Eun-Jung; Jang, Min Seong; Jeun, Eun-Ji; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Areum; Yun, Chang Ho; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, You-Me; Seoh, Ju-Young; Jung, YunJae; Surh, Charles D; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophils play proinflammatory roles in helminth infections and allergic diseases. Under steady-state conditions, eosinophils are abundantly found in the small intestinal lamina propria, but their physiological function is largely unexplored. In this study, we found that small intestinal eosinophils down-regulate Th17 cells. Th17 cells in the small intestine were markedly increased in the ΔdblGATA-1 mice lacking eosinophils, and an inverse correlation was observed between the number of eosinophils and that of Th17 cells in the small intestine of wild-type mice. In addition, small intestinal eosinophils suppressed the in vitro differentiation of Th17 cells, as well as IL-17 production by small intestinal CD4(+)T cells. Unlike other small intestinal immune cells or circulating eosinophils, we found that small intestinal eosinophils have a unique ability to constitutively secrete high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1β. Moreover, small intestinal eosinophils isolated from IL-1Ra-deficient mice failed to suppress Th17 cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that small intestinal eosinophils play a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by regulating Th17 cells via production of IL-1Ra. PMID:26951334

  18. Immunotherapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirali N.; Dave, Hema; Wayne, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of leukemia in childhood. Despite this, leukemia remains a leading cause of pediatric cancer-related mortality and the prognosis is guarded for individuals with relapsed or refractory disease. Standard therapies are associated with a wide array of acute and long-term toxicities and further treatment intensification may not be tolerable or beneficial. The curative potential of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is due in part to the graft-versus-leukemia effect, which provides evidence for the therapeutic capacity of immune-based therapies. In recent years there have been significant advances in the development and application of immunotherapy in the treatment of leukemias, including the demonstration of activity in chemotherapy-resistant cases. This review summarizes immunotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of pediatric leukemia including current results and future directions. PMID:23847759

  19. Purinergic P2Y12 Receptor Activation in Eosinophils and the Schistosomal Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Muniz, Valdirene S.; Baptista-dos-Reis, Renata; Benjamim, Claudia F.; Mata-Santos, Hilton A.; Pyrrho, Alexandre S.; Strauch, Marcelo A.; Melo, Paulo A.; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Silva-Paiva, Juliana; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Weller, Peter F.; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T.; Neves, Josiane S.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying new target molecules through which eosinophils secrete their stored proteins may reveal new therapeutic approaches for the control of eosinophilic disorders such as host immune responses to parasites. We have recently reported the expression of the purinergic P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) in human eosinophils; however, its functional role in this cell type and its involvement in eosinophilic inflammation remain unknown. Here, we investigated functional roles of P2Y12R in isolated human eosinophils and in a murine model of eosinophilic inflammation induced by Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni) infection. We found that adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) induced human eosinophils to secrete eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) in a P2Y12R dependent manner. However, ADP did not interfere with human eosinophil apoptosis or chemotaxis in vitro. In vivo, C57Bl/6 mice were infected with cercariae of the Belo Horizonte strain of S. mansoni. Analyses performed 55 days post infection revealed that P2Y12R blockade reduced the granulomatous hepatic area and the eosinophilic infiltrate, collagen deposition and IL-13/IL-4 production in the liver without affecting the parasite oviposition. As found for humans, murine eosinophils also express the P2Y12R. P2Y12R inhibition increased blood eosinophilia, whereas it decreased the bone marrow eosinophil count. Our results suggest that P2Y12R has an important role in eosinophil EPO secretion and in establishing the inflammatory response in the course of a S. mansoni infection. PMID:26448282

  20. T-helper 2 Cytokines, Transforming Growth Factor β1, and Eosinophil Products Induce Fibrogenesis and Alter Muscle Motility in Patients with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Nonevski, Ilche; Ma, Jie; Ouyang, Zhufeng; West, Gail; Protheroe, Cheryl; DePetris, Giovanni; Schirbel, Anja; Lapinski, James; Goldblum, John; Bonfield, Tracey; Lopez, Rocio; Harnett, Karen; Lee, James; Hirano, Ikuo; Falk, Gary; Biancani, Piero; Fiocchi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) often become dysphagic from the combination of organ fibrosis and motor abnormalities. We investigated mechanisms of dysphagia, assessing the response of human esophageal fibroblasts (HEF), muscle cells (HEMC), and esophageal muscle strips to eosinophil-derived products. METHODS Biopsies were collected via endoscopy from the upper, middle and lower thirds of the esophagus of 18 patients with EoE and 21 individuals undergoing endoscopy for other reasons (controls). Primary cultures of esophageal fibroblasts and muscle cells were derived from 12 freshly resected human esophagectomy specimens. Eosinophil distribution was investigated by histologic analyses of full-thickness esophageal tissue. Active secretion of EoE-related mediators was assessed from medium underlying mucosal biopsy cultures. We quantified production of fibronectin and collagen I by HEF and HEMC in response to eosinophil products. We also measured expression of ICAM1 and VCAM1 by, and adhesion of human eosinophils to, HEF and HEMC. Eosinophil products were tested in an esophageal muscle contraction assay. RESULTS Activated eosinophils were present in all esophageal layers. Significantly higher concentrations of eosinophil-related mediators were spontaneously secreted in mucosal biopsies from patients with EoE than controls. Exposure of HEF and HEMC to increasing concentrations of eosinophil products or co-culture with eosinophils caused HEF and HEMC to increase secretion of fibronectin and collagen I; this was inhibited by blocking transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAKP) signaling. Eosinophil binding to HEF and HEMC increased following incubation of mesenchymal cells with eosinophil-derived products, and decreased following blockade of TGFβ1 and p38MAPK blockade. Eosinophil products reduced electrical field-induced contraction of esophageal muscle strips, but not acetylcholine-induced contraction. CONCLUSION In an analysis of tissues samples from patients with EoE, we linked the presence and activation state of eosinophils in EoE with altered fibrogenesis and motility of esophageal fibroblasts and muscle cells. This process might contribute to the development of dysphagia. PMID:24486052

  1. Eosinophilic Pneumonia in a Patient with Bronchial Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Arindom; Al-Ismaili, Suad; Ramadhan, Fatma A.; Al-Wardi, Talal H. M.; Al-Salmi, Quasem; Al-Hashami, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary myiasis is an unusual form of myiasis in humans and has been recently identified as a cause of eosinophilic pneumonia. We report the case of a 13-year-old Omani boy who presented to the Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in October 2014 with respiratory distress. Bronchial aspirates revealed features of eosinophilic pneumonia. Possible larvae identified in the cytology report, a high immunoglobulin E level and the patient history all indicated bronchial myiasis. The patient was treated with steroids and ventilation and has since been disease-free with no long-term side-effects. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of bronchial myiasis in Oman. PMID:26629385

  2. Eosinophilic pleuritis due to sparganum: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oh, Youngmin; Kim, Jeong-Tae; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Chang, You-Jin; Eom, Keeseon; Park, Jung-Gi; Lee, Ki-Man; Choe, Kang-Hyeon; An, Jin-Young

    2014-10-01

    Sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by migrating plerocercoid tapeworm larva of the genus Spirometra. Infection in humans is mainly caused by the ingestion of raw or inadequately cooked flesh of infected frogs, snakes, and chickens. Here, we report a rare case of a 45-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with left lower chest pain. The chest radiograph and computed tomography (CT) scan revealed localized pleural effusion in the left lower lobe; further, peripheral blood eosinophilia and eosinophilic pleural effusion were present. Percutaneous catheter drainage was performed, which revealed long worm-shaped material that was identified as a sparganum by DNA sequencing. The patient showed clinical improvement after drainage of the sparganum. This study demonstrates the importance of considering parasitic diseases in the differential diagnosis of eosinophilic pleural effusion. PMID:25352705

  3. Effects of olopatadine in limited scleroderma with peripheral eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Motoo; Inagaki, Toshiaki; Hanaki, Hidekazu; Harada, Shinsuke; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2008-09-01

    Scleroderma and eosinophilia often occur together, though the pathogenesis is unclear. We investigated the effect of olopatadine hydrochloride in a series of cases of limited scleroderma (LS). Ten patients with LS and positive eosinophil counts (LSE) were enrolled (average age, 85 years; six men and four women). Serum concentrations of the anti-Scl-70 antibody were positive. Olopatadine hydrochloride was prescribed at 10 mg/day for 3 weeks. Serum concentrations of the anti-Scl-70 antibody significantly decreased, but changes in eosinophil numbers and percentages in peripheral blood were not significant. Factor analysis suggested a correlation between serum concentrations of the anti-Scl-70 antibody and complement C4. Olopatadine could be effective in reducing anti-Scl-70 antibodies in the elderly with LSE. PMID:18822005

  4. Emphysematous Eosinophilic Lymphangitis in the Ruminal Submucosa of Cattle.

    PubMed

    Ohfuji, S

    2015-11-01

    Twenty cattle (14 Holstein-Friesian, 3 Japanese Black, 3 Aberdeen Angus) ranging in age from 3 months to 8 years exhibited, at slaughter, emphysematous thickening of the ruminal submucosa owing to the appearance of numerous, contiguous, small gas bubbles. Microscopic changes in the ruminal submucosa consisted of (1) multiple cystic (emphysematous) lymphangiectasis that was frequently lined or occluded by granulomatous inflammatory infiltrates including macrophages, multinucleate giant cells, and eosinophils; (2) intralymphatic phagocytosis by macrophages and giant cells of eosinophils that showed positive labeling with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end-labeling assay; and (3) an inflammatory infiltrate extending from the area of lymphangitis into surrounding tissue, as well as edema, hemorrhage, fibrin exudation, fibroplasia, or capillary proliferation throughout the lesional submucosa. In addition, 15 (75%) of the cattle had globular leukocyte infiltrates in the mucosal epithelia of the rumen. PMID:25710949

  5. Eosinophilic Otitis Media: CT and MRI Findings and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Won Jung; Lim, Hyun Kyung; Yoon, Tae Hyun; Cho, Kyung Ja; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is a relatively rare, intractable, middle ear disease with extremely viscous mucoid effusion containing eosinophils. EOM is associated with adult bronchial asthma and nasal allergies. Conventional treatments for otitis media with effusion (OME) or for chronic otitis media (COM), like tympanoplasty or mastoidectomy, when performed for the treatment of EOM, can induce severe complications such as deafness. Therefore, it should be differentiated from the usual type of OME or COM. To our knowledge, the clinical and imaging findings of EOM of temporal bone are not well-known to radiologists. We report here the CT and MRI findings of two EOM cases and review the clinical and histopathologic findings of this recently described disease entity. PMID:22563277

  6. Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis preceding allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Teo, F S W; Santosa, A; Teng, G G

    2015-11-01

    A 61-year-old Chinese man with long-standing, stable Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (EGPA) and asthma, presented with acute hypoxemia and declining obstructive pulmonary function. Elevated serum IgE levels, positive Aspergillus fumigatus specific IgE and CT findings of central bronchiectasis with small airway mucoid impaction confirmed new development of Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA). The maintenance therapy for EGPA, azathioprine, was discontinued. Prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/day and Itraconazole improved his symptoms and IgE levels. To our knowledge, ABPA occurring in a patient with EGPA has not been reported. Differentiation of EGPA with asthmatic flare vs ABPA vs asthma with aspergillus hypersensitivity is discussed. Heightened Th2 immunity where eosinophils play a central role may link these conditions. PMID:26549342

  7. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-21

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  8. Comprehensive multiplexed protein quantitation delineates eosinophilic and neutrophilic experimental asthma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Improvements in asthma diagnosis and management require deeper understanding of the heterogeneity of the complex airway inflammation. We hypothesise that differences in the two major inflammatory phenotypes of asthma; eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma, will be reflected in the lung protein expression profile of murine asthma models and can be delineated using proteomics of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Methods BAL from mice challenged with ovalbumin (OVA/OVA) alone (standard model of asthma, here considered eosinophilic) or OVA in combination with endotoxin (OVA/LPS, model of neutrophilic asthma) was analysed using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry, and compared with steroid-treated animals and healthy controls. In addition, conventional inflammatory markers were analysed using multiplexed ELISA (Bio-Plex™ assay). Multivariate statistics was performed on integrative proteomic fingerprints using principal component analysis. Proteomic data were complemented with lung mechanics and BAL cell counts. Results Several of the analysed proteins displayed significant differences between the controls and either or both of the two models reflecting eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma. Most of the proteins found with mass spectrometry analysis displayed a considerable increase in neutrophilic asthma compared with the other groups. Conversely, the larger number of the inflammatory markers analysed with Bio-Plex™ analysis were found to be increased in the eosinophilic model. In addition, major inflammation markers were correlated to peripheral airway closure, while commonly used asthma biomarkers only reflect central inflammation. Conclusion Our data suggest that the commercial markers we are currently relying on to diagnose asthma subtypes are not giving us comprehensive or specific enough information. The analysed protein profiles allowed to discriminate the two models and may add useful information for characterization of different asthma phenotypes. PMID:24993465

  9. Sulfasalazine: A rare cause of acute eosinophilic pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajan, P.; Fabre, A.; Kelly, E.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfasalazine is a compound of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and sulfapyridine joined by an azo bond. It is a widely used drug in the treatment of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Fatal toxicity of sulfasalazine arises from its effects on the bone marrow and the resulting blood dyscrasias. Pulmonary toxicity from sulfasalazine is a rather rare finding. Here, we present the case of a patient who developed acute eosinophilic pneumonia with sulfasalazine use.

  10. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Antibiotics against Eosinophilic Pustular Folliculitis

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Sachiko; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Otsuka, Atsushi; Kabashima, Kenji; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF) is a chronic intractable pruritic dermatosis. Although indomethacin is generally effective against EPF and considered as a first-line therapy, quite a few patients with indomethacin still suffer from the symptoms. Among other therapeutic options, some antibiotics have been reported to be effective; however, there has been no epidemiological description regarding oral antibiotics use in patients with EPF. In this study, we investigated the frequency of antibiotics use and the effectiveness in patients with EPF. PMID:23741214

  11. Eosinophils in Fungus-Associated Allergic Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sumit; Hoselton, Scott A.; Dorsam, Glenn P.; Schuh, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is frequently caused and/or exacerbated by sensitization to fungal allergens, which are ubiquitous in many indoor and outdoor environments. Severe asthma with fungal sensitization is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and bronchial constriction in response to an inhaled allergen that is worsened by environmental exposure to airborne fungi and which leads to a disease course that is often very difficult to treat with standard asthma therapies. As a result of complex interactions among inflammatory cells, structural cells, and the intercellular matrix of the allergic lung, patients with sensitization to fungal allergens may experience a greater degree of airway wall remodeling and progressive, accumulated pulmonary dysfunction as part of the disease sequela. From their development in the bone marrow to their recruitment to the lung via chemokine and cytokine networks, eosinophils form an important component of the inflammatory milieu that is associated with this syndrome. Eosinophils are recognized as complex multi-factorial leukocytes with diverse functions in the context of allergic fungal asthma. In this review, we will consider recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are associated with eosinophil development and migration to the allergic lung in response to fungal inhalation, along with the eosinophil’s function in the immune response to and the immunopathology attributed to fungus-associated allergic pulmonary disease. PMID:23378838

  12. Eosinophilic Endomyocarditis: A Rare Case of Neonatal Mortality.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Allison J; Hitt, Stacy L; Stier, Michael A; Houser, Laura M

    2015-10-01

    Background Eosinophilic endomyocarditis (EEM) is a rare diagnosis that is extremely uncommon in newborns. This case report aimed to present a case of neonatal mortality from acute cardiac failure due to EEM. Case Our report presents a term male neonate with minor complications in the immediate postnatal course, who was discharged at 48 hours of life, but who developed unexpected respiratory distress, followed by cardiac arrest and death at 3 days of life. One day after discharge, the infant developed respiratory distress and cool skin, and then developed cardiac arrest at the pediatrician's office, undergoing resuscitation with intravenous fluid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, epinephrine, atropine, and failed intubation. Autopsy revealed EEM, an inflammatory infiltrative process involving the endomyocardium. Pathology Pathogenesis involves three stages: (1) myocarditis with an acute eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate followed by (2) myocyte necrosis and eventually (3) fibrosis in the final stage of the disease. Discussion The cause of death was acute cardiac failure due to intense eosinophilic infiltration and degranulation with early subendocardial myocyte necrosis but before development of extensive myocyte necrosis. This case appears to be the youngest patient reported with EEM. PMID:26495174

  13. Eosinophilic Endomyocarditis: A Rare Case of Neonatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Allison J.; Hitt, Stacy L.; Stier, Michael A.; Houser, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic endomyocarditis (EEM) is a rare diagnosis that is extremely uncommon in newborns. This case report aimed to present a case of neonatal mortality from acute cardiac failure due to EEM. Case Our report presents a term male neonate with minor complications in the immediate postnatal course, who was discharged at 48 hours of life, but who developed unexpected respiratory distress, followed by cardiac arrest and death at 3 days of life. One day after discharge, the infant developed respiratory distress and cool skin, and then developed cardiac arrest at the pediatrician's office, undergoing resuscitation with intravenous fluid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, epinephrine, atropine, and failed intubation. Autopsy revealed EEM, an inflammatory infiltrative process involving the endomyocardium. Pathology Pathogenesis involves three stages: (1) myocarditis with an acute eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate followed by (2) myocyte necrosis and eventually (3) fibrosis in the final stage of the disease. Discussion The cause of death was acute cardiac failure due to intense eosinophilic infiltration and degranulation with early subendocardial myocyte necrosis but before development of extensive myocyte necrosis. This case appears to be the youngest patient reported with EEM. PMID:26495174

  14. Nasal histamine responses in nonallergic rhinitis with eosinophilic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ciofalo, Andrea; Romeo, Raffaello; Soldo, Pietro; Fusconi, Massimo; Greco, Antonio; Magliulo, Giuseppe; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nonallergic rhinitis with eosinophilic syndrome (NARES) is persistent, without atopy, but with ≥25% nasal eosinophilia. Hypereosinophilia seems to contribute to nasal mucosa dysfunction. Objectives: This analytical case-control study aimed at assessing the presence and severity of nonspecific nasal hyperactivity and at finding out whether eosinophilia may be correlated with the respiratory and mucociliary clearance functions. Materials: The symptom score was assessed in 38 patients and 15 controls whose nasal smear was also tested for eosinophils and mucociliary transport (MCT). Nonspecific nasal provocation tests (NSNPT) with histamine were also carried out, and total nasal resistance (TNR) was determined. Results: The symptom score of NARES after NSNPT were not significantly different from the control group, and there was poor or no correlation among the single symptoms and the differences studied for every nasal reactivity class. This correlation improved when using the composite symptom score. The most severe eosinophilia was observed in high reactivity groups, and it was correlated with an increase in TNR. MCT worsened as eosinophilia and nasal reactivity increased. Unlike controls, a significant correlation was observed between the increase in MCT and TNR. Conclusions: In NARES, nonspecific nasal hyperreactivity is the result of epithelial damage produced by eosinophilic inflammation, which causes MCT slow down, an increase in TNR, and nasal reactivity classes, with possible impact on classification, prognosis, and treatment control. PMID:26302729

  15. Eosinophilic esophagitis: an immune-mediated esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Weinbrand-Goichberg, Jenny; Segal, Idit; Ovadia, Adi; Levine, Arie; Dalal, Ilan

    2013-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease defined by esophageal dysfunction, by typical endoscopic findings and by abnormal eosinophilic inflammation within the esophagus. Eosinophilic accumulation in the esophagus occurs as a result of esophageal overexpression of pro-inflammatory mediators, including T cells and mast cells, cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-13, IL-5 and IL-15, as well as chemoattractants (eotaxin and transforming growth factor-β1, fibroblast growth factor and the newly characterized gene--thymic stromal lymphopoietin, which is a key regulator of allergic sensitization initiation). The role of allergy, particularly food allergy in EoE is indisputable, as elimination diet is a proven commonly used treatment for the disease. However, unlike classical immediate IgE-mediated reaction to allergen, EoE is associated with an altered immune response, characterized by a combination of IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated mechanisms. In this review, we aim to discuss the many typical aspects of EoE as opposed to other entities involving the esophagus, with focusing on the aberrant immune-mediated key players contributing to the pathogenesis of this unique disease. PMID:23579771

  16. Disease associations in eosinophilic oesophagitis and oesophageal eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic infiltration into oesophageal tissue, typical of eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), has been described in several other conditions, including infections, hypersensitivity, and other autoimmune disorders. Since its description, EoE has been associated with an increasing number of diseases also characterized by tissue infiltration, including eosinophilic gastroenteritis and Crohn's disease. While an association between EoE and coeliac disease was previously reported, it is not supported by recent research. In contrast, EoE seems to be common in patients with a history of congenital oesophageal atresia, leading to hypotheses linking both disorders. The prevalence of EoE has also been shown to be eight times higher in patients with connective tissue disorders (CTDs), which has led to the proposal of an EoE-CTD phenotype, although this requires further assessment. This paper reviews the evidence of EoE's associations with several disorders, defining the common bases from an epidemiological, clinical, molecular and genetic perspective whenever possible. PMID:26552775

  17. Distinguishing GERD from eosinophilic oesophagitis: concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Kia, Leila; Hirano, Ikuo

    2015-07-01

    Over the past three decades, the detection of oesophageal mucosal eosinophils has transitioned from a biomarker of GERD to a diagnostic criterion for eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE). In GERD, oesophageal eosinophils are considered part of the chronic inflammatory response to acid reflux, whereas the marked eosinophilia in EoE is viewed as a central feature of the immune response to ingested food and/or environmental antigen stimulation. Descriptions of a considerable subset of patients with symptomatic, endoscopic and histological findings of EoE that resolve with PPI therapy has led to confusion and controversy regarding the distinction of EoE from GERD. Study findings indicate that PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE) more closely resembles EoE than GERD, both from a clinical and immunological aspect. Although responsiveness to PPI therapy should not be utilized to exclude EoE, PPI therapy is effective at reducing oesophageal eosinophilia in ∼40% of patients, and PPI therapy is both a safe and practical initial step in the management of patients with oesophageal eosinophilia. Ongoing studies elucidating the mechanism behind PPI-REE will improve our understanding and management of EoE. In this Review, the mechanisms and evidence that underlie the controversy in the distinction between GERD and EoE are evaluated. PMID:25986303

  18. Allergy and Eosinophil-associated Gastrointestinal Disorders (EGID)

    PubMed Central

    DeBrosse, Charles W.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2008-01-01

    Eosinophil-associated Gastrointestinal Disorders (EGID) are characterized by an inappropriate accumulation of eosinophils within the gastrointestinal tract. The underlying etiology and pathophysiology that lead to development of EGID are far from being elucidated. However, there is growing evidence to support the role of aeroallergens and food allergens in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Recent advances have highlighted the role of Th2 driven cytokines in the development of EGID, and clinical studies have verified that children and adults with EGID often have positive skin testing to food allergens. The most common form of EGID, Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EE), has garnered intense investigation following an increased recognition over the past decade. Recently, there have been several important studies providing insight into both the cellular mechanisms governing EE and in clinical therapies directed toward the treatment of EE. In the article herein, we will review the most recent scientific advances influencing our understanding of EGID with special emphasis on the role of allergens in the pathogenesis of EGID. PMID:18721876

  19. Eosinophil-Associated Gene Pathways but not Eosinophil Numbers are Differentially Regulated between Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Treatment and Synchrotron Broad-Beam Treatment by 48 Hours Postirradiation.

    PubMed

    Ibahim, M J; Yang, Y; Crosbie, J C; Stevenson, A; Cann, L; Paiva, P; Rogers, P A

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron microbeam radiation treatment (MRT) is a preclinical radiotherapy technique with considerable clinical promise, although some of the underlying radiobiology of MRT is still not well understood. In recently reported studies, it has been suggested that MRT elicits a different tumor immune profile compared to broad-beam treatment (BB). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of synchrotron MRT and BB on eosinophil-associated gene pathways and eosinophil numbers within and around the tumor in the acute stage, 48 h postirradiation. Balb/C mice were inoculated with EMT6.5 mouse mammary tumors and irradiated with microbeam radiation (112 and 560 Gy) and broad-beam radiation (5 and 9 Gy) at equivalent doses determined from a previous in vitro study. After tumors were collected 24 and 48 h postirradiation, RNA was extracted and quantitative PCR performed to assess eosinophil-associated gene expression. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect two known markers of eosinophils: eosinophil-associated ribonucleases (EARs) and eosinophil major basic protein (MBP). We identified five genes associated with eosinophil function and recruitment (Ear11, Ccl24, Ccl6, Ccl9 and Ccl11) and all of them, except Ccl11, were differentially regulated in synchrotron microbeam-irradiated tumors compared to broad-beam-irradiated tumors. However, immunohistochemical localization demonstrated no significant differences in the number of EAR- and MBP-positive eosinophils infiltrating the primary tumor after MRT compared to BB. In conclusion, our work demonstrates that the effects of MRT on eosinophil-related gene pathways are different from broad-beam radiation treatment at doses previously demonstrated to be equivalent in an in vitro study. However, a comparison of the microenvironments of tumors, which received MRT and BB, 48 h after exposure showed no difference between them with respect to eosinophil accumulation. These findings contribute to our understanding of the role of differential effects of MRT on the tumor immune response. PMID:26720800

  20. Organ-specific eosinophilic disorders of the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Dagmar; Wardlaw, Andrew; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that increase in various tissues in a variety of disorders. Locally, they can be involved in the initiation and propagation of diverse inflammatory responses. In this review, the clinical association of eosinophils with diseases of the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract is summarized. An approach to determining the causal role of eosinophils in these diseases is presented. Recent findings concerning molecular diagnosis, etiology and treatment are discussed. PMID:20392477

  1. Eosinophils in the 1990s: new perspectives on their role in health and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    Eosinophils are characterized by their unique crystalloid granules that contain four basic proteins--MBP, ECP, EDN and EPO. The cell has many common features with neutrophils but, unlike that cell type, eosinophils utilize VLA-4/VCAM-1 as an adherence pathway and have a number of other receptors not shared by neutrophils. These include recognition units for IgE (distinct from CD23), and receptors for IL-5, IL-3 and RANTES. Following stimulation with a variety of agents, eosinophils preferentially elaborate LTC4 as the major 5-lipoxygenase product of arachidonic acid and produce substantial amounts of PAF. Of particular interest is the ability of eosinophils to synthesize a number of cytokines. Thus eosinophils have marked pro-inflammatory potential. There is now convincing evidence that eosinophilia is T-cell dependent. The Th2-type cell, which selectively secretes IL-5 and IL-4, seems particularly involved. IL-5, IL-3 and GM-CSF are required for eosinophil maturation, and cause activation and prolonged survival of the mature cell. IL-5 is unique in that it promotes terminal differentiation of the committed eosinophil precursor and in vivo in mice appears to be sufficient on its own for eosinophil growth from uncommited stem cells. IL-4 selectively upregulates VCAM-1 expression on endothelial cells thus augmenting VLA-4-dependent eosinophil adhesion. The role of eosinophils in disease is complex but in general their numbers are increased in helminthic parasitic disease and atopic allergy and asthma. Eosinophil products can produce many of the pathological features of asthma, and helminthic larvae coated with immunoglobulin or complement are particularly susceptible to eosinophil-mediated cytotoxicity. Eosinopenia is often related to acute inflammation or stress. PMID:7937446

  2. [Acute myocardial infarction as Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Churg Strauss syndrome) initial presentation].

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Wahinuddin; Seung, Ong Ping; Noor, Sabariah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a rare primary vasculitic disease characterized by hypereosinophilia, late onset asthma and extravascular eosinophil granulomas. We report a case presented initially with acute myocardial infarction which later only proceed with asthma, skin manifestations and peripheral neuropathy. Laboratory parameters showed hypereosinohpilia with negative perinuclear pattern of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (p-ANCA). Skin biopsy showed leucocytoclastic vasculitis with eosinophilic infiltration while coronary angiography was normal. The patient's symptoms improved with IV methylprednisolone, pulse cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. PMID:25627304

  3. Significance of Mouse Models in Dissecting the Mechanism of Human Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Diseases (EGID)

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that eosinophils play a significant role in promoting several gastrointestinal diseases, and animal models are the significant tools to understand the pathogenesis of eosinophil-associatd inflammatory disorders. The focus of this review is on the significance of mouse models that mimic the characteristics of human eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases. Eosinophils are the important leukocytes with diverse functions in the gastrointestinal tract, such as excretion of intestinal parasites and promoting the pathogenesis of a numerous allergic gastrointestinal disorders like food allergy, parasitic infection, allergic gastroenteritis, allergic colitis, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Among these gastrointestinal diseases, the eosinophilic esophagitis is the most recently recognized disease and the mouse models are proven to be an effective tool to understand the pathophysiology of disease and to test novel treatment strategies. Based on patients allergic conditions and the gene overexpressed in human EGID, a number of gene overexpressed and allergen-challenged mouse models of gastrointestinal disorders were developed. These models were utilized to explore the mechanism(s) that promotes the eosinophil-mediated gastrointestinal diseases including the role of the eosinophil responsive cytokines and chemokines. Herein, we have provided a detailed overviews of the mouse models of gastrointestinal disorders that mimic the human eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases and can be utilized as a tool for understanding the diseases pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25866707

  4. Expression microarray analysis identifies novel epithelial-derived protein markers in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Matoso, Andres; Mukkada, Vincent A; Lu, Shaolei; Monahan, Renee; Cleveland, Kelly; Noble, Lelia; Mangray, Shamlal; Resnick, Murray B

    2013-05-01

    Gene expression studies in eosinophilic esophagitis support an immune-mediated etiology associated with differential regulation of inflammatory and epithelial-derived genes. We aimed to further characterize epithelial gene expression alterations in eosinophilic esophagitis and to explore the use of immunohistochemistry to identify these alterations. Esophageal biopsies from pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis before and after therapy with topical steroids (N=7) were screened by gene expression microarray and results were validated by RT-PCR. A larger group of eosinophilic esophagitis patients (N=42) was then used to evaluate protein expression by immunohistochemistry compared with reflux patients (N=15) and normal controls (N=17). Microarray and RT-PCR studies identified overexpression of ALOX15 and tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced factor 6 (TNFAIP6) and underexpression of filaggrin (FLG), SLURP1 and cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP3) in eosinophilic esophagitis. Immunohistochemistry for ALOX15 was positive in 95% of eosinophilic esophagitis and negative in all controls, all eosinophilic esophagitis after therapy and all reflux biopsies (P<0.001). TNFAIP6 was positive in 88% of eosinophilic esophagitis samples versus 47% of controls, 29% of eosinophilic esophagitis after therapy and 40% of reflux samples (P=0.002). Overexpression of both ALOX15 and TNFAIP6 directly correlated with the degree of eosinophilic infiltration. FLG was positive in 88% of controls and 100% of reflux biopsies, but negative in all eosinophilic esophagitis samples, and its expression was regained in 86% of eosinophilic esophagitis after therapy patients (P<0.001). SLURP1 expression was positive in all controls and reflux samples, but only positive in 5% of eosinophilic esophagitis and was re-expressed to 100% positivity in eosinophilic esophagitis after therapy patients (P<0.001). The majority of controls (89%) and reflux biopsies (100%) were positive for CRISP3 while eosinophilic esophagitis before therapy were positive in 14% of samples (P<0.001) with partial recovery after treatment (43%, P=0.105). This study identified five epithelial-derived markers differentially expressed in eosinophilic esophagitis easily detectable by immunohistochemistry with potential diagnostic utility. PMID:23503644

  5. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor-Activated Eosinophils Promote Interleukin-23 Driven Chronic Colitis.

    PubMed

    Griseri, Thibault; Arnold, Isabelle C; Pearson, Claire; Krausgruber, Thomas; Schiering, Chris; Franchini, Fanny; Schulthess, Julie; McKenzie, Brent S; Crocker, Paul R; Powrie, Fiona

    2015-07-21

    The role of intestinal eosinophils in immune homeostasis is enigmatic and the molecular signals that drive them from protective to tissue damaging are unknown. Most commonly associated with Th2 cell-mediated diseases, we describe a role for eosinophils as crucial effectors of the interleukin-23 (IL-23)-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) axis in colitis. Chronic intestinal inflammation was characterized by increased bone marrow eosinopoiesis and accumulation of activated intestinal eosinophils. IL-5 blockade or eosinophil depletion ameliorated colitis, implicating eosinophils in disease pathogenesis. GM-CSF was a potent activator of eosinophil effector functions and intestinal accumulation, and GM-CSF blockade inhibited chronic colitis. By contrast neutrophil accumulation was GM-CSF independent and dispensable for colitis. In addition to TNF secretion, release of eosinophil peroxidase promoted colitis identifying direct tissue-toxic mechanisms. Thus, eosinophils are key perpetrators of chronic inflammation and tissue damage in IL-23-mediated immune diseases and it suggests the GM-CSF-eosinophil axis as an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26200014

  6. Bronchoalveolar lavage and technetium-99m glucoheptonate imaging in chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Lieske, T.R.; Sunderrajan, E.V.; Passamonte, P.M.

    1984-02-01

    A patient with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia was evaluated using bronchoalveolar lavage, technetium-99m glucoheptonate, and transbronchial lung biopsy. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed 43 percent eosinophils and correlated well with results of transbronchial lung biopsy. Technetium-99m glucoheptonate lung imaging demonstrated intense parenchymal uptake. After eight weeks of corticosteroid therapy, the bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophil population and the technetium-99m glucoheptonate uptake had returned to normal. We suggest that bronchoalveolar lavage, with transbronchial lung biopsy, is a less invasive way than open lung biopsy to diagnose chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. The mechanism of uptake of technetium-99m glucoheptonate in this disorder remains to be defined.

  7. Clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and resource utilization in children and adults with eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Craig; Woosley, John T.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare condition where eosinophilic inflammation occurs in the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of secondary causes. Little is known regarding aetiology, pathogenesis, or natural history. Aims To characterize the clinical, endoscopic, and histopathologic features of eosinophilic gastroenteritis and to summarize treatment outcomes. Methods Pathologic reports of all patients who had undergone upper endoscopy with biopsy between January 1, 2000 and June 20, 2013 were reviewed. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis was diagnosed if there were ≥20 eosinophils/hpf on either gastric of duodenal biopsy, symptoms attributable to the gastrointestinal tract, and no known secondary cause of eosinophilia. Descriptive statistics characterized patients diagnosed with eosinophilic gastroenteritis and bivariate analysis compared adults and children. Results There were 44 patients diagnosed with eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease. The most common symptoms were vomiting (71%) and abdominal pain (62%). Of the eosinophilic gastroenteritis cases, 12 (30%) had esophageal involvement, and 11 (28%) had colonic involvement. For treatment, 36 (80%) received corticosteroids. Overall, 27 (60%) had symptom resolution and 23 (51%) had endoscopic resolution. Cases underwent a mean of five endoscopic procedures per year. Conclusion Eosinophilic gastroenteritis presents with non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms and in almost one-third of cases has concomitant esophageal or colonic involvement. It remains difficult to treat, with high rates of endoscopic utilization. PMID:25547198

  8. A Player and Coordinator: The Versatile Roles of Eosinophils in the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hai; Liao, Wei; Wang, Ling; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Eosinophils have traditionally been associated with allergic diseases and parasite infection. Research advances in the recent decades have brought evolutionary changes in our understanding of eosinophil biology and its roles in immunity. It is currently recognized that eosinophils play multiple roles in both innate and adaptive immunity. As effector cells in innate immunity, eosinophils exert a pro-inflammatory and destructive role in the Th2 immune response associated with allergic inflammation or parasite infection. Eosinophils can also be recruited by danger signals released by pathogen infections or tissue injury, inducing host defense against parasitic, fungal, bacterial or viral infection or promoting tissue repair and remodeling. Eosinophils also serve as nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells in response to allergen challenge or helminth infection, and, meanwhile, are known to function as a versatile coordinator that actively regulates or interacts with various immune cells including T lymphocytes and dendritic cells. More roles of eosinophils implicated in immunity have been proposed including in immune homeostasis, allograft rejection, and anti-tumor immunity. Eosinophil interactions with structural cells are also implicated in the mechanisms in allergic inflammation and in Helicobacter pylori gastritis. These multifaceted roles of eosinophils as both players and coordinators in immune system are discussed in this review. PMID:27226792

  9. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor-Activated Eosinophils Promote Interleukin-23 Driven Chronic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Griseri, Thibault; Arnold, IsabelleC.; Pearson, Claire; Krausgruber, Thomas; Schiering, Chris; Franchini, Fanny; Schulthess, Julie; McKenzie, BrentS.; Crocker, PaulR.; Powrie, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Summary The role of intestinal eosinophils in immune homeostasis is enigmatic and the molecular signals that drive them from protective to tissue damaging are unknown. Most commonly associated with Th2 cell-mediated diseases, we describe a role for eosinophils as crucial effectors of the interleukin-23 (IL-23)-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) axis in colitis. Chronic intestinal inflammation was characterized by increased bone marrow eosinopoiesis and accumulation of activated intestinal eosinophils. IL-5 blockade or eosinophil depletion ameliorated colitis, implicating eosinophils in disease pathogenesis. GM-CSF was a potent activator of eosinophil effector functions and intestinal accumulation, and GM-CSF blockade inhibited chronic colitis. By contrast neutrophil accumulation was GM-CSF independent and dispensable for colitis. In addition to TNF secretion, release of eosinophil peroxidase promoted colitis identifying direct tissue-toxic mechanisms. Thus, eosinophils are key perpetrators of chronic inflammation and tissue damage in IL-23-mediated immune diseases and it suggests the GM-CSF-eosinophil axis as an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26200014

  10. Circulating Human Eosinophils Share a Similar Transcriptional Profile in Asthma and Other Hypereosinophilic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barnig, Cindy; Dembélé, Doulaye; Paul, Nicodème; Poirot, Anh; Uring-Lambert, Béatrice; Georgel, Philippe; de Blay, Fréderic; Bahram, Seiamak

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are leukocytes that are released into the peripheral blood in a phenotypically mature state and are capable of being recruited into tissues in response to appropriate stimuli. Eosinophils, traditionally considered cytotoxic effector cells, are leukocytes recruited into the airways of asthma patients where they are believed to contribute to the development of many features of the disease. This perception, however, has been challenged by recent findings suggesting that eosinophils have also immunomodulatory functions and may be involved in tissue homeostasis and wound healing. Here we describe a transcriptome-based approach–in a limited number of patients and controls—to investigate the activation state of circulating human eosinophils isolated by flow cytometry. We provide an overview of the global expression pattern in eosinophils in various relevant conditions, e.g., eosinophilic asthma, hypereosinophilic dermatological diseases, parasitosis and pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to healthy subjects, circulating eosinophils isolated from asthma patients differed in their gene expression profile which is marked by downregulation of transcripts involved in antigen presentation, pathogen recognition and mucosal innate immunity, whereas up-regulated genes were involved in response to non-specific stimulation, wounding and maintenance of homeostasis. Eosinophils from other hypereosinophilic disorders displayed a very similar transcriptional profile. Taken together, these observations seem to indicate that eosinophils exhibit non-specific immunomodulatory functions important for tissue repair and homeostasis and suggest new roles for these cells in asthma immunobiology. PMID:26524763

  11. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions acute promyelocytic leukemia acute promyelocytic leukemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Acute promyelocytic leukemia is a form of acute myeloid leukemia, a ...

  13. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Monoclonal antibody therapy is a type of targeted therapy used to treat hairy cell leukemia. Monoclonal antibody therapy uses antibodies made in the laboratory from ...

  14. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  15. CT findings in leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1984-12-01

    Review of 84 computed tomographic (CT) scans in leukemic patients demonstrate a wide spectrum of abnormalities. Findings caused by leukemia were lymphadenopathy, visceral enlargement, focal defects, and tissue infiltration. Hemorrhage was by far the most common complication and could usually be characterized on the noncontrast CT scan. The distinction between old hematomas, foci of infection, and leukemia infiltration could not be made with certainty without CT-guided aspiration. Unusual instances of sepsis, such as microabscesses of the liver and typhlitis, were seen.

  16. Eosinophil-Derived Neurotoxin (EDN/RNase 2) and the Mouse Eosinophil-Associated RNases (mEars): Expanding Roles in Promoting Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2015-01-01

    The eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN/RNase2) and its divergent orthologs, the mouse eosinophil-associated RNases (mEars), are prominent secretory proteins of eosinophilic leukocytes and are all members of the larger family of RNase A-type ribonucleases. While EDN has broad antiviral activity, targeting RNA viruses via mechanisms that may require enzymatic activity, more recent studies have elucidated how these RNases may generate host defense via roles in promoting leukocyte activation, maturation, and chemotaxis. This review provides an update on recent discoveries, and highlights the versatility of this family in promoting innate immunity. PMID:26184157

  17. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  18. Thrombosis and acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Solís, Erick

    2012-04-01

    Thrombosis is a common complication in patients with acute leukemia. While the presence of central venous lines, concomitant steroids, the use of Escherichia coli asparaginase and hereditary thrombophilic abnormalities are known risk factors for thrombosis in children, information on the pathogenesis, risk factors, and clinical outcome of thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still scarce. Expert consensus and guidelines regarding leukemia-specific risk factors, thrombosis prevention, and treatment strategies, as well as optimal type of central venous catheter in acute leukemia patients are required. It is likely that each subtype of acute leukemia represents a different setting for the development of thrombosis and the risk of bleeding. This is perhaps due to a combination of different disease-specific pathogenic mechanisms of thrombosis, including the type of chemotherapy protocol chosen, the underlying patients health, associated risk factors, as well as the biology of the disease itself. The risk of thrombosis may also vary according to ethnicity and prevalence of hereditary risk factors for thrombosis; thus, it is advisable for Latin American, Asian, and African countries to report on their specific patient population. PMID:22507812

  19. Leukemias in telephone linemen

    SciTech Connect

    Obrams, G.I.

    1988-01-01

    An epidemiologic case-control study was conducted to assess the risk of leukemia in telephone linemen. Linemen work in close proximity to power distribution lines mounted on poles shared between the electrical utilities and the telephone companies. They are exposed to the associated electromagnetic fields, which have been suggested as a cause of leukemia. All deaths from leukemia that occurred among active or retired telephone company employees between 9175 and 1980 were identified. Study cases included all 222 active or pensioned employees who worked at least two years for AT T, were identified through the AT T mortality data base, died of leukemia other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the six-year period 1975-1980, and did not have another underlying hematologic cancer. Specific cell types of leukemia were identified from death certificates and company medical records. Six hundred and eighty-seven controls were selected from the Bell System Personnel Data Base, matched to the cases by age, sex, company and year of hire.

  20. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.A.; LeBeau, M.M.; Vardiman, J.W.; Rowley, J.D.

    1996-12-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase 11, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11 q23 or 21 q22. The MLL gene at 11 q23 or the AML1 gene at 21 q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 1 1 q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11 q23 or 21 q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Larson, R A; LeBeau, M M; Vardiman, J W; Rowley, J D

    1996-01-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogenic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase II, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11q23 or 21q22. The MLL gene at 11q23 or the AML1 gene at 21q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 11q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11q23 or 21q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. PMID:9118910

  2. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  3. Re-defining the Unique Roles for Eosinophils in Allergic Respiratory Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The role of eosinophils in the progression and resolution of allergic respiratory inflammation is poorly defined despite the commonality of their presence and in some cases their use as a biomarker for disease severity and/or symptom control. However, this ambiguity belies the wealth of insights that have recently been gained through the use of eosinophil-deficient/attenuated strains of mice that have demonstrated novel immunoregulatory and remodeling/repair functions for these cells in the lung following allergen provocation. Specifically, studies of eosinophil-deficient mice suggest that eosinophils contribute to events occurring in the lungs following allergen provocation at several key moments: (i) The initiating phase of events leading to Th2-polarized pulmonary inflammation, (ii) The suppression Th1/Th17 pathways in lung draining lymph nodes, (iii) The recruitment of effector Th2 T cells to the lung, and finally (iv) Mechanisms of inflammatory resolution that re-establish pulmonary homeostasis. These suggested functions have recently been confirmed and expanded upon using allergen provocation of an inducible eosinophil-deficient strain of mice (iPHIL) that demonstrated an eosinophil-dependent mechanism(s) leading to Th2 dominated immune responses in the presence of eosinophils in contrast to neutrophilic as well as mixed Th1/Th17/Th2 variant phenotypes in the absence of eosinophils. These findings highlighted that eosinophils are not exclusively downstream mediators controlled by T cells, dendritic cells (DC), and/or innate lymphocytic cells (ILC2). Instead, eosinophils appear to be more aptly described as significant contributors in complex interrelated pathways that lead to pulmonary inflammation and subsequently promote resolution and the re-establishment of homeostatic baseline. In this review we summarize and put into the context the evolving hypotheses that are now expanding our understanding of the roles eosinophils likely have in the lung following allergen provocation. PMID:24961290

  4. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Organizing pneumonia and pulmonary eosinophilic infiltration associated with daptomycin.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Cobb E; Kimbrough RC; Nugent KM; Phy MP

    2007-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of organizing pneumonia with pulmonary eosinophilic infiltrates in a patient receiving daptomycin.CASE SUMMARY: An 84-year-old man developed bilateral, irregularly shaped nodules and infiltrates in the mid and peripheral lung and multiple mediastinal lymph nodes following treatment with intravenous daptomycin for infection of his left knee prosthesis. His other symptoms included decreased appetite, weight loss (6.8 kg over 4-6 wk), malaise, and generalized weakness after 4 weeks of daptomycin therapy. Transthoracic needle biopsy revealed organizing pneumonia with scattered eosinophils. His symptoms and results of computed tomography (CT) scan improved in the month following discontinuation of daptomycin. The Naranjo probability scale indicated a probable reaction to daptomycin.DISCUSSION: Pulmonary reactions have been reported with numerous drugs and have a wide range of clinical and radiographic presentations. Clinical trials have shown that daptomycin is well tolerated and has an adverse effect profile similar to that of vancomycin and the semisynthetic penicillins. This case report suggests that chronic use of daptomycin caused organizing pneumonia with eosinophilic infiltrates in a patient treated for an infected knee prosthesis. A definite mechanism for this reaction is not known. We speculate that the chronic administration of daptomycin allowed drug accumulation in surfactant in the alveolar spaces. This may result in higher concentrations of drug near the alveolar epithelial surface, which could injure the epithelium, resulting in organizing pneumonia.CONCLUSIONS: Development of new pulmonary infiltrates in patients treated with chronic daptomycin therapy should alert healthcare workers to this potential association.

  6. Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells’ syndrome) caused by a temporary henna tattoo

    PubMed Central

    Celegen, Mehmet; Karkıner, Canan Sule Unsal; Günay, Ilker; Diniz, Güllden; Can, Demet

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells’ syndrome) is an uncommon condition of unknown etiology. Wells’ syndrome is usually seen in adulthood but very rare in childhood. Although pathogenesis of the disease is not very clear, it is a hypersensitivity reaction developing against a variety of exogenous and endogenous antigenic stimuli. Paraphenylenediamine is a strong allergen frequently used as a temporary henna tattoo, which makes the color darker. Here, a 9-year-old male patient with Wells’ syndrome is presented, which developed following a temporary henna tattoo and shown by the patch test sensitivity to paraphenylenediamine. PMID:25395929

  7. Current Diagnostic and Therapeutic Aspects of Eosinophilic Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Kuchynka, Petr; Palecek, Tomas; Masek, Martin; Cerny, Vladimir; Lambert, Lukas; Vitkova, Ivana; Linhart, Ales

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic myocarditis (EM) represents a rare form of myocardial inflammation with very heterogeneous aetiology. In developed countries, the most prevalent causes of EM are hypersensitivity or allergic reactions, as well as hematological diseases leading to eosinophilia. The disease may have a variable clinical presentation, ranging from asymptomatic forms to life-threatening conditions. Most patients with EM have marked eosinophilia in peripheral blood. Endomyocardial biopsy needs to be performed in most cases in order to establish a definitive diagnosis of EM. The therapy depends on the underlying aetiology. Immunosuppressive therapy represents the treatment mainstay in the majority of EM forms. PMID:26885504

  8. Invariant Natural Killer T cells in children with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Jyonouchi, Soma; Smith, Cara Lea; Saretta, Francesca; Abraham, Valsamma; Ruymann, Kathryn R; Modayur-Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna; Wang, Mei-Lun; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Cianferoni, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an atopic disease characterized by eosinophilic inflammation in which dietary antigens (in particular, milk) play a major role. EoE is most likely a mixed IgE and non-IgE food-mediated reaction in which over-expression of Th2 cytokines, particularly IL-13, play a major role; however, the cells responsible for IL-13 over-expression remain elusive. Th2-cytokines are secreted following the ligation of invariant natural killer T cell receptors to sphingolipids (SL). Sphingolipids (SL) are presented via the CD1d molecule on the INKT cell surface. Cow’s milk-derived SL has been shown to activate iNKTs from children with IgE-mediated food allergies to milk (FA-MA) to produce Th2 cytokines. The role of iNKTs and milk-SL in EoE pathogenesis is currently unknown. Objective To investigate the role of iNKTs and milk-SL in EoE. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 10 children with active EoE (EoE-A), 10 children with controlled EoE (EoE-C), and 16 healthy controls (Non-EoE) were measured ex-vivo and then incubated with α-galactosylceramide (αGal) and milk-SL. INKTs from peripheral blood (PB) and esophageal biopsies were studied. Results EoE-A-children had significantly fewer peripheral blood iNKTs with a greater Th2-response to αGal and milk-SM compared to iNKTs of EoE-C and Non-EoE children. Additionally, EoE-A children had increased iNKT levels in esophageal biopsies compared to EoE-C children. Conclusion Milk-SLs are able to activate peripheral blood iNKTs in EoE-A children to produce Th2 cytokines. Additionally, iNKT levels are higher at the site of active esophageal eosinophilic inflammation. Clinical Relevance This study suggests that sphingolipids (SL) contained in milk may drive the development of EoE by promoting an iNKT cell-mediated Th2-type cytokine response that facilitates eosinophil-mediated allergic inflammation. PMID:24118614

  9. Chronic Cough and Eosinophilic Esophagitis: An Uncommon Association

    PubMed Central

    Orizio, Paolo; Cinquini, Massimo; Minetti, Stefano; Alberti, Daniele; Paolo, Camilla Di; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Torri, Fabio; Crispino, Paola; Facchetti, Susanna; Rizzini, Fabio Lodi; Bassotti, Gabrio; Tosoni, Cinzia

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of children, usually with gastrointestinal symptoms, is diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis (EE), and a particular subset of these patients complains of airway manifestations. We present the case of a 2-year-old child with chronic dry cough in whom EE was found after a first diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) due to pathological 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. Traditional allergologic tests were negative, while patch tests were diagnostic for cow's milk allergy. We discuss the intriguing relationship between GERD and EE and the use of patch test for the allergologic screening of patients. PMID:21960955

  10. Anticipation in familial leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, M.; Goode, E. L.; Jarvik, G. P.

    1996-01-01

    Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. PMID:8900225

  11. Anticipation in familial leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.; Jarvik, G.P.; Goode, E.L.

    1996-11-01

    Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. 55 refs., 4 figs.

  12. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissue What is chronic lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... cancers start and spread, see What Is Cancer? Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a type of cancer that starts ...

  13. Eosinophils and IL-4 Support Nematode Growth Coincident with an Innate Response to Tissue Injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Beiting, Daniel P; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G; Gagliardo, Lucille F; Ruyechan, Maura C; Lee, Nancy A; Lee, James J; Appleton, Judith A

    2015-12-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the functions of eosinophils extend beyond host defense and allergy to metabolism and tissue regeneration. These influences have strong potential to be relevant in worm infections in which eosinophils are prominent and parasites rely on the host for nutrients to support growth or reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the observation that eosinophils promote growth of Trichinella spiralis larvae in skeletal muscle. Our results indicate that IL-4 and eosinophils are necessary for normal larval growth and that eosinophils from IL-4 competent mice are sufficient to support growth. The eosinophil-mediated effect operates in the absence of adaptive immunity. Following invasion by newborn larvae, host gene expression in skeletal muscle was compatible with a regenerative response and a shift in the source of energy in infected tissue. The presence of eosinophils suppressed local inflammation while also influencing nutrient homeostasis in muscle. Redistribution of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and phosphorylation of Akt were observed in nurse cells, consistent with enhancement of glucose uptake and glycogen storage by larvae that is known to occur. The data are consistent with a mechanism in which eosinophils promote larval growth by an IL-4 dependent mechanism that limits local interferon-driven responses that otherwise alter nutrient metabolism in infected muscle. Our findings document a novel interaction between parasite and host in which worms have evolved a strategy to co-opt an innate host cell response in a way that facilitates their growth. PMID:26720604

  14. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10-40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  15. Functional Analysis of Free Fatty Acid Receptor GPR120 in Human Eosinophils: Implications in Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Yasunori; Ueki, Shigeharu; Takeda, Masahide; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Tamaki, Mami; Moritoki, Yuki; Oyamada, Hajime; Itoga, Masamichi; Kayaba, Hiroyuki; Omokawa, Ayumi; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that eosinophils play an important role in metabolic homeostasis through Th2 cytokine production. GPR120 (FFA4) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for long-chain fatty acids that functions as a regulator of physiological energy metabolism. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether human eosinophils express GPR120 and, if present, whether it possesses a functional capacity on eosinophils. Eosinophils isolated from peripheral venous blood expressed GPR120 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation with a synthetic GPR120 agonist, GW9508, induced rapid down-regulation of cell surface expression of GPR120, suggesting ligand-dependent receptor internalization. Although GPR120 activation did not induce eosinophil chemotactic response and degranulation, we found that GW9508 inhibited eosinophil spontaneous apoptosis and Fas receptor expression. The anti-apoptotic effect was attenuated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors and was associated with inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Eosinophil response investigated using ELISpot assay indicated that stimulation with a GPR120 agonist induced IL-4 secretion. These findings demonstrate the novel functional properties of fatty acid sensor GPR120 on human eosinophils and indicate the previously unrecognized link between nutrient metabolism and the immune system. PMID:25790291

  16. IL-1β in eosinophil-mediated small intestinal homeostasis and IgA production.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y; Wen, T; Mingler, M K; Caldwell, J M; Wang, Y H; Chaplin, D D; Lee, E H; Jang, M H; Woo, S Y; Seoh, J Y; Miyasaka, M; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-07-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that reside in the gastrointestinal (GI) lamina propria, where their basal function remains largely unexplored. In this study, by examining mice with a selective deficiency of systemic eosinophils (by lineage ablation) or GI eosinophils (eotaxin-1/2 double deficient or CC chemokine receptor 3 deficient), we show that eosinophils support immunoglobulin A (IgA) class switching, maintain intestinal mucus secretions, affect intestinal microbial composition, and promote the development of Peyer's patches. Eosinophil-deficient mice showed reduced expression of mediators of secretory IgA production, including intestinal interleukin 1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase, lymphotoxin (LT) α, and LT-β, and reduced levels of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t-positive (ROR-γt(+)) innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), while maintaining normal levels of APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand), BAFF (B cell-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family), and TGF-β (transforming growth factor β). GI eosinophils expressed a relatively high level of IL-1β, and IL-1β-deficient mice manifested the altered gene expression profiles observed in eosinophil-deficient mice and decreased levels of IgA(+) cells and ROR-γt(+) ILCs. On the basis of these collective data, we propose that eosinophils are required for homeostatic intestinal immune responses including IgA production and that their affect is mediated via IL-1β in the small intestine. PMID:25563499

  17. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10–40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  18. Eosinophils and IL-4 Support Nematode Growth Coincident with an Innate Response to Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lu; Beiting, Daniel P.; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G.; Gagliardo, Lucille F.; Ruyechan, Maura C.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.; Appleton, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the functions of eosinophils extend beyond host defense and allergy to metabolism and tissue regeneration. These influences have strong potential to be relevant in worm infections in which eosinophils are prominent and parasites rely on the host for nutrients to support growth or reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the observation that eosinophils promote growth of Trichinella spiralis larvae in skeletal muscle. Our results indicate that IL-4 and eosinophils are necessary for normal larval growth and that eosinophils from IL-4 competent mice are sufficient to support growth. The eosinophil-mediated effect operates in the absence of adaptive immunity. Following invasion by newborn larvae, host gene expression in skeletal muscle was compatible with a regenerative response and a shift in the source of energy in infected tissue. The presence of eosinophils suppressed local inflammation while also influencing nutrient homeostasis in muscle. Redistribution of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and phosphorylation of Akt were observed in nurse cells, consistent with enhancement of glucose uptake and glycogen storage by larvae that is known to occur. The data are consistent with a mechanism in which eosinophils promote larval growth by an IL-4 dependent mechanism that limits local interferon-driven responses that otherwise alter nutrient metabolism in infected muscle. Our findings document a novel interaction between parasite and host in which worms have evolved a strategy to co-opt an innate host cell response in a way that facilitates their growth. PMID:26720604

  19. Malignant lymphoma presenting with a high eosinophilia, eosinophilic pleurisy, and pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, A. H.; Mejia, G.

    1969-01-01

    Two cases of malignant lymphoma with an unusually high eosinophilia are reported. The first patient presented with eosinophilic pleural effusion, developed eosinophilic pericarditis and tamponade, and was found at thoracotomy to have lymphosarcoma. The occurrence in malignant lymphoma of these uncommon features is briefly reviewed. The development of a pleurobronchial fistula is also described as an alarming complication of pleural paracentesis. PMID:5818234

  20. IL-1β in eosinophil-mediated small intestinal homeostasis and IgA production

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Y; Wen, T; Mingler, MK; Caldwell, JM; Wang, YH; Chaplin, DD; Lee, EH; Jang, MH; Woo, SY; Seoh, JY; Miyasaka, M; Rothenberg, ME

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that reside in the gastrointestinal (GI) lamina propria, where their basal function remains largely unexplored. In this study, by examining mice with a selective deficiency of systemic eosinophils (by lineage ablation) or GI eosinophils (eotaxin-1/2 double–deficient or CC chemokine receptor 3–deficient), we show that eosinophils support immunoglobulin A (IgA) class switching, maintain intestinal mucus secretions, affect intestinal microbial composition, and promote the development of Peyer’s patches. Eosinophil-deficient mice showed reduced expression of mediators of secretory IgA production, including intestinal interleukin 1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase, lymphotoxin (LT) α, and LT-β, and reduced levels of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t–positive (ROR-γt+) innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) while maintaining normal levels of APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand), BAFF (B cell–activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family), and TGF-β (transforming growth factor β). GI eosinophils expressed a relatively high level of IL-1β, and IL-1β–deficient mice manifested the altered gene expression profiles observed in eosinophil-deficient mice and decreased levels of IgA+ cells and ROR-γt+ ILCs. On the basis of these collective data, we propose that eosinophils are required for homeostatic intestinal immune responses including IgA production and that their affect is mediated via IL-1β in the small intestine. PMID:25563499

  1. Viscous topical is more effective than nebulized steroid therapy for patients with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Dellon, Evan S; Sheikh, Arif; Speck, Olga; Woodward, Kimberly; Whitlow, Ann B; Hores, Jessica M; Ivanovic, Marija; Chau, Allen; Woosley, John T; Madanick, Ryan D; Orlando, Roy C; Shaheen, Nicholas J

    2012-08-01

    We performed a randomized trial to compare nebulized and viscous topical corticosteroid treatments for eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Subjects with incident EoE (n = 25) received budesonide 1 mg twice daily, either nebulized and then swallowed (NEB) or as an oral viscous slurry (OVB), for 8 weeks. Baseline eosinophil counts for the NEB and OVB groups were 101 and 83 (P = .62). Posttreatment counts were 89 and 11 (P = .02). The mucosal medication contact time, measured by scintigraphy, was higher for the OVB group than the NEB group (P < .005) and was inversely correlated with eosinophil count (R = -0.67; P = .001). OVB was more effective than NEB in reducing numbers of esophageal eosinophils in patients with EoE. OVB provided a significantly higher level of esophageal exposure to the therapeutic agent, which correlated with lower eosinophil counts. PMID:22561055

  2. Localization of Eosinophilic Esophagitis from H&E stained images using multispectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study is an initial investigation on the capability of multispectral imaging to capture subtle spectral information that would enable the automatic delineation between the eosinophilic esophagitis and other eosin stained tissue components, especially the RBCs. In the method, a principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the spectral transmittance samples of the different tissue components, excluding however the transmittance samples of the eosinophilic esophagitis. From the average spectral error configuration of the eosinophilic esophagitis transmittance samples, i.e. the difference between the actual transmittance and the estimated transmittance using m PC vectors, we indentified two spectral bands by which we can localize the eosinophils. Initial results show the possibility of automatically localizing the eosinophilic esophagitis by utilizing spectral information. PMID:21489190

  3. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Two Patients with Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frech, Tracy M.; Boynton, Kathleen; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Jones, Bryan; Kriesel, John D.; Peterson, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is the most common extracutaneous organ system damaged in systemic sclerosis (SSc) and is the presenting feature in 10% of patients. The esophagus as the portion of the GIT is the most commonly affected and there is an association of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) with SSc interstitial lung disease (ILD). Thus, an aggressive treatment for GER is recommended in all SSc patients with ILD; however, it is recognized that a long-term benefit to this treatment is needed to understand its impact. In this case report we discuss the presence of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) in two SSc patients and discuss the role for early EGD in SSc patients with moderate-severe GER symptoms for tissue study. Assessment of esophageal biopsy specimens for the presence of eosinophils and possibly ANA can help elucidate disease pathogenesis and direct therapy, as the presence of EoE in SSc has important management considerations, particularly with regards to dietary modification strategies. PMID:26904346

  4. Update on Eosinophilic Meningoencephalitis and Its Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; da Silva, Ana Cristina Arámburu; Yoshimura, Kentaro

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis is caused by a variety of helminthic infections. These worm-specific infections are named after the causative worm genera, the most common being angiostrongyliasis, gnathostomiasis, toxocariasis, cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, baylisascariasis, and paragonimiasis. Worm parasites enter an organism through ingestion of contaminated water or an intermediate host and can eventually affect the central nervous system (CNS). These infections are potentially serious events leading to sequelae or death, and diagnosis depends on currently limited molecular methods. Identification of parasites in fluids and tissues is rarely possible, while images and clinical examinations do not lead to a definitive diagnosis. Treatment usually requires the concomitant administration of corticoids and anthelminthic drugs, yet new compounds and their extensive and detailed clinical evaluation are much needed. Eosinophilia in fluids may be detected in other infectious and noninfectious conditions, such as neoplastic disease, drug use, and prosthesis reactions. Thus, distinctive identification of eosinophils in fluids is a necessary component in the etiologic diagnosis of CNS infections. PMID:19366917

  5. Immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinical pathologic disease characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilia of the esophagus. When the diagnosis is confirmed, it is important to treat the eosinophilic inflammation not only to control the presenting symptoms, but also to prevent acute and chronic complications. The pathogenesis of EoE is most likely a mixed IgE and non-IgE food-mediated reaction, where Th2 cytokines drive esophageal eosinophilia as in other atopic diseases. Hence, it is not surprising that therapy is based on inflammation control, with steroids (oral or topical) and/or food antigen avoidance. However, these treatment options are not specific, reduce the quality of life of patients and have significant side effects, therefore, there is an ongoing effort to design more specific immunotherapies. In this review, we review standard and immunotherapeutic options for EoE treatment, such as anti-IL-5, anti-TNFα, anti-IgE, anti-CRTH, oral allergy desensitization and environmental immunotherapy. PMID:24762076

  6. Recent discoveries and emerging therapeutics in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Aakash; Cheng, Edaire

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergy-mediated disease culminating in severe eosinophilic inflammation and dysfunction of the esophagus. This chronic disorder of the esophagus causes significant morbidity, poor quality of life, and complications involving fibrosis and esophageal remodeling. Overlapping features between EoE and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) pose great challenges to differentiating the two conditions, although the two disorders are not mutually exclusive. Recent findings suggest that the confounding condition proton pump inhibitor - responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE) is likely a subset of EoE. Since PPIs have therapeutic properties that can benefit EoE, PPIs should be considered as a therapeutic option for EoE rather than a diagnostic screen to differentiate GERD, PPI-REE, and EoE. Other current treatments include dietary therapy, corticosteroids, and dilation. Immunomodulators and biologic agents might have therapeutic value, and larger trials are needed to assess efficacy and safety. Understanding the pathophysiology of EoE is critical to the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:26855809

  7. Elimination diets in the management of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Schwartz, Sally; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis, an increasingly recognized chronic inflammatory disorder isolated to the esophagus, is triggered by an abnormal allergic response to dietary antigens. Current treatment includes swallowed topical steroids and dietary modification, which aim to resolve symptoms and prevent long-term complications such as formation of strictures. The dietary approach has become more widely accepted because long-term steroid therapy is associated with potential risks. Dietary treatment includes elemental and elimination diets. An exclusive elemental diet, which requires replacement of all intact protein with amino acid-based formula, offers the best response of all available therapies, with remission in up to 96% of subjects proving it to be superior to all other available therapies including topical steroids. However, compliance with this approach is challenging because of poor taste and monotony. The high cost of formula and the associated psychosocial problems are additional drawbacks of this approach. Empiric and allergy test-directed elimination diets have gained popularity given that elimination of a limited number of foods is much easier and as such is more readily acceptable. There is a growing body of literature supporting this type of therapy in both children and adults. This paper reviews the evidence for all types of dietary therapy in eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:24920928

  8. Eosinophilic Cholangitis—A Challenging Diagnosis of Benign Biliary Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Fragulidis, Georgios Panagiotis; Vezakis, Antonios I.; Kontis, Elissaios A.; Pantiora, Eirini V.; Stefanidis, Gerasimos G.; Politi, Aikaterini N.; Koutoulidis, Vasilios K.; Mela, Maria K.; Polydorou, Andreas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract When confronting a biliary stricture, both benign and malignant etiologies must be carefully considered as a variety of benign biliary strictures can masquerade as hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Therefore, patients could undergo a major surgery despite the possibility of a benign biliary disease. Approximately 15% to 24% of patients undergoing surgical resection for suspected biliary malignancy will have benign pathology. Eosinophilic cholangitis (EC) is a rare benign disorder of the biliary tract, which can cause obstructive jaundice and can pose a difficult diagnostic task. We present a rare case of a young woman who was referred to our hospital with obstructive painless jaundice due to a biliary stricture at the confluence of the hepatic bile ducts, with a provisional diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. Though, during her work up she was found to have EC, an extremely rare benign cause of biliary stricture, which is characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltration of the biliary tree causing stricturing, fibrosis, and obstruction and which is reversible with short-term high-dose steroids. Despite its rarity, EC should be taken into consideration when imaging modalities demonstrate a biliary stricture, especially if preoperative diagnosis of malignancy cannot be made, in the setting of peripheral eosinophilia and the absence of cardinal symptoms of malignancy. PMID:26735539

  9. [Acantholysis and eosinophilic spongiosis: pemphigus herpetiformis. Successful retinoid therapy].

    PubMed

    Bauer, R; Stadler, R; Immel, C; Orfanos, C E

    1983-01-01

    Pemphigus herpetiformis is an unusual variant of the pemphigus group, showing acantholytic bulla formation together with marked eosinophilic spongiosis. The clinical picture shows erythematous and pruritic papulovesicular bullous lesions affecting the skin and the oral mucosa. It most closely resembles dermatitis herpetiformis or bullous pemphigoid. In contrast, the presence of acantholysis and of antiepithelial antibodies indicate pemphigus. Three patients, all women, showing this unusual variant of pemphigus, were seen during the last 3 years, a fourth is reported here. One patient responded well to dapsone; the three others did not. Oral treatment with aromatic retinoid (Ro 10-9359) was clearly effective in the last patient, leading to full remission of the skin lesions in a few days. The oral mucosa improved only partly. Discontinuation of the aromatic retinoid treatment and replacement of the drug by placebo was followed by a relapse both of mucosal and skin lesions. Aromatic retinoid possibly inhibits eosinophilic migration into the epidermis and impedes acantholysis associated with this phenomenon. PMID:6841074

  10. Recent discoveries and emerging therapeutics in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Aakash; Cheng, Edaire

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergy-mediated disease culminating in severe eosinophilic inflammation and dysfunction of the esophagus. This chronic disorder of the esophagus causes significant morbidity, poor quality of life, and complications involving fibrosis and esophageal remodeling. Overlapping features between EoE and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) pose great challenges to differentiating the two conditions, although the two disorders are not mutually exclusive. Recent findings suggest that the confounding condition proton pump inhibitor - responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE) is likely a subset of EoE. Since PPIs have therapeutic properties that can benefit EoE, PPIs should be considered as a therapeutic option for EoE rather than a diagnostic screen to differentiate GERD, PPI-REE, and EoE. Other current treatments include dietary therapy, corticosteroids, and dilation. Immunomodulators and biologic agents might have therapeutic value, and larger trials are needed to assess efficacy and safety. Understanding the pathophysiology of EoE is critical to the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:26855809

  11. Effects of ischemia and reperfusion on eosinophilic accumulation and distribution in mucosa of equine jejunum and colon.

    PubMed

    Rötting, Anna K; Freeman, David E; Constable, Peter D; Eurell, Jo Ann C; Wallig, Matt A

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the eosinophilic response in intestinal mucosa of horses with intestinal ischemia and reperfusion or with strangulation of the jejunum or colon. SAMPLE Mucosal samples from horses with naturally occurring strangulation (n = 24 horses) or distention (n = 6) of the jejunum or colon (11), with experimentally induced ischemia and reperfusion of the jejunum (6) or colon (15), or that were euthanized for reasons other than gastrointestinal tract disease (13). PROCEDURES Mucosal samples were collected and grouped by type of intestinal injury. Slides were stained with Luna eosinophil stain and histologically examined to determine eosinophil accumulation and distribution. Number of eosinophils per mm(2) of mucosa was calculated as a measure of eosinophil accumulation. Additionally, mucosa was categorized into 5 regions; the percentage of eosinophils in each of the 5 regions, relative to the total eosinophil count in all regions, was determined. RESULTS Eosinophil migration toward and onto the luminal surface was evident in tissues after ischemia and reperfusion and after naturally occurring strangulating disease of the jejunum and colon, as indicated by a decrease in the number of eosinophils near the muscularis mucosa and an increase in the number of eosinophils on or near the luminal surface. Ischemia alone did not change eosinophil distribution in the jejunum or colon. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Eosinophils responded to mucosal damage evoked by ischemia and reperfusion by migration toward and onto the luminal surface. This migration could represent an important component of the inflammatory response to injury in equine gastrointestinal mucosa. PMID:27111021

  12. The Role and Immunobiology of Eosinophils in the Respiratory System: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Eng, Stephanie S; DeFelice, Magee L

    2016-04-01

    The eosinophil is a fully delineated granulocyte that disseminates throughout the bloodstream to end-organs after complete maturation in the bone marrow. While the presence of eosinophils is not uncommon even in healthy individuals, these granulocytes play a central role in inflammation and allergic processes. Normally appearing in smaller numbers, higher levels of eosinophils in the peripheral blood or certain tissues typically signal a pathologic process. Eosinophils confer a beneficial effect on the host by enhancing immunity against molds and viruses. However, tissue-specific elevation of eosinophils, particularly in the respiratory system, can cause a variety of short-term symptoms and may lead to long-term sequelae. Eosinophils often play a role in more commonly encountered disease processes, such as asthma and allergic responses in the upper respiratory tract. They are also integral in the pathology of less common diseases including eosinophilic pneumonia, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms. They can be seen in neoplastic disorders or occupational exposures as well. The involvement of eosinophils in pulmonary disease processes can affect the method of diagnosis and the selection of treatment modalities. By analyzing the complex interaction between the eosinophil and its environment, which includes signaling molecules and tissues, different therapies have been discovered and created in order to target disease processes at a cellular level. Innovative treatments such as mepolizumab and benralizumab will be discussed. The purpose of this article is to further explore the topic of eosinophilic presence, activity, and pathology in the respiratory tract, as well as discuss current and future treatment options through a detailed literature review. PMID:26797962

  13. Obatoclax, Fludarabine, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  14. Severe Rhabdomyolysis without Systemic Involvement: A Rare Case of Idiopathic Eosinophilic Polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Ayesha; Choksi, Vivek; Chu, Andrew; Mankodi, Dhruti; Shaharyar, Sameer; O'Brien, Keith; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Eosinophilic polymyositis (EPM) is a rare cause of rhabdomyolysis characterized by eosinophilic infiltrates in the muscle. We describe the case of a young patient with eosinophilic polymyositis causing isolated severe rhabdomyolysis without systemic involvement. Case Presentation. A 22-year-old Haitian female with no past medical history presented with progressive generalized muscle aches without precipitating factors. Examination of the extremities revealed diffuse muscle tenderness. Laboratory findings demonstrated peripheral eosinophilia and high creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) and transaminase levels. Workup for the common causes of rhabdomyolysis were negative. Her CPK continued to rise to greater than 100,000 units/L so a muscle biopsy was performed which showed widespread eosinophilic infiltrate consistent with eosinophilic polymyositis. She was started on high dose systemic corticosteroids with improvement of her symptoms, eosinophilia, and CPK level. Discussion. This case illustrates a systematic workup of rhabdomyolysis in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Many differential diagnoses must be considered before establishing a diagnosis of idiopathic eosinophilic polymyositis. To our knowledge, our case of eosinophilic polymyositis is unique as it presented with severe rhabdomyolysis without another organ involvement. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for this physically debilitating disease to aid in prompt diagnosis. PMID:26229703

  15. Natural Killer Cells Limit Cardiac Inflammation and Fibrosis by Halting Eosinophil Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Ong, SuFey; Ligons, Davinna L.; Barin, Jobert G.; Wu, Lei; Talor, Monica V.; Diny, Nicola; Fontes, Jillian A.; Gebremariam, Elizabeth; Kass, David A.; Rose, Noel R.; Čiháková, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is a leading cause of sudden cardiac failure in young adults. Natural killer (NK) cells, a subset of the innate lymphoid cell compartment, are protective in viral myocarditis. Herein, we demonstrated that these protective qualities extend to suppressing autoimmune inflammation. Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) was initiated in BALB/c mice by immunization with myocarditogenic peptide. During EAM, activated cardiac NK cells secreted interferon γ, perforin, and granzyme B, and expressed CD69, tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand treatment, and CD27 on their cell surfaces. The depletion of NK cells during EAM with anti-asialo GM1 antibody significantly increased myocarditis severity, and was accompanied by elevated fibrosis and a 10-fold increase in the percentage of cardiac-infiltrating eosinophils. The resultant influx of eosinophils to the heart was directly responsible for the increased disease severity in the absence of NK cells, because treatment with polyclonal antibody asialogangloside GM-1 did not augment myocarditis severity in eosinophil-deficient ΔdoubleGATA1 mice. We demonstrate that NK cells limit eosinophilic infiltration both indirectly, through altering eosinophil-related chemokine production by cardiac fibroblasts, and directly, by inducing eosinophil apoptosis in vitro. Altogether, we define a new pathway of eosinophilic regulation through interactions with NK cells. PMID:25622543

  16. The Eosinophil in Health and Disease: from Bench to Bedside and Back.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei; Long, Hai; Chang, Christopher Chia-Chi; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-04-01

    Historically, eosinophils have been considered as end-stage cells involved in host protection against parasitic infection and in the mechanisms of hypersensitivity. However, later studies have shown that this multifunctional cell is also capable of producing immunoregulatory cytokines and soluble mediators and is involved in tissue homeostasis and modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review, we summarize the biology of eosinophils, including the function and molecular mechanisms of their granule proteins, cell surface markers, mediators, and pathways, and present comprehensive reviews of research updates on the genetics and epigenetics of eosinophils. We describe recent advances in the development of epigenetics of eosinophil-related diseases, especially in asthma. Likewise, recent studies have provided us with a more complete appreciation of how eosinophils contribute to the pathogenesis of various diseases, including hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). Over the past decades, the definition and criteria of HES have been evolving with the progress of our understanding of the disease and some aspects of this disease still remain controversial. We also review recent updates on the genetic and molecular mechanisms of HES, which have spurred dramatic developments in the clinical strategies of diagnosis and treatment for this heterogeneous group of diseases. The conclusion from this review is that the biology of eosinophils provides significant insights as to their roles in health and disease and, furthermore, demonstrates that a better understanding of eosinophil will accelerate the development of new therapeutic strategies for patients. PMID:26410377

  17. Siglec-8 as a drugable target to treat eosinophil and mast cell-associated conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kiwamoto, Takumi; Kawasaki, Norihito; Paulson, James C.; Bochner, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Siglecs (sialic acid immunoglobulin-like lectins) are members of the immunoglobulin gene family that contain sialoside binding N-terminal domains. They are cell surface proteins found predominantly on cells of the immune system. Among them, Siglec-8 is uniquely expressed by human eosinophils and mast cells, as well as basophils. Engaging this structure with antibodies or glycan ligands results in apoptosis in human eosinophils and inhibition of release of preformed and newly generated mediators from human mast cells without affecting their survival. Pro-apoptotic effects are also seen when its closest functional paralog, Siglec-F, on mouse eosinophils is similarly engaged in vitro, and beneficial effects are observed after administration of Siglec-F antibody using models of eosinophilic pulmonary and gastrointestinal inflammation in vivo. Siglec-8 targeting may thus provide a means to specifically inhibit or deplete these cell types. Cell-directed therapies are increasingly sought after by the pharmaceutical industry for their potential to reduce side effects and increase safety. The challenge is to identify suitable targets on the cell type of interest, and selectively deliver a therapeutic agent. By targeting Siglec-8, monoclonal antibodies and glycan ligand-conjugated nanoparticles may be ideally suited for treatment of eosinophil and mast cell-related diseases, such as asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis, chronic urticaria, hypereosinophilic syndromes, mast cell and eosinophil malignancies and eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:22749793

  18. Comparison of superoxide generation and luminol-dependent chemiluminescence with eosinophils and neutrophils from normal individuals.

    PubMed

    Shult, P A; Graziano, F M; Wallow, I H; Busse, W W

    1985-12-01

    Although eosinophilia is found in many allergic and hypersensitivity diseases, the function of the eosinophil is not clearly established. To evaluate and characterize this function, anticoagulated blood from normal subjects was separated into purified populations of both eosinophils and neutrophils by a modified method for Percoll gradients. With this separation procedure, highly purified populations of eosinophils (95.0% +/- 2.1%) and neutrophils (97.2% +/- 0.4%) were obtained. Functional response of these two isolated granulocyte cell types was measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) and superoxide generation to opsonized zymosan and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Both the eosinophil and neutrophil peak CL response and superoxide generation to zymosan (1 mg), in the presence of autologous serum (10%), were identical. In contrast, when PMA (10(-4) to 10(0) micrograms/ml) was the stimulant, eosinophil CL was at least twofold greater than the neutrophil light emission (1,595,741 +/- 122,435 cpm/5 X 10(5) cells vs. 765,448 +/- 24,171 cpm/5 X 10(5) cells; n = 6). This same differential in responsiveness was seen in superoxide generation. Thus, under certain conditions the eosinophil's respiratory burst may be greater than that of the neutrophil, and this differential in metabolic activity may contribute directly to the eosinophil's inflammatory potential. PMID:2999272

  19. Severe Rhabdomyolysis without Systemic Involvement: A Rare Case of Idiopathic Eosinophilic Polymyositis

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Ayesha; Choksi, Vivek; Chu, Andrew; Mankodi, Dhruti; Shaharyar, Sameer; O'Brien, Keith; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Eosinophilic polymyositis (EPM) is a rare cause of rhabdomyolysis characterized by eosinophilic infiltrates in the muscle. We describe the case of a young patient with eosinophilic polymyositis causing isolated severe rhabdomyolysis without systemic involvement. Case Presentation. A 22-year-old Haitian female with no past medical history presented with progressive generalized muscle aches without precipitating factors. Examination of the extremities revealed diffuse muscle tenderness. Laboratory findings demonstrated peripheral eosinophilia and high creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) and transaminase levels. Workup for the common causes of rhabdomyolysis were negative. Her CPK continued to rise to greater than 100,000 units/L so a muscle biopsy was performed which showed widespread eosinophilic infiltrate consistent with eosinophilic polymyositis. She was started on high dose systemic corticosteroids with improvement of her symptoms, eosinophilia, and CPK level. Discussion. This case illustrates a systematic workup of rhabdomyolysis in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Many differential diagnoses must be considered before establishing a diagnosis of idiopathic eosinophilic polymyositis. To our knowledge, our case of eosinophilic polymyositis is unique as it presented with severe rhabdomyolysis without another organ involvement. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for this physically debilitating disease to aid in prompt diagnosis. PMID:26229703

  20. Dusp5 negatively regulates IL-33-mediated eosinophil survival and function

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Derek A; Yeh, Jung-Hua; Yan, Donghong; Xu, Min; Chan, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation controls diverse cellular functions including cellular survival, proliferation, and apoptosis. Tuning of MAPK activation is counter-regulated by a family of dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs). IL-33 is a recently described cytokine that initiates Th2 immune responses through binding to a heterodimeric IL-33Rα (ST2L)/IL-1α accessory protein (IL-1RAcP) receptor that coordinates activation of ERK and NF-κB pathways. We demonstrate here that DUSP5 is expressed in eosinophils, is upregulated following IL-33 stimulation and regulates IL-33 signaling. Dusp5−/− mice have prolonged eosinophil survival and enhanced eosinophil effector functions following infection with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. IL-33-activated Dusp5−/− eosinophils exhibit increased cellular ERK1/2 activation and BCL-XL expression that results in enhanced eosinophil survival. In addition, Dusp5−/− eosinophils demonstrate enhanced IL-33-mediated activation and effector functions. Together, these data support a role for DUSP5 as a novel negative regulator of IL-33-dependent eosinophil function and survival. PMID:25398911

  1. A parallel signal-transduction pathway for eotaxin- and interleukin-5-induced eosinophil shape change

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Nam; Choi, Moon Kyung; Park, Choon-Sik; Chung, Il Yup

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin-5 (IL-5) and eotaxin are the most important cytokines/chemokines responsible for regulating eosinophil locomotion and are known to play a co-operative role in the selective recruitment of eosinophils to inflamed tissues. Following exposure to chemoattractants, eosinophils undergo a series of events, including reorganization of actin filaments and subsequent rapid shape changes, culminating in chemotaxis. In this study we examined the signalling pathways for eosinophil shape change regulated by eotaxin and IL-5, primarily using a gated autofluorescence/forward-scatter assay. Eotaxin and IL-5 were able to elicit shape change with peaks at 10 and 60 min, respectively, and IL-5 triggered the shape change more efficiently than eotaxin. The pharmacological inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) and p38 blocked both eotaxin- and IL-5-induced eosinophil shape change in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, depletion of intracellular Ca2+ and inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) strongly reduced eosinophil shape change. In contrast, even when used at high concentrations, protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors caused only a slight reduction in the ability to change shape. However, treatment with protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, such as GF109203X and staurosporine, resulted in a striking inhibition of eosinophil shape change by IL-5, but not eotaxin. Data from the inhibition of activation and chemotaxis of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) by the PKC inhibitors were also consistent with findings from the experiments on shape change. Collectively, two eosinophil-selective cytokines/chemokines probably regulate eosinophil shape change via a largely overlapping signalling pathway, with involvement of PKC restricted to the IL-5 signal alone. PMID:12562334

  2. Eosinophil resistance to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis is mediated by the transcription factor NFIL3.

    PubMed

    Pazdrak, Konrad; Moon, Young; Straub, Christof; Stafford, Susan; Kurosky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The mainstay of asthma therapy, glucocorticoids (GCs) exert their therapeutic effects through the inhibition of inflammatory signaling and induction of eosinophil apoptosis. However, laboratory and clinical observations of GC-resistant asthma suggest that GCs' effects on eosinophil viability may depend on the state of eosinophil activation. In the present study we demonstrate that eosinophils stimulated with IL-5 show impaired pro-apoptotic response to GCs. We sought to determine the contribution of GC-mediated transactivating (TA) and transrepressing (TR) pathways in modulation of activated eosinophils' response to GC by comparing their response to the selective GC receptor (GR) agonist Compound A (CpdA) devoid of TA activity to that upon treatment with Dexamethasone (Dex). IL-5-activated eosinophils showed contrasting responses to CpdA and Dex, as IL-5-treated eosinophils showed no increase in apoptosis compared to cells treated with Dex alone, while CpdA elicited an apoptotic response regardless of IL-5 stimulation. Proteomic analysis revealed that both Nuclear Factor IL-3 (NFIL3) and Map Kinase Phosphatase 1 (MKP1) were inducible by IL-5 and enhanced by Dex; however, CpdA had no effect on NFIL3 and MKP1 expression. We found that inhibiting NFIL3 with specific siRNA or by blocking the IL-5-inducible Pim-1 kinase abrogated the protective effect of IL-5 on Dex-induced apoptosis, indicating crosstalk between IL-5 anti-apoptotic pathways and GR-mediated TA signaling occurring via the NFIL3 molecule. Collectively, these results indicate that (1) GCs' TA pathway may support eosinophil viability in IL-5-stimulated cells through synergistic upregulation of NFIL3; and (2) functional inhibition of IL-5 signaling (anti-Pim1) or the use of selective GR agonists that don't upregulate NFIL3 may be effective strategies for the restoring pro-apoptotic effect of GCs on IL-5-activated eosinophils. PMID:26880402

  3. Blood eosinophils and inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β-2 agonist efficacy in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Pavord, Ian D; Lettis, Sally; Locantore, Nicholas; Pascoe, Steve; Jones, Paul W; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Barnes, Neil C

    2016-01-01

    Objective We performed a review of studies of fluticasone propionate (FP)/salmeterol (SAL) (combination inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)/long-acting β2-agonist (LABA)) in patients with COPD, which measured baseline (pretreatment) blood eosinophil levels, to test whether blood eosinophil levels ≥2% were associated with a greater reduction in exacerbation rates with ICS therapy. Methods Three studies of ≥1-year duration met the inclusion criteria. Moderate and severe exacerbation rates were analysed according to baseline blood eosinophil levels (<2% vs ≥2%). At baseline, 57–75% of patients had ≥2% blood eosinophils. Changes in FEV1 and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) scores were compared by eosinophil level. Results For patients with ≥2% eosinophils, FP/SAL was associated with significant reductions in exacerbation rates versus tiotropium (INSPIRE: n=719, rate ratio (RR)=0.75, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.92, p=0.006) and versus placebo (TRISTAN: n=1049, RR=0.63, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.79, p<0.001). No significant difference was seen in the <2% eosinophil subgroup in either study (INSPIRE: n=550, RR=1.18, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.51, p=0.186; TRISTAN: n=354, RR=0.99, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.47, p=0.957, respectively). In SCO30002 (n=373), no significant effects were observed (FP or FP/SAL vs placebo). No relationship was observed in any study between eosinophil subgroup and treatment effect on FEV1 and SGRQ. Discussion Baseline blood eosinophil levels may represent an informative marker for exacerbation reduction with ICS/LABA in patients with COPD and a history of moderate/severe exacerbations. PMID:26585525

  4. Volatile organic compounds discriminate between eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schleich, Florence N; Dallinga, Jan W; Henket, Monique; Wouters, Emiel F M; Louis, Renaud; Van Schooten, Frederik J

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation associated oxidative stress leads to peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids thereby generating volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The integrative analysis of the total amount of VOCs released by eosinophils and neutrophils in vitro enables the search for those compounds that discriminates between various inflammatory conditions. The approach comprises isolating eosinophils and neutrophils from 30 ml of blood of healthy non-smoking volunteers by gradient centrifugation, using lymphoprep. Eosinophils are separated from neutrophils by immunomagnetic cell separation using anti-CD16. Cells are activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and VOCs from the headspace are collected at time 0', 30', 60' and 90' by introduction of ultra-pure nitrogen in the closed flasks at a flow rate of 200 ml min(-1) during 10 min. The gases are trapped onto a sorption tube and analyzed by gas chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectometry (GC-TOF-MS) in order to identify VOCs released in the headspace by activated neutrophils and eosinophils. Eosinophils and neutrophils were isolated from 26 healthy non-smoking volunteers. The average absolute number of eosinophils and neutrophils upon isolation was 3.5  ×  10(6) and 19.4  ×  10(6), respectively. The volatome in headspace consisted of 2116 compounds and those compounds present in at least 8% of the samples (1123 compounds) were used for further discriminant analysis. Discriminant analysis showed that two VOCs were able to distinguish between eosinophilic and neutrophilic cultures in the unactivated state with 100% correct classification of the entire data set and upon cross validation while five VOCs were able to discriminate between activated eosinophils and neutrophils with 96% correct classification in the original set and upon cross-validation. Analysis of VOCs seems to be a very promising approach in identifying eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation but it needs further development and in vivo confirmation. PMID:26828318

  5. Fasciola hepatica induces eosinophil apoptosis in the migratory and biliary stages of infection in sheep.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, A; Bautista, M J; Zafra, R; Pacheco, I L; Ruiz, M T; Martínez-Cruz, S; Méndez, A; Martínez-Moreno, A; Molina-Hernández, V; Pérez, J

    2016-01-30

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the number of apoptotic eosinophils in the livers of sheep experimentally infected with Fasciola hepatica during the migratory and biliary stages of infection. Four groups (n=5) of sheep were used; groups 1-3 were orally infected with 200 metacercariae (mc) and sacrificed at 8 and 28 days post-infection (dpi), and 17 weeks post-infection (wpi), respectively. Group 4 was used as an uninfected control. Apoptosis was detected using immunohistochemistry with a polyclonal antibody against anti-active caspase-3, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Eosinophils were identified using the Hansel stain in serial sections for caspase-3, and by ultrastructural features using TEM. At 8 and 28 dpi, numerous caspase-3(+) eosinophils were mainly found at the periphery of acute hepatic necrotic foci. The percentage of caspase -3(+) apoptotic eosinophils in the periphery of necrotic foci was high (46.1-53.9) at 8 and 28 dpi, respectively, and decreased in granulomas found at 28 dpi (6%). Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of apoptotic eosinophils in hepatic lesions at 8 and 28 dpi. At 17 wpi, apoptotic eosinophils were detected in the infiltrate surrounding some enlarged bile ducts containing adult flukes. This is the first report of apoptosis induced by F. hepatica in sheep and the first study reporting apoptosis in eosinophils in hepatic inflammatory infiltrates in vivo. The high number of apoptotic eosinophils in acute necrotic tracts during the migratory and biliary stages of infection suggests that eosinophil apoptosis may play a role in F. hepatica survival during different stages of infection. PMID:26801599

  6. Mechanisms of eosinophil secretion: large vesiculotubular carriers mediate transport and release of granule-derived cytokines and other proteins.

    PubMed

    Melo, Rossana C N; Spencer, Lisa A; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F

    2008-02-01

    Eosinophils generate and store a battery of proteins, including classical cationic proteins, cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Rapid secretion of these active mediators by eosinophils is central to a range of inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses. Eosinophil products are packaged within a dominant population of cytoplasmic specific granules and generally secreted by piecemeal degranulation, a process mediated by transport vesicles. Large, pleiomorphic vesiculotubular carriers were identified recently as key players for moving eosinophil proteins from granules to the plasma membrane for extracellular release. During secretion, these specialized, morphologically distinct carriers, termed eosinophil sombrero vesicles, are actively formed and direct differential and rapid release of eosinophil proteins. This review highlights recent discoveries concerning the organization of the human eosinophil secretory pathway. These discoveries are defining a broader role for large vesiculotubular carriers in the intracellular trafficking and secretion of proteins, including selective receptor-mediated mobilization and transport of cytokines. PMID:17875811

  7. Eosinophilic and granular cell tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Damiani, S; Dina, R; Eusebi, V

    1999-05-01

    Eosinophilic and granular cell tumors of the breast are a heterogeneous group encompassing both epithelial and mesenchymal lesions. A granular appearance of the cytoplasm may be caused by the accumulation of secretory granules, mitochondria, or lysosomes. In the breast, mucoid carcinomas, carcinomas showing apocrine differentiation, and neuroendocrine carcinomas are well known entities, while tumors with oncocytic and acinic cell differentiation have been only recently recognized. An abundance of lysosomes is characteristic of Schwannian granular cell neoplasms, but smooth muscle cell tumors also may have this cytoplasmic feature. Awareness of all these possibilities when granular cells are found in breast lesions improves diagnostic accuracy and helps to avoid misdiagnosis of both benign lesions and malignant tumors. PMID:10452577

  8. Eosinophilic granuloma of the mandible: a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Rana K; Akhtar, Kafil; Qadri, Shagufta; Ray, Prasenjit Sen

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) is a rare histiocytic disorder resulting from clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells. It accounts for less than 1% of all osseous neoplasms and has a predilection for involving the axial skeleton. Although suspicion of the disease may arise from clinical features and radiographic demonstration of destructive bone lesions, it is still difficult to make a correct diagnosis without proper pathological evaluation. This is more evident when common differentials mimicking EG, both clinically and radiologically, need to be ruled out. This report describes a case of unifocal EG of the mandible occurring in a 4-year-old boy whose initial presentation led to confusion between osteomyelitis, primary bone tumour and lymphoma. A final diagnosis of EG was established after histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. PMID:24700031

  9. Mucosal immunology, eosinophilic esophagitis, and other intestinal inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Dan; Furuta, Glenn T

    2010-02-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa constitutes the largest host-environment interface of the body. It uses both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms to provide protection from the diverse onslaught of foods, microbes, and other ingested products. The innate immune system is genetically encoded and evolutionarily ancient, possesses no memory, and lacks diversity. In contrast, the adaptive immune system is quite diverse, develops memory, and undergoes expansion after stimulation. The gastrointestinal mucosa is charged with the difficult task of mounting protective responses against invading microorganisms while simultaneously maintaining an overall state of nonresponsiveness or tolerance to innocuous substances, such as commensal bacteria and food antigens. Perturbation or malfunction of these complex protective mechanisms results in diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases, celiac disease, or eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:20176262

  10. Dividing the Janus vasculitis? Pathophysiology of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangitis.

    PubMed

    Chaigne, Benjamin; Terrier, Benjamin; Thieblemont, Nathalie; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Mouthon, Luc

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangitis (EGPA) is a rare small- and medium-sized vessel vasculitis belonging to the group of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV). It is commonly divided into two phenotypes depending on the presence of ANCAs targeting myeloperoxidase (MPO). MPO-ANCAs are present in 31% to 38% of patients and are associated with a vasculitis phenotype of the disease, whereas patients without MPO-ANCA are at risk of cardiac involvement. Despite significant advances in understanding the overall pathogenesis of the disease, the explanation for this dichotomy is still unclear. In this review, we synthesize our knowledge of the pathogenesis of EGPA and attempt to i) distinguish EGPA from other diseases including other AAVs, asthma, allergy and hypereosinophilic-associated conditions and ii) speculate about the preponderant mechanisms, which could explain the two disease phenotypes. PMID:26506114

  11. Translating New Developments in Eosinophilic Esophagitis Pathogenesis into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Edaire

    2015-01-01

    Opinion Statement New developments in eosinophilic esophagitis pathogenesis are shaping our current therapeutic and management strategies. EoE is a chronic allergic inflammatory disease with progression to fibrostenotic disease. The disease warrants early diagnosis and long-term maintenance therapy. The diagnosis of EoE should be based on the concept of an allergy-mediated disease with esophageal dysfunction and esophageal eosinophilia. Recent findings suggest PPI-REE is likely a continuum of EoE or similar Th2-mediated allergic process. PPIs have therapeutic properties that can benefit both GERD and EoE. Therefore, PPIs should not be considered a diagnostic tool, but rather a therapeutic option for EoE. If patients are PPI-nonresponsive, then dietary therapy or steroid therapy should be considered. Dilation can be reserved as adjuvant therapy for severe fibrostenotic lesions. PMID:25598233

  12. Microscopic colitis (lymphocytic and collagenous), eosinophilic colitis, and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, M Sophia; Alimi, Yewande

    2015-06-01

    Multiple tests are needed to diagnose a patient with noninfectious diarrhea. Some patients will be mistakenly labeled as diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) because of nonspecific computed tomographic scans and grossly normal endoscopic findings. It is crucial to understand other less common pathologies to avoid these instances of misdiagnosis. This article focuses on microscopic colitis (MC), eosinophilic colitis (EC), and celiac disease. MC is an inflammatory condition of the colon that presents with two subtypes, only to be differentiated by histology. EC is a rare chronic inflammatory process. Depending on the extent of the disease, it can present with mild diarrhea, malabsorption, or at its worst, cause obstruction and perforation. Celiac disease affects the small bowel, but interestingly can present similarly to colitis. Both MC and EC respond to oral budesonide. Patients with celiac disease improve on gluten-free diets. These treatments are distinctly different from typical IBS-D care plans. PMID:26034409

  13. An allergist's perspective to the evaluation of Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a classic atopic disease as it shares features with other atopic disease on all levels including pathogenesis, genetics, epidemiology, and treatment options. EoE has elements of Th2 pathogenesis with increase levels of Th2 cytokines (IL4, 5, and 13). In addition, it shares atopic genetic risk factors including thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) loci as a risk factor in genome wide association studies. EoE patients have a higher rate of other atopic disease (asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy) compared to the general population indicating their atopic phenotype. Like asthma, atopic dermatitis or food allergy, EoE has increased in the last 20 years. Treatment options include the basic principle of other atopic diseases include using topical steroids or avoidance of the triggers (food or pollen). An allergist provides a critical role as they are experts in the treatment of atopic disease including avoidance strategies. PMID:26552776

  14. Therapeutic strategies in eosinophilic esophagitis: Induction, maintenance and refractory disease.

    PubMed

    Sodikoff, Jamie; Hirano, Ikuo

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune-mediated disease that is increasingly recognized as one of the most common causes of dysphagia and foregut symptoms in adults and children. Topical corticosteroids, elimination diets, and esophageal dilations are effective options for both induction and maintenance therapy in EoE. Current pharmacologic options are being used off-label as no agent has yet been approved by regulatory authorities. Little is known about the natural history of EoE, however, raising controversy regarding the necessity of maintenance and therapy in asymptomatic or treatment-refractory patients. Furthermore, variability in treatment endpoints used in EoE clinical trials makes interpretation and comparability of EoE treatments challenging. Recent validation of a patient-related outcome (PRO) instruments, a histologic scoring tool, and an endoscopic grading system for EoE are significant advances toward establishing consistent treatment endpoints. PMID:26552781

  15. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Due to Rhus Ingestion Presenting with Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wonsuk; Choi, Chan; Cho, Kyuman; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Rhus-related illnesses in Korea are mostly caused by ingestion of parts of the Rhus tree. Contact dermatitis occurrence after ingestion of Rhus-related food is very common in Korea. However, Rhus-related gastrointestinal disease is very rare. Herein, we present a case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis caused by Rhus ingestion. A 75-year-old woman was admitted with hematemesis and hematochezia after Rhus extract ingestion. Routine laboratory tests revealed leukocytosis without eosinophilia. Endoscopy showed friable and granular mucosal changes with touch bleeding in the second portion of the duodenum. Abdominal computed tomography revealed edematous wall thickening of the duodenum and proximal jejunal loops. Patch testing with Rhus extracts showed a strong positive reaction, suggesting Rhus as the allergen. Her symptoms improved after avoidance of the allergen. PMID:25844348

  16. Multifocal eosinophilic granuloma presenting as progressive brainstem and cerebellar dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Fukazawa, T; Yanagihara, T; Hamada, K; Hamada, T

    1994-01-01

    A 55 year old woman with multifocal eosinophilic granuloma (MEG) is described. She developed facial numbness and twitching followed by slowly progressive cerebellar symptoms. Two years later polyuria and polydipsia were noted. A CT of the brain showed multifocal enhancing lesions, and MRI showed areas of hyperintensity on T2 weighted studies in the cerebellar peduncles, pons, and midbrain. Radiographs of the skull, pelvis, and long bones were normal, but a 99mTc diphosphonate bone scan and MRI showed bone lesions compatible with granuloma. The diagnosis of MEG was made by bone biopsy. This is believed to be the first case of MEG with such unusual clinical profiles and radiographical findings. Skeletal surveys are indicated for patients with unexplained focal or multifocal inflammatory changes in the cerebellum. Images PMID:8057124

  17. Cancer Statistics: Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 60,140 % of All New Cancer Cases 3.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 24,400 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 333,975 people living with leukemia in the ...

  18. Esophageal human beta-defensin expression in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Shauna; Robinson, Zachary D.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Hosford, Lindsay; Moore, Wendy; Pan, Zhaoxing; Harris, Rachel; Souza, Rhonda F.; Spechler, Stuart Jon; Fillon, Sophie A.; Furuta, Glenn T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Defensins are antimicrobial peptides expressed on mucosal surfaces that contribute to maintaining intestinal homeostasis by providing innate defense mechanisms for the epithelia. Defensin expression is altered in a number of diseases that affect mucosal surfaces, such as atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Similar to atopic dermatitis, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic disease in which the squamous epithelial surface is affected by a similar TH2 microenvironment and eosinophil predominant inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized defensin expression would be decreased in EoE. Methods To address this, we measured defensin expression in vitro in cell lines derived from patients with EoE (EoE1-T) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (NES-G4T cells), and ex vivo in esophageal mucosal biopsy samples from children with EoE, GERD, and control children without esophageal disease. Results IL-5 induced a decrease in human beta-defensin 1 (hBD1) and human beta-defensin 3 (hBD3) expression in EoE1-T but not in NES-G4T cells. Compared to esophageal biopsy specimens from GERD and control children, specimens from EoE pediatric patients revealed significant decrease in mRNA and protein expression for hBD1 and hBD3. Conclusion Diminished expression of hBD1 and hBD3 may make the esophageal epithelium more susceptible to the development and/or perpetuation of EoE. PMID:23385963

  19. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE. PMID:25548504

  20. Ultrastructural features of eosinophilic oesophagitis: impact of treatment on desmosomes

    PubMed Central

    Capocelli, Kelley E; Fernando, Shahan D; Menard-Katcher, Calies; Furuta, Glenn T; Masterson, Joanne C; Wartchow, Eric P

    2015-01-01

    Aims A growing body of evidence suggests a role for altered epithelial barrier function in the pathophysiology of eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), but few have described the epithelial structure during inflammation. The purpose of this study was to define ultrastructural features of active, inactive EoE and control subject’s oesophageal epithelia. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients undergoing diagnostic upper endoscopy for evaluation of EoE. Mucosal pinch biopsies were obtained from the distal oesophagus and processed for routine histology and electron microscopic assessment. Clinical features of enrolled subjects were analysed and subjects were divided into four groups: normal, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), inactive EoE and active EoE. Representative photomicrographs of the basal and superficial epithelia were reviewed for abnormalities. Desmosomes were quantified on the surface of epithelia three to four prickle-cell layers above the basal layer. Results Twenty-nine paediatric cases (ages 2–18 years) were enrolled in the study. We observed a significant decrease in the number of desmosomes per cell (DPC) of subjects with active EoE compared with inactive EoE, GERD and normal epithelia. With respect to DPC, no significant differences were found between inactive EoE compared with GERD or normal subjects. Additional ultrastructural features observed included epithelial microplicae and evidence of eosinophil transmigration, degranulation, and sombrero formation. Conclusions Consistent with clinical and molecular findings, our ultrastructural data provide support for an altered oesophageal barrier in paediatric cases with active EoE, which may improve following treatment. PMID:25359789

  1. Interrelationship of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, bronchiolitis obliterans, and rheumatoid disease: a hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, T P

    1981-01-01

    Three patients with histologically proven bronchiolitis obliterans are presented, two of whom had rheumatoid disease. All three patients had, in addition, clinical and radiological evidence of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia; open lung biopsy in two showed coexistent features of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia and bronchiolitis obliterans. The association of both rheumatoid disease are chronic eosinophilic pneumonia with bronchiolitis obliterans in these patients may simply be coincidental, but the striking similarities between the cases suggest that a real interrelationship of these disease entities may exist. Images 1b-1e 1a Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7229091

  2. Missing the beat: arrhythmia as a presenting feature of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Sharpley, Faye Amelia

    2014-01-01

    Palpitations are a common presenting symptom in patients attending the emergency department; however, eosinophilic infiltration of the myocardium is rarely the cause. This case describes a 77-year-old woman who presents with sudden onset palpitations and is later diagnosed with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (previously known as Churg-Strauss syndrome). Cardiac involvement does occur in 50% of cases but heart failure, myocarditis, pericarditis, constrictive pericarditis and myocardial infarction are much more commonly recognised complications. Arrhythmia is less well described. In this report, we propose eosinophilic inflammation as the precipitant for an aberrant conduction pathway. PMID:24811559

  3. Eosinophilic pleural effusion: a rare complication of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Maral; Kumar, Perikala Vijayananda; Ghayumi, Mohammad-Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has been widely used to treat renal stones. The procedure is relatively safe with minor complications. Case. The patient is a 32-year-old man who presented with left sided pleural effusion after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Results. The pleural effusion study revealed an exudative fluid rich in eosinophils (30%). So, the diagnosis of eosinophilic pleural effusion as a complication of lithotripsy was made. Conclusion. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy should be regarded as an etiology of unexplained eosinophilic pleural effusion after this procedure. PMID:23935633

  4. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis complicated with Helicobacter pylori infection unresponsive to eradication therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akira; Iwaya, Yugo; Iwaya, Mai; Okamura, Takuma; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Daikuhara, Seiichi; Nozawa, Yuichi; Fukuzawa, Shinya; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Okuhara, Sadahisa; Yamada, Shigenori; Yokosawa, Shuichi; Suga, Tomoaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Tanaka, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    An adolescent girl presented with inappetence. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed rough and cracked mucosa at the gastric antrum with a scarred duodenal ulcer, and a biopsy sample demonstrated abundant eosinophils. We therefore diagnosed the patient as having eosinophilic gastroenteritis. Eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) did not improve her symptoms; however, proton pump inhibitor therapy was effective in resolving her chief complaints. There are several reports of eosinophilic gastroenteritis complicated with H. pylori infection in which the association between eradication therapy and the patient's symptoms is unclear. In the present case, the patient's symptoms did not improve with eradication therapy, and there appeared to be no relationship between the two. PMID:25224188

  5. Association of the EGF-TM7 receptor CD97 expression with FLT3-ITD in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wobus, Manja; Bornhäuser, Martin; Jacobi, Angela; Kräter, Martin; Otto, Oliver; Ortlepp, Claudia; Guck, Jochen; Ehninger, Gerhard; Thiede, Christian; Oelschlägel, Uta

    2015-01-01

    Internal tandem duplications within the juxtamembrane region of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase receptor FLT3 (FLT3-ITD) represents one of the most common mutations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) which results in constitutive aberrant activation, increased proliferation of leukemic progenitors and is associated with an aggressive clinical phenotype. The expression of CD97, an EGF-TM7 receptor, has been linked to invasive behavior in thyroid and colorectal cancer. Here, we have investigated the association of CD97 with FLT3-ITD and its functional consequences in AML. Higher CD97 expression levels have been detected in 208 out of 385 primary AML samples. This was accompanied by a significantly increased bone marrow blast count as well as by mutations in the FLT3 gene. FLT3-ITD expressing cell lines as MV4-11 and MOLM-13 revealed significantly higher CD97 levels than FLT3 wildtype EOL-1, OCI-AML3 and HL-60 cells which were clearly decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors PKC412 and SU5614. CD97 knock down by short hairpin RNA in MV4-11 cells resulted in inhibited trans-well migration towards fetal calf serum (FCS) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) being at least in part Rho-A dependent. Moreover, knock down of CD97 led to an altered mechanical phenotype, reduced adhesion to a stromal layer and lower wildtype FLT3 expression. Our results, thus, constitute the first evidence for the functional relevance of CD97 expression in FLT3-ITD AML cells rendering it a potential new theragnostic target. PMID:26462154

  6. CCR2 deficiency leads to increased eosinophils, alternative macrophage activation, and type 2 cytokine expression in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Bolus, W Reid; Gutierrez, Dario A; Kennedy, Arion J; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K; Hasty, Alyssa H

    2015-10-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation during obesity is mediated by immune cells and closely correlates with systemic insulin resistance. In lean AT, eosinophils are present in low but significant numbers and capable of promoting alternative macrophage activation in an IL-4/IL-13-dependent manner. In WT mice, obesity causes the proportion of AT eosinophils to decline, concomitant with inflammation and classical activation of AT macrophages. In this study, we show that CCR2 deficiency leads to increased eosinophil accumulation in AT. Furthermore, in contrast to WT mice, the increase in eosinophils in CCR2(-/-) AT is sustained and even amplified during obesity. Interestingly, a significant portion of eosinophils is found in CLSs in AT of obese CCR2(-/-) mice, which is the first time eosinophils have been shown to localize to these inflammatory hot spots. CCR2(-/-) bone marrow precursors displayed increased expression of various key eosinophil genes during in vitro differentiation to eosinophils, suggesting a potentially altered eosinophil phenotype in the absence of CCR2. In addition, the proportion of eosinophils in AT positively correlated with local expression of Il5, a potent eosinophil stimulator. The increase in eosinophils in CCR2(-/-) mice was detected in all white fat pads analyzed and in the peritoneal cavity but not in bone marrow, blood, spleen, or liver. In AT of CCR2(-/-) mice, an increased eosinophil number positively correlated with M2-like macrophages, expression of the Treg marker Foxp3, and type 2 cytokines, Il4, Il5, and Il13. This is the first study to link CCR2 function with regulation of AT eosinophil accumulation. PMID:25934927

  7. Leukemia and Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called “second cancer” that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called “niches” that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these “niches” may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

  8. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms can suggest that ... described below. Tests used to diagnose and classify ALL If your doctor thinks you have leukemia, he ...

  9. General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Key Points Hairy cell leukemia is a ...

  10. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Option Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Key Points Hairy cell leukemia is a ...

  11. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Deletion of 3'-CBFB gene in association with an inversion (16)(p13q22) and a loss of the Y chromosome in a 2-year-Old child with acute myelogenous leukemia-M4.

    PubMed

    Batanian, J R; Huang, Y; Fallon, R

    2000-09-01

    Inversion 16(p13q22) is most commonly associated with acute myelomonocytic leukemia with abnormal eosinophils (M4). In association with this inversion, a proximal deletion at the 16p13 primary arm breakpoint occurs in 20% of cases. We report on a first case of inversion 16 with a distal deletion at the primary arm breakpoint 16q22, detected by using the fluorescent-labeled dual-color probe CBFB. PMID:11063812

  13. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. [Infant acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Brethon, Benoît; Cavé, Hélène; Fahd, Mony; Baruchel, André

    2016-03-01

    If acute leukemia is the most frequent cancer in childhood (33%), it remains a very rare diagnosis in infants less than one year old, e.g. less than 5% of cases. At this age, the frequency of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (almost all of B-lineage) is quite similar to the one of myeloblastic forms (AML). Infant leukemia frequently presents with high hyperleucocytosis, major tumoral burden and numerous extra-hematological features, especially in central nervous system and skin. Whatever the lineage, the leukemic cell is often very immature cytologically and immunologically. Rearrangements of the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene, located on band 11q23, are the hallmark of these immature leukemias and confer a particular resistance to conventional approaches, corticosteroids and chemotherapy. The immaturity of infants less than 1-year-old is associated to a decrease of the tolerable dose-intensity of some drugs (anthracyclines, alkylating agents) or asks questions about some procedures like radiotherapy or high dose conditioning regimen, responsible of inacceptable acute and late toxicities. The high level of severe infectious diseases and other high-grade side effects limits also the capacity to cure these infants. The survival of infants less than 1-year-old with AML is only 50% but similar to older children. On the other hand, survival of those with ALL is the same, then quite limited comparing the 80% survival in children over one year. Allogeneic stem cell transplantations are indicated in high-risk subgroups of infant ALL (age below 6 months, high hyperleucocytosis >300.10(9)/L, MLL-rearrangement, initial poor prednisone response). However, morbidity and mortality remain very important and these approaches cannot be extended to all cases. During the neonatal period, the dismal prognosis linked to the high number of primary failures or very early relapses and uncertainties about the late toxicities question physicians about ethics. It is an emergency to propose different strategies (targeted therapies) to these infants with acute leukemia as conventional trials failed to improve outcome. PMID:26826739

  15. [Determining asthma treatment in children by monitoring fractional exhaled nitric oxide, sputum eosinophils and leukotriene B₄].

    PubMed

    Vizmanos-Lamotte, G; Cruz, M J; Gómez-Ollés, S; Muñoz, X; de Mir Messa, I; Moreno-Galdó, A

    2015-01-01

    Sputum eosinophils and exhaled fractional nitric oxide (FENO) are markers of airway inflammation in asthma. Cytokines, cysteinyl-leukotrienes and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) are responsible for this inflammation. The aim of this study is to determine the usefulness of these markers in monitoring asthma treatment in children. FENO, sputum eosinophils, and LTB4 in induced sputum were performed in 10 children (9-15 years old). These determinations were repeated four months later, after the beginning or an increase in the treatment. FENO values tended to decrease (P=.15), pulmonary function tended to improve (P=.10), and sputum eosinophils decreased (P=.003) compared to the first determination. There were no differences in LTB4 concentrations (P=.88). Sputum eosinophils seem to be more precise than FENO in the monitoring of inflammation in asthmatic children. PMID:24857428

  16. Eosinophil recruitment to nasal nerves after allergen challenge in allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Margaret A; Akasheh, Nadim; Walsh, Marie-Therese; Moloney, Michael; Sheahan, Patrick O; Smyth, Claire M; Walsh, Rory McConn; Morgan, Ross M; Curran, David R; Walsh, Michael T; Gleich, Gerald J; Costello, Richard W

    2013-04-01

    In allergen challenged animal models, eosinophils localize to airway nerves leading to vagally-mediated hyperreactivity. We hypothesized that in allergic rhinitis eosinophils recruited to nasal nerves resulted in neural hyperreactivity. Patients with persistent allergic rhinitis (n=12), seasonal allergic rhinitis (n=7) and controls (n=10) were studied. Inferior nasal turbinate biopsies were obtained before, 8 and 48h after allergen challenge. Eight hours after allergen challenge eosinophils localized to nerves in both rhinitis groups; this was sustained through 48h. Bradykinin challenge, with secretion collection on the contralateral side, was performed to demonstrate nasal nerve reflexes. Twenty fourhours after allergen challenge, bradykinin induced a significant increase in secretions, indicating nasal hyperreactivity. Histological studies showed that nasal nerves expressed both vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 26 (CCL-26). Hence, after allergen challenge eosinophils are recruited and retained at nerves and so may be a mechanism for neural hyperreactivity. PMID:23518598

  17. Piecemeal degranulation in human eosinophils: a distinct secretion mechanism underlying inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Melo, Rossana C N; Weller, Peter F

    2010-10-01

    Secretion is a fundamental cell process underlying different physiological and pathological events. In cells from the human immune system such as eosinophils, secretion of mediators generally occurs by means of piecemeal degranulation, an unconventional secretory pathway characterized by vesicular transport of small packets of materials from the cytoplasmic secretory granules to the cell surface. During piecemeal degranulation in eosinophils, a distinct transport vesicle system, which includes large, pleiomorphic vesiculo-tubular carriers is mobilized and enables regulated release of granule-stored proteins such as cytokines and major basic protein. Piecemeal degranulation underlies distinct functions of eosinophils as effector and immunoregulatory cells. This review focuses on the structural and functional advances that have been made over the last years concerning the intracellular trafficking and secretion of eosinophil proteins by piecemeal degranulation during inflammatory responses. PMID:20712018

  18. Histopathologic study of eosinophilic bronchointerstitial pneumonia caused by Crenosoma striatum in the hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Youssefi, Mohammad Reza; Mousapour, Aliasghar; Dozouri, Rohollah; Eshkevari, Shahab Ramezanpour; Nikzad, Mohammad; Nikzad, Reza; Omidzahir, Shila

    2014-06-01

    Crenosoma striatum is a species of parasitic nematodes from the family Crenosomatidae responsible for pathologic lung lesions in the hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus). Infection with C. striatum can cause weight loss, dry cough, and bronchitis. In the present study, hedgehogs killed by road accidents, or trapped and found dead on farms in different parts of Mazandaran province (Iran), were transferred to the laboratory. After dissection, parasite samples collected from the lung were placed into 70% alcohol. After clarification with lactophenol and subsequent staining, the nematodes were identified as C. striatum according to previously published guidelines. For histopathologic examination, lung samples were collected. The tissues were fixed and following routine processing, sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Microscopic diagnoses included hyperemia, eosinophilic bronchointerstitial pneumonia, thickening of the interstitium, and eosinophilic microabscesses in bronchial airways. Eosinophilic pneumonia was characterized by eosinophil and other mononuclear leukocyte infiltration within the lung interstitium. Crenosoma striatum can lead to mortality in hedgehogs. PMID:25000695

  19. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  20. Temsirolimus and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  1. Imatinib Mesylate and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  2. Leukemia and radium groundwater contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, B.L.; Letourneau, E.G.

    1986-06-27

    In the August 2, 1985, issue of JAMMA, Lyman et al claim to have shown an association between leukemia incidence in Florida and radium in groundwater supplies. Although cautious in their conclusions, the authors imply that this excess in leukemia was in fact caused by radiation. The authors believe they have not presented a convincing argument for causation. The radiation doses at these levels of exposure could account for only a tiny fraction of the leukemia excess.

  3. Platelet-activating factor-induced human eosinophil activation. Generation and release of cyclo-oxygenase metabolites in human blood eosinophils from asthmatics.

    PubMed Central

    Kroegel, C; Matthys, H

    1993-01-01

    The spontaneous and stimulated generation of fatty acid cyclo-oxygenase pathway-derived products of arachidonic acid from highly purified (91.6 +/- 1.3%, n = 23) human blood eosinophils obtained from asthmatics were examined using combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Under resting conditions, eosinophils spontaneously generated 0.24 +/- 0.10 pg prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), 0.51 +/- 0.20 prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), 0.35 +/- 0.10 pg prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) and 8.5 +/- 2.2 pg thromboxane B2 (TXB2), the stable metabolite of TXA2 per 10(6) cells. In contrast, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha and 9 alpha,11 beta-prostaglandin F2 were not detectable. Stimulation of eosinophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF) for 5 min induced a two- to sixfold increase in the biosynthesis of prostanoids. More than 95% of the generated prostanoids were released into the surrounding medium. The response to PAF was inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2086 (1 microM). The fatty acid cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, ibuprofen, abolished both the spontaneous and PAF-stimulated generation of prostanoids by eosinophils. LTB4, PMA and calcimycin also produced an increase in prostanoid production, whereas lyso-PAF, the PAF precursor and metabolite, failed to induce prostanoid generation over basal production. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that PAF potently activates human eosinophils to generate and release several fatty acid cyclo-oxygenase metabolites of the arachidonic acid pathway, with TXB2 being the most abundant. These data are in agreement with previous observations suggesting that PAF may be an important stimulus for prostanoid release by the eosinophil in allergic diseases such as asthma. Images Figure 4 PMID:8473016

  4. Toxic effects of human eosinophil products on isolated rat heart cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Tai, P C; Hayes, D J; Clark, J B; Spry, C J

    1982-01-01

    Rat heart cells and mitochondria were incubated with supernatants from eosinophils or neutrophils that had been stimulated with zymosan-C3b. Supernatants from eosinophils, but not neutrophils, were toxic to rat heart cells in a dose-dependent manner. This was associated with an increased O2 uptake, which was blocked by either 1 mM-cyanide or 100 microM-ouabain. Supernatants from eosinophils, but not neutrophils, caused a decrease in O2 uptake by rat heart mitochondria utilizing pyruvate (+ malate) but not other substrates. The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.1) from rat heart was inhibited by Ca2+-free eosinophil supernatants. The activity of oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.2) was also inhibited but not that of lipoamide dehydrogenase (EC 1.6.4.3). Prior incubation with heparin prevented these effects of eosinophil supernatants on heart cells, suggesting that they were caused by eosinophil cationic proteins. Other cationic proteins, including poly-L-lysine and poly-L-arginine were also toxic to rat heart cells, but these reduced O2 uptake. It was concluded that granulocyte secretion products containing eosinophil cationic proteins are toxic to isolated rat heart cells in vitro. This may be due to an initial increase in membrane permeability, which may lead to activation of (Na+ + K+)-dependent ATPase and increased O2 uptake. A second step may involve inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase by the same products, leading to a decreased O2 uptake. It is suggested that these mechanisms could contribute to the development of cardiac injury and myocardial disease in clinical situations where many degranulated eosinophils are present. PMID:7115333

  5. [Difficulties in the diagnosis of prolonged pulmonary eosinophilic infiltration in a child].

    PubMed

    Murgoci, G

    1993-01-01

    The paper deals with a 6-year-old child admitted to hospital for prolonged febrile syndrome, hemoptic sputum with radiological persistence of some pulmonary opacities which raised many hypotheses concerning the etiological diagnosis. A prolonged eosinophilic pulmonary infiltrate due to an infestation with Ascaris lumbricoides and Giardia was the matter in the study case. The specific anti-parasitic treatment has a decisive role in the clinical radiological improvement in case of a parasitic eosinophilic lung. PMID:7950452

  6. Accumulation of eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils in the spleen in anaphylactic deaths.

    PubMed

    Edston, Erik

    2013-12-01

    Death in anaphylactic shock cannot be diagnosed by autopsy alone. Morphological diagnosis of anaphylactic death by counting mast cells in the lung and airways have failed to give consistent results. Previously it has been observed that eosinophils seem to accumulate in the spleen in anaphylaxis. The purpose of this study was to investigate if it is possible to safely diagnose anaphylactic deaths by counting eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils in the spleen. In 43 forensic autopsy cases specific antibodies to mast cells, eosinophil-, and basophil granulocytes were used on sections from lung and splenic tissue. The cells were counted in 20 × 40 fields in a Leica photo-microscope. Presumed deaths in anaphylaxis were compared with sudden deaths after intravenous injection of opiates, and sudden cardiac deaths (control group). The main result was that significant (p < 0.05) increases of both eosinophil granulocytes (mean 26.6 ± 17.8/SD/)and mast cells (3.2 ± 2.0/SD/) versus controls (eosinophils mean 7.0 ± 10.5 and mast cells mean 0.9 ± 1.1) were seen in splenic tissue in anaphylactic deaths. Comparing cases with high and low concentrations of mast cell tryptase in serum showed a similar increase in eosinophils and mast cells in the spleen in cases with elevated tryptase, but not in the lung. The numbers of pulmonary mast cells and eosinophils were not different in anaphylactic deaths compared with controls. It is concluded that by quantifying eosinophil granulocytes and mast cells in the spleen in combination with tryptase measurements in serum it is possible to diagnose anaphylaxis with a high degree of certainty. PMID:23839665

  7. Eosinophilic reaction in nasal cytology in patients sensitive to perennial and seasonal allergens.

    PubMed

    Zyła, Małgorzata; Leśniak, Małgorzata; Myszkowska, Dorota; Dabal, Ewa; Lorenc, Justyna; Wojtaszek-Czapla, Maria; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Czarnobilska, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Nasal exfoliative cytology is a complementary tool in diagnostics of allergic (AR) and non-allergic (NAR) rhinitis. The aim of the study was to determine the usefulness of the nasal cytology in patients sensitive to common inhalant allergens with positive SPT(+) and negative SPT(-) (Skin Prick Tests) depending on the symptoms of intermittent and persistent rhinitis. The study was performed in a group of 285 patients treated in the Department of Allergology University Hospital in Krakow, suspected on AR in 2008-2010. The patients were made a smear test of inferior nasal concha. The samples were stained using the eosin-hematoxylin method and examined under a light microscope (1000x). Patients were divided into two groups: SPT(+) (144 patients) and SPT(-) (141 patients). Depending on the percentage of obtained eosinophils each group was divided into three subgroups: 0-2%, 3-20%, >20%. In the most percentage of patients with 3-20% of eosinophils in nasal cytology were found, in both studied groups (SPT)(+) and (SPT)(-), while the highest percentage of eosinophils (> 20%) was observed in the bigger group of patients with SPT(+), than with SPT(-). The number of patients with eosinophils > 20% in the SPT(+) group was higher in patients with persistent symptoms (NS differences), while in the SPT(-) group, the number of patients with intermittent symptoms in the subgroup > 20% of eosinophils statistically prevailed (p<0.001). The mean percentage of eosinophils in both groups was comparable, while the statistically significant differences were found considering the distinguished subgroups. In intermittent SPT(+) group the most sensitizing allergens were pollen grains (birch or grass pollen), while the patients with persistent AR symptoms were mainly sensitive the house dust mites. The mean percentage of eosinophils in an exfoliative cytology correlated significantly with allergic rhinitis symptoms and SPT results, the most evident relationship was found between higher level of eosinophils and the patients with confirmed AR diagnosis on the basis of positive SPT, manifesting the intermittent symptoms. PMID:24720123

  8. Characterization of the relationship between dose and blood eosinophil response following subcutaneous administration of mepolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Pouliquen, Isabelle J.; Kornmann, Oliver; Barton, Sharon V.; Price, Jeffrey A.; Ortega, Hector G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Mepolizumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that blocks human IL-5 from binding to the IL-5 receptor, which is mainly expressed on eosinophils. Eosinophils are key cells in the inflammatory cascade of various diseases, including asthma. This study investigated the pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) relationship between exposure of mepolizumab subcutaneous (SC) administration and blood eosinophil reduction compared with intravenous (IV) administration in adult subjects with asthma. Methods: In this multi-center, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, repeat-dose study, 70 adult subjects received one of four possible treatment regimens: mepolizumab 12.5, 125, or 250 mg SC or 75 mg IV. In addition to analyzing the dose and PK/PD relationship, absolute bioavailability, safety, tolerability, and incidence of anti-mepolizumab antibodies were evaluated. Results: Blood eosinophil levels decreased in a dose-dependent manner with the lowest (12.5 mg) dose clearly differentiating from the other doses. A non-linear inhibition Imax model based on blood eosinophil levels at week 12 identified that the SC doses providing 50% and 90% of maximal blood eosinophil inhibition were 11 mg (95% confidence interval (CI): 5.19 – 16.85) and 99 mg (95% CI: 47 – 152), respectively. The route of administration did not affect the exposure-response relationship. The estimated mepolizumab SC absolute bioavailability (arm) was 74% (90% CI: 54 – 102%). The safety profile of mepolizumab was favorable. Conclusions: A dose-dependent reduction in blood eosinophils across all mepolizumab doses investigated was observed. The subcutaneous absolute bioavailability was 74%. The route of administration did not affect the mepolizumab exposure eosinophil response relationship. PMID:26445140

  9. Electron tomography and immunonanogold electron microscopy for investigating intracellular trafficking and secretion in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Melo, Rossana C N; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F

    2008-08-01

    Electron tomography (ET) has increasingly been used to understand the complexity of membrane systems and protein-trafficking events. By ET and immunonanogold electron microscopy, we recently defined a route for vesicular transport and release of granule-stored products from within activated human eosinophils, cells specialized in the secretion of numerous cytokines and other proteins during inflammatory responses. Here, we highlight these techniques as important tools to unveil a distinct eosinophil vesicular system and secretory pathway. PMID:18410520

  10. Human eosinophils have prolonged survival, enhanced functional properties, and become hypodense when exposed to human interleukin 3.

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, M E; Owen, W F; Silberstein, D S; Woods, J; Soberman, R J; Austen, K F; Stevens, R L

    1988-01-01

    Human eosinophils were cultured in the presence of recombinant human IL-3 for up to 14 d and their biochemical, functional, and density properties were assessed. After 3 d of culture in 10 pM IL-3, eosinophils had a viability of 70% compared with only 10% in enriched medium alone. Neither IL-1 alpha, IL-2, IL-4, tumor necrosis factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, nor platelet-derived growth factor maintained eosinophil viability. The 7- and 14-d survival of the cultured eosinophils was 55 and 53%, respectively. No other cell type, including neutrophils, was present after culture. After 7 d of culture, the normodense eosinophils were converted to hypodense cells as assessed by density centrifugation. Eosinophils exposed to 1,000 pM IL-3 for 30 min or cultured in 10 pM IL-3 for 7 d generated approximately threefold more leukotriene C4 (LTC4) in response to calcium ionophore than freshly isolated cells. Furthermore, whereas freshly isolated eosinophils killed only 14% of the antibody-coated Schistosoma mansoni larvae, these eosinophils killed 54% of the larvae when exposed to 100 pM IL-3. The enhanced helminth cytotoxicity was maintained for 7 d when eosinophils were cultured in the presence of both 10 pM IL-3 and 3T3 fibroblasts, but not when eosinophils were cultured in the presence of IL-3 alone. IL-3 thus maintains the viability of eosinophils in vitro, augments the calcium ionophore-induced generation of LTC4, enhances cytotoxicity against antibody-sensitized helminths, and induces the eosinophils to become hypodense cells. These phenotypic changes in the eosinophil may be advantageous to host defense against helminthic infections but may be disadvantageous in conditions such as allergic disease. Images PMID:3133397

  11. Donor cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Arguelles, Alejandro

    2012-04-01

    Minimal residual disease refers to the tumour cells that are still present in a given patient after completion of a therapeutic scheme. The demonstration and quantification of residual neoplastic cells has a crucial impact in clinical decision making, for it might prompt continuation of treatment, while the absence of such cells might serve as evidence to withdraw therapy. Therefore, both sensitivity and specificity of the methods used to unravel residual neoplastic cells must be highly reliable and robust. Flow cytometry has been widely used for this purpose, and its clinical performance depends mainly on the criteria of interpretation, rather than in the technique by itself; molecular biology techniques have proved to be highly sensitive and specific but unfortunately they cannot be used in all patients or in all types of leukemia. Finally, the development of donor cell leukemia in transplanted patients, might mimic residual disease and add more confusion to an already controversial issue. These topics are discussed in this paper. PMID:22507784

  12. Mast cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Dubreuil, Patrice; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Hermine, Olivier; Damaj, Gandhi

    2013-02-21

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a very rare form of aggressive systemic mastocytosis accounting for < 1% of all mastocytosis. It may appear de novo or secondary to previous mastocytosis and shares more clinicopathologic aspects with systemic mastocytosis than with acute myeloid leukemia. Symptoms of mast cell activation-involvement of the liver, spleen, peritoneum, bones, and marrow-are frequent. Diagnosis is based on the presence of ≥ 20% atypical mast cells in the marrow or ≥ 10% in the blood; however, an aleukemic variant is frequently encountered in which the number of circulating mast cells is < 10%. The common phenotypic features of pathologic mast cells encountered in most forms of mastocytosis are unreliable in MCL. Unexpectedly, non-KIT D816V mutations are frequent and therefore, complete gene sequencing is necessary. Therapy usually fails and the median survival time is < 6 months. The role of combination therapies and bone marrow transplantation needs further investigation. PMID:23243287

  13. Acute Leukemias in Children

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Mohan K. R.

    1979-01-01

    With combination chemotherapy approximately 50% of children with lymphoblastic leukemia survive for five or more years and it is now realistic to hope for a cure. Development of sophisticated cytochemical and immunological techniques have enabled us to recognize the factors that predispose to treatment failures. The survival in acute non-lymphocytic leukemia continues to be poor despite the introduction of several innovative treatment regimens. Current research is focused on the manipulation of the host-tumor immune response to eradicate the disease by treatment modalities such as immunotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Since the treatment regimens are becoming more complex, the initial diagnosis and treatment is best carried out at centres specialized in the management of childhood malignancies. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:21297755

  14. Activated eosinophils in association with enteric nerves in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Claire M; Akasheh, Nadim; Woods, Sara; Kay, Elaine; Morgan, Ross K; Thornton, Margaret A; O'Grady, Anthony; Cummins, Robert; Sheils, Orla; Smyth, Peter; Gleich, Gerald J; Murray, Frank M; Costello, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    Enteric neural dysfunction leads to increased mucous production and dysmotility in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Prior studies have shown that tissue eosinophilia is related to disease activity. We hypothesized that interactions between eosinophils and nerves contribute to neural dysfunction in IBD. Tissue from patients with intractable IBD, endoscopic biopsies from patients with steroid responsive IBD, both when active and quiescent, and control tissue were studied. Immunohistochemical studies showed that eosinophils localize to nerves in the mucosal layer of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) (p<0.001) and ulcerative colitis (UC), (p<0.01). Eosinophils localized to substance P and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunostained nerves. Real time PCR of laser capture micro-dissected enteric ganglia demonstrated Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM-1) mRNA was increased 7-fold in UC (n?=?4), (p?=?0.03), and 10-fold in CD (n?=?3), (p?=?0.05). Compared with controls, eotaxin-3 (CCL-26) mRNA was increased 9-fold in UC (p?=?0.04) and 15-fold in CD (p?=?0.06). Eosinophil numbers correlated with disease activity, while deposition of major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil Transforming Growth Factor ?-1 (TGF?-1) expression were seen in therapeutically responsive disease. These data indicate a significant localization of eosinophils to nerves in IBD, mediated through neurally expressed ICAM-1 and eotaxin-3. This cell/neural interaction may influence the function of nerves and contribute to symptoms in IBD. PMID:23717571

  15. Activated Eosinophils in Association with Enteric Nerves in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Claire M.; Akasheh, Nadim; Woods, Sara; Kay, Elaine; Morgan, Ross K.; Thornton, Margaret A.; OGrady, Anthony; Cummins, Robert; Sheils, Orla; Smyth, Peter; Gleich, Gerald J.; Murray, Frank M.; Costello, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Enteric neural dysfunction leads to increased mucous production and dysmotility in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Prior studies have shown that tissue eosinophilia is related to disease activity. We hypothesized that interactions between eosinophils and nerves contribute to neural dysfunction in IBD. Tissue from patients with intractable IBD, endoscopic biopsies from patients with steroid responsive IBD, both when active and quiescent, and control tissue were studied. Immunohistochemical studies showed that eosinophils localize to nerves in the mucosal layer of patients with Crohns disease (CD) (p<0.001) and ulcerative colitis (UC), (p<0.01). Eosinophils localized to substance P and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunostained nerves. Real time PCR of laser capture micro-dissected enteric ganglia demonstrated Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM-1) mRNA was increased 7-fold in UC (n?=?4), (p?=?0.03), and 10-fold in CD (n?=?3), (p?=?0.05). Compared with controls, eotaxin-3 (CCL-26) mRNA was increased 9-fold in UC (p?=?0.04) and 15-fold in CD (p?=?0.06). Eosinophil numbers correlated with disease activity, while deposition of major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil Transforming Growth Factor ? -1 (TGF?-1) expression were seen in therapeutically responsive disease. These data indicate a significant localization of eosinophils to nerves in IBD, mediated through neurally expressed ICAM-1 and eotaxin-3. This cell/neural interaction may influence the function of nerves and contribute to symptoms in IBD. PMID:23717571

  16. Toxicity of eosinophil MBP is repressed by intracellular crystallization and promoted by extracellular aggregation.

    PubMed

    Soragni, Alice; Yousefi, Shida; Stoeckle, Christina; Soriaga, Angela B; Sawaya, Michael R; Kozlowski, Evelyne; Schmid, Inès; Radonjic-Hoesli, Susanne; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Cascio, Duilio; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Burghammer, Manfred; Riekel, Christian; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Riek, Roland; Eisenberg, David S; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2015-03-19

    Eosinophils are white blood cells that function in innate immunity and participate in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and neoplastic disorders. Their secretory granules contain four cytotoxic proteins, including the eosinophil major basic protein (MBP-1). How MBP-1 toxicity is controlled within the eosinophil itself and activated upon extracellular release is unknown. Here we show how intragranular MBP-1 nanocrystals restrain toxicity, enabling its safe storage, and characterize them with an X-ray-free electron laser. Following eosinophil activation, MBP-1 toxicity is triggered by granule acidification, followed by extracellular aggregation, which mediates the damage to pathogens and host cells. Larger non-toxic amyloid plaques are also present in tissues of eosinophilic patients in a feedback mechanism that likely limits tissue damage under pathological conditions of MBP-1 oversecretion. Our results suggest that MBP-1 aggregation is important for innate immunity and immunopathology mediated by eosinophils and clarify how its polymorphic self-association pathways regulate toxicity intra- and extracellularly. PMID:25728769

  17. An experimental study of inner ear injury in an animal model of eosinophilic otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Hisanori; Kurose, Akira; Nakagawa, Takashi; Takahata, Junko; Sasaki, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: As the periods of intratympanic injection of ovalbumin (OVA) to the middle ear became longer, marked eosinophil infiltration in the perilymphatic space was observed. Moreover severe morphological damage of the organ of Corti was observed in the 28-day antigen-stimulation side. These results indicate that eosinophilic inflammation occurred in the inner ear and caused profound hearing loss. Objective: The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the inner ear damage in a new animal model of eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) which we recently constructed. Methods: We constructed the animal model of EOM by intraperitoneal and intratympanic injection of OVA. Infiltrating cells and the inner ear damage were examined by histological study. Results: In the inner ear, a few eosinophils were seen in the scala tympani of the organ of Corti and the dilation of capillaries of the stria vascularis was observed in the 7-day stimulation side. In the 14-day antigen stimulation side, some eosinophils and macrophages were seen in not only the scala tympani but also the scala vestibule. In the 28-day antigen-stimulation side, severe morphological damage of the organ of Corti and many eosinophils, red blood cells, and plasma cells infiltrating the perilymph were observed. PMID:24359096

  18. Uvaol attenuates pleuritis and eosinophilic inflammation in ovalbumin-induced allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Agra, Lais Costa; Lins, Marvin Paulo; da Silva Marques, Patrícia; Smaniotto, Salete; Bandeira de Melo, Christianne; Lagente, Vincent; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-06-01

    Uvaol, a triterpene present in olives and virgin olive oil, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties and antioxidant effects. However, until now, no studies have demonstrated its potential effects on allergic inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of uvaol in a mouse model of allergy characterized by eosinophil-dominant inflammation in actively sensitized mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of uvaol was analyzed in two murine models of allergic inflammation (pleurisy and asthma). In these models, Swiss mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). In the pleurisy model, the pleural eosinophilic inflammation and IL-5 concentrations were examined 24h after the OVA challenge, while in the asthma model were examined the airway inflammation via bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid cytology and lung histopathology analyses. Our results showed that uvaol decreased the accumulation of eosinophils and the concentration of IL-5 in pleural effluent. Uvaol also demonstrated important anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting production of IL-5 and influx of leukocytes, mainly of eosinophils, in BAL fluid, but without interfering with levels of reactive oxygen species in leukocytes. Moreover, the eosinophil infiltration, mucus production, number of alveoli that collapsed, and IL-5 levels in the lung were clearly decreased by uvaol treatment. These findings indicate that uvaol can be a good candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammation by inhibiting eosinophil influx and IL-5 production in ovalbumin-induced allergy. PMID:27038519

  19. Elevated IgG antibody to Sarcocystis cruzi associated with eosinophilic myositis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Ely, R W; Fox, J C

    1989-01-01

    Blood sera, skeletal muscle, and cardiac muscle from 24 bovine carcasses condemned for eosinophilic myositis by US Department of Agriculture meat inspection veterinarians were compared with similar specimens from 35 random carcasses passed for human consumption. Fluorescence values determined by using a fluorometric immunoassay system were used to measure the specific antibodies to Sarcocystis cruzi. The values were significantly elevated in carcasses condemned for eosinophilic myositis as compared to carcasses passed for human consumption. The elevated fluorescence values appeared to be more than coincidental, suggesting that S. cruzi may be a causative agent of eosinophilic myositis. Microscopic examination of affected muscle revealed lesions typical of eosinophilic myositis. Lesions were characterized by extensive multifocal areas of myofiber hyaline degeneration, necrosis with sarcoplasmic fragmentation, mineralization of occasional myofibers, and atrophy of fibers with varied stages of fibrosis. Inflammatory cell exudates were predominantly eosinophils, with some macrophages and lymphocytes, and extravasated erythrocytes within, and adjacent to, affected myofibers. Affected muscles contained more S. cruzi than unaffected muscle from passed carcasses. However, a distinct cause and effect relationship could not be determined between the parasite and the presence of eosinophilic myositis. PMID:2518705

  20. Uterine type II estrogen-binding sites are not of eosinophil origin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-05

    A recent report suggested that nuclear type II sites in the rat uterus are of eosinophil origin and may represent (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding to eosinophil peroxidase. To further evaluate this hypothesis the authors examined the response of nuclear type II sites to estrogen under conditions where eosinophils are not present. Results of the experiments show that physiological levels of estradiol-17..beta.. (10 nM for 72 h) will stimulate nuclear type II sites in highly purified cultures of rat uterine stromal and myometrial cells. The magnitude of the response of type II sites to estradiol in these stromal (4-fold) and myometrial (80-fold) cell cultures was essentially identical to that observed in the uterine cell types following in vivo estrogen treatment. Since these highly purified cultures of uterine cells were prepared from the uterus of a 21-day ovariectomized rat which is devoid of eosinophils, it was concluded that estradiol stimulation of nuclear type II sites is a direct intracellular response to estrogen which occurs independent of eosinophil accumulation. Furthermore, it was found that type II sites in the rat uterus are not peroxidase. Stimulation of cytosol and nuclear type II sites by estrogen in the rat uterus is a direct intracellular response to the hormone unrelated to eosinophil accumulation and/or peroxidase activity.

  1. Leukemia in telephone linemen.

    PubMed

    Matanoski, G M; Elliott, E A; Breysse, P N; Lynberg, M C

    1993-03-15

    This case-control study examines potential associations between telephone linework and the occurrence of leukemia except chronic lymphocytic leukemia in a primarily retired population of American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T) workers. Cases died between 1975 and 1980. Exposure is defined both by job title and, for workers with complete job histories, by a lifetime exposure score based on industrial hygiene personal monitoring measurements of line and nonline jobs. When the time-weighted average mean for each job is accumulated into a lifetime exposure score, workers with scores above the median for the population show an excess of leukemia 2.5 times higher than workers below the median (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-8.6). Those individuals with long duration of employment in jobs with intermittent peak exposures may be at higher risk of leukemia than those with a constant exposure level. Analyses that allow for a latent period suggest the risk is associated with exposures that occurred 10 or more years before death. Workers with peak exposure scores above the median have odds ratios of 2.4 (95% CI 0.7-9.0) and 6.6 (95% CI 0.7-58) for latent periods of 10 and 15 years, respectively. The data suggest an increasing risk with increasing exposure (p for trend = 0.05) when cumulated scores are based on peak exposure scores. Peak exposures tended to occur in cable splicing work and in old telephone switching offices. The numbers in this study are small and observed differences may be due to chance. PMID:8470662

  2. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis: perspectives of adult and pediatric gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    King, Jeremy; Khan, Seema

    2010-04-01

    To survey pediatric (PGI) and adult gastroenterologists (AGI) regarding their perceptions about the etiology, diagnosis, and management of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), and to assess whether differences in the clinical approach to EoE exist between these subspecialists. A 21-item survey related to EoE was emailed to PGI who subscribe to the PEDSGI Bulletin Board, and to two AGI per Electoral College vote in the US, randomly selected from each state. The survey was voluntary, and consent was assumed based on survey submission. The responses were submitted anonymously and results compiled in a secure Web site. A total of 249 physicians from across the globe responded to the survey, 68% of whom were PGI. The majority of respondents worked primarily in an academic institution or teaching hospital. Respondents revealed diagnosing an average of six cases (median 8, range 0-30) of EoE in the past 6 months. Ninety-two percent of AGI who see a patient with dysphagia and suspected EoE proceed to endoscopy with biopsies, compared to only 54% of PGI (P < 0.05); 38% of PGI would first perform an upper GI study. Both subspecialties agreed that biopsies of the proximal and distal esophagus are needed to make a definitive diagnosis of EoE. Fifty-eight percent PGI and 44% AGI defined EoE as an eosinophilic density of > or =20 per high power field (hpf) in esophageal biopsies. Seventy-seven percent of PGI but only 16% of AGI reported routine referral of patients for food allergy evaluation (P < 0.05). While 77% PGI and 91% of AGI would rely on a symptom-based follow-up, 27% PGI versus 9% AGI follow patients with biopsies according to a pre-determined schedule and another 38% repeat biopsies as needed, versus 15% AGI. This survey exposes a few inconsistencies among gastroenterologists in the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of patients with EoE. The currently available practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of EoE are largely based on retrospective studies and expert opinion. The results of this survey suggest that a collaborative effort based on robust research is required upon us to develop evidence for how we care for these patients. PMID:19390967

  4. Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-20

    Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

  5. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Eosinophil viability is increased by acidic pH in a cAMP- and GPR65-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kottyan, Leah C; Collier, Ann R; Cao, Khanh H; Niese, Kathryn A; Hedgebeth, Megan; Radu, Caius G; Witte, Owen N; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Rothenberg, Marc E; Zimmermann, Nives

    2009-09-24

    The microenvironment of the lung in asthma is acidic, yet the effect of acidity on inflammatory cells has not been well established. We now demonstrate that acidity inhibits eosinophil apoptosis and increases cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner between pH 7.5 and 6.0. Notably, acidity induced eosinophil cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP) production and enhanced cellular viability in an adenylate cyclase-dependent manner. Furthermore, we identify G protein-coupled receptor 65 (GPR65) as the chief acid-sensing receptor expressed by eosinophils, as GPR65-deficient eosinophils were resistant to acid-induced eosinophil cAMP production and enhanced viability. Notably, GPR65(-/-) mice had attenuated airway eosinophilia and increased apoptosis in 2 distinct models of allergic airway disease. We conclude that eosinophil viability is increased in acidic microenvironments in a cAMP- and GPR65-dependent manner. PMID:19641187

  7. Cutting Edge: STAT6 signaling in eosinophils is necessary for development of Allergic Airway Inflammation¶

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Kindra; LaMarche, Nelson M.; Islam, Nasif; Wood, Amie; Huang, Weishan; August, Avery

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are critical cellular mediators in allergic asthma and inflammation, however signals that regulate their functions are unclear. The transcription factor STAT6 regulates Th2 cytokine responses, acting downstream of IL-4 and -13. We have previously shown that eosinophil derived IL-13 plays an important role in the recruitment of T cells to the lung, and subsequent development of allergic asthma. However whether eosinophils respond to Th2 signals to control allergic airway inflammation is unclear. Here, we show that STAT6−/− eosinophils are unable to induce the development of allergic lung inflammation, including recruitment of CD4+ T cells, mucous production and development of airways hyperresponsiveness. This is likely due to the reduced migration of STAT6−/− eosinophils to the lung and in response to eotaxin. These data indicate that like Th cells, eosinophils need to respond to Th2 cytokines via STAT6 during the development of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:25681342

  8. Expression and subcellular localization of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin17 in human eosinophils

    SciTech Connect

    Carmo, Lívia A.S.; Dias, Felipe F.; Malta, Kássia K.; Amaral, Kátia B.; Shamri, Revital; Weller, Peter F.; Melo, Rossana C.N.

    2015-10-01

    Background: SNARE members mediate membrane fusion during intracellular trafficking underlying innate and adaptive immune responses by different cells. However, little is known about the expression and function of these proteins in human eosinophils, cells involved in allergic, inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses. Here, we investigate the expression and distribution of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin17 (STX17) within human eosinophils isolated from the peripheral blood. Methods: Flow cytometry and a pre-embedding immunonanogold electron microscopy (EM) technique that combines optimal epitope preservation and secondary Fab-fragments of antibodies linked to 1.4 nm gold particles for optimal access to microdomains, were used to investigate STX17. Results: STX17 was detected within unstimulated eosinophils. Immunogold EM revealed STX17 on secretory granules and on granule-derived vesiculotubular transport carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles-EoSVs). Quantitative EM analyses showed that 77.7% of the granules were positive for STX17 with a mean±SEM of 3.9±0.2 gold particles/granule. Labeling was present on both granule outer membranes and matrices while EoSVs showed clear membrane-associated labeling. STX17 was also present in secretory granules in eosinophils stimulated with the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or the CC-chemokine ligand 11 CCL11 (eotaxin-1), stimuli that induce eosinophil degranulation. The number of secretory granules labeled for STX17 was significantly higher in CCL11 compared with the unstimulated group. The level of cell labeling did not change when unstimulated cells were compared with TNF-α-stimulated eosinophils. Conclusions: The present study clearly shows by immunanonogold EM that STX17 is localized in eosinophil secretory granules and transport vesicles and might be involved in the transport of granule-derived cargos. - Highlights: • First demonstration of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin-17 (STX17) in human eosinophils. • High resolution immunogold EM shows STX17 in granules and tubular vesicles. • Unstimulated, TNF-α or CCL11-stimulated eosinophils express STX17. • Our findings suggest a role for STX17 in the transport of granule-derived cargos.

  9. Update on topical steroid therapy for eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2015-01-01

    This review aims to summarize evolving evidence on topical steroid (TS) therapy for eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Currently, we still use "off-label" TS, originally designed for bronchial or intranasal delivery. Direct oral administration (i.e., oral viscous budesonide) achieves better histological results than the aerosolized swallowed route, due to longer mucosal contact time. High-dose fluticasone (880 μg bid) has recently shown higher cure rates in children and adults. Steroid resistance is present in around 25-40% of patients. Nonetheless, novel steroid formulations specifically designed for EoE have exhibited outstanding preliminary results (cure rates around 100%). Narrow caliber esophagus (<13 mm) might explain persistent dysphagia despite histological remission on TS therapy and endoscopic dilation should be considered. TS are currently considered safe drugs, but we lack long-term safety data. Maintenance anti-inflammatory therapy is recommended in all patients to prevent disease recurrence and esophageal fibrotic remodeling, although this strategy is yet to be defined. PMID:25630928

  10. Helminthic eosinophilic meningitis: emerging zoonotic diseases in the South.

    PubMed

    Diaz, James H

    2008-01-01

    Today most emerging infectious diseases, such as West Nile virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), arise in the natural environment as zoonoses and are often imported into the United States (US). The most common helminthic infections that can cause eosinophilic meningitis (EoM) in the US, neuroangiostrongyliasis and baylisascariasis, share many of the characteristics of emerging infectious diseases. Neuroangiostrongyliasis, a rodent zoonosis caused by the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, is now endemic in the US following the importation of infected rats on container ships and African land snails, the parasite's intermediate hosts, as biological controls and exotic pets. Baylisascariasis, a raccoon zoonosis, caused by the raccoon roundworm, Baylisascaris procyonis, has extended its US distribution range from suburban neighborhoods in the northern US to the Southeast and West Coast since the 1980s. Both A. cantonensis and B. procyonis are now enzootic in Louisiana and have caused EoM in humans. This review analyzes scientific articles selected by MEDLINE search, 1966-2008, in order to assess the evolving epidemiology of EoM in the US, and specifically in Louisiana; and to alert Louisiana clinicians to populations at increased risk of helminthic EoM as a result of age, ethnicity, lifestyle, food choices, location of permanent residence, or recent travel in the Americas or Caribbean. Most parasitic diseases causing EoM are no longer confined to tropical countries; they are now endemic in the US and in Louisiana and more cases may be anticipated. PMID:19283982

  11. Elimination and elemental diet therapy in eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Warners, M J; Vlieg-Boerstra, B J; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated disorder of the oesophagus. The incidence of EoE has been raised substantially and EoE has recently become the most prevalent cause of dysphagia among the adolescents. Food and aeroallergens are believed to play a major role in the pathogenesis. Current treatment includes topical steroids and dietary therapy. Dietary therapy with elimination of causative allergens could provide a durable long-term solution. Dietary therapy in EoE consists of in elemental and empiric elimination diets. Elemental diet with amino acid-based formula is most effective in achieving disease remission but poor taste makes adherence challenging. Empiric elimination diet based on avoidance of most common food allergens offers moderate response rates, the usefulness of allergy test-directed elimination diets is questioned by low response rates. In conclusion, dietary treatments for EoE seem promising, but further refinement is required before it can become standard care. PMID:26552778

  12. Rapid Growing Eosinophilic Granuloma in Skull after Minor Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Ji

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a case of rapidly progressing eosinophilic granuloma (EG) of the skull without hemorrhage after minor trauma. A 6-year-old boy presented with a soft mass on the midline of his forehead. He had a surgery for EG 19 months ago. One month earlier, computed tomography (CT) and bone scans were performed to evaluate the possible recurrence of EG, and there was no evidence of recurrence in CT. However, a slightly increased uptake in the bone scan was noted on the midline of the forehead. A rapid growing mass developed in a new spot after a minor trauma 7 days before the patient arrived at the clinic. His physical examination was unremarkable, except for a non-tender, soft, and immobile mass. A plain skull X-ray and CT showed a lytic bony defect on the midline of the frontal bone. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 1.4 cm sized enhancing mass. Surgical resection and cranioplasty were done. The role of trauma in the development of EG is unclear. However, our case suggests that minor trauma is an aggravating factor for EG formation. Careful observation with regular follow-up is necessary in patients with EG after minor trauma.

  13. Otolaryngologic surgeries are frequent in children with eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Linn, David; Chun, Robert H.; Keppel, Kristina L.; Noel, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the prevalence of otolaryngologic surgeries in pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Methods Retrospective cohort study at a tertiary care center. The type of otolaryngologic surgeries performed in patients with diagnosis of EoE was recorded during a 5-year period. Results 75% of patients were male, with average age of EoE diagnosis at 7.5 years with an 83% incidence of atopy. Cohort analysis revealed 33% (119/362) had a total of 275 otolaryngologic surgeries. Surgeries performed on 119 patients are as follows: 20% bilateral myringotomy with tubes, 14% tonsillectomy, 18.5% adenoidectomy, 1.4% sinus irrigation, 3.3% bronchoscopy, and 1.4% laryngotracheoplasty (LTP). 63% of patients underwent multiple procedures. 30% of patients undergoing BMT needed additional tubes. 4 of 5 LTP patients had successful operations. 12% of patients had EoE diagnosis prior to an otolaryngologic surgery. Conclusions 33% of children with EoE required otolaryngologic surgical intervention and nearly one-third who underwent BMT required additional ear tubes. A large fraction of children with EoE will undergo an otolaryngologic surgery, only a minority with a preoperative EoE diagnosis. Until the nature of this relationship is clarified, the high coincidence with otolaryngologic surgeries dictates that otolaryngologists should be familiar with diagnosis of EoE in patients. PMID:25385840

  14. [Eosinophilic fasciitis associated with Parkinson's syndrome - a case report].

    PubMed

    Budisin, Vesna; Vrabec-Matković, Dragica; Milavac-Puretić, Visnja

    2013-01-01

    We present a 67 year old patient with erythema and swelling of the right arm. Suspected erysipelas and lymphedema are diagnosed at infectious department in the second month of the disease. He was treated with parenteral antibiotics (clindamycin + quinolon). After that, he was hospitalized at rheumatology department as right hand lymphedema, condition after erysipelas, cervicobrachial syndrome and ulnar epicondylitis of right elbow. Lymphatic drainage of right hand was performed, but with no effect. In the seventh month of the disease, the diagnosis of eosinophilic faciitis was established and started treatment with corticosteroids. Besides mentioned, dizziness, tremor, balance disorders, impaired hearing and pain in the cervical and lumbar spine were apeared. The therapy was introduced with levodopa and ropanirol and there is a slight improvement of neurological manifestations of extrapyramidal syndrome. After 18 months of disease the patient has a contracture of his right shoulder, induration and painful movements right forearm, pronounced tremor of the head and hands, balance disorders, neck pain and back pain, difficulty in walking. PMID:24003683

  15. Interactions between gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Molina-Infante, Javier; van Rhijn, Bram D

    2015-10-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is the most common oesophageal disorder, whereas eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease unresponsive to PPI therapy. Updated guidelines in 2011 described proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE), a novel phenotype in EoE patients who were responsive to PPIs. This article aims to update the complex interplay between GORD, EoE and PPIs. Oesophageal mucosal integrity is diffusely impaired in EoE and PPI-REE patients. PPI-REE might occur with either normal or pathological pH monitoring. The genetic hallmark of EoE is overlapped in PPI-REE, but not in GORD. PPIs can partially restore epithelial integrity and reverse allergic inflammation gene expression in PPI-REE. Acid hypersensitivity in EoE patients may explain symptomatic but not histological response on PPIs. Unsolved issues with PPI-REE are whether oesophageal barrier impairment is the cause or the effect of oesophageal eosinophilia and whether PPIs primarily targets barrier integrity or oesophageal inflammation. PMID:26552774

  16. Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

  17. Effects of prednisone on eosinophilic bronchitis in asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis*,**

    PubMed Central

    Sakae, Thiago Mamôru; Maurici, Rosemeri; Trevisol, Daisson José; Pizzichini, Marcia Margaret Menezes; Pizzichini, Emílio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect size of oral corticosteroid treatment on eosinophilic bronchitis in asthma, through systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: We systematically reviewed articles in the Medline, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, and LILACS databases. We selected studies meeting the following criteria: comparing at least two groups or time points (prednisone vs. control, prednisone vs. another drug, or pre- vs. post-treatment with prednisone); and evaluating parameters before and after prednisone use, including values for sputum eosinophils, sputum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and sputum IL-5-with or without values for post-bronchodilator FEV1-with corresponding 95% CIs or with sufficient data for calculation. The independent variables were the use, dose, and duration of prednisone treatment. The outcomes evaluated were sputum eosinophils, IL-5, and ECP, as well as post-bronchodilator FEV1. RESULTS: The pooled analysis of the pre- vs. post-treatment data revealed a significant mean reduction in sputum eosinophils (↓8.18%; 95% CI: 7.69-8.67; p < 0.001), sputum IL-5 (↓83.64 pg/mL; 95% CI: 52.45-114.83; p < 0.001), and sputum ECP (↓267.60 µg/L; 95% CI: 244.57-290.63; p < 0.0001), as well as a significant mean increase in post-bronchodilator FEV1 (↑8.09%; 95% CI: 5.35-10.83; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with moderate-to-severe eosinophilic bronchitis, treatment with prednisone caused a significant reduction in sputum eosinophil counts, as well as in the sputum levels of IL-5 and ECP. This reduction in the inflammatory response was accompanied by a significant increase in post-bronchodilator FEV1. PMID:25410844

  18. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in activated eosinophils is associated with mucosal remodeling in nasal polyps

    PubMed Central

    XIN, JINGWEI; SUN, HUI; KONG, HONG; LI, LIN; ZHENG, JUN; YIN, CHUNXIA; CAO, YANG; JIA, YUNXIAO; LI, CHAOXU

    2015-01-01

    Nasal polyposis (NP) is characterized by chronic mucosal inflammation with infiltrating eosinophils. Eosinophil-mediated tissue remodeling may be involved in NP pathogenesis; therefore, improved understanding of tissue remodeling may result the identification of novel pathways and therapeutic strategies. The present study aimed to investigate the pathological changes occurring during tissue remodeling in NP, in order to assess the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in localized tissue remodeling and the potential association between ICAM-1 expression and markers of eosinophil activation. A total of 28 eligible patients and 10 healthy controls participated in the current study. Nasal mucosal tissues of these subjects were retrospectively evaluated for mucosal remodeling using histopathological staining. ICAM-1 and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) expression levels were determined by immunohistochemical analysis. Compared with the healthy controls, all the specimens from NP patients presented substantial epithelial damage, skewed cellular distribution with a reduced density of goblet cells, an increased density of subepithelial gland and increased subepithelial collagen deposition. In addition, the NP specimens exhibited significantly higher eosinophil infiltration and ICAM-1 expression compared with the controls. Positive correlations were observed between ICAM-1 and ECP expression levels (P=0.010), as well as between extracellular collagen deposition and ICAM-1 (P=0.010) and ECP (P=0.012) expression levels in the NP specimens, but not in the control specimens. Morphological evidence demonstrated eosinophil-mediated tissue remodeling in NP tissues. ICAM-1 expression in activated eosinophils was associated with NP remodeling, indicating the possibility that ICAM-1 may regulate NP remodeling. PMID:25573100

  19. Eosinophil Inversely Associates with Type 2 Diabetes and Insulin Resistance in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min; Xu, Yu; Li, Mian; Wang, Tiange; Sun, Jichao; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Baihui; Lu, Jieli; Bi, Yufang; Wang, Weiqing; Xu, Yiping

    2013-01-01

    Context Limited population-based study focused on relationship between eosinophil and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Objectives We aimed to evaluate the relationship between peripheral eosinophil percentage and glucose metabolism and insulin resistance in a large sample size of Chinese population aged 40 and older. Design and Methods A cross-sectional study was performed among 9,111 Chinese adults including 3,561 men and 5,550 women. The glucose metabolism status was confirmed by 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index and serum insulin levels were used to evaluate insulin resistance. Homeostasis model assessment-B was used to evaluate β cell function. Results The average age of participants was 58.5 years. The prevalence of T2D decreased across the tertiles of eosinophil percentage (21.3%, 18.2% and 16.9%, P<0.0001). Each one tertile increase of eosinophil percentage inversely associated with risk of T2D when referred not only to normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (odds ratio (OR) 0.81, 95% CI 0.76–0.87, P< 0.0001), but also to impaired glucose regulation (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83–0.97, P = 0.006), respectively, after adjustment for the confounding factors. Compared with the first tertile, the third tertile of eosinophil percentage associated with a 23% decrease of insulin resistance in NGT participants after full adjustments (P = 0.005). Each 1-standard deviation of increment of eosinophil percentage associated with a 37% decrease of insulin resistance (P = 0.005). Conclusions Higher peripheral eosinophil percentage was associated with decreased risk of T2D. The inverse relation to insulin resistance was detected in NGT participants. PMID:23894289

  20. Periostin - A Novel Systemic Biomarker for Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Emprm, Viswanathan; Rajanandh, MG

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic airway inflammation and remodelling are fundamental features of asthma. The molecular phenotypes in asthma are Th2 high and Th2 low. Serum periostin is a biomarker which aid in understanding Th2 high eosinophilic asthma. Aim The present study aimed to identify whether or not serum periostin is a systemic biomarker for eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatics. Materials and Methods The study was designed as a prospective, case control study. Patients who presented with consistent symptoms of asthma and confirmed by spirometry with reversibility were the cases. The controls were healthy subjects who had no history of lung disease with normal lung function. The sputum and blood samples were collected from both the groups. Sputum eosinophils, Absolute Eosinophil Counts (AEC) and serum periostin levels were compared between the groups. Results The study comprised of 101 participants in which 30 were controls and 71 were cases. In the study group, mean post FEV1 was 64.45. There was a positive correlation of sputum eosinophils with severity of obstruction. The ROC curve analysis showed the cut-off value of 24.556 for serum periostin with the p-value of <0.001. As the severity of obstruction increased, the serum periostin levels were also found to be increased. Serum periostin had a sensitivity and specificity of 97.18% and 86.67% with a diagnostic accuracy of 94.06%. Conclusion Serum periostin appears to be a more sensitive tool for detection of airflow limitation in asthmatic patients with a Th2 high eosinophilic phenotype when compared to AEC and sputum eosinophils. PMID:27054127

  1. Supportive Care for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Leukapheresis for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Next Topic Stem cell transplant for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Supportive care for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Supportive care for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is aimed at helping with problems related to the cancer and its treatment. For ...

  2. Radiation-induced leukemias in ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Toolis, F.; Potter, B.; Allan, N.C.; Langlands, A.O.

    1981-10-01

    Three cases of leukemia occurred in patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated by radiotherapy. In each case, the leukemic process exhibited bizarre features suggesting that radiation is likely to induce atypical forms of leukemia possessing unusual attributes not shared by spontaneously developing leukemia. The likely distinctive aspects of radiation-induced leukemia are discussed.

  3. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  4. SJG-136 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  5. Bendamustine Plus Alemtuzumab for Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-20

    Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  6. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Tumor eosinophil infiltration and improved survival of colorectal cancer patients: Iowa Women's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Prizment, Anna E; Vierkant, Robert A; Smyrk, Thomas C; Tillmans, Lori S; Lee, James J; Sriramarao, P; Nelson, Heather H; Lynch, Charles F; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Church, Timothy R; Cerhan, James R; Anderson, Kristin E; Limburg, Paul J

    2016-05-01

    The role of the innate immune response in colorectal cancer is understudied. We examined the survival of colorectal cancer patients in relation to eosinophils, innate immune cells, infiltrating the tumor. Tissue microarrays were constructed from paraffin-embedded tumor tissues collected between 1986 and 2002 from 441 post-menopausal women diagnosed with colorectal cancer in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Tissue microarrays were stained with an eosinophil peroxidase antibody. Eosinophils in epithelial and stromal tissues within the tumor (called epithelial and stromal eosinophils, hereafter) were counted and scored into three and four categories, respectively. In addition, the degree of eosinophil degranulation (across epithelial and stromal tissues combined) was quantified and similarly categorized. We used Cox regression to estimate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence interval for all-cause and colorectal cancer death during 5-year follow-up after diagnosis and during follow-up through 2011 ('total follow-up'). The hazard ratios associated with eosinophil scores were adjusted for age of diagnosis, SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) stage, tumor grade, body mass, and smoking history. High tumor stromal eosinophil score was inversely correlated with age and stage, and was associated with a decreased risk for all-cause and colorectal cancer death: hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 0.61 (0.36-1.02; P-trend=0.02) and 0.48 (0.24-0.93; P-trend=0.01), respectively, during the 5-year follow-up for the highest vs lowest category. The inverse associations also existed for total follow-up for all-cause and colorectal cancer death for the highest vs lowest stromal eosinophil score: hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 0.72 (0.48-1.08; P-trend=0.04) and 0.61 (0.34-1.12; P-trend=0.04), respectively. Further adjustment for treatment, comorbidities, additional lifestyle factors, tumor location, or molecular markers did not markedly change the associations, while adjustment for cytotoxic T cells slightly attenuated all associations. The infiltration of tumors with eosinophils, especially in stromal tissue, may be an important prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. PMID:26916075

  8. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-03

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

  9. Clinical Manifestations and Treatment Outcomes of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Sub; Choi, Shin Jie; Lee, Kyung Jae; Kim, Ahlee; Yoo, Jung Kyung; Yang, Hye Ran; Moon, Jin Soo; Chang, Ju Young; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical features and outcome of eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) in children. Methods Our study enrolled 24 children who were diagnosed with EGE from 1993 to 2014 at the Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Children's Hospital. The patients' clinical manifestations, treatments, and outcomes were reviewed from the medical records. Results The mean age at diagnosis was 5.3 years. Most patients had gastrointestinal symptoms including diarrhea (54.2%) and abdominal pain (45.8%). Peripheral eosinophilia was present in 91.7% of the patients. Thirteen patients (54.2%) showed anemia, and 15 patients (62.5%) had hypoalbuminemia. EGE was classified as mucosal, subserosal, or muscular in 75.0%, 20.8%, and 4.2% of cases, respectively. Three patients showed gastroduodenal ulcers upon endoscopic analysis. A history of allergy was reported in 13 patients, including atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, and asthma. Five patients (20.8%) improved with food restrictions. Among the 19 patients treated with steroids, 11 (57.9%) discontinued steroid treatment without subsequent relapse, 4 (21.1%) relapsed after ceasing steroid treatment, and 4 (21.1%) showed no response to steroids. Two patients who were resistant to steroids underwent therapeutic surgery. The presence of gastroduodenal ulcers was significantly associated with relapse and steroid resistance. Conclusion A high suspicion of EGE is warranted when children have nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms and peripheral eosinophilia. Most patients improved with food restrictions or steroid treatment, although one-third of patients showed a relapse or steroid resistance. PMID:26770900

  10. Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis: a comprehensive review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Elliot; Scheinfeld, Noah

    2004-01-01

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF), also known as Ofuji disease, is a disease that manifests with follicular papules or pustules. Its variants include a classic type that occurs most commonly in Japan, an HIV-associated type, an infantile type, a type that occurs on the palms and soles, a rare medication-associated variant, and a rare neoplasia-associated variant.A wide range of medications has been used to treat EPF. Topical corticosteroids are the first-line treatment option for EPF. Topical tacrolimus seems to be useful initial therapy as well. Oral indometacin (50-75 mg/day) is an effective treatment of classic EPF although it can induce peptic ulcers. For treatment of HIV-associated EPF when topical corticosteroids and indometacin do not work, various other treatments should be considered. These treatment options include cetirizine 20-40 mg/day, metronidazole 250 mg three times a day, itraconazole starting at a dosage of 200 mg/day and increasing to 300-400 mg/day, and topical permethrin. If these treatments do not work phototherapy with UVB is the 'gold standard' of treatment and is often curative. Treatments with less certain risk-benefit ratios but with some efficacy include PUVA (psoralen + UVA) photochemotherapy, oral corticosteroids, synthetic retinoids (i.e. isotretinoin 1 mg/kg/day), and acitretin (0.5 mg/kg/day), oral cyclosporine (ciclosporine) 5 mg/kg/day, interferon (IFN)-alpha-2b, and IFNgamma. Minocycline 100mg twice daily and dapsone 50-100mg twice daily have been used with some effect. The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy for HIV has resulted in the amelioration of EPF as CD4 cell counts rise above 250/mm(3). The diversity of clinical presentations and affected populations make it seem that EPF is a reaction pattern as much as a disease and that therapy should be tailored to the variant of EPF and the underlying etiology. PMID:15186198

  11. [Two cases of eosinophilic gastroenteritis whose causative allergens are usefully diagnosed by patch test].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Atsuko

    2010-05-01

    Case 1: 67-years-old woman with pollinosis noticed oppressive feeling of chest and back, and heart burn after accidental ingestion of her dental filling and dental treatment. Oral famotidine did not improve her symptom. Her peripheral blood eosinophils increased to 38.0%. As for the specific IgE, only cedar and cypress were positive. Case 2: a 42-years-old-woman with pollinosis and asthma repeated urticaria, heart burn, diarrhea and peripheral eosinophilia (25%). At her first visit to our department, her blood eosinophil increased to 52.9%, her serum IgG markedly increased in polyclonal pattern and overt all subclasses. The specific IgE was positive only for cypress. Because they revealed a remarkable infiltrates of eosinophils in the mucosa of alimentary tract, we diagnosed the 2 patient as eosinophilic gastroenteritis. In case 1, based on the history and patch-test-positive finding of formalin and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, we diagnosed the two may be causative allergens. In case 2, based on the patch-test-positive finding of garlic and sesame and improvement after removal of the two allergens, we diagnosed the two may be causative allergens. Although causative allergens of eosinophilic gastroenteritis are almost unknown, some cases are reported to be determined the allergens of foods and drugs. In our cases, patch test was useful to identify the allergens. PMID:20502103

  12. High Fat Diet Causes Depletion of Intestinal Eosinophils Associated with Intestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Andrew M. F.; Costanzo, Anne; Gareau, Melanie G.; Armando, Aaron M.; Quehenberger, Oswald; Jameson, Julie M.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2015-01-01

    The development of intestinal permeability and the penetration of microbial products are key factors associated with the onset of metabolic disease. However, the mechanisms underlying this remain unclear. Here we show that, unlike liver or adipose tissue, high fat diet (HFD)/obesity in mice does not cause monocyte/macrophage infiltration into the intestine or pro-inflammatory changes in gene expression. Rather HFD causes depletion of intestinal eosinophils associated with the onset of intestinal permeability. Intestinal eosinophil numbers were restored by returning HFD fed mice to normal chow and were unchanged in leptin-deficient (Ob/Ob) mice, indicating that eosinophil depletion is caused specifically by a high fat diet and not obesity per se. Analysis of different aspects of intestinal permeability in HFD fed and Ob/Ob mice shows an association between eosinophil depletion and ileal paracelullar permeability, as well as leakage of albumin into the feces, but not overall permeability to FITC dextran. These findings provide the first evidence that a high fat diet causes intestinal eosinophil depletion, rather than inflammation, which may contribute to defective barrier integrity and the onset of metabolic disease. PMID:25837594

  13. Expression of eosinophils be beneficial to early clinical diagnosis of brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Peng-Fei; Chu, Wei-Li; Ren, Gao-Fei; Hou, Jun-Na; Li, Ya-Meng; Xing, Li-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Investigate the expression and significance of eosinophils in brucellosis. Methods: Retrospective analysis of clinical data for 151 brucellosis patients (BR group), complete blood count and blood bacterial culture etc.; in addition, 150 general bacterial infection patients (BI group) and 135 persons in healthy physical condition upon testing (NC group) are selected respectively as the control groups to comparatively study expression of white blood cells and eosinophils for brucellosis patients. Adopt t test to compare measurement data. Results: In comparison with BI group, WBC, NE, EO, MO, NE% and EO% in BR group are reduced but LY, LY% and MO% are increased and such difference shows statistical significance (P<0.01). In comparison with NC group, difference of WBC and NE in BR group shows no statistical significance (P>0.05). NE%, EO and EO% are reduced but MO, LY% and MO% are increased and such difference shows statistical significance (P<0.01). LY is increased and the difference shows statistical significance (P<0.05). White blood cell count is normal or is reduced among most of Brucellosis patients, accounting for 90.73% (137/151); the patients whose eosinophils are reduced account for 75.50% (114/151) and those whose eosinophils disappear are about 18.54% (28/151). Conclusion: There is an incidence rate of eosinophils decrease or disappearance in Brucellosis and it shows the indication significance in the diagnosis of early disease. PMID:26770598

  14. Molecular cloning of the human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin: A member of the ribonuclease gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, H.F.; Tenen, D.G.; Ackerman, S.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The authors have isolated a 725-base-pair cDNA clone for human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). EDN is a distinct cationic protein of the eosinophil's large specific granule known primarily for its ability to induce ataxia, paralysis, and central nervous system cellular degeneration in experimental animals (Gordon phenomenon). The open reading frame encodes a 134-amino acid mature polypeptide with a molecular mass of 15.5 kDa and a 27-residue amino-terminal hydrophobic leader sequence. The sequence of the mature polypeptide is identical to that reported for human urinary ribonuclease, and to the amino-terminal sequence of human liver ribonuclease; the cDNA encodes a tryptophan in position 7. Both EDN and the related granule protein, eosinophil cationic protein, have ribonucleolytic activity; sequence similarities among EDN, eosinophil cationic protein, ribonucleases from liver, urine, and pancreas, and angiogenin define a ribonuclease multigene family. mRNA encoding EDN was detected in uninduced HL-60 cells and was up-regulated in cells induced toward eosinophilic differentiation with B-cell growth factor 2/interleukin 5 and toward neutrophilic differentiation with dimethyl sulfoxide. EDN mRNA was detected in mature neutrophils even though EDN-like neurotoxic activity is not found neutrophil extracts. These results suggest that neutrophils contain a protein that is closely related or identical to EDN.

  15. Proteoglycans are potent modulators of the biological responses of eosinophils to chemokines.

    PubMed

    Culley, Fiona J; Fadlon, Emma J; Kirchem, Antje; Williams, Timothy J; Jose, Peter J; Pease, James E

    2003-05-01

    Chemokines play critical roles in governing the recruitment and activation of eosinophils at sites of allergic inflammation, particularly the asthmatic lung. However, we know little of how chemokine function is regulated post-translationally. Proteoglycans, consisting of a core protein and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains, are cell surface molecules and components of the extracellular matrix that are able to bind chemokines, whilst heparin is a GAG with therapeutic value in asthma. We examined whether soluble GAG could alter the actions of chemokines in assays of eosinophil activation. Heparin inhibited intracellular calcium flux, respiratory burst and chemotactic responses of eosinophils to CCL11, but not to the chemoattractant C5a, and inhibited binding of CCL11 to CCR3. Heparin also inhibited eosinophil stimulation by CCL11, CCL24, CCL7, CCL13 and CCL5 to differing degrees, which broadly correlated with their relative affinities for heparin. Heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate, but not chondroitin sulfate, also inhibited the actions of CCL11 and CCL13 in assays of cellular shape change and chemotaxis. Following treatment with the sulfation inhibitor chlorate or proteoglycanases, no inhibition of CCL11-induced activity was observed using either eosinophils or a CCR3-expressing transfectant cell line. This suggests that cell surface proteoglycans are not necessary for signaling via CCR3. However, the GAG context in which chemokines are expressed is likely to represent an important level of regulation of allergic inflammation. PMID:12731055

  16. Eosinophilic pneumonias in children: A review of the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Giovannini-Chami, Lisa; Blanc, Sibylle; Hadchouel, Alice; Baruchel, André; Boukari, Rachida; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Fayon, Michael; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Nathan, Nadia; Albertini, Marc; Clément, Annick; de Blic, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric eosinophilic pneumonias (EPs) are characterized by a significant infiltration of the alveolar spaces and lung interstitium by eosinophils, with conservation of the lung structure. In developed countries, EPs constitute exceptional entities in pediatric care. Clinical symptoms may be transient (Löffler syndrome), acute (<1 month and mostly <7 days), or chronic (>1 month). Diagnosis relies on demonstration of alveolar eosinophilia on bronchoalveolar lavage, whether or not associated with blood eosinophilia. EPs are a heterogeneous group of disorders divided into: (i) secondary forms (seen mainly in parasitic infections, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and drug reactions); and (ii) primary forms (eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, and idiopathic acute eosinophilic pneumonia). Despite their rarity, the etiological approach to EP must be well-defined as some causes can be rapidly life-threatening without initiation of the proper treatment. This approach (i) eliminates secondary forms, with comprehensive history taking and minimal biological assessment, (ii) is oriented in primary forms by the acute or chronic setting, and the existence of extrapulmonary symptoms. Treatment of primary forms has traditionally relied on corticosteroids, usually with a dramatic response. Specific treatments or the adjunction of corticosteroid-sparing treatment or immunosuppressors are currently being evaluated in order to improve the prognosis and the side effects associated with corticosteroid treatment in a pediatric setting. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:203-216. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26716396

  17. Histamine is required for IL-4-driven eosinophilic allergic responses1

    PubMed Central

    Swartzendruber, Julie A.; Byrne, Adam J.; Bryce, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Histamine is an important allergic mediator and studies have defined roles for both histamine 1 and 4 receptors (H1R and H4R) in allergic airway inflammation. Here, we show that histamine is necessary to generate IL-4-driven eosinophilic inflammation, as histamine deficient mice cannot generate eosinophilic lung inflammation in response to intratracheal IL-4 and exogenous histamine restores responsiveness. This is histamine 2 receptor (H2R) dependent since H2R KO mice fail to respond to IL-4, and a H2R agonist restores inflammation in HDC KO. Furthermore, alveolar epithelial cells require H2R in order to produce CCL24, an eosinophil recruitment factor, while H2R blockade reduces CCL24 production from WT cells. In an allergic inflammation model, H2R KO mice show significantly reduced eosinophilic inflammation and CCL24 expression. These data demonstrate a previously unidentified role for H2R in allergic inflammation and establishes a synergy between endogenous histamine and IL-4 that supports eosinophilic recruitment to the lung. PMID:22156496

  18. Cutting edge: histamine is required for IL-4-driven eosinophilic allergic responses.

    PubMed

    Swartzendruber, Julie A; Byrne, Adam J; Bryce, Paul J

    2012-01-15

    Histamine is an important allergic mediator, and studies have defined roles for both histamine 1 and 4 receptors in allergic airway inflammation. In this study, we show that histamine is necessary to generate IL-4-driven eosinophilic inflammation, as histamine-deficient mice cannot generate eosinophilic lung inflammation in response to intratracheal IL-4 and exogenous histamine restores responsiveness. This is histamine 2 receptor (H2R) dependent because H2R knockout mice fail to respond to IL-4, and a H2R agonist restores inflammation in histidine decarboxylase knockout. Furthermore, alveolar epithelial cells require H2R to produce CCL24, an eosinophil recruitment factor, whereas H2R blockade reduces CCL24 production from wild-type cells. In an allergic inflammation model, H2R knockout mice show significantly reduced eosinophilic inflammation and CCL24 expression. These data demonstrate a previously unidentified role for H2R in allergic inflammation and establishes a synergy between endogenous histamine and IL-4 that supports eosinophilic recruitment to the lung. PMID:22156496

  19. Integrin alpha 4 beta 7 mediates human eosinophil interaction with MAdCAM-1, VCAM-1 and fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, G M; Symon, F A; Lazarovils, A L; Wardlaw, A J

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the contribution of integrin alpha 4 beta 7 to human peripheral blood eosinophil adhesive interactions. Immunofluorescence and flow cytometry demonstrated constitutive expression of alpha 4 beta 7 by eosinophils. Expression of alpha 4 beta 7 or alpha 4 beta 7 was not enhanced by eosinophil activation with platelet-activating factor (PAF). Expression of alpha 4 beta 7 was confirmed by immuno-precipitation of 125I-labeled lysates analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE). Approximately 20% of unstimulated eosinophils were adherent to L1-2 cells transfected with vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) cDNA, while very few resting eosinophils adhered to mouse mucosal adressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1) transfectants. Binding of unstimulated eosinophils to VCAM-1 transfectant was inhibited by HPI 2 (an antibody that blocks both alpha 4 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 7 functions), but not Act-1, and alpha 4 beta 1 monoclonal antibody (mAb). PAF stimulation resulted in increased binding of eosinophils to MAdCAM-1 transfectants, which was inhibited by both HPI 2 and Act-1. In contrast, PAF did not enhance binding to VCAM 1 transfectants, although binding of PAE-stimulated eosinophils to VCAM-1 could be partially inhibited by Act-1. Stimulation of eosinophils with the beta 7-activating mAb TS2 16 resulted in enhanced binding of eosinophils to both VCAM-1 and MAdCAM-1 transfectants. The increased binding was largely alpha 4 beta 7-dependent. Unstimulated eosinophils bound to soluble recombinant human (rh) VCAM-1 and fibronectin (Fn), coated on 96-well plates in dose-dependent manner. Binding was inhibited by HPI-2 and 4b4, an anti-beta 1 mAb, but not by Act-1. TS2 16 treatment increased adherent cell numbers and this enhanced binding was inhibited by Act-1. We have therefore confirmed that alpha 4 beta 7 is functionally active on unstimulated eosinophils. In contrast, PAF-induced enhancement of eosinophils binding to VCAM-1 or MAdCAM-1 was alpha 4 beta 7-dependent. In addition treatment with TS2 16 resulted in a alpha 4 beta 7-dependent enhancement of eosinophil binding to VCAM-1, MAdCAM-1 and Fn. We therefore hypothesize that alpha 4 beta 7 may have an important role in eosinophil localization in diseases such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. Images Figure 2 PMID:8911148

  20. Sialyltransferase ST3Gal-III regulates Siglec-F ligand formation and eosinophilic lung inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Suzukawa, Maho; Miller, Marina; Rosenthal, Peter; Cho, Jae Youn; Doherty, Taylor; Varki, Ajit; Broide, David

    2013-01-01

    Siglec-F is highly expressed on mouse eosinophils and plays an important role in regulating levels of eosinophilic lung inflammation. In this study we investigated the mechanism of constitutive and inducible Siglec-F ligand expression by lung airway epithelial cells and inflammatory cells in WT and genetically altered mice (ST3Gal-III heterozygotes; Fuc-TIV/VII double null; STAT6 null). Flow cytometry demonstrated that Siglec-F ligands are constitutively expressed in vitro and in vivo in selected lung cell types (epithelial cells, eosinophils, macrophages, mast cells, but not CD4, CD8, or B cells) and induced in response to divergent stimuli including innate stimuli (TLR ligands, Alternaria), Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13), and adaptive immune stimuli (OVA allergen). Furthermore studies of deficient mice demonstrated the greater importance of the sialyltransferase ST3Gal-III compared to fucosyltransferases Fuc-TIV/VII in the synthesis of the constitutive and inducible Siglec-F ligands by lung epithelial and non-epithelial cells. In keeping with this, ST3Gal-III heterozygote mice (deficient in expression of Siglec-F ligands) also had significantly enhanced OVA-induced eosinophilic airway inflammation associated with reduced eosinophil apoptosis. Reduced eosinophil apoptosis in the lung of ST3Gal-III deficient mice is likely mediated by reduced epithelial expression of Siglec-F ligands as WT eosinophils (which highly express Siglec-F) cultured with ST3Gal-III deficient epithelial cells (which do not express Siglec-F ligand) showed reduced eosinophil apoptosis compared to WT eosinophils cultured with WT epithelial cells. Overall, these studies demonstrate that ST3Gal-III plays an important role in Siglec-F ligand formation and eosinophil apoptosis with resultant effects on eosinophilic inflammation in the lung. PMID:23677475

  1. Regulation of carcinogenesis by IL-5 and CCL11: a potential role for eosinophils in tumor immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    Simson, Ljubov; Ellyard, Julia I; Dent, Lindsay A; Matthaei, Klaus I; Rothenberg, Marc E; Foster, Paul S; Smyth, Mark J; Parish, Christopher R

    2007-04-01

    The role of the immune system in the surveillance of transformed cells has seen a resurgence of interest in the last 10 years, with a substantial body of data in mice and humans supporting a role for the immune system in host protection from tumor development and in shaping tumor immunogenicity. A number of earlier studies have demonstrated that eosinophils, when recruited into tumors, can very effectively eradicate transplantable tumors. In this study, we investigated whether eosinophils also play a role in tumor immune surveillance by determining the incidence of methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced fibrosarcomas in IL-5 transgenic mice that have greatly enhanced levels of circulating eosinophils, CCL11 (eotaxin-1)-deficient mice that lack a key chemokine that recruits eosinophils into tissues, and the eosinophil-deficient mouse strains, IL-5/CCL11(-/-) and DeltadblGATA. It was found that MCA-induced tumor incidence and growth were significantly attenuated in IL-5 transgenic mice of both the BALB/c and C57BL/6 backgrounds. Histological examination revealed that the protective effect of IL-5 was associated with massively enhanced numbers of eosinophils within and surrounding tumors. Conversely, there was a higher tumor incidence in CCL11(-/-) BALB/c mice, which was associated with a reduced eosinophil influx into tumors. This correlation was confirmed in the eosinophil-deficient IL-5/CCL11(-/-) and DeltadblGATA mouse strains, where tumor incidence was greatly increased in the total absence of eosinophils. In addition, subsequent in vitro studies found that eosinophils could directly kill MCA-induced fibrosarcoma cells. Collectively, our data support a potential role for the eosinophil as an effector cell in tumor immune surveillance. PMID:17371978

  2. Human eosinophil adhesion and degranulation stimulated with eotaxin and RANTES in vitro: Lack of interaction with nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Lintomen, Letícia; Franchi, Gilberto; Nowill, Alexandre; Condino-Neto, Antonio; de Nucci, Gilberto; Zanesco, Angelina; Antunes, Edson

    2008-01-01

    Background Airway eosinophilia is considered a central event in the pathogenesis of asthma. The toxic components of eosinophils are thought to be important in inducing bronchial mucosal injury and dysfunction. Previous studies have suggested an interaction between nitric oxide (NO) and chemokines in modulating eosinophil functions, but this is still conflicting. In the present study, we have carried out functional assays (adhesion and degranulation) and flow cytometry analysis of adhesion molecules (VLA-4 and Mac-1 expression) to evaluate the interactions between NO and CC-chemokines (eotaxin and RANTES) in human eosinophils. Methods Eosinophils were purified using a percoll gradient followed by immunomagnetic cell separator. Cell adhesion and degranulation were evaluated by measuring eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) activity, whereas expression of Mac-1 and VLA-4 was detected using flow cytometry. Results At 4 h incubation, both eotaxin (100 ng/ml) and RANTES (1000 ng/ml) increased by 133% and 131% eosinophil adhesion, respectively. L-NAME alone (but not D-NAME) also increased the eosinophil adhesion, but the co-incubation of L-NAME with eotaxin or RANTES did not further affect the increased adhesion seen with chemokines alone. In addition, L-NAME alone (but not D-NAME) caused a significant cell degranulation, but it did not affect the CC-chemokine-induced cell degranulation. Incubation of eosinophils with eotaxin or RANTES, in absence or presence of L-NAME, did not affect the expression of VLA-4 and Mac-1 on eosinophil surface. Eotaxin and RANTES (100 ng/ml each) also failed to elevate the cyclic GMP levels above baseline in human eosinophils. Conclusion Eotaxin and RANTES increase the eosinophil adhesion to fibronectin-coated plates and promote cell degranulation by NO-independent mechanisms. The failure of CC-chemokines to affect VLA-4 and Mac-1 expression suggests that changes in integrin function (avidity or affinity) are rather involved in the enhanced adhesion. PMID:18700028

  3. Marrow transplantation for leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.D.

    1981-07-01

    Marrow transplantation for selected patients with leukemia, as for patients with severe combined immunologic deficiency or severe aplastic anemia, has now become an accepted clinical procedure. For patients with acute leukemia who have relapsed after achieving a remission of chemotherapy, marrow grafting from an identical twin or an HLA-identical sibling has now been demonstrated to produce median remissions as long as or longer than any reported for combination chemotherapy. In contrast to chemotherapy, marrow transplantation offers the possibility of cure for a small but significant fraction of these patients. Marrow transplantation for patients with ANL in first remission has now resulted in median survivals much longer than any reported with chemotherapy. Although it now appears that more than 50% of these patients can be cured with marrow transplantation, a much longer follow-up is indicated since some patients who achieve a complete remission with combination chemotherapy are now living for a long time, and some of these patients (less than 20%) may also be cured. Current intensive research with new modalities such as interferon, Acyclovir, Cyclosporin A, and monoclonal antibodies can reasonably be expected to improve the overall results of marrow transplantation.

  4. Targeted therapy in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Downing, James R

    2008-05-01

    Research conducted over the last two decades has yielded a detailed understanding of the molecular lesions that contribute to the malignant transformation of hematopoietic stem cells and committed progenitors into the various forms of acute and chronic leukemia. Although our understanding of the molecular pathology of leukemia remains incomplete, the information gained to date has had a profound impact on the way these malignancies are both diagnosed and monitored during therapy. More recently, targeted therapies have been developed against some of the identified genetic lesions. These therapies have led to significant improvements in patient outcomes while simultaneously decreasing therapy-related toxicity. With the advent of genome-wide methods to define the total complement of genetic and epigenetic lesions involved in leukemogenesis, new targeted therapies can be anticipated. This review highlights some of the targeted therapies that are presently being used to treat hematopoietic malignancies and describes some of the recent advances that should have a significant impact on the development of future target therapies. PMID:18437169

  5. Management of prolymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dearden, Claire

    2015-12-01

    B-cell (B-PLL) and T-cell (T-PLL) prolymphocytic leukemias are rare, poor-prognosis lymphoid neoplasms with similar presentation characterized by symptomatic splenomegaly and lymphocytosis. They can be distinguished from each other and from other T- and B-cell leukemias by careful evaluation of morphology, immunophenotyping, and molecular genetics. The clinical behavior is typically aggressive, although a subset of patients may have an indolent phase of variable length. First-line therapy for T-PLL is with intravenous alemtuzumab and for B-PLL is with combination purine analog-based chemo-immunotherapy. New B-cell receptor inhibitors, such as ibrutinib and idelalisib, may have a role in the management of B-PLL, especially for the patients harboring abnormalities of TP53. Allogenic stem cell transplantation should still be considered for eligible patients and may be the only current therapy capable of delivering a cure. In the past few years, many of the molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis and progression have been revealed and are likely to lead to the development of novel targeted approaches. PMID:26637744

  6. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) and Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukopenia” (a below-normal concentration of white cells) • Enlargement of the spleen and/or liver • Feeling of fullness below the ribs due to spleen enlargement. Published as a public service by The Leukemia &  ...

  8. The effect of treatment with montelukast on levels of serum interleukin-10, eosinophil cationic protein, blood eosinophil counts, and clinical parameters in children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Birol; Aydemir, Cumhur; Ustündag, Gonca; Eldeş, Nilüfer; Kutsal, Ebru; Can, Murat; Demirtaş, Selda; Tomaç, Nazan

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an important immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine. IL-10 levels are reduced in asthmatic airways. A regulatory mechanism involving IL-4 induced allergen-specific IL-10 production may be defective in allergic subjects, and this defect potentially contributes to more intense inflammation. The aim of this study was to define the effect of treatment with montelukast on serum levels of IL-10, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), blood eosinophil counts, and clinical parameters (symptom score and lung function tests) in children with mild and moderate persistent asthma. Twenty-five children with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma and 25 nonatopic healthy children as controls were enrolled in the study. Patients were treated with montelukast for four weeks. Lung function tests for forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% (FEF25-75) were performed before and after treatment. Serum IL-10, ECP levels, and blood eosinophil counts were determined in both the control group and asthmatic children before and after treatment. The mean serum IL-10 levels were significantly lower before treatment than after treatment (1.75 +/- 0.9 pg/ml and 5.49 +/- 3.6 pg/ml; p < 0.001) and in control subjects (5.6 +/- 2.8 pg/ml). After four weeks of treatment with montelukast, the mean blood eosinophil count value (608 +/- 73/mm3 and 469 +/- 57/mm3; p < 0.05) but not the ECP value (33.98 +/- 24.3 microg/L and 29.03 +/- 19.2 microg/L; p > 0.05) was significantly decreased. After treatment with montelukast, all clinical parameters and lung function tests improved. We found no statistical correlations between the serum level of IL-10 and the serum level of ECP, eosinophil count, lung function tests, or clinical scores after treatment with montelukast. Montelukast caused a statistically significant increase in serum IL-10 levels and decrease in peripheral blood eosinophil counts over the four-week treatment period. Our study indicates that montelukast provides clinical benefits for children with chronic asthma and produces an anti-inflammatory response by increasing serum IL-10 levels, PMID:20112601

  9. Elevation of serum surfactant protein-A with exacerbation in canine eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sone, Katsuhito; Akiyoshi, Hideo; Hayashi, Akiyoshi; Ohashi, Fumihito

    2016-02-01

    A 7-year-old female spayed Labrador Retriever was admitted to our hospital, because of cough with sputum. She was diagnosed as having canine eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) based on blood eosinophilia, bronchial pattern and infiltrative shadow observed on thoracic radiography, bronchiolar obstruction and air-space consolidation predominantly affecting the right caudal lung lobe, as revealed by computed tomography (CT), predominant eosinophils in CT-guided fine needle aspiration and the clinical course. She exhibited a good response to steroid therapy, and the cough disappeared. The serum surfactant protein (SP)-A level increased with the aggravated symptom and decreased markedly with improvement compared with the C-reactive protein level and the number of eosinophils. We propose that serum SP-A level is a good biomarker in CEP. PMID:26300438

  10. Elevation of serum surfactant protein-A with exacerbation in canine eosinophilic pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    SONE, Katsuhito; AKIYOSHI, Hideo; HAYASHI, Akiyoshi; OHASHI, Fumihito

    2015-01-01

    A 7-year-old female spayed Labrador Retriever was admitted to our hospital, because of cough with sputum. She was diagnosed as having canine eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) based on blood eosinophilia, bronchial pattern and infiltrative shadow observed on thoracic radiography, bronchiolar obstruction and air-space consolidation predominantly affecting the right caudal lung lobe, as revealed by computed tomography (CT), predominant eosinophils in CT-guided fine needle aspiration and the clinical course. She exhibited a good response to steroid therapy, and the cough disappeared. The serum surfactant protein (SP)-A level increased with the aggravated symptom and decreased markedly with improvement compared with the C-reactive protein level and the number of eosinophils. We propose that serum SP-A level is a good biomarker in CEP. PMID:26300438

  11. Eosinophils and mast cells as therapeutic targets in pediatric functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Craig A; Schurman, Jennifer V; Colombo, Jennifer M; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing appreciation for the importance of inflammation as a pathophysiologic entity that contributes to functional gastrointestinal disorders including functional dyspepsia (FD). Importantly, inflammation may serve as a mediator between psychologic and physiologic functions. This manuscript reviews the literature implicating two inflammatory cell types, mast cells and eosinophils, in the generation of dyspeptic symptoms and explores their potential as targets for the treatment of FD. There are a number of inciting events which may initiate an inflammatory response, and the subsequent recruitment and activation of mast cells and eosinophils. These include internal triggers such as stress and anxiety, as well as external triggers such as microbes and allergens. Previous studies suggest that there may be efficacy in utilizing medications directed at mast cells and eosinophils. Evidence exists to suggest that combining “anti-inflammatory” medications with other treatments targeting stress can improve the rate of symptom resolution in pediatric FD. PMID:24199024

  12. Sarcocystis fayeri-Induced Granulomatous and Eosinophilic Myositis in 2 Related Horses.

    PubMed

    Herd, H R; Sula, M M; Starkey, L A; Panciera, R J; Johnson, E M; Snider, T A; Holbrook, T C

    2015-11-01

    This report describes 2 genetically related paint mares, case Nos. 1 and 2, presented to the Oklahoma State University Boren Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital for chronic weight loss and abnormal gait, respectively. Notable findings in both cases included marked persistent eosinophilia and multiple intramuscular lateral thoracic masses. Histologic examination of masses revealed eosinophilic, centrally necrotic granulomas and marked eosinophilic myositis. Granulomas in case No. 1 also contained intralesional Sarcocystis sp material, and adjacent muscle fibers contained intact protozoal cysts. Case No. 1 developed severe refractory muscle pain and recurrent esophageal dysphagia. At necropsy, disseminated, grossly visible granulomas were present throughout all examined striated muscles. Nested polymerase chain reaction of the 18S rRNA gene revealed >99% homology with Sarcocystis fayeri. Sarcocystis spp are apicomplexan protozoa that infect striated muscle of many omnivorous species, typically without inciting clinical disease. Sarcocystosis should be considered a rare cause of granulomatous eosinophilic myositis and choke in horses. PMID:25957356

  13. Radiation-induced eosinophilic, polymorphic, and pruritic eruption in a pig skin model

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Won Seok; Bae, Min Ji; Park, Sunhoo

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic, polymorphic and pruritic eruption associated with radiotherapy (EPPER) can occur in cancer patients after irradiation. In this study, we characterized the clinical and histopathological features of pig skin that developed widespread polymorphic and pruritic skin lesions following localized 50 Gy gamma-irradiation. The pigs developed pruritus 5-7 weeks after irradiation, and infiltration of the dermis by eosinophils was detected 4-7 weeks after irradiation. The irradiated animals also showed transiently increased numbers of peripheral eosinophils 5-7 weeks after treatment. Irradiation induced desquamation after 2-4 weeks, which and the desquamation gradually resolved after 7 weeks. These pathological changes correspond to those seen in irradiated human skin, indicating that this model could be useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of EPPER and for developing therapeutic and prophylactic methods. PMID:26755924

  14. Clinical manifestations of Eosinophilic meningitis due to infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis in children.

    PubMed

    Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Chindaprasirt, Jarin; Senthong, Vichai; Limpawattana, Panita; Auvichayapat, Narong; Tassniyom, Sompon; Chotmongkol, Verajit; Maleewong, Wanchai; Intapan, Pewpan M

    2013-12-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis, caused by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, is prevalent in northeastern Thailand, most commonly in adults. Data regarding clinical manifestations of this condition in children is limited and may be different those in adults. A chart review was done on 19 eosinophilic meningitis patients aged less than 15 years in Srinagarind Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Thailand. Clinical manifestations and outcomes were reported using descriptive statistics. All patients had presented with severe headache. Most patients were males, had fever, nausea or vomiting, stiffness of the neck, and a history of snail ingestion. Six patients had papilledema or cranial nerve palsies. It was shown that the clinical manifestations of eosinophilic meningitis due to A. cantonensis in children are different from those in adult patients. Fever, nausea, vomiting, hepatomegaly, neck stiffness, and cranial nerve palsies were all more common in children than in adults. PMID:24516281

  15. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  16. In vitro study of histamine and histamine receptor ligands influence on the adhesion of purified human eosinophils to endothelium.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Marek; Wójcik, Tomasz; Chlopicki, Stefan; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-04-15

    It is a well-known fact that histamine is involved in eosinophil-dependent inflammatory responses including cellular chemotaxis and migration. Nevertheless, the relative role of histamine receptors in the mechanisms of eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells is not known. Therefore the aim of presented study was to examine the effect of selective histamine receptors ligands on eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. For that purpose the highly purified human eosinophils have been isolated from the peripheral blood. The viability and functional integrity of isolated eosinophils have been validated in several tests. Histamine as well as 4-methylhistamine (selective H4 agonist) in concentration-dependent manner significantly increased number of eosinophils that adhere to endothelium. Among the selective histamine receptors antagonist or H1 inverse agonist only JNJ7777120 (histamine H4 antagonist) and thioperamide (dual histamine H3/H4 antagonist) had direct effect on eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells. Antagonists of H1 (diphenhydramine, mepyramine) H2 (ranitidine and famotidine) and H3 (pitolisant) histamine receptors were ineffective. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that histamine receptor H4 plays a dominant role in histamine-induced eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. PMID:26939881

  17. Blood eosinophils as a marker of response to inhaled corticosteroids in COPD.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Neil C; Sharma, Raj; Lettis, Sally; Calverley, Peter M A

    2016-05-01

    Identification of a biomarker that predicts response to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) would help evaluate the risk/benefit profile of ICS in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and guide treatment.The ISOLDE study randomised 751 patients (mean post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) 1.4 L: 50% predicted normal) to fluticasone propionate 500 μg twice daily or placebo for 3 years, finding no difference in FEV1 rate of decline between treatments (p=0.16) and a significant reduction in median exacerbation rate with fluticasone propionate versus placebo (p=0.026). We re-analysed ISOLDE results by baseline blood eosinophil count to investigate whether eosinophil level predicts ICS benefit.Patients with eosinophils <2% (n=456) had a similar rate of post-bronchodilator FEV1 decline with fluticasone propionate as placebo (-2.9 mL·year(-1); p=0.688). With eosinophils ≥2% (n=214), the rate of decline decreased by 33.9 mL·year(-1) with fluticasone propionate versus placebo (p=0.003). Exacerbation rate reduction on ICS for fluticasone propionate versus placebo was higher in the eosinophil <2% group compared with the ≥2% group; time-to-first moderate/severe exacerbation was not different between treatments in either group.A baseline blood eosinophil count of ≥2% identifies a group of COPD patients with slower rates of decline in FEV1 when treated with ICS: prospective testing of this hypothesis is now warranted. PMID:26917606

  18. Expression and translocation of Rac2 in eosinophils during superoxide generation.

    PubMed

    Lacy, P; Mahmudi-Azer, S; Bablitz, B; Gilchrist, M; Fitzharris, P; Cheng, D; Man, S F; Bokoch, G M; Moqbel, R

    1999-10-01

    Eosinophils induce tissue injury by releasing granule-associated cytotoxic proteins, lipid mediators and superoxide anions in response to appropriate stimuli. Superoxide generation associated with respiratory burst is largely dependent on the assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex in the membrane, consisting of membrane-bound cytochrome b558 and translocated p47phox and p67phox. The activation of this complex is critically dependent on the translocation of GTP-bound Rac1, or its homologue Rac2, from the cytosol to the membrane in neutrophils. Rac expression has not yet been fully characterized in eosinophils. We proposed that eosinophils translate and express Rac2 and its GDP-dissociation inhibitor, RhoGDI. Furthermore, we hypothesized that Rac2 translocates along with p47phox and p67phox proteins from the cytosol to the plasma membrane during respiratory burst. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis and sequencing of the amplified product, guinea-pig eosinophils were found to express Rac2 mRNA, exhibiting 93% homology with the human Rac2 sequence. Rac1 mRNA was also detected in eosinophils but not its translated product. In contrast, Rac2 protein expression was detected using a specific antibody. In subcellular fractions, Rac2 was found to translocate, along with p47phox and p67phox, from cytosol to plasma membrane-associated fractions following phorbol myristate acetate stimulation, while RhoGDI remained within cytosolic fractions. These findings suggest that Rac2 is preferentially expressed and activated in eosinophils, and is likely to be a crucial regulator of the release of reactive oxygen species from these cells during inflammatory reactions. PMID:10540223

  19. γδ T Lymphocytes Coordinate Eosinophil Influx during Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Henriques, Maria Das Graças Muller; Penido, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Tissue eosinophil infiltration, which is a hallmark of allergic and helminthic diseases, is mainly coordinated by T lymphocytes, via the production of eosinophilotactic chemokines. Among T lymphocyte subsets, lymphocytes expressing γδ T cell receptor have been determined as a key factor for eosinophil accumulation via direct and indirect mechanisms. This knowledge is strongly supported by the fact that, in different experimental models of eosinophilic airway inflammation and helminth-induced Th2 lung inflammation, an evident tissue accumulation of γδ T lymphocytes is observed. In addition, the depletion of γδ T lymphocytes is correlated with the impairment of eosinophil accumulation in inflamed tissue. γδ T lymphocytes are non-conventional T lymphocytes, which comprise a minor T lymphocyte subset, mainly distributed in the tissue, and present crucial roles in innate and acquired immune responses. γδ T lymphocytes recognize several danger- and pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules and stress antigens in a MHC-independent fashion and can provide rapid tissue-specific responses, via the production of a wide range of chemical mediators capable to modulate other cell populations. These mediators include chemoattractant cytokines and chemokines that attract eosinophils into the tissue by either direct recognition (such as IL-5, CCL11/eotaxin), or indirect mechanisms via the modulation of αβ T lymphocytes and macrophages (through the production of interferon-γ, IL-4, and CCL2/Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, MCP-1, for example). The present review presents an overview of how γδ T lymphocytes coordinate eosinophil accumulation in allergy, by focusing on their role in airway inflammation and by discussing the involvement of cytokines and chemokines in this phenomenon. PMID:23316161

  20. Pulmonary eosinophils and their role in immunopathologic responses to formalin-inactivated pneumonia virus of mice

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Qiu, Zhijun; Phipps, Simon; Foster, Paul S.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced disease is the term used to describe the aberrant Th2 skewed responses to naturally-acquired human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) infection observed in individuals vaccinated with formalin-inactivated viral antigens. Here we explore this paradigm with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a pathogen that faithfully reproduces features of severe hRSV infection in a rodent host. We demonstrate that PVM infection in mice vaccinated with formalin-inactivated antigens from PVM-infected cells (PVM Ags) yields Th2-skewed hypersensitivity, analogous to that observed in response to hRSV. Specifically, we detect elevated levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of PVM-infected mice that were vaccinated with PVM Ags, but not among mice vaccinated with formalin-inactivated antigens from uninfected cells (Ctrl Ags). Interestingly, infection in PVM Ag-vaccinated mice was associated with a ~10-fold reduction in lung virus titer and protection against weight loss when compared to infected mice vaccinated with Ctrl Ags, despite the absence of serum neutralizing antibodies. Given recent findings documenting a role for eosinophils in promoting clearance of hRSV in vivo, we explored the role of eosinophils in altering the pathogenesis of disease with eosinophil-deficient mice. We found that eosinophil deficiency had no impact on virus titer in PVM Ags-vaccinated mice, nor on weight loss or levels of CCL11 (eotaxin-1), interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-5, or IL-13 in BAL fluid. However, levels of both IL-4 and CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α) in BAL fluid were markedly diminished in PVM Ag-vaccinated, PVM-infected eosinophil-deficient mice when compared to wild type controls (246 words). PMID:19542471

  1. Prospective assessment of the diagnostic utility of esophageal brushings in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kern, E; Lin, D; Larson, A; Yang, G-Y; Taft, T; Zalewski, A; Gonsalves, N; Hirano, I

    2016-01-01

    Patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) undergo multiple endoscopies with biopsy for both diagnosis and assessment of treatment response, which is inconvenient and costly. Brush cytology has been examined in Barrett's esophagus to reduce the need for repeated endoscopic biopsies. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the ability of brush cytology to detect mucosal eosinophilia in patients with EoE. This prospective study included adults with untreated and treated esophageal eosinophilia undergoing endoscopy at a tertiary care center. Patients received paired brushings and biopsies at the proximal and distal esophagus. A blinded pathologist quantified the number of eosinophils and epithelial cells per high-power field (hpf) on the cytology slides. The ratio of eosinophils/epithelial cells was used to normalize the cytology specimens for density of cells collected. The main outcome measures were sensitivity and specificity of brush cytology, and correlation between cytology and histology. Twenty-eight patients enrolled. The average age of the cohort was 37.7 ± 10.4 years; 75% of subjects were male. The sensitivity of cytology was 67-69% at the proximal esophagus and 70-72% at the distal esophagus. The specificity was 61-67% proximally and 70-75% distally. Histology was not significantly correlated with the max ratio of eosinophils/epithelial cells per hpf or the absolute number of eosinophils on cytology slides. Cytology using esophageal brushing has limited sensitivity and specificity for the detection of esophageal mucosal eosinophilia. The presence of exudates on endoscopy increased the detection of eosinophilia, which could make cytology useful in pediatric EoE, which often has a more exudative presentation. Diagnostic yield may improve with alternative acquisition techniques or the incorporation of eosinophil degranulation proteins. PMID:25515533

  2. Tryptase staining of mast cells may differentiate eosinophilic esophagitis from gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.; Chen, Xiaoxin; Miller, C. Ryan; Fritchie, Karen J.; Rubinas, Tara C.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Mast cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), but their role in diagnosis is unknown. Our aim was to determine whether tryptase staining of esophageal mast cells differentiates EoE from GERD and has utility for diagnosis of EoE. Methods We performed a case-control study comparing patients with EoE, defined by consensus guidelines, to GERD patients with eosinophils on esophageal biopsy. Immunohistochemistry was performed with mast cell tryptase. The density (mast cells/mm2) and intensity (0–4 scale) of mast cell staining was compared between groups after masking the diagnosis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed, and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated to assess mast cell staining as both a stand-alone diagnostic test and an adjunctive assay with eosinophil counts. Results Fifty-four EoE (mean age: 24; 69% male; mean 146 eos/hpf) and 55 GERD (mean age 34; 60% male; mean 20 eos/hpf) patients were analyzed. The maximum epithelial tryptase density was higher in EoE than in GERD (162 ± 87 mast cells/mm2 vs 67 ± 54; p<0.001). Mast cells were diffusely distributed throughout the biopsy in more EoE than GERD patients (41% vs 7%; p<0.001). Tryptase density and eosinophil count were only weakly correlated (R2=0.09; p=0.002). The AUC was 0.84 for tryptase staining alone, and 0.96 for the combination of mast cells and eosinophils. Conclusions Patients with EoE have higher levels of tryptase positive mast cells compared to GERD patients, improving the diagnostic value of biopsies beyond eosinophil counts alone. Mast cell tryptase may have utility as a diagnostic assay for EoE. PMID:20978486

  3. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Automated image analysis in the study of lymphocyte subpopulation in eosinophilic oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is characterized by the presence of eosinophils in oesophageal mucosa. Other inflammatory cells, mainly lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and mast cells may also play an important role in this disease. The aim of this study is to compare the inflammatory pattern of the mucosa between EoE and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), using automatic image analysis in digital slides, and to assess treatment response after elimination diet and food challenge test. Methods From 2010 to 2013, 35 oesophageal biopsies from EoE and GERD patients were randomly selected. In six EoE biopsies, patients had been treated with selective food exclusion diet. Immunohistochemical study with CD3, CD20, CD4, and CD8 for lymphocyte populations, CD1a for dendritic cells, and CD117/c-kit for mast cells was performed. Slides were scanned using Leica Aperio Scanscope XT with 40× magnification. Immunohistochemical expression was quantified in 245 immunohistochemistry digital slides with Leica Aperio positive pixel count algorithm using two different approaches: whole slide analysis versus selection of a 2 mm2 hot spot area. Results Average eosinophil cell count was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the first biopsy of EoE patients before treatment (30.75 eosinophils per high power field - HPF) than in GERD patients (0.85 eosinophils/HPF) or in EoE patients after treatment with elimination diet (1.60 eosinophils/HPF). In the immunohistochemical study, manual count and automatic image analysis showed a significant increase in the number of CD3 and CD8 cells in EoE patients, compared with GERD patients. However, the increase of CD117/c-kit was only statistically significant when manual counting procedures were used. CD20 positive cell count also showed a non-statistically significant tendency to reduce after elimination diet treatment. Manual eosinophil count correlated much better with CD3 and CD8 count using hot spot approach than with a whole slide approach. Conclusions Positive pixel count algorithm can be a useful tool to quantify the immunohistochemical expression of inflammatory cells in the diagnosis and follow up of eosinophilic oesophagitis. PMID:25565117

  7. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia as a complication of influenza A (H1N1) pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Larranaga, Jose Maria; Marcos, Pedro J; Pombo, Francisco; Otero-Gonzalez, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP) is a rare disease characterized by its acute onset and a clinical presentation simulating a bacterial pneumonia. Although it can be idiopathic, it has been described related to drugs, toxic agents and infections, mostly parasitic. We describe the case of influenza A (H1N1) severe pneumonia complicated by an acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Patient presented with respiratory failure and diffuse ground-glass opacities at chest-computed tomography. Clinical suspicion for this complication and bronchoalveolar lavage with cellular count analysis is crucial. PMID:27055842

  8. Non-Eosinophilic Nasal Polyps Shows Increased Epithelial Proliferation and Localized Disease Pattern in the Early Stage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Kyu; Jin, Hong Ryul; Eun, Kyoung Mi; Mutusamy, Somasundran; Cho, Seong H.; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Dae Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-eosinophilic nasal polyps (NPs) show less inflammatory changes and are less commonly associated with lower airway inflammatory disorders such as asthma, compared with eosinophilic NPs. However, the development of non-eosinophilic NPs which is a predominant subtype in Asian population still remains unclear. Methods A total of 81 patients (45 with non-eosinophilic NPs and 36 with eosinophilic NPs) were enrolled. Clinical information and computed tomography (CT), endoscopic, and histological findings were investigated. Tissue samples were analyzed for total IgE levels and for mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL–5, IL–13, interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-17A, IL–22, IL-23p19, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, and periostin. Immunostaining assessment of Ki–67 as a proliferation marker was performed. Results We found that epithelial in-growing patterns such as pseudocysts were more frequently observed in histological and endoscopic evaluations of non-eosinophilic NPs, which was linked to increase epithelial staining of Ki–67, a proliferating marker. Eosinophilic NPs were characterized by high infiltration of inflammatory cells, compared with non-eosinophilic NPs. To investigate the developmental course of each subtype, CT was analyzed according to CT scores and subtypes. Non-eosinophilic NPs showed more localized pattern and maxillary sinus involvement, but lesser olfactory involvement in early stage whereas eosinophilic NPs were characterized by diffuse ethmoidal and olfactory involvement. In addition, high ethmoidal/maxillary (E/M) CT scores, indicating ethmoidal dominant involvement, were one of surrogate markers for eosinophilic NP. E/M CT scores was positively correlated with levels of TH2 inflammatory markers, including IL–4, IL–5, periostin mRNA expression and total IgE levels in NPs, whereas levels of the TH1 cytokine, IFN- γ were inversely correlated. Moreover, if the combinatorial algorithm meet the three of the four markers, including IL–5 (<2.379), periostin (<3.889), IFN-γ (>0.316), and E/M ratio (<2.167), non-eosinophilic CRSwNP are diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.4% and a specificity of 84.8%. Conclusion Histologic, immunologic and clinical data suggest that non-eosinophilic NPs showed enhanced epithelial alteration and more localized maxillary involvement. Combination of cutoff value on IL–5, periostin, IFN-γ, and E/M scores may be one of surrogate markers for non-eosinophil NP subtype. PMID:26439628

  9. Genetic predispositions to childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stieglitz, Elliot

    2013-01-01

    While the majority of leukemia cases occur in the absence of any known predisposing factor, there are germline mutations that significantly increase the risk of developing hematopoietic malignancies in childhood. In this review article, we describe a number of these mutations and their clinical features. These predispositions can be broadly classified as those leading to bone marrow failure, those involving tumor suppressor genes, DNA repair defects, immunodeficiencies or other congenital syndromes associated with transient myeloid disorders. While leukemia can develop as a secondary event in the aforementioned syndromes, there are also several syndromes that specifically lead to the development of leukemia as their primary phenotype. Many of the genes discussed in this review can also be somatically mutated in other cancers, highlighting the importance of understanding shared alterations and mechanisms underpinning syndromic and sporadic leukemia. PMID:23926459

  10. What Is Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... In this way CMML is more like a myeloproliferative disease ( myelo -- bone marrow, proliferative -- excessive growth). Chronic myeloid leukemia is an example of a myeloproliferative disease where there is an overproduction of white ...

  11. Management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ghia, Paolo; Hallek, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has undergone profound changes that have been driven by an improved understanding of the biology of the disease and the approval of several new drugs. Moreover, many novel drugs are currently under evaluation for rapid approval or have been approved by regulatory agencies, further broadening the available therapeutic armamentarium for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The use of novel biological and genetic parameters combined with a careful clinical evaluation allows us to dissect some of the heterogeneity of the disease and to distinguish patients with a very mild onset and course, who often will not need any treatment, from those with an intermediate prognosis and a third group with a very aggressive course (high-risk leukemia). On this background, it becomes increasingly challenging to select the right treatment strategy. In this paper, we describe our own approach to the management of different patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24881042

  12. Stages of Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Monoclonal antibody therapy is a type of targeted therapy used to treat hairy cell leukemia. Monoclonal antibody therapy uses antibodies made in the laboratory from ...

  13. Leukemia as a second malignancy.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Uppin MS; Paul TR; Rajappa S; Gayathri K; Jacob R; Uppin SG

    2007-07-01

    To study the occurrence of leukemia as a second malignancy following various primary solid and hematological malignancies. Total 11 cases of leukemia presenting as a second malignancy were studied over a period of 15 years from 1990 to 2005. The primary malignancies included carcinoma breast (4), multiple myeloma (3) and one each of Hodgkin's lymphoma, mediastinal germ cell tumor, papillary carcinoma thyroid and myxopapillary ependymoma. Ten patients had received chemotherapy with combination radiotherapy in six patients. The commonest type of leukemia was AML-M2. The cyogenetic test results were available in three cases. The secondary leukemia showed aggressive behaviour and all patients on follow-up died within a period of one month. The risk benefit ratio of chemotherapy and radiotherapy should be considered before starting the patients on treatment. A high degree of suspicion and follow up with hematological parameters is required for therapy related complications.

  14. How Is Childhood Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in immature forms of cells that make platelets. World Health Organization (WHO) classification of AML The FAB ... phases, but a common system (proposed by the World Health Organization) is described below. If the leukemia ...

  15. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  16. Effectiveness of Dietary Allergen Exclusion Therapy on Eosinophilic Colitis in Chinese Infants and Young Children ≤ 3 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Geng, Lanlan; Chen, Peiyu; Wang, Fenghua; Xu, Zhaohui; Liang, Cuiping; Li, Huiwen; Fang, Tiefu; Friesen, Craig A.; Gong, Sitang; Li, Dingyou

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic colitis is a well recognized clinical entity mainly associated with food allergies. Empiric treatment options include dietary allergen exclusion (extensively hydrolyzed protein formula and elimination diet), anti-allergy medications (antihistamines and leukotriene receptor antagonists) and corticosteroids. We evaluated the effectiveness of dietary antigen exclusion on clinical remission of eosinophilic colitis in infants and young children. We retrospectively reviewed charts of all infants and children ≤3 years of age who were diagnosed with eosinophilic colitis (defined as mucosal eosinophilia ≥20 hpf−1) from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2013 at a tertiary children’s hospital in China. Forty-nine children were identified with eosinophilic colitis. Elemental formula, simple elimination diet or combination therapy resulted in clinical improvement in 75%, 88.2% and 80% of patients, respectively. In conclusion, eosinophilic colitis in infants and children ≤3 years of age responded well to dietary allergen exclusion. PMID:25768952

  17. PROGRESS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady gains in clinical research and a renaissance of genomics in leukemia have led to improved outcomes. The recognition of tremendous heterogeneity in AML has allowed individualized treatments of specific disease entities within the context of patient age, cytogenetics, and mutational analysis. The following is a comprehensive review of the current state of AML therapy and a roadmap of our approach to these distinct disease entities. PMID:25441110

  18. Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Plenderleith, I. H.

    1970-01-01

    The clinical findings in 12 patients with an unusual type of leukemia have been reviewed. The leukemic cell cannot be identified with any of the normal hematopoietic cells or with any of the lymphomas and may best be referred to by the descriptive term “hairy cell”, which describes its appearance, most clearly seen on phase contrast microscopy. The patients were all males and the major clinical features were enlargement of the liver and spleen, with little lymph node enlargement. Hematologic findings in most patients have been anemia and thrombocytopenia with the characteristic abnormal cells present in the peripheral blood and bone marrow. The disease most often runs an indolent course and has shown little or no response to a variety of forms of treatment. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4939244

  19. [Plasma cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Ravinet, Aurlie; Bay, Jacques Olivier; Tournilhac, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare disorder which develops spontaneously (primary PCL) or evolves in patients with multiple myeloma (secondary PCL). It is defined by the presence of 2 10(9)/L peripheral blood plasma cells or plasmacytosis accounting for more than 20 % of the differential white cell count. PCL presents more often extramedullary involvement, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypercalcemia, as well as impaired renal function. Cytogenetic abnormalities and mutations observed in PCL lead to escape from immune surveillance and independence from the bone marrow microenvironment with changes in expression of adhesion molecules or chemokines receptors. The outcome of PCL has improved with combination approaches with novel agents (including bortezomib and immunomodulatory drugs, such as lenalidomide) and with autologous stem cell transplantation. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is currently available for young patients. This article is an overview of this rare and severe disease and the different therapeutics options that are recommended. PMID:25418598

  20. [Acute myeloid leukemia complicated with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis at presentation].

    PubMed

    Doki, Noriko; Hoshino, Takumi; Irisawa, Hiroyuki; Sakura, Tohru; Miyawaki, Shuichi

    2005-07-01

    A 47-year-old male had symptoms of coughing and with fever and was admitted to our hospital where tests revealed he had anemia and thrombocytopenia. Following the results obtained from a bone marrow aspiration, he was diagnosed as having acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A chest radiograph and a CT scan demonstrated nodular shadows and pleural exudate in both lungs. We suspected atypical pneumonia, or fungal pneumonia, and he was subsequently given antibiotics and antifungal agents, which were, however, ineffective. On the third day after admission, he was put on mechanical ventilation, and a bronchoalveolar lavage examination revealed no germs. His respiration, however, progressively worsened and he died on the twelfth day after admission. Although the autopsy findings revealed no infectious lesions in his lungs, a PAS-positive intra-alveolar eosinophilic material, which was positive for surfactant apoprotein A staining, was present. As a result of the autopsy findings, a diagnosis of secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) associated with AML was made. Among the reported cases of PAP in hematological malignancy, there has not been one case detected at the time AML was diagnosed. If there is evidence of an unknown cause of lung infiltration when AML is diagnosed, attention should be paid to the possibility of the presence of PAP. PMID:16440746

  1. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-07

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Antibody Therapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vedi, Aditi; Ziegler, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing cure rates for pediatric leukemia, relapsed disease still carries a poor prognosis with significant morbidity and mortality. Novel targeted therapies are currently being investigated in an attempt to reduce adverse events and improve survival outcomes. Antibody therapies represent a form of targeted therapy that offers a new treatment paradigm. Monoclonal antibodies are active in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are currently in Phase III trials. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are the next generation of antibodies where a highly potent cytotoxic agent is bound to an antibody by a linker, resulting in selective targeting of leukemia cells. ADCs are currently being tested in clinical trials for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and ALL. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibodies are a construct whereby each antibody contains two binding sites, with one designed to engage the patient’s own immune system and the other to target malignant cells. BiTE antibodies show great promise as a novel and effective therapy for childhood leukemia. This review will outline recent developments in targeted agents for pediatric leukemia including monoclonal antibodies, ADCs, and BiTE antibodies. PMID:24795859

  3. Molecular diagnosis of lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Goud, Kalal Iravathy; Dayakar, Seetha; Prasad, S V S S; Rao, Koteshwar N; Shaik, Amina; Vanjakshi, S

    2013-01-01

    The mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene at chromosome band 11q23 is commonly involved in reciprocal translocations that is detected in acute leukemia. The MLL gene, commonly known as mixed lineage leukemia or myeloid lymphoid leukemia, has been independently identified and cloned from the 11q23 breakpoint of acute leukemia. We describe a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia whose cells had shown reciprocal translocation between short arm (p21) of chromosome 2 and long arm (q23) of chromosome number 11 [t(2;11) (p21;q23)] by cytogenetic analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) was also performed for reconfirmation with a probe for MLL which showed split signals, hybridizing to both the derivative 2 and 11 chromosomes. Our study confirmed FISH as the most suitable assay for detecting MLL rearrangements because of its sensitivity and speed. It recommended that FISH should be used as complementary to conventional cytogenetic analysis. In conclusion, evaluation of the t(2;11)(p21;q23) was done by molecular clarification and flow cytometry. PMID:24125990

  4. Chemically induced leukemia in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, R H; Seiber, S M

    1981-01-01

    The human population may be exposed to potentially leukemogenic agents, either in the form of drugs and food additives or as environmental contaminants and pollutants. However, in spite of the large number and diversity of these chemicals, only a few have been implicated as human leukemogens. One such agent is benzene, a known bone marrow depressant. A number of case reports have associated chronic exposure to this agent with the development of acute leukemia, as have several epidemiologic surveys. Treatment with various antitumor agents, including procarbazine, melphalan, thio-TEPA, chlorambucil, and cyclophosphamide, has also been associated with the development of acute leukemia. In addition, chloramphenicol and phenylbutazone have been implicated as human leukemogens, but the association between exposure to these two agents and acute leukemia appears at present to be weaker than it is for benzene and antitumor agent exposure. Despite such associations between exposure to chemicals and acute leukemia, several important problems exist with regard to implicating specific agents in the development of this neoplasm in man, including the paucity of animal models for chemically induced leukemia, and the frequent necessity to rely on single case reports or clusters of cases in which chemical exposures are associated with acute leukemia. Future efforts should be directed at performing properly designed and well executed epidemiologic studies, and at developing new in vitro and in vivo models for the study of this neoplasm. PMID:6786872

  5. Eosinophilic density in graft biopsies positive for rejection and blood eosinophil count can predict development of post-transplant digestive tract eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Bush, Jonathan W; Mohammad, Saeed; Melin-Aldana, Hector; Kagalwalla, Amir F; Arva, Nicoleta C

    2016-06-01

    EGID is a known post-transplant complication. Its etiology has been related to antirejection medication, but other factors may also play a role as only few transplant recipients develop EGID despite standardized treatment. This study aimed to determine whether EGID is associated with rejection events and with a specific phenotype of the rejection-positive graft biopsies in children with solid organ transplant. All patients with liver, heart, and kidney transplant followed at our institution were included in the study. Digestive tract eosinophilia was more common in heart and liver recipients and was a rare event after renal transplantation. Subjects with EGID had higher incidence of rejection and elevated peripheral blood AEC. The first rejection event and high AEC values preceded EGID diagnosis in the majority of patients. Histologically, the initial rejection-positive graft biopsy revealed accentuated eosinophilia in EGID patients compared with non-EGID cohort, which correlated with higher blood eosinophil counts at the time of first rejection episode. Prominent graft tissue and peripheral blood eosinophilia prior to EGID diagnosis suggests a predisposition for eosinophil activation in patients with post-transplant digestive eosinophilic disorder. These parameters can be used as markers for subsequent development of EGID. PMID:26917244

  6. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  8. Phase I/II Study of Nilotinib/Ruxolitinb Therapy for TKI Resistant Ph-Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-04

    Chronic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Philadelphia Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Resistant to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy

  9. Eosinophilic inflammation of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is related to OX40 ligand expression.

    PubMed

    Boita, Monica; Garzaro, Massimiliano; Raimondo, Luca; Riva, Giuseppe; Mazibrada, Jasenka; Pecorari, Giancarlo; Bucca, Caterina; Bellone, Graziella; Vizio, Barbara; Heffler, Enrico; Ricciardolo, Fabio Luigi; Rolla, Giovanni

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate OX40 ligand expression in sinus tissue from patients with nasal polyposis compared with patients with chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps (NPs), and to determine if OX40 ligand expression is related to eosinophilic sinus infiltration. Twenty patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (11 with and nine without NPs) and seven controls were enrolled in the study. The mRNA expression of OX40 ligand and thymic stromal lymphopoietin and its receptor were analyzed. The immunoreactivity score for OX40 ligand and the eosinophil count were obtained. The mRNA expression and immunoreactivity score of OX40 ligand were higher in patients with nasal polyposis than in patients without NPs, as well as healthy controls. The mRNA expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and its receptor was significantly higher in nasal polyposis than in the control, but not significantly higher than in chronic rhinosinusitis without NPs. A correlation between the number of OX40 ligand-positive cells and the number of eosinophils in sinus biopsies was found only in patients with nasal polyposis. In conclusion, the thymic stromal lymphopoietin/OX40 ligand axis is up-regulated in nasal polyposis and is related to the intensity of eosinophilic inflammation. PMID:24583911

  10. Contemporary consensus proposal on criteria and classification of eosinophilic disorders and related syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Valent, Peter; Klion, Amy D.; Horny, Hans-Peter; Roufosse, Florence; Gotlib, Jason; Weller, Peter F.; Hellmann, Andrzej; Metzgeroth, Georgia; Leiferman, Kristin M.; Arock, Michel; Butterfield, Joseph H.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Sotlar, Karl; Vandenberghe, Peter; Haferlach, Torsten; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Reiter, Andreas; Gleich, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilia is an important indicator of various neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions. Depending on the underlying disease and mechanisms, eosinophil infiltration can lead to organ dysfunction, clinical symptoms, or both. During the past 2 decades, several different classifications of eosinophilic disorders and related syndromes have been proposed in various fields of medicine. Although criteria and definitions are, in part, overlapping, no global consensus has been presented to date. The Year 2011 Working Conference on Eosinophil Disorders and Syndromes was organized to update and refine the criteria and definitions for eosinophilic disorders and to merge prior classifications in a contemporary multidisciplinary schema. A panel of experts from the fields of immunology, allergy, hematology, and pathology contributed to this project. The expert group agreed on unifying terminologies and criteria and a classification that delineates various forms of hypereosinophilia, including primary and secondary variants based on specific hematologic and immunologic conditions, and various forms of the hypereosinophilic syndrome. For patients in whom no underlying disease or hypereosinophilic syndrome is found, the term hypereosinophilia of undetermined significance is introduced. The proposed novel criteria, definitions, and terminologies should assist in daily practice, as well as in the preparation and conduct of clinical trials. PMID:22460074

  11. Nasal and pharyngeal eosinophil peroxidase levels in adults with poorly controlled asthma correlate with sputum eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Rank, M A; Ochkur, S I; Lewis, J C; Teaford, H G; Wesselius, L J; Helmers, R A; Lee, N A; Nair, P; Lee, J J

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study was to compare nasal, pharyngeal, and sputum eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) levels with induced sputum eosinophil percentage in 10 adults with poorly controlled asthma and 10 normal controls. EPX was measured using an ELISA and normalized for grams of protein for nasal and pharynx specimens and for mL-gram of protein for sputum. Sputum EPX levels were statistically different between asthma and control subjects (P = 0.024). EPX levels measured in the nasal and pharyngeal swab samples derived from the same patients were also different between asthma and control subjects, each displaying a high degree of significance (P = 0.002). Spearman's correlation coefficients for nasal EPX and pharyngeal EPX levels compared to induced sputum eosinophil percentage were 0.81 (P = 0.0007) and 0.78 (P = 0.0017), respectively. Thus, there is a strong association in a given patient between both nasal and pharyngeal EPX levels and the eosinophil percentage of induced sputum. PMID:26645423

  12. Histone deacetylase activity and recurrent bacterial bronchitis in severe eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    Zuccaro, L; Cox, A; Pray, C; Radford, K; Novakowski, K; Dorrington, M; Surette, M G; Bowdish, D; Nair, P

    2016-04-01

    An increase in P13 Kinase activity and an associated reduction in histone deacetylase activity may contribute to both relative steroid insensitivity in patients with severe eosinophilic asthma and impaired macrophage scavenger function and susceptibility to recurrent infective bronchitis that may, in turn, contribute to further steroid insensitivity. PMID:26715426

  13. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by tropical eosinophilic lung disease: a case in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Chani, M; Iken, M; Eljahiri, Y; Nzenze, J R; Mion, G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the case of a 28-year-old woman in whom acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following cholecystectomy led to the discovery of eosinophilic lung disease. Outcome was favorable after oxygenotherapy and medical treatment using ivermectin and corticosteroids. The case shows that hypereosinophilic syndrome can be the underlying cause of ARDS. PMID:21695880

  14. Eosinophilic proliferative pylephlebitis in the liver of Japanese beef cattle with fascioliasis.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, T; Shirota, K; Ohtsuki, Y; Araki, K

    1998-10-01

    Intrahepatic pylephlebitis was detected in 17 Japanese beef cattle. Grossly, the intrahepatic vessels in the caudate lobe and/or in the periphery of the other hepatic lobes were thickened and protruded above the lobar surface. The vessel lumina were packed with white to red, waste thread-like contents. A few immature flukes were found in the bile ducts in 3 of the 7 cases with biliary thickening. Foci of hepatic necrosis and hemorrhage were scattered around the thickened vessels in 8 cases. Histologically, the interlobular veins were thickened due to severe intimal hyperplasia with endothelial proliferation and eosinophilic accumulation and medial hypertrophy, accompanied by fibrosis and eosinophilic infiltration in the portal areas. Hepatic tissues with necrosis and hemorrhage were surrounded by eosinophils and histiocytes including a granulomatous reaction. One immature fluke was detected in one of these regions of necrosis. Immunoperoxidase staining revealed that the small fluke, Kupffer cells, and histiocytes in the liver of all cases were positively stained with anti-Japanese Fasciola sp. antiserum. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of the sera of 15 cases revealed that all were positive for the anti-Fasciola antibody. On the basis of these findings, the present cases were regarded as an atypical form of fascioliasis, characterized by eosinophilic proliferative pylephlebitis of the liver. PMID:9819759

  15. Histamine 1 Receptor Blockade Enhances Eosinophil-Mediated Clearance of Adult Filarial Worms

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ellen Mueller; Morris, Christopher P.; Hübner, Marc P.; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filariae are tissue-invasive nematodes that cause diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness. The goal of this study was to characterize the role of histamine during Litomosoides sigmodontis infection of BALB/c mice, a murine model of filariasis. Time course studies demonstrated that while expression of histidine decarboxylase mRNA increases throughout 12 weeks of infection, serum levels of histamine exhibit two peaks—one 30 minutes after primary infection and one 8 weeks later. Interestingly, mice treated with fexofenadine, a histamine receptor 1 inhibitor, demonstrated significantly reduced worm burden in infected mice compared to untreated infected controls. Although fexofenadine-treated mice had decreased antigen-specific IgE levels as well as lower splenocyte IL-5 and IFNγ production, they exhibited a greater than fourfold rise in eosinophil numbers at the tissue site where adult L. sigmodontis worms reside. Fexofenadine-mediated clearance of L. sigmodontis worms was dependent on host eosinophils, as fexofenadine did not decrease worm burdens in eosinophil-deficient dblGATA mice. These findings suggest that histamine release induced by tissue invasive helminths may aid parasite survival by diminishing eosinophilic responses. Further, these results raise the possibility that combining H1 receptor inhibitors with current anthelmintics may improve treatment efficacy for filariae and other tissue-invasive helminths. PMID:26204515

  16. Unusual Larva in the CSF and Unique MRI Findings in a Case of Eosinophilic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Santosh; Madi, Deepak; Pai, Shivanand; Baliga, Shrikala

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis may be caused by non-infectious and infectious agents. Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the commonest causative agent of eosinophilic meningitis. Rats are the primary hosts of this parasite. Humans get infected by ingestion of raw or inadequately cooked hosts (snails or monitor lizard) or food contaminated with the infective third-stage larvae. A 16-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital with history of fever, headache, and altered sensorium. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed unique findings. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed eosinophilia and the CSF wet mount identified a larva. Patient history revealed ingestion of monitor lizard 2 weeks prior to onset of symptoms. Hence, a diagnosis of eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis was made. He was treated with oral albendazole and steroids, resulting in gradual improvement. A. cantonensis as a cause of eosinophilic meningitis is a possibility in patients who present with headache and vomiting after eating raw meat (monitor lizard). To the best of our knowledge, this is a very rare case being reported from India where the larva was identified during the microscopic examination of the CSF. PMID:25806134

  17. A photoreactive fluorescent marker for identifying eosinophils and their cytoplasmic granules in tissues.

    PubMed

    Eversole, Rob R; Mackenzie, Charles D; Beuving, Leonard J

    2003-02-01

    Here we describe a simple histochemical technique that provides an improved approach to identifying eosinophil components in tissues through the formation of photoreactive complexes that produce stable fluorescent emissions. This method worked readily with histological tissue sections 6-60 microm thick, which were fixed in neutral buffered formalin (NBF), and with cell suspensions similarly fixed and unfixed. Deep red (>605 nm) fluorescent emissions were produced by eosinophil-specific granules when exposed to broadband excitation spectra from a 100-W mercury lamp source (510-590 nm), as well as single-wavelength excitations from both an argon laser (488 nm) and a UV-visible laser (514 nm). The fluorophore-granule complex emissions increased in intensity during the first minute of continuous photoexcitation, then remained stable (>10 min). All nonspecific autofluorescence phenomena associated with these tissues were photobleached in the first minute, including areas of background Biebrich scarlet binding where photoreactive complexes were not formed (i.e., collagen), indicating environmental influences on the fluorophore. This technique allows the visualization of eosinophil granules over a greater period of time than is usually permissible with standard fluorescent markers. Therefore, techniques such as confocal microscopy can be utilized to their fullest extent, providing much more detailed information on the location and distribution of the cytoplasmic contents of eosinophils. PMID:12533534

  18. Histamine 1 Receptor Blockade Enhances Eosinophil-Mediated Clearance of Adult Filarial Worms.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ellen Mueller; Morris, Christopher P; Hübner, Marc P; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filariae are tissue-invasive nematodes that cause diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness. The goal of this study was to characterize the role of histamine during Litomosoides sigmodontis infection of BALB/c mice, a murine model of filariasis. Time course studies demonstrated that while expression of histidine decarboxylase mRNA increases throughout 12 weeks of infection, serum levels of histamine exhibit two peaks-one 30 minutes after primary infection and one 8 weeks later. Interestingly, mice treated with fexofenadine, a histamine receptor 1 inhibitor, demonstrated significantly reduced worm burden in infected mice compared to untreated infected controls. Although fexofenadine-treated mice had decreased antigen-specific IgE levels as well as lower splenocyte IL-5 and IFNγ production, they exhibited a greater than fourfold rise in eosinophil numbers at the tissue site where adult L. sigmodontis worms reside. Fexofenadine-mediated clearance of L. sigmodontis worms was dependent on host eosinophils, as fexofenadine did not decrease worm burdens in eosinophil-deficient dblGATA mice. These findings suggest that histamine release induced by tissue invasive helminths may aid parasite survival by diminishing eosinophilic responses. Further, these results raise the possibility that combining H1 receptor inhibitors with current anthelmintics may improve treatment efficacy for filariae and other tissue-invasive helminths. PMID:26204515

  19. [A case of eosinophilic pneumonia caused by inhalation of nickel dusts].

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, M; Sato, A; Taniguchi, M; Imokawa, S; Nakazawa, K; Hayakawa, H; Chida, K

    1994-05-01

    A 16-year-old male, an industrial high school student working at an ironworks, without a dust mask, began to complain of dry cough and fever several hours after inhalation of stainless steel dusts including 0.1% nickel. A chest X-ray film revealed ground glass shadows, patchy shadows and Kerley B lines in the right lung fields. A high resolution chest CT scan showed fusing panlobular densities, thickening of bronchial walls and thickening of interlobular septa. Blood cells counts revealed leucocytosis with eosinophilia. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed hypoxemia. A bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimen showed a marked increase in the total cell count and in eosinophils. A transbronchial biopsy specimen showed eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltration in the alveolar septa. Steroid therapy with methylpredonisolne (250 mg x three days) resulted in clinical remission. As we suspected nickel-induced eosinophilic pneumonia, an inhalation provocation test with 0.5% nickel sulfate solution was carried out with the patient's informed consent. Six hours after inhalation he developed a dry cough and fever with leucocytosis and A-aDo2 widening. The positive results of the inhalation provocation test provided a definite diagnosis of nickel induced eosinophilic pneumonia. A review of the world literature revealed three case reports of nickel induced PIE syndrome, all of whom were clinically diagnosed without biopsy however. We believe that this is the first case diagnosed by transbronchial biopsy-proven tissue eosinophilia and a positive nickel inhalation provocation test. PMID:8084105

  20. Ultrastructural and transmission evidence of Sarcocystis cruzi associated with eosinophilic myositis in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Gajadhar, A A; Marquardt, W C

    1992-01-01

    Skeletal muscle, diaphragm, tongue, esophagus and heart of beef carcasses that were condemned for eosinophilic myositis and those that were unaffected were collected at an abattoir in Colorado and studied to determine the involvement of Sarcocystis spp. All affected carcasses contained similar granulomatous lesions with adjacent infiltrations of leukocytes. Intact or fragments of sarcocysts were found within 32 of 363 granulomas, and whole sarcocysts were present in nearby unaffected muscle cells. Light and electron microscopic examinations revealed that sarcocysts, affected or unaffected by cellular response in condemned carcasses, as well as those found in unaffected carcasses, were consistent with those of S. cruzi. Transmission experiments confirmed that S. cruzi were present in all carcasses, and that dogs, but not cats, were the definitive hosts. The results of pepsin-HCl digestion assays showed that unaffected carcasses that were approved for human consumption generally contained more infective parasites than carcasses that were condemned for eosinophilic myositis. This study provides evidence to support the suggestion that dogs, rather than cats, and unaffected rather than eosinophilic myositis-affected carcasses, have greater potential for contributing to the perpetuation of eosinophilic myositis in the cattle industry. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1586892