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Sample records for ephemeral fever

  1. Bovine ephemeral fever: a review.

    PubMed

    Nandi, S; Negi, B S

    1999-04-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever is a viral disease of cattle and buffaloes besides subclinical involvement of a variety of ruminant species. The subtropical and temperate regions of Africa, Asia and Australia have experienced the major epidemic of the bovine ephemeral fever but the occurrence in the tropics can not be overlooked. Although the substantial role played by the vectors viz., mosquitoes and culicoides in bovine ephemeral fever perpetuation and dissemination, other vector involvement if any should be extensively studied. The clinical severity of the disease is not apparent and the mortality is low. However, high morbidity, enormous economic losses in terms of significant reduction in production, disruption of national and international trade and finally a variety of complications resulting from the disease have drawn appreciable attention from the researchers around the world to resolve the unsolved questions in this area. In this review, detailed informations of all the aspects of the disease has been provided in a simple, lucid and easily understandable manner. PMID:10051179

  2. Epidemiology and control of bovine ephemeral fever.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter J; Klement, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (or 3-day sickness) is an acute febrile illness of cattle and water buffaloes. Caused by an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus, bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV), the disease occurs seasonally over a vast expanse of the globe encompassing much of Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. Although mortality rates are typically low, infection prevalence and morbidity rates during outbreaks are often very high, causing serious economic impacts through loss of milk production, poor cattle condition at sale and loss of traction power at harvest. There are also significant impacts on trade to regions in which the disease does not occur, including the Americas and most of Europe. In recent years, unusually severe outbreaks of bovine ephemeral fever have been reported from several regions in Asia and the Middle East, with mortality rates through disease or culling in excess of 10-20%. There are also concerns that, like other vector-borne diseases of livestock, the geographic distribution of bovine ephemeral fever could expand into regions that have historically been free of the disease. Here, we review current knowledge of the virus, including its molecular and antigenic structure, and the epidemiology of the disease across its entire geographic range. We also discuss the effectiveness of vaccination and other strategies to prevent or control infection. PMID:26511615

  3. Bovine ephemeral fever in Australia and the world.

    PubMed

    Walker, P J

    2005-01-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is a disabling viral disease of cattle and water buffaloes. It can cause significant economic impact through reduced milk production in dairy herds, loss of condition in beef cattle and loss of draught animals at the time of harvest. Available evidence indicates clinical signs of BEF, which include bi-phasic fever, anorexia, muscle stiffness, ocular and nasal discharge, ruminal stasis and recumbency, are due primarily to a vascular inflammatory response. In Australia, between 1936 and 1976, BEF occurred in sweeping epizootics that commenced in the tropical far north and spread over vast cattle grazing areas of the continent. In the late 1970s, following several epizootics in rapid succession, the disease became enzootic in most of northern and eastern Australia. In Africa, the Middle East and Asia, BEF occurs as also epizootics which originate in enzootic tropical areas and sweep north or south to sub-tropical and temperate zones. The causative virus is transmitted by haematophagous insects that appear to be borne on the wind, allowing rapid spread of the disease. Bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) has been classified as the type species of the genus Ephemerovirus in the Rhabdoviridae. It has a complex genome organization which includes two glycoprotein genes that appear to have arisen by gene duplication. The virion surface glycoprotein (G protein) contains four major antigenic sites that are targets for neutralizing antibody. An analysis of a large number of BEFV isolates collected in Australia between 1956 and 1992 has indicated remarkable stability in most neutralization sites. However, epitope shifts have occurred in the major conformational site G3 and these have been traced to specific mutations in the amino acid sequence. BEFV isolates from mainland China and Taiwan are closely related to Australian isolates, but some variations have been detected. Natural BEFV infection induces a strong neutralizing antibody response and

  4. Evolution of Bovine Ephemeral Fever Virus in the Australian Episystem

    PubMed Central

    Trinidad, Lee; Blasdell, Kim R.; Joubert, D. Albert; Davis, Steven S.; Melville, Lorna; Kirkland, Peter D.; Coulibaly, Fasséli; Holmes, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) is an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus that causes a debilitating disease of cattle in Africa, Asia, and Australia; however, its global geodynamics are poorly understood. An evolutionary analysis of G gene (envelope glycoprotein) ectodomain sequences of 97 BEFV isolates collected from Australia during 1956 to 2012 revealed that all have a single common ancestor and are phylogenetically distinct from BEFV sampled in other geographical regions. The age of the Australian clade is estimated to be between 56 and 65 years, suggesting that BEFV has entered the continent on few occasions since it was first reported in 1936 and that the 1955-1956 epizootic was the source of all currently circulating viruses. Notably, the Australian clade has evolved as a single genetic lineage across the continent and at a high evolutionary rate of ∼10−3 nucleotide substitutions/site/year. Screening of 66 isolates using monoclonal antibodies indicated that neutralizing antigenic sites G1, G2, and G4 have been relatively stable, although variations in site G3a/b defined four antigenic subtypes. A shift in an epitope at site G3a, which occurred in the mid-1970s, was strongly associated with a K218R substitution. Similarly, a shift at site G3b was associated primarily with substitutions at residues 215, 220, and 223, which map to the tip of the spike on the prefusion form of the G protein. Finally, we propose that positive selection on residue 215 was due to cross-reacting neutralizing antibody to Kimberley virus (KIMV). IMPORTANCE PMID:24227855

  5. Epizootics of bovine ephemeral fever on dairy farms in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Farag, M A; al-Sukayran, A; Mazloum, K S; al-Bukomy, A M

    1998-12-01

    In 1990 and 1996, field veterinarians suspected the clinical occurrence of bovine ephemeral fever among dairy and conventional cattle in different regions of Saudi Arabia. The disease has a seasonal occurrence; it begins in early summer (May) and ends in late autumn (November). The mortality rate is low: 0.3% to 0.6%. The morbidity rate ranged from 5% to 61% within the different age groups of one affected herd in the 1996 outbreaks and from 3.4% to 19% among four affected herds in the 1990 outbreaks. A sudden sharp drop in milk production occurred in lactating animals, some of which had become dry by the end of the outbreaks. Trials to isolate the causative virus in cell culture and in baby mice were unsuccessful. Serum neutralisation tests, which used a cell culture-adapted vaccine strain of bovine ephemeral fever virus as an antigen, revealed the presence of specific antibodies with significantly increased titres in the convalescent sera of affected animals. In addition, the testing of paired sera from non-affected heifers and from both dry and milking cows, performed twice, with an interval of 21 days, revealed the presence of neutralising antibodies. In the 1990 outbreaks, comparative serological studies indicated a high percentage (67.5%; 27/40) of seropositive animals in herds in which bovine ephemeral fever had been previously suspected. No antibodies were detected in animals of herds which had no recorded clinical history of bovine ephemeral fever. Following serological confirmation of the prevalence of bovine ephemeral fever in Saudi Arabia, some dairy farms started using a live imported vaccine to control the disease. This study discusses the epizootiological findings in regard to bovine ephemeral fever, as well as its economic impact on four affected dairy farms in 1990. In addition, the authors evaluate the efficacy of immunoprophylaxis in another dairy herd during the same outbreaks. PMID:9850542

  6. Preliminary observations on the epidemiology of bovine ephemeral fever in China.

    PubMed

    Bai, W B; Jiang, C L; Davis, S S

    1991-02-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is a viral disease of cattle and water buffalo recognised for the first time in China in 1955. The disease has been endemic in south China with 13 epidemics since 1955, seven epidemics reaching central China and one extending into north-east China (40 degrees N). The outbreaks have been seasonal with all occurring in the warmer summer/autumn months of June to October when possible insect vectors are active. Reports of clinical disease were confirmed as BEF by the detection of virus-neutralising antibody. The economic impact of the disease includes loss of milk production, late-term abortions and the loss of draught animal power. PMID:2038767

  7. Theoretical epidemiology on bovine ephemeral fever outbreaks in Tanegashima Island, Kagoshima Prefecture of Japan in 1988.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, T; Fujisono, S

    1992-10-01

    From the end of September to November 1988, a compact scale of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) outbreaks occurred suddenly in Tanegashima island of Kagoshima Prefecture, southern part of Kyusyu island of Japan. The BEF outbreak pattern showed epidemical characteristics as follows; (1) outbreak spread from few foci to zone during one month, and (2) the disease might be transmitted in farms with a fixed probability of adequate contact. By using the above aspects, we attempted to analyze the disease theoretically with the application of Poisson distribution and Reed-Frost model. The BEF incidence in farms was in well accord with the Poisson distribution. As the very rare event occurred in unit time or in unit area in this epidemic, the cattle population at risk were equivalently susceptible to BEF virus in this island, due to the influence of no vaccination to BEF control before the first outbreak. Similarly, the epidemic curve of the Reed-Frost model was proved to fit well the incidence observed in a farm, and the probability of adequate contact was induced as p = 0.226. If the cattle population is less than 5 in this farm, the outbreak would not occur in the first instance. PMID:1420574

  8. Safety, Immunogenicity and Duration of Immunity Elicited by an Inactivated Bovine Ephemeral Fever Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Aziz-Boaron, Orly; Leibovitz, Keren; Gelman, Boris; Kedmi, Maor; Klement, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is an economically important viral vector-borne cattle disease. Several live-attenuated, inactivated and recombinant vaccines have been tested, demonstrating varying efficacy. However, to the best of our knowledge, duration of immunity conferred by an inactivated vaccine has never been reported. In the last decade, Israel has faced an increasing number of BEF outbreaks. The need for an effective vaccine compatible with strains circulating in the Middle East region led to the development of a MONTANIDE™ ISA 206 VG (water-in-oil-in-water), inactivated vaccine based on a local strain. We tested the safety, immunogenicity and duration of immunity conferred by this vaccine. The induced neutralizing antibody (NA) response was followed for 493 days in 40 cows vaccinated by different protocols. The vaccine did not cause adverse reactions or a decrease in milk production. All cows [except 2 (6.7%) which did not respond to vaccination] showed a significant rise in NA titer of up to 1:256 following the second, third or fourth booster vaccination. Neutralizing antibody levels declined gradually to 1:16 up to 120 days post vaccination. This decline continued in cows vaccinated only twice, whereas cows vaccinated 3 or 4 times showed stable titers of approximately 1:16 for up to 267 days post vaccination. At least three vaccinations with the inactivated BEF vaccine were needed to confer long-lasting immunity. These results may have significant implications for the choice of vaccination protocol with inactivated BEF vaccines. Complementary challenge data should however be added to the above results in order to determine what is the minimal NA response conferring protection from clinical disease. PMID:24349225

  9. Occurrence of bovine ephemeral fever in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, in 2012 and development of a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay to detect bovine ephemeral fever virus gene

    PubMed Central

    NIWA, Tsuyoshi; SHIRAFUJI, Hiroaki; IKEMIYAGI, Kazufumi; NITTA, Yoshiki; SUZUKI, Moemi; KATO, Tomoko; YANASE, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    In September 2012, several cows and a calf showed decreased activity, anorexia and fever on Ishigaki Island, Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, and the cases were diagnosed as bovine ephemeral fever (BEF). We isolated BEF virus (BEFV) from one of the affected cows and then determined the complete genome sequence of the G gene, which encodes a class I transmembrane glycoprotein of BEFV. The BEFV isolate in this case, ON-3/E/12, was sorted into the same cluster as other BEFV isolates in Japan, Taiwan and China obtained in 1996−2004 and was most closely related to a 2002 Chinese isolate, JT02L, according to the phylogenetic analysis of the complete G gene. Since inactivated vaccines for BEF available in Japan are considered effective against the ON-3/E/12 isolate as well as other isolates in East Asia from 1996−2004, annual vaccination should be conducted to prevent BEF in Okinawa. Additionally, in this study, we developed an RT-PCR assay to detect the BEFV gene in Japan and neighboring countries. Our assay was able to amplify target sequences in all of the tested BEFV isolates, including 18 isolates in Japan and another isolate in Australia. The assay was found to be useful also for testing RNA samples extracted from bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the detection limit of the assay was 10 copies per tube. We believe that our assay would be an important tool for the screening of BEFV infection and the diagnosis of BEF. PMID:25648276

  10. Risk analysis and seroprevalence of bovine ephemeral fever virus in cattle in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Zaghawa, Ahmed; Housawi, Fadhel Mohamed Taher; Al-Naeem, Abdulmohsen; Al-Nakhly, Hassan; Kamr, Ahmed; Toribio, Ramiro

    2016-03-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) is an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus that causes disabling clinical signs and major economic losses in cattle and water buffalo. The disease is well documented in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East; however, the seroprevalence of BEFV in different regions and bovine breeds in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) is unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze risk factors which affect the prevalence of antibodies against BEFV in small herds of cattle in four geographical regions of KSA. A total of 1480 serum samples from non-BEFV vaccinated small herds of cattle were collected from the Eastern, Jizan, Qasim, and Riyadh regions (370 samples per region) during the summer of 2010. Serum neutralization test was used to detect antibodies against BEFV. There was a significant effect of region, breed, sex, and age on the seroprevalence of BEFV. Seropositive ratios were 18, 18, 26, and 12 % for the Eastern, Jizan, Qasim, and Riyadh regions, respectively (P = 0.00002); 23.2 % for dairy and 13.7 % for non-dairy breeds (P = 0.00004); 24.4 % for males and 14.6 % for females (P = 0.00004); and 15.4, 29.1, and 11.4 % for animals <1 year, 1-3 years, and >3 years, respectively (P < 0.001). Risk analysis showed a significant effect of different regions of KSA on the seroprevalence of BEFV. Host risk factors (age, sex, and breed) showed also a significant effect on the seroprevalence of BEFV. This indicates active circulation of this virus in small herds of cattle. Insect control strategies and BEFV vaccination programs during the spring are recommended to reduce the spread of BEFV and minimize subsequent economic losses as this is adopted in many enzootic countries. PMID:26676243

  11. Genome organization and transcription strategy in the complex GNS-L intergenic region of bovine ephemeral fever rhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, S M; Kongsuwan, K; Cowley, J A; Byrne, K A; Walker, P J

    1997-06-01

    A 1622 nucleotide region of the bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) genome, located between the second glycoprotein (GNS) gene and the polymerase (L) gene, has been cloned and sequenced in Australian (BB7721) and Chinese (Beijing-1) isolates of the virus. In the Australian isolate, the region contains five long open reading frames (ORFs) organized into three coding regions (alpha, beta and gamma), each of which are bound by a consensus transcription initiation and transcription termination-polyadenylation-like sequences. The alpha coding region contains three long ORFs (alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 3). The alpha 1 ORF encodes a 10.6 kDa polypeptide which contains hydrophobic and highly basic regions characteristic of a viroporin. The alpha 2 ORF encodes a 13.7 kDa polypeptide and overlaps the alpha 3 ORF which encodes a 5.7 kDa polypeptide. The beta coding region contains a single long ORF encoding a polypeptide of 12.2 kDa. The gamma coding region, which does not occur in Adelaide River virus (ARV), contains a single long ORF encoding a polypeptide of 13.4 kDa. The Chinese isolate shares 91% nucleotide sequence identity with the Australian isolate. The organization of the alpha, beta and gamma coding regions is preserved and the sequences of the encoded polypeptides are similar to those of BB7721. The major transcription products of the region were identified in BB7721 as polycistronic alpha (alpha 1-alpha 2-alpha 3) and beta-gamma mRNAs. Sequence similarities in the BEFV alpha-beta and beta-gamma gene junctions, and the gamma-L and beta-L gene junctions of BEFV and ARV, suggest that the gamma gene may have evolved from the beta-gene by sequence duplication. PMID:9191923

  12. Serological detection of bovine ephemeral fever virus using an indirect ELISA based on antigenic site G1 expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fu-Ying; Lin, Guo-Zhen; Qiu, Chang-Qing; Zhou, Ji-Zhang; Cao, Xiao-An; Gong, Xiao-Wei

    2010-08-01

    An indirect ELISA for the serological detection of bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) infection in cattle is described in which a glycosylated protein of approximately 25 kDa (including the G1 antigenic site of the virus glycoprotein) expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115 was used as the coating antigen. The optimal concentration of coated antigen was 0.3 microg/well at a serum dilution of 1:40. The optimal positive threshold value of the assay was 1.88, as derived from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The test had 100% sensitivity and 96.7% specificity when compared with a micro-neutralisation test using 336 positive and 180 negative sera to BEFV, respectively. The inter-assay and intra-assay coefficients of variation for 15 sera were both <5.8% and there was no evidence of cross-reactivity between the tested coating antigen and antibodies to related rabies virus. The ELISA is an inexpensive and rapid serological detection method that would be suitable for screening for BEFV infection on a large scale. PMID:19586786

  13. Seroprevalence of bovine ephemeral fever virus in domesticated and wildlife species during epidemic and inter-epidemic periods (2000-2009) in Israel.

    PubMed

    Aziz-Boaron, O; Brettschneider, S; King, R; Gelman, B; Klement, E

    2015-04-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is an economically important vector-borne viral disease of cattle and buffalo. It has been reported from most of the world's tropical and subtropical regions. In the last few decades, outbreaks of BEF have occurred in Israel almost every other year. Several serological studies have demonstrated a wide range of wild animal species that are positive for BEF virus (BEFV) antibodies. However, the question of whether wild animals and domesticated species other than cattle also play an important role in the maintenance and transmission of BEFV in Israel remains. Here, we examined the prevalence of anti-BEFV antibodies in 942 samples collected from various wild, semi-captive and domesticated animal species during the years 2000-2009 using the serum neutralization (SN) method. SN test revealed the presence of BEFV-neutralizing antibodies in nine samples (0.96%), from three species: Bubalus bubalis (4/29, 13.79%), Gazella g. gazella (3/68, 4.44%) and Dama d. mesopotamica (2/296, 0.68%). All positive samples were collected in areas of earlier outbreaks. The low prevalence of positive animals and the solid correlation with prior outbreaks indicate that the tested species probably do not serve as virus reservoirs and may play only a minor role in the maintenance of BEFV in the Middle East. PMID:23675891

  14. Kinetics of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-10, and virus neutralising antibodies during acute ephemeral fever virus infections in Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Barigye, R; Melville, L F; Davis, S; Walsh, S; Hunt, N; Hunt, R; Elliot, N

    2015-12-15

    While fever and inflammation are hallmark features of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF), the cytokine networks that underlie the acute phase of the disease have not been empirically defined in cattle. This study characterised the plasma kinetics of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α) and IL-10 during acute BEF and elucidated on the relationship between the onset of the virus neutralizing antibody response and resolution of viraemia in natural BEF virus (BEFV) infections in cattle. Plasma from three BEFV-infected and three uninfected cattle was tested for the study cytokines by a cELISA, viraemia monitored by qRT-PCR, and virus neutralizing antibody titres determined using a standard protocol. Unlike the negative controls, plasma concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 were consistently increased in the three virus-infected animals. Two of the infected heifers were recumbent and pyrexic on the first day of monitoring and increased cytokine production was already in progress by the time viraemia was detected in all the three infected animals. In all the virus-infected heifers, IL-1β was the most strongly expressed cytokine, IL-6 and IL-10 manifested intermediate plasma concentrations while TNF-α was the least expressed and demonstrated bi-phasic peaks three and five days after the onset of pyrexia. In two of the BEFV-infected heifers, viraemia resolved on the day of seroconversion while in the other infected animal, viral RNA was detectable up to three days after seroconversion. The present data document variable increase in plasma IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 during natural BEFV infections and the fact that upregulation of all but TNF-α precedes seroconversion. In addition to virus neutralising antibodies, it is likely that cytokine-mediated cellular mechanisms may be required for resolution of viraemia in BEF. Considering the anti-inflammatory properties of IL-10, its upregulation may potentially antagonise the fever response in BEFV

  15. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria ... cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make ...

  16. Fever

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of body temperature remains one of the most common ways to assess health. An increase in temperature above what is considered to be a normal value is inevitably regarded as a sure sign of disease and referred to with one simple word: fever. In this review, we summarize how research on fever allowed the identification of the exogenous and endogenous molecules and pathways mediating the fever response. We also show how temperature elevation is common to different pathologies and how the molecular components of the fever-generation pathway represent drug targets for antipyretics, such as acetylsalicylic acid, the first “blockbuster drug”. We also show how fever research provided new insights into temperature and energy homeostasis, and into treatment of infection and inflammation. PMID:20305990

  17. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... of charts. A fever is defined as a temperature 1° or more above the normal 98.6°. Minor infections may cause mild or short-term temperature elevations. Temperatures of 103° and above are considered ...

  18. Monitoring inundation on ephemeral lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, R. G.

    2003-04-01

    Ephemeral lakes have been recognized as being among the most sensitive of closed hydrological systems to regional changes in rainfall patterns, and in some cases, due to their inhospitable nature and isolation, they can also be unaffected by the level of contemporary human interference or management that characterizes perennial catchments. By monitoring and modelling inundation patterns for large ephemeral lakes we can begin to understand and quantify the effects of forecast changes in precipitation (P) and evaporation (E) on the hydrology of a number of dryland systems. Examples are taken from North Africa and the Zone of Chotts (Tunisia and Algeria). Gross changes in the hydrology of ephemeral lakes (or the balance of P-E) can lead to extreme changes in regional dust emissions. Monitoring and modelling changes in the frequency and extent of inundation may lead to a greater understanding of fluctuations in regional dust loadings. Examples of the effects of inundation on dust emissions from large northern and southern-hemisphere dust sources are discussed.

  19. REGEM: THE REVISED EPHEMERAL GULLY EROSION MODEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ephemeral gullies serve as effective links transferring sediment and associated agrichemicals from upland areas to stream channels. Current erosion prediction technologies often require the exact topographic position (the length) of an ephemeral gully a priori, which greatly limits the utility of su...

  20. Ephemeral Gully Erosion Research: Processes and Modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) defines ephemeral gullies as small channels that can be filled in by normal tillage operations only to reform in the same location by subsequent runoff events. Ephemeral gullies contribute significantly to soil erosion in agricultural fields, an...

  1. Ephemeral gully: soil control factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollobarren, Paul; Giménez, Rafael; Ángel Campo, Miguel; Casalí, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion on hillslopes has been divided traditionally into sheet, rill, and (ephemeral) gully erosion. In sheet erosion, a relatively shallow overland flow acts on a hillslope and removes sediment particles uniformly from the land surface. Usually, rill erosion occur in uncertain points within sloping surfaces, whereas gullies occur in more specific places in the landscapes, i.e., within topographic swales or hollows. So that, current models for prediction of (ephemeral) gully initiation and development rely mainly on topographic factors while soil conditions are almost neglected. However, the assessment of the erodibility of soil materials is essential for analyzing and properly modeling gully erosion. But, despite the wealth of studies to characterize soil vulnerability to (gully) erosion, a universal approach is still lacking. This is due to the complexity of soil conditions and erosion phenomenon and their interactions. A useful and feasible soil characterization for gully erosion prediction at large scale should be based on simple, quick, repeatable and relatively inexpensive tests to perform. This work proposes a methodology for conducting simple tests in the field and laboratory to detect soil conditions prone to gully initiation. This approach for assessing soil erodibility includes the use of vane shear apparatus, penetrometers and a mini-rain simulator as well as some current (modified) laboratory tests for assessing soil crustability and erodibility. A pool of simple soil variables to assess soils prone to gully development is proposed. Among the main variables we have the granulometric composition of the top soil (textural fractions and gravel), organic matter content, soil cohesiveness and relative sensitivity of topsoils for crusting. Our finding may be particularly useful for erosion modelling when gully initiation and development do not largely rely on topographic features but in soil conditions.

  2. Yellow Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... tropical and subtropical areas in South America and Africa. The virus is transmitted to people by the ... fever Maps of Yellow fever endemic areas in Africa and South America Yellow fever vaccination Prevention Vaccine ...

  3. Q fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever is antibiotics. For early-stage Q fever, doxycycline is the recommended antibiotic. If you have the ... fever. Your health care provider may prescribe both doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine. You may need to take antibiotics ...

  4. Desert potholes: Ephemeral aquatic microsystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chan, M.A.; Moser, K.; Davis, J.M.; Southam, G.; Hughes, K.; Graham, T.

    2005-01-01

    An enigma of the Colorado Plateau high desert is the "pothole", which ranges from shallow ephemeral puddles to deeply carved pools. The existence of prokaryotic to eukaryotic organisms within these pools is largely controlled by the presence of collected rainwater. Multivariate statistical analysis of physical and chemical limnologic data variables measured from potholes indicates spatial and temporal variations, particularly in water depth, manganese, iron, nitrate and sulfate concentrations and salinity. Variation in water depth and salinity are likely related to the amount of time since the last precipitation, whereas the other variables may be related to redox potential. The spatial and temporal variations in water chemistry affect the distribution of organisms, which must adapt to daily and seasonal extremes of fluctuating temperature (0-60 ??C), pH changes of as much as 5 units over 12 days, and desiccation. For example, many species become dormant when potholes dry, in order to endure intense heat, UV radiation, desiccation and freezing, only to flourish again upon rehydration. But the pothole organisms also have a profound impact on the potholes. Through photosynthesis and respiration, pothole organisms affect redox potential, and indirectly alter the water chemistry. Laboratory examination of dried biofilm from the potholes revealed that within 2 weeks of hydration, the surface of the desiccated, black biofilm became green from cyanobacterial growth, which supported significant growth in heterotrophic bacterial populations. This complex biofilm is persumably responsible for dissolving the cement between the sandstone grains, allowing the potholes to enlarge, and for sealing the potholes, enabling them to retain water longer than the surrounding sandstone. Despite the remarkable ability of life in potholes to persist, desert potholes may be extremely sensitive to anthropogenic effects. The unique limnology and ecology of Utah potholes holds great scientific

  5. Intermittent ephemeral river-breaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reniers, A. J.; MacMahan, J. H.; Gallagher, E. L.; Shanks, A.; Morgan, S.; Jarvis, M.; Thornton, E. B.; Brown, J.; Fujimura, A.

    2012-12-01

    In the summer of 2011 we performed a field experiment in Carmel River State Beach, CA, at a time when the intermittent natural breaching of the ephemeral Carmel River occurred due to an unusually rainy period prior to the experiment associated with El Nino. At this time the river would fill the lagoon over the period of a number of days after which a breach would occur. This allowed us to document a number of breaches with unique pre- and post-breach topographic surveys, accompanying ocean and lagoon water elevations as well as extremely high flow (4m/s) velocities in the river mouth during the breaching event. The topographic surveys were obtained with a GPS-equipped backpack mounted on a walking human and show the evolution of the river breaching with a gradually widening and deepening river channel that cuts through the pre-existing beach and berm. The beach face is qualified as a steep with an average beach slope of 1:10 with significant reflection of the incident waves (MacMahan et al., 2012). The wave directions are generally shore normal as the waves refract over the deep canyon that is located offshore of the beach. The tide is mixed semi-diurnal with a range on the order of one meter. Breaching typically occurred during the low-low tide. Grain size is highly variable along the beach with layers of alternating fine and coarse material that could clearly be observed as the river exit channel was cutting through the beach. Large rocky outcroppings buried under the beach sand are also present along certain stretches of the beach controlling the depth of the breaching channel. The changes in the water level measured within the lagoon and the ocean side allows for an estimate of the volume flux associated with the breach as function of morphology, tidal elevation and wave conditions as well as an assessment of the conditions and mechanisms of breach closure, which occurred on the time scale of O(0.5 days). Exploratory model simulations will be presented at the

  6. Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... by four families of viruses. These include the Ebola and Marburg, Lassa fever, and yellow fever viruses. ... Some VHFs cause mild disease, but some, like Ebola or Marburg, cause severe disease and death. VHFs ...

  7. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from areas that have a dengue fever epidemic, the risk of contracting dengue fever is small for international travelers./p> Reviewed by: Elana Pearl Ben-Joseph, ... Nile Virus First Aid: Vomiting Are Insect Repellents With DEET ...

  8. Rheumatic fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ASO test) Complete blood count (CBC) Electrocardiogram (EKG) Sedimentation rate (ESR -- a test that measures inflammation ... criteria include: Fever High ESR Joint pain Abnormal EKG You'll likely be diagnosed with rheumatic fever ...

  9. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Button Leading research to understand, treat, and prevent infectious, immunologic, and allergic diseases NIAID Home Health & ... NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Dengue Fever > Understanding Dengue Fever Understanding Cause Transmission Symptoms ...

  10. Valley Fever

    MedlinePlus

    Valley Fever is a disease caused by a fungus (or mold) called Coccidioides. The fungi live in the soil ... from person to person. Anyone can get Valley Fever. But it's most common among older adults, especially ...

  11. Tools for Ephemeral Gully Erosion Process Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Techniques to quantify ephemeral gully erosion have been identified by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) as one of gaps in current erosion assessment tools. One reason that may have contributed to this technology gap is the difficulty to quantify changes in channel geometry to asses...

  12. Q fever.

    PubMed

    Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Raoult, Didier

    2008-09-01

    Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by the pathogen Coxiella burnetii causing acute and chronic clinical manifestations. The name "Q fever" derives from "Query fever" and was given in 1935 following an outbreak of febrile illness in an abattoir in Queensland, Australia. C burnetii is considered a potential agent of bioterrorism (class B by the Centers for Disease Control). PMID:18755387

  13. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    MedlinePlus

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... Four different dengue viruses are known to cause dengue hemorrhagic fever. Dengue hemorrhagic fever occurs when a person is bitten by ...

  14. Rheumatic Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... always tell your doctor or dentist about your history of rheumatic fever before you have a surgical or dental procedure. Such procedures may cause bacteria to enter the bloodstream and infect your heart ...

  15. Lassa Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... an acute viral illness that occurs in west Africa. The illness was discovered in 1969 when two ... Lassa fever is endemic in parts of west Africa including Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria; however, ...

  16. Typhoid fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly caused due to a bacteria called Salmonella typhi ( S typhi ). Causes S typhi is spread through contaminated ... as food handlers. Alternative Names Enteric fever Images Salmonella typhi organism Fly Digestive system organs References Harris ...

  17. Dengue fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... by the bite of mosquitoes, most commonly the mosquito Aedes aegypti , which is found in tropic and ... Clothing, mosquito repellent, and netting can help reduce the risk of mosquito bites that can spread dengue fever and ...

  18. Hay Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat. This can trigger a type of allergy called hay fever. Symptoms can include Sneezing, often ... to use distilled or sterilized water with saline. Allergy shots can help make you less sensitive to ...

  19. Simulating Ephemeral Gully Erosion in AnnAGNPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ephemeral gullies serve as a major source and transport mechanism of sediment and associated agrichemicals from upland areas. Accurate prediction technology is necessary to assess the magnitude of these phenomena and to identify areas where mitigation measures are critical. Current ephemeral gully p...

  20. Ephemeral Gullies: To Till or Not to Till?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ephemeral gully erosion is now recognized as a significant, if not dominant source of sediment from agricultural lands worldwide. Ephemeral gullies are typically plowed in and tilled across annually or more frequently, thus restoring the original swale and allowing erosion processes to become reacti...

  1. Tools for quantifying rill and ephemeral gully development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying rill and ephemeral gully erosion has been a challenge.Rills and ephemeral gullies develop at the field scale and it has been shown that both topographic and hydrologic attributes play significant roles in the channel initiation and development. Even at the field scale, changes in channel...

  2. Predicting Runoff for a RUSLE2 Ephemeral Gully Calculator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RUSLE2 provides robust estimates of average annual sheet and rill erosion from a wide range of land use, soil, and climatic conditions, but it cannot calculate channel erosion, including ephemeral gully erosion. Estimation of ephemeral gully erosion within RUSLE2 has been identified as a priority n...

  3. Q Fever

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, M.; Raoult, D.

    1999-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis with a worldwide distribution with the exception of New Zealand. The disease is caused by Coxiella burnetii, a strictly intracellular, gram-negative bacterium. Many species of mammals, birds, and ticks are reservoirs of C. burnetii in nature. C. burnetii infection is most often latent in animals, with persistent shedding of bacteria into the environment. However, in females intermittent high-level shedding occurs at the time of parturition, with millions of bacteria being released per gram of placenta. Humans are usually infected by contaminated aerosols from domestic animals, particularly after contact with parturient females and their birth products. Although often asymptomatic, Q fever may manifest in humans as an acute disease (mainly as a self-limited febrile illness, pneumonia, or hepatitis) or as a chronic disease (mainly endocarditis), especially in patients with previous valvulopathy and to a lesser extent in immunocompromised hosts and in pregnant women. Specific diagnosis of Q fever remains based upon serology. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antiphase II antibodies are detected 2 to 3 weeks after infection with C. burnetii, whereas the presence of IgG antiphase I C. burnetii antibodies at titers of ≥1:800 by microimmunofluorescence is indicative of chronic Q fever. The tetracyclines are still considered the mainstay of antibiotic therapy of acute Q fever, whereas antibiotic combinations administered over prolonged periods are necessary to prevent relapses in Q fever endocarditis patients. Although the protective role of Q fever vaccination with whole-cell extracts has been established, the population which should be primarily vaccinated remains to be clearly identified. Vaccination should probably be considered in the population at high risk for Q fever endocarditis. PMID:10515901

  4. Saturn ring particles as dynamic ephemeral bodies.

    PubMed

    Davis, D R; Weidenschilling, S J; Chapman, C R; Greenberg, R

    1984-05-18

    Although Saturn's rings are within the Roche zone, the accretion of centimeter-sized particles into large aggregates many meters in diameter occurs readily, on a time scale of weeks. These aggregates are disrupted when tidal stresses exceed their very low strengths; thus most of the mass of the ring system is continually processed through a population of large "dynamic ephemeral bodies," which are continually forming and disintegrating. These large aggregates are not at all like the idealized ice spheres often used in modeling Saturn's ring dynamics. Their coefficient of restitution is low, hence they form a monolayer in the ring plane. The optically observable characteristics of the rings are dominated by the swarm of centimeter-sized particles. PMID:17780622

  5. Yellow Fever Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    What is yellow fever?Yellow fever is a serious disease caused by the yellow fever virus. It is found in certain parts of Africa and South America. Yellow fever is spread through the bite of an infected ...

  6. Dengue fever (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

  7. Rat-bite fever

    MedlinePlus

    Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic erythema; Spirillary fever; Sodoku ... Rat-bite fever can be caused by 2 different bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Both of these are found in ...

  8. Yellow Fever Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    What is yellow fever?Yellow fever is a serious disease caused by the yellow fever virus. It is found in certain parts of Africa ... How can I prevent yellow fever?Yellow fever vaccine can prevent yellow fever. ... only at designated vaccination centers. After getting the vaccine, you ...

  9. Orchid Fever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    Exotic, captivating, and seductive, orchids have long fascinated plant lovers. They first attracted the attention of Westerners in the 17th century, when explorers brought back samples from South America and Asia. By the mid-1800s, orchid collecting had reached a fever pitch, not unlike that of the Dutch tulip craze of the 1630s, with rich (and…

  10. Dengue Fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    “Dengue Fever” will be included in “Health Information for International Travel, 2007-2008” which will be published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever are viral diseases transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. The disease is found in tropical and s...

  11. Capturing the ephemeral human pluripotent state.

    PubMed

    Ávila-González, Daniela; García-López, Guadalupe; García-Castro, Irma Lydia; Flores-Herrera, Héctor; Molina-Hernández, Anayansi; Portillo, Wendy; Díaz, Néstor Fabián

    2016-07-01

    During human development, pluripotency is present only in early stages of development. This ephemeral cell potential can be captured in vitro by obtaining pluripotent stem cells (PSC) with self-renewal properties, the human embryonic stem cells (hESC). However, diverse studies suggest the existence of a plethora of human PSC (hPSC) that can be derived from both embryonic and somatic sources, depending on defined culture conditions, their spatial origin, and the genetic engineering used for reprogramming. This review will focus on hPSC, covering the conventional primed hESC, naïve-like hPSC that resemble the ground-state of development, region-selective PSC, and human induced PSC (hiPSC). We will analyze differences and similarities in their differentiation potential as well as in the molecular circuitry of pluripotency. Finally, we describe the need for human feeder cells to derive and maintain hPSC, because they could emulate the interaction of in vivo pluripotent cells with extraembryonic structures that support development. Developmental Dynamics 245:762-773, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004967

  12. Q fever.

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, L G

    1993-01-01

    Q fever is an acute febrile illness first described in 1935 and now seen in many parts of the world. Human infection follows exposure to animals, especially domestic livestock. Recent outbreaks in metropolitan areas have implicated cats as the carrier of disease to humans. The etiologic agent, Coxiella burnetti, belongs to the family Rickettsiaceae, although it has distinct genetic characteristics and modes of transmission. Most recent attention has been focused on a number of large outbreaks of Q fever associated with medical research involving pregnant sheep. Although most infections are self-limited, some patients require prolonged treatment. Recent vaccines have had encouraging success in the prevention of disease in individuals at high risk of exposure. PMID:8358703

  13. Zika fever.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Salazar, Pablo; Suy, Anna; Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Rodó, Carlota; Salvador, Fernando; Molina, Israel

    2016-04-01

    Zika fever is an arboviral systemic disease that has recently become a public health challenge of global concern after its spread through the Americas. This review highlights the current understanding on Zika virus epidemiology, its routes of transmission, clinical manifestations, diagnostic tests, and the current management, prevention and control strategies. It also delves the association between zika infection and complications, such as microencephaly or Guillem-Barré syndrome. PMID:26993436

  14. Typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Wain, John; Hendriksen, Rene S; Mikoleit, Matthew L; Keddy, Karen H; Ochiai, R Leon

    2015-03-21

    Control of typhoid fever relies on clinical information, diagnosis, and an understanding for the epidemiology of the disease. Despite the breadth of work done so far, much is not known about the biology of this human-adapted bacterial pathogen and the complexity of the disease in endemic areas, especially those in Africa. The main barriers to control are vaccines that are not immunogenic in very young children and the development of multidrug resistance, which threatens efficacy of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Clinicians, microbiologists, and epidemiologists worldwide need to be familiar with shifting trends in enteric fever. This knowledge is crucial, both to control the disease and to manage cases. Additionally, salmonella serovars that cause human infection can change over time and location. In areas of Asia, multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi) has been the main cause of enteric fever, but now S Typhi is being displaced by infections with drug-resistant S enterica serovar Paratyphi A. New conjugate vaccines are imminent and new treatments have been promised, but the engagement of local medical and public health institutions in endemic areas is needed to allow surveillance and to implement control measures. PMID:25458731

  15. Towards reliable seasonal ensemble streamflow forecasts for ephemeral rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, James; Wang, Qj; Li, Ming; Robertson, David

    2016-04-01

    Despite their inherently variable nature, ephemeral rivers are an important water resource in many dry regions. Water managers are likely benefit considerably from even mildly skilful ensemble forecasts of streamflow in ephemeral rivers. As with any ensemble forecast, forecast uncertainty - i.e., the spread of the ensemble - must be reliably quantified to allow users of the forecasts to make well-founded decisions. Correctly quantifying uncertainty in ephemeral rivers is particularly challenging because of the high incidence of zero flows, which are difficult to handle with conventional statistical techniques. Here we apply a seasonal streamflow forecasting system, the model for generating Forecast Guided Stochastic Scenarios (FoGSS), to 26 Australian ephemeral rivers. FoGSS uses post-processed ensemble rainfall forecasts from a coupled ocean-atmosphere prediction system to force an initialised monthly rainfall runoff model, and then applies a staged hydrological error model to describe and propagate hydrological uncertainty in the forecast. FoGSS produces 12-month streamflow forecasts; as forecast skill declines with lead time, the forecasts are designed to transit seamlessly to stochastic scenarios. The ensemble rainfall forecasts used in FoGSS are known to be unbiased and reliable, and we concentrate here on the hydrological error model. The FoGSS error model has several features that make it well suited to forecasting ephemeral rivers. First, FoGSS models the error after data is transformed with a log-sinh transformation. The log-sinh transformation is able to normalise even highly skewed data and homogenise its variance, allowing us to assume that errors are Gaussian. Second, FoGSS handles zero values using data censoring. Data censoring allows streamflow in ephemeral rivers to be treated as a continuous variable, rather than having to model the occurrence of non-zero values and the distribution of non-zero values separately. This greatly simplifies parameter

  16. Psychogenic fever, functional fever, or psychogenic hyperthermia?

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Berend

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic fever reflects a phenomenon where core body temperature is high (up to 41°C) or low-grade high (37–38°C) during either acute or chronic stress. Underlying mechanisms are distinct from infection-induced fever and involve the central and sympathetic nervous systems. Psychogenic fever appears a complex psychological, physiological and endocrinological phenomenon.

  17. Predicting and generalizing the refuge function of intermittent and ephemeral streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intermittent and ephemeral streams can provide important functions within stream networks. For fish, intermittent and ephemeral streams can contribute energy and materials to downstream perennial waters, serve as seasonal habitats, and/or provide refuge functions. Understanding t...

  18. LOW-ALTITUDE DIGITAL PHOTOGRAMMETRY TECHNIQUE TO ASSESS EPHEMERAL GULLY EROSION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ephemeral gully erosion is the main source of sediment from the agricultural landscape, unfortunately, it has been overlooked in traditional soil erosion assessment. Since an ephemeral gully can be easily alleviated or filled by normal tillage, the difficulty in making the ephemeral gully erosion a...

  19. Simulating Ephemeral Gully Erosion in AnnAGNPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ephemeral gully erosion can cause severe soil degradation and contribute significantly to total soil losses in agricultural areas. Physically-based prediction technology is necessary to assess the magnitude of these phenomena so that appropriate conservation measures can be implemented, but such te...

  20. Spatially distributed sheet, rill, and ephemeral gully erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ephemeral gully erosion can be a serious contributor to soil degradation in agricultural fields, but few conservation planning tools account for and predict this form of erosion. To address this deficiency, a new modelling system was developed and applied to a 6.3 ha research watershed near Treynor,...

  1. Ephemeral gully channel width and erosion simulation technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated runoff increases erosion and transfers fine sediment and associated agrichemicals from upland areas to stream channels. Ephemeral gully erosion on cropland in the U.S. may contribute up to 40% or more of the sediment delivered to the edge of the field. Typically, conservation practices ...

  2. Runoff generation through ephemeral streams in south-east Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, A.; Simeone, V.; Giustolisi, O.

    2012-04-01

    Ephemeral streams are morphological elements, typical of karst areas, characterized by relatively large and flat bottom transects (Camarasa & Tilford, 2002). These occasionally drain runoff generated by extreme rainfall events, characterized by high return periods. The activation of these streams was investigated by several authors for the Mediterranean regions, and in particular for south Spain and north Africa (Camarasa & Segura, 2001; De Vera, 1984). However, there are few analyses for karst areas of south-east of Italy (Cotecchia, 2006; Polemio, 2010). South-east of Italy, in particular the central part of Apulia, is characterized by a karst morphology, with a moderately elevated plateau, namely Murgia, which is drained by a network of ephemeral streams. These are normally dry, relatively short-length and straights, and their main outlets are on the coast. They normally drain water after extraordinary rainfall events, which can generate very high discharges, which can potentially flood the areas close to the streams. For this reason, the definition of an activation threshold for ephemeral streams is a paramount problem, even if this constitutes a complex problem, since the dynamics of the catchment drained by these streams in highly non-linear and biased by multiple variables (e.g. urbanization, land use, etc.). The main problem affecting the analysis and prediction of flood events in karst semi-arid regions is the almost complete absence of discharge time-series, measured at the outlets of the ephemeral streams. This prevents from the identification of accurate statistics of flood events and on the determination of rainfall events, which may potentially generate floods. Indeed, floods and in general flash floods are relatively rare events for semi-arid karst regions, however they can be really severe and disruptive, causing serious damages to people and infrastructures. This work presents an analysis of the ephemeral stream activation in karst semi-arid areas

  3. Formation of Ephemeral Bedform Turrets in Coastal Foredunes.

    PubMed

    Jackson; Cooper

    1999-09-01

    Rare, erosional turret bedforms are described in a coastal foredune environment. These ephemeral structures are formed as a result of moist columns of sand being sculpted by aeolian action of saltating particles. Mature formation of these features appears to be facilitated by the action of an advancing foredune ridge, first preserving and then isolating the turrets for further enhanced erosion within a dune environment. It is envisaged that these structures may be preserved in dune stratigraphy. PMID:10504140

  4. How Is Topographic Simplicity Maintained in Ephemeral, Dryland Channels?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, M. B.; Michaelides, K.

    2014-12-01

    Topography in river channels reflects the time integral of streamflow-driven sediment flux mass balance. In dryland basins, infrequent and spatially heterogeneous rainfall generates a nonuniform sediment supply to ephemeral channels from hillslopes, and this sediment is subsequently sorted by spatially and temporally discontinuous channel flow. Paradoxically, the time integral of these interactions tends to produce simple topography, manifest in straight longitudinal profiles and symmetrical cross sections, which are distinct from bed morphology in perennial channels, but the controlling processes are unclear. We present a set of numerical modeling experiments based on field measurements and scenarios of uniform/nonuniform streamflow to investigate ephemeral channel bed-material flux and net sediment accumulation behavior in response to variations in channel hydrology, width, and grain size distribution. Coupled with variations in valley and channel width and frequent, yet discontinuous hillslope supply of coarse sediment, bed material becomes weakly sorted into coarse and fine sections that then affect rates of channel Qs. We identify three sediment transport thresholds relevant to poorly armored, dryland channels: 1) a low critical value required to entrain any grain sizes from the bed; 2) a value of ~4.5τ*c needed to move all grain sizes within a cross section with equal mobility; and 3) a value of ~50τ*c required to entrain gravel at nearly equivalent rates at all sections along a reach. The latter represents the 'geomorphically effective' event, which resets channel topography. We show that spatially variable flow below ~50τ*c creates and subsequently destroys incipient topography along ephemeral reaches and that large flood events above this threshold apparently dampen fluctuations in longitudinal sediment flux and thus smooth incipient channel bar forms. Both processes contribute to the maintenance of topographic simplicity in ephemeral dryland channels.

  5. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a type of bacteria carried by ticks. ... Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii (R. Rickettsii) , which is carried by ticks. The ...

  6. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fever with Renal Syndrome Hendra Virus Disease Kyasanur Forest Disease Lassa Fever Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis (LCM) Marburg Hemorrhagic ... the rodent species carrying several of the New World arenaviruses, live in geographically restricted areas. Therefore, the ...

  7. Colorado tick fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... immediately by using tweezers, pulling carefully and steadily. Insect repellent may be helpful. Alternative Names Mountain tick fever; ... chap 51. Read More Acute Encephalitis Fever Incidence Insect bites and stings Update Date 12/7/2014 Updated by: Jatin ...

  8. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000654.htm Rocky Mountain spotted fever To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a ...

  9. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever, dengue, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur forest disease). Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015 All information on Ebola virus disease Ebola features map Dashboard - Progress update ...

  10. Rat-bite fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection. Symptoms due to Streptobacillus moniliformis may include: Chills Fever Joint pain, redness, or swelling Rash Symptoms due to Spirillum minus may include: Chills Fever Open sore at the site of the ...

  11. Effects of Hysteresis on Groundwater Recharge From Ephemeral Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parissopoulos, G. A.; Wheater, H. S.

    1992-11-01

    The effects of hysteresis on the movement of the saturated and unsaturated soil water phase due to infiltration from ephemeral surface water flows are investigated for different scenarios of flood events in homogeneous and heterogeneous media with the use of a two-dimensional model based on Richards' equation and the dependent domain hysteresis model of Mualem (1984). Hysteresis effects were found in general to be small, but sensitive to water ponding depth, hydraulic contact between surface and groundwater and initial moisture distribution. In all cases tested, hysteresis resulted in higher rise of the toe of the water mound formed beneath the wadi despite a decrease of cumulative infiltration.

  12. Q fever - a review.

    PubMed

    Marrie, T J

    1990-08-01

    Q or "query" fever is a zoonosis caused by the organism Coxiella burnetii. Cattle, sheep and goats are the most common reservoirs of this organism. The placenta of infected animals contains high numbers (up to 10(9)/g) of C. burnetii. Aerosols occur at the time of parturition and man becomes infected following inhalation of the microorganism. The spectrum of illness in man is wide and consists of acute and chronic forms. Acute Q fever is most often a self-limited flu-like illness but may include pneumonia, hepatitis, or meningoencephalitis. Chronic Q fever almost always means endocarditis and rarely osteomyelitis. Chronic Q fever is not known to occur in animals other than man. An increased abortion and stillbirth rate are seen in infected domestic ungulates.Four provinces (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario and Alberta) reported cases of Q fever in 1989.A vaccine for Q fever has recently been licensed in Australia. PMID:17423643

  13. Mecillinam in enteric fever.

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, B K; Ironside, A G; Brennand, J

    1979-01-01

    Twelve consecutive patients with enteric fever entered a trial of 14 days' treatment with mecillinam. Only three patients became afebrile within three days; four continued unimproved with fever and toxaemia for seven to nine days, when treatment was changed to chloramphenicol with good results. In one case the fever did not settle until the 13th day, and five days later the patient had a clinical relapse. Although all organisms recovered were fully sensitive to mecillinam, this drug is not an effective or consistent treatment for enteric fever. PMID:218670

  14. [Fever in returning travelers].

    PubMed

    Burchard, G

    2014-03-01

    Travel-related illness is most often due to gastrointestinal, febrile, and dermatologic diseases. Fever in a returned traveler demands prompt attention because it may be a manifestation of an infection that could be rapidly progressive and lethal. The approach to the febrile patient should be stepwise and consider travel and exposure history. Malaria is the most common cause of fever in patients returning from Sub-Saharan Africa, whereas dengue is more frequent in travelers from other tropical and subtropical areas. Other serious diseases are typhoid and paratyphoid fever, amebic liver abscess, visceral leishmaniasis, leptospirosis and-rarely-viral hemorrhagic fevers. PMID:24557143

  15. Automated Mapping of Potential for Ephemeral Gully Formation in Agricultural Watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erosion associated with ephemeral gullies in cultivated areas is known to contribute significantly to soil loss and sediment yield from arable watersheds. Despite this, no automated method currently exists for mapping the potential for ephemeral gully formation. This study identifies that the capabi...

  16. Ephemeral Gully Erosion by Preferential Flow Through a Discontinuous Soil-Pipe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lateral flow through soil pipes has been postulated to facilitate the development of ephemeral gullies, yet these soil pipes are buried and thereby made discontinuous when gullies are filled-in. The objective was to determine the effect of flow through discontinuous soil-pipes on ephemeral gully ero...

  17. Malignant Mediterranean spotted fever

    PubMed Central

    Lunge, Snehal Balvant; Patil, Vaibhav; Ambar, Sameer; Naik, Vishwas

    2015-01-01

    Fever with rash is one of the most common causes of referral to a dermatologist. A plethora of conditions need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. They may be broadly classified into infectious causes, drug reactions, and autoimmune disorders. Here we present a rare case of rickettsial fever with cardiac involvement in an elderly male patient with no comorbidities. PMID:26904440

  18. Rat-bite fever.

    PubMed

    van Nood, E; Peters, S H A

    2005-09-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with fever, arthralgias and a skin rash. She possessed nine pet rats, and denied that she had been bitten. Blood culture was positive for Streptobacillus moniliformis, which can cause rat-bite fever. The patient fully recovered after treatment with clarithromycin. PMID:16186643

  19. Rat Bite Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Rat Bite Fever Page Content Article Body Rat-bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who have been bitten by an infected rat or, in some cases, squirrels, mice, cats, and ...

  20. Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus or arbovirus that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In the last decade, Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have resulted in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily a...

  1. 37 CFR 261.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 261.3 Section 261.3 Patents, Trademarks, and... § 261.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. (a) For... transmissions of sound recordings made pursuant to 17 U.S.C. 114(d)(2), and the making of ephemeral...

  2. Remote sensing of ephemeral water bodies in western Niger

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Research was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring the small ephemeral water bodies of the Sahel with the 1.1 km resolution data of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). Twenty-one lakes of western Niger with good ground observation records were selected for examination. Thematic Mapper images from 1988 were first analysed to determine surface areas and temperature differences between water and adjacent land. Six AVHRR scenes from the 1988-89 dry season were then studied. It was found that a lake can be monitored until its surface area drops below 10 ha, in most cases. Furthermore, with prior knowledge of the location and shape of a water body, its surface area can be estimated from AVHRR band 5 data to within about 10 ha. These results are explained by the sharp temperature contrast between water and land, on the order of 13?? C.

  3. Environmental controls on drainage behavior of an ephemeral stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blasch, K.W.; Ferre, T. P. A.; Vrugt, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Streambed drainage was measured at the cessation of 26 ephemeral streamflow events in Rillito Creek, Tucson, Arizona from August 2000 to June 2002 using buried time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes. An unusual drainage response was identified, which was characterized by sharp drainage from saturation to near field capacity at each depth with an increased delay between depths. We simulated the drainage response using a variably saturated numerical flow model representing a two-layer system with a high permeability layer overlying a lower permeability layer. Both the observed data and the numerical simulation show a strong correlation between the drainage velocity and the temperature of the stream water. A linear combination of temperature and the no-flow period preceding flow explained about 90% of the measured variations in drainage velocity. Evaluation of this correlative relationship with the one-dimensional numerical flow model showed that the observed temperature fluctuations could not reproduce the magnitude of variation in the observed drainage velocity. Instead, the model results indicated that flow duration exerts the most control on drainage velocity, with the drainage velocity decreasing nonlinearly with increasing flow duration. These findings suggest flow duration is a primary control of water availability for plant uptake in near surface sediments of an ephemeral stream, an important finding for estimating the ecological risk of natural or engineered changes to streamflow patterns. Correlative analyses of soil moisture data, although easy and widely used, can result in erroneous conclusions of hydrologic cause—effect relationships, and demonstrating the need for joint physically-based numerical modeling and data synthesis for hypothesis testing to support quantitative risk analysis.

  4. Yellow fever: an update.

    PubMed

    Monath, T P

    2001-08-01

    Yellow fever, the original viral haemorrhagic fever, was one of the most feared lethal diseases before the development of an effective vaccine. Today the disease still affects as many as 200,000 persons annually in tropical regions of Africa and South America, and poses a significant hazard to unvaccinated travellers to these areas. Yellow fever is transmitted in a cycle involving monkeys and mosquitoes, but human beings can also serve as the viraemic host for mosquito infection. Recent increases in the density and distribution of the urban mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, as well as the rise in air travel increase the risk of introduction and spread of yellow fever to North and Central America, the Caribbean and Asia. Here I review the clinical features of the disease, its pathogenesis and pathophysiology. The disease mechanisms are poorly understood and have not been the subject of modern clinical research. Since there is no specific treatment, and management of patients with the disease is extremely problematic, the emphasis is on preventative vaccination. As a zoonosis, yellow fever cannot be eradicated, but reduction of the human disease burden is achievable through routine childhood vaccination in endemic countries, with a low cost for the benefits obtained. The biological characteristics, safety, and efficacy of live attenuated, yellow fever 17D vaccine are reviewed. New applications of yellow fever 17D virus as a vector for foreign genes hold considerable promise as a means of developing new vaccines against other viruses, and possibly against cancers. PMID:11871403

  5. Monitoring Ephemeral Streams Using Airborne Very High Resolution Multispectral Remote Sensing in Arid Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Y.; O'Connor, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    Development in arid environments often results in the loss and degradation of the ephemeral streams that provide habitat and critical ecosystem functions such as water delivery, sediment transport, and groundwater recharge. Quantification of these ecosystem functions is challenging because of the episodic nature of runoff events in desert landscapes and the large spatial scale of watersheds that potentially can be impacted by large-scale development. Low-impact development guidelines and regulatory protection of ephemeral streams are often lacking due to the difficulty of accurately mapping and quantifying the critical functions of ephemeral streams at scales larger than individual reaches. Renewable energy development in arid regions has the potential to disturb ephemeral streams at the watershed scale, and it is necessary to develop environmental monitoring applications for ephemeral streams to help inform land management and regulatory actions aimed at protecting and mitigating for impacts related to large-scale land disturbances. This study focuses on developing remote sensing methodologies to identify and monitor impacts on ephemeral streams resulting from the land disturbance associated with utility-scale solar energy development in the desert southwest of the United States. Airborne very high resolution (VHR) multispectral imagery is used to produce stereoscopic, three-dimensional landscape models that can be used to (1) identify and map ephemeral stream channel networks, and (2) support analyses and models of hydrologic and sediment transport processes that pertain to the critical functionality of ephemeral streams. Spectral and statistical analyses are being developed to extract information about ephemeral channel location and extent, micro-topography, riparian vegetation, and soil moisture characteristics. This presentation will demonstrate initial results and provide a framework for future work associated with this project, for developing the necessary

  6. Is fever beneficial?

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Fever, the regulation of body temperature at an elevated level, is a common response to infection throughout the vertebrates, as well as in many species of invertebrate animals. It is probable that fever evolved as an adaptive response to infection hundreds of millions of years ago. Many components of the nonspecific and specific host response to infection are enhanced by small elevations in temperature. Perhaps more important, studies of bacterial- and viral-infected animals have shown that, in general, moderate fevers decrease morbidity and increase survival rate. PMID:3488621

  7. Rift Valley Fever (RVF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outbreak resources, VHF information for specific groups, virus ecology, references... RVF Distribution Map Rift Valley Fever Transmission ... Outbreaks Outbreak Summaries RVF Distribution Map Resources Virus Ecology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  8. Scarlet Fever (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Scarlet Fever KidsHealth > ...

  9. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biological pro...

  10. Q fever - early

    MedlinePlus

    ... burnetii , which live in domestic animals such as cattle, sheep, goats, birds, and cats. Some wild animals and ticks also carry the bacteria. You can get Q fever by drinking raw (unpasteurized) milk, or after breathing ...

  11. Hay Fever Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... and fall hay fever symptoms. While avoiding the allergens that trigger symptoms is the best way to ... before you first come into contact with spring allergens, the medication can prevent the release of histamine ...

  12. Polymer fume fever.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Taro; Hamada, Osamu; Sasaki, Akinori; Ikeda, Mari

    2012-01-01

    A 29-year-old Japanese man presented with fever, dyspnoea and non-productive cough after massive inhalation of evaporant from a polytetrafluoroethylene-coated cooking pan. Chest CT scan showed diffuse interstitial infiltration in both lungs. Based on the patient history, images and the pan he brought to the hospital, polymer fume fever was strongly suspected. His symptoms dramatically improved over the following 2 days after admission. PMID:23230259

  13. Hydrologic landscape regions for predicting and generalizing the refuge function of intermittent and ephemeral streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intermittent and ephemeral (IE) streams can provide important functions within stream networks. Understanding the relative benefit provided to downstream waters is needed to better inform watershed management. Although the potential functions of IE streams are relatively well kn...

  14. Spring Ephemerals Adapt to Extremely High Light Conditions via an Unusual Stabilization of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenfeng; Li, Yang; Liu, Wu; Wu, Lishuan; Xie, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yuanming; Wilhelm, Christian; Yang, Chunhong

    2015-01-01

    Ephemerals, widely distributed in the Gobi desert, have developed significant characteristics to sustain high photosynthetic efficiency under high light (HL) conditions. Since the light reaction is the basis for photosynthetic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy, the photosynthetic performances in thylakoid membrane of the spring ephemerals in response to HL were studied. Three plant species, namely two C3 spring ephemeral species of Cruciferae: Arabidopsis pumila (A. pumila) and Sisymbrium altissimum (S. altissimum), and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) were chosen for the study. The ephemeral A. pumila, which is genetically close to A. thaliana and ecologically in the same habitat as S. altissimum, was used to avoid complications arising from the superficial differences resulted from comparing plants from two extremely contrasting ecological groups. The findings manifested that the ephemerals showed significantly enhanced activities of photosystem (PS) II under HL conditions, while the activities of PSII in A. thaliana were markedly decreased under the same conditions. Detailed analyses of the electron transport processes revealed that the increased plastoquinone pool oxidization, together with the enhanced PSI activities, ensured a lowered excitation pressure to PSII of both ephemerals, and thus facilitated the photosynthetic control to avoid photodamage to PSII. The analysis of the reaction centers of the PSs, both in terms of D1 protein turnover kinetics and the long-term adaptation, revealed that the unusually stable PSs structure provided the basis for the ephemerals to carry out high photosynthetic performances. It is proposed that the characteristic photosynthetic performances of ephemerals were resulted from effects of the long-term adaptation to the harsh environments. PMID:26779223

  15. Spring Ephemerals Adapt to Extremely High Light Conditions via an Unusual Stabilization of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wenfeng; Li, Yang; Liu, Wu; Wu, Lishuan; Xie, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yuanming; Wilhelm, Christian; Yang, Chunhong

    2016-01-01

    Ephemerals, widely distributed in the Gobi desert, have developed significant characteristics to sustain high photosynthetic efficiency under high light (HL) conditions. Since the light reaction is the basis for photosynthetic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy, the photosynthetic performances in thylakoid membrane of the spring ephemerals in response to HL were studied. Three plant species, namely two C3 spring ephemeral species of Cruciferae: Arabidopsis pumila (A. pumila) and Sisymbrium altissimum (S. altissimum), and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) were chosen for the study. The ephemeral A. pumila, which is genetically close to A. thaliana and ecologically in the same habitat as S. altissimum, was used to avoid complications arising from the superficial differences resulted from comparing plants from two extremely contrasting ecological groups. The findings manifested that the ephemerals showed significantly enhanced activities of photosystem (PS) II under HL conditions, while the activities of PSII in A. thaliana were markedly decreased under the same conditions. Detailed analyses of the electron transport processes revealed that the increased plastoquinone pool oxidization, together with the enhanced PSI activities, ensured a lowered excitation pressure to PSII of both ephemerals, and thus facilitated the photosynthetic control to avoid photodamage to PSII. The analysis of the reaction centers of the PSs, both in terms of D1 protein turnover kinetics and the long-term adaptation, revealed that the unusually stable PSs structure provided the basis for the ephemerals to carry out high photosynthetic performances. It is proposed that the characteristic photosynthetic performances of ephemerals were resulted from effects of the long-term adaptation to the harsh environments. PMID:26779223

  16. Ephemeral cellular segmentation in the thalamus of the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Ivy, G O; Killackey, H P

    1981-08-01

    The distribution of thalamocortical relay cells in the rat ventrobasal complex was studied during the early postnatal period using the retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase from the parietal cortex. It was found that the relay cells undergo marked changes in their distribution during the first two postnatal weeks. On postnatal days (PNDs) 0 and 1, the cells are rather homogeneously distributed throughout the ventrobasal complex. However, by PND 2, and more clearly by PND 3, the cells form a distinctly segmented pattern. This pattern consists of discrete curvilinear arrays of cells extending throughout most of the rostrocaudal extent of the nucleus. This distinct cellular pattern is present from PND 2 to about PND 8. In animals sacrificed on PND 15 or as adults, the pattern is no longer obvious. The cellular pattern seen at PND 8 was examined in the 3 standard planes of section and compared to both the somatotopic organization of the nucleus and to the organization of its major ascending and descending inputs. The developmental time course of the cellular segmentation was related to that of the lemniscal and corticothalamic afferents, which also show ephemeral segmentation patterns during the first two postnatal weeks. PMID:7272763

  17. Ephemerality of discrete methane vents in lake sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scandella, Benjamin P.; Pillsbury, Liam; Weber, Thomas; Ruppel, Carolyn; Hemond, Harold F.; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas whose emission from sediments in inland waters and shallow oceans may both contribute to global warming and be exacerbated by it. The fraction of methane emitted by sediments that bypasses dissolution in the water column and reaches the atmosphere as bubbles depends on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of venting from the sediments. Earlier studies have concluded that hot spots—persistent, high-flux vents—dominate the regional ebullitive flux from submerged sediments. Here the spatial structure, persistence, and variability in the intensity of methane venting are analyzed using a high-resolution multibeam sonar record acquired at the bottom of a lake during multiple deployments over a 9 month period. We confirm that ebullition is strongly episodic, with distinct regimes of high flux and low flux largely controlled by changes in hydrostatic pressure. Our analysis shows that the spatial pattern of ebullition becomes homogeneous at the sonar's resolution over time scales of hours (for high-flux periods) or days (for low-flux periods), demonstrating that vents are ephemeral rather than persistent, and suggesting that long-term, lake-wide ebullition dynamics may be modeled without resolving the fine-scale spatial structure of venting.

  18. Stochastic Index estimation of flow duration curves on ephemeral basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, Maura; Napolitano, Francesco; Russo, Fabio

    2010-05-01

    Flow duration curves (FDC) and annual flow duration curves can be used for describe the flow river regime. FDCs represents frequency distribution of discharges, and can be derived from gauged data, AFDCs allow to introduce confidence intervals for the median AFDC, and to assign return periods to individual AFDCs. But in semiarid environments with ephemeral flows or little basins, where there are environmental problems caused by pollutant discharges, the presence of zeros in a registration creates a discontinuity that makes difficult to model this curves using common distributions. Therefore this work combines the stochastic index model, that relates FDC and AFDC of daily flow series, and that permits to reproduce the mean, the median and variance of AFDC without regard persistency and seasonality of the series for recreate the curve of the non-zero period, with the theory of total probability, that allows to evaluate the percentage of time the river is dry. Next regionalization of information is necessary to apply this model to ungauged stations and a cross-validation procedure for evaluate robustness of results is need. This procedure is applied to a nested catchment in the Lazio region. Here heterogeneity of basins processes appears over a range of space and time scales. Then understanding of statistical and physical relationships that connect the components of the hydrological cycle across these scales is a basic requirement.

  19. Ephemerality of discrete methane vents in lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, Benjamin P.; Pillsbury, Liam; Weber, Thomas; Ruppel, Carolyn; Hemond, Harold F.; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-05-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas whose emission from sediments in inland waters and shallow oceans may both contribute to global warming and be exacerbated by it. The fraction of methane emitted by sediments that bypasses dissolution in the water column and reaches the atmosphere as bubbles depends on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of venting from the sediments. Earlier studies have concluded that hot spots—persistent, high-flux vents—dominate the regional ebullitive flux from submerged sediments. Here the spatial structure, persistence, and variability in the intensity of methane venting are analyzed using a high-resolution multibeam sonar record acquired at the bottom of a lake during multiple deployments over a 9 month period. We confirm that ebullition is strongly episodic, with distinct regimes of high flux and low flux largely controlled by changes in hydrostatic pressure. Our analysis shows that the spatial pattern of ebullition becomes homogeneous at the sonar's resolution over time scales of hours (for high-flux periods) or days (for low-flux periods), demonstrating that vents are ephemeral rather than persistent, and suggesting that long-term, lake-wide ebullition dynamics may be modeled without resolving the fine-scale spatial structure of venting.

  20. Size differences in migrant sandpiper flocks: ghosts in ephemeral guilds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eldridge, J.L.; Johnson, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    Scolopacid sandpipers were studied from 1980 until 1984 during spring migration in North Dakota. Common species foraging together in mixed-species flocks differed in bill length most often by 20 to 30 percent (ratios from 1.2:1 to 1.3:1). Observed flocks were compared to computer generated flocks drawn from three source pools of Arctic-nesting sandpipers. The source pools included 51 migrant species from a global pool, 33 migrant species from a Western Hemisphere pool, and 13 species that migrated through North Dakota. The observed flocks formed randomly from the available species that used the North Dakota migration corridor but the North Dakota species were not a random selection from the Western Hemisphere and global pools of Arctic-nesting scolopacid sandpipers. In short, the ephemeral, mixed-species foraging flocks that we observed in North Dakota were random mixes from a non-random pool. The size-ratio distributions were consistent with the interpretation that use of this migration corridor by sandpipers has been influenced by some form of size-related selection such as competition.

  1. Recurrent Fever in Children

    PubMed Central

    Torreggiani, Sofia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time. PMID:27023528

  2. Recurrent Fever in Children.

    PubMed

    Torreggiani, Sofia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time. PMID:27023528

  3. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Schwabe, Arthur D.; Terasaki, Paul I.; Barnett, Eugene V.; Territo, Mary C.; Klinenberg, James R.; Peters, Robert S.

    1977-01-01

    The success of colchicine therapy in the management of familial Mediterranean fever has provided new direction to investigations into the pathogenesis of this disease. Examination of HLA antigen frequencies in 53 patients with familial Mediterranean fever and appropriate controls, as well as various immunologic studies have yielded no significant differences. However, B lymphocyte typing and assays for immune complexes, lymphokines and prostaglandins may be of potential interest. Preliminary studies indicate that leukocytes of patients with familial Mediterranean fever release increased amounts of lysozyme (P<0.01), when subjected to high temperatures, and of both lysozyme and myeloperoxidase at low osmotic concentrations. The known and potential effects of colchicine on leukocyte and cellular metabolism, and the current status of colchicine prophylaxis are reviewed. In patients receiving an optimum colchicine dose of 1.5 to 1.8 mg per day, side effects have been minimal and the frequency of attacks has been decreased significantly. PMID:878470

  4. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Walker, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  5. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  6. Chikungunya fever from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kouta; Matumoto, Kentaro; Lim, Chang-Kweng; Moi, Meng Ling; Kotaki, Akira; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2010-01-01

    An adult Malaysian woman returned to Japan from Kuala Lumpur and had onset of dengue fever-like symptoms including high fever, malaise and arthritis in early January 2009. Serum obtained on the following day was tested at the National Institute of Infectious Diseases in Tokyo, where it was determined to be positive for chikungunya virus (CHIKV) RNA. IgM antibody against CHIKV was negative on January 6 and sero-converted to be positive on January 14, confirming a recent CHIKV infection. Except for arthralgia, all her symptoms resolved uneventfully within 10 days. PMID:20190493

  7. Fever in honeybee colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, P. T.; Blackie, Caroline A.; Seeley, Thomas D.

    Honeybees, Apis spp., maintain elevated temperatures inside their nests to accelerate brood development and to facilitate defense against predators. We present an additional defensive function of elevating nest temperature: honeybees generate a brood-comb fever in response to colonial infection by the heat-sensitive pathogen Ascosphaera apis. This response occurs before larvae are killed, suggesting that either honeybee workers detect the infection before symptoms are visible, or that larvae communicate the ingestion of the pathogen. This response is a striking example of convergent evolution between this "superorganism" and other fever-producing animals.

  8. Treatment for Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Institutes of Health (NIH) is sponsoring a randomized controlled trial to learn more about the best ... recently called attention to Valley fever and this randomized controlled trial . How is Valley fever treated? For ...

  9. Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (Marburg HF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... was first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, ...

  10. Bacterial succession within an ephemeral hypereutrophic mojave desert playa lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Navarro, J.B.; Moser, D.P.; Flores, A.; Ross, C.; Rosen, Michael R.; Dong, H.; Zhang, G.; Hedlund, B.P.

    2009-01-01

    Ephemerally wet playas are conspicuous features of arid landscapes worldwide; however, they have not been well studied as habitats for microorganisms. We tracked the geochemistry and microbial community in Silver Lake playa, California, over one flooding/desiccation cycle following the unusually wet winter of 2004-2005. Over the course of the study, total dissolved solids increased by 10-fold and pH increased by nearly one unit. As the lake contracted and temperatures increased over the summer, a moderately dense planktonic population of 1 ?????106 cells ml-1 of culturable heterotrophs was replaced by a dense population of more than 1????????109 cells ml-1, which appears to be the highest concentration of culturable planktonic heterotrophs reported in any natural aquatic ecosystem. This correlated with a dramatic depletion of nitrate as well as changes in the microbial community, as assessed by small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of bacterial isolates and uncultivated clones. Isolates from the early-phase flooded playa were primarily Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes, yet clone libraries were dominated by Betaproteobacteria and yet uncultivated Actinobacteria. Isolates from the late-flooded phase ecosystem were predominantly Proteobacteria, particularly alkalitolerant isolates of Rhodobaca, Porphyrobacter, Hydrogenophaga, Alishwenella, and relatives of Thauera; however, clone libraries were composed almost entirely of Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria). A sample taken after the playa surface was completely desiccated contained diverse culturable Actinobacteria typically isolated from soils. In total, 205 isolates and 166 clones represented 82 and 44 species-level groups, respectively, including a wide diversity of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Acidobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  11. Bacterial succession within an ephemeral hypereutrophic Mojave Desert playa Lake.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Jason B; Moser, Duane P; Flores, Andrea; Ross, Christian; Rosen, Michael R; Dong, Hailiang; Zhang, Gengxin; Hedlund, Brian P

    2009-02-01

    Ephemerally wet playas are conspicuous features of arid landscapes worldwide; however, they have not been well studied as habitats for microorganisms. We tracked the geochemistry and microbial community in Silver Lake playa, California, over one flooding/desiccation cycle following the unusually wet winter of 2004-2005. Over the course of the study, total dissolved solids increased by approximately 10-fold and pH increased by nearly one unit. As the lake contracted and temperatures increased over the summer, a moderately dense planktonic population of approximately 1x10(6) cells ml(-1) of culturable heterotrophs was replaced by a dense population of more than 1x10(9) cells ml(-1), which appears to be the highest concentration of culturable planktonic heterotrophs reported in any natural aquatic ecosystem. This correlated with a dramatic depletion of nitrate as well as changes in the microbial community, as assessed by small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of bacterial isolates and uncultivated clones. Isolates from the early-phase flooded playa were primarily Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes, yet clone libraries were dominated by Betaproteobacteria and yet uncultivated Actinobacteria. Isolates from the late-flooded phase ecosystem were predominantly Proteobacteria, particularly alkalitolerant isolates of Rhodobaca, Porphyrobacter, Hydrogenophaga, Alishwenella, and relatives of Thauera; however, clone libraries were composed almost entirely of Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria). A sample taken after the playa surface was completely desiccated contained diverse culturable Actinobacteria typically isolated from soils. In total, 205 isolates and 166 clones represented 82 and 44 species-level groups, respectively, including a wide diversity of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Acidobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. PMID:18758846

  12. Q Fever Update, Maritime Canada

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, Thomas J.; Campbell, Nancy; McNeil, Shelly A.; Webster, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    Since the 1990s, reports of Q fever in Nova Scotia, Canada, have declined. Passive surveillance for Q fever in Nova Scotia and its neighboring provinces in eastern Canada indicates that the clinical manifestation of Q fever in the Maritime provinces is pneumonia and that incidence of the disease may fluctuate. PMID:18258080

  13. Three-day fever.

    PubMed

    Akakpo, A J

    2015-08-01

    Three-day fever is a viral disease caused by an Ephemerovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae, transmitted by arthropod vectors. It is common in tropical and sub-tropical regions, where it affects mainly domestic cattle and buffaloes, especially in intensive dairy or fattening production systems. It is of economic importance because it reduces milk production and fertility and causes abortion. The disease is generally benign. It manifests in several susceptible subjects simultaneously, with a sudden episode of fever accompanied by muscle involvement with arthritis, stiffness of the limbs, and lameness, followed by rapid recovery. The presence of a serofibrinous exudate in the joints is indicative of the disease. Clinical diagnosis is often difficult in the absence of pathognomonic signs. Epidemiological factors (proliferation of arthropod vectors), associated with a short-lived fever and the presence of many immature neutrophils, point strongly to three-day fever. In the absence of any specific treatment, the symptoms are treated with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. Medical prophylaxis currently uses live attenuated vaccines, pending the development of recombinant vaccines, which are giving promising results. PMID:26601454

  14. Malignant Catarrhal Fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal viral disease of ruminant species, particularly cattle, bison, and deer. Clinical signs vary between species. Two major epidemiologic types of MCF exist, and are defined by the ruminant species that serve as natural reservoir hosts for infection...

  15. Rift Valley Fever Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a disease of animals and humans that occurs in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. A Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae causes the disease that is transmitted by mosquitoes. Epidemics occur during years of unusually heavy rainfall that assessment models are being develo...

  16. Concepts of fever.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak, P A

    1998-09-28

    If asked to define fever, most physicians would offer a thermal definition, such as "fever is a temperature greater than...." In offering their definition, many would ignore the importance of the anatomic site at which temperature measurements are taken, as well as the diurnal oscillations that characterize body temperature. If queried about the history of clinical thermometry, few physicians could identify the source or explain the pertinacity of the belief that 98.6 degrees F (37.0 degrees C) has special meaning vis-à-vis normal body temperature. Fewer still could cite the origin of the thermometer or trace the evolution of modern concepts of clinical thermometry. Although many would have some knowledge of the fundamentals of thermoregulation and the role played by exogenous and endogenous pyrogens in the induction of fever, few would have more than a superficial knowledge of the broad biological activities of pyrogenic cytokines or know of the existence of an equally complex and important system of endogenous cryogens. A distinct minority would appreciate the obvious paradoxes inherent in an enlarging body of data concerned with the question of fever's adaptive value. The present review considers many of these issues in the light of current data. PMID:9759682

  17. Potential transition from seasonal to ephemeral snow in Great Lakes watersheds in a warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, M. T.; Rine, M.

    2013-12-01

    Snow cover in many regions is a primary contributor to the hydrologic cycle and has significant surface energy balance, biogeochemical, ecological, and societal impacts. This study uses weather stations in Canada (using Environment Canada (EC) data) and the United States (using the Midwest Regional Climate Center (MRCC) data) to characterize climatological snow cover in the Great Lakes basins, and its sensitivity to future winter temperature increases. Much of this region is dominated by an ephemeral snow cover, where snow comes and goes throughout the winter months, having no significant seasonal duration. We defined "expected duration" as the uninterrupted number of days with snow cover on the ground in a typical winter. The number of days of snow cover (as opposed to the expected duration) are also analyzed; the expected duration is a better metric of whether a snowcover is ephemeral or seasonal, since it ties more directly to snowpack residence times and seasonality of runoff. We estimated the snowcover expected duration at 448 weather stations throughout the Great Lakes basins. We defined ephemeral snowcover to have an expected duration of 60 days or greater per winter, which corresponds to a latitude north of approximately 44°, in this area. We found that average winter temperature can be used to predict duration of snowcover expected duration, to first order. The ephemeral snow line in the Great Lakes basins corresponds to an average winter temperature of approximately -4 to -5° C. The statistical model relating snowcover expected duration and average winter air temperature indicates approximately a 22 day decrease in snowcover expected duration with an increase of 2° degree C. This estimate of duration sensitivity to temperature was used to identify seasonal and ephemeral watershed changes for 2° C increase in temperature. Our analysis shows that approximately 25 percent of the snow cover in the Great Lakes Basins will shift from a seasonal to an

  18. Quantifying the Functionality of Ephemeral Streams at the Watershed Scale for Land Management Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, B. L.; Hamada, Y.; Bowen, E. E.; Wuthrich, K. K.; Grippo, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Land development and associated disturbances in arid environments can adversely affect the ecological functionality of ephemeral stream channels. Land use managers have limited methodologies available for assessing low-impact development plans, or for monitoring changes in stream functionality as land use changes are implemented. The development of utility-scale solar energy facilities is underway in the southwestern United States. Federal and state agencies have developed plans to concentrate facilities in specific regions to minimize transmission limitations (e.g., the Bureau of Land Management's Solar Energy Zones cover 1,100 km2). However, multiple facility footprints in a single desert valley have the potential to drastically alter the natural pattern of ephemeral stream networks. This study focuses on quantifying the sensitivity of ephemeral streams with respect to land disturbance impacts on flow and sediment conveyance, groundwater recharge, and the loss of soil and vegetative habitats. An initial assessment used publicly-available geospatial data (typically 10- to 30-m resolution) on topography, surficial geology, and soil characteristics, as well as data on historical peak discharges and aerial photographs. These datasets were used to inform a professional judgment, score-based ranking of potential land disturbance impacts on the functionality of ephemeral streams. The results were limited to mapped stream channels in the National Hydrography Dataset, but suggested that hydrological and geomorphic impacts were a greater concern in valley piedmont regions, and that habitat concerns were greater in the valley regions where vegetation is sparsely distributed. Current efforts are focused on using a remote sensing approach to obtain high-resolution information on topography, soil, and vegetation in order to map detailed ephemeral stream networks, measure channel bathymetry characteristics, and use spectral indices of soil and vegetation to develop surrogate

  19. Cytokines and fever.

    PubMed

    Conti, Bruno; Tabarean, Iustin; Andrei, Cristina; Bartfai, Tamas

    2004-05-01

    Cytokines are highly inducible, secreted proteins mediating intercellular communication in the nervous and immune system. Fever is the multiphasic response of elevation and decline of the body core temperature regulated by central thermoregulatory mechanisms localized in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus. The discovery that several proinflammatory cytokines act as endogenous pyrogens and that other cytokines can act as antipyretic agents provided a link between the immune and the central nervous systems and stimulated the study of the central actions of cytokines. The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) as well as the antiinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) have been most investigated for their pyrogenic or antipyretic action. The experimental evidence demonstrating the role of these secreted proteins in modulating the fever response is as follows: 1) association between cytokine levels in serum and CSF and fever; 2) finding of the presence of cytokine receptors on various cell types in the brain and demonstration of the effects of pharmacological application of cytokines and of their neutralizing antibodies on the fever response; 3) fever studies on cytokine- and cytokine receptor- transgenic models. Studies on the peripheral and the central action of cytokines demonstrated that peripheral cytokines can communicate with the brain in several ways including stimulation of afferent neuronal pathways and induction of the synthesis of a non cytokine pyrogen, i.e. PGE2, in endothelial cells in the periphery and in the brain. Cytokines synthesized in the periphery may act by crossing the blood brain barrier and acting directly via neuronal cytokine receptors. The mechanisms that ultimately mediate the central action of cytokines and of LPS on the temperature-sensitive neurons in the preoptic hypothalamic region involved in

  20. Analysis of streambed temperatures in ephemeral channels to determine streamflow frequency and duration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Stonestrom, D.; Stewart, A.E.; Niswonger, R.; Smith, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns in streamflow are rarely monitored for ephemeral streams. Flashy, erosive streamflows common in ephemeral channels create a series of operational and maintenance problems, which makes it impractical to deploy a series of gaging stations along ephemeral channels. Streambed temperature is a robust and inexpensive parameter to monitor remotely, leading to the possibility of analyzing temperature patterns to estimate streamflow frequency and duration along ephemeral channels. A simulation model was utilized to examine various atmospheric and hydrological upper boundary conditions compared with a series of hypothetical temperature-monitoring depths within the streambed. Simulation results indicate that streamflow events were distinguished from changing atmospheric conditions with greater certainty using temperatures at shallow depths (e.g., 10-20 cm) as opposed to the streambed surface. Three ephemeral streams in the American Southwest were instrumented to monitor streambed temperature for determining the accuracy of using this approach to ascertain the long-term temporal and spatial extent of streamflow along each stream channel. Streambed temperature data were collected at the surface or at shallow depth along each stream channel, using thermistors encased in waterproof, single-channel data loggers tethered to anchors in the channel. On the basis of comparisons with site information, such as direct field observations and upstream flow records, diurnal temperature variations successfully detected the presence and duration of streamflow for all sites.

  1. Acquisition of ephemeral module in roots: a new view and test

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Deliang; Ma, Chengen

    2014-01-01

    The terminal root branch orders composed mainly of primarily-developed tissues are increasingly recognized as an ephemeral module specialized for resource absorption. This root module is crucial in driving a range of ecosystem processes such as belowground productivity, carbon and nutrient cycling. Traditionally, acquisition of the ephemeral root module is achieved by separating these primarily-developed branch orders with forceps. However, obtaining this root segment with forceps approach is labor-intensive which may not be applicable for studies with an appreciable amount of root samples. To address this challenge, we developed a new idea to obtain the ephemeral root module. In this new view, root samples were tenderly kneaded by hand and the detached roots are considered as the ephemeral root module. To test this idea, four species with contrasting growing environment were selected and a range of chemicals were determined including C, N, P, Ca, S, Mg, Ba, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cu, V and Li. We found no or little difference of these chemicals in roots by hand-kneading approach from roots by forceps approach. These results suggested that hand-kneading method could be a convenient way to acquire ephemeral root module. PMID:24865985

  2. The incidence of scarlet fever.

    PubMed Central

    Perks, E. M.; Mayon-White, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    This study attempted to find the incidence of scarlet fever in the Oxford region, including the proportion of patients from whom Streptococcus pyogenes could be isolated. General practitioners collected throat swabs from patients with suspected scarlet fever. The swabs were examined for viral and bacterial pathogens. Children admitted to hospital were used as controls. Twenty-five of 105 patients with suspected scarlet fever grew Str. pyogenes; M type 4 was the commonest type. The clinical diagnosis of scarlet fever was not always confirmed by throat culture. The annual incidence of scarlet fever was estimated to be 0.3 cases per 1000 per year. PMID:6358344

  3. Ecohydrologic function and disturbance of desert ephemeral stream channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, D.; Macias, M.; Miller, D. M.; Newlander, A.; Perkins, K. S.; Sandquist, D. R.; Schwinning, S.

    2011-12-01

    In response to rare high-intensity or long duration rainstorms, runoff in desert ephemeral channels can redistribute water through landscapes and potentially serve as a resource subsidy. We are using transect studies, mapping, monitoring and manipulation experiments to investigate the ecohydrologic relations of these pervasive features with vegetation in the eastern Mojave Desert, USA. We focus on a gently sloping piedmont transected by a ~100 year old railroad that alters natural channel flow by diverting it through staggered culverts to areas downslope of the railroad. This creates three distinct ecohydrologic zones: 1) relatively undisturbed areas above the railroad, 2) areas below the railroad that receive enhanced flow where water is diverted through culverts (enhanced zones), and 3) areas below the railroad where water flow from upslope has been blocked (deprived zones). In all areas we found that vegetation cover and density are higher adjacent to stream channels and decrease with distance from the channels. Relative to the undisturbed areas, vegetation cover is higher in the enhanced areas, and lower in the deprived. Species-specific vegetation changes included higher cover of the drought deciduous sub-shrub Ambrosia dumosa in deprived zones and higher cover of the evergreen drought-tolerant shrub Larrea tridentata in enhanced zones. Using simulated channel runoff experiments, we found that most Larrea within 3 m, and Ambrosia within 1.5 m of an undisturbed stream channel physiologically responded to a water pulse and the responses persisted for over a month. Less pronounced responses were seen adjacent to channels in the deprived zones, and did not persist as long. Electrical resistance imaging of the watering experiments shows that water infiltrates vertically in channels and spreads laterally at depth; vegetation use of channel water in the deprived zones appears to be reduced. While we have no information on the pace of vegetation change due to channel

  4. Ephemeral disturbances have long-lasting impacts on forest invasion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Eschtruth, Anne K; Battles, John J

    2014-07-01

    Ephemeral disturbances are common in many systems. Often, these brief events are assumed to be a nuisance with little long-term ecological impact. We quantified the impact of the ephemeral forest disturbance caused by gypsy moth canopy defoliation on exotic plant invasion in eight hardwood forests in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, USA. Six years following the gypsy moth disturbance, we were able to predict 59% of the increase in Alliaria petiolata abundance and 42% of the increase in Microstegium vimineum abundance with models incorporating an interaction between disturbance severity and propagule pressure. In addition, we found that the disturbance timing had substantial impacts on the invasion dynamics of Alliaria petiolata. Our results suggest that ephemeral disturbances can have important and long-lasting impacts on plant communities, and highlight the need to account for variations in disturbance characteristics and the role of propagule pressure in determining the disturbance-invasion relationship. PMID:25163111

  5. Analysis of temperature profiles for investigating stream losses beneath ephemeral channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Stewart, A.E.; Niswonger, R.; Sarma, L.

    2002-01-01

    Continuous estimates of streamflow are challenging in ephemeral channels. The extremely transient nature of ephemeral streamflows results in shifting channel geometry and degradation in the calibration of streamflow stations. Earlier work suggests that analysis of streambed temperature profiles is a promising technique for estimating streamflow patterns in ephemeral channels. The present work provides a detailed examination of the basis for using heat as a tracer of stream/groundwater exchanges, followed by a description of an appropriate heat and water transport simulation code for ephemeral channels, as well as discussion of several types of temperature analysis techniques to determine streambed percolation rates. Temperature-based percolation rates for three ephemeral stream sites are compared with available surface water estimates of channel loss for these sites. These results are combined with published results to develop conclusions regarding the accuracy of using vertical temperature profiles in estimating channel losses. Comparisons of temperature-based streambed percolation rates with surface water-based channel losses indicate that percolation rates represented 30% to 50% of the total channel loss. The difference is reasonable since channel losses include both vertical and nonvertical component of channel loss as well as potential evapotranspiration losses. The most significant advantage of the use of sediment-temperature profiles is their robust and continuous nature, leading to a long-term record of the timing and duration of channel losses and continuous estimates of streambed percolation. The primary disadvantage is that temperature profiles represent the continuous percolation rate at a single point in an ephemeral channel rather than an average seepage loss from the entire channel.

  6. Considerations for Minimizing the Impacts of Utility Scale Solar Energy Development on Intermittent and Ephemeral Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grippo, M.; Walston, L.; LaGory, K.; Hayse, J.; Von Lonkhuyzen, R.; Vinikour, W.

    2011-12-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Department of Energy are currently developing criteria for avoiding utility-scale solar energy development on certain BLM-administered lands in the arid southwest. One central criterion is avoiding and minimizing impacts to streams, a goal which can be difficult because intermittent and ephemeral streams and washes often cover much of the developable landscape. Here we discuss the potential impacts of solar energy development on ephemeral and intermittent streams and the consequences for their ecological structure and function. The primary impacts could result from the direct loss of stream habitat within the construction footprint and from a reduction in the quality and quantity of stream habitat resulting from construction activities, increased water withdrawal, and alteration in drainage patterns. Such changes could affect both terrestrial and aquatic biota including the large number of protected and special status species that depend on seasonally available aquatic habitat. Several case studies are discussed in which solar energy development was rejected in a specific region based on the potential for ecological impacts to intermittent and ephemeral streams. From the case studies we conclude that although the ecological functions and values of larger intermittent and ephemeral streams is clear, the ecology of smaller washes are less understood, and consequently developing scientifically defensible avoidance criteria and mitigation plans is challenging. Although general avoidance criteria can be developed, ultimately site specific data may be required, as well as guidance from researchers and management agencies on acceptable impact levels, particularly to small ephemeral washes. Ultimately, an understanding of the basic ecology of intermittent and ephemeral streams and how they are integrated into the larger desert ecosystem is needed to minimize the ecological impacts from utility-scale solar energy developments.

  7. Dengue fever: natural management.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Abbas, Khizar; Tahir, Madeha; Irfan, Muhammad; Raza Bukhari, Syeda Fiza; Ahmed, Bilal; Hanif, Muhammad; Rasul, Akhtar; Ali, Muhammad

    2015-03-01

    Dengue fever is caused by the mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) serotypes 1-4, and is the most common arboviral infection of humans in subtropical and tropical regions of the world. Dengue virus infections can present with a spacious range of clinical signs, from a mild feverish illness to a life-threatening shock syndrome. Till now, there is no approved vaccine or drug against this virus. Therefore, there is an urgent need of development of alternative solutions for dengue. Several plant species have been reported with anti-dengue activity. Many herbal/natural drugs, most of which are commonly used as nutritional components, have been used as antiviral, larvicidal, mosquitocidal and mosquito repellents that may be used against dengue. The objective of this review article was to provide current approaches for the treatment and management/prevention of dengue fever by targeting viral proteins involved in replication cycle of the virus and different developmental stages of mosquito. PMID:25730815

  8. African swine fever.

    PubMed

    Penrith, Mary-Louise

    2009-03-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a devastating haemorrhagic fever of pigs that causes up to 100% mortality, for which there is no vaccine. It is caused by a unique DNA virus that is maintained in an ancient cycle between warthogs and argasid ticks, making it the only known DNA arbovirus. ASF has a high potential for transboundary spread, and has twice been transported from Africa to other continents--Europe and subsequently the Caribbean and Brazil (1957, 1959) and the Caucasus (2007). It is also a devastating constraint for pig production in Africa. Research at Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute has made and is making important contributions to knowledge of this disease, focusing on the cycle in warthogs and tampans and transmission from that cycle to domestic pigs, resistance to its effects in domestic pigs, and the molecular genetic characterisation and epidemiology of the virus. PMID:19967933

  9. Understanding rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Pedro Ming; Pereira, Rosa Rodrigues; Guilherme, Luiza

    2012-05-01

    Through a comprehensive review of the recent findings on rheumatic fever, we intend to propose a new physiopathologic model for this disease. A Medline search was performed for all articles containing the terms rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease in title or abstract from 1970 to 2011. Best evidence qualitative technique was used to select the most relevant. The scientific interest on rheumatic fever has notably diminished throughout the twentieth century as evidenced by the comparison of the proportion of articles in which RF was a subject in 1950 (0.26%) and today (0.03%) [Pubmed]. However, RF remains a major medical and social problem in the developing world and in the so-called hotspots, where it still causes around 500.000 deaths each year, not too different from the pre-antibiotic era. The role of genetic factors in RF susceptibility is discussed. Familiar aggregation, similarity of disease patterns between siblings, identical twin, and HLA correlation studies are evidence for a genetic influence on RF susceptibility. The suspect-involved genes fall mainly into those capable of immunologic mediation. Molecular mimicry explains the triggering of RF, but an intense and sustained inflammation is needed to cause sequels. Also, RF patients vary greatly in terms of symptoms. It is likely that a genetic background directing immune response towards a predominantly Th1 or Th2 pattern contributes to these features. The recent findings on rheumatic fever provide important insight on its physiopathology that helps understanding this prototype post-infectious autoimmune disease giving insights on other autoimmune conditions. PMID:21953302

  10. Poisons and fever.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Rowsey, P J

    1998-02-01

    1. Dysfunction of the thermoregulatory system is one of many pathologies documented in experimental animals and humans exposed to toxic chemicals. The mechanism of action responsible for many types of poison-induced fevers is not understood. Some elevations in body temperature are attributed to the peripheral actions of some poisons that stimulate metabolic rate and cause a forced hyperthermia. Exposure to organophosphate (OP) pesticides and certain metal fumes appears to cause a prolonged, regulated elevation in body temperature (Tb). 2. Activation of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and the production of prostaglandin (PG)E2 in central nervous system (CNS) thermoregulatory centres is required to elicit a fever. Activating the COX-PGE2 pathway by a poison may occur by one of three mechanisms: (i) induction of cell-mediated immune responses and the subsequent release of cytokines; (ii) induction of lipid peroxidation in the CNS; and (iii) direct neurochemical activation. 3. Radiotelemetric monitoring of core temperature in unstressed rodents has led to an experimental animal model of poison-induced fever. Rats administered the OP agents chlorpyrifos and diisopropyl fluorophosphate display an initial hypothermic response lasting approximately 24 h, followed by an elevation in diurnal core temperature for 24-72 h after exposure. The hyperthermia is apparently a result of the activation of the COX-PGE2 pathway because it is blocked by the anti-pyretic sodium salicylate. Overall, the delayed hyperthermia resulting from OP exposure involves activation of thermoregulatory pathways that may be similar to infection-mediated fever. PMID:9493505

  11. Fever in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alexander K.C.; Robson, W. Lane M.

    1992-01-01

    The most common cause of fever of unknown origin (FUO) is infectious disease, followed less frequently by collagen vascular disease, and malignancy. Most children with FUO have a common disorder that is atypical in presentation. A history and physical examination are vital and should be repeated until a diagnosis is established. Specific laboratory tests and diagnostic imaging studies should be ordered based on the clinical evaluation. Children with FUO have a better prognosis than adults; most can expect full recovery. PMID:21221316

  12. 37 CFR 380.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 380.12 Section 380.12 Patents, Trademarks, and... EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS Broadcasters § 380.12 Royalty fees for the public performance of sound...

  13. 37 CFR 380.22 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 380.22 Section 380.22 Patents, Trademarks, and... performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. (a) Minimum fee. Each Noncommercial Educational... on the assumption that the number of sound recordings performed is 12 per hour. The Collective...

  14. 37 CFR 260.2 - Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... value of each performance of each digital sound recording shall be the same. ... performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral phonorecords by preexisting subscription services... SERVICES' DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND MAKING OF EPHEMERAL PHONORECORDS § 260.2...

  15. 37 CFR 383.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... performances of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings. 383.3 Section 383.3 Patents... SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES § 383.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings. (a) Royalty rates. Royalty rates for the public performance of sound recordings...

  16. 37 CFR 380.22 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 380.22 Section 380.22 Patents, Trademarks, and... performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. (a) Minimum fee. Each Noncommercial Educational... on the assumption that the number of sound recordings performed is 12 per hour. The Collective...

  17. 37 CFR 380.22 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 380.22 Section 380.22 Patents, Trademarks, and... performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. (a) Minimum fee. Each Noncommercial Educational... on the assumption that the number of sound recordings performed is 12 per hour. The Collective...

  18. 37 CFR 380.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 380.12 Section 380.12 Patents, Trademarks, and... EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS Broadcasters § 380.12 Royalty fees for the public performance of sound...

  19. 37 CFR 380.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 380.12 Section 380.12 Patents, Trademarks, and... EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS Broadcasters § 380.12 Royalty fees for the public performance of sound...

  20. 37 CFR 380.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 380.12 Section 380.12 Patents, Trademarks, and... EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS Broadcasters § 380.12 Royalty fees for the public performance of sound...

  1. 37 CFR 380.22 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 380.22 Section 380.22 Patents, Trademarks, and... performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. (a) Minimum fee. Each Noncommercial Educational... on the assumption that the number of sound recordings performed is 12 per hour. The Collective...

  2. Flows and hypoxic blackwater events in managed ephemeral river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladyz, Sally; Watkins, Susanne C.; Whitworth, Kerry L.; Baldwin, Darren S.

    2011-04-01

    Edward-Wakool system - thus, initial inundation of these channels at a low flow rate during summer (or when water temperature is equal to or greater than 20 °C) is highly likely to trigger a hypoxic blackwater event. In addition, one month of litterfall in summer was calculated to be sufficient to deliver enough carbon to dry channels to create a hypoxic blackwater event. These findings suggest that to reduce the likelihood of a hypoxic blackwater event occurring as a result of managed flows in ephemeral systems; (1) the principal source(s) of DOC as well as the pathway and timing of accumulation in dry channels should be identified, and (2) the timing of the re-instatement of flows in a dry channel should be considered in light of the timing of maximum rates of accumulation of the principal source(s) of DOC.

  3. Q fever — a review

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    Q or “query” fever is a zoonosis caused by the organism Coxiella burnetii. Cattle, sheep and goats are the most common reservoirs of this organism. The placenta of infected animals contains high numbers (up to 109/g) of C. burnetii. Aerosols occur at the time of parturition and man becomes infected following inhalation of the microorganism. The spectrum of illness in man is wide and consists of acute and chronic forms. Acute Q fever is most often a self-limited flu-like illness but may include pneumonia, hepatitis, or meningoencephalitis. Chronic Q fever almost always means endocarditis and rarely osteomyelitis. Chronic Q fever is not known to occur in animals other than man. An increased abortion and stillbirth rate are seen in infected domestic ungulates. Four provinces (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario and Alberta) reported cases of Q fever in 1989. A vaccine for Q fever has recently been licensed in Australia. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:17423643

  4. Dengue and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, Duane J.

    1998-01-01

    Dengue fever, a very old disease, has reemerged in the past 20 years with an expanded geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased epidemic activity, the development of hyperendemicity (the cocirculation of multiple serotypes), and the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in new geographic regions. In 1998 this mosquito-borne disease is the most important tropical infectious disease after malaria, with an estimated 100 million cases of dengue fever, 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 25,000 deaths annually. The reasons for this resurgence and emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the waning years of the 20th century are complex and not fully understood, but demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure changes in the past 30 years have contributed greatly. This paper reviews the changing epidemiology of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever by geographic region, the natural history and transmission cycles, clinical diagnosis of both dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, serologic and virologic laboratory diagnoses, pathogenesis, surveillance, prevention, and control. A major challenge for public health officials in all tropical areas of the world is to devleop and implement sustainable prevention and control programs that will reverse the trend of emergent dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:9665979

  5. Typhoid Fever, Below the Belt

    PubMed Central

    Raveendran, Kamakshi Mahadevan

    2016-01-01

    Genital ulcers occur due to infective, inflammatory, malignant and drug-related causes. In tropical countries such as India, such ulcers are due to parasitic, tubercular, rickettsial and bacterial (sexually transmitted infections) aetiologies. Typhoid fever is endemic in the tropics. Except “rose spots”, skin manifestations in typhoid fever are unusual, and they are missed due to pigmented skin. Patients do not often complain of genital ulcers due to shame or fear. Genital examination is not routinely performed in typhoid fever. We describe scrotal ulcers as the presenting symptom of typhoid fever, which subsided with appropriate therapy. PMID:26894114

  6. Life span and structure of ephemeral root modules of different functional groups from a desert system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; He, Junxia; Zeng, Fanjiang; Lei, Jiaqiang; Arndt, Stefan K

    2016-07-01

    The terminal branch orders of plant root systems have been proposed as short-lived 'ephemeral' modules specialized for resource absorption. The occurrence of ephemeral root modules has so far only been reported for a temperate tree species and it is unclear if the concept also applies to other woody (shrub, tree) and herb species. Fine roots of 12 perennial dicotyledonous herb, shrub and tree species were monitored for two growing seasons using a branch-order classification, sequential sampling and rhizotrons in the Taklamakan desert. Two root modules existed in all three plant functional groups. Among the first five branch orders, the first two (perennial herbs, shrubs) or three (trees) root orders were ephemeral and had a primary anatomical structure, high nitrogen (N) concentrations, high respiration rates and very short life spans of 1-4 months, whereas the last two branch orders in all functional groups were perennial, with thicker diameters, no or collapsed cortex, distinct secondary growth, low N concentrations, low respiration rates, but much longer life spans. Ephemeral, short-lived root modules and long-lived, persistent root modules seem to be a general feature across many plant functional groups and could represent a basic root system design. PMID:26856386

  7. 75 FR 6097 - Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral Recordings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 380 Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral... nonsubscription transmission or a transmission by a new subscription service. 72 FR 24084. In Intercollegiate... implement that settlement pursuant to the order of remand from the D.C. Circuit. 74 FR 68214 (December...

  8. SIMULATING SUB-DECADAL CHANNEL MORPHOLOGIC CHANGE IN EPHEMERAL STREAM NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A distributed watershed model was modified to simulate cumulative channel morphologic
    change from multiple runoff events in ephemeral stream networks. The model incorporates the general design of the event-based Kinematic Runoff and" Erosion Model (KINEROS), which describes t...

  9. Genes associated with opening and senescence of the ephemeral flowers of Mirabilis jalapa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A modest ethylene climacteric accompanies flower senescence in Mirabilis jalapa L., and exogenous ethylene accelerates the process. However, inhibitors of ethylene action and synthesis have little effect on the life-span of these ephemeral flowers. Treatment with a-amanitin, an inhibitor of DNA-depe...

  10. Modeling Long-Term Soil Losses on Agricultural Fields Due to Ephemeral Gully Erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is now recognized worldwide that soil erosion on agricultural fields due to ephemeral gullies may be greater than those losses attributed to sheet and rill erosion processes. Yet it is not known whether the common practice of repairing or obliterating these gullies during annual tillage activitie...

  11. Evaluating ephemeral gully erosion impact on Zea mays L. yield and economics using AnnAGNPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ephemeral gully erosion causes serious water quality and economic problems in the Midwest United States. A critical barrier to soil conservation practice adoption is often the implementation cost, although it is recognized that erosion reduces farm income. Yet few, if any, understand the relationshi...

  12. 75 FR 14074 - Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral Recordings for a New Subscription...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ...) allows the making of ephemeral reproductions for the purpose of facilitating certain digital audio... pursuant to these provisions. See 70 FR 72471, 72472 (December 5, 2005) (after receipt of petition... sound recordings on digital audio channels programmed by the licensee for transmission by a...

  13. The identification and interaction of network, intranetwork, and ephemeral-region magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Sara F.

    1988-01-01

    Network magnetic fields are described as the dynamic product of the merging and cancelling of intranetwork fields, ephemeral regions, and the remnants of active regions. The similarities of these phenomena with solar magnetic features are pointed out. The intranetwork magnetic fields are characterized by the flow of successive fragments in approximately radial patterns away from their apparent source sites.

  14. 76 FR 13025 - Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral Recordings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    .... See Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral Recordings (Final rule), 75 FR 6097... DMCA, published at 74 FR 318 (January 5, 2009). The rates and terms set in this proceeding apply to the... Determination for Rates and Terms in Docket No. 2005-1 CRB DTRA, 72 FR 24084 (May 1, 2007) (``Webcaster...

  15. Analysis of topographic attributes for identification of ephemeral gully channel initiation in agricultural watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watershed-scale modeling tools, such as USDA’s watershed management planning tool AnnAGNPS, already have been developed with components necessary for evaluation of the effect of ephemeral gullies on farming and conservation practices; however, the identification of potential downstream gully channel...

  16. Patterns of grain-size dependent sediment tranpsort in low-ordered, ephemeral-channels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment data were analyzed to determine grain-size dependant factors affecting sediment transport in a low ordered, ephemeral watershed. Sediment was collected during 37 flow events at the outlet of a 4.53 ha sub-watershed within the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in southeastern Arizona. Meas...

  17. Pore water effects on soil erodibility and its implication in ephemeral gully erosion modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ephemeral gully erosion is the main source of sediment from the agricultural landscape, unfortunately, it has been overlooked in traditional soil erosion assessment. Field observations, and subsequent support from controlled lab experiments, have shown the linkage between transient soil hydraulic co...

  18. The Role of Preferential Flow Through Soil-Pipes on Ephemeral Gully Erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimates by the USDA for 17 States suggest that ephemeral gully erosion ranges from 18 to 73% of the total erosion with a median of 35%. Concentrated flow is generally considered the controlling process and subsurface flow is often overlooked. Pipe-erosion may occur with no visible evidence until p...

  19. Identifying Critical Ephemeral Streams and Reducing Impacts Associated with Utility-Scale Solar Energy Development in the Southwest United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, B. L.; Carr, A.; Patton, T.; Hamada, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Department of Energy are preparing a joint programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) assessing the potential impacts of utility-scale solar energy development on BLM-administered lands in six southwestern states. One of the alternatives considered in the PEIS involves development within identified solar energy zones (SEZs) that individually cover approximately 10 to 1,000 km2, located primarily in desert valleys of the Basin and Range physiographic region. Land-disturbing activities in these alluvium-filled valleys have the potential to adversely affect ephemeral streams with respect to their hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecologic functions. Regulation and management of ephemeral streams typically falls under the spectrum of federal, state, and local programs, but scientifically based guidelines for protecting ephemeral streams with respect to land-development activities are largely nonexistent. The PEIS analysis attempts to identify critical ephemeral streams by evaluating the integral functions of flood conveyance, sediment transport, groundwater recharge, and supporting ecological habitats. The initial approach to classifying critical ephemeral streams involved identifying large, erosional features using available flood hazards mapping, historical peak discharges, and aerial photographs. This approach identified ephemeral features not suitable for development (based primarily on the likelihood of damaging floods and debris flows) to address flood conveyance and sediment transport functions of ephemeral streams. Groundwater recharge and the maintenance of riparian vegetation and wildlife habitats are other functions of ephemeral streams. These functions are typically associated with headwater reaches rather than large-scale erosional features. Recognizing that integral functions of ephemeral streams occur over a range of spatial scales and are driven by varying climatic-hydrologic events, the PEIS analysis

  20. Rainfall Threshold For Ephemeral Gully Erosion In Foothill Cultivated Lands (Wiśnicz Foothills, Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Święchowicz, Jolanta

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the results of ephemeral gullies studies carried out in hydrological years 1998-2009 on the Jagiellonian University's farm, which is located in the village of Łazy (Southern Poland). The farm covers an area of 103 ha. The dominant relief type is low hills. Soil erosion hardly ever occurs on the whole area of slopes in the catchment, and transport of eroded material is irregular and not simultaneous. The formation of ephemeral gullies happens once a year or once in a few years. The events are occasional and happen locally. Ephemeral gullies most frequently form and develop on cultivated slopes in natural drainage lines or they are associated with man-made agricultural activities like field borders, furrows, tractor traces and cart roads. The research carried out in Wiśnicz Foothills shows that the development of ephemeral gullies was limited both by extrinsic (erosivity of rain) and intrinsic thresholds (the length of slope, the presence (or lack of) Bt horizon, soil moisture, type and calendar of crops and farming activities). Ephemeral gullies usually form and develop during single rain or several subsequent rains of high erosivity (of several hundred MJmmha-1h-1) on long cultivated slopes, particularly at the beginning of vegetation period, when most slopes are devoid of vegetation cover or plants are in the initial stage of growth. The process of enlarging and deepening of ephemeral gullies slows down when the incision of a gully reaches Bt horizon. Then the effectiveness of even high erosivity rainfall is much smaller. Similarly, very high erosivity of rainfall in the middle of the vegetation season is not able to cause such serious effect and the intensity of deepening of ephemeral gullies is much smaller. The process of intensified linear water erosion is more significant on commercial farms with a large acreage of crops. As a result all the mapped erosion forms were disposed of by farmers (e.g. by ploughing or filling up). If these forms

  1. Yellow fever vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Chawla, Suraj

    2014-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is an acute viral communicable disease transmitted by an arbovirus of the Flavivirus genus. It is primarily a zoonotic disease, especially the monkeys. Worldwide, an estimated 200 000 cases of yellow fever occurred each year, and the case-fatality rate is ~15%. Forty-five endemic countries in Africa and Latin America, with a population of close to 1 billion, are at risk. Up to 50% of severely affected persons from YF die without treatment. During 2009, 55 cases and 18 deaths were reported from Brazil, Colombia, and Peru. Brazil reported the maximum number of cases and death, i.e., 42 cases with 11 deaths. From January 2010 to March 2011, outbreaks of YF were reported to the WHO by Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Senegal, and Uganda. Cases were also reported in three northern districts of Abim, Agago, and Kitugun near the border with South Sudan. YF usually causes fever, muscle pain with prominent backache, headache, shivers, loss of appetite, and nausea or vomiting. Most patients improve, and their symptoms disappear after 3 to 4 d. Half of the patients who enter the toxic phase die within 10–14 d, while the rest recover without significant organ damage. Vaccination has been the single most important measure for preventing YF. The 17D-204 YF vaccine is a freeze-dried, live attenuated, highly effective vaccine. It is available in single-dose or multi-dose vials and should be stored at 2–8 °C. It is reconstituted with normal saline and should be used within 1 h of reconstitution. The 0.5 mL dose is delivered subcutaneously. Revaccination is recommended every 10 y for people at continued risk of exposure to yellow fever virus (YFV). This vaccine is available worldwide. Travelers, especially to Africa or Latin America from Asia, must have a certificate documenting YF vaccination, which is required by certain countries for entry under the International Health Regulations (IHR) of the WHO. PMID

  2. [Maculopathy and dengue fever].

    PubMed

    Jellab, B; Fardeau, C; Lehoang, P

    2013-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 20 year old female who presented a bilateral decrease in vision. Detailed history revealed that 15 days before the onset of symptoms, the patient presented a dengue fever during her stay in Martinique. On initial examination, the fundus exam revealed a bilateral loss of foveal reflection. The optical coherence tomography demonstrated the macular edema and the dengue serology was postive. The patient received an interferon2a-based therapy. The macular edema disappeared and we noticed a partial but fast improvement of visual acuity 12 days after the treatment initiation. PMID:24923080

  3. A geomorphic classification of ephemeral channels in a mountainous, arid region, southwestern Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutfin, Nicholas A.; Shaw, Jeremy; Wohl, Ellen E.; Cooper, David

    2014-09-01

    Despite the global abundance of arid-region ephemeral streams, hydrologic and geomorphic data for these systems are limited compared to their perennial counterparts. High spatial and temporal variability in flow makes hydrologic and geomorphic aspects of dryland ephemeral channels difficult to characterize. Perennial stream classifications have been extended to dryland ephemeral streams but do not adequately describe observed differences in channel geometry and characteristics of ephemeral channels in desert environments. We present a geomorphic classification for ephemeral streams in mountainous regions based on planform, degree of confinement, and composition of confining material. Five stream types were identified in the Sonoran desert of southwestern Arizona: (1) piedmont headwater, (2) bedrock, (3) bedrock with alluvium, (4) incised alluvium, and (5) braided channels. Nonparametric permutational multivariate analysis of variance for 101 surveyed reaches indicated differences (p < 0.001) in channel geometry and hydraulics among the five stream types. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination identified the strongest channel geometry and hydraulic variables capable of distinguishing the five channel types, and a classification tree determined relative importance of these variables in the following order: width-to-depth ratio (W/D), stream gradient (S), stream power (Ω), and shear stress (τ). A classification tree and discriminant analysis used W/D, S, Ω, and τ for 86 study reaches on the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground (77% and 77% internal validation hit rate, respectively) to predict stream type of 15 separate study reaches on Barry Goldwater Air Force Range with 67% and 73% external validation hit rates, respectively. Differences in channel geometry among the five stream types reflect likely differences in hydrology, hydraulics, and sediment transport with implications for disturbance regime, channel adjustment to disturbance, and ecological sensitivity.

  4. [A mild blackwater fever].

    PubMed

    Bouldouyre, M-A; Dia, D; Carmoi, T; Fall, K Ba; Chevalier, B; Debonne, J-M

    2006-06-01

    We report a highly probable case of moderately severe blackwater fever. A French woman, living in Guinea Bissau, was used to taking self-medication halofantrine for malaria. On this occasion, she felt unusual chills and pyrexia after a non documented bout of malaria, followed by nausea, then jaundice with dark-red urines despite another treatment with halofantrine. A sepsis was eliminated by two negatives thick peripheral blood drop examinations. Hemolysis was noted with 8.1 g/dl of hemoglobin, Coombs positive, and LDH at 1,452 IU/l, associated to renal failure with 34 ml per minute of clearance. The outcome was favourable with rehydration. Blackwater fever has been described with the three aminoalcohols, but mainly in severe presentations. Clinicians are not familiar with this disease, even though it has major therapeutic implications: quinine, halofantrine, and mefloquine become strictly contra-indicated. Moderate forms may be unknown, and this observation should be taken into account to prevent mistreatment in future patients. PMID:16806779

  5. Typhoid and paratyphoid fever.

    PubMed

    Bhan, M K; Bahl, Rajiv; Bhatnagar, Shinjini

    Typhoid fever is estimated to have caused 21.6 million illnesses and 216,500 deaths globally in 2000, affecting all ages. There is also one case of paratyphoid fever for every four of typhoid. The global emergence of multidrug-resistant strains and of strains with reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones is of great concern. We discuss the occurrence of poor clinical response to fluoroquinolones despite disc sensitivity. Developments are being made in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, and genomic and proteomic studies reveal the possibility of new targets for diagnosis and treatment. Further, we review guidelines for use of diagnostic tests and for selection of antimicrobials in varying clinical situations. The importance of safe water, sanitation, and immunisation in the presence of increasing antibiotic resistance is paramount. Routine immunisation of school-age children with Vi or Ty21a vaccine is recommended for countries endemic for typhoid. Vi vaccine should be used for 2-5 year-old children in highly endemic settings. PMID:16125594

  6. Borrelia hispanica Relapsing Fever, Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Sarih, M’hammed; Garnier, Martine; Boudebouch, Najma; Bouattour, Ali; Rihani, Abdelaziz; Hassar, Mohammed; Gern, Lise; Postic, Danièle

    2009-01-01

    We found that 20.5% of patients with an unexplained fever in northwestern Morocco had tick-borne relapsing fever. Molecular detection specific for the 16S rRNA gene identified Borrelia hispanica. The noncoding intergenic spacer sequence domain showed high sensitivity and good resolution for this species. PMID:19861058

  7. Borrelia hispanica relapsing fever, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Sarih, M'hammed; Garnier, Martine; Boudebouch, Najma; Bouattour, Ali; Rihani, Abdelaziz; Hassar, Mohammed; Gern, Lise; Postic, Danièle; Cornet, Muriel

    2009-10-01

    We found that 20.5% of patients with an unexplained fever in northwestern Morocco had tick-borne relapsing fever. Molecular detection specific for the 16S rRNA gene identified Borrelia hispanica. The noncoding intergenic spacer sequence domain showed high sensitivity and good resolution for this species. PMID:19861058

  8. [Genetic fever syndromes. Hereditary recurrent (periodic) fever syndromes].

    PubMed

    Neudorf, U; Lainka, E; Kallinich, T; Holzinger, D; Roth, J; Föll, D; Niehues, T

    2013-05-01

    Genetic fever syndromes or hereditary recurrent fever syndromes (HRF) are considered to be part of the autoinflammatory diseases (AID) which result from errors in the innate immune system. Patients typically have self-limiting episodes of fever and high levels of inflammation markers. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant. The diseases of the HRF include familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1-associated periodic syndrome, hyper-IgD syndrome and cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndromes. The disease known as deficiency of interleukin 1 (IL1) receptor antagonist does not fully belong to this group because fever is not a typical symptom. The therapy depends on the type and severity of the disease. Effective prophylaxis is possible for FMF. Biologicals, especially IL1 blocking agents are highly effective in very severe fever syndromes. In order to collect more information on AID, to establish a biobank and coordinate research in this field the AID-Net project was founded. Currently 606 patients with AID are registered of whom 381 have HRF. PMID:23552978

  9. Effects of ephemeral gully erosion on soil degradation in a cultivated area in Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spada, Carmelo; Capra, Antonina; Gelsomino, Antonio; Ollobarren del Barrio, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Water erosion is the main cause of soil degradation on cultivated lands under Mediterranean climate. In this conditions, gully erosion is a major contributor to loss of soil productivity due to the big amounts of soil removed from the most productive top-layer. However, only few studies on the effects of gully erosion and artificial controlling measures on soil degradation are available. The study analyzes the effects of the ephemeral gully erosion and infilling by tillage operations on several physical-chemical soil properties influencing the soil productivity. The study area is located in the center of Sicily, in an agricultural context characterized by ephemeral gully erosion. Five fields with different crops and soil characteristics affected by this type of erosion were selected. Currently, local farmers adopt the artificial measure to gully filling activities to control gully erosion and continue the same agricultural management practice. Therefore, the studied ephemeral gullies show a cyclic behavior. They appear during the rainy season, are erased from July to October by soil infill from areas adjacent to the channel using ordinary tillage equipment, and, in most years, they reappear in the same position during the following rainy season. For each situation, 20 samples were taken, located on 5 transects in the direction perpendicular to the ephemeral gully, in specific positions: 2 outside the erosive channel (one in the valley-deposit area and one upstream of the basin in the undisturbed area), and 3 along the same. For each transect, the samples were collected in 4 different positions: one inside the ephemeral gully, the other 3 in external points spaced to represent the areas affected by the annual process of erosion and infilling of the gully. For each sample, a set of the main chemical and physical soil characteristics which influence the soil fertility were determined: particle size, pH, electrical conductivity, total content of carbonates, nitrates

  10. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Racsa, Lori D; Kraft, Colleen S; Olinger, Gene G; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-01-15

    There are 4 families of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), including Filoviridae. Ebola virus is one virus within the family Filoviridae and the cause of the current outbreak of VHF in West Africa. VHF-endemic areas are found throughout the world, yet traditional diagnosis of VHF has been performed in large reference laboratories centered in Europe and the United States. The large amount of capital needed, as well as highly trained and skilled personnel, has limited the availability of diagnostics in endemic areas except in conjunction with governmental and nongovernmental entities. However, rapid diagnosis of VHF is essential to efforts that will limit outbreaks. In addition, increased global travel suggests VHF diagnoses may be made outside of the endemic areas. Thus, understanding how to diagnose VHF is imperative for laboratories worldwide. This article reviews traditional and current diagnostic modalities for VHF. PMID:26354968

  11. Lassa fever vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; McCormick, Joseph B

    2004-04-01

    Lassa fever remains a serious challenge to public health in West Africa threatening both local residents in rural areas and those who serve them, particularly medical care providers. Given the ecology of the rodent host and conditions in the endemic area, a vaccine is mandatory for control. The challenge is to overcome the scientific, political and economic obstacles to producing a human use vaccine candidate. There are some scientific issues to resolve. It is known that the G-protein confers protection but we do not know its duration. If the N-protein is also included there may be a better duration of protection but it is unclear whether the N-protein as a vaccine may possibly enhance the infection. The original vaccinia vector must be replaced by new vectors, chimeras or by delivering DNA in some format. A live vaccine is attractive because it can confer protection in a single shot. A killed vaccine is more stable, particularly for distribution in the tropics but usually requires repeated shots. For practical reasons a live vaccine format should probably be pursued, which could then be combined with a yellow fever vaccine, using the same cold chains, since this disease occupies the same endemic areas in West Africa. Lassa vaccine initiatives have suffered from a lack of funding in the past but bioterrorism has brought new resources to Lassa virus science. Adequate funding and applications of new vaccine technologies give hope that we may soon see a vaccine in clinical trials. However, the difficulty of conducting trials in endemic areas and lack of political stability remain serious problems. PMID:15056044

  12. 37 CFR 383.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS RATES AND TERMS FOR STATUTORY... eligible digital transmissions made over a Service pursuant to 17 U.S.C. 114, and for ephemeral...

  13. 37 CFR 383.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS RATES AND TERMS FOR STATUTORY... eligible digital transmissions made over a Service pursuant to 17 U.S.C. 114, and for ephemeral...

  14. 37 CFR 383.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS RATES AND TERMS FOR STATUTORY... eligible digital transmissions made over a Service pursuant to 17 U.S.C. 114, and for ephemeral...

  15. AnnAGNPS GIS-based tool for watershed-scale identification and mapping of cropland potential ephemeral gullies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The formation of ephemeral gullies in agricultural fields has been recognized as an important source of sediment contributing to environmental degradation and compromising crop productivity. Methodologies are being developed for assessing gully formation and gully sediment yield. The Annualized Agri...

  16. Distributed soil loss estimation system including ephemeral gully development and tillage erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, D. A. N.; Dabney, S. M.; Yoder, D. C.

    2015-03-01

    A new modelling system is being developed to provide spatially-distributed runoff and soil erosion predictions for conservation planning that integrates the 2D grid-based variant of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, version 2 model (RUSLER), the Ephemeral Gully Erosion Estimator (EphGEE), and the Tillage Erosion and Landscape Evolution Model (TELEM). Digital representations of the area of interest (field, farm or entire watershed) are created using high-resolution topography and data retrieved from established databases of soil properties, climate, and agricultural operations. The system utilizes a library of processing tools (LibRaster) to deduce surface drainage from topography, determine the location of potential ephemeral gullies, and subdivide the study area into catchments for calculations of runoff and sheet-and-rill erosion using RUSLER. EphGEE computes gully evolution based on local soil erodibility and flow and sediment transport conditions. Annual tillage-induced morphological changes are computed separately by TELEM.

  17. Predicting location and length of ephemeral gullies with a process-based Topographic Index model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheshukov, A. Y.

    2015-03-01

    Ephemeral gully (EG) erosion can be a major source of sediment in agricultural watersheds and predicting the location and length of EGs is important to assess sediment source areas. Topographic index (TI) models utilize topographic-only factors to locate concentrated flow paths on agricultural fields. In this paper, the TI-model is expanded by incorporating an overland flow equation that describes surface excess rate, roughness, and soil critical shear stress. An un-calibrated Process-Based (PB) topographic index model was applied to an agricultural watershed in Central Kansas and the results were compared with a calibrated Slope-Area (SA) model. The analysis showed that the PB model slightly over-predicted topographic properties of ephemeral gullies compared to the observed data. Accuracy of the SA model depended on the selected threshold value.

  18. Impact of precipitation and runoff on ephemeral gully development in cultivated croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimov, V.; Sheshukov, A.; Barnes, P.

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this study was to estimate the impacts of precipitation and runoff on ephemeral gully development. A field experiment was conducted during the summer of 2013 on an agricultural field near the city of McPherson in central Kansas, USA. Precipitation data were collected, and the gully headcut was measured every three to four weeks. The rainfall excess was calculated with the WEPP model, whereas headcut soil losses were estimated based on measurements. Headcut measurements showed that there was no gully development during rainfall events of short duration of high or low intensity. However, headcut propagation was clearly detected under saturated soil conditions for a three-day storm. This field study provides data to model the mechanics of ephemeral gully development. Further measurements of precipi-tation and gully morphology are needed for statistical analysis of gully erosion and the associated soil losses.

  19. Rhombencephalitis associated with Dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Bharti, Kavita; Mehta, Mannan; Bansod, Amrit

    2016-05-01

    Dengue infection is gradually disseminating throughout the world in alarming proportions. It is a arbovirus infection,transmitted by aedes mosquitoes. It is a multi-systemic disorder associated with varied neurological complications. There is increased trend of development of neurological complications in dengue fever. The neurological complications arising due to dengue infection can be categorized into central and neuromuscular complications. The central nervous system disorders reported with dengue fever are encephalopathy,encephalitis and myelitis.Here we report a case of rhombencephalitis associated with dengue fever. The literature does not mention rhombencephalitis occurring with dengue illness. PMID:27015434

  20. Experimentally Isolating the Contributions of a Disturbed Ephemeral Drainage to a Headwater Stream in the Southern Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, J. P.; Lord, M.; Kinner, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests contributions to runoff from ephemeral channels during events can exhibit significant control over water quality in higher order streams. Furthermore, field observations from a steep Appalachian catchment influenced by human activity suggest these disturbed ephemeral drainages exhibit significant control over turbidity, water temperature, and conductivity levels downstream. High turbidity during stormflow is a water quality problem in many areas of the Southern Appalachians. However, upland ephemeral channels are not included in the jurisdiction of the Clean Water Act. This offers little recourse if their contributions degrade the water quality of larger-scale streams and highlights the need for robust evidence of the potential impacts of ephemeral drainages. The aim of this research is to isolate the contribution of a disturbed ephemeral drainage by diverting its flow from the study stream network. Spatially and temporally distributed stream water samples taken during storms, when the channel is diverted or allowed to flow normally, will allow us to assess its contribution. In this poster, we present initial spatial and temporal streamwater chemistry and turbidity data as well as a detailed description of the stream network, study design, and diversion construction. We anticipate the findings of this study will be relevant to describing the environmental impact of disturbed ephemeral channels and to describing their potential influence on other water chemistry parameters downstream.

  1. Hydrologic influences on soil properties along ephemeral rivers in the Namib Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, P.J.; Jacobson, K.M.; Angermeier, P.L.; Cherry, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    Soils were examined along three ephemeral rivers in the Namib Desert to assess the influence of their hydrologic characteristics on soil properties. Soils consisted of layers of fluvially deposited, organic-rich silts, interstratified with fluvial and aeolian sands. The most significant influence of the ephemeral hydrologic regime upon soils was related to the downstream alluviation associated with hydrologic decay. This alluviation increased the silt proportion of soils in the lower reaches of the rivers. Organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous were correlated with silt content, and silt deposition patterns influenced patterns of moisture availability and plant rooting, creating and maintaining micro-habitats for various organisms. Localized salinization occurred in association with wetland sites and soluble salt content tended to increase downstream. Because of the covariance between silt and macronutrients, and the influence of silt upon moisture availability and habitat suitability, alluviation patterns associated with the hydrologic regime strongly influence the structure, productivity, and spatial distribution of biotic communities in ephemeral river ecosystems. (C) 2000 Academic Press.

  2. Volume and Flood Frequency Characteristics of Ephemeral Streams in the Semi-arid U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, A.; Schumer, R.; Boyle, D. P.

    2007-12-01

    Large runoff events in the arid and semi-arid regions of the U.S. are generally a result of intense, short-duration (less than 24 hours) precipitation events and frequently result in considerable property damage and loss of life. Urban flood mitigation and channel restoration projects in these areas currently depend on short duration volume frequency relationships derived from precipitation characteristics in the course of performing rainfall-runoff analyses, rather than directly from observed streamflow data as is standard practice for longer durations (>1- day). Until recently, only average daily flows were reported for USGS stream gauges so hydrograph characteristics could not be used to assess rainfall-runoff models or evaluate whether mitigation structures were meeting design specifications. Archived high-temporal resolution streamflow records for 14 uncontrolled ephemeral streams in the Las Vegas region were digitized so that hydrograph characteristics (peak, shape, volume) could be measured. Where possible, flood frequency and volume-frequency-duration analyses were performed for the ephemeral streams. These analyses demonstrate the importance of using partial duration series rather than annual maxima for frequency analyses as well as the significance of using maximum daily flow rather than average daily flow when assessing the hazards posed by ephemeral streams.

  3. Understanding and quantifying focused, indirect groundwater recharge from ephemeral streams using water table fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Acworth, R. I.; Andersen, M. S.; Larsen, J. R.; McCallum, A. M.; Rau, G. C.; Tellam, J. H.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding and managing groundwater resources in drylands is a challenging task, but one that is globally important. The dominant process for dryland groundwater recharge is thought to be as focused, indirect recharge from ephemeral stream losses. However, there is a global paucity of data for understanding and quantifying this process and transferable techniques for quantifying groundwater recharge in such contexts are lacking. Here we develop a generalized conceptual model for understanding water table and groundwater head fluctuations due to recharge from episodic events within ephemeral streams. By accounting for the recession characteristics of a groundwater hydrograph, we present a simple but powerful new water table fluctuation approach to quantify focused, indirect recharge over both long term and event time scales. The technique is demonstrated using a new, and globally unparalleled, set of groundwater observations from an ephemeral stream catchment located in NSW, Australia. We find that, following episodic streamflow events down a predominantly dry channel system, groundwater head fluctuations are controlled by pressure redistribution operating at three time scales from vertical flow (days to weeks), transverse flow perpendicular to the stream (weeks to months), and longitudinal flow parallel to the stream (years to decades). In relative terms, indirect recharge decreases almost linearly away from the mountain front, both in discrete monitored events as well as in the long-term average. In absolute terms, the estimated indirect recharge varies from 80 to 30 mm/a with the main uncertainty in these values stemming from uncertainty in the catchment-scale hydraulic properties.

  4. Humidifier fever 1

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    MRC Symposium (1977).Thorax, 32, 653-663. Humidifier fever. In enclosed environments, it may be necessary to regulate temperature, ventilation, and humidity to maintain comfortable working conditions. Several systems can be used although in terms of installation and running costs a simple radiator system is far more economical than air conditioning with complete temperature and humidity control. Humidity control requires the introduction of water into a moving current of air, and in such a system baffle plates are often used to eliminate large droplets; also any unused water is usually recirculated. Organic dust drawn into the system and settling on the baffle plates and in the mixing chamber may be utilised by micro-organisms introduced from the atmosphere and from the water supply, and a biomass builds up. Microbial material is then voided into the working atmosphere by the ventilation system. Under appropriate exposure conditions susceptible individuals may succumb to an episode of humidifier fever, an influenza-like illness with pyrexia and malaise as the main symptoms, but cough, chest tightness, dyspnoea and weight loss may also be seen. The episodes usually occur after absence from work for a few days and have been termed `Monday sickness'. Individuals are often able to return to work the next day and appear refractory to further exposure. The disease is of the winter months probably due to the larger amount (up to 90%) of fresh air drawn into the humidifier during the summer. In the blood of exposed subjects precipitins are usually present to extracts of baffle plate material and recirculating water although they are not necessarily indicative of disease. Skin tests may be positive and inhalation challenge has reproduced the disease in susceptible individuals. Many organisms may be isolated from baffle plates and recirculating water but only amoeba extracts have produced consistently positive reactions with sera from affected individuals. Remedial actions

  5. Q Fever in French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    Eldin, Carole; Mahamat, Aba; Demar, Magalie; Abboud, Philippe; Djossou, Félix; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is present worldwide. Recent studies have shown that this bacterium is an emerging pathogen in French Guiana and has a high prevalence (24% of community-acquired pneumonia). In this review, we focus on the peculiar epidemiology of Q fever in French Guiana. We place it in the context of the epidemiology of the disease in the surrounding countries of South America. We also review the clinical features of Q fever in this region, which has severe initial presentation but low mortality rates. These characteristics seem to be linked to a unique genotype (genotype 17). Finally, we discuss the issue of the animal reservoir of C. burnetii in French Guiana, which is still unknown. Further studies are necessary to identify this reservoir. Identification of this reservoir will improve the understanding of the Q fever epidemic in French Guiana and will provide new tools to control this public health problem. PMID:25092817

  6. Fever in Infants and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... later? Yes Slightly larger bumps may be from MEASLES. Small "sandpaper" bumps may be from SCARLET FEVER, ... in the treatment of viral infections such as measles. If your child has measles, make sure he ...

  7. [Persistent fever of dental origin].

    PubMed

    Pernice, L; Ribault, J Y; Fourestier, J; Gacon, J; Quilichini, R; Aubert, L; Chaffanjon, P; Roubaudi, G

    1990-01-01

    Based on 5 cases of unexplained prolonged fever, the authors stress the need to systematically look for a dental focus of infection. They discuss the difficulties in determining the site of the probable causal focus and stress the uncertain pathogenic relationship between the dental focus of infection and the fever. The extraction of infected teeth leads to a cure, however, the functional disadvantages of multiple extractions need to be carefully taken into account. PMID:2130447

  8. [The fever of international travel].

    PubMed

    Hristea, Adriana; Luka, A I; Aramă, Victoria; Moroti, Ruxandra

    2008-01-01

    Between 20 and 70 percent of the 50 million people who travel from the industrialized world to the developing world each year report some illness associated with their travel. Although most illness reported by travellers are mild, 20-70% of travellers become ill enough to seek medical attention, either during or immediately after travel. The full spectrum of health complaints is unknown. Nevertheless the usual presentation of a returned traveller is a particular syndrome-fever, respiratory infection, diarrhoea, eosinophilia, or skin and soft tissue infection- or screening for asymptomatic infection. The most common diseases diagnosed in returning travellers are more often of cosmopolitan than exotic origin. However, fever in returned travelers always should raise suspicion for a severe or potentially life-threatening tropical infection. Therefore, fever in a returned traveller requires prompt investigation focused on infections that are life-threatening, treatable or transmissible. Careful assessment of the travel history, likely incubation period, exposure history, associated signs and symptoms, duration of fever, immunization status, use or non-use of antimalarial chemoprophylaxis and degree of compliance with the prescribed regimen, if used, helps to establish the diagnosis. Determining an approximate incubation period can be particularly helpful in ruling out possible causes of fever. Malaria is the most important cause of fever in the returned traveller. While most travel-related infections present within 6 months of return, some infections with long latent periods or potential for lifetime persistence might be seen in those who have lived abroad. PMID:20201239

  9. Vegetation Structure and Function along Ephemeral Streams in the Sonoran Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, J. C.; Katz, G.

    2011-12-01

    Despite being the most prevalent stream type in the American Southwest, far less is known about riparian ecosystems associated with ephemeral streams than with perennial streams. Patterns of plant composition and structure reflect complex environmental gradients, including water availability and flood intensity, which in turn are related to position in the stream network. A survey of washes in the Sonoran Desert near Tucson, Arizona showed species composition of small ephemeral washes to be comprised largely of upland species, including large seeded shrubs such as Acacia spp. and Larrea tridentata. Small seeded disturbance adapted xerophytic shrubs, such as Baccharis sarothroides, Hymenoclea monogyra and Isocoma tenuisecta, were common lower in the stream network on the larger streams that have greater scouring forces. Because ephemeral streams have multiple water sources, including deep (sometimes perched) water tables and seasonally variable rain and flood pulses, multiple plant functional types co-exist within a stream segment. Deep-rooted phreatophytes, including Tamarix and nitrogen-fixing Prosopis, are common on many washes. Such plants are able to access not only water, but also pools of nutrients, several meters below ground thereby affecting nutrient levels and soil moisture content in various soil strata. In addition to the perennial plants, many opportunistic and shallow-rooted annual species establish during the bimodal wet seasons. Collectively, wash vegetation serves to stabilize channel substrates and promote accumulation of fine sediments and organic matter. In addition to the many streams that are ephemeral over their length, ephemeral reaches also occupy extensive sections of interrupted perennial rivers. The differences in hydrologic conditions that occur over the length of interrupted perennial rivers influence plant species diversity and variability through time. In one study of three interrupted perennial rivers, patterns of herbaceous species

  10. Yellow Fever Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    David-West, Tam. S.; Smith, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    A sequential and quantitative survey of brain and liver of suckling mice for infective virus and complement-fixing antigen, after infection with yellow fever virus, showed that while there was progressive increase of infective virus content in both organs, only the brain showed a corresponding rise in CF antigen. Histopathological examination revealed that the liver was not significantly involved. The target organ was the brain, where the progressive pathological changes culminated in an acute encephalitis by the 3rd day of experiment. Organ destruction began with the molecular layer of the grey matter. But by the 4th day after infection the entire cerebral cortex was involved. At the initial stages the hippocampus was particularly affected. Tissue damage did not appear to be entirely due to the differential quantitative localization of infective virus. It was hypothesized that the CF antigen acting singly or in conjunction with some hypothetical proteins may be principally involved in the pathological outcome of the disease. ImagesFigs. 7-9Figs. 3-6 PMID:5582071

  11. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Comer, K M

    1991-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is an endemic tickborne disease found throughout the United States and other regions of the world. Exposure may result in a spectrum of disease from subclinical infection to severe or fatal multiorgan collapse. The disease is maintained in nature in Ixodid tick vectors and their hosts. The most important ticks in the United States are Dermacentor variabilis and Dermacentor andersoni. Small mammals are the natural reservoirs in the wild. Dogs become infected when a tick harboring Rickettsia rickettsii feeds on the dog. Dogs do not develop sufficient rickettsemia to act as a reservoir in the transmission of Rickettsia rickettsii. Thus, although dogs act as sentinels to the presence of the disease, they cannot directly transmit infection. Signs in early stages of disease often are nonspecific. The most characteristic laboratory abnormality is thrombocytopenia, but serologic testing is necessary for confirmation of infection. Tetracycline and chloramphenicol are effective antibiotics to treat infection. Treatment should continue for 14 to 21 days to allow host immune defenses to develop and eradicate the organism. Prevention requires avoidance of tick-infested areas and rapid removal of ticks should exposure occur. PMID:2014623

  12. Fever in Children and Fever of Unknown Origin.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Rajeshwar; Agarwal, Dipti

    2016-01-01

    Fever is the most common symptom in children and can be classified as fever with or without focus. Fever without focus can be less than 7 d and is subclassified as fever without localizing signs and fever of unknown origin (FUO). FUO is defined as a temperature greater than 38.3 °C, for more than 3 wk or failure to reach a diagnosis after 1 wk of inpatient investigations. The most common causes of FUO in children are infections, connective tissue disorders and neoplasms. Infectious diseases most commonly implicated in children with FUO are salmonellosis, tuberculosis, malaria and rickettsial diseases. Juvenile rheumatic arthritis is the connective tissue disease frequently associated with FUO. Malignancy is the third largest group responsible for FUO in children. Diagnostic approach of FUO includes detailed history and examination supported with investigations. Age, history of contact, exposure to wild animals and medications should be noted. Examination should include, apart from general appearance, presence of sweating, rashes, tonsillitis, sinusitis and lymph node enlargement. Other signs such as abdominal tenderness and hepatosplenomegly should be looked for. The muscles and bones should be carefully examined for connective tissue disorders. Complete blood count, blood smear examination and level of acute phase reactants should be part of initial investigations. Radiological imaging is useful aid in diagnosing FUO. Trials of antimicrobial agents should not be given as they can obscure the diagnosis of the disease in FUO. PMID:25724501

  13. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control. PMID:25902360

  14. Cotton Fever: Does the Patient Know Best?

    PubMed

    Xie, Yingda; Pope, Bailey A; Hunter, Alan J

    2016-04-01

    Fever and leukocytosis have many possible etiologies in injection drug users. We present a case of a 22-year-old woman with fever and leukocytosis that were presumed secondary to cotton fever, a rarely recognized complication of injection drug use, after an extensive workup. Cotton fever is a benign, self-limited febrile syndrome characterized by fevers, leukocytosis, myalgias, nausea and vomiting, occurring in injection drug users who filter their drug suspensions through cotton balls. While this syndrome is commonly recognized amongst the injection drug user population, there is a paucity of data in the medical literature. We review the case presentation and available literature related to cotton fever. PMID:26105678

  15. A Comparison of Satellite-Derived Snow Maps with a Focus on Ephemeral Snow in North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Fuhrmann, Christopher M.; Perry, L. Baker; Riggs, George A.; Robinson, David A.; Foster, James L.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the attributes and limitations of four commonly-used daily snowcover products with respect to their ability to map ephemeral snow in central and eastern North Carolina. We show that the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fractional snow-cover maps can delineate the snow-covered area very well through the use of a fully-automated algorithm, but suffer from the limitation that cloud cover precludes mapping some ephemeral snow. The semi-automated Interactive Multi-sensor Snow and ice mapping system (IMS) and Rutgers Global Snow Lab (GSL) snow maps are often able to capture ephemeral snow cover because ground-station data are employed to develop the snow maps, The Rutgers GSL maps are based on the IMS maps. Finally, the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) provides some good detail of snow-water equivalent especially in deeper snow, but may miss ephemeral snow cover because it is often very thin or wet; the AMSR-E maps also suffer from coarse spatial resolution. We conclude that the southeastern United States represents a good test region for validating the ability of satellite snow-cover maps to capture ephemeral snow cover,

  16. The Allure of Privacy or the Desire for Self-Expression? Identifying Users' Gratifications for Ephemeral, Photograph-Based Communication.

    PubMed

    Waddell, T Franklin

    2016-07-01

    Temporary messaging programs continue to rise in popularity, due in large part to the perceived privacy that they afford. However, recent controversies have revealed that messages shared on ephemeral messaging services are persistent and potentially retrieval, thus undermining the privacy they are assumed to provide. Given this paradox, why are temporary messaging services so popular? Does the allure of privacy still motivate the use of temporary messaging programs? Or, if privacy is no longer afforded by ephemeral messaging, what other psychological gratifications do these applications fulfill that might account for their continued use? Informed by the Modality-Agency-Interactivity-Navigability (MAIN) model and the uses and gratifications tradition, the current study conducted qualitative interviews to identify the gratifications that individuals derive from the popular ephemeral messaging application, Snapchat. Study results show that the visual affordances of ephemeral messaging have legitimized photographic communication, providing self-expression and relational gratifications that are unfulfilled by text-based applications. By comparison, users report low levels of trust in the privacy affordances of ephemeral messaging, and instead projecting negative effects of temporary messaging on other users rather than self. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed. PMID:27428032

  17. Monitoring Physicochemical and Nutrient Dynamics Along a Development Gradient in Maine Ephemeral Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzikowski, L. Y.; Capps, K. A.; Calhoun, A.

    2014-12-01

    Vernal pools are ephemeral wetlands in forested landscapes that fill with snowmelt, precipitation, and/or groundwater in the spring, and characteristically dry down through the summer months. Typically, vernal pool research has focused on the population and community ecology of pool-breeding organisms (amphibians and macroinvertebrates) conducted during their relatively short breeding season. Yet, little is known about the temporal variability of biogeochemical processes within and among vernal pools in urbanizing landscapes. In this study, we monitored physicochemical characteristics and nutrient dynamics in 22 vernal pools in central Maine post thaw in 2014. Four pristine pools were sampled weekly in five locations within the pool for ambient nutrient concentrations (SRP, NH4, NOx) and at three locations for physicochemical characteristics (DO, pH, temperature, conductivity). In the remaining 18 pools, we sampled one location for nutrients and three locations for physicochemical characteristics at least monthly to estimate the influence of increasing urbanization on the physical and chemical environment. Our data suggest most pools found in urbanizing areas have higher conductivity (developed sites ranging 18.52 - 1238 μS cm-1 compared to pristine between 14.08 - 58.4 μS cm-1). Previous work suggests forested pools exhibit dystrophic conditions with high coloration from DOC limiting primary production due to increased light attenuation in pools. However, both pristine and urban pools experienced spikes in DO (>100% saturation) throughout the day, suggesting that high productivity is not a reliable indicator of the effects of urbanization on vernal pools. We argue that continued monitoring of vernal pools along a gradient of urbanization could give insight into the role of ephemeral wetlands as potential biogeochemical hotspots and may also indicate how human development may alter biogeochemical cycling in ephemeral wetlands.

  18. Variation in material transport and water chemistry along a large ephemeral river in the Namib Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, P.J.; Jacobson, K.M.; Angermeier, P.L.; Cherry, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    1. The chemical characteristics of floodwaters in ephemeral rivers are little known, particularly with regard to their organic loads. These rivers typically exhibit a pronounced downstream hydrological decay but few studies have documented its effect on chemical characteristics and material transport. To develop a better understanding of the dynamics of floods and associated material transport in large ephemeral rivers, floods of the ephemeral Kuiseb River in south-western Africa were tracked and repeatedly sampled at multiple points along the river's lower 220 km. 2. We quantified the composition and transport of solute and sediment loads in relation to longitudinal hydrological patterns associated with downstream hydrological decay. Source and sink areas for transported materials were identified, and the composition and transport dynamics of the organic matter load were compared to those described from more mesic systems. 3. Concentrations of sediments and solutes transported by floods in the Kuiseb River tended to increase downstream in association with pronounced hydrological decay. The contribution of particulate organic matter to total organic load is among the highest recorded, despite our observation of unusually high levels of dissolved organic matter. Hydrological decay resulted in deposition of all transported material within the lower Kuiseb River, with no discharge of water or materials to the Atlantic Ocean. 4. Our results suggest that longitudinal variation in surface flow and associated patterns of material transport renders the lower Kuiseb River a sink for materials transported from upstream. The downstream transport and deposition of large amounts of labile organic matter provides an important carbon supplement to heterotrophic communities within the river's lower reaches.

  19. Relapsing Fever Borreliae in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Elbir, Haitham; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The study of relapsing fever borreliae in Africa has long suffered from the use of non-specific laboratory tools for the direct detection of these spirochetes in clinical and vector specimens. Accordingly, Borrelia hispanica, Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia duttonii, and Borrelia recurrentis have traditionally been distinguished on the basis of geography and vector and the unproven hypothesis that each species was exclusive to one vector. The recent sequencing of three relapsing fever Borrelia genomes in our laboratory prompted the development of more specific tools and a reappraisal of the epidemiology in Africa. Five additional potential species still need to be cultured from clinical and vector sources in East Africa to further assess their uniqueness. Here, we review the molecular evidence of relapsing fever borreliae in hosts and ectoparasites in Africa and explore the diversity, geographical distribution, and vector association of these pathogens for Africans and travelers to Africa. PMID:23926141

  20. Sadfly fever: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Özkale, Yasemin; Özkale, Murat; Kiper, Pinar; Çetinkaya, Bilin; Erol, İlknur

    2016-01-01

    Sandfly fever, also known as ‘three-day fever’ or ‘pappataci fever’ or ‘Phlebotomus fever’ is a viral infection that causes self-limited influenza-like symptoms and characterized by a rapid onset. The disease occurs commonly in endemic areas in summer months and especially in August during which sandflies are active. In this article, two siblings who presented with high fever, redness in the eyes, headache, weakness, malaise and inability to walk, who were found to have increased liver function tests and creatine kinase levels and who were diagnosed with sadfly fever with positive sadfly IgM and IgG antibodies are reported because of the rarity of this disease. PMID:27489469

  1. Management of acute childhood fevers.

    PubMed

    Teuten, Polly; Paul, Siba Prosad; Heaton, Paul Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Feverish illnesses commonly affect children and are the second most frequent reason for a child to be admitted to hospital. Most cases are viral in origin, usually with a good prognosis. Fever can be caused by severe and rapidly progressive illness which needs urgent referral to hospital for potentially life-saving treatment, and community practitioners must be able to identify such cases showing 'red flag'features. The fear of serious disease among parents and carers may result in 'fever phobia' leading to minor illnesses being managed inappropriately. Community practitioners are well placed to reassure and support families, and to provide education regarding the facts about fever, the appropriate use of antipyretic medication, how to avoid dehydration, and the beneficial role of immunisation in preventing infection. PMID:26387247

  2. Assessment of AnnAGNPS model capacity to simulate ephemeral gullies initiation and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahor, Youssef; Giménez, Rafael; Casalí, Javier

    2015-04-01

    The relatively recent recognition of the importance of ephemeral gully erosion in agricultural fields in Europe explains that so far only a few mathematical models have included algorithms to simulate this type of concentrated flow erosion. Precisely, a conceptual and numerical framework was recently incorporated in the Annualized Agricultural Non-Point Source (AnnAGNPS) model to simulate gully initiation and development in order to assess the impact of gully erosion (sediment production) on management practices at watershed scale. More precisely, the Compound Topographic Index (CTI) approach was integrated within the existing AnnAGNPS GIS interface in order to identify the Potential Ephemeral Gully (PEG) mouth throughout a watershed. In addition, the Tillage-Induced Ephemeral Gully Erosion Model (TIEGEM) was also incorporated into AnnAGNPS to estimate ephemeral gully development. The aim of this work was to assess the capability of AnnAGNPS for predicting (i) PEG location and (ii) gully erosion rate and gully geometry. The study was carried out in the region of Pitillas (southern Navarre, Spain; under continental Mediterranean climate), in several field sites cultivated with wheat. First, thirty-one EGs observed in the fields and depicted in aerial photographs were taken as references. A DEM of the study area (5 x 5 m) was processed using AGNPS ArcView interface to determine the CTI values of each raster grid. Then, seven cumulative percentage values of CTI thresholds (94%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, 99% and 99.5%) were used to create seven potential scenarios of PEG mouths locations in the study area. These scenarios were compared with the reference EGs. The CTI cumulative percentage thresholds of 95% presented the best performance in predicting EGs locations. However, the accuracy of the CTI approach notably decreased in low slope areas. On the other hand, four EGs developed and surveyed in the same study area -in different years between 1996 and 2001- were used to

  3. Leukemoid Reaction in Chikungunya Fever

    PubMed Central

    Charaniya, Riyaz; Sahoo, Ratnakar; Tansir, Ghazal; Sasmal, Gargi

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya is a viral illness caused by an arbovirus which is transmitted by Aedes mosquito. Fever and polyarthralgia are hallmark of this viral illness. Viral infections are generally associated with leucopenia and bacterial infections with leukocytosis. Leukemoid Reaction (LR) is defined by reactive increase in leukocyte count of more than 50,000/cu mm with increase in mature leukocytes on peripheral blood. Leukocytosis is common in Chikungunya but leukemoid reaction has not been reported in medical literature. Our patient presented with high grade fever and symmetrical polyarthritis. Blood investigation showed Leukemoid reaction and after extensive work up a diagnosis of chikungunya was made. PMID:27437276

  4. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  5. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) [PDF - 2 pages] Virus Ecology Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) Information for Specific Groups ... Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Outbreak Distribution Map Resources Virus Ecology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  6. Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Zika & Pregnancy Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature KidsHealth > For Parents > Fever and Taking Your Child's ... a mercury thermometer.) previous continue Tips for Taking Temperatures As any parent knows, taking a squirming child's ...

  7. Ephemeral Presence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Nina

    2007-01-01

    For the past seven years, the author has been researching the representations of women who were engaged in a range of espionage activities during World War II. It seems much of people's knowledge about women spies is formed by popular representations, which are often, and intriguingly, full of stereotypes and half-truths. The skilled and heroic…

  8. Yellow Fever Outbreak, Southern Sudan, 2003

    PubMed Central

    Onyango, Clayton O.; Grobbelaar, Antoinette A.; Gibson, Georgina V.F.; Sang, Rosemary C.; Sow, Abdourahmane; Swanepoel, Robert

    2004-01-01

    In May 2003, an outbreak of fatal hemorrhagic fever, caused by yellow fever virus, occurred in southern Sudan. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus belonged to the East African genotype, which supports the contention that yellow fever is endemic in East Africa with the potential to cause large outbreaks in humans. PMID:15498174

  9. First report of Q fever in Oman.

    PubMed Central

    Scrimgeour, E. M.; Johnston, W. J.; Al Dhahry, S. H.; El-Khatim, H. S.; John, V.; Musa, M.

    2000-01-01

    Although serologic evidence suggests the presence of Q fever in humans and animals in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, acute Q fever has not been reported on the Arabian Peninsula. We report the first two cases of acute Q fever in Oman. PMID:10653575

  10. Classification of ephemeral, intermittent, and perennial stream reaches using a TOPMODEL-based approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Tanja N.; Agouridis, Carmen T.; Barton, Christopher D.; Villines, Jonathan A.; Lant, Jeremiah G.

    2015-01-01

    Whether a waterway is temporary or permanent influences regulatory protection guidelines, however, classification can be subjective due to a combination of factors, including time of year, antecedent moisture conditions, and previous experience of the field investigator. Our objective was to develop a standardized protocol using publically available spatial information to classify ephemeral, intermittent, and perennial streams. Our hypothesis was that field observations of flow along the stream channel could be compared to results from a hydrologic model, providing an objective method of how these stream reaches can be identified. Flow-state sensors were placed at ephemeral, intermittent, and perennial stream reaches from May to December 2011 in the Appalachian coal basin of eastern Kentucky. This observed flow record was then used to calibrate the simulated saturation deficit in each channel reach based on the topographic wetness index used by TOPMODEL. Saturation deficit values were categorized as flow or no-flow days, and the simulated record of streamflow was compared to the observed record. The hydrologic model was more accurate for simulating flow during the spring and fall seasons. However, the model effectively identified stream reaches as intermittent and perennial in each of the two basins.

  11. Ephemeral Fe(II)/Fe(III) layered double hydroxides in hydromorphic soils: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Shoba, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Ephemeral green rust is formed seasonally in some hydromorphic soils. It consists of Fe(II)/Fe(III) layered double hydroxides with different types of interlayer anions and different oxidation degrees of iron ( x). In synthetized stoichiometric green rust, x = 0.25-0.33; in soil fougerite, it may reach 0.50-0.66. The mineral stability is provided by the partial substitution of Mg2+ for Fe2+. The ephemeral properties of the green rust are manifested in the high sensitivity to the varying redox regime in hydromorphic soils. Green rust disappears during oxidation stages, which complicates its diagnostics in soils. For green rust formation, excessively moist mineral soil needs organic matter as a source of energy for the vital activity of iron-reducing bacteria. In a gleyed Cambisol France, where fougerite is formed in the winter, the index of hydrogen partial pressure rH2 is 7.0-8.2, which corresponds to highly reducing conditions; upon the development of oxidation, fougerite is transformed into lepidocrocite. In the mineral siderite horizon of peatbogs in Belarus, where green rust is formed in the summer, rH2 is 11-14, which corresponds to the lower boundary of reducing conditions ( rH2 = 10-18); magnetite is formed in these soils in the winter season upon dehydration of the soil mass.

  12. Ephemeral clonal integration in Calathea marantifolia (Marantaceae): Evidence of diminished integration over time.

    PubMed

    Matlaga, David P; da S L Sternberg, Leonel

    2009-02-01

    A major advantage of clonal growth forms is the intergenerational transfer of resources through vascular connections (clonal integration). Connections linking ramets can be persistent or ephemeral. For species with ephemeral connections, whether the extent of clonal integration changes over time is unclear. To address this issue, we tracked water movement using an isotopic label and assessed the demographic performance of parent and offspring ramets over time in a severing experiment. Our study system was the understory herb Calathea marantifolia, which has parent ramets that produce vegetative bulbils (clonal offspring) that pass through distinct pre- and post-rooting stages. Little water was transported between parents and offspring, and the direction of movement was primarily from parent to pre-rooting offspring. Anatomical observations of inter-ramet connections showed that vascular bundles were twice as abundant in parent stems compared to inter-ramet connections. Severing inter-ramet connections reduced the growth of offspring ramets but not parents. Survival of pre-rooting offspring was reduced by 10% due to severing, but post-rooting offspring were not affected. Our results suggest that offspring ramets of C. marantifolia are weaned from their parent as they progress from pre- to post-rooting stages. PMID:21628198

  13. Relative contributions of transient and steady state infiltration during ephemeral streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blasch, K.W.; Ferre, T. P. A.; Hoffmann, J.P.; Fleming, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Simulations of infiltration during three ephemeral streamflow events in a coarse-grained alluvial channel overlying a less permeable basin-fill layer were conducted to determine the relative contribution of transient infiltration at the onset of streamflow to cumulative infiltration for the event. Water content, temperature, and piezometric measurements from 2.5-m vertical profiles within the alluvial sediments were used to constrain a variably saturated water flow and heat transport model. Simulated and measured transient infiltration rates at the onset of streamflow were about two to three orders of magnitude greater than steady state infiltration rates. The duration of simulated transient infiltration ranged from 1.8 to 20 hours, compared with steady state flow periods of 231 to 307 hours. Cumulative infiltration during the transient period represented 10 to 26% of the total cumulative infiltration, with an average contribution of approximately 18%. Cumulative infiltration error for the simulated streamflow events ranged from 9 to 25%. Cumulative infiltration error for typical streamflow events of about 8 hours in duration in is about 90%. This analysis indicates that when estimating total cumulative infiltration in coarse-grained ephemeral stream channels, consideration of the transient infiltration at the onset of streamflow will improve predictions of the total volume of infiltration that may become groundwater recharge. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Blackwater fever in children, Burundi.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Federico; Audagnotto, Sabrina; Trentini, Laura; Nkurunziza, Innocent; Corachan, Manuel; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2005-07-01

    Blackwater fever is characterized by acute intravascular hemolysis with hemoglobinuria in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Its pathogenesis and management are still debated. Nine cases of this syndrome occurred in 2003 at Kiremba Hospital in Burundi in children receiving multiple quinine treatments. PMID:16022794

  15. Q fever in maritime Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, T. J.; Haldane, E. V.; Noble, M. A.; Faulkner, R. S.; Lee, S. H.; Gough, D.; Meyers, S.; Stewart, J.

    1982-01-01

    Only nine cases of Q fever were recorded in Canada in the 20 years prior to 1978. In the 18 months from August 1979 to January 1981 the disease was diagnosed serologically in six patients from the Maritime provinces. All were epidemiologically unrelated and none had been exposed to animals. Five had pneumonia and one had chronic Q fever with probable prosthetic valve endocarditis. Three of the five pneumonia patients presented with signs and symptoms of an acute lower respiratory tract infection and were indistinguishable clinically from other patients with atypical pneumonias. The other two with pneumonia presented with nonresolving pulmonary infiltrates and complained of decreased energy. Four of the five pneumonia patients responded well to treatment with erythromycin; the fifth required two courses of tetracycline. The patient with chronic Q fever had a large amount of cryoglobulins in his serum and evidence of immune complex disease. These cases indicate that Q fever should be considered as a possible cause of atypical pneumonia in Canada. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:7074457

  16. Behavioral fever in newborn rabbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satinoff, E.; Mcewen, G. N., Jr.; Williams, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    New Zealand white rabbit pups aged 12 to 72 hr were divided into three groups and given an intraperitoneal injection of Pseudomonas polysaccharide, a saline vehicle alone, and no treatment, respectively. The animals injected with pyrogen and maintained at an ambient temperature of 32 C for 2 hr did not develop fever. When placed in a thermally graded alleyway, the animals injected with pyrogen selected gradient positions that represented significantly higher temperatures than controls injected with saline. Further stay at selected positions for 5 min caused a considerable increase in the rectal temperature of the pyrogen-injected pups but not that of controls. The results support the hypothesis that newborn rabbits will develop a fever by behavioral means after a single injection of an exogenous pyrogen if the opportunity for thermoregulatory behavior is present. No fever develops if the pups must rely solely on internal thermoregulatory mechanisms. The behavioral system for producing a fever is mature at birth, but an adequate system of internal reflexes does not appear to develop for some days.

  17. Quantifying the sensitivity of ephemeral streams to land disturbance activities in arid ecosystems at the watershed scale.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Ben L; Hamada, Yuki; Bowen, Esther E; Grippo, Mark A; Hartmann, Heidi M; Patton, Terri L; Van Lonkhuyzen, Robert A; Carr, Adrianne E

    2014-11-01

    Large areas of public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management and located in arid regions of the southwestern United States are being considered for the development of utility-scale solar energy facilities. Land-disturbing activities in these desert, alluvium-filled valleys have the potential to adversely affect the hydrologic and ecologic functions of ephemeral streams. Regulation and management of ephemeral streams typically falls under a spectrum of federal, state, and local programs, but scientifically based guidelines for protecting ephemeral streams with respect to land-development activities are largely nonexistent. This study developed an assessment approach for quantifying the sensitivity to land disturbance of ephemeral stream reaches located in proposed solar energy zones (SEZs). The ephemeral stream assessment approach used publicly-available geospatial data on hydrology, topography, surficial geology, and soil characteristics, as well as high-resolution aerial imagery. These datasets were used to inform a professional judgment-based score index of potential land disturbance impacts on selected critical functions of ephemeral streams, including flow and sediment conveyance, ecological habitat value, and groundwater recharge. The total sensitivity scores (sum of scores for the critical stream functions of flow and sediment conveyance, ecological habitats, and groundwater recharge) were used to identify highly sensitive stream reaches to inform decisions on developable areas in SEZs. Total sensitivity scores typically reflected the scores of the individual stream functions; some exceptions pertain to groundwater recharge and ecological habitats. The primary limitations of this assessment approach were the lack of high-resolution identification of ephemeral stream channels in the existing National Hydrography Dataset, and the lack of mechanistic processes describing potential impacts on ephemeral stream functions at the watershed scale. The

  18. Geochemical signature of permanent and ephemeral thermal springs in Val di Cornia, Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierotti, Lisa; Pennisi, Maddalena; Muti, Antonio; Gherardi, Fabrizio

    2014-05-01

    In the Val di Cornia area, several permanent thermal springs outflow. They belong to the hydrothermal system of Campiglia Marittima and have been exploited since longtime for the therapeutic properties of the discharged waters. With an average outflow of 250 L/sec, Calidario (36.3±0.2° C) is the most important permanent spring of the area. Periodically, i.e. about every 10 years, a number of ephemeral thermo-mineral springs in Bagnarello (46±0.2° C) and Monte Peloso (42.2±0.3° C) area, spontaneously reactivate over short time periods (several weeks to few months), with a maximum discharge of 150±20 L/sec. This phenomenon is generally induced by intensive rainfall events. In this contribution, we present new geochemical analyses of waters discharged from Calidario and the ephemeral springs reactivated at the beginning of 2001 and at the end of 2010. These new data are then compared to previous analyses to investigate geochemical variations over a 30-years period. Both ephemeral and permanent thermal springs have Ca-SO4 geochemical signature, typical of groundwaters circulating through the carbonate-evaporitic complexes of the Tuscan Nappe (Mesozoic age). Clear salinity trends are identified, with TDS increasing from Calidario to Monte Peloso and Bagnarello springs, up to a maximum of about 3000 ppm. Chemical speciation indicates that most of the thermal waters are close to saturation with respect to fluorite and gypsum/anhydrite, with solute geothermometers indicating possible equilibrium temperature of 50-55° C for Monte Peloso and Bagnarello waters, respectively. Higher temperatures, up to 75° C, were inferred by assuming equilibrium at depth with the aluminosilicates of the regional Basement (phyllitic formations of Paleozoic age), below the evaporites of the Tuscan Nappe (Triassic age). With δ18O and δ2H values of -6.4 (±0.2)o and -38.9 (±2.9)o respectively, the ephemeral springs have a steady stable isotope composition, comparable to permanent

  19. Q fever in Bulgaria and Slovakia.

    PubMed Central

    Serbezov, V. S.; Kazár, J.; Novkirishki, V.; Gatcheva, N.; Kovácová, E.; Voynova, V.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of dramatic political and economic changes in the beginning of the 1990s, Q-fever epidemiology in Bulgaria has changed. The number of goats almost tripled; contact between goat owners (and their families) and goats, as well as goats and other animals, increased; consumption of raw goat milk and its products increased; and goats replaced cattle and sheep as the main source of human Coxiella burnetii infections. Hundreds of overt, serologically confirmed human cases of acute Q fever have occurred. Chronic forms of Q fever manifesting as endocarditis were also observed. In contrast, in Slovakia, Q fever does not pose a serious public health problem, and the chronic form of infection has not been found either in follow-ups of a Q-fever epidemic connected with goats imported from Bulgaria and other previous Q-fever outbreaks or in a serologic survey. Serologic diagnosis as well as control and prevention of Q fever are discussed. PMID:10341175

  20. Carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from the transitional zone of a Virginia ephemeral wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, J. W.; Epstein, H. E.; Welsch, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial and temporal controls mediating the switch between anaerobic and aerobic respiration within soils located in transitional zones adjacent to ephemeral wetlands remains unclear. As ephemeral wetlands dry down, a soil moisture gradient develops in adjacent transitional zones resulting in changes to the soil environment—moving from anoxic to oxic conditions. Under oxic conditions, aerobic decomposition and CO2 fluxes should dominate, while under anoxic conditions, anaerobic decomposition and CH4 emissions should be more prominent. To investigate the spatial controls and temporal dynamics of anaerobic and aerobic respiration we ran three 20 m transects starting from the late spring peak wetland edge (June 1, 2014 max. lake extent) of Lake Arnold, an ephemeral wetland located at Blandy Experimental Farm in Boyce, Virginia. At 10 m intervals along each transect, high-resolution soil moisture and temperature sensors were installed at three depth levels in the soil (5 cm, 20 cm, and 50 cm). Soil surface CO2 efflux was measured weekly at 5 m intervals using a portable, infra-red gas analyzer and surface chamber (EGM-4 and SRC-1; PP Systems; Amherst, MA). CH4 emissions were sampled weekly using a non-steady state chamber at 10 m intervals along each transect and analyzed in the lab using gas chromatography. Redox potential was measured weekly at two soil depths (5 cm and 20 cm) at 5 m intervals using platinum electrodes and a Ag/Cl reference electrode. Lake Arnold water levels decreased at a rate of 18.16 mm day-1 during the month of July. Preliminary results show a distinct drop in soil moisture at 5 and 20 cm depths at the 0 and 10 m distances along each transect. At 50 cm, soil moisture shows no distinct trend. Late July measurements of redox potential ranged from -196 mV to 865 mV and was correlated with soil moisture (R2 = 0.52). Rates of soil CO2 efflux were diminished at volumetric water contents (VWC) above 45% (ranging from 2.45 - 7.3 µmol CO2 m-2 sec

  1. Lessons learned from integrated hydrological modeling of ephemeral catchments with different land uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, Matteo; Dean, Joshua; Daly, Edoardo

    2016-04-01

    Land use, in particular tree cover, has a strong influence on evapotranspiration (ET) and thus a large effect on the water budget of ephemeral catchments in arid and semi-arid climates. Unfortunately, the dearth of medium to long-term experimental observations in such areas limits the understanding of the interplay between catchment geology, land use, and climate in driving catchment water balance. Here we use four years (2011-2014) of rainfall, streamflow, and groundwater level measurements to estimate the water balance components in two small, adjacent, ephemeral catchments in a semi-arid region of south-eastern Australia; one catchment was predominantly covered with a eucalypt plantation established in July 2008 and the other was dedicated to grazing pasture. The integrated hydrological model CATHY (CATchment HYdrology) was calibrated against the data in the two catchments using streamflow and groundwater level observations in 2011; the data in the following years (2012-2014) were used for the model validation. The model was able to adequately reproduce the periods of flow in both catchments in all years, although streamflow and groundwater levels were better reproduced in the pasture than in the plantation. This can partly be attributed to the root growth of the trees, which is difficult to estimate; the declining water storage in the eucalypt catchment could only be obtained when including a simple model of root growth dynamics. Other sources of uncertainty could be due to an imperfect description of the surface topography and bedrock geology, which prevent us from accurately reproducing the effects of the tree furrows and subsurface wetness connectivity. The water balances estimated from both data and model showed a significant increase in ET in the eucalypt plantation catchment at the expense of groundwater storage: ET accounted for 95-104% of rainfall in the pasture catchment and 104-119% in the eucalypt catchment across the four years studied. However, the

  2. Assessment of the Compound Topographic Index CTI to predict Potential Ephemeral Gullies in Navarre (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahor, Y.; Casalí, J.; Giménez, R.

    2012-04-01

    Ephemeral gullies are relatively small (susceptible of being obliterated by conventional tillage operation) eroded channels that are able to generate however important in-site and off-site damages (removal of top soil and nutrients, degradation of drinking water quality, contamination of aquatic ecosystems, siltation, etc.). Gully initiation and development in a watershed is greatly driven by topographic factors. Precisely, several topographic indexes have been used to identify areas with risk of gully erosion. Among them, the Compound Topographic Index (CTI= A.S.PLANC; A: upstream drainage area, S: local slope, PLANC: planform curvature) is an approach recently implemented in the AnnAGNPS (Annualized Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution) model. It allows defining the location of potential ephemeral gullies (PEG). The aim of this work was to assess the capability of CTI for predicting PEG mouths (potential headcut) location in an agricultural field of Navarre (Spain) through AnnAGNPS. The study was carried out in a 450 ha area cultivated with wheat and located in Pitillas (southern Navarre). The climate is continental Mediterranean with a mean temperature of 13°C and annual rainfall of 500 mm. Top soil textures are mostly loamy and silt-loam. The 3 topographic components of the CTI were computed by TOPAZ program implemented in AnnAGNPS 5.10 using a digital elevation model of 5-m resolution. The CTI is computed for each raster grid. Then all the values are arranged from the smallest to the largest and then percentiles are calculated (for example, the 95th percentile is the threshold CTI value below which 95% of the CTI values may be found). Grid cells whose values correspond to a percentile lower than 90% are discarded by the model by default. On the other hand, 31 ephemeral gullies located within the studied agricultural field were selected from orthophotos (1:5,000). Natural drainage channels located in abandoned, steep pieces of terrain were not considered in

  3. Transport, retention, and ecological significance of woody debris within a large ephemeral river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, P.J.; Jacobson, K.M.; Angermeier, P.L.; Cherry, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    The spatiotemporal patterns and ecological significance of the retention of coarse particulate organic matter and large woody debris have been intensively studied in perennial rivers and streams but are virtually unknown in ephemeral systems. We examined the influence of 2 features characteristic of ephemeral systems, downstream hydrologic decay and in-channel tree growth, on the distribution, transport, and retention of woody debris following a flood having a ~2.6-y recurrence interval in the ephemeral Kuiseb River in southwestern Africa. A total of 2105 pieces of wood were painted at 8 sites along the river channel to measure retention patterns. The flood had a peak discharge of 159 m3/s at the upper end of the study area, decaying to <1 m3/s by 200 km downstream. Downstream export of wood from marking sites totaled 59.5% (n = 1253). Transport distances ranged from 1 to 124 km, and 34.8% (n = 436) of the exported wood was recovered. Marked wood retained within marking sites was significantly longer than exported wood (p < 0.001, t-test). Once in transport, there was little correlation between wood length and distance traveled (r = 0.11, correlation analysis, n = 369). Length influenced the site of retention; material retained on debris piles was significantly longer than that stranded on channel sediments (p < 0.001, t-test). In-channel growth of Faidherbia trees significantly influenced wood retention; 83.7% of marked wood not moved by the flood was associated with debris piles on Faidherbia trees. Similarly, 65% of the exported wood retained within downstream debris piles was associated with Faidherbia trees. In contrast to many perennial systems, we observed a general increase in wood retention downstream, peaking in the river's lower reaches in response to hydrologic decay. Debris piles induced sediment deposition and the formation of in-channel islands. Following flood recession, debris piles and their associated sediments provided moist, organic

  4. 37 CFR 261.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES AND PROCEDURES... the period October 28, 1998, through December 31, 2002, royalty rates and fees for eligible digital... Broadcaster licensed to make eligible digital transmissions and/or ephemeral recordings pursuant to...

  5. 37 CFR 261.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES AND PROCEDURES... the period October 28, 1998, through December 31, 2002, royalty rates and fees for eligible digital... Broadcaster licensed to make eligible digital transmissions and/or ephemeral recordings pursuant to...

  6. 37 CFR 261.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES AND PROCEDURES... the period October 28, 1998, through December 31, 2002, royalty rates and fees for eligible digital... Broadcaster licensed to make eligible digital transmissions and/or ephemeral recordings pursuant to...

  7. Identifying ephemeral and perennial stream reaches using apparent thermal inertia for an ungauged basin: The Rio Salado, Central New Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Night and day temperature images from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) remote sensing images are used to identify ephemeral and perennial stream reaches for use in the calibration of an integrated hydrologic model of an ungauged basin. The concept is based on a...

  8. Degradation of soil physicochemical quality by ephemeral gully erosion on sloping cropland of the hilly Loess Plateau, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ephemeral gully erosion (EGE) is a common type of shallow linear erosion that exerts a major threat to the productivity and sustainability of agricultural systems. The objective was to evaluate the impact of EGE on soil physicochemical properties that determine soil quality. It was hypothesized that...

  9. 37 CFR 382.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LICENSES RATES AND TERMS FOR DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND THE REPRODUCTION OF EPHEMERAL RECORDINGS BY PREEXISTING SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES AND PREEXISTING SATELLITE DIGITAL AUDIO RADIO SERVICES Preexisting Satellite Digital Audio Radio Services § 382.12 Royalty fees for the public performance of...

  10. 37 CFR 382.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LICENSES RATES AND TERMS FOR DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND THE REPRODUCTION OF EPHEMERAL RECORDINGS BY PREEXISTING SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES AND PREEXISTING SATELLITE DIGITAL AUDIO RADIO SERVICES Preexisting Satellite Digital Audio Radio Services § 382.12 Royalty fees for the public performance of...

  11. 37 CFR 382.2 - Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral phonorecords by preexisting subscription services. 382.2 Section 382.2 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS RATES AND TERMS FOR STATUTORY...

  12. 37 CFR 382.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LICENSES RATES AND TERMS FOR DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND THE REPRODUCTION OF EPHEMERAL RECORDINGS BY PREEXISTING SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES AND PREEXISTING SATELLITE DIGITAL AUDIO RADIO SERVICES Preexisting Satellite Digital Audio Radio Services § 382.12 Royalty fees for the public performance of...

  13. 37 CFR 262.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MAKING OF EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS § 262.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and... Recordings. The royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for any reproduction of a phonorecord made by a... royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for the reproduction of phonorecords by a Business...

  14. 37 CFR 262.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MAKING OF EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS § 262.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and... Recordings. The royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for any reproduction of a phonorecord made by a... royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for the reproduction of phonorecords by a Business...

  15. 37 CFR 262.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MAKING OF EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS § 262.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and... Recordings. The royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for any reproduction of a phonorecord made by a... royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for the reproduction of phonorecords by a Business...

  16. 37 CFR 262.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MAKING OF EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS § 262.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and... Recordings. The royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for any reproduction of a phonorecord made by a... royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for the reproduction of phonorecords by a Business...

  17. THE ECOLOGICAL AND HYDROLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF EPHEMERAL AND INTERMITTENT STREAMS IN THE ARID AND SEMI-ARID AMERICAN SOUTHWEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report represents a state-of-the-art synthesis of current knowledge of the ecology and hydrology of ephemeral (dry washes) and intermittent streams in the American Southwest, and may have important bearing on establishing nexus to traditional navigable waters (TNW) and defin...

  18. Experimental therapies for yellow fever.

    PubMed

    Julander, Justin G

    2013-02-01

    A number of viruses in the family Flaviviridae are the focus of efforts to develop effective antiviral therapies. Success has been achieved with inhibitors for the treatment of hepatitis C, and there is interest in clinical trials of drugs against dengue fever. Antiviral therapies have also been evaluated in patients with Japanese encephalitis and West Nile encephalitis. However, no treatment has been developed against the prototype flavivirus, yellow fever virus (YFV). Despite the availability of the live, attenuated 17D vaccine, thousands of cases of YF continue to occur each year in Africa and South America, with a significant mortality rate. In addition, a small number of vaccinees develop severe systemic infections with the 17D virus. This paper reviews current efforts to develop antiviral therapies, either directly targeting the virus or blocking detrimental host responses to infection. PMID:23237991

  19. Pathogenesis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses belong to the most devastating emerging human diseases and represent serious public health problems. Arenavirus VHFs in humans are acute diseases characterized by fever and, in severe cases, different degrees of hemorrhages associated with a shock syndrome in the terminal stage. Over the past years, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of arenaviruses at the cellular level, in particular their ability to subvert the host cell's innate antiviral defenses. Clinical studies and novel animal models have provided important new information about the interaction of hemorrhagic arenaviruses with the host's adaptive immune system, in particular virus-induced immunosuppression, and have provided the first hints towards an understanding of the terminal hemorrhagic shock syndrome. The scope of this article is to review our current knowledge on arenavirus VHF pathogenesis with an emphasis on recent developments. PMID:21171877

  20. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Moaz; Aleem, Numra A.; Zahid, Mohammad F.; Rahman, Arshalooz J.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is an acute febrile illness that follows a self-limiting course. However, some patients suffer from complications, including myocarditis, due to the involvement of other organs. A child presented at the Aga Khan University Hospital in Karachi, Pakistan, in June 2013 with a high-grade fever, malaise and epigastric pain radiating to the chest. Positive DF antigen and immunoglobulin M assays confirmed the diagnosis of DF. Persistent bradycardia with low blood pressure led to further cardiac investigations which showed a decreased ejection fraction and raised serum cardiac enzymes, indicating myocardial damage. With supportive care and use of inotropes, the spontaneous normalisation of cardiac enzyme levels and ejection fraction was observed. The child was discharged five days after admission. This case highlights the importance of identifying myocarditis in DF patients suffering from cardiac symptoms that are not explained by other potential aetiologies. Awareness, early suspicion and supportive care are essential to ensure favourable outcomes. PMID:26909198

  1. Rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Kalhan, R; Kaur, I; Singh, R P; Gupta, H C

    1998-01-01

    A Reverse Passive Haemagglutination Test (RPHA) was designed for the detection of Salmonella typhi antigen and rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever. Two per cent fresh sheep RBC's were coated with 32 micrograms/ml of immunoglobulin. The minimal detectable level of the antigen was 1250 micrograms/ml. Cross reactions were observed with the samples of patients suffering from Salmonella paratyphi A and pseudomonas infections. The RPHA established was used for the detection of S. typhi antigen in culture broths from 100 patients with clinically suspected typhoid fever with culture and/or widal positive, 50 patients with septicemia caused by bacteria other than S. typhi and 50 normal, afebrile healthy controls. It was found that the sensitivity and specificity of this assay was 70% and 92% respectively. PMID:10773905

  2. Familial Mediterranean fever: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sönmez, Hafize Emine; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Özen, Seza

    2016-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most frequent monogenic autoinflammatory disease, and it is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and polyserositis. The disease is associated with mutations in the MEFV gene encoding pyrin, which causes exaggerated inflammatory response through uncontrolled production of interleukin 1. The major long-term complication of FMF is amyloidosis. Colchicine remains the principle therapy, and the aim of treatment is to prevent acute attacks and the consequences of chronic inflammation. With the evolution in the concepts about the etiopathogenesis and genetics of the disease, we have understood that FMF is more complicated than an ordinary autosomal recessive monogenic disorder. Recently, recommendation sets have been generated for interpretation of genetic testing and genetic diagnosis of FMF. Here, we have reviewed the current perspectives in FMF in light of recent recommendations. PMID:27051312

  3. [Amyloidosis and familial Mediterranean fever].

    PubMed

    Pras, M

    1986-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (F. M. F.) is an autosomal recessive disorder occurring most commonly in Sepharadi Jews and Armenians. Two phenotypic features characterize the disease: brief episodic febrile attacks of peritonitis, pleuritis or synovitis recurring from childhood or adolescence and the development of systemic amyloidosis. Attacks are accompanied by striking elevations of acute phase proteins, including serum amyloid A protein. The amyloidosis of Familial Mediterranean Fever is of the AA type, and manifest clinically as a nephropathy that passes through proteinuria, nephrotic and uremic stages to renal death. Although there is ethnic variation in the incidence of amyloidosis of F. M. F. in our patient population--predominantly Sepharadi Jews of North African extraction--an amyloidotic death at an early age is their genetic destiny. Since the introduction in 1972 of colchicine to prevent the febrile attacks, the drug has been proven and become the main stay of therapy. Today, colchicine has been shown to be effective in preventing amyloidosis as well as the febrile attacks in Familial Mediterranean Fever. End stage renal disease is not the end of the road for patients with F.M.F. because of improving outlook for dialysis and renal transplantation in these patients. PMID:2943362

  4. Evidence for a Noachian-Aged Ephemeral Lake in Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, S. W.; Niles, P. B.; Alfano, F.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Gusev crater was selected as the landing site for the Spirit rover because of the likelihood that it contained an ancient lake. Although outcrops rich in Mg-Fe carbonate dubbed Comanche were discovered in the Noachian-aged Columbia Hills, they were inferred to result from volcanic hydrothermal activity. Spirit encountered other mineral and chemical indicators of aqueous activity, but none was recognized as definitive evidence for a former lake in part because none was associated with obvious lacustrine sedimentary deposits. However, water discharge into Martian crater basins like Gusev may have been episodic, producing only small amounts of sediment and shallow ephemeral lakes. Evaporative precipitation from such water bodies has been suggested as a way of producing the Mg- and Fe-rich carbonates found in ALH84001 and carbonates and salts in some nakhlites a hypothesis we examine for the Comanche carbonate.

  5. Inorganic nitrogen cycling in ephemeral urban waterways of the semi-arid Southwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, E. L.; Lohse, K. A.; Brooks, P. D.; Meixner, T.; Pavao-zuckerman, M.

    2012-12-01

    Non-point source inorganic nitrogen (N) pollution in urban runoff is a major water quality concern in water and N limited regions such as the semi-arid Southwestern US. Although ephemeral streams in drylands have long been recognized as biogeochemical hotspots, it is unclear how inorganic N cycling varies across ephemeral urban streams of distinct substrates in response to episodic wetting. We performed wetting experiments using an isotopic label (15N as K15NO3) to identify N-processing pathway differences in 3 ephemeral urban streams of distinct substrates in Tucson, AZ: 1) sand, 2) sandy loam and 3) loam. We applied the 15N label at a rate of 1.3 kg ha-1, and wetted the experimental plots to 25% volumetric water content. We monitored soil moisture, CO2 and N2O gas fluxes for 6 hours and soil inorganic and microbial N pools before and after the experiment. Fluxes of CO2 were significantly (α = 0.05) lower in the sand (1.05 ± 0.21 SD g CO2-C m-2 hr-1) than in the sandy loam and loam streams (1.77 ± 0.75 and 1.86 ± 0.87 g CO2-C m-2 hr-1, respectively); and varied with soil temperature, % soil C, % soil N and soil moisture at the loam site. Surprisingly, N2O fluxes in the sand and sandy loam sites (6.91 ± 5.06 and 8.42 ± 7.17 mg N2O-N m-2 hr-1, respectively) were significantly higher than N2O fluxes in the loam site (3.03 ± 2.49 mg N2O-N m-2 hr-1). Similarly, δ15N of N2O was significantly higher in the sand and sandy loam (4652 ± 4685 ‰ and 7280 ± 7191 ‰, respectively) than in the loam stream (794 ± 2577 ‰); indicating that a greater fraction of NO3-N is lost to denitrification in the sand and sandy loam sites. Surprisingly, post-experimental exchangeable inorganic δ15N was significantly higher in the sand and sandy loam sites (1014 ± 740 ‰ and 2840 ± 2686 ‰, respectively) than in the loam site (315 ± 238 ‰). Microbial biomass N did not significantly increase at the sand and sandy loam sites. However, it significantly increased in the deep

  6. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Machine: Protecting Privacy with Ephemeral Channels

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Alan M.; Lee, Michael Z.; Jana, Suman; Kim, Sangman; Silberstein, Mark; Xu, Yuanzhong; Shmatikov, Vitaly; Witchel, Emmett

    2014-01-01

    Modern systems keep long memories. As we show in this paper, an adversary who gains access to a Linux system, even one that implements secure deallocation, can recover the contents of applications’ windows, audio buffers, and data remaining in device drivers—long after the applications have terminated. We design and implement Lacuna, a system that allows users to run programs in “private sessions.” After the session is over, all memories of its execution are erased. The key abstraction in Lacuna is an ephemeral channel, which allows the protected program to talk to peripheral devices while making it possible to delete the memories of this communication from the host. Lacuna can run unmodified applications that use graphics, sound, USB input devices, and the network, with only 20 percentage points of additional CPU utilization. PMID:24755709

  7. Method for estimating spatially variable seepage loss and hydraulic conductivity in intermittent and ephemeral streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niswonger, R.G.; Prudic, D.E.; Fogg, G.E.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Buckland, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating seepage loss and streambed hydraulic conductivity along intermittent and ephemeral streams using streamflow front velocities in initially dry channels. The method uses the kinematic wave equation for routing streamflow in channels coupled to Philip's equation for infiltration. The coupled model considers variations in seepage loss both across and along the channel. Water redistribution in the unsaturated zone is also represented in the model. Sensitivity of the streamflow front velocity to parameters used for calculating seepage loss and for routing streamflow shows that the streambed hydraulic conductivity has the greatest sensitivity for moderate to large seepage loss rates. Channel roughness, geometry, and slope are most important for low seepage loss rates; however, streambed hydraulic conductivity is still important for values greater than 0.008 m/d. Two example applications are presented to demonstrate the utility of the method. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. A LANDSAT study of ephemeral and perennial rangeland vegetation and soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, R. G., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Salmon-Drexler, B. C.; Bonner, W. J.; Vincent, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Several methods of computer processing were applied to LANDSAT data for mapping vegetation characteristics of perennial rangeland in Montana and ephemeral rangeland in Arizona. The choice of optimal processing technique was dependent on prescribed mapping and site condition. Single channel level slicing and ratioing of channels were used for simple enhancement. Predictive models for mapping percent vegetation cover based on data from field spectra and LANDSAT data were generated by multiple linear regression of six unique LANDSAT spectral ratios. Ratio gating logic and maximum likelihood classification were applied successfully to recognize plant communities in Montana. Maximum likelihood classification did little to improve recognition of terrain features when compared to a single channel density slice in sparsely vegetated Arizona. LANDSAT was found to be more sensitive to differences between plant communities based on percentages of vigorous vegetation than to actual physical or spectral differences among plant species.

  9. Differential effects of ephemeral colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in two Cuscuta species with different ecology.

    PubMed

    Behdarvandi, Behrang; Guinel, Frédérique C; Costea, Mihai

    2015-10-01

    Seedlings of parasitic Cuscuta species are autotrophic but can survive only a short period of time, during which they must locate and attach to a suitable host. They have an ephemeral root-like organ considered not a "true" root by most studies. In the present study, two species with contrasting ecology were examined: Cuscuta gronovii, a North American riparian species, and Cuscuta campestris, an invasive dodder that thrives in disturbed habitats. The morphology, structure, and absorptive capability of their root-like organ were compared, their potential for colonization by two species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was assessed, and the effect of the AMF on seedling growth and survival was determined. The root of both species absorbed water and interacted with AMF, but the two species exhibited dissimilar growth and survival patterns depending on the colonization level of their seedlings. The extensively colonized seedlings of C. gronovii grew more and survived longer than non-colonized seedlings. In contrast, the scarce colonization of C. campestris seedlings did not increase their growth or longevity. The differential growth responses of the AMF-colonized and non-colonized Cuscuta species suggest a mycorrhizal relationship and reflect their ecology. While C. gronovii roots have retained a higher ability to interact with AMF and are likely to take advantage of fungal communities in riparian habitats, the invasive C. campestris has largely lost this ability possibly as an adaptation to disturbed ecosystems. These results indicate that dodders have a true root, even if much reduced and ephemeral, that can interact with AMF. PMID:25720736

  10. Ephemeral-streamflow Induced Focused Recharge in the Desert Southwest (US)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantz, J. E.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Multiyear studies examined meteorologic and hydrogeologic controls on ephemeral streamflow and focused groundwater recharge at 8 sites across arid and semiarid southwestern regions of the US. Intensive data collection targeted the Great Basin, Mojave Desert, Sonoran Desert, Rio Grande Rift, and Colorado Plateau physiographic areas (USGS Prof. Pap. 1703-C). During the study period (1997-2002), the region went from wetter than normal conditions associated with a strong El Niño climatic pattern (1997-1998) to drier than normal conditions associated with a La Niña climatic pattern. The 1997-1998 El Niño, the strongest in the modern instrumental record, roughly doubled precipitation at the Great Basin, Mojave Desert, and Colorado Plateau study sites. Precipitation at all sites thereafter trended sharply lower, producing moderate- to severe-drought conditions by the end of the study. Streamflow in regional rivers indicated diminishing groundwater recharge, with annual-flow volumes declining to levels of only 10-46% of their respective long-term averages by 2002. Local streamflows showed higher variability, reflecting smaller scales of integration (in time and space) within study-site watersheds. Toward the end of study, extended periods (9-15 months) of zero or negligible flow were observed at half the sites. Summer monsoonal rains generated the majority of streamflow and associated recharge in the Sonoran Desert sites and the more southerly Rio Grande Rift site, whereas winter storms and spring snowmelt dominated the northern and westernmost sites. Proximity to moisture sources and meteorologic fluctuations, in concert with orography, largely control the generation of focused groundwater recharge from ephemeral streamflow, although other aspects (geology, soil, and vegetation) were also identified as factors. Estimates of annual focused infiltration for the research sites ranged from about 105-107 cubic meters from contributing areas that ranged from 26-2,260 square

  11. Recent human impacts and change in dynamics and morphology of ephemeral rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J. A.; Razola, L.; Garzón, G.

    2014-03-01

    Ephemeral streams induce flash-flood events, which cause dramatic morphological changes and impacts on population, mainly because they are intermittent and less predictable. Human pressures on the basin modify load and discharge relationships, inducing dormant instability on the fluvial system that will manifest abruptly during flood events. The flash-flood response of two ephemeral streams affected by load supply modification due to land use changes is discussed in a combination of geomorphic and hydraulic approaches. During the Rivillas flash flood, intensive clearing on the basin led to high rates of sediment flowing into an artificially straightened and inefficient channel. The stream evolved from a sinuous single channel into a shallow braiding occupying the entire width of the valley floor. Misfits and unsteady channel conditions increased velocity, stream power and sediment entrainment capacity and considerably magnified flood damage. Resulting morphosedimentary features revealed a close relationship with the valley floor post-flood hydraulic model, and pre-event awareness would have made it possible to predict risk-sensitive areas. In the second case, the Azohía stream, modelling of current pre-flood channel conditions make it possible to determine channel narrowing and entrenchment in the lower alluvial fan stretch. Abandonment of intensive agriculture, basin reforestation and urbanization diminish load contribution and trigger channel incision. This induces an increase in slope and velocity in the bankfull channel, producing renewed erosive energy and thus activating upstream propagation of incision and bank undermining. The absence of water-spreading dynamics on the alluvial fan in favour of confinement in a single channel produces an unstable dynamic in the system, also offering a false sense of stability, as long as no large magnitude floods occur. When modelling flood-prone areas and analysing hydraulic variables, it is important to detect possible

  12. Rain and channel flow supplements to subsurface water beneath hyper-arid ephemeral stream channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Stephanie K.; Faulconer, Joshua; Shaw, Jeremy R.; Sutfin, Nicholas A.; Cooper, David J.

    2016-05-01

    In hyper-arid regions, ephemeral stream channels are important sources of subsurface recharge and water supply for riparian vegetation, but few studies have documented the subsurface water content dynamics of these systems. This study examines ephemeral channels in the hyper-arid western Sonoran Desert, USA to determine how frequently water recharges the alluvial fill and identify variables that affect the depth and persistence of recharge. Precipitation, stream stage, and subsurface water content measurements were collected over a three-year study at six channels with varying contributing areas and thicknesses of alluvial fill. All channels contain coarse alluvium composed primarily of sands and gravels, and some locations also have localized layers of fine sediment at 2-3 m depth. Rain alone contributed 300-400 mm of water input to these channels over three years, but water content responses were only detected for 36% of the rain events at 10 cm depth, indicating that much of the rain water was either quickly evaporated or taken up by plants. Pulses of water from rain events were detected only in the top meter of alluvium. The sites each experienced ⩽5 brief flow events, which caused transient saturation that usually lasted only a few hours longer than flow. These events were the only apparent source of water to depths >1 m, and water from flow events quickly percolated past the deepest measurement depths (0.5-3 m). Sustained saturation in the shallow subsurface only developed where there was a near-surface layer of finer consolidated sediments that impeded deep percolation.

  13. The hydrology of riparian buffer zones; two case studies in an ephemeral and a perennial stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassam, David W.; Fellows, Christine S.; De Hayr, Robert; Hunter, Heather; Bloesch, Philip

    2006-06-01

    Riparian zones can provide a protective buffer between streams and adjacent land-based activities by removing nitrate from shallow groundwater flowing through them. Hydrological factors are an important influence on the effectiveness of riparian buffer zones in reducing pollutant loads delivered to streams. In this paper, we present results from a study of the hydrology of two riparian buffers belonging to an ephemeral and a perennial stream, which are part of a research project to study nitrogen transport and transformation processes in shallow groundwater in South-East Queensland, Australia. The investigation at the ephemeral site has shown that a shallow perched water table forms shortly after stream flow commences as a result of lateral flow from the stream to floodplain; it resides within the carbon-rich root zone and drains off after stream flow ceases. The low head gradient of 1% results in a low flow rate of about 6 cm/day along the floodplain, slow enough to allow effective removal of nitrate via denitrification to occur. The investigation at the perennial site has shown that water table dynamics within the floodplain are dissociated from the up-slope area except during over-bank flood events. During non-event conditions, there is low streamward gradient that results in a base flow component to the stream; the water table depth is about 3.5 m, hence missing most of the carbon-rich soils located close to the soil surface. During flood events, a reverse gradient towards the floodplain is formed; the streamward gradient is re-established after the flood wave passes. The water table fluctuates between 1.8 and 3.5 m under these conditions thus having a higher chance of interacting with more active floodplain sediments. Water stored in the floodplain has a residence time of 2-10 days, providing an opportunity for denitrification to reduce nitrate concentrations prior to water draining back to the stream.

  14. [Combatting fever, phlegm and cough].

    PubMed

    Solar Silva, M A

    1991-03-01

    only ones that should be treated. Fever it probably the defense mechanism that has elicited the greatest treatment efforts. Lowering the fever through medication does nothing to fight the virus but makes children feel well enough to resume playing outside, thereby increasing the risk of secondary bacterial infection. Children with fevers should be kept hydrated. Only in the case of pain should medication be given to lower the fever. Aspirin should be avoided in children. An untreated fever provides information on the course of the disease: spontaneous decline followed by a rise may indicate bacterial infection. PMID:12343310

  15. Q fever--selected issues.

    PubMed

    Bielawska-Drózd, Agata; Cieślik, Piotr; Mirski, Tomasz; Bartoszcze, Michał; Knap, Józef Piotr; Gaweł, Jerzy; Żakowska, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    Q fever is an infectious disease of humans and animals caused by Gram-negative coccobacillus Coxiella burnetii, belonging to the Legionellales order, Coxiellaceae family. The presented study compares selected features of the bacteria genome, including chromosome and plasmids QpH1, QpRS, QpDG and QpDV. The pathomechanism of infection--starting from internalization of the bacteria to its release from infected cell are thoroughly described. The drugs of choice for the treatment of acute Q fever are tetracyclines, macrolides and quinolones. Some other antimicrobials are also active against C. burnetii, namely, telitromycines and tigecyclines (glicylcycline). Q-VAX vaccine induces strong and long-term immunity in humans. Coxevac vaccine for goat and sheep can reduce the number of infections and abortions, as well as decrease the environmental transmission of the pathogen. Using the microarrays technique, about 50 proteins has been identified which could be used in the future for the production of vaccine against Q fever. The routine method of C. burnetii culture is proliferation within cell lines; however, an artificial culture medium has recently been developed. The growth of bacteria in a reduced oxygen (2.5%) atmosphere was obtained after just 6 days. In serology, using the IF method as positive titers, the IgM antibody level >1:64 and IgG antibody level >1:256 (against II phase antigens) has been considered. In molecular diagnostics of C. burnetii infection, the most frequently used method is PCR and its modifications; namely, nested PCR and real time PCR which detect target sequences, such as htpAB and IS1111, chromosome genes (com1), genes specific for different types of plasmids and transposase genes. Although Q fever was diagnosed in Poland in 1956, the data about the occurrence of the disease are incomplete. Comprehensive studies on the current status of Q fever in Poland, with special focus on pathogen reservoirs and vectors, the sources of infection and

  16. Typhoid fever: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza Palma, Natalia Carolina; Farías Molina, Solange; Calzadilla Riveras, Jeannette; Hermoso, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever remains a major health problem worldwide, in contrast to Chile, where this disease is an isolated finding. Clinical presentation is varied, mainly presenting with fever, malaise, abdominal discomfort, and nonspecific symptoms often confused with other causes of febrile syndrome. We report a six-year-old, male patient presenting with fever of two weeks associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, malaise, hepatomegaly and elevated liver enzymes. Differential diagnoses were considered and a Widal reaction and two blood cultures were requested; both came back positive, confirming the diagnosis of typhoid fever caused by Salmonella typhi. Prior to diagnosis confirmation, empirical treatment was initiated with ceftriaxone and metronidazole, with partial response; then drug therapy was adjusted according to ciprofloxacin susceptibility testing with a favorable clinical response. We discuss diagnostic methods and treatment of enteric fever with special emphasis on typhoid fever. PMID:27392073

  17. Chronic Q Fever in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Karakousis, Petros C.; Trucksis, Michele; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Infections due to Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, are uncommon in the United States. Cases of chronic Q fever are extremely rare and most often manifest as culture-negative endocarditis in patients with underlying valvular heart disease. We describe a 31-year-old farmer from West Virginia with a history of congenital heart disease and recurrent fevers for 14 months who was diagnosed with Q fever endocarditis based on an extremely high antibody titer against Coxiella burnetii phase I antigen. Despite treatment with doxycycline, he continued to have markedly elevated Coxiella burnetii phase I antibody titers for 10 years after the initial diagnosis. To our knowledge, this case represents the longest follow-up period for a patient with chronic Q fever in the United States. We review all cases of chronic Q fever reported in the United States and discuss important issues pertaining to epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of this disease. PMID:16757641

  18. Prevention of lassa Fever in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Inegbenebor, Ute; Okosun, John; Inegbenebor, Josephine

    2010-01-01

    Although specific treatment is available for Lassa fever, early diagnosis is still difficult in most Nigerian primary and secondary health centers. This study was carried out to compare the case-fatality rates of Lassa fever and other medical diseases commonly seen in adult medical wards, to determine the community habits that make Lassa fever endemic in Edo Central District of Nigeria, with the aim of prescribing preventive measures for its control in Nigeria. The records of 908 inpatients in the adult medical wards of Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua and responses from respondents interviewed by trained interviewers on their knowledge, attitudes and practices pertaining to Lassa fever were used for this study. The case-fatality rate of Lassa fever in this center was 28%. Cultural factors and habits were found to favor endemicity of Lassa fever in Edo Central District of Nigeria. Preventive measures were prescribed for families and communities. PMID:19712954

  19. Describing the Breakbone Fever: IDODEN, an Ontology for Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    Mitraka, Elvira; Topalis, Pantelis; Dritsou, Vicky; Dialynas, Emmanuel; Louis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Background Ontologies represent powerful tools in information technology because they enhance interoperability and facilitate, among other things, the construction of optimized search engines. To address the need to expand the toolbox available for the control and prevention of vector-borne diseases we embarked on the construction of specific ontologies. We present here IDODEN, an ontology that describes dengue fever, one of the globally most important diseases that are transmitted by mosquitoes. Methodology/Principal Findings We constructed IDODEN using open source software, and modeled it on IDOMAL, the malaria ontology developed previously. IDODEN covers all aspects of dengue fever, such as disease biology, epidemiology and clinical features. Moreover, it covers all facets of dengue entomology. IDODEN, which is freely available, can now be used for the annotation of dengue-related data and, in addition to its use for modeling, it can be utilized for the construction of other dedicated IT tools such as decision support systems. Conclusions/Significance The availability of the dengue ontology will enable databases hosting dengue-associated data and decision-support systems for that disease to perform most efficiently and to link their own data to those stored in other independent repositories, in an architecture- and software-independent manner. PMID:25646954

  20. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients. PMID:22668446

  1. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  2. Dengue fever complicated by hemophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Maria; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Bhumi; Kurup, Akhil Rajendra; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a common acute viral febrile illness in the tropics. Although the usual presentation is that of a self-limiting illness, its complications are protean. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with an acute febrile illness and was diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Despite appropriate supportive therapy, the patient initially improved, but subsequently had clinical deterioration. Evaluation revealed features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. He was successfully treated with glucocorticoids and had an uneventful recovery. This case adds to the limited adult cases of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature and the need for prompt recognition and treatment of this rare complication. PMID:27274854

  3. A critical discussion on the applicability of Compound Topographic Index (CTI) for predicting ephemeral gully erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalí, Javier; Chahor, Youssef; Giménez, Rafael; Campo-Bescós, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The so-called Compound Topographic Index (CTI) can be calculated for each grid cell in a DEM and be used to identify potential locations for ephemeral gullies (e. g.) based on land topography (CTI = A.S.PLANC, where A is upstream drainage area, S is local slope and PLANC is planform curvature, a measure of the landscape convergence) (Parker et al., 2007). It can be shown that CTI represents stream power per unit bed area and it considers the major parameters controlling the pattern and intensity of concentrated surface runoff in the field (Parker et al., 2007). However, other key variables controlling e.g. erosion (e. g. e.) such as soil characteristics, land-use and management, are not had into consideration. The critical CTI value (CTIc) "represents the intensity of concentrated overland flow necessary to initiate erosion and channelised flow under a given set of circumstances" (Parker et al., 2007). AnnAGNPS (Annualized Agriculture Non-Point Source) pollution model is an important management tool developed by (USDA) and uses CTI to locate potential ephemeral gullies. Then, and depending on rainfall characteristics of the period simulated by AnnAGNPS, potential e. g. can become "actual", and be simulated by the model accordingly. This paper presents preliminary results and a number of considerations after evaluating the CTI tool in Navarre. CTIc values found are similar to those cited by other authors, and the e. g. networks that on average occur in the area have been located reasonably well. After our experience we believe that it is necessary to distinguish between the CTIc corresponding to the location of headcuts whose migrations originate the e. g. (CTIc1); and the CTIc necessary to represent the location of the gully networks in the watershed (CTIc2), where gully headcuts are located in the upstream end of the gullies. Most scientists only consider one CTIc value, although, from our point of view, the two situations are different. CTIc1 would represent the

  4. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... by 1 degree or more. Physical activity, strong emotion, eating, heavy clothing, medications, high room temperature, and ... and smiling at you Has a normal skin color Looks well when their temperature comes down Take ...

  5. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious medical illness, such as a heart problem, sickle cell anemia, diabetes, or cystic fibrosis Recently had an immunization ... serious medical illness, such as a heart problem, sickle cell anemia, diabetes, cystic fibrosis, COPD, or other chronic lung ...

  6. ModABa Model: Annual Flow Duration Curves Assessment in Ephemeral Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumo, Dario; Viola, Francesco; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2013-04-01

    A representation of the streamflow regime for a river basin is required for a variety of hydrological analyses and engineering applications, from the water resource allocation and utilization to the environmental flow management. The flow duration curve (FDC) represents a comprehensive signature of temporal runoff variability often used to synthesize catchment rainfall-runoff responses. Several models aimed to the theoretical reconstruction of the FDC have been recently developed under different approaches, and a relevant scientific knowledge specific to this topic has been already acquired. In this work, a new model for the probabilistic characterization of the daily streamflows in perennial and ephemeral catchments is introduced. The ModABa model (MODel for Annual flow duration curves assessment in intermittent BAsins) can be thought as a wide mosaic whose tesserae are frameworks, models or conceptual schemes separately developed in different recent studies. Such tesserae are harmoniously placed and interconnected, concurring together towards a unique final aim that is the reproduction of the FDC of daily streamflows in a river basin. Two separated periods within the year are firstly identified: a non-zero period, typically characterized by significant streamflows, and a dry period, that, in the cases of ephemeral basins, is the period typically characterized by absence of streamflow. The proportion of time the river is dry, providing an estimation of the probability of zero flow occurring, is empirically estimated. Then, an analysis concerning the non-zero period is performed, considering the streamflow disaggregated into a slow subsuperficial component and a fast superficial component. A recent analytical model is adopted to derive the non zero FDC relative to the subsuperficial component; this last is considered to be generated by the soil water excess over the field capacity in the permeable portion of the basin. The non zero FDC relative to the fast

  7. Monitoring Potential Transport of Radioactive Contaminants in Shallow Ephemeral Channels: FY 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve A.; McCurdy, Greg; Campbell, Scott A.

    2012-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Management’s Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550, Smoky Contamination Area (CA), during precipitation runoff events. CAU 550 includes Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 08-23-03, 08-23-04, 08-23-06, and 08-23-07; these CASs are associated with tests designated Ceres, Smoky, Oberon, and Titania, respectively. Field measurements at the T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, CAU 370, suggest that radioactive material may have migrated along a shallow ephemeral drainage that traverses the site (NNSA/NSO, 2009). (It is not entirely clear how contaminated soils got into their present location at the T-4 Site, but flow to the channel has been redirected and the contamination does not appear to be migrating at present.) Although DRI initially looked at the CAU 370 site, given that it could not be confirmed that migration of contamination into the channel was natural, an alternate study site was selected at CAU 550. Aerial surveys in selected portions of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) also suggest that radioactivity may be migrating along ephemeral channels in Areas 3, 8, 11, 18, and 25 (Colton, 1999). Figure 1 shows the results of a low-elevation aerial survey (Colton, 1999) in Area 8. The numbered markers in Figure 1 identify ground zero for three safety experiments conducted in 1958 [Oberon (number 1), Ceres (number 2), and Titania (number 4)] and a weapons effects test conducted in 1964, Mudpack (number 3). This survey suggests contaminants may be migrating down the ephemeral channels that traverse CAU 550. Note particularly the lobe of higher concentration extending southeastward at the south end of the high concentration area marked as number 3 in Figure 1. CAU 550 in Area 8 of the NNSS was selected for

  8. [Yellow fever epidemiology in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Mondet, B

    2001-08-01

    We have carried out a meticulous time-space-analysis of the incidence of yellow fever in humans in Brazil from 1954 to 1972 and especially from 1973 to 1999. This study has added to our knowledge of the epidemiology of yellow fever and enabled us to redefine epidemiological zones and determine their geographical limits. The endemic area is located within the Amazon basin; here cases are scattered and generally limited in number. However, there are also "foci of endemic emergence" within this area, where cases are less rare, although occurrence remains irregular. The epidemic area is for the most part situated outside the Amazon basin, to the north east and particularly to the south. It has been divided into two parts according to whether the occurrence of yellow fever is cyclic or sporadic. The epidemics, which are all sylvatic, follow either a circular path (in the forest area) or a linear path (in forest-galleries of the savannah area). The study of the development of the 3 main epidemics (1972-74; 1979-82; 1986-92) in the cyclic emergence area showed that, on each occasion, the yellow fever virus appeared at a particularly active outbreak site located in the "serra dos Carajás", and from there, it followed the courses of the Tocantins and Araguaia rivers upstream, moving southwards during the "pre-epidemic phase" which may be visible due to the occurrence of a few cases, or may remain invisible. Subsequently the virus reached the emergence area, where it appeared in the form of epidemics. In this zone, it also followed privileged south-western pathways, moving from one hydraulic basin to another along the upstream courses of the rivers. Almost exactly the same pathways have been identified for each of the 3 epidemics studied. The distances travelled by the virus over a period of one year--when it goes rapidly--can reach several hundred kilometers. On the other hand, it may be stationary for a period of one or two consecutive years, occasionally three, remaining

  9. Fever, immunity, and molecular adaptations.

    PubMed

    Hasday, Jeffrey D; Thompson, Christopher; Singh, Ishwar S

    2014-01-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) is an ancient and highly conserved process that is essential for coping with environmental stresses, including extremes of temperature. Fever is a more recently evolved response, during which organisms temporarily subject themselves to thermal stress in the face of infections. We review the phylogenetically conserved mechanisms that regulate fever and discuss the effects that febrile-range temperatures have on multiple biological processes involved in host defense and cell death and survival, including the HSR and its implications for patients with severe sepsis, trauma, and other acute systemic inflammatory states. Heat shock factor-1, a heat-induced transcriptional enhancer is not only the central regulator of the HSR but also regulates expression of pivotal cytokines and early response genes. Febrile-range temperatures exert additional immunomodulatory effects by activating mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades and accelerating apoptosis in some cell types. This results in accelerated pathogen clearance, but increased collateral tissue injury, thus the net effect of exposure to febrile range temperature depends in part on the site and nature of the pathologic process and the specific treatment provided. PMID:24692136

  10. Dynamics of Floodwater Infiltration and Groundwater Recharge Under Ephemeral Channels in Arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarsky, B.; Dahan, O.; Enzel, Y.

    2007-05-01

    Shallow alluvial aquifers underneath ephemeral streams are often the only reliable source of water that can sustain human habitation in arid environments (e.g. Arava Valley, Israel; Rio Andarax, Spain; Kuiseb River, Namibia). The main source of replenishment of these alluvial aquifers is recharge from floodwater infiltration. Accordingly, effective management of surface water and groundwater in arid regions requires a better understanding of the processes controlling floodwater infiltration and recharge of alluvial aquifers. This study focuses on understanding the dynamic process of floodwater infiltration from ephemeral channels while implementing innovative methods specifically designed to quantify the recharge fluxes. The monitoring system provides real-time continuous measurements of the hydraulic conditions in all three domains involved in the recharge process: (a) the flood, (b) water-content variations along the unsaturated profile, (c) the groundwater response to the recharge event. Water-content variations along the unsaturated profile were monitored using flexible TDR (FTDR) probes installed along slanted boreholes underneath the stream channel. Water levels and salinity of both the flood and the groundwater were measured simultaneously. Two study sites were selected for this work: the Buffels River, South Africa and the Kuiseb River, Namibia. The monitoring stations installed at those sites recorded several flood events during 2005/2006. Data collected during this period revealed the dynamic process in which floodwater percolates through the vadose zone and recharges the groundwater. Each flood initiated an infiltration event expressed by wetting of the vadose zone and a rise in the water table. The sequential wetting of the vadose zone allowed direct calculations of the wetting-front propagation velocities and percolation fluxes from land surface down to the groundwater. With the arrival of the wetting front to the water table, groundwater began to rise

  11. Satellite time series analysis to study the ephemeral nature of archaeological marks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Archaeological structures buried beneath the ground often leave traces at the surface. These traces can be in the form of differences in soil moisture and composition, or vegetation growth caused for example by increased soil water retention over a buried ditch, or by insufficient soil depth over a buried wall for vegetation to place deep roots. Buried structures also often leave subtle topographic traces at the surface. Analyses is carried out on the ephemeral characteristics of buried archaeological crop and soil marks over a number of sites around the city of Rome using satellite data from both optical and SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) sensors, including Kompsat-2, ALOS PRISM and COSMO SkyMed. The sensitivity of topographic satellite data, obtained by optical photogrammetry and interferometric SAR, is also analysed over the same sites, as well as other sites in Egypt. The analysis includes a study of the interferometric coherence of successive pairs of a time series of SAR data over sites containing buried structuresto better understand the nature of the vegetated or bare soil surface. To understand the ephemeral nature of archaeological crop and soil marks, the spectral reflectance characteristics of areas where such marks sometimes appear are extracted from a time series of optical multispectral and panchromatic imagery, and their backscatter characteristics extracted from a time series of SAR backscatter amplitude data. The results of this analysis is then compared with the results of the coherence analysis to see if any link can be established between the appearance of archaeological structures and the nature of ground cover. Results show that archaeological marks in the study areas are more present in SAR backscatter data over vegetated surfaces, rather than bare soil surfaces, but sometimes appear also in bare soil conditions. In the study areas, crop marks appear more distinctly in optical data after long periods without rainfall. The topographic

  12. Parental fever phobia and its correlates.

    PubMed

    Kramer, M S; Naimark, L; Leduc, D G

    1985-06-01

    Parents of 202 young febrile children were surveyed about their knowledge, attitudes, and fears concerning fever and its treatment. Forty-eight percent of the parents considered temperatures less than 38.0 degrees C to be "fevers", 43% felt that temperatures less than 40.0 degrees C could be dangerous to a child, 21% favored treatment for fevers less than 38.0 degrees C, and 15% believed that, left untreated, temperature could rise to 42.0 degrees C or higher. Fifty-three percent advocated waking a febrile child at night to administer antipyretic therapy. Young age of the child was associated with a preference for use of acetaminophen over aspirin and, unexpectedly, with a higher parental threshold for consideration of fever. The higher their child's temperature at the time they were questioned, the higher the minimum temperature that parents considered a cause for concern. Surprisingly, higher socioeconomic status was not associated with a lesser degree of fever phobia. In fact, parents of higher socioeconomic status were more concerned about the risks of brain damage or seizures as sequelae of fever than were parents of lower socioeconomic status. It is concluded that undue fear and overly aggressive treatment of fever are epidemic among parents of infants and young children, even among the highly educated and well-to-do. Considerable effort will be required on the part of pediatricians and other child health workers to reeducate these parents about the definition, consequences, and appropriate treatment of fever. PMID:4000786

  13. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cases of epidemic typhus have been documented in Argentina since 1919; however, no confirmed reports of spotted fever rickettsiosis were described in this country until 1999. We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (R...

  14. Educational Fever and South Korean Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jeong-Kyu

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of educational fever on the development of the Republic of Korea education and economy in the context of the cultural history of this country. In order to examine this study, the author explains the concept of educational fever and discusses the relation between Confucianism and education zeal. Educational fever…

  15. Multicentric Castleman disease presenting with fever.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christiana; Lee-Miller, Cathy; Dishop, Megan K; Cost, Carrye; Wang, Michael; Asturias, Edwin J

    2014-12-01

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder that usually manifests with nonspecific symptoms, including fever and lymphadenopathy. Treatment of pediatric MCD varies greatly. A 21-month-old child was diagnosed with MCD after presenting with fever. He had incomplete response to initial therapy directed at interleukin-6, but improved with subsequent chemotherapy. PMID:25282064

  16. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or...

  17. Ask Dr. Sue: "Children and Fevers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1989-01-01

    Considers aspects of children's fevers. Answers questions concerning: (1) the temperature at which a fever is infectious; (2) the point at which a feverish child in care should be sent home; (3) the length of time a parent should wait before returning the child to day care; and (4) the way to take a child's temperature. (RJC)

  18. Mothers’ perceptions of fever in children

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Akaberian, Sherafat; Hatami, Gissou

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fever is one of the most common symptoms for children. Most fevers are not dangerous; parents, especially mothers, nevertheless experience severe anxiety confronting children's fevers. This study aimed to explore the mothers’ perceptions of fever in their children. Materials and Methods: Mothers of hospitalized febrile children were selected by purposeful sampling method from two hospitals in Bushehr in 2012. Data saturation was reached after in-depth semi structured interviews with 12 participants. Data analysis was done by conventional content analysis method. Findings: Sense of concern, the necessity for quick action and the need for protection emerged from mothers’ views. Sense of concern came from concerns over cause of fever, child's hospitalization and possible side-effects of fever. The necessity for quick action resulted from gathering information, self-medication and referring to healthcare centres; the need for spiritual and emotional protection created the need to protect in mothers. Conclusion: Findings showed that mothers need educational, emotional and spiritual protection in order to overcome their concerns and managing their children's fever. It is recommended that an empowering model based on these findings be developed in order to strengthen mothers in dealing with fevers in order to prevent excessive concern and anxiety. PMID:25250363

  19. Prolonged and recurrent fevers in children.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Gary S

    2014-01-01

    Some children referred for prolonged fever are actually not having elevated temperatures; the approach here requires dissection of the history and correction of health misperceptions. Others have well-documented fevers associated with clinical, laboratory, or epidemiologic findings that should point to a specific diagnosis. "Fever-of-Unknown-Origin" (FUO) is the clinical scenario of daily fever for ≥ 14 days that defies explanation after a careful history, physical examination, and basic laboratory tests. The diagnostic approach requires a meticulous fever diary, serial clinical and laboratory evaluations, vigilance for the appearance of new signs and symptoms, and targeted investigations; the pace of the work-up is determined by the severity of the illness. Approximately half of children with FUO will have a self-limited illness and will never have a specific diagnosis made; the other half will ultimately be found to have, in order, infectious, inflammatory, or neoplastic conditions. Irregular, intermittent, recurrent fevers in the well-appearing child are likely to be sequential viral illnesses. Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases should be considered in those who do not fit the picture of recurrent infections and who do not have hallmarks of immune deficiency. Stereotypical febrile illnesses that recur with clockwork periodicity should raise the possibilities of cyclic neutropenia, if the cycle is approximately 21 days, or periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, the most common periodic fever in childhood. PMID:24120354

  20. Detection and Response for Rift Valley fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever is a viral disease that impacts domestic livestock and humans in Africa and the Middle East, and poses a threat to military operations in these areas. We describe a Rift Valley fever Risk Monitoring website, and its ability to predict risk of disease temporally and spatially. We al...

  1. History of Epidemiological Aspects of Yellow Fever

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Wilbur G.

    1982-01-01

    This review attempts to follow the trail of the development of epidemiological aspects and concepts of yellow fever and yellow fever transmission (vectors, vertebrate hosts, spacing of epidemic outbreaks) with less emphasis on well-documented early history and more emphasis on epidemiological problems still remaining, plus discussion of possible means of resolving certain of these problems. PMID:6758368

  2. Q Fever Chronic Osteomyelitis in Two Children.

    PubMed

    Costa, Beatriz; Morais, Andreia; Santos, Ana Sofia; Tavares, Delfin; Seves, Graça; Gouveia, Catarina

    2015-11-01

    We report 2 cases of chronic Q fever osteomyelitis in 10- and 5-year-old girls who presented with distal right femoral and left parasternal granulomatous osteomyelitis, respectively. Both were treated with ciprofloxacin and rifampin with good response. Q fever osteomyelitis is a challenging diagnosis in children, and the choice of antimicrobial treatment is difficult because of limited available data. PMID:26226441

  3. Hindcasting Historical Breeding Conditions for an Endangered Salamander in Ephemeral Wetlands of the Southeastern USA: Implications of Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Houston C; Rypel, Andrew L; Jiao, Yan; Haas, Carola A; Gorman, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    The hydroperiod of ephemeral wetlands is often the most important characteristic determining amphibian breeding success, especially for species with long development times. In mesic and wet pine flatwoods of the southeastern United States, ephemeral wetlands were a common landscape feature. Reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi), a federally endangered species, depend exclusively on ephemeral wetlands and require at least 11 weeks to successfully metamorphose into terrestrial adults. We empirically modeled hydroperiod of 17 A. bishopi breeding wetlands by combining downscaled historical climate-model data with a recent 9-year record (2006-2014) of observed water levels. Empirical models were subsequently used to reconstruct wetland hydrologic conditions from 1896-2014 using the downscaled historical climate datasets. Reconstructed hydroperiods for the 17 wetlands were highly variable through time but were frequently unfavorable for A. bishopi reproduction (e.g., only 61% of years, using a conservative estimate of development time [12 weeks], were conducive to larval development and metamorphosis). Using change-point analysis, we identified significant shifts in average hydroperiod over the last century in all 17 wetlands. Mean hydroperiods were shorter in recent years than at any other point since 1896, and thus less suitable for A. bishopi reproduction. We suggest that climate change will continue to impact the reproductive success of flatwoods salamanders and other ephemeral wetland breeders by reducing the number of years these wetlands have suitable hydroperiods. Consequently, we emphasize the importance of conservation and management for mitigating other forms of habitat degradation, especially maintenance of high quality breeding sites where reproduction can occur during appropriate environmental conditions. PMID:26910245

  4. Hindcasting Historical Breeding Conditions for an Endangered Salamander in Ephemeral Wetlands of the Southeastern USA: Implications of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Houston C.; Rypel, Andrew L.; Jiao, Yan; Haas, Carola A.; Gorman, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    The hydroperiod of ephemeral wetlands is often the most important characteristic determining amphibian breeding success, especially for species with long development times. In mesic and wet pine flatwoods of the southeastern United States, ephemeral wetlands were a common landscape feature. Reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi), a federally endangered species, depend exclusively on ephemeral wetlands and require at least 11 weeks to successfully metamorphose into terrestrial adults. We empirically modeled hydroperiod of 17 A. bishopi breeding wetlands by combining downscaled historical climate-model data with a recent 9-year record (2006–2014) of observed water levels. Empirical models were subsequently used to reconstruct wetland hydrologic conditions from 1896–2014 using the downscaled historical climate datasets. Reconstructed hydroperiods for the 17 wetlands were highly variable through time but were frequently unfavorable for A. bishopi reproduction (e.g., only 61% of years, using a conservative estimate of development time [12 weeks], were conducive to larval development and metamorphosis). Using change-point analysis, we identified significant shifts in average hydroperiod over the last century in all 17 wetlands. Mean hydroperiods were shorter in recent years than at any other point since 1896, and thus less suitable for A. bishopi reproduction. We suggest that climate change will continue to impact the reproductive success of flatwoods salamanders and other ephemeral wetland breeders by reducing the number of years these wetlands have suitable hydroperiods. Consequently, we emphasize the importance of conservation and management for mitigating other forms of habitat degradation, especially maintenance of high quality breeding sites where reproduction can occur during appropriate environmental conditions. PMID:26910245

  5. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  6. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  7. Dengue fever: a Wikipedia clinical review.

    PubMed

    Heilman, James M; De Wolff, Jacob; Beards, Graham M; Basden, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is a mosquito-borne infectious tropical disease caused by the dengue virus. Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash that is similar to measles. In a small proportion of cases, the disease develops into life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever, which results in bleeding, thrombocytopenia, and leakage of blood plasma, or into dengue shock syndrome, in which dangerously low blood pressure occurs. Treatment of acute dengue fever is supportive, with either oral or intravenous rehydration for mild or moderate disease and use of intravenous fluids and blood transfusion for more severe cases. Along with attempts to eliminate the mosquito vector, work is ongoing to develop a vaccine and medications targeted directly at the virus. PMID:25426178

  8. Fever management: Evidence vs current practice

    PubMed Central

    El-Radhi, A Sahib Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Fever is a very common complaint in children and is the single most common non-trauma-related reason for a visit to the emergency department. Parents are concerned about fever and it’s potential complications. The biological value of fever (i.e., whether it is beneficial or harmful) is disputed and it is being vigorously treated with the belief of preventing complications such as brain injury and febrile seizures. The practice of alternating antipyretics has become widespread at home and on paediatric wards without supporting scientific evidence. There is still a significant contrast between the current concept and practice, and the scientific evidence. Why is that the case in such a common complaint like fever The article will discuss the significant contrast between the current concepts and practice of fever management on one hand, and the scientific evidence against such concepts and practice. PMID:25254165

  9. DENGUE FEVER AND DENGUE HEMORRHAGIC FEVER IN ADULTS.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever are re-emerging diseases that are endemic in the Tropics. The global prevalence of dengue cases has increased in South-East Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific, and the Americas. The increasingly widespread distribution and the rising incidence of dengue virus infections are related to increased distribution of Aedes aegypti, an increasingly urban population, and increasing air travel. Several Southeast Asian countries show that the age of the reported dengue cases has increased from 5-9 years, to older children and young adults. Dengue infection in adolescents and adults has also been recognized as a potential hazard to international travelers returning from endemic areas, especially SoutheastAsia. Dengue is one disease entity with different clinical presentations; often with unpredictable clinical evolutions and outcomes. Bleeding manifestations in adult patients, including petechiae and menorrhagia were also frequently found; however, massive hematemesis may occur in adult patients because of peptic ulcer disease and may not be associated with profound shock as previously reported in children. Although shock and plasma leakage seem to be more prevalent as age decreases, the frequency of internal hemorrhage rises as age increases. Increase in liver enzymes found in both children and adults indicated liver involvement during dengue infections. Pre-existing liver diseases in adults such as chronic hepatitis, alcoholic cirrhosis, and hemoglobinopathies may aggravate the liver impairment in dengue infection. Fulminant hepatitis is a rare but well described problem in adult patients with dengue infection. Currently, no specific therapeutic agent exists for dengue. The early recognition of dengue infection, bleeding tendency, and signs of circulatory collapse would reduce mortality rates in adult patients with dengue infection. PMID:26506734

  10. Maintenance of Ecosystem Nitrogen Limitation by Ephemeral Forest Disturbance: An Assessment using MODIS, Hyperion, and Landsat ETM+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Brenden E.; deBeurs, Kirsten M.; Eshleman, Keith N.; Foster, Jane R.; Townsend, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Ephemeral disturbances, such as non-lethal insect defoliations and crown damage from meteorological events, can significantly affect the delivery of ecosystem services by helping maintain nitrogen (N) limitation in temperate forest ecosystems. However, the impacts of these disturbances are difficult to observe across the broad-scales at which they affect ecosystem function. Using remotely sensed measures and field data, we find support for the hypothesis that ephemeral disturbances help maintain landscape-wide ecosystem N limitation. Specifically, a phenology-based defoliation index derived from daily MODIS satellite imagery predicts three ecosystem responses from oak-dominated forested watersheds: elevated stream water N export (R(exp 2) = 0.48), decreased foliar N (R(exp 2) = 0.69, assessed with Hyperion imagery), and reduced vegetation growth vigor (R(exp 2) = 0.49, assessed with Landsat ETM+ imagery). The results indicate that ephemeral disturbances and other forest stressors may sustain N limitation by reducing the ability of trees to compete for--and retain--soil available N.

  11. Maintenance of ecosystem nitrogen limitation by ephemeral forest disturbance: An assessment using MODIS, Hyperion, and Landsat ETM+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Brenden E.; de Beurs, Kirsten M.; Eshleman, Keith N.; Foster, Jane R.; Townsend, Philip A.

    2007-10-01

    Ephemeral disturbances, such as non-lethal insect defoliations and crown damage from meteorological events, can significantly affect the delivery of ecosystem services by helping maintain nitrogen (N) limitation in temperate forest ecosystems. However, the impacts of these disturbances are difficult to observe across the broad-scales at which they affect ecosystem function. Using remotely sensed measures and field data, we find support for the hypothesis that ephemeral disturbances help maintain landscape-wide ecosystem N limitation. Specifically, a phenology-based defoliation index derived from daily MODIS satellite imagery predicts three ecosystem responses from oak-dominated forested watersheds: elevated stream water N export (R2 = 0.48), decreased foliar N (R2 = 0.69, assessed with Hyperion imagery), and reduced vegetation growth vigor (R2 = 0.49, assessed with Landsat ETM+ imagery). The results indicate that ephemeral disturbances and other forest stressors may sustain N limitation by reducing the ability of trees to compete for -and retain- soil available N.

  12. Beyond Intuition: Patient Fever Symptom Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Nancy J.; Peng, Claudia; Powers, John H.; Leidy, Nancy Kline; Miller-Davis, Claiborne; Rosenberg, Alice; VanRaden, Mark; Wallen, Gwenyth R.

    2013-01-01

    Context Fever is an important sign of inflammation recognized by health care practitioners and family caregivers. However, few empirical data obtained directly from patients exist to support many of the long-standing assumptions about the symptoms of fever. Many of the literature-cited symptoms, including chills, diaphoresis, and malaise, have limited scientific bases, yet they often represent a major justification for antipyretic administration. Objectives To describe the patient experience of fever symptoms for the preliminary development of a fever assessment questionnaire. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 28 inpatients, the majority (86%) with cancer diagnoses, who had a recorded temperature of ≥38°C within approximately 12 hours before the interview. A semi-structured interview guide was used to elicit patient fever experiences. Thematic analyses were conducted by three independent research team members, and the data were verified through two rounds of consensus building. Results Eleven themes emerged. The participants reported experiences of feeling cold, weakness, warmth, sweating, nonspecific bodily sensations, gastrointestinal symptoms, headaches, emotional changes, achiness, respiratory symptoms, and vivid dreams/hallucinations. Conclusion Our data not only confirm long-standing symptoms of fever but also suggest new symptoms and a level of variability and complexity not captured by the existing fever literature. Greater knowledge of patients’ fever experiences will guide more accurate assessment of symptoms associated with fever and the impact of antipyretic treatments on patient symptoms in this common condition. Results from this study are contributing to the content validity of a future instrument that will evaluate patient outcomes related to fever interventions. PMID:23742739

  13. Arroyo channel head evolution in a flash-flood-dominated discontinuous ephemeral stream system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, Stephen B.; Johnson, Joel P.L.; Whipple, Kelin X.

    2014-01-01

    We study whether arroyo channel head retreat in dryland discontinuous ephemeral streams is driven by surface runoff, seepage erosion, mass wasting, or some combination of these hydrogeomorphic processes. We monitored precipitation, overland flow, soil moisture, and headcut migration over several seasonal cycles at two adjacent rangeland channel heads in southern Arizona. Erosion occurred by headward retreat of vertical to overhanging faces, driven dominantly by surface runoff. No evidence exists for erosion caused by shallow-groundwater–related processes, even though similar theater-headed morphologies are sometimes attributed to seepage erosion by emerging groundwater. At our field site, vertical variation in soil shear strength influenced the persistence of the characteristic theater-head form. The dominant processes of erosion included removal of grains and soil aggregates during even very shallow (1–3 cm) overland flow events by runoff on vertical to overhanging channel headwalls, plunge-pool erosion during higher-discharge runoff events, immediate postrunoff wet mass wasting, and minor intra-event dry mass wasting on soil tension fractures developing subparallel to the headwall. Multiple stepwise linear regression indicates that the migration rate is most strongly correlated with flow duration and total precipitation and is poorly correlated with peak flow depth or time-integrated flow depth. The studied channel heads migrated upslope with a self-similar morphologic form under a wide range of hydrological conditions, and the most powerful flash floods were not always responsible for the largest changes in landscape form in this environment. 

  14. Species Traits Predict Assemblage Dynamics at Ephemeral Resource Patches Created by Carrion

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Philip S.; Cunningham, Saul A.; Macdonald, Ben C. T.; McIntyre, Sue; Lindenmayer, David B.; Manning, Adrian D.

    2013-01-01

    Carrion is an ephemeral and spatially patchy resource that supports a diverse subset of species linked to nutrient cycling and the decomposition process. A number of studies have separately documented changes in the diversity of plants, arthropods and vertebrates at individual carcasses, but there are few studies that have examined how functional traits of different groups of organisms underpin their responses to carrion patches. We used a carrion addition experiment to compare changes in composition and functional traits of insect and plant assemblages at carcasses compared with control sites. We found that significant changes in insect assemblage evenness and heterogeneity was associated with species’ dispersal traits, and that plant assemblage responses to subsequent soil nitrogen changes was most apparent among graminoids and exotic species. Beetles at carcasses were twice as large as their counterparts at control sites during the first week of carrion decomposition, and also had higher wing loadings. Plants with high specific leaf area responded faster to the carcass addition, and twice as many species recolonised the centre of carcasses in exotic-dominated grassland compared with carcasses in native-dominated grassland. These results provide an example of how traits of opportunist species enable them to exploit patchy and dynamic resources. This increases our understanding of how carcasses can drive biodiversity dynamics, and has implications for the way carrion might be managed in ecosystems, such as appropriate consideration of spatial and temporal continuity in carrion resources to promote heterogeneity in nutrient cycling and species diversity within landscapes. PMID:23326549

  15. Species traits predict assemblage dynamics at ephemeral resource patches created by carrion.

    PubMed

    Barton, Philip S; Cunningham, Saul A; Macdonald, Ben C T; McIntyre, Sue; Lindenmayer, David B; Manning, Adrian D

    2013-01-01

    Carrion is an ephemeral and spatially patchy resource that supports a diverse subset of species linked to nutrient cycling and the decomposition process. A number of studies have separately documented changes in the diversity of plants, arthropods and vertebrates at individual carcasses, but there are few studies that have examined how functional traits of different groups of organisms underpin their responses to carrion patches. We used a carrion addition experiment to compare changes in composition and functional traits of insect and plant assemblages at carcasses compared with control sites. We found that significant changes in insect assemblage evenness and heterogeneity was associated with species' dispersal traits, and that plant assemblage responses to subsequent soil nitrogen changes was most apparent among graminoids and exotic species. Beetles at carcasses were twice as large as their counterparts at control sites during the first week of carrion decomposition, and also had higher wing loadings. Plants with high specific leaf area responded faster to the carcass addition, and twice as many species recolonised the centre of carcasses in exotic-dominated grassland compared with carcasses in native-dominated grassland. These results provide an example of how traits of opportunist species enable them to exploit patchy and dynamic resources. This increases our understanding of how carcasses can drive biodiversity dynamics, and has implications for the way carrion might be managed in ecosystems, such as appropriate consideration of spatial and temporal continuity in carrion resources to promote heterogeneity in nutrient cycling and species diversity within landscapes. PMID:23326549

  16. Recharge From an Ephemeral Stream Following Wetting Front Arrival to Water Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulrazzak, Mohamed J.; Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J.

    1983-02-01

    After the infiltration wetting front from a river bed of an ephemeral stream in flood reaches the shallow water table, the rate of recharge, which is also that of infiltration, is affected by the development of a groundwater mound. The effect is practically immediate if the water content behind the wetting front is close to saturation. An approximate analytical solution is developed in that case, which predicts the time dependence of the recharge rate. Comparison with experimental results in the laboratory shows that the solution is excellent in spite of the assumptions necessary in the derivations. As long as the ratio of river width over depth to water table exceeds 2 and as long as the ratio of initial saturated thickness over depth to the water table exceeds 2.5, the analytical solution is essentially exact. Under most field conditions these ratios are largely exceeded. Consequently, the predictive equation for the time dependence of the recharge is both quite simple to use and adequately accurate for field applications.

  17. Estimating seepage flux from ephemeral stream channels using surface water and groundwater level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorduijn, Saskia L.; Shanafield, Margaret; Trigg, Mark A.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Cook, Peter G.; Peeters, L.

    2014-02-01

    Seepage flux from ephemeral streams can be an important component of the water balance in arid and semiarid regions. An emerging technique for quantifying this flux involves the measurement and simulation of a flood wave as it moves along an initially dry channel. This study investigates the usefulness of including surface water and groundwater data to improve model calibration when using this technique. We trialed this approach using a controlled flow event along a 1387 m reach of artificial stream channel. Observations were then simulated using a numerical model that combines the diffusion-wave approximation of the Saint-Vénant equations for streamflow routing, with Philip's infiltration equation and the groundwater flow equation. Model estimates of seepage flux for the upstream segments of the study reach, where streambed hydraulic conductivities were approximately 101 m d-1, were on the order of 10-4 m3 d-1 m-2. In the downstream segments, streambed hydraulic conductivities were generally much lower but highly variable (˜10-3 to 10-7 m d-1). A Latin Hypercube Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis showed that the flood front timing, surface water stage, groundwater heads, and the predicted streamflow seepage were most influenced by specific yield. Furthermore, inclusion of groundwater data resulted in a higher estimate of total seepage estimates than if the flood front timing were used alone.

  18. Yeasts found on an ephemeral reproductive caste of the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens rubropilosa.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, Silvio Lovato; Pagnocca, Fernando Carlos; Melo, Weilan Gomes da Paixão; Nagamoto, Nilson Satoru; Komura, Dirce Leimi; Rodrigues, Andre

    2014-09-01

    Winged males of leaf-cutting ants are considered an ephemeral reproductive caste only produced before the mating flight season. Although much is known about the yeast diversity found in fungus gardens of attine ants, no study has focused on the yeasts associated with males of leaf-cutting ants. Here, we surveyed the yeasts on the integuments of males of Atta sexdens rubropilosa and assessed their potential role in the attine ant-microbe symbiosis. Using culture-dependent techniques, we found yeasts to be abundant on the integuments of males (54.5 %, n = 200 alates). A total of 242 yeast strains were obtained representing six orders, ten genera and 25 species. Strains of Aureobasidium, Cryptococcus, Hannaella and Rhodotorula were prevalent on the integuments and likely originated from the fungus garden of the parental nest or from the soil. The majority of strains (87.1 %) produced at least one of the evaluated enzymes: pectinase, polygalacturonase, cellulase, xylanase, ligninases and lipase. Aureobasidium pullulans accounted for the highest number of strains that produced all enzymes. In addition, yeasts showed the ability to assimilate the resulting oligosaccharides, supporting observations of other studies that yeasts may be involved in the plant biomass metabolism in the fungus gardens. Because winged males harbor several yeasts with putative functional roles, these fungi may take part and be beneficial in the microbial consortia of the new incipient nest. PMID:25012689

  19. Mixed-Valent Fe Films ('Schwimmeisen') on the Surface of Reduced Ephemeral Pools

    SciTech Connect

    Grathoff, Georg H.; Baham, John E.; Easterly, Heather R.; Gassman, Paul L.; Hugo, Rick C.

    2007-12-01

    Floating, mixed-valent Fe films have been observed worldwide in wetlands, ferrous iron rich seeps, and in seasonally reduced soils, but are usually misidentified as oil or biofilms. Little characterization or explanation to their formation has taken place. Along the Oregon coast such films were found on ephemeral pools where Fe(II) rich groundwater (~ 100 μM Fe) discharged at the base of Pleistocene sand dunes. Fe(II) oxidized to Fe(III) at the air-water interface to form ~ 100 to 300nm thick films. Analyses indicated that the films contained both Fe(III) and Fe(II) in a ratio of 3:1. Si was the other main cation, OH was the main anion and some C was identified as well. The film morphology was flat, under optical and electron microscopy with some attached floccules having a stringlike morphology. Energy filtered electron diffraction patterns (EFED) showed three diffraction rings at 4.5, 2.6, and 1.4 Å in some places and 2 rings (2.6 and 1.4 Å) in others. Upon further oxidation the films became 2-line ferrihydrite. We are proposing the name „Schwimmeisen“ for the floating, mixed-valent Fe film.

  20. A critical discussion on the applicability of Compound Topographic Index (CTI) for predicting ephemeral gully erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalí, Javier; Chahor, Youssef; Giménez, Rafael; Campo-Bescós, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The so-called Compound Topographic Index (CTI) can be calculated for each grid cell in a DEM and be used to identify potential locations for ephemeral gullies (e. g.) based on land topography (CTI = A.S.PLANC, where A is upstream drainage area, S is local slope and PLANC is planform curvature, a measure of the landscape convergence) (Parker et al., 2007). It can be shown that CTI represents stream power per unit bed area and it considers the major parameters controlling the pattern and intensity of concentrated surface runoff in the field (Parker et al., 2007). However, other key variables controlling e.g. erosion (e. g. e.) such as soil characteristics, land-use and management, are not had into consideration. The critical CTI value (CTIc) "represents the intensity of concentrated overland flow necessary to initiate erosion and channelised flow under a given set of circumstances" (Parker et al., 2007). AnnAGNPS (Annualized Agriculture Non-Point Source) pollution model is an important management tool developed by (USDA) and uses CTI to locate potential ephemeral gullies. Then, and depending on rainfall characteristics of the period simulated by AnnAGNPS, potential e. g. can become "actual", and be simulated by the model accordingly. This paper presents preliminary results and a number of considerations after evaluating the CTI tool in Navarre. CTIc values found are similar to those cited by other authors, and the e. g. networks that on average occur in the area have been located reasonably well. After our experience we believe that it is necessary to distinguish between the CTIc corresponding to the location of headcuts whose migrations originate the e. g. (CTIc1); and the CTIc necessary to represent the location of the gully networks in the watershed (CTIc2), where gully headcuts are located in the upstream end of the gullies. Most scientists only consider one CTIc value, although, from our point of view, the two situations are different. CTIc1 would represent the

  1. Coral settlement onto Halimeda opuntia: a fatal attraction to an ephemeral substrate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugues, Maggy M.; Szmant, Alina M.

    2006-11-01

    Degraded reefs with a high abundance of macroalgae usually also have low densities of coral recruits. Few studies, however, have examined whether these algae affect coral larval settlement. This study demonstrates, experimentally, that larvae of the Caribbean coral Favia fragrum can settle on the green alga Halimeda opuntia even when another substrate more suitable for settlement is present. Larval settlement onto experimental substrates was quantified under three treatments: rubble only, rubble plus plastic algal mimic, and rubble plus live H. opuntia. Similar total larval settlement was observed in all treatments. No larvae settled on the algal mimic, but total settlement was similar on the rubble in the first two treatments, showing that the rubble alone offered sufficient substrate for high settlement success. About half the larvae in the live algal treatment settled on H. opuntia instead of on the rubble, showing that larvae did not reject this substrate as they did the algal mimic. This result raises the possibility that corals will settle on some macroalgae when their abundance is high. Most macroalgae, including H. opuntia, are ephemeral substrates unsuitable for post-settlement survival. Such unexpected settlement may therefore have significant consequences for coral recruitment success on algal-dominated reefs.

  2. Life associated with a 2.76 Ga ephemeral pond?: evidence from Mount Roe #2 paleosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rye, R.; Holland, H. D.

    2000-01-01

    Dark sericitic material at and near the top of the 2.765 +/- 0.01 Ga Mount Roe #2 paleosol in Western Australia contains 0.05-0.10 wt% organic carbon with delta 13C values between -33% and -51% PDB (Peedee belemnite). Such negative isotopic values strongly indicate that methanotrophs once inhabited this material. The textures and the chemical composition of the dark sericitic material indicate that the methanotrophs lived in or at the edges of ephemeral ponds, that these ponds became desiccated, and that heavy rains transported the material to its present sites. The discovery of methanotrophs associated with the Mount Roe #2 paleosol may extend their geologic record on land by at least 1.5 b.y. Methanotrophy in this setting is consistent with the notion that atmospheric methane levels were > or = 20 (mu)atm during the Late Archean. The radiative forcing due to such high atmospheric methane levels could have compensated for the faint younger sun and helped to prevent massive glaciation during the Late Archean.

  3. Ephemeral active regions and coronal bright points: A solar maximum Mission 2 guest investigator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, K. L.; Tang, F. Y. C.; Gaizauskas, V.; Poland, A. I.

    1986-01-01

    A dominate association of coronal bright points (as seen in He wavelength 10830) was confirmed with the approach and subsequent disappearance of opposite polarity magnetic network. While coronal bright points do occur with ephemeral regions, this association is a factor of 2 to 4 less than with sites of disappearing magnetic flux. The intensity variations seen in He I wavelength 10830 are intermittent and often rapid, varying over the 3 minute time resolution of the data; their bright point counterparts in the C IV wavelength 1548 and 20 cm wavelength show similar, though not always coincident time variations. Ejecta are associated with about 1/3 of the dark points and are evident in the C IV and H alpha data. These results support the idea that the anti-correlation of X-ray bright points with the solar cycle can be explained by the correlation of these coronal emission structures with sites of cancelling flux, indicating that, in some cases, the process of magnetic flux removal results in the release of energy. That the intensity variations are rapid and variable suggests that this process works intermittently.

  4. Microbial communities reflect temporal changes in cyanobacterial composition in a shallow ephemeral freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Jason Nicholas; Kinsela, Andrew Stephen; Collins, Richard Nicholas; Bowling, Lee Chester; Honeyman, Gordon L; Holliday, Jon K; Neilan, Brett Anthony

    2016-06-01

    The frequency of freshwater cyanobacterial blooms is at risk of increasing as a consequence of climate change and eutrophication of waterways. It is increasingly apparent that abiotic data are insufficient to explain variability within the cyanobacterial community, with biotic factors such as heterotrophic bacterioplankton, viruses and protists emerging as critical drivers. During the Australian summer of 2012-2013, a bloom that occurred in a shallow ephemeral lake over a 6-month period was comprised of 22 distinct cyanobacteria, including Microcystis, Dolichospermum, Oscillatoria and Sphaerospermopsis. Cyanobacterial cell densities, bacterial community composition and abiotic parameters were assessed over this period. Alpha-diversity indices and multivariate analysis were successful at differentiating three distinct bloom phases and the contribution of abiotic parameters to each. Network analysis, assessing correlations between biotic and abiotic variables, reproduced these phases and assessed the relative importance of both abiotic and biotic factors. Variables possessing elevated betweeness centrality included temperature, sodium and operational taxonomic units belonging to the phyla Verrucomicrobia, Planctomyces, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Species-specific associations between cyanobacteria and bacterioplankton, including the free-living Actinobacteria acI, Bacteroidetes, Betaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia, were also identified. We concluded that changes in the abundance and nature of freshwater cyanobacteria are associated with changes in the diversity and composition of lake bacterioplankton. Given this, an increase in the frequency of cyanobacteria blooms has the potential to alter nutrient cycling and contribute to long-term functional perturbation of freshwater systems. PMID:26636552

  5. Viral haemorrhagic fever in children.

    PubMed

    MacDermott, Nathalie E; De, Surjo; Herberg, Jethro A

    2016-05-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are currently at the forefront of the world's attention due to the recentZaire ebolavirusepidemic in West Africa. This epidemic has highlighted the frailty of the world's public health response mechanisms and demonstrated the potential risks to nations around the world of imported cases of epidemic diseases. While imported cases in children are less likely, the potential for such a scenario remains. It is therefore essential that paediatricians are aware of and prepared for potential imported cases of tropical diseases, VHFs being of particular importance due to their propensity to cause nosocomial spread. Examining the four families of viruses-Filoviridae,Arenaviridae,BunyaviridaeandFlaviviridae, we describe the different types of VHFs, with emphasis on differentiation from other diseases through detailed history-taking, their presentation and management from a paediatric perspective. PMID:26787609

  6. A fever from the tropics.

    PubMed

    Gherardin, T

    2000-03-01

    Shirley is a 42 year old woman who has rung you 5 days after returning from a 3 week resort holiday in Malaysia and Thailand. You saw her before her trip and administered a hepatitis A vaccine and advised her that she did not require anti malarial drugs as she was only going to large cities and beach resorts. She says she has had a high fever, headache and body aches for several days and that she feels exhausted, but is well enough to come to the surgery. When you see her later that morning, she looks fairly well, although she is moving rather gingerly. She says she has been resting, is drinking lots of fluids, has some anorexia, but no other significant symptoms. Examination reveals a temperature of 38 degrees C and she has a fine morbilliform rash on her body, limbs and neck. There are no other abnormal findings. PMID:10785992

  7. Antimicrobial therapies for Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Gilbert J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Q fever is caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii and has both acute and chronic forms. The acute disease is a febrile illness often with headache and myalgia that can be self-limiting whereas the chronic disease typically presents as endocarditis and can be life threatening. The normal therapy for the acute disease is a two week course of doxycycline, whereas chronic disease requires 18-24 months of doxycycline in combination with hydroxychloroquine. Alternative treatments are used for pregnant women, young children, and those who cannot tolerate doxycycline. Doxycycline resistance is rare but has been reported. Co-trimoxazole is a currently recommended alternative treatment, but quinolones, rifampin, and newer macrolides may also provide some benefit. PMID:24073941

  8. Effective Vaccine for Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Hoch, S. P.; Hutwagner, L.; Brown, B.; McCormick, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    Lassa fever has been estimated to cause 5,000 deaths annually in West Africa. Recently, war in the zone where Lassa fever is hyperendemic has severely impeded control and treatment. Vaccination is the most viable control measure. There is no correlation between antibody levels and outcome in human patients, and inactivated vaccines produce high titers of antibodies to all viral proteins but do not prevent virus replication and death in nonhuman primates. Accordingly, we vaccinated 44 macaques with vaccinia virus-expressed Lassa virus structural proteins separately and in combination, with the object of inducing a predominantly TH1-type immune response. Following Lassa virus challenge, all unvaccinated animals died (0% survival). Nine of 10 animals vaccinated with all proteins survived (90% survival). Although no animals that received full-length glycoprotein alone had a high titer of antibody, 17 of 19 survived challenge (88%). In contrast, all animals vaccinated with nucleoprotein developed high titers of antibody but 12 of 15 died (20% survival). All animals vaccinated with single glycoproteins, G1 or G2, died, but all those that received both single glycoproteins (G1 plus G2) at separate sites survived, showing that both glycoproteins are independently important in protection. Neither group had demonstrable antibody levels prior to challenge. We demonstrate that in primates, immune responses to epitopes on both glycoproteins are required to protect against lethal challenge with Lassa virus without having untoward side effects and that this protection is likely to be primarily cell mediated. We show that an effective, safe vaccine against Lassa virus can and should be made and that its evaluation for human populations is a matter of humanitarian priority. PMID:10888616

  9. A clinicopathological study of human yellow fever*

    PubMed Central

    Francis, T. I.; Moore, D. L.; Edington, G. M.; Smith, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    During an epidemic of yellow fever in the Jos Plateau area of Nigeria, 9 adult males with clinically diagnosed yellow fever were studied by haematological, biochemical, virological, serological, and liver biopsy methods. The ages of the patients ranged from 20 to 55 years and the duration of illness was 3-62 days. No virus was isolated from any patient but all patients should biochemical evidence of severe hepatocellular damage. Leucopenia was a feature of the late acute stage of the disease. Five sera had antibodies to yellow fever at titres greater than 1: 32, 3 of them being monospecific for yellow fever. The classical histological features of yellow fever were present only in the acute or late acute stages, when complement-fixation tests may be negative. With convalescence and the production of complement-fixing antibodies in high titres, the histological features resembled those of a persisting nonspecific hepatitis. In an endemic area, the histological features of yellow fever will depend on the stage of the disease and a picture of nonspecific hepatitis would not exclude yellow fever in the absence of confirmation from serological tests. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2AFig. 2BFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:4538039

  10. Vertical Stability of Ephemeral Step-Pool Streams Largely Controlled By Tree Roots, Central Kentucky, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmannis, K. R.; Hawley, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    The mechanisms controlling stability on small streams in steep settings are not well documented but have many implications related to stream integrity and water quality. For example, channel instability on first and second order streams is a potential source of sediment in regulated areas with Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) on water bodies that are impaired for sedimentation, such as the Chesapeake Bay. Management strategies that preserve stream integrity and protect channel stability are critical to communities that may otherwise require large capital investments to meet TMDLs and other water quality criteria. To contribute to an improved understanding of ephemeral step-pool systems, we collected detailed hydrogeomorphic data on 4 steep (0.06 - 0.12 meter/meter) headwater streams draining to lower relief alluvial valleys in Spencer County, Kentucky, USA. The step-pool streams (mean step height of 0.47 meter, mean step spacing of 4 meters) drained small undeveloped catchments dominated by early successional forest. Data collection for each of the 4 streams included 2 to 3 cross section surveys, bed material particle counts at cross section locations, and profile surveys ranging from approximately 125 to 225 meters in length. All survey data was systematically processed to understand geometric parameters such as cross sectional area, depth, and top width; bed material gradations; and detailed profile measurements such as slope, pool and riffle lengths, pool spacing, pool depth, step height, and step length. We documented the location, frequency, and type of step-forming materials (i.e., large woody debris (LWD), rock, and tree roots), compiling a database of approximately 130 total steps. Lastly, we recorded a detailed tree assessment of all trees located within 2 meters of the top of bank, detailing the species of tree, trunk diameter, and approximate distance from the top of bank. Analysis of geometric parameters illustrated correlations between channel

  11. Optimal placement of off-stream water sources for ephemeral stream recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rigge, Matthew B.; Smart, Alexander; Wylie, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Uneven and/or inefficient livestock distribution is often a product of an inadequate number and distribution of watering points. Placement of off-stream water practices (OSWP) in pastures is a key consideration in rangeland management plans and is critical to achieving riparian recovery by improving grazing evenness, while improving livestock performance. Effective OSWP placement also minimizes the impacts of livestock use radiating from OSWP, known as the “piosphere.” The objective of this study was to provide land managers with recommendations for the optimum placement of OSWP. Specifically, we aimed to provide minimum offset distances of OSWP to streams and assess the effective range of OSWP using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values, an indicator of live standing crop. NDVI values were determined from a time-series of Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) 20-m images of western South Dakota mixed-grass prairie. The NDVI values in ephemeral stream channels (in-channel) and uplands were extracted from pre- and post-OSWP images taken in 1989 and 2010, respectively. NDVI values were normalized to a reference imagine and subsequently by ecological site to produce nNDVI. Our results demonstrate a significant (P 2 = 0.49, P = 0.05) and increased with average distance to OSWP in a pasture (R2 = 0.43, P = 0.07). Piospheric reduction in nNDVI was observed within 200 m of OSWP, occasionally overlapping in-channel areas. The findings of this study suggest placement of OSWP 200 to 1 250 m from streams to achieve optimal results. These results can be used to increase grazing efficiency by effectively placing OSWP and insure that piospheres do not overlap ecologically important in-channel areas.

  12. Morphological impacts of flow events of varying magnitude on ephemeral channels in a semiarid region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooke, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Flows in ephemeral channels in semiarid areas are only occasional, and channel changes are episodic; but the flash floods can be devastating and have major geomorphological impacts. Data on morphological impacts of flows in semiarid areas are needed to increase understanding of the dynamics and variability of geomorphic responses in such channels. For this purpose nine reaches of river channel in three catchments in SE Spain - the Nogalte, Torrealvilla, and Salada - have been sites for measurement of flows and their effects over the period 1997-2012. The sites encompass a range of channel size, channel morphology, substrate, vegetation, and position within the catchments. A major difference is between schist and marl bedrock areas. Peak flow stage has been recorded and topography surveyed at frequent intervals and after major flow events. Over the 16-year period, an average of 0.5 flow events per year has been recorded at the schist sites, and an average of one per year at the marl sites; but occurrence has been highly variable from year to year. Threshold daily rainfall for channel flow is mostly 15-20 mm, but higher rainfalls do not always produce flow. One to two major floods have occurred in each of the catchments in the period, including the extreme flood event of September 2012 in the Nogalte catchment. Measured morphological changes have occurred between 2 and 10 times at the monitored sites. The same size flow can have differing effects depending on the state of the system. Low flow can mobilise sediment without producing much morphological change. The long-term trajectory of the reaches and the sediment substrate has a major influence on response to events. Channel change is governed by threshold values of hydraulic conditions. The measurements provide an indication of the scale of maximum erosion and deposition that occurs within the channels and on the floodplains over a range of flow magnitudes and the flow impacts that need to be considered in

  13. Sedimentary Response of AN Ephemeral Lake during Deglacial and Holocene Climate Evolution, Swan Lake, Southeast Idaho.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, J. J.; Miller, D. M.; Wahl, D.; Anderson, L.; Tripati, A.; Presnetsova, L.; Oviatt, C. G.; McGeehin, J. P.; Bright, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Perennial water systems are important ecological resources in the arid western US and provide many ecosystem services. Lakes can record fluctuations in climate (such as temperature and effective moisture) and can offer insight into regional variations in climate patterns. We studied a 7.65-m core from Swan Lake, which is a small lake and wetland complex that seasonally overflows, to examine small scale climate changes in its continuous sedimentary record. Our core is similar to that studied by Bright (1966), which exhibits two primary sedimentary facies, mud and peat, with a time span of 13.5 cal ka. The methodology includes radiocarbon dating, particle size analyses, sediment mineralogy, stable isotopes and clumped isotopes on calcium carbonate. Mud in the lower half of the core is primarily composed of clay and silt-size quartz-feldspar, but it transitions to calcium carbonate mud. Clays change from 660 to 585 cm and 350 to 220 cm in the core with an increase in kaolinite and illite upward. Ostracods in the carbonate muds are fairly uniform, indicating a mixture of wetland and lake environments from the last 5.8 ka. Similarly, summer temperatures obtained using Δ47 measurements show fluctuations in the range of 18.1 to 23.4 oC with carbonate muds generally corresponding to lower temperatures and peats to higher temperatures. We interpret muds as open water, shallow lake conditions and peats as wetlands across the floor of the ephemeral lake. If our interpretations are correct, the time from onset of the Younger Dryas to the end of the early Holocene was effectively dry, with low groundwater discharge. Similar events occurred from 4.7 to 1.0 ka and briefly at ~400 cal yr BP. Warmer climate may lead to effective moisture increase in this part of the eastern Great Basin.

  14. Spatial and temporal variability of water salinity in an ephemeral, arid-zone river, central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costelloe, Justin F.; Grayson, Rodger B.; McMahon, Thomas A.; Argent, Robert M.

    2005-10-01

    This study describes the spatial and temporal variability of water salinity of the Neales-Peake, an ephemeral river system in the arid Lake Eyre basin of central Australia. Saline to hypersaline waterholes occur in the lower reaches of the Neales-Peake catchment and lie downstream of subcatchments containing artesian mound springs. Flood pulses are fresh in the upper reaches of the rivers (<200 mg l-1). In the salt-affected reaches, flood pulses become increasingly saline during their recession. It is hypothesized that leakage from the Great Artesian Basin deposits salt at the surface. This salt is then transported by infrequent runoff events into the main river system over long periods of time. The bank/floodplain store downstream of salt-affected catchments contains high salt concentrations, and this salt is mobilized during the flow recession when bank/floodplain storage discharges into the channel. The salinity of the recession increases as the percentage of flow derived from this storage increases. A simple conceptual model was developed for investigating the salt movement processes during flow events. The model structure for transport of water and salt in the Neales-Peake catchment generated similar spatial and temporal patterns of salt distribution in the floodplain/bank storage and water flow as observed during flow events in 2000-02. However, more field-data collection and modelling are required for improved calibration and description of salt transport and storage processes, particularly with regard to the number of stores required to represent the salt distribution in the upper zone of the soil profile.

  15. Specialist pollinators deplete pollen in the spring ephemeral wildflower Claytonia virginica.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alison J; Williams, Neal M; Thomson, James D

    2016-08-01

    Pollinators that collect pollen - and specifically, pollen-specialist bees - are often considered to be the best pollinators of a (host) plant. Although pollen collectors and pollen specialists often benefit host plants, especially in the pollen that they deliver (their pollination "effectiveness"), they can also exact substantial costs because they are motivated to collect as much pollen as possible, reducing the proportion of pollen removed that is subsequently delivered to stigmas (their pollination "efficiency"). From the plant perspective, pollen grains that do not pollinate conspecific stigmas are "wasted", and potentially costly. We measured costs and benefits of nectar-collecting, pollen-collecting, and pollen-specialist pollinator visitation to the spring ephemeral Claytonia virginica. Visits by the pollen-specialist bee Andrena erigeniae depleted pollen quickly and thoroughly. Although all pollinators delivered roughly the same number of grains, the pollen specialist contributed most to C. virginica pollen delivery because of high visitation rates. However, the pollen specialist also removed a large number of grains; this removal may be especially costly because it resulted in the depletion of pollen grains in C. virginica populations. While C. virginica appears to rely on pollen transfer by the pollen specialist in these populations, nectar-collecting visitors could provide the same benefit at a lower cost if their visitation rates increased. Pollen depletion affects a pollinator's value to plants, but is frequently overlooked. If they lower the effectiveness of future floral visitors, visits by A. erigeniae females to C. virginica may be more detrimental than beneficial compared to other pollinators and may, in some circumstances, reduce plant fitness rather than increase it. Therefore, A. erigeniae and C. virginica may vary in their degree of mutualism depending on the ecological context. PMID:27551374

  16. Hyperspectral Mapping of Iron-bearing Minerals Associated with Dry and Ephemeral Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Bowen, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    This research project is utilizing data from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) on the International Space Station (ISS) to examine a set of playas and ephemeral lakes in Australia and in the southwestern United States. HICO collects hyperspectral data from 0.35 to 1.08 μm thus excluding the SWIR vibrational overtone region of clays and carbonates. We are assessing the utility of HICO for detecting iron-bearing minerals and materials associated with playas and mapping their fractional abundance outside of the playa boundaries. Sites being investigated include the clastics-dominated Railroad Valley and Lunar Lake playas of Nevada, the evaporite-dominated Bonneville Salt Flats, and the acid-saline Lake Tyrrell of northwest Victoria, Australia. HICO, and supporting airborne hyperspectral datasets (AVIRIS and HyMap), are being converted from at-sensor radiance to surface reflectance using the FLAASH radiance transfer-based atmospheric correction software. Fe-bearing minerals and materials are determined through a standardized endmember detection approach using the commercial ENVI software and mapped using a variety of approaches including linear spectral mixture analysis, constrained energy minimization, and spectral feature fitting. Interpretations of remote data are guided by field-based observations and mapping. We are using the remote sensing data to assess the surface state of the playa (wet vs. dry, soft vs. hard). These factors have bearing in that dusts stripped from playa surfaces can affect nearby human communities and agricultural fields. Playas are also used for recreation and sometimes as transportation corridors and their physical state has important bearing for those functions. Assessing the types of minerals present has relevance for their impact as wind-entrained particulates that could have adverse effects on the health of humans, crops, or livestock.

  17. Treating Allergies, Hay Fever, and Hives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hay Fever, and Hives: Comparing Effectiveness, Safety, and Price There are newer antihistamines. Antihistamines are drugs that ... prescription only, monthly costs reflect nationwide retail average prices for February 2013, rounded to the nearest dollar. ...

  18. A Physician's Nightmare: Fever of Unknown Origin

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Farrukh

    2016-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains to be a challenge despite advancement in diagnostic technologies and procedures. FUO is considered when fever presents intermittently without an explanation. It has been linked to various etiologies, which makes it difficult to diagnose. We present the case of 18-month-old female with recurrent fever, splenomegaly, abdominal pain, and constipation. The workup for her symptoms revealed wandering spleen. Wandering spleen is a result from excessive laxity or absence of splenic ligaments. The patient underwent splenectomy and was advised to continue on Senna, Miralax, and high fiber diet. Her mother reported that the fever is no longer present and there is marked improvement in her constipation and abdominal pain after splenectomy. PMID:27433363

  19. Genetics Home Reference: familial Mediterranean fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epub 2013 Sep 9. Review. Citation on PubMed Lidar M, Kedem R, Berkun Y, Langevitz P, Livneh ... 090401. Epub 2009 Dec 15. Citation on PubMed Lidar M, Livneh A. Familial Mediterranean fever: clinical, molecular ...

  20. Airborne Dust Models in Valley Fever Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, W. A.; Galgiani, J. N.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Vukovic, A. J.; Prasad, A. K.; Djurdjevic, V.; Nickovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    Dust storms (haboobs) struck Phoenix, Arizona, in 2011 on July 5th and again on July 18th. One potential consequence: an estimated 3,600 new cases of Valley Fever in Maricopa County from the first storm alone. The fungi, Coccidioides immitis, the cause of the respiratory infection, Valley Fever, lives in the dry desert soils of the American southwest and southward through Mexico, Central America and South America. The fungi become part of the dust storm and, a few weeks after inhalation, symptoms of Valley Fever may appear, including pneumonia-like illness, rashes, and severe fatigue. Some fatalities occur. Our airborne dust forecast system predicted the timing and extent of the storm, as it has done with other, often different, dust events. Atmosphere/land surface models can be part of public health services to reduce risk of Valley Fever and exacerbation of other respiratory and cardiovascular illness.

  1. Treatment of Fever After Stroke: Conflicting Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wrotek, Sylwia E.; Kozak, Wieslaw E.; Hess, David C.; Fagan, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 50% of patients hospitalized for stroke develop fever. In fact, experimental evidence suggests that high body temperature is significantly correlated to initial stroke severity, lesion size, mortality, and neurologic outcome. Fever occurring after stroke is associated with poor outcomes. We investigated the etiology of fever after stroke and present evidence evaluating the efficacy and safety of interventions used to treat stroke-associated fever. Oral antipyretics are only marginally effective in lowering elevated body temperature in this population and may have unintended adverse consequences. Nonpharmacologic approaches to cooling have been more effective in achieving normothermia, but whether stroke outcomes can be improved remains unclear. We recommend using body temperature as a biomarker and a catalyst for aggressive investigation for an infectious etiology. Care must be taken not to exceed the new standard of a maximum acetaminophen does of 3 g/day to avoid patient harm. PMID:22026396

  2. Moxalactam in the treatment of typhoid fever.

    PubMed Central

    Uwaydah, M; Vartivarian, S; Shatila, S; Raad, I; Harakeh, H; Nassar, N T

    1986-01-01

    Moxalactam therapy was evaluated in 25 patients with typhoid fever. A satisfactory initial response was observed in all cases. Treatment for 3 days resulted in a much higher relapse rate (three of five patients) than did treatment for 5 days (one of nine patients). None of the 11 patients treated for 10 to 11 days relapsed. Moxalactam is effective in typhoid fever, but its use is better restricted to special indications. PMID:3532946

  3. An Unusual Manifestation of Q Fever: Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Gülden; Öztürk, Bengi; Memikoğlu, Osman; Coşkun, Belgin; Yalçı, Aysun; Metin, Özge; Ünal, Hatice; Kurt, Halil

    2015-01-01

    Q fever has rarely been reported and can be difficult to diagnose, especially in immunocompromised patients. In the present report, we describe an unusual case of Q fever that presented as peritonitis and was treated with long-term combination therapy with doxycycline, ciprofloxacin and rifampicin for five weeks in a patient who had been on peritoneal dialysis for six years due to hypertensive nephropathy. PMID:25899561

  4. [Dengue fever in mainland France].

    PubMed

    Paty, M-C

    2014-11-01

    Dengue fever is the most widespread distributed vector borne viral disease. It is transmitted through the bites of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. With the expansion of Aedes albopictus and increasing travel exchange, it is no longer limited to the tropical zone and transmission has been documented in temperate areas. In mainland France, where Aedes albopictus has been present and disseminating since 2004, 2 episodes of autochthonous transmission occurred in 2010 and in 2013. Control measures against dengue and chikungunya, which shares the same vector, are implemented every year since 2006, in the areas where the vector is present. They aim at preventing or limiting local transmission of these diseases. They are based on epidemiological and entomological surveillance and vector control measures. The diagnosis of dengue, and chikungunya should be considered in case of suggestive symptoms in patients returning from an area of virus circulation. It should also be considered for patients living or having stayed in areas of mainland France where Aedes albopictus is present, during its activity period from May 1 to November 30. The prevention and control system, including vector control measures and the notification of cases to the local health authority should be known, as the risk of autochthonous transmission increases every year. PMID:25080833

  5. The evolution of an annual life cycle in killifish: adaptation to ephemeral aquatic environments through embryonic diapause.

    PubMed

    Furness, Andrew I

    2016-08-01

    An annual life cycle is characterized by growth, maturity, and reproduction condensed into a single, short season favourable to development, with production of embryos (seeds, cysts, or eggs) capable of surviving harsh conditions which juveniles or adults cannot tolerate. More typically associated with plants in desert environments, or temperate-zone insects exposed to freezing winters, the evolution of an annual life cycle in vertebrates is fairly novel. Killifish, small sexually dimorphic fishes in the Order Cyprinodontiformes, have adapted to seasonally ephemeral water bodies across much of Africa and South America through the independent evolution of an annual life history. These annual killifish produce hardy desiccation-resistant eggs that undergo diapause (developmental arrest) and remain buried in the soil for long periods when fish have perished due to the drying of their habitat. Killifish are found in aquatic habitats that span a continuum from permanent and stable to seasonal and variable, thus providing a useful system in which to piece together the evolutionary history of this life cycle using natural comparative variation. I first review adaptations for life in ephemeral aquatic environments in killifish, with particular emphasis on the evolution of embryonic diapause. I then bring together available evidence from a variety of approaches and provide a scenario for how this annual life cycle evolved. There are a number of features within Aplocheiloidei killifish including their inhabitation of marginal or edge aquatic habitat, their small size and rapid attainment of maturity, and egg properties that make them particularly well suited to the colonization of ephemeral waters. PMID:25969869

  6. Water balance complexities in ephemeral catchments with different land uses: Insights from monitoring and distributed hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, J. F.; Camporese, M.; Webb, J. A.; Grover, S. P.; Dresel, P. E.; Daly, E.

    2016-06-01

    Although ephemeral catchments are widespread in arid and semiarid climates, the relationship of their water balance with climate, geology, topography, and land cover is poorly known. Here we use 4 years (2011-2014) of rainfall, streamflow, and groundwater level measurements to estimate the water balance components in two adjacent ephemeral catchments in south-eastern Australia, with one catchment planted with young eucalypts and the other dedicated to grazing pasture. To corroborate the interpretation of the observations, the physically based hydrological model CATHY was calibrated and validated against the data in the two catchments. The estimated water balances showed that despite a significant decline in groundwater level and greater evapotranspiration in the eucalypt catchment (104-119% of rainfall) compared with the pasture catchment (95-104% of rainfall), streamflow consistently accounted for 1-4% of rainfall in both catchments for the entire study period. Streamflow in the two catchments was mostly driven by the rainfall regime, particularly rainfall frequency (i.e., the number of rain days per year), while the downslope orientation of the plantation furrows also promoted runoff. With minimum calibration, the model was able to adequately reproduce the periods of flow in both catchments in all years. Although streamflow and groundwater levels were better reproduced in the pasture than in the plantation, model-computed water balance terms confirmed the estimates from the observations in both catchments. Overall, the interplay of climate, topography, and geology seems to overshadow the effect of land use in the study catchments, indicating that the management of ephemeral catchments remains highly challenging.

  7. African swine fever virus serotype-specific proteins are significant protective antigens for African swine fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African swine fever (ASF) is an emerging disease threat for the swine industry worldwide. No ASF vaccine is available and progress is hindered by lack of knowledge concerning the extent of African swine fever virus (ASFV) strain diversity and the viral antigens conferring type specific protective im...

  8. Acute Q fever in southern Taiwan: atypical manifestations of hyperbilirubinemia and prolonged fever.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ko; Lee, Nan-Yao; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lee, Hsin-Chun; Lu, Po-Liang; Chang, Chia-Ming; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Hsieh, Hsiao-Chen; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2008-02-01

    The clinical information of acute Q fever in Taiwan was limited. A clinical study of 109 adults with serologically documented acute Q fever in the past decade (1994-2005) at 3 referral hospitals in southern Taiwan was reported. Their clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and clinical outcomes were analyzed. Males predominated (98, 90%). There is a significant correlation between monthly average temperature and case numbers of acute Q fever (r = 0.74, P = 0.006). Fever (99%), chills (69%), and headache (45%) were the common symptoms, and relative bradycardia (44/60, 73 %) was often noted. Acute hepatitis, defined as either serum aspartate aminotransferase >or=60 IU/L or alanine aminotransferase >or=78 IU/L, was found in 88 (85%) cases, and more than one-third (31/87, 36%) had hyperbilirubinemia (serum total bilirubin >or=1.4 mg/dL) at initial presentation. The intervals between initiation of appropriate therapy to defervescence were longer in patients with hyperbilirubinemia than those without hyperbilirubinemia, irrespective of tetracycline or fluoroquinolone therapy. Of note, 8 (7.3%) cases experienced a prolonged period of fever (>28 days). In southern Taiwan, the predominant presentation of acute Q fever is acute febrile illness with hepatitis with or without jaundice. Acute Q fever should be added to the list of differential diagnoses of patients with fever, headache, relative bradycardia, elevated serum aminotransferase levels, or prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time, irrespective of jaundice. PMID:17949935

  9. Geophysical Imaging of Near Surface Hydrostratigraphy in Arid Ephemeral Stream Systems Near Yuma, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, D. L.; Sutfin, N. A.; Shaw, J. R.; Faulconer, J.; Genco, A. J.; Wohl, E.; Kampf, S. K.; Cooper, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar and DC electrical resistivity profiles image the upper 4 m of the subsurface beneath ephemeral streams in Yuma and Mohave Washes in the Sonoran Desert, 30 km northeast of Yuma, Arizona. The geophysical data are tied to trenches to establish a lithostratigraphic interpretation. Archie's Law, calibrated to resistivity measurements on soil samples from each site, is used to estimate in-situ soil pore saturation. Three different stream types are surveyed. Increasing in stream order, these are incised bedrock with alluvium fill, incised alluvium, and braided streams. Three radar facies are identified on the basis of reflection amplitude, continuity, and dip. Near the surface, RF1 (0.5-1.5 m thick) contains laterally continuous sheetlike deposits interpreted to be active channel gravel, sand, and cobble deposits reworked during floods. Below, RF2 contains moderately continuous downlapping and onlapping reflections interpreted to be partially lithified Pleistocene gravel and cobble valley fill deposits. The underlying facies RF3 is nearly reflection free, but at the larger washes contains weak reflection similar in character to RF2. In the smaller washes, RF3 contains abundant diffractions. Two electrofacies are identified. The shallowest, EF1, extends from the surface to ~2.5 m deep. EF1 encompasses radar facies RF1 and RF2, with resistivity ranging from 250-1500 ohm-m. Estimated soil moisture in this facies ranges from 2-40%, and varies up to 20% laterally over 2-5 m distances in the smallest washes. Facies EF2 coincides with radar facies RF3, with resistivity ranging from 10-300 ohm-m and estimated pore saturation is estimated to exceed 70%. Electrofacies EF1 is inferred to represent a relatively dry surficial layer that includes the modern channel deposits and the upper ~1 m of the Pleistocene strata. At the larger washes, EF2 is interpreted to be Pleistocene valley fill, distinguishable from the overlying lithologically equivalent Pleistocene

  10. On the ecohydrologic function and disturbance effects of ephemeral desert stream channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, David; Schwinning, Susan; Newlander, April; Miller, David; Sandquist, Darren

    2010-05-01

    Ephemeral stream channels are widespread features throughout desert landscapes, particularly on alluvial fans. These channels range in width from a few tens of centimeters to many meters. Runoff in these channels can redistribute water from upper portions of the landscape in response to rare high-intensity or long duration rainstorms. Visual observations suggest that shrubland vegetation is often clustered at higher cover alongside these channels. We are using transect studies, mapping, monitoring and manipulation experiments to investigate the hydrologic relations of these features to vegetation in the eastern Mojave Desert of the USA. We use a piedmont that is perpendicularly transected by a ~100 year old railroad that alters natural flow by diverting it through staggered culverts to areas below the railroad. This creates an opportunity to study: 1) relatively undisturbed areas above the railroad, 2) areas below the railroad that receive enhanced flow where water is diverted through culverts (enhanced) and, 3) areas below the railroad where water flow from upslope has been blocked (deprived). In all areas we found that vegetation cover and density is higher alongside stream channels and decreases with distance from the channels. In all but the deprived areas, vegetation is nearly absent in the stream channels. Relative to the upper undisturbed areas, vegetation cover is higher in the enhanced areas, and lower in the deprived areas; however, when diversion is not considered cover above and below the road is equal overall. Furthermore, species-specific differences were present. The drought deciduous sub-shrub Ambrosia dumosa shows increased cover in deprived areas and in all areas peaked closer to the channel margin than the evergreen drought-tolerant shrub Larrea tridentata, we believe due to differences in root morphology. In a simulated channel runoff event, we found that vegetation within 3 meters of the stream channel physiologically responded (elevated water

  11. Malignant catarrhal fever: a review.

    PubMed

    Russell, George C; Stewart, James P; Haig, David M

    2009-03-01

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease of cattle and other ungulates caused by the ruminant gamma-herpesviruses alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) and ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2). These viruses cause inapparent infection in their reservoir hosts (wildebeest for AlHV-1 and sheep for OvHV-2), but fatal lymphoproliferative disease when they infect MCF-susceptible hosts, including cattle, deer, bison, water buffalo and pigs. MCF is an important disease wherever reservoir and MCF-susceptible species mix and currently is a particular problem in Bali cattle in Indonesia, bison in the USA and in pastoralist cattle herds in Eastern and Southern Africa. MCF is characterised by the accumulation of lymphocytes (predominantly CD8(+) T lymphocytes) in a variety of organs, often associated with tissue necrosis. Only a small proportion of these lymphocytes appear to contain virus, although recent results with virus gene-specific probes indicate that more infected cells may be present than previously thought. The tissue damage in MCF is hypothesised to be caused by the indiscriminate activity of MHC-unrestricted cytotoxic T/natural killer cells. The pathogenesis of MCF and the virus life cycle are poorly understood and, currently, there is no effective disease control. Recent sequencing of the OvHV-2 genome and construction of an AlHV-1 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) are facilitating studies to understand the pathogenesis of this extraordinary disease. Furthermore, new and improved methods of disease diagnosis have been developed and promising vaccine strategies are being tested. The next few years are likely to be exciting and productive for MCF research. PMID:18760944

  12. Yellow fever vaccination in the Americas.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Outbreaks of yellow fever in recent years in the Americas have prompted concern about the possible urbanization of jungle fever. Vaccination, using the 17D strain of yellow fever virus, provides an effective, practical method of large scale protection against the disease. Because yellow fever can reappear in certain areas after a 2-year dormancy period, some countries maintain routine vaccination programs in areas where jungle yellow fever is endemic. The size of the endemic area (approximately half of South America), transportation and communication difficulties, and the inability to ensure a reliable cold chain are problems facing these programs. In addition, the problem of reaching dispersed and isolated populations has been addressed by the use of mobile teams, radio monitoring, and educational methods. During yellow fever outbreaks, many countries institute massive vaccination campaigns, targeted at temporary workers and migrants. Because epidemics in South America may involve extensive areas, these campaigns may not effectively address the problem. The ped-o-jet injector method, used in Brazil and Colombia, should be used in outbreak situations, as it is effective for large-scale vaccination. Vaccine by needle, suggested for maintenance programs, should be administered to those above 1 year of age. An efficient monitoring method to avoid revaccination, and to assess immunity, should be developed. The 17D strain produces seroconversion in 95% of recipients, and most is prepared in Brazil and Colombia. But, problems with storage methods, instability in seed lots, and difficulties in large-scale production were identified in 1981 by the Pan American Health Organization and WHO. The group recommended modernization of current production techniques and further research to develop a vaccine that could be produced in cell cultures. Brazil and Colombia have acted on these recommendations, modernizing vaccine production and researching thermostabilizing media for

  13. Context dependency and generality of fever in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahlschmidt, Z. R.; Adamo, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Fever can reduce mortality in infected animals. Yet, despite its fitness-enhancing qualities, fever often varies among animals. We used several approaches to examine this variation in insects. Texas field crickets ( Gryllus texensis) exhibited a modest fever (1 °C increase in preferred body temperature, T pref) after injection of prostaglandin, which putatively mediates fever in both vertebrates and invertebrates, but they did not exhibit fever during chronic exposure to heat-killed bacteria. Further, chronic food limitation and mating status did not affect T pref or the expression of behavioural fever, suggesting limited context dependency of fever in G. texensis. Our meta-analysis of behavioural fever studies indicated that behavioural fever occurs in many insects, but it is not ubiquitous. Thus, both empirical and meta-analytical results suggest that the fever response in insects `is widespread, although certainly not inevitable' (Moore 2002). We highlight the need for future work focusing on standardizing an experimental protocol to measure behavioural fever, understanding the specific mechanism(s) underlying fever in insects, and examining whether ecological or physiological costs often outweigh the benefits of fever and can explain the sporadic nature of fever in insects.

  14. Role of fever in infection: has induced fever any therapeutic potential in HIV infection?

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R S; Rashid, S

    1997-01-01

    Ancient societies had no rational understanding of fever. The Greeks were the first to recognise that it may be part of nature's method of effecting cure in some diseases. How best to assist nature went through many trials and errors. Appreciation of the prognostic value of fever and how it may be controlled was slow to appear. That there was a place in the therapeutic arsenal for induced fever came only with the 20th century. Finding a suitable, safe, and satisfactory means came slowly. The curative power of well controlled and reproducible levels of fever was proved by the arrest of one deadly and incurable complication of a sexually transmitted disease in the first half of this century. The purpose of this review is to promote discussion and, hopefully, well ordered laboratory and clinical trials aimed at learning whether or not induced fevers have a place in the care of patients with HIV/AIDS. Images PMID:9306904

  15. Ephemeral-Stream Channel and Basin-Floor Infiltration and Recharge in the Sierra Vista Subwatershed of the Upper San Pedro Basin, Southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coes, A.L.; Pool, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    The timing and location of streamflow in the San Pedro River are partially dependent on the aerial distribution of recharge in the Sierra Vista subwatershed. Previous investigators have assumed that recharge in the subwatershed occurs only along the mountain fronts by way of stream-channel infiltration near the contact between low-permeability rocks of the mountains and the basin fill. Recent studies in other alluvial basins of the Southwestern United States, however, have shown that significant recharge can occur through the sediments of ephemeral stream channels at locations several kilometers distant from the mountains. The purpose of this study was to characterize the spatial distribution of infiltration and subsequent recharge through the ephemeral channels in the Sierra Vista subwatershed. Infiltration fluxes in ephemeral channels and through the basin floor of the subwatershed were estimated by using several methods. Data collected during the drilling and coring of 16 boreholes included physical, thermal, and hydraulic properties of sediments; chloride concentrations of sediments; and pore-water stable-isotope values and tritium activity. Surface and subsurface sediment temperatures were continuously measured at each borehole. Twelve boreholes were drilled in five ephemeral stream channels to estimate infiltration within ephemeral channels. Active infiltration was verified to at least 20 meters at 11 of the 12 borehole sites on the basis of low sediment-chloride concentrations, high soil-water contents, and pore-water tritium activity similar to present-day precipitation. Consolidated sediments at the twelfth site prevented core recovery and estimation of infiltration. Analytical and numerical methods were applied to determine the surface infiltration flux required to produce the observed sediment-temperature fluctuations at six sites. Infiltration fluxes were determined for summer ephemeral flow events only because no winter flows were recorded at the sites

  16. Bichat guidelines for the clinical management of haemorrhagic fever viruses and bioterrorism-related haemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Philippe; Tegnell, Anders; Baka, Agoritsa; Van Loock, Frank; Hendriks, Jan; Werner, Albrecht; Maidhof, Heinrich; Gouvras, Georgios

    2004-12-01

    Haemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse group of viruses that cause a clinical disease associated with fever and bleeding disorder. HFVs that are associated with a potential biological threat are Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), Lassa fever and New World arenaviruses (Machupo, Junin, Guanarito and Sabia viruses) (Arenaviridae), Rift Valley fever (Bunyaviridae) and yellow fever, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, and Kyanasur Forest disease (Flaviviridae). In terms of biological warfare concerning dengue, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and Hantaviruses, there is not sufficient knowledge to include them as a major biological threat. Dengue virus is the only one of these that cannot be transmitted via aerosol. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and the agents of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome appear difficult to weaponise. Ribavirin is recommended for the treatment and the prophylaxis of the arenaviruses and the bunyaviruses, but is not effective for the other families. All patients must be isolated and receive intensive supportive therapy. PMID:15677844

  17. Imported Lassa fever--New Jersey, 2004.

    PubMed

    2004-10-01

    Lassa fever is an acute viral illness caused by Lassa virus, which is hosted by rodents in the Mastomys natalensis species complex and rarely imported to countries outside of those areas in Africa where the disease is endemic. Lassa fever is characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, and chest and abdominal pain. Approximately 15%-20% of patients hospitalized for Lassa fever die from the illness; however, approximately 80% of human infections with Lassa virus are mild or asymptomatic, and 1% of infections overall result in death. On August 28, 2004, a man aged 38 years residing in New Jersey died from Lassa fever after returning from travel to West Africa. This report summarizes the clinical and epidemiologic investigations conducted by federal, state, and local public health agencies. The findings illustrate the need for clinicians and public health officials to remain alert to emerging infectious diseases and to institute appropriate measures to promptly identify and limit spread of unusual pathogens. PMID:15457145

  18. How do sink and source activities influence the reproduction and vegetative growth of spring ephemeral herbs under different light conditions?

    PubMed

    Sunmonu, Ninuola; Kudo, Gaku

    2014-07-01

    Spring ephemeral herbs inhabiting deciduous forests commonly complete reproduction and vegetative growth before canopy closure in early summer. Effects of shading by early canopy closure on reproductive output and vegetative growth, however, may vary depending on the seasonal allocation patterns of photosynthetic products between current reproduction and storage for future growth in each species. To clarify the effects of sink-source balance on seed production and bulb growth in a spring ephemeral herb, Gagea lutea, we performed a bract removal treatment (source reduction) and a floral-bud removal treatment (sink reduction) under canopy and open conditions. Leaf carbon fixations did not differ between the forest and open sites and among treatments. Bract carbon fixations were also similar between sites but tended to decrease when floral buds were removed. Seed production was higher under open condition but decreased by the bract-removal treatment under both light conditions. In contrast, bulb growth was independent of light conditions and the bract-removal treatment but increased greatly by the bud-removal treatment. Therefore, leaves and bracts acted as specialized source organs for vegetative and reproductive functions, respectively, but photosynthetic products by bracts were flexibly used for bulb growth when plants failed to set fruits. Extension of bright period was advantageous for seed production (i.e., source limited) but not for vegetative growth (i.e., sink limited) in this species. PMID:24879401

  19. Freshwater seepages and ephemeral macroalgae proliferation in an intertidal bay: I Effect on benthic community structure and food web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouisse, Vincent; Riera, Pascal; Migné, Aline; Leroux, Cédric; Davoult, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater seepages and ephemeral Enteromorpha spp. proliferation create heterogeneity at small spatial scale in intertidal sediment. Macrobenthic community diversity was compared between these two disturbances and their respective control points throughout the year 2007 at the Roscoff Aber Bay (Western English Channel, France). In March and September 2007, trophic community pathways of characteristic species were additionally studied using stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen. The low salinity recorded at the freshwater seepage induced the exclusion of the main bioturbator and the presence of omnivores which modified the community composition by biotic pressure. Moreover, food web analyses clearly highlighted a separation at small spatial scale between the two trophic pathways of the impacted area and its control. On the contrary, little differences were observed owning to the ephemeral Enteromorpha spp. proliferation. This suggested a progressive and diffusive disturbance which was applied from the algal mat to the nearby area. However, seasonal changes were observed. First, the algal expansion phase increased the macrofauna diversity and foraminifers' abundance (meiofauna) and then acted as a physical barrier decreasing sediment and water column exchanges and decreasing the fauna diversity. This study highlights the need to take into account small spatial heterogeneity to avoid misinterpretations in intertidal ecology studies.

  20. Dengue haemorrhagic fever with unusual prolonged thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Kamil, S M; Mohamad, N H; Narazah, M Y; Khan, F A

    2006-04-01

    We describe a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever with prolonged thrombocytopaenia. A 22-year-old Malay man with no prior illness presented with a history of fever and generalised macular rash of four days duration. Initial work-up suggested the diagnosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever based on thrombocytopaenia and positive dengue serology. Patient recovered from acute illness by day ten, and was discharged from the hospital with improving platelet count. He was then noted to have declining platelet count on follow-up and required another hospital admission on day 19 of his illness because of declining platelet count. The patient remained hospitalised till day 44 of his illness and managed with repeated platelet transfusion and supportive care till he recovered spontaneously. PMID:16572249

  1. Immunological features underlying viral hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Ilhem; Basler, Christopher F

    2015-10-01

    Several enveloped RNA viruses of the arenavirus, bunyavirus, filovirus and flavivirus families are associated with a syndrome known as viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF). VHF is characterized by fever, vascular leakage, coagulation defects and multi organ system failure. VHF is currently viewed as a disease precipitated by viral suppression of innate immunity, which promotes systemic virus replication and excessive proinflammatory cytokine responses that trigger the manifestations of severe disease. However, the mechanisms by which immune dysregulation contributes to disease remain poorly understood. Infection of nonhuman primates closely recapitulates human VHF, notably Ebola and yellow fever, thereby providing excellent models to better define the immunological basis for this syndrome. Here we review the current state of our knowledge and suggest future directions that will better define the immunological mechanisms underlying VHF. PMID:26163194

  2. Quinolone and Cephalosporin Resistance in Enteric Fever

    PubMed Central

    Capoor, Malini Rajinder; Nair, Deepthi

    2010-01-01

    Enteric fever is a major public health problem in developing countries. Ciprofloxacin resistance has now become a norm in the Indian subcontinent. Novel molecular substitutions may become frequent in future owing to selective pressures exerted by the irrational use of ciprofloxacin in human and veterinary therapeutics, in a population endemic with nalidixic acid-resistant strains. The therapeutics of ciprofloxacin-resistant enteric fever narrows down to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, azithromycin, tigecycline and penems. The first-line antimicrobials ampicillin, chloramphenicol and co-trimoxazole need to be rolled back. Antimicrobial surveillance coupled with molecular analysis of fluoroquinolone resistance is warranted for reconfirming novel and established molecular patterns for therapeutic reappraisal and for novel-drug targets. This review explores the antimicrobial resistance and its molecular mechanisms, as well as novel drugs in the therapy of enteric fever. PMID:20927288

  3. Lost Trust: A Yellow Fever Patient Response

    PubMed Central

    Runge, John S.

    2013-01-01

    In the 19th century, yellow fever thrived in the tropical, urban trade centers along the American Gulf Coast. Industrializing and populated, New Orleans and Memphis made excellent habitats for the yellow fever-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and the virulence they imparted on their victims. Known for its jaundice and black, blood-filled vomit, the malady terrorized the region for decades, sometimes claiming tens of thousands of lives during the near annual summertime outbreaks. In response to the failing medical community, a small, pronounced population of sick and healthy laypeople openly criticized the efforts to rid the Gulf region of yellow jack. Utilizing newspapers and cartoons to vocalize their opinions, these critics doubted and mocked the medical community, contributing to the regional and seasonal dilemma yellow fever posed for the American South. These sentient expressions prove to be an early example of patient distrust toward caregivers, a current problem in clinical heath care. PMID:24348220

  4. Optimal Repellent Usage to Combat Dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Dorsett, Chasity; Oh, Hyunju; Paulemond, Marie Laura; Rychtář, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Dengue fever is one of the most important vector-borne diseases. It is transmitted by Aedes Stegomyia aegypti, and one of the most effective strategies to combat the disease is the reduction of exposure to bites of these mosquitoes. In this paper, we present a game-theoretical model in which individuals choose their own level of protection against mosquito bites in order to maximize their own benefits, effectively balancing the cost of protection and the risk of contracting the dengue fever. We find that even when the usage of protection is strictly voluntary, as soon as the cost of protection is about 10,000 times less than the cost of contracting dengue fever, the optimal level of protection will be within 5 % of the level needed for herd immunity. PMID:27142427

  5. Fever: suppress or let it ride?

    PubMed

    Ray, Juliet J; Schulman, Carl I

    2015-12-01

    While our ability to detect and manage fever has evolved since its conceptualization in the 5(th) century BC, controversy remains over the best evidence-based practices regarding if and when to treat this physiologic derangement in the critically ill. There are two basic fields of thought: (I) fever should be suppressed because its metabolic costs outweigh its potential physiologic benefit in an already stressed host; vs. (II) fever is a protective adaptive response that should be allowed to run its course under most circumstances. The latter approach, sometime referred to as the "let it ride" philosophy, has been supported by several recent randomized controlled trials like that of Young et al. [2015], which are challenging earlier observational studies and may be pushing the pendulum away from the Pavlovian treatment response. PMID:26793378

  6. Fever: suppress or let it ride?

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Juliet J.

    2015-01-01

    While our ability to detect and manage fever has evolved since its conceptualization in the 5th century BC, controversy remains over the best evidence-based practices regarding if and when to treat this physiologic derangement in the critically ill. There are two basic fields of thought: (I) fever should be suppressed because its metabolic costs outweigh its potential physiologic benefit in an already stressed host; vs. (II) fever is a protective adaptive response that should be allowed to run its course under most circumstances. The latter approach, sometime referred to as the “let it ride” philosophy, has been supported by several recent randomized controlled trials like that of Young et al. [2015], which are challenging earlier observational studies and may be pushing the pendulum away from the Pavlovian treatment response. PMID:26793378

  7. Clinical aspects of Marburg hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Mehedi, Masfique; Groseth, Allison; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Marburg virus belongs to the genus Marburgvirus in the family Filoviridae and causes a severe hemorrhagic fever, known as Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), in both humans and nonhuman primates. Similar to the more widely known Ebola hemorrhagic fever, MHF is characterized by systemic viral replication, immunosuppression and abnormal inflammatory responses. These pathological features of the disease contribute to a number of systemic dysfunctions including hemorrhages, edema, coagulation abnormalities and, ultimately, multiorgan failure and shock, often resulting in death. A detailed understanding of the pathological processes that lead to this devastating disease remains elusive, a fact that contributes to the lack of licensed vaccines or effective therapeutics. This article will review the clinical aspects of MHF and discuss the pathogenesis and possible options for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:22046196

  8. Effect of (social) media on the political figure fever model: Jokowi-fever model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Benny; Samat, Nor Azah

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, political figures begin to utilize social media as one of alternative to engage in communication with their supporters. Publics referred to Jokowi, one of the candidates in Indonesia presidential election in 2014, as the first politician in Indonesia to truly understand the power of social media. Social media is very important in shaping public opinion. In this paper, effect of social media on the Jokowi-fever model in a closed population will be discussed. Supporter population is divided into three class sub-population, i.e susceptible supporters, Jokowi infected supporters, and recovered supporters. For case no positive media, there are two equilibrium points; the Jokowi-fever free equilibrium point in which it locally stable if basic reproductive ratio less than one and the Jokowi-fever endemic equilibrium point in which it locally stable if basic reproductive ratio greater than one. For case no negative media, there is only the Jokowi-fever endemic equilibrium point in which it locally stable if the condition is satisfied. Generally, for case positive media proportion is positive, there is no Jokowi-fever free equilibrium point. The numerical result shows that social media gives significantly effect on Jokowi-fever model, a sharp increase or a sharp decrease in the number of Jokowi infected supporters. It is also shown that the boredom rate is one of the sensitive parameters in the Jokowi-fever model; it affects the number of Jokowi infected supporters.

  9. Mecillinam: a new antibiotic for enteric fever.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, P D; Geddes, A M; McGhie, D; Wall, J C

    1976-01-01

    Mecillinam is a new antibiotic related to the penicillins but more active than ampicillin against salmonellae, including Salmonella typhi. Mecillinam must be administered parenterally, but the ester, pivmecillinam, is absorbed from the gut. Eight patients suffering from typhoid fever and one suffering from paratyphoid fever were treated with the antibiotic, and seven responded satisfactorily. One patient could not tolerate pivmecillinam because of vomiting but there were no other adverse reactions. Serum and bile levels of mecillinam were many times the minimum inhibitory concentrations for most salmonellae. The antibiotic is a promising addition to the agents available for treating typhoid. PMID:820402

  10. Milk Fever Control Principles: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Three main preventive principles against milk fever were evaluated in this literature review, and the efficacy of each principle was estimated from the results of controlled investigations. Oral calcium drenching around calving apparently has a mean efficacy of 50%–60% in terms of milk fever prevention as well as prevention of milk fever relapse after intravenous treatment with calcium solutions. However, some drenches have been shown to cause lesions in the forestomacs. When using the DCAD (dietary cation-anion difference) principle, feeding rations with a negative DCAD (measured as (Na + K) – (Cl + S)) significantly reduce the milk fever incidence. Calculating the relative risk (RR) of developing milk fever from controlled experiments results in a mean RR between 0.19 and 0.35 when rations with a negative versus positive DCAD are compared. The main drawback from the DCAD principle is a palatability problem. The principle of feeding rations low in calcium is highly efficient in milk fever prevention provided the calcium intake in the dry period is kept below 20 g per day. Calculating the relative risk (RR) of developing milk fever from controlled experiments results in a very low mean RR (between 0 and 0.20) (daily calcium intake below versus above 20 g/d). The main problem in implementing the low-Ca principle is difficulties in formulating rations sufficiently low in calcium when using commonly available feeds. The use of large doses of vitamin D metabolites and analogues for milk fever prevention is controversial. Due to toxicity problems and an almost total lack of recent studies on the subject this principle is not described in detail. A few management related issues were discussed briefly, and the following conclusions were made: It is important to supply the periparturient cow with sufficient magnesium to fulfil its needs, and to prevent the dry cows from being too fat. Available information on the influence of carbohydrate intake, and on the effect of

  11. When your baby or infant has a fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever a baby or infant has is often scary for parents. Most fevers are harmless and are ... seizures occur in some children and can be scary to parents. However, most febrile seizures are over ...

  12. Is It Flu, or Is It Valley Fever?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160138.html Is It Flu, or Is It Valley Fever? Potentially fatal infection is found in ... often-overlooked infection, and about 160 die from it, the society says. "Valley fever is underdiagnosed in ...

  13. Field assessment of flood event suspended sediment transport from ephemeral streams in the tropical semi-arid catchments.

    PubMed

    Ondieki, C M

    1995-03-01

    An assessment of suspended sediment transport was carried out in a number of semiarid catchments during flood events in order to quantify the degradation rates. In order to quantify these, a systematic sampling procedure of the episodic flood events was proposed for representative catchments. The procedure allows for an integration over the whole run-off episode using both the rising and falling limbs of the run-off hydrograph to compute the sediment quantities for each individual flood event.Higher sediment concentrations occurred in the rising limb than those at the recession for any stage of flow. The maximum suspended sediment concentration was observed at the peak of the flood hydrograph. An integration of the sediment concentration over its duration gave the total sediment yield from the flood event. For the ephemeral channels, only a small number of flood events were observed over a three-year experimental period each with a duration of the order of 3-6 h. It is notable that high sediment loads were associated with high flow volumes which were effectively the result of the catchment characteristics and incident rainfall causing the flood events in the respective catchments. A large percentage of the annual sediment yield from a catchment is transported by the ephemeral streams during a small number of flood events. The correct determination of the total sediment yield from any of the flood events depends entirely on the accuracy of the measurements.The understanding of run-off and sediment loss for the representative catchments aims at assisting planning, management and control of water and land resources for sustainable development in the semi-arid parts of the tropics. The sediment rates reveal the degradation of catchments which have repercussions on the crop and pasture production and this has a bearing on the soil and water conservation programmes in the delicate ecological balance of the semi-arid areas. Further, these rates will determine the lifespan

  14. Fertilisation of the Southern Atlantic: Ephemeral River Valleys as a replenishing source of nutrient-enriched mineral aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dansie, Andrew; Wiggs, Giles; Thomas, David

    2016-04-01

    Oceanic dust deposition provides biologically important iron and macronutrients (Phosphorus (P) and Nitrogen-based (N) compounds) that contribute to phytoplankton growth, marine productivity and oceanic atmospheric CO2 uptake. Research on dust emission sources to date has largely focused on the northern hemisphere and on ephemeral lakes and pans. Our work considers the ephemeral river valleys of the west coast of Namibia as an important yet overlooked source of ocean-fertilizing dust. Dust plumes are frequently emitted from the river valleys by strong easterly winds during the Southern Hemisphere winter, when the upwelling of the Benguela Current is at its weakest. We present field data from dust emission source areas along the main river channels near the coastal termini of the Huab, Kuiseb and Tsauchab river valleys. Collected data include erodible surface sediment, wind-blown flux, and associated meteorological data. Extensive surface sediment sampling was also undertaken throughout the combined 34,250 km2 extent of each river valley catchment with samples collected from within the main river channels, the main branches of each river system, selected tributaries, and into the upper watersheds. Geochemical data show valley sediment and wind-blown flux material have high concentrations of bioavailable Fe, P and N, exceeding that measured at the major dry lake basin dust sources in southern Africa. The contribution of fertilising deposition material is enhanced by both the spatial proximity of the source areas to the ocean and enrichment of source material by ephemeral fluvial accumulation and desiccation. Results show that geographical factors within each watershed play a key role in the nutrient composition of the emitting fluvial deposits in the river valleys. Analysis explores potential relationships between land use, geology, climate and precipitation in the upper watersheds and their influence on bioavailability of Fe, P and N compounds in wind

  15. 78 FR 8960 - Texas (Splenetic) Fever in Cattle

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ..., Staff Entomologist, Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program Manager, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 39.... Splenetic or tick fever is a contagious, infectious, and communicable disease of cattle that causes cattle.... Currently, the title of part 72 is ``Texas (Splenetic) Tick Fever in Cattle.'' We are changing the title......

  16. Modeling the Contribution of Ephemeral Gully Erosion Under Different Soil Management in An Olive Orchard Microcatchment Using AnnAGNPS Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Spain, few studies have been carried out to explore the erosion caused by processes other than interrill and rill erosion, such as gully and ephemeral gully erosion, especially because most of the available studies have evaluated the erosion at plot scale. A study about the en...

  17. Modeling the contribution of ephemeral gully erosion under different soil managements: A case study in an olive orchard microcatchment using the AnnAGNPS model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Spain, few studies have been carried out to explore the erosion caused by processes other than interril and rill erosion, such as gully and ephemeral gully erosion, especially because most of the available studies have evaluated the erosion at plot scale. A study about the environmental and econo...

  18. [Fever caused by metapramine. Diagnosis of fever caused by psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Le Jeunne, C; Plaisant, O; Henslik, V; Hugues, F C

    1988-01-01

    Because of two hyperthermias, due to metapramine a french antidepressives of the tricyclic family, international literature concerning drug fever induced by psychotropics was reviewed. This study stresses the fact that apart from neuroleptics which are frequently involved in that type of accident, other psychotropics are very rarely responsible of hyperthermia. One hundred and five cases published since 1970 and sufficiently well documented to be analysed according to Dangoumeau's french method of imputation of side effects of drugs, were reviewed. Among these cases, one hundred (95%) corresponded to malignant syndrome of neuroleptics, 89 concerned neuroleptics alone, and 11, neuroleptics associated with other psychotropics. Regarding the different mechanisms which can explain drug fever as described by Lipsky, it seems that concerning psychotropics two types may be retained: Fever due to central dysregulation directly induced by drugs, and mainly, immunoallergic fever, the most frequently seen as described in our two cases. PMID:3364875

  19. Lassa fever or lassa hemorrhagic fever risk to humans from rodent-borne zoonoses.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Megahed, Laila Abdel-Mawla; Abdalla Saleh, Hala Ahmed; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound hemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. Lassa fever, an acute hemorrhagic fever characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and chest and abdominal pain. Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne zoonosis worldwide. Transmission rodents to humans occur by aerosol spread, either from the genus Mastomys rodents' excreta (multimammate rat) or through the close contact with infected patients (nosocomial infection). Other rodents of the genera Rattus, Mus, Lemniscomys, and Praomys are incriminated rodents hosts. Now one may ask do the rodents' ectoparasites play a role in Lassa virus zoonotic transmission. This paper summarized the update knowledge on LHV; hopping it might be useful to the clinicians, nursing staff, laboratories' personals as well as those concerned zoonoses from rodents and rodent control. PMID:26012219

  20. Fever - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... XYZ List of All Topics All Fever - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) French (français) ...

  1. Malignant catarrhal fever: inching towards understanding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is an often lethal infection of many species in the order Artiodactyla, caused by members of the MCF virus group within Gammaherpesvirinae. MCF is a worldwide problem and has a significant economic impact on highly disease-susceptible hosts, such as cattle, bison and ...

  2. Severe spotted fever group rickettsiosis, Australia.

    PubMed

    McBride, William J H; Hanson, Joshua P; Miller, Robert; Wenck, Drew

    2007-11-01

    We report 3 cases of spotted fever group rickettsial infection (presumed Queensland tick typhus) in residents of northern Queensland, Australia, who had unusually severe clinical manifestations. Complications included renal failure, purpura fulminans, and severe pneumonia. Clinical illness caused by Rickettsia australis may not be as benign as previously described. PMID:18217560

  3. Diagnostic approaches for Rift Valley Fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease outbreaks caused by arthropod-borne animal viruses (arboviruses) resulting in significant livestock and economic losses world-wide appear to be increasing. Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus (RVFV) is an important arbovirus that causes lethal disease in cattle, camels, sheep and goats in Sub-Saha...

  4. Prediction of a Rift Valley fever Outbreak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using satellite measurements to detect elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and subsequent elevated normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data in Africa, we predicted an outbreak of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in humans and animals in the Horn of Africa during September 2006-May 2007. We det...

  5. Adjuvant steroids and relapse of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Cooles, P

    1986-10-01

    In a retrospective study, relapse after non-severe acute typhoid fever was highly significantly related to the use of adjuvant steroid in the initial illness. The steroid was given late and in small doses when compared with other studies. Caution should be observed when using steroids in this way as relapse though often mild may be a severe illness. PMID:3795323

  6. Fever and sickness behavior: Friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Harden, L M; Kent, S; Pittman, Q J; Roth, J

    2015-11-01

    Fever has been recognized as an important symptom of disease since ancient times. For many years, fever was treated as a putative life-threatening phenomenon. More recently, it has been recognized as an important part of the body's defense mechanisms; indeed at times it has even been used as a therapeutic agent. The knowledge of the functional role of the central nervous system in the genesis of fever has greatly improved over the last decade. It is clear that the febrile process, which develops in the sick individual, is just one of many brain-controlled sickness symptoms. Not only will the sick individual appear "feverish" but they may also display a range of behavioral changes, such as anorexia, fatigue, loss of interest in usual daily activities, social withdrawal, listlessness or malaise, hyperalgesia, sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction, collectively termed "sickness behavior". In this review we consider the issue of whether fever and sickness behaviors are friend or foe during: a critical illness, the common cold or influenza, in pregnancy and in the newborn. Deciding whether these sickness responses are beneficial or harmful will very much shape our approach to the use of antipyretics during illness. PMID:26187566

  7. Rift Valley fever: A neglected zoonotic disease?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a serious viral disease of animals and humans in Africa and the Middle East that is transmitted by mosquitoes. First isolated in Kenya during an outbreak in 1930, subsequent outbreaks have had a significant impact on animal and human health, as well as national economies. ...

  8. [Metal fume fever, an almost forgotten disease].

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Y; Cantin, D; Le Guerroué, G; Pourriat, J-L

    2010-05-01

    Metal fume fever is an ancient and almost forgotten occupational disease found among welders. Diagnosis is made difficult by the frequency and the non-specific flue-like symptomatology. We present the cases of three patients admitted for developing the symptoms after being exposed to welding fumes. Treatment was symptom based. Severe cases have been described after exposure to military fumes. PMID:20378299

  9. [Typhoid fever in Lebanon: epidemiological study].

    PubMed

    Naji-Rammal, Soraya; Bedrossian, Nora

    2010-01-01

    Typhoid fever is a major public health problem, especially in developing countries. From 2000 through 2008, the infectious disease surveillance unit at the Lebanese Ministry of Public Health received 6148 reports of typhoid cases. A case is considered positive for typhoid or paratyphoid fever when fever of at least 38 degrees C persists for three days, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi or Paratyphi is isolated from blood, bone marrow, or stool. Statistical analysis was performed with STATA v.10 software. The most cases were recorded in 2003 (n=891), followed by 2007 (n=879), while the fewest were recorded in 2005 (n=461). The distribution of typhoid was not homogeneous between age groups: the age group most affected were those aged 20-39 years, followed by those from 10-19 years; those older than 60 years were least affected. Nor was the geographic distribution, by district (combining Nabatieh and the South together), homogeneous. The most affected individuals were in the North (n=2,192), followed by Bekaa (n=1,651) and Mount Lebanon (n= 1,094). Beirut was the least affected, with 210 cases. The results indicate that typhoid fever remains endemic in Lebanon and that the risk of epidemic episodes is still present. PMID:20696646

  10. [Yellow fever: study of an outbreak].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mirtes; Antunes, Carlos Maurício de Figueiredo

    2009-01-01

    This study had the aim of describing an outbreak of yellow fever that occurred in the municipalities under the jurisdiction of the Regional Healthcare Administration of Diamantina, Minas Gerais, between 2002 and 2003, in which 36 cases were notified. This was an autochthonous outbreak of wild-type yellow fever. Failure of vaccinal coverage and low levels of detection of mild cases were found. Among the cases, 33 (91.7%) were male and the age range was from 16 to 67 years. Nineteen (52.8%) of the cases were classified as severe and 12 men (33.3%) died of the disease. All of the cases came from rural areas and presented fever, headache, vomiting, jaundice, myalgia, oliguria and signs of hemorrhage. Surveillance through laboratory tests was the determining factor in diagnosing the outbreak. By describing the epidemiological and clinic findings, this study contributes towards diagnosing and classifying this disease. It was deduced that there is a relationship between deforestation, and outbreaks, and that there is a potential regional risk of yellow fever because of the local development of tourism. PMID:19967234

  11. Passive hemagglutination test for enteric fever.

    PubMed

    Petchclai, B; Ausavarungnirun, R; Manatsathit, S

    1987-01-01

    A passive hemagglutination (PHA) test for serodiagnosis of enteric fever was developed by sensitizing glutaraldehyde-preserved erythrocytes with lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella serogroups A, B, C, and D singly or simultaneously. The lipopolysaccharide-sensitized erythrocytes were tested with sera from 200 blood donors, 100 patients whose hemoculture was positive for Salmonella species, and 10 patients septicemic for other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. The PHA test was positive in 90% of 28 acute-phase serum samples from patients with enteric fever from one hospital and in 93% of 72 acute-phase serum samples from another hospital. It was also positive in 100 and 60% of early- and late-convalescent-phase sera, respectively. The PHA test was negative in all patients septicemic for other members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Absorption of sera from patients with enteric fever with lipopolysaccharide from other members of the Enterobacteriaceae did not reduce PHA titers, indicating the specificity of the PHA test. Simultaneous sensitization with lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella serogroups A, B, C, and D was useful as a screening test in a limited trial with 28 acute-phase sera, 10 early-convalescent-phase sera, and 17 late-convalescent-phase sera. The PHA test is indeed a simple, sensitive, specific, and rapid test supplementing hemoculture in laboratory diagnosis of enteric fever. PMID:3793865

  12. Metal fume fever among galvanized welders.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Datau, E A

    2014-07-01

    The metal fume fever (MFF) is an inhalation fever syndrome in welders of galvanized steel, who join and cut metal parts using flame or electric arc and other sources of heat. Inhalation of certain freshly formed metal oxides produced from welding process can cause MFF as an acute self-limiting flulike illness. The most common cause of MFF is the inhalation of zinc oxide (ZnO). The inhalation of ZnO particles can provoke a number of clinical responses of which accompanied by changes in composition of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, including early increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory marker, and recruitment of inflammatory cells in the lungs. The MFF is characterized by fever, cough, sputing, wheezing, chest tightness, fatique, chills, fever, myalgias, cough, dyspnea, leukocytosis with a left shift, thirst, metallic taste, and salivations. The diagnosis of MFF diagnosis is based on clinical finding and occupational history. The symptoms resolved spontaneously. The treatment of MFF is entirely symptomatic, no specific treatment is indicated for MFF. The mainstay of management of MFF is prevention of sub-sequent exposure to harmful metals. Including public and physician awareness of MFF may help to reduce the occurrence of the disease. PMID:25348190

  13. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the rash, the infection can cause fever, chills, muscle aches, vomiting, and nausea. Typically, RMSF is ... often 103°-105°F (39°-40°C) — with chills, muscle aches, and a severe headache. Eyes can ...

  14. [A case of Yellow fever in 1887].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Sven Erik

    2015-01-01

    A young Danish sailor died from yellow fever in Barbados in 1887. The Shipmaster's letter to the family with a description of the course of the disease, which has been preserved, is presented here together with a photo of the sailor and a painting of the Danish sailing-ship. PMID:27086445

  15. Enzootic Transmission of Yellow Fever Virus, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Auguste, Albert J.; Lemey, Philippe; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Moncada, Maria; Morón, Dulce; Hernandez, Rosa; Navarro, Juan-Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of yellow fever virus (YFV) strains isolated from Venezuela strongly supports YFV maintenance in situ in Venezuela, with evidence of regionally independent evolution within the country. However, there is considerable YFV movement from Brazil to Venezuela and between Trinidad and Venezuela. PMID:25531105

  16. The pathogenesis of cianidanol-induced fever.

    PubMed

    Daniel, P T; Holzschuh, J; Berg, P A

    1988-01-01

    Recently, there has been a variety of reports of adverse drug reactions during therapy with the flavonoid Cianidanol (Ci), a cytoprotective radical scavenger, especially involving haemolytic anaemia and drug fever. To elucidate whether the fever was due to a direct, antigen-independent interaction of Ci with immune competent cells, its effect on macrophage (M phi) function and early biochemical events during lymphocyte activation has been examined. A direct interaction of Ci with M phi was demonstrated, resulting in increased secretion of interleukin-1 (IL-1). The influence of Ci on lymphocyte activation was assessed by measuring levels of cyclic AMP and GMP. At high concentrations of Ci, cAMP levels were increased, and at low Ci concentrations cGMP levels were elevated. Both findings are correlated with lymphocyte proliferation and function, which is increased at low and decreased at high concentrations of Ci. The synthesis of prostaglandin E2 by M phi, an important factor in M phi-mediated suppression, was reduced by increasing doses of Ci, which inhibited M phi-cyclooxygenase. Ci did not affect phospholipase A2 activity. These findings indicate that flavonoid-induced fever may be due to allergic as well as pseudo-allergic mechanisms, the latter probably caused by increased antigen-independent release of IL-1, the endogenous mediator of fever. PMID:2840292

  17. Imported Lassa Fever, Pennsylvania, USA, 2010

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, Adam; McConnell, Ryan; Patel, Ami; Dillon, Katherine E.; Hamilton, Keith; Erickson, Bobbie Rae; Campbell, Shelley; Knust, Barbara; Cannon, Deborah; Miller, David; Manning, Craig; Rollin, Pierre E.; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of Lassa fever in a US traveler who visited rural Liberia, became ill while in country, sought medical care upon return to the United States, and subsequently had his illness laboratory confirmed. The patient recovered with supportive therapy. No secondary cases occurred. PMID:20875288

  18. Imported Lassa fever, Pennsylvania, USA, 2010.

    PubMed

    Amorosa, Valerianna; MacNeil, Adam; McConnell, Ryan; Patel, Ami; Dillon, Katherine E; Hamilton, Keith; Erickson, Bobbie Rae; Campbell, Shelley; Knust, Barbara; Cannon, Deborah; Miller, David; Manning, Craig; Rollin, Pierre E; Nichol, Stuart T

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of Lassa fever in a US traveler who visited rural Liberia, became ill while in country, sought medical care upon return to the United States, and subsequently had his illness laboratory confirmed. The patient recovered with supportive therapy. No secondary cases occurred. PMID:20875288

  19. Paratyphoid Fever: Splicing the Global Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Cindy Shuan Ju; Chua, Kek Heng; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of enteric fever caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A (S. Paratyphi A) is increasing in many parts of the world. Although there is no major outbreak of paratyphoid fever in recent years, S. Paratyphi A infection still remains a public health problem in many tropical countries. Therefore, surveillance studies play an important role in monitoring infections and the emergence of multidrug resistance, especially in endemic countries such as India, Nepal, Pakistan and China. In China, enteric fever was caused predominantly by S. Paratyphi A rather than by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi). Sometimes, S. Paratyphi A infection can evolve into a carrier state which increases the risk of transmission for travellers. Hence, paratyphoid fever is usually classified as a “travel-associated” disease. To date, diagnosis of paratyphoid fever based on the clinical presentation is not satisfactory as it resembles other febrile illnesses, and could not be distinguished from S. Typhi infection. With the availability of Whole Genome Sequencing technology, the genomes of S. Paratyphi A could be studied in-depth and more specific targets for detection will be revealed. Hence, detection of S. Paratyphi A with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method appears to be a more reliable approach compared to the Widal test. On the other hand, due to increasing incidence of S. Paratyphi A infections worldwide, the need to produce a paratyphoid vaccine is essential and urgent. Hence various vaccine projects that involve clinical trials have been carried out. Overall, this review provides the insights of S. Paratyphi A, including the bacteriology, epidemiology, management and antibiotic susceptibility, diagnoses and vaccine development. PMID:24904229

  20. Estimating average dissolved-solids yield from basins drained by ephemeral and intermittent streams, Green River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, L.L.; Wells, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    A method was developed to determine the average dissolved-solids yield contributed by small basins characterized by ephemeral and intermittent streams in the Green River basin in Wyoming. The method is different from that commonly used for perennial streams. Estimates of dissolved-solids discharge at eight water quality sampling stations operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management range from less than 2 to 95 tons/day. The dissolved-solids yield upstream from the sampling stations ranges from 0.023 to 0.107 tons/day/sq mi. However, estimates of dissolved solids yield contributed by drainage areas between paired stations on Bitter, Salt Wells, Little Muddy, and Muddy creeks, based on dissolved-solids discharge versus drainage area, range only from 0.081 to 0.092 tons/day/sq mi. (USGS)

  1. Use of the continuous slope-area method to estimate runoff in a network of ephemeral channels, southeast Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Anne M.; Callegary, James B.; Smith, Christopher F.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Leenhouts, James M.; Fritzinger, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The continuous slope-area (CSA) method is an innovative gaging method for indirect computation of complete-event discharge hydrographs that can be applied when direct measurement methods are unsafe, impractical, or impossible to apply. This paper reports on use of the method to produce event-specific discharge hydrographs in a network of sand-bedded ephemeral stream channels in southeast Arizona, USA, for water year 2008. The method provided satisfactory discharge estimates for flows that span channel banks, and for moderate to large flows, with about 10–16% uncertainty, respectively for total flow volume and peak flow, as compared to results obtained with an alternate method. Our results also suggest that the CSA method may be useful for estimating runoff of small flows, and during recessions, but with increased uncertainty.

  2. High pH microbial ecosystems in a newly discovered, ephemeral, serpentinizing fluid seep at Yanartaş (Chimera), Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R.; Woycheese, Kristin M.; Yargıçoğlu, Erin N.; Cardace, Dawn; Shock, Everett L.; Güleçal-Pektas, Yasemin; Temel, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Gas seeps emanating from Yanartaş (Chimera), Turkey, have been documented for thousands of years. Active serpentinization produces hydrogen and a range of carbon gases that may provide fuel for life. Here we report a newly discovered, ephemeral fluid seep emanating from a small gas vent at Yanartaş. Fluids and biofilms were sampled at the source and points downstream. We describe site conditions, and provide microbiological data in the form of enrichment cultures, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of solids, and PCR screens of nitrogen cycle genes. Source fluids are pH 11.95, with a Ca:Mg of ~200, and sediments under the ignited gas seep measure 60°C. Collectively, these data suggest the fluid is the product of active serpentinization at depth. Source sediments are primarily calcite and alteration products (chlorite and montmorillonite). Downstream, biofilms are mixed with montmorillonite. SEM shows biofilms distributed homogeneously with carbonates. Organic carbon accounts for 60% of the total carbon at the source, decreasing downstream to <15% as inorganic carbon precipitates. δ13C ratios of the organic carbon fraction of solids are depleted (−25 to −28‰) relative to the carbonates (−11 to −20‰). We conclude that heterotrophic processes are dominant throughout the surface ecosystem, and carbon fixation may be key down channel. δ15N ratios ~3‰, and absence of nifH in extracted DNA suggest that nitrogen fixation is not occurring in sediments. However, the presence of narG and nirS at most locations and in enrichments indicates genomic potential for nitrate and nitrite reduction. This small seep with shallow run-off is likely ephemeral, but abundant preserved microterracettes in the outflow and the surrounding area suggest it has been present for some time. This site and others like it present an opportunity for investigations of preserved deep biosphere signatures, and subsurface-surface interactions

  3. Comparative orbital evolution of transient Uranian co-orbitals: exploring the role of ephemeral multibody mean motion resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2014-07-01

    Uranus has three known co-orbitals: 83982 Crantor (2002 GO9), 2010 EU65 and 2011 QF99. All of them were captured in their current resonant state relatively recently. Here, we perform a comparative analysis of the orbital evolution of these transient co-orbitals to understand better how they got captured in the first place and what makes them dynamically unstable. We also look for additional temporary Uranian co-orbital candidates among known objects. Our N-body simulations show that the long-term stability of 2011 QF99 is controlled by Jupiter and Neptune; it briefly enters the 1:7 mean motion resonance with Jupiter and the 2:1 with Neptune before becoming a Trojan and prior to leaving its tadpole orbit. During these ephemeral two-body mean motion resonance episodes, apsidal corotation resonances are also observed. For known co-orbitals, Saturn is the current source of the main destabilizing force but this is not enough to eject a minor body from the 1:1 commensurability with Uranus. These objects must enter mean motion resonances with Jupiter and Neptune in order to be captured or become passing Centaurs. Asteroid 2010 EU65, a probable visitor from the Oort cloud, may have been stable for several Myr due to its comparatively low eccentricity. Additionally, we propose 2002 VG131 as the first transient quasi-satellite candidate of Uranus. Asteroid 1999 HD12 may signal the edge of Uranus' co-orbital region. Transient Uranian co-orbitals are often submitted to complex multibody ephemeral mean motion resonances that trigger the switching between resonant co-orbital states, making them dynamically unstable. In addition, we show that the orbital properties and discovery circumstances of known objects can be used to outline a practical strategy by which additional Uranus' co-orbitals may be found.

  4. Ephemeral Dissolved Organic Carbon Fluxes from Agricultural Runoff on the Virginia Coastal Plain in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caverly, E. K.; Kaste, J. M.; Hancock, G. S.; Cammer, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays a critical role in nutrient cycling and contaminant transport, but DOC fluxes are not well constrained across different land uses and environments. Recent work has shown that agricultural runoff can have high DOC contents due to leaching of crop residues and soil organic matter by rain and irrigation waters. While riparian buffers are assumed to protect surface waters from agricultural runoff, on some fields, the natural topography can concentrate runoff to such an extent that a channel is incised. These channels can become ephemeral pathways for agricultural runoff to exit fields and enter nearby perennial streams without substantial contact with the riparian buffer. We use automated high resolution sampling of agricultural storm runoff and stream height to quantify DOC fluxes and dynamics in a single channel on the coastal plain of Virginia. We also assess dissolved organic matter as a source of organically bound nitrogen and phosphorus in this environment. Discharge measurements for flux calculations are determined with rating curves developed using stream stage height and salt dilution measurements for individual storms. We quantify DOC and major nutrients using ion chromatography, high temperature catalytic oxidation, and specific absorbance measurements at 254 nm. We determine N and P pools using UV digestion followed by ion chromatography. For a single storm event, specific absorbance at 254 nm increases as the hydrograph progresses, suggesting that water with a longer field residence time leaches more DOC as it is transported to the monitoring site. It is anticipated that the antecedent field conditions, particularly the degree of saturation from previous rain events, strongly influence the fluxes and character of DOC from an agricultural watershed. While ephemeral channels are often overlooked as sources of agricultural runoff, we find that they can facilitate the export of large quantities of DOC and nutrients during

  5. High pH microbial ecosystems in a newly discovered, ephemeral, serpentinizing fluid seep at Yanartaş (Chimera), Turkey.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R; Woycheese, Kristin M; Yargıçoğlu, Erin N; Cardace, Dawn; Shock, Everett L; Güleçal-Pektas, Yasemin; Temel, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Gas seeps emanating from Yanartaş (Chimera), Turkey, have been documented for thousands of years. Active serpentinization produces hydrogen and a range of carbon gases that may provide fuel for life. Here we report a newly discovered, ephemeral fluid seep emanating from a small gas vent at Yanartaş. Fluids and biofilms were sampled at the source and points downstream. We describe site conditions, and provide microbiological data in the form of enrichment cultures, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of solids, and PCR screens of nitrogen cycle genes. Source fluids are pH 11.95, with a Ca:Mg of ~200, and sediments under the ignited gas seep measure 60°C. Collectively, these data suggest the fluid is the product of active serpentinization at depth. Source sediments are primarily calcite and alteration products (chlorite and montmorillonite). Downstream, biofilms are mixed with montmorillonite. SEM shows biofilms distributed homogeneously with carbonates. Organic carbon accounts for 60% of the total carbon at the source, decreasing downstream to <15% as inorganic carbon precipitates. δ(13)C ratios of the organic carbon fraction of solids are depleted (-25 to -28‰) relative to the carbonates (-11 to -20‰). We conclude that heterotrophic processes are dominant throughout the surface ecosystem, and carbon fixation may be key down channel. δ(15)N ratios ~3‰, and absence of nifH in extracted DNA suggest that nitrogen fixation is not occurring in sediments. However, the presence of narG and nirS at most locations and in enrichments indicates genomic potential for nitrate and nitrite reduction. This small seep with shallow run-off is likely ephemeral, but abundant preserved microterracettes in the outflow and the surrounding area suggest it has been present for some time. This site and others like it present an opportunity for investigations of preserved deep biosphere signatures, and subsurface-surface interactions. PMID

  6. Rapid estimation of recharge potential in ephemeral-stream channels using electromagnetic methods, and measurements of channel and vegetation characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callegary, J.B.; Leenhouts, J.M.; Paretti, N.V.; Jones, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    To classify recharge potential (RCP) in ephemeral-stream channels, a method was developed that incorporates information about channel geometry, vegetation characteristics, and bed-sediment apparent electrical conductivity (??a). Recharge potential is not independently measurable, but is instead formulated as a site-specific, qualitative parameter. We used data from 259 transects across two ephemeral-stream channels near Sierra Vista, Arizona, a location with a semiarid climate. Seven data types were collected: ??a averaged over two depth intervals (0-3 m, and 0-6 m), channel incision depth and width, diameter-at-breast-height of the largest tree, woody-plant and grass density. A two-tiered system was used to classify a transect's RCP. In the first tier, transects were categorized by estimates of near-surface-sediment hydraulic permeability as low, moderate, or high using measurements of 0-3 m-depth ??a. Each of these categories was subdivided into low, medium, or high RCP classes using the remaining six data types, thus yielding a total of nine RCP designations. Six sites in the study area were used to compare RCP and ??a with previously measured surrogates for hydraulic permeability. Borehole-averaged percent fines showed a moderate correlation with both shallow and deep ??a measurements, however, correlation of point measurements of saturated hydraulic conductivity, percent fines, and cylinder infiltrometer measurements with ??a and RCP was generally poor. The poor correlation was probably caused by the relatively large measurement volume and spatial averaging of ??a compared with the spatially-limited point measurements. Because of the comparatively large spatial extent of measurement transects and variety of data types collected, RCP estimates can give a more complete picture of the major factors affecting recharge at a site than is possible through point or borehole-averaged estimates of hydraulic permeability alone. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The response and recovery of the dissolved organic carbon cycle in ephemeral streams to large flood events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, J.; Shutova, Y.; Hartland, A.; Andersen, M. S.; Baker, A.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    The supply, transport, and cycling of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within river systems is a critical component of the carbon cycle, determines freshwater ecosystem primary productivity, and is a key driver of water quality through associated redox transformations. Despite this importance, there is very little understanding of how both the concentration and quality of DOC are influenced by natural variations in hydrology, particularly extreme events such as floods, and within different climatic zones. In this study, we examined the evolution of DOC within an ephemeral catchment in semi-arid Australia during a 1:20 year flood event. Total DOC concentrations increased ~3 fold compared to pre-flood concentrations, with peak concentrations occurring in the rising limb of the hydrograph, similar to previous studies of event based DOC. Although we found the DOC to be dominated by Humic substances, the behaviour of the Humic fraction more closely followed the flood hydrograph, suggesting there is a contrast between the large pool of DOC that can be released quickly at the beginning of an event, and DOC which is transported and mixed within the actual flood wave. We also analysed the fluorescence characteristics of the dissolved organic matter, which provides insights into the ability of micro-organisms to process DOC within floods, and also how these systems respond during flow recession. In terms of the total DOC budget, this one event accounts for ~ 6 times the mean annual DOC export of this catchment, within 2% of the time. This work extends our knowledge of riverine DOC fluxes to ephemeral environments, and highlights the potential importance of extreme events to ecosystem carbon processing.

  8. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever Leading to Unnecessary Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Lovekesh; Singh, Mahendra; Saxena, Ashish; Kolhe, Yuvraj; Karande, Snehal K.; Singh, Narendra; Venkatesh, P.; Meena, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arbovirus illness with an estimated incidence of 50–100 million cases per year. The common symptoms of dengue include fever, rash, malaise, nausea, vomiting, and musculoskeletal pain. Dengue fever may present as acute abdomen leading to diagnostic dilemma. The acute surgical complications of dengue fever include acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis, nonspecific peritonitis, and acute appendicitis. We report a case of dengue fever that mimicked acute appendicitis leading to unnecessary appendectomy. A careful history examination for dengue-related signs, and serial hemogram over the first 3-4 days of disease may prevent unnecessary appendectomy. PMID:26167314

  9. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever Leading to Unnecessary Appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lovekesh; Singh, Mahendra; Saxena, Ashish; Kolhe, Yuvraj; Karande, Snehal K; Singh, Narendra; Venkatesh, P; Meena, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arbovirus illness with an estimated incidence of 50-100 million cases per year. The common symptoms of dengue include fever, rash, malaise, nausea, vomiting, and musculoskeletal pain. Dengue fever may present as acute abdomen leading to diagnostic dilemma. The acute surgical complications of dengue fever include acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis, nonspecific peritonitis, and acute appendicitis. We report a case of dengue fever that mimicked acute appendicitis leading to unnecessary appendectomy. A careful history examination for dengue-related signs, and serial hemogram over the first 3-4 days of disease may prevent unnecessary appendectomy. PMID:26167314

  10. Q Fever: An Old but Still a Poorly Understood Disease

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Q fever is a bacterial infection affecting mainly the lungs, liver, and heart. It is found around the world and is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. The bacteria affects sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, cats, birds, rodents, and ticks. Infected animals shed this bacteria in birth products, feces, milk, and urine. Humans usually get Q fever by breathing in contaminated droplets released by infected animals and drinking raw milk. People at highest risk for this infection are farmers, laboratory workers, sheep and dairy workers, and veterinarians. Chronic Q fever develops in people who have been infected for more than 6 months. It usually takes about 20 days after exposure to the bacteria for symptoms to occur. Most cases are mild, yet some severe cases have been reported. Symptoms of acute Q fever may include: chest pain with breathing, cough, fever, headache, jaundice, muscle pains, and shortness of breath. Symptoms of chronic Q fever may include chills, fatigue, night sweats, prolonged fever, and shortness of breath. Q fever is diagnosed with a blood antibody test. The main treatment for the disease is with antibiotics. For acute Q fever, doxycycline is recommended. For chronic Q fever, a combination of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine is often used long term. Complications are cirrhosis, hepatitis, encephalitis, endocarditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, meningitis, and pneumonia. People at risk should always: carefully dispose of animal products that may be infected, disinfect any contaminated areas, and thoroughly wash their hands. Pasteurizing milk can also help prevent Q fever. PMID:23213331

  11. Q Fever: an old but still a poorly understood disease.

    PubMed

    Honarmand, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Q fever is a bacterial infection affecting mainly the lungs, liver, and heart. It is found around the world and is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. The bacteria affects sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, cats, birds, rodents, and ticks. Infected animals shed this bacteria in birth products, feces, milk, and urine. Humans usually get Q fever by breathing in contaminated droplets released by infected animals and drinking raw milk. People at highest risk for this infection are farmers, laboratory workers, sheep and dairy workers, and veterinarians. Chronic Q fever develops in people who have been infected for more than 6 months. It usually takes about 20 days after exposure to the bacteria for symptoms to occur. Most cases are mild, yet some severe cases have been reported. Symptoms of acute Q fever may include: chest pain with breathing, cough, fever, headache, jaundice, muscle pains, and shortness of breath. Symptoms of chronic Q fever may include chills, fatigue, night sweats, prolonged fever, and shortness of breath. Q fever is diagnosed with a blood antibody test. The main treatment for the disease is with antibiotics. For acute Q fever, doxycycline is recommended. For chronic Q fever, a combination of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine is often used long term. Complications are cirrhosis, hepatitis, encephalitis, endocarditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, meningitis, and pneumonia. People at risk should always: carefully dispose of animal products that may be infected, disinfect any contaminated areas, and thoroughly wash their hands. Pasteurizing milk can also help prevent Q fever. PMID:23213331

  12. Infection Control During Filoviral Hemorrhagic Fever Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Vanessa, N Raabe; Matthias, Borchert

    2012-01-01

    Breaking the human-to-human transmission cycle remains the cornerstone of infection control during filoviral (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fever outbreaks. This requires effective identification and isolation of cases, timely contact tracing and monitoring, proper usage of barrier personal protection gear by health workers, and safely conducted burials. Solely implementing these measures is insufficient for infection control; control efforts must be culturally sensitive and conducted in a transparent manner to promote the necessary trust between the community and infection control team in order to succeed. This article provides a review of the literature on infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks focusing on outbreaks in a developing setting and lessons learned from previous outbreaks. The primary search database used to review the literature was PUBMED, the National Library of Medicine website. PMID:22529631

  13. Yellow Fever Outbreak, Imatong, Southern Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Ofula, Victor O.; Sang, Rosemary C.; Konongoi, Samson L.; Sow, Abdourahmane; De Cock, Kevin M.; Tukei, Peter M.; Okoth, Fredrick A.; Swanepoel, Robert; Burt, Felicity J.; Waters, Norman C.; Coldren, Rodney L.

    2004-01-01

    In May 2003, the World Health Organization received reports about a possible outbreak of a hemorrhagic disease of unknown cause in the Imatong Mountains of southern Sudan. Laboratory investigations were conducted on 28 serum samples collected from patients in the Imatong region. Serum samples from 13 patients were positive for immunoglobulin M antibody to flavivirus, and serum samples from 5 patients were positive by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction with both the genus Flavivirus–reactive primers and yellow fever virus–specific primers. Nucleotide sequencing of the amplicons obtained with the genus Flavivirus oligonucleotide primers confirmed yellow fever virus as the etiologic agent. Isolation attempts in newborn mice and Vero cells from the samples yielded virus isolates from five patients. Rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis enabled an interagency emergency task force to initiate a targeted vaccination campaign to control the outbreak. PMID:15207058

  14. Tickborne Relapsing Fever, Bitterroot Valley, Montana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Joshua; Fischer, Robert J.; McCoy, Brandi N.; Raffel, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    In July 2013, a resident of the Bitterroot Valley in western Montana, USA, contracted tickborne relapsing fever caused by an infection with the spirochete Borrelia hermsii. The patient’s travel history and activities before onset of illness indicated a possible exposure on his residential property on the eastern side of the valley. An onsite investigation of the potential exposure site found the vector, Ornithodoros hermsi ticks, and 1 chipmunk infected with spirochetes, which on the basis of multilocus sequence typing were identical to the spirochete isolated from the patient. Field studies in other locations found additional serologic evidence and an infected tick that demonstrated a wider distribution of spirochetes circulating among the small mammal populations. Our study demonstrates that this area of Montana represents a previously unrecognized focus of relapsing fever and poses a risk for persons of acquiring this tickborne disease. PMID:25625502

  15. [Q fever, a potential biowarfare agent].

    PubMed

    Bossi, Philippe; Guihot, Amélie; Bricaire, François

    2003-10-18

    SEVERAL POSSIBLE METHODS OF TRANSFUSION: Q fever is a zoonosis due to Coxiella burnetii. Its interest as a potential biowarfare agent is in its possible transmission by inhalation of sprayed particles. This form of transmission would probably be used: the inhalation of 1 to 10 bacteria could provoke the development of an infection in humans. Another possible method of transmission in the context of a terrorist act would be the intentional introduction of the bacteria into foodstuff. A DISABLING WEAPON: However, C. burnetii has never been used as a biological weapon. The probability that this germ could be used is very low: indeed, the incubation of Q fever is very long, and the majority of the infections is asymptomatic and mortality is low. In fact C. burnetii would more likely be used as a disabling weapon. PMID:14576588

  16. Rainfall and epizootic Rift Valley fever*

    PubMed Central

    Davies, F. G.; Linthicum, K. J.; James, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    Epizootic Rift Valley fever (RVF) has occurred in Kenya four times over the last 30 years. Widespread, frequent, and persistent rainfall has been a feature of these epizootic periods. A composite statistic, based upon measurements of these rainfall characteristics, is positive during periods of epizootic Rift Valley fever. The heavy rainfall raises the level of the water table in certain areas, flooding the grassland depressions (dambos) that are the habitat of the immature forms of certain ground-pool-breeding mosquitos of the genus Aedes. RVF virus is probably transmitted transovarially in these species, very large numbers of which emerge under these damp conditions. This is when clinical signs of the disease are first seen. PMID:3879206

  17. Lessons from nosocomial viral haemorrhagic fever outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P

    2005-01-01

    The outbreak of Marburg haemorrhagic fever in Angola in 2004-2005 shows once again the devastating and rapid spread of viral haemorrhagic fevers in medical settings where hygiene practices are poorly applied or ignored. The legacy of years of war and poverty in Angola has resulted in very poor medical education and services. The initial high rate of infection among infants in Angola may have been related to poor hospital practices, possibly administration of vaccines. Though the outbreak in Angola was in a part of Africa not previously known to have filovirus infection, prior ecological modelling had predicted this location and many others. Prevention of future outbreaks will not be easy. The urgent need is dissemination of knowledge and the training, discipline and resources for good clinical practice. Educating the public to demand higher standards could be a powerful tool. Good practices are difficult to establish and maintain on the scale needed. PMID:16373655

  18. Dengue fever, Hawaii, 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    Effler, Paul V; Pang, Lorrin; Kitsutani, Paul; Vorndam, Vance; Nakata, Michele; Ayers, Tracy; Elm, Joe; Tom, Tammy; Reiter, Paul; Rigau-Perez, José G; Hayes, John M; Mills, Kristin; Napier, Mike; Clark, Gary G; Gubler, Duane J

    2005-05-01

    Autochthonous dengue infections were last reported in Hawaii in 1944. In September 2001, the Hawaii Department of Health was notified of an unusual febrile illness in a resident with no travel history; dengue fever was confirmed. During the investigation, 1,644 persons with locally acquired denguelike illness were evaluated, and 122 (7%) laboratory-positive dengue infections were identified; dengue virus serotype 1 was isolated from 15 patients. No cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome were reported. In 3 instances autochthonous infections were linked to a person who reported denguelike illness after travel to French Polynesia. Phylogenetic analyses showed the Hawaiian isolates were closely associated with contemporaneous isolates from Tahiti. Aedes albopictus was present in all communities surveyed on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and Kauai; no Ae. aegypti were found. This outbreak underscores the importance of maintaining surveillance and control of potential disease vectors even in the absence of an imminent disease threat. PMID:15890132

  19. Marylanders defeat Philadelphia: yellow fever updated.

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, T. E.; Beisel, W. R.; Faulkner, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Those strategic points which influence this amateur historian to declare a victory for Baltimore and Maryland over Philadelphia are: I. Based upon clinical and epidemiological data, two Marylanders, Potter and Davidge, were among the first to contest Rush and his contagion theory; they told him so and published their views. To prove this point, Potter went to the extreme of inoculating himself with presumedly infected material. Stubbins Ffirth, a young University of Pennsylvania medical student, did the same four years later. To Rush's credit was ultimate abandonment of his originally held views. II. John Crawford, of Baltimore, although not the originator of the insect concept of transmission of infectious agents, published his concepts in 1811. III. Henry Rose Carter, a Maryland graduate, clearly delineated, in 1898, that after identification of an index case of yellow fever an extrinsic incubation period was necessary before the evolution of secondary cases. IV. James Carroll, another University of Maryland graduate, who worked as Deputy under Walter Reed with Lazear and Agramonte, helped prove Finlay's original concept that the Aedes aegypti mosquito was the natural vector of yellow fever. Carroll himself was the first experimentally induced case. V. Studies in primates provide new approaches for management of yellow fever. Nutritional support and treatment with specific anti-viral agents may be useful for therapy of human yellow fever. Maryland members of the Climatological are mindful of Philadelphia's rich medical heritage and of the many battles won in the City of Brotherly Love. Physicians in colonial and early America experienced The best and worst of times, theirs was an age of foolishness and belief, of incredulity and light, of darkness, despair and hope. This tale of two cities ends in peace. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 PMID:822563

  20. Hypozincemia during fever may trigger febrile convulsion.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Y; Ishii, K; Akiba, K; Hayashi, T

    1990-05-01

    Febrile convulsions are generally thought to be induced by metabolic changes during the rise-phase of body temperature. The mechanism by which convulsions are induced, however, is not fully elucidated. In this article, we propose a new hypothesis about the induction mechanism of febrile convulsions that takes into account the hypozincemia during fever. This hypozincemia activates the NMDA receptor, one of the glutamate family of receptors, which may play an important role in the induction of epileptic discharge. PMID:2190072

  1. Q fever pneumonia in children in Japan.

    PubMed Central

    To, H; Kako, N; Zhang, G Q; Otsuka, H; Ogawa, M; Ochiai, O; Nguyen, S V; Yamaguchi, T; Fukushi, H; Nagaoka, N; Akiyama, M; Amano, K; Hirai, K

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence of Q fever pneumonia among children with atypical pneumonia from whom only an acute-phase serum sample was available was traced by using an indirect immunofluorescence (IF) test, nested PCR, and isolation. Twenty (34.5%) of 58 sera were found to have both polyvalent and immunoglobulin M antibodies to the phase II antigen of Coxiella burnetii by the IF test. Q fever pneumonia was present in 23 (39.7%) of 58 patients as determined by both the nested PCR and isolation and in 20 patients as determined by the IF test. The sensitivities for nested PCR and isolation were 100%, and that for the IF test was 87%. Our results indicate that nested PCR was faster and more sensitive than isolation and the IF test in the diagnosis of acute Q fever when a single acute-phase serum was available. These findings suggest that C. burnetii is an important cause of atypical pneumonia in children in Japan. PMID:8904431

  2. [Chikungunya fever - A new global threat].

    PubMed

    Montero, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    The recent onset of epidemics caused by viruses such as Ebola, Marburg, Nipah, Lassa, coronavirus, West-Nile encephalitis, Saint Louis encephalitis, human immunodeficiency virus, dengue, yellow fever and Venezuelan hemorrhagic fever alerts about the risk these agents represent for the global health. Chikungunya virus represents a new threat. Surged from remote African regions, this virus has become endemic in the Indic ocean basin, the Indian subcontinent and the southeast of Asia, causing serious epidemics in Africa, Indic Ocean Islands, Asia and Europe. Due to their epidemiological and biological features and the global presence of their vectors, chikungunya represents a serious menace and could become endemic in the Americas. Although chikungunya infection has a low mortality rate, its high attack ratio may collapse the health system during epidemics affecting a sensitive population. In this paper, we review the clinical and epidemiological features of chikungunya fever as well as the risk of its introduction into the Americas. We remark the importance of the epidemiological control and mosquitoes fighting in order to prevent this disease from being introduced into the Americas. PMID:25087211

  3. Advanced vaccine candidates for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Lukashevich, Igor S

    2012-11-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF). LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever) with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered. PMID:23202493

  4. Advanced Vaccine Candidates for Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF). LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever) with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered. PMID:23202493

  5. Pathogenesis of lassa fever in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lassa virus (LASV) infection causes an acute and sometimes fatal hemorrhagic disease in humans and nonhuman primates; however, little is known about the development of Lassa fever. Here, we performed a pilot study to begin to understand the progression of LASV infection in nonhuman primates. Methods Six cynomolgus monkeys were experimentally infected with LASV. Tissues from three animals were examined at an early- to mid-stage of disease and compared with tissues from three animals collected at terminal stages of disease. Results Dendritic cells were identified as a prominent target of LASV infection in a variety of tissues in all animals at day 7 while Kupffer cells, hepatocytes, adrenal cortical cells, and endothelial cells were more frequently infected with LASV in tissues of terminal animals (days 13.5-17). Meningoencephalitis and neuronal necrosis were noteworthy findings in terminal animals. Evidence of coagulopathy was noted; however, the degree of fibrin deposition in tissues was less prominent than has been reported in other viral hemorrhagic fevers. Conclusion The sequence of pathogenic events identified in this study begins to shed light on the development of disease processes during Lassa fever and also may provide new targets for rational prophylactic and chemotherapeutic interventions. PMID:21548931

  6. Chikungunya Fever Presenting as a Systemic Disease with Fever. Arthritis and Rash: Our Experience in Israel.

    PubMed

    Tanay, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya fever (CHIK-F) has been increasingly documented among Western travelers returning from areas with chikungunya virus transmission, which are also popular tourist sites. We present three Israeli travelers who developed fever, maculopapular rash and long-standing arthralgias while visiting northern Indian states not known to be involved in the chikungunya fever epidemic. We also present an epidemiological review of the chikungunya epidemic over the past decades. Rare systemic manifestations of this disorder, like catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) and adult-onset Still's syndrome, are discussed. The present era of international travel poses a new diagnostic and epidemiologic challenge that demands increased awareness to the possibility of an exotic tropical infectious disease. PMID:27228635

  7. A comparison of methane flux rates from the margins of a permanent wetland and an ephemeral wetland in southern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, L. C.; Kannenberg, S.; Ludwig, S.; Rich, H.; Spawn, S.; Porterfield, J.; Schade, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    The degree of expansion and contraction of wetlands is likely to change as climate change alters drought and precipitation events. As wetland size becomes more dynamic, the extent and duration of inundation of soils on their margins will change. The amount of methane released from wetlands will also change since methanogens thrive in anoxic, saturated soils. It is critical to study the factors that influence methane emissions from wetlands because methane is 20 times more effective at trapping heat in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide. The objective of our research was to compare methane flux rates from the margins of a permanent wetland and an ephemeral wetland. We also assessed the impact of Reed Canary Grass (Phalaris arundinacea) on transport of methane from the soil to the atmosphere. Methane flux emissions were measured using portable gas flux chambers at Bakko Pond (a permanent wetland) and East Coyote Pond (an ephemeral wetland) on the St. Olaf College Natural Lands in southern Minnesota. At each wetland, we measured methane emissions from plots of clipped and unclipped Reed Canary Grass. We found no statistical difference between clipped and unclipped plots, suggesting that a diffusive gas transport system rather than a coupling of a diffusive and convective gas transport emits methane. We also found that the average rate of methane flux was higher at East Coyote Pond at both the wet Reed Canary Grass and dry Reed Canary Grass sites, when compared to the dry Reed Canary Grass site at Bakko Pond. Higher methane emission rates at East Coyote Pond is consistent with the characteristics of a wetland with a shallow bank where marginal soil is frequently inundated with water, creating a favorable anoxic environment for active methanogens. In contrast, Bakko Pond has a steep embankment, reducing soil saturation. We also found that soil moisture was strongly correlated with methane flux rates between the sites and over time within a site. Overall, our results

  8. Geodatabase Development in Support of Integrated Hydrologic Forecasting for an Ungaged Ephemeral Channel: Rio Salado, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, P.; Duffy, C.

    2004-05-01

    This research is constructing an integrated, multi-process model for estimating long-term streamflow in an ephemeral, ungaged basin, the Rio Salado in central New Mexico. The semi-arid basin drains 3575km2 and with seasonal channel flow from summer thunderstorms and winter precipitation. The basin is presently ungaged although streamflow records near the outlet with the Rio Grande are available for 1948-1984. The research will test the hypothesis that integrated models incorporating land surface, soil moisture, groundwater and streamflow processes can be used to forecast ungaged basin response. The focus of this paper is to develop a strategy for supporting the physical model with an appropriate space-time data for geometry, physical parameters and forcing for the model. The creation of an integrated database, instead of a collection of data layers, provides a stronger foundation for building water resources applications in Geographic Information Systems. We use the ArcHydro Data Model with the geodatabase environment for geospatial and time series data for water resources. The results of this research demonstrate the process of collecting geospatial data in its many forms and populating a geodatabase for support of the integrated hydrologic model. Here we use MODHMS (developed by HydroGeologic Inc.), which is a fully integrated and comprehensive hydrologic model that is physically-based, spatially-distributed framework that includes 3-D variably saturated subsurface flow, 2-D areal overland flow, and flow through a network of 1-D channels. Layers required include vector data like polygons (geology and soils), lines (stream networks with cross-sections), points (monitoring points including bore holes), and raster data which includes gridded digital elevation model and satellites (ie ASTER for determining reaches that are perennial or ephemeral). A variety of interfaces exist for accessing the geodatabase, including ESRI ArcMap, Microsoft Access, Microsoft Excel

  9. Evaluating recharge to an ephemeral dryland stream using a hydraulic model and water, chloride and isotope mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogramaci, Shawan; Firmani, Giovanni; Hedley, Paul; Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Grierson, Pauline F.

    2015-02-01

    Dewatering associated with mining below water table to achieve dry mining conditions may exert significant pressure on water balance in terms of lowering the water table and change in the dynamics of interactions between surface water and groundwater. The discharge of surplus mine water into ephemeral streams may also affect the water balance, by elevating groundwater levels and altering the exchange rate between streams and underlying aquifers. However, it is unclear whether volumes and recharge processes are within the range of natural variability. Here, we present a case study of an ephemeral creek in the semi-arid Hamersley Basin of northwest Australia that has received continuous mine discharge for more than six years. We used a numerical model coupled with repeated measurements of water levels, chloride concentrations and the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope composition (δ2H and δ18O) to estimate longitudinal evapotranspiration and recharge rates along a 27 km length of Weeli Wolli Creek. We found that chloride increased from 73 to 120 mg/L across this length, while δ18O increased from -8.2‰ to -7.00‰. Groundwater is directly connected to the creek for the first 13 km and recharge rates are negligible. Below this point, the creek flows over a highly permeable aquifer and water loss by recharge increases to a maximum rate of 4.4 mm/d, which accounts for ∼65% of the total water discharged to the creek. Evapotranspiration losses account for the remaining ∼35%. The calculated recharge from continuous flow due to surplus water discharge is similar to that measured for rainfall-driven flood events along the creek. Groundwater under the disconnected section of the creek is characterised by a much lower Cl concentration and more depleted δ18O value than mining discharge water but is similar to flood water generated by large episodic rainfall events. Our results suggest that the impact of recharge from continuous flow on the water balance of the creek

  10. Yellow fever in China is still an imported disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Lu, Hongzhou

    2016-05-23

    Yellow fever is a vector-borne disease endemic to tropical regions of Africa and South America. A recent outbreak in Angola caused hundreds of deaths. Six cases of yellow fever imported from Angola were reported recently in China. This raised the question of whether it will spread in China and how it can be prevented. This article discusses the possibility of yellow fever transmission in China and the strategies to counter it. PMID:27052094

  11. Acute Arthritis in Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ahmeti, Salih; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Halili, Bahrije; Shala, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is a severe viral disease caused by a Nairovirus. An atypical manifestation in the form of acute arthritis was found in a confirmed Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus Kosova-Hoti strain positive patient. Acute arthritis in Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) may be as a result of immune mechanisms or the bleeding disorder underlying CCHF. PMID:24926169

  12. Sensitivity of growth and biomass allocation patterns to increasing nitrogen: a comparison between ephemerals and annuals in the Gurbantunggut Desert, north-western China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Zhang, Yuanming; Niklas, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Biomass accumulation and allocation patterns are critical to quantifying ecosystem dynamics. However, these patterns differ among species, and they can change in response to nutrient availability even among genetically related individuals. In order to understand this complexity further, this study examined three ephemeral species (with very short vegetative growth periods) and three annual species (with significantly longer vegetative growth periods) in the Gurbantunggut Desert, north-western China, to determine their responses to different nitrogen (N) supplements under natural conditions. Methods Nitrogen was added to the soil at rates of 0, 0·5, 1·0, 3·0, 6·0 and 24·0 g N m−2 year−1. Plants were sampled at various intervals to measure relative growth rate and shoot and root dry mass. Key Results Compared with annuals, ephemerals grew more rapidly, increased shoot and root biomass with increasing N application rates and significantly decreased root/shoot ratios. Nevertheless, changes in the biomass allocation of some species (i.e. Erodium oxyrrhynchum) in response to the N treatment were largely a consequence of changes in overall plant size, which was inconsistent with an optimal partitioning model. An isometric log shoot vs. log root scaling relationship for the final biomass harvest was observed for each species and all annuals, while pooled data of three ephemerals showed an allometric scaling relationship. Conclusions These results indicate that ephemerals and annuals differ observably in their biomass allocation patterns in response to soil N supplements, although an isometric log shoot vs. log root scaling relationship was maintained across all species. These findings highlight that different life history strategies behave differently in response to N application even when interspecific scaling relationships remain nearly isometric. PMID:24287812

  13. Urbanisation of yellow fever in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Van der Stuyft, P; Gianella, A; Pirard, M; Cespedes, J; Lora, J; Peredo, C; Pelegrino, J L; Vorndam, V; Boelaert, M

    1999-05-01

    Until recently, urban yellow fever had not been reported from the Americas since 1954, but jungle yellow fever increasingly affects forest dwellers in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. The reinvasion by Aedes aegypti of cities in the Americas now threatens to urbanize yellow fever. After yellow fever infection was identified in a resident of Santa Cruz, Bolivia, in December 1997, all subsequent suspected cases were investigated. Active surveillance of yellow fever was introduced in the Santa Cruz area, with hospitals and selected urban and rural health centers reporting all suspected cases. Patients were serologically screened for yellow fever, dengue, hepatitis A and B, and leptospirosis; clinical and epidemiological data were collected from patients' records and through interviews; and a population-based serosurvey was conducted in the neighborhood of one case. Between December 1997 and June 1998, symptomatic yellow fever infection was confirmed in 6 residents of Santa Cruz, of whom 5 died. 5 lived in the southern sector of the city. 2 cases did not leave the city during their incubation period, and 1 had visited only an area in which sylvatic transmission was deemed impossible. Of the 281 people covered in the serosurvey, 16 (6%) were positive for IgM antibody to yellow fever. Among 5 people for whom that result could not be explained by recent vaccination, there were 2 pairs of neighbors. This instance of urban yellow fever transmission was limited in both time and space. PMID:10334253

  14. [Q fever : A rare differential diagnosis of granulomatous disease].

    PubMed

    Hippe, S; Kellner, N; Seliger, G; Wiechmann, V; Grünewald, T

    2016-05-01

    Q fever is a worldwide distributed zoonotic disease with a mostly benign course, which regularly reoccurs in Germany. This report is about a patient with sporadic serologically proven Q fever, which also showed typical histopathological findings with nonspecific granulomatous hepatitis, usually seen in acute disease. The bone marrow biopsy revealed so-called doughnut granulomas, which are not pathognomonic but a typical finding in Q fever. This case report impressively underlines that the histomorphological findings can make a decisive contribution to the clarification by extended differential diagnostics, even though it plays a subordinate role in the routine diagnostics of disseminated Q fever. PMID:26919849

  15. Seir Model for Transmission of Dengue Fever in Selangor Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syafruddin, S.; Noorani, M. S. M.

    In this paper, we study a system of differential equations that models the population dynamics of SEIR vector transmission of dengue fever. The model studied breeding value based on the number of reported cases of dengue fever in Selangor because the state had the highest case in Malaysia. The model explains that maximum level of human infection rate of dengue fever achieved in a very short period. It is also revealed that there existed suitability result between theoretical and empirical calculation using the model. The result of SEIR model will hopefully provide an insight into the spread of dengue fever in Selangor Malaysia and basic form for modeling this area.

  16. Lassa fever presenting as acute abdomen: a case series.

    PubMed

    Dongo, Andrew E; Kesieme, Emeka B; Iyamu, Christopher E; Okokhere, Peter O; Akhuemokhan, Odigie C; Akpede, George O

    2013-01-01

    Lassa fever, an endemic zoonotic viral infection in West Africa, presents with varied symptoms including fever, vomiting, retrosternal pain, abdominal pain, sore-throat, mucosal bleeding, seizures and coma. When fever and abdominal pain are the main presenting symptoms, and a diagnosis of acute abdomen is entertained, Lassa fever is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis, even in endemic areas. Rather the diagnosis of Lassa fever is suspected only after surgical intervention. Therefore, such patients often undergo unnecessary surgery with resultant delay in the commencement of ribavirin therapy. This increases morbidity and mortality and the risk of nosocomial transmission to hospital staff. We report 7 patients aged between 17 months and 40 years who had operative intervention for suspected appendicitis, perforated typhoid ileitis, intussuception and ruptured ectopic pregnancy after routine investigations. All seven were post-operatively confirmed as Lassa fever cases. Four patients died postoperatively, most before commencement of ribavirin, while the other three patients eventually recovered with appropriate antibiotic treatment including intravenous ribavirin. Surgeons working in West Africa should include Lassa fever in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen, especially appendicitis. The presence of high grade fever, proteinuria and thrombocytopenia in patients with acute abdomen should heighten the suspicion of Lassa fever. Prolonged intra-operative bleeding should not only raise suspicion of the disease but also serve to initiate precautions to prevent nosocomial transmission. PMID:23597024

  17. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented. Both patients developed severe sensorineural hearing loss at acute phases of the infections. Conclusion Sensorineural hearing loss from Lassa fever infections can occur in both acute and convalescent stages and is probably induced by an immune response. PMID:19178735

  18. Lassa fever presenting as acute abdomen: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lassa fever, an endemic zoonotic viral infection in West Africa, presents with varied symptoms including fever, vomiting, retrosternal pain, abdominal pain, sore-throat, mucosal bleeding, seizures and coma. When fever and abdominal pain are the main presenting symptoms, and a diagnosis of acute abdomen is entertained, Lassa fever is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis, even in endemic areas. Rather the diagnosis of Lassa fever is suspected only after surgical intervention. Therefore, such patients often undergo unnecessary surgery with resultant delay in the commencement of ribavirin therapy. This increases morbidity and mortality and the risk of nosocomial transmission to hospital staff. We report 7 patients aged between 17 months and 40 years who had operative intervention for suspected appendicitis, perforated typhoid ileitis, intussuception and ruptured ectopic pregnancy after routine investigations. All seven were post-operatively confirmed as Lassa fever cases. Four patients died postoperatively, most before commencement of ribavirin, while the other three patients eventually recovered with appropriate antibiotic treatment including intravenous ribavirin. Surgeons working in West Africa should include Lassa fever in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen, especially appendicitis. The presence of high grade fever, proteinuria and thrombocytopenia in patients with acute abdomen should heighten the suspicion of Lassa fever. Prolonged intra-operative bleeding should not only raise suspicion of the disease but also serve to initiate precautions to prevent nosocomial transmission. PMID:23597024

  19. Local structuring factors of invertebrate communities in ephemeral freshwater rock pools and the influence of more permanent water bodies in the region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jocque, M.; Graham, T.; Brendonck, L.

    2007-01-01

    We used three isolated clusters of small ephemeral rock pools on a sandstone flat in Utah to test the importance of local structuring processes on aquatic invertebrate communities. In the three clusters we characterized all ephemeral rock pools (total: 27) for their morphometry, and monitored their water quality, hydrology and community assemblage during a full hydrocycle. In each cluster we also sampled a set of more permanent interconnected freshwater systems positioned in a wash, draining the water from each cluster of rock pools. This design allowed additional testing for the potential role of more permanent water bodies in the region as source populations for the active dispersers and the effect on the community structure in the rock pools. Species richness and community composition in the rock pools correlated with level of permanence and the ammonia concentration. The length of the rock pool inundation cycle shaped community structure, most probably by inhibiting colonization by some taxa (e.g. tadpoles and insect larvae) through developmental constraints. The gradient in ammonia concentrations probably reflects differences in primary production. The more permanent water bodies in each wash differed both environmentally and in community composition from the connected set of rock pools. A limited set of active dispersers was observed in the rock pools. Our findings indicate that aquatic invertebrate communities in the ephemeral rock pools are mainly structured through habitat permanence, possibly linked with biotic interactions and primary production. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  20. Water availability controls on community structure of an ephemeral meltwater stream ecosystem in the McMurdo Dry Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D. M.; Simmons, B.; Stanish, L.

    2009-05-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica contain many glacial meltwater streams that flow during the summer into lakes on the valley floors. Many streams have thriving cyanobacterial mats that are freeze-dried in winter and begin photosynthesis when flow arrives. We studied the community structure in a formerly abandoned channel, which was reactivated by a flow diversion in 1994. Cyanobacterial mats became abundant in the reactivated channel within a week and have remained evident even through cold, low flow summers. We recently compared the abundance and species distribution of invertebrates and diatoms in the cyanobacterial mats and in hyporheic zone during cold (low flow) and warm (high flow) summers. During the warm summer, there were sites where the invertebrate abundance was greater in the mats than in the underlying hyporheic sediments. In contrast, during the cold summer the invertebrate biomass was lower in the mats than in the hyporheic sediments. These findings suggest that the optimal micro-habitat for invertebrates in these mats and sediments is partially driven by ephemeral stream hydrology. This limitation on potential invertebrate grazers (which are important nutrient transformers) may account for the accumulation of algal biomass and subsequent nutrient immobilization in the mats over many summers.

  1. Carbon-Fixation Rates and Associated Microbial Communities Residing in Arid and Ephemerally Wet Antarctic Dry Valley Soils

    PubMed Central

    Niederberger, Thomas D.; Sohm, Jill A.; Gunderson, Troy; Tirindelli, Joëlle; Capone, Douglas G.; Carpenter, Edward J.; Cary, S. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-fixation is a critical process in severely oligotrophic Antarctic Dry Valley (DV) soils and may represent the major source of carbon in these arid environments. However, rates of C-fixation in DVs are currently unknown and the microorganisms responsible for these activities unidentified. In this study, C-fixation rates measured in the bulk arid soils (<5% moisture) ranged from below detection limits to ∼12 nmol C/cc/h. Rates in ephemerally wet soils ranged from ∼20 to 750 nmol C/cc/h, equating to turnover rates of ∼7–140 days, with lower rates in stream-associated soils as compared to lake-associated soils. Sequencing of the large subunit of RuBisCO (cbbL) in these soils identified green-type sequences dominated by the 1B cyanobacterial phylotype in both arid and wet soils including the RNA fraction of the wet soil. Red-type cbbL genes were dominated by 1C actinobacterial phylotypes in arid soils, with wetted soils containing nearly equal proportions of 1C (actinobacterial and proteobacterial signatures) and 1D (algal) phylotypes. Complementary 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA gene sequencing also revealed distinct differences in community structure between biotopes. This study is the first of its kind to examine C-fixation rates in DV soils and the microorganisms potentially responsible for these activities. PMID:26696969

  2. On the effects of improved cross-section representation in one-dimensional flow routing models applied to ephemeral rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Christopher J.; Brazier, Richard E.; Nicholas, Andrew P.; Nearing, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Flash floods are an important component of the semiarid hydrological cycle, and provide the potential for groundwater recharge as well as posing a dangerous natural hazard. A number of catchment models have been applied to flash flood prediction; however, in general they perform poorly. This study has investigated whether the incorporation of light detection and ranging (lidar) derived data into the structure of a 1-D flow routing model can improve the prediction of flash floods in ephemeral channels. Two versions of this model, one based on an existing trapezoidal representation of cross-section morphology (K-Tr), and one that uses lidar data (K-Li) were applied to 5 discrete runoff events measured at two locations on the main channel of The Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, United States. In general, K-Li showed improved performance in comparison to K-Tr, both when each model was calibrated to individual events and during an evaluation phase when the models (and parameter sets) were applied across events. Sensitivity analysis identified that the K-Li model also had more consistency in behavioral parameter sets across runoff events. In contrast, parameter interaction within K-Tr resulted in poorly constrained behavioral parameter sets across the multidimensional parameter space. These results, revealed with a modeling focus on the structure of a particular element of a distributed catchment model, suggest that lidar derived cross-section morphology can lead to improved, and more robust flash flood prediction.

  3. Assessment of channel changes in a Mediterranean ephemeral stream since the early twentieth century. The Rambla de Cervera, eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura-Beltrán, Francisca; Sanchis-Ibor, Carles

    2013-11-01

    An analysis of morphological changes during the last six decades is presented for a 16.5-km reach of the Rambla de Cervera, a Mediterranean ephemeral stream located in eastern Spain. Channel changes were analysed through a range of techniques, specifically the analysis of aerial photographs with geographical information systems (GIS) and comparison of topographic surveys. The gravel channel underwent a general decline over the study period, losing width (68.5%) and surface area (45.7%) caused by the development of established islands frequently attached to the floodplain. These morphological changes exhibit an interesting temporal variability, with a maximum decrease of the gravel channel in the period 1946-1956 and another narrowing stage between 1977 and 1991. Two periods (1956-1977 and 1991-2006) also had mixed performance. In addition, incision processes occurred along the entire study reach at an average depth of 3.5 m. Natural and human-induced factors producing contradictory effects are considered responsible for changes in the Rambla de Cervera.

  4. Managing the child with a fever.

    PubMed

    Hague, Rosie

    2015-01-01

    Most illnesses associated with fever are self-limiting and children recover with no specific treatment. However, fever can also be the presenting feature of serious illness, which may be life threatening if not diagnosed and treated appropriately. It is important to establish whether the temperature has been measured and, if so, how. The height of the temperature should be recorded, and always enquire what device has been used, as a reading from a forehead thermometer may not be accurate. While many families will use a thermometer the impression of the child being hot to touch without formal measurement should still be taken seriously. Check whether the child is still feeding or taking fluids adequately. Any child may be irritable when their temperature is high, but a constantly irritable or inconsolable child, or one who is extremely lethargic, drowsy or difficult to rouse is a cause for concern. Ask about any skin changes or rashes the parent may have noticed. Find out what measures the parent may already have taken to manage the fever, and in particular, whether, and at what time, antipyretics have been given. Enquire about contact with infectious illnesses, and foreign travel. Other vital signs, including heart rate, respiratory rate and capillary refill time should also be recorded. The child should be examined for focal signs indicating the site of infection, and hydration should be assessed. Posture, tone, fontanelle (if patent), presence of a rash, neck stiffness and level of consciousness should also be assessed. If the diagnosis is unclear, potentially serious, and specific treatment may be needed to prevent deterioration, the child should be referred. PMID:26514056

  5. SATELLITE-BASED RIFT VALLEY FEVER FORECASTS PREDICT A LARGE YELLOW FEVER EPIDEMIC IN SUDAN, 2005

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustained, heavy East African rainfall is associated with Aedes spp. breeding in Kenyan grasslands and Rift Valley Fever (RVF) epidemics. Validated RVF forecasts use satellite measurements of vegetation greenness (which increases after heavy rains) and other eco-climate indicators. These models may ...

  6. Brazilian purpuric fever: epidemic purpura fulminans associated with antecedent purulent conjunctivitis. Brazilian Purpuric Fever Study Group.

    PubMed

    1987-10-01

    In late 1984, 10 children in a small, rural town in Brazil had high fever associated with vomiting and abdominal pain. Within 12-48 h of the onset of fever, purpura developed associated with vascular collapse and peripheral necrosis. All 10 children died. Cerebrospinal fluid examinations did not suggest meningitis and, when done, tests were negative for Neisseria meningitidis. Other culture, serological, and necropsy examinations did not reveal a cause. Case-finding uncovered another cluster of similar illness in children in a second town and sporadic cases in five other cities. Two case-control studies demonstrated that children who became ill were significantly more likely than control children to have had conjunctivitis during the month before illness. This conjunctivitis was purulent, preceded the onset of more severe disease by 3-15 days, and had resolved before fever began. Although no conjunctival cultures were obtained from case-children, Haemophilus aegyptius was the most common pathogen isolated from other conjunctival cultures during the epidemic. This organism was also isolated from a non-aseptic skin scraping from 1 case child. A 25-megadalton plasmid distinguished the H aegyptius isolates epidemiologically associated with illness from other Brazilian conjunctival isolates. Brazilian purpuric fever is a newly recognized syndrome of epidemic purpura fulminans associated with antecedent purulent conjunctivitis, possibly caused by H aegyptius. PMID:2888985

  7. Atypical arthritis revisited: Acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Binoy; Bhutia, Euden; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with vague musculoskeletal pain and involvement of multiple small and large joints along with axial skeleton for the last 3 years, poorly responsive to aspirin. However, on account of presence of carditis and fulfilment of Jones criteria, a diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) with atypical arthritis was made. We report this case to break the myth and sensitize pediatricians and rheumatologists to keep the possibility of atypical articular presentations, as in our case, in patients with ARF and prevent delayed diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27212853

  8. [Conjugate vaccines against bacterial infections: typhoid fever].

    PubMed

    Paniagua, J; García, J A; López, C R; González, C R; Isibasi, A; Kumate, J

    1992-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides have been studied as possible vaccines against infectious diseases. However, they are capable to induce only short-run protection because of their T-independent properties and they would not be protective against infection in high-risk populations. The alternative to face this problem is to develop methods to join covalently the polysaccharide and proteins to both increase the immunogenicity of and to confer the property of T-dependence to this antigen. In order to obtain a conjugate vaccine against typhoid fever, in our laboratory we have tried to synthesize a conjugate immunogen between the Vi antigen and porins from Salmonella typhi. PMID:1377407

  9. Relapsing Fever Borreliae: A Global Review.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Sally J

    2015-12-01

    Relapsing fever borreliae were notorious and feared infectious agents that earned their place in history through their devastating impact as causes of both epidemic and endemic infection. They are now considered more as an oddity, and their burden of infection is largely overshadowed by other infections such as malaria, which presents in a similar clinical way. Despite this, they remain the most common bacterial infection in some developing countries. Transmitted by soft ticks or lice, these fascinating spirochetes have evolved a myriad of mechanisms to survive within their diverse environments. PMID:26593261

  10. With what was rheumatic fever confused?

    PubMed

    Stanhope, J M; Chilvers, C D; Aitchison, W R

    1981-08-26

    Follow-up of 427 cases initially diagnosed in Wairoa county during 1962-76 as rheumatic fever and/or rheumatic heart disease showed that 40 had neither condition and 51 had chronic rheumatic heart disease only. Sources of misdiagnosis were cardiac (e.g. congenital heart disease, onset of atrial fibrillation), joint (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, gout), streptococcal infections not proceeding to rheumatic activity and febrile conditions of childhood. Awareness of the problems, some strengthening of the diagnostic criteria, and the evolution of the illness with time would serve to correct misdiagnosis. PMID:6946305

  11. Titration of African swine fever (ASF) virus.

    PubMed

    Enjuanes, L; Carrascosa, A L; Moreno, M A; Viñuela, E

    1976-09-01

    A haemadsorption microtest for African swine fever (ASF) virus is described. This assay is as sensitive and its response is faster than the conventional assay which uses buffy coat cultures in Leighton tubes. The method can also process a larger number of samples by using smaller amounts of swine blood and laboratory space. A plaque assay for ASF virus adapted to grow in VERO cells gives a titre similar to that obtained using the haemadsorption microtest. In both the micromethod and the plaque assay infection may be produced by a single infective particle. PMID:823294

  12. Endothelial cells in dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Kelley, James F

    2014-09-01

    Therapies to prevent or reverse endothelial dysfunction and vascular leak found in dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) have not been identified. In this review we summarize dengue viruses and the spectrum of human disease and highlight evidence of endothelial cell dysfunction in DHF based on studies in patients and mouse and tissue culture models. Evidence suggests that both virus antigen and host immune response, can cause endothelial cell dysfunction and weaken endothelial barrier integrity. We suggest possible therapeutic interventions and highlight how therapies targeting altered endothelial function might be evaluated in animal models and in patients with DHF. PMID:25025934

  13. Fever in a traveler returning from the Amazon. Do not forget hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Teper, Rina Seerke; Raza, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Travelers returning from the tropics with fever remain a diagnostic challenge. Fever and chills suggest malaria, but may be present in dengue, chikungunya and influenza, and splenomegaly favors malaria or typhoid fever. In terms of laboratory tests, leukopenia suggests dengue fever, chikungunya fever or influenza. Atypical lymphocytes are present in malaria, dengue fever, chikungunya fever and influenza HAV, but not typhoid fever. Thrombocytopenia is profound in dengue fever, is also present in influenza and malaria. Mildly increased serum transaminases are common in malaria, typhoid fever, dengue fever, chikungunya fever and influenza while very high serum transaminases point to HAV. We present a case of a young woman traveler returning from the Amazon with splenomegaly, leukopenia, atypical lymphocytes, elevated LDH and minimally elevated serum transaminases who was found to have acute hepatitis A infection. PMID:27051578

  14. Management of enteric fever with amdinocillin.

    PubMed

    Ball, A P; Geddes, A M

    1983-08-29

    Twenty-six patients with enteric fever treated with amdinocillin and/or its pivaloyloxymethyl ester in 1975 to 1978 were compared with 21 patients with enteric fever treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in 1972 to 1974. Diagnosis was based on clinical illness and isolation of Salmonella typhi or S. paratyphi A/B from blood cultures or stool cultures. The dosage of pivamdinocillin in adults was 400 to 800 mg, every 6 hours, for 10 to 16 days; dosage in children was half this amount for 11 to 15 days. Of the 21 patients treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 18 (86 percent) showed a satisfactory clinical response; 13 of these 18 had negative stools immediately after therapy, and two more were negative at the time of discharge (total: 83 percent). Mean hospital stay of these patients was 34.5 days. Of the 26 patients treated with amdinocillin, 23 showed a satisfactory clinical response; 20 of those responding clinically were still excreting the causative organism at the end of therapy; seven of the group remained as convalescent patients who continued to excrete the causative organism in feces at the time of discharge. Mean hospital stay was 43 days. The results of initial trials of amdinocillin and ampicillin in combination suggest that such therapy may be preferable to use of amdinocillin alone, although the excretion of the causative organism during convalescence has not been adequately assessed. PMID:6311001

  15. Lassa fever: review of epidemiology and epizootiology

    PubMed Central

    Monath, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    The basic ecology of Lassa fever appears to involve enzootic transmission of virus in commensal populations of a single murine species, Mastomys natalensis. Virus may spill over from the rodent cycle to man by various routes. Secondary spread between humans may occur within domiciliary groups, and persons infected within the community who develop clinical disease may introduce the virus into hospital and begin a cycle of nosocomial infection. Between 1969, when Lassa fever was first described, and June 1975, the disease was recognized on 9 discrete occasions, affecting 114 persons. Over one-third of these infections were acquired by person-to-person spread within hospitals. In only one outbreak (in Sierra Leone) were the majority of cases acquired in the community. Recent observations have indicated hyperendemic disease in eastern Sierra Leone. Cases have occurred in Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, and serological evidence exists for activity of the virus elsewhere in West and Central Africa. Seasonal factors appear to play a role in the appearance of human cases. Attack rates have been higher in adults than in children. The source of infection and potential routes of virus transmission in the various epidemics are discussed, and perspectives for future epidemiological research are presented. PMID:782738

  16. Typhoid fever in Fiji: a reversible plague?

    PubMed

    Thompson, Corinne N; Kama, Mike; Acharya, Shrish; Bera, Una; Clemens, John; Crump, John A; Dawainavesi, Aggie; Dougan, Gordon; Edmunds, W John; Fox, Kimberley; Jenkins, Kylie; Khan, M Imran; Koroivueta, Josefa; Levine, Myron M; Martin, Laura B; Nilles, Eric; Pitzer, Virginia E; Singh, Shalini; Raiwalu, Ratu Vereniki; Baker, Stephen; Mulholland, Kim

    2014-10-01

    The country of Fiji, with a population of approximately 870 000 people, faces a growing burden of several communicable diseases including the bacterial infection typhoid fever. Surveillance data suggest that typhoid has become increasingly common in rural areas of Fiji and is more frequent amongst young adults. Transmission of the organisms that cause typhoid is facilitated by faecal contamination of food or water and may be influenced by local behavioural practices in Fiji. The Fijian Ministry of Health, with support from Australian Aid, hosted a meeting in August 2012 to develop comprehensive control and prevention strategies for typhoid fever in Fiji. International and local specialists were invited to share relevant data and discuss typhoid control options. The resultant recommendations focused on generating a clearer sense of the epidemiology of typhoid in Fiji and exploring the contribution of potential transmission pathways. Additionally, the panel suggested steps such as ensuring that recommended ciprofloxacin doses are appropriate to reduce the potential for relapse and reinfection in clinical cases, encouraging proper hand hygiene of food and drink handlers, working with water and sanitation agencies to review current sanitation practices and considering a vaccination policy targeting epidemiologically relevant populations. PMID:25066005

  17. Ciprofloxacin resistant osteomyelitis following typhoid fever

    PubMed Central

    Ayeni, Itunuayo V; Calver, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella typi is a rare cause of chronic osteomyelitis in a non-sickle cell patient. The authors report the case of a 25-year-old gentleman with a history of typhoid fever and an infected skin nodule on his left forearm 5 years prior to the diagnosis. He was referred to our orthopaedic colleagues with chronic osteomyelitis and underwent debridement of the bone for which samples grew Salmonella typhi. He was commenced on intravenous ceftriaxone 2 g once daily for 6 weeks followed by oral azithromycin 500 mg once daily for a further 6 weeks. The purpose of this case report is to consider the possible mode for antibiotic resistance. In this patient, the authors believe that partial treatment of the typhoid fever 5 years prior to diagnosis of osteomyelitis enabled antibiotic resistance to ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, the authors believe that the infected nodule was the result of direct inoculation with the Salmonella organism which then acted as a focus for further infections. PMID:22802563

  18. Vaccination against typhoid fever: present status.

    PubMed Central

    Ivanoff, B.; Levine, M. M.; Lambert, P. H.

    1994-01-01

    Typhoid fever remains an underestimated important health problem in many developing countries, causing more than 600,000 deaths annually in the world. Because of the reactogenicity of the parenteral, killed whole-cell vaccine, research has been oriented towards vaccination orally using live organisms and purified antigen. Live vaccine Ty21a, given by the oral route, has been extensively tested in several studies in developing countries. Its liquid formulation was the most effective, providing more than 60% protection after 7 years of follow-up. A Vi polysaccharide vaccine has been elaborated and provided more than 65% protection; after 3 years of follow-up the Vi antibody level was still at a high level. These two vaccines are therefore candidates for use in public health control programmes. Before such use, however, they need further evaluation for safety and protective efficacy when administered to the EPI-targeted age groups. The question of whether typhoid fever vaccines interfere with the response to simultaneously administered measles vaccine must also be studied. New live vaccines, given by the oral route in one dose, have been constructed through genetic engineering. The first results are promising, but they must be improved before use in a large-scale study. These strains could be used as live vector to deliver foreign antigens to the intestinal mucosa. PMID:7867143

  19. Typhoid fever as cellular microbiological model.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Dahir Ramos; de Andrade Júnior, Dahir Ramos

    2003-01-01

    The knowledge about typhoid fever pathogenesis is growing in the last years, mainly about the cellular and molecular phenomena that are responsible by clinical manifestations of this disease. In this article are discussed several recent discoveries, as follows: a) Bacterial type III protein secretion system; b) The five virulence genes of Salmonella spp. that encoding Sips (Salmonella invasion protein) A, B, C, D and E, which are capable of induce apoptosis in macrophages; c) The function of Toll R2 and Toll R4 receptors present in the macrophage surface (discovered in the Drosophila). The Toll family receptors are critical in the signalizing mediated by LPS in macrophages in association with LBP and CD14; d) The lines of immune defense between intestinal lumen and internal organs; e) The fundamental role of the endothelial cells in the inflammatory deviation from bloodstream into infected tissues by bacteria. In addition to above subjects, the authors comment the correlation between the clinical features of typhoid fever and the cellular and molecular phenomena of this disease, as well as the therapeutic consequences of this knowledge. PMID:14502344

  20. Hay fever in adolescents and adults

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Hay fever is found throughout the world. Epidemiological evidence suggests considerable geographical variation in its prevalence. Symptoms are caused by an IgE-mediated type 1 hypersensitivity reaction to airborne allergens such as pollen or fungal spores, and may also cause eye, sinus, respiratory, and systemic problems. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for hay fever in adolescents and adults? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 211 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: intranasal corticosteroids, oral antihistamines, intranasal antihistamines, oral leukotriene receptor antagonists, systemic corticosteroids, intranasal ipratropium bromide, oral decongestants, and combinations of these treatments. PMID:21726475

  1. Q fever in domestic and wild birds.

    PubMed

    RASKA, K; SYRUCEK, L

    1956-01-01

    The authors report on the results of several years' research into the role of domestic and wild birds in the epidemiology and epizootiology of Q fever in Czechoslovakia. They examined 572 blood specimens taken from domestic birds in an area of endemic Q fever and found positive reactions to the complement-fixation test in hens, turkeys, ducks, geese, and pigeons, with hens showing the highest percentage of positive reactions. In addition, the susceptibility of hens to infection with Rickettsia burnetii was demonstrated experimentally, and excretion of R. burnetii in the stools of hens was demonstrated from the 7th to the 40th day after infection.Complement-fixation tests were also done on 480 blood specimens from wild birds with positive serological reactions in 15.8% of birds living directly on infected farms, 4.3% of birds living in the immediate vicinity of those farms, and 1.8% of birds living independently of human habitations but in an endemic area. R. burnetii was isolated from the spleen and liver of the redstart and the white wagtail and from ectoparasites of swallows. PMID:13383368

  2. Dengue Fever: Causes, Complications, and Vaccine Strategies.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Niyati; Khanna, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a highly endemic infectious disease of the tropical countries and is rapidly becoming a global burden. It is caused by any of the 4 serotypes of dengue virus and is transmitted within humans through female Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease varies from mild fever to severe conditions of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome. Globalization, increased air travel, and unplanned urbanization have led to increase in the rate of infection and helped dengue to expand its geographic and demographic distribution. Dengue vaccine development has been a challenging task due to the existence of four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes, each capable of eliciting cross-reactive and disease-enhancing antibody response against the remaining three serotypes. Recently, Sanofi Pasteur's chimeric live-attenuated dengue vaccine candidate has been approved in Mexico, Brazil, and Philippines for usage in adults between 9 and 45 years of age. The impact of its limited application to the public health system needs to be evaluated. Simultaneously, the restricted application of this vaccine candidate warrants continued efforts in developing a dengue vaccine candidate which is additionally efficacious for infants and naïve individuals. In this context, alternative strategies of developing a designed vaccine candidate which does not allow production of enhancing antibodies should be explored, as it may expand the umbrella of efficacy to include infants and naïve individuals. PMID:27525287

  3. Fever, hyperthermia and the heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ishwar S; Hasday, Jeffrey D

    2013-08-01

    The heat shock response is a highly conserved primitive response that is essential for survival against a wide range of stresses, including extremes of temperature. Fever is a more recently evolved response, during which organisms raise their core body temperature and temporarily subject themselves to thermal stress in the face of infections. The present review documents studies showing the potential overlap between the febrile response and the heat shock response and how both activate the same common transcriptional programme (although with different magnitudes) including the stress-activated transcription factor, heat shock factor-1, to modify host defences in the context of infection, inflammation and injury. The review focuses primarily on how hyperthermia within the febrile range that often accompanies infections and inflammation acts as a biological response modifier and modifies innate immune responses. The characteristic 2-3 °C increase in core body temperature during fever activates and utilises elements of the heat shock response pathway to modify cytokine and chemokine gene expression, cellular signalling and immune cell mobilisation to sites of inflammation, infection and injury. Interestingly, typical proinflammatory agonists such as Toll-like receptor agonists modify the heat shock-induced transcriptional programme and expression of HSP genes following co-exposure to febrile range hyperthermia or heat shock, suggesting a complex reciprocal regulation between the inflammatory pathway and the heat shock response pathway. PMID:23863046

  4. Dengue Fever: Causes, Complications, and Vaccine Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a highly endemic infectious disease of the tropical countries and is rapidly becoming a global burden. It is caused by any of the 4 serotypes of dengue virus and is transmitted within humans through female Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease varies from mild fever to severe conditions of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome. Globalization, increased air travel, and unplanned urbanization have led to increase in the rate of infection and helped dengue to expand its geographic and demographic distribution. Dengue vaccine development has been a challenging task due to the existence of four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes, each capable of eliciting cross-reactive and disease-enhancing antibody response against the remaining three serotypes. Recently, Sanofi Pasteur's chimeric live-attenuated dengue vaccine candidate has been approved in Mexico, Brazil, and Philippines for usage in adults between 9 and 45 years of age. The impact of its limited application to the public health system needs to be evaluated. Simultaneously, the restricted application of this vaccine candidate warrants continued efforts in developing a dengue vaccine candidate which is additionally efficacious for infants and naïve individuals. In this context, alternative strategies of developing a designed vaccine candidate which does not allow production of enhancing antibodies should be explored, as it may expand the umbrella of efficacy to include infants and naïve individuals. PMID:27525287

  5. Typhoid fever and invasive nontyphoid salmonellosis, Malawi and South Africa.

    PubMed

    Feasey, Nicholas A; Archer, Brett N; Heyderman, Robert S; Sooka, Arvinda; Dennis, Brigitte; Gordon, Melita A; Keddy, Karen H

    2010-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of invasive nontyphoid salmonellosis and typhoid fever in Malawi and South Africa, we compared case frequency and patient age distribution. Invasive nontyphoid salmonellosis showed a clear bimodal age distribution; the infection developed in women at a younger age than in men. Case frequency for typhoid fever was lower than for salmonellosis. PMID:20735930

  6. Typhoid Fever and Invasive Nontyphoid Salmonellosis, Malawi and South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Archer, Brett N.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Sooka, Arvinda; Dennis, Brigitte; Keddy, Karen H.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of invasive nontyphoid salmonellosis and typhoid fever in Malawi and South Africa, we compared case frequency and patient age distribution. Invasive nontyphoid salmonellosis showed a clear bimodal age distribution; the infection developed in women at a younger age than in men. Case frequency for typhoid fever was lower than for salmonellosis. PMID:20735930

  7. Louseborne Relapsing Fever among East African Refugees, Italy, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Lipani, Filippo; Costa, Cecilia; Scarvaglieri, Mariaelisabetta; Balbiano, Rosanna; Carosella, Sinibaldo; Calcagno, Andrea; Audagnotto, Sabrina; Barbui, Anna Maria; Brossa, Silvia; Ghisetti, Valeria; Dal Conte, Ivano; Caramello, Pietro; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    During June 9–September 30, 2015, five cases of louseborne relapsing fever were identified in Turin, Italy. All 5 cases were in young refugees from Somalia, 2 of whom had lived in Italy since 2011. Our report seems to confirm the possibility of local transmission of louse-borne relapsing fever. PMID:26812354

  8. DIAGNOSTIC FINDINGS IN PIGS WITH PORCINE MALIGNANT CATARRHAL FEVER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For the first time Ovine Herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) was identified in Swiss pigs as the causative agent of Porcine Malignant Catarrhal Fever (MCF). Diseased animals from two farms were observed to show weakness, anorexia, fever up to 41°C, and neurological symptoms, i.e. ataxia, convulsions and hyperest...

  9. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today's periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin. PMID:26566482

  10. Valley Fever: Danger Lurking in a Dust Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Larry; Gaab, Erin M.; Sanchez, Javier; Bui, Phuong Q.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Hoyer, Katrina K.; Peterson, Michael W.; Ojcius, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii contribute to the development of Valley Fever. The ability of these fungal pathogens to evade the host immune system creates difficulty in recognition and treatment of this debilitating infection. In this review, we describe the current knowledge of Valley Fever and approaches to improve prevention, detection, and treatment. PMID:25038397

  11. Effects of Vegetation Microclimate on Larval Cattle Fever Tick Survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle Fever Ticks (CFT), Rhipicephalus annulatus and R. microplus, have been a threat to the livestock industry for many years. These ticks are vectors of cattle fever, a disease produced by the hemoparasite Babesia bovis and B. bigemina. Laboratory research on CFT larval survival has shown that co...

  12. The first cases of Lassa fever in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Dzotsi, E K; Ohene, S-A; Asiedu-Bekoe, F; Amankwa, J; Sarkodie, B; Adjabeng, M; Thouphique, A M; Ofei, A; Oduro, J; Atitogo, D; Bonney, J H K; Paintsil, S C N; Ampofo, W

    2012-09-01

    Lassa fever is a zoonotic disease endemic in West Africa but with no previous case reported in Ghana. We describe the first two laboratory confirmed cases of Lassa fever from the Ashanti Region of Ghana detected in October and December, 2011. PMID:23661832

  13. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today’s periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin. PMID:26566482

  14. Epidemiological aspects of the 1969 yellow fever epidemic in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Carey, D. E.; Kemp, G. E.; Troup, J. M.; White, H. A.; Smith, E. A.; Addy, R. F.; Fom, A. L. M. D.; Pifer, J.; Jones, E. M.; Brès, P.; Shope, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Virus Research Laboratory of the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, was notified on 23 October 1969 that cases of suspected yellow fever had occurred in the Jos area. The diagnosis was confirmed by virus isolation and the existence of a widespread outbreak on the Jos Plateau and adjacent areas was established. This was the first recognized epidemic of yellow fever in Nigeria since 1953. Between September and the end of December 1969, an estimated total of 252 patients with yellow fever were hospitalized. The case—fatality ratio for hospitalized patients was approximately 40%. The diagnosis of yellow fever was confirmed by virus isolation, serology, or pathology in 55 patients. It is estimated that up to 100 000 cases of yellow fever may have occurred during the epidemic. PMID:4538037

  15. A Case of Relapsing Polychondritis Initiating with Unexplained Fever

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Kosuke; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Yoshimura, Satoshi; Kurohama, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Mai; Takahata, Taichi; Oku, Ryuta; Ito, Masahiro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease affecting the multiple organ system. Here, we describe a case of RP initially presenting with high fever. The patient was referred to our hospital for further examination of fever of unknown origin (FUO). On admission, the patient reported dry cough in addition to fever. On physical examination, her red, swollen ears were noted, attributed on histology to inflammation with auricular perichondritis. She was diagnosed with RP and treated with oral prednisone (50 mg/day); her fever and auricular inflammation resolved. The patient no longer reported cough and body temperature returned to normal and the elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) were normalized. In this case, identification of the origin of fever was a challenge because of unspecific symptoms; however, awareness of the systemic manifestations of RP may lead to the prompt diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26981127

  16. Surveillance of Lassa fever in missionaries stationed in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Frame, John D.

    1975-01-01

    To determine the distribution of Lassa virus in West Africa, a serological survey was undertaken. A number of mission hospital supplied sera from patients admitted with a history of fever and specimens were also collected in New York from missionaries who had experienced an unusual febrile illness while working in Africa. More cases of Lassa fever were detected among missionaries than among Africans, possibly because many African patients had left hospital before the complement fixation tests had become positive. Although most adults had fairly high fever and some were prostrated, fever was less severe in the children examined. In general the findings confirm that not all Lassa fever patients have the severe syndrome described in the original reports. PMID:1085213

  17. Laboratory Validation of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Will K; Szymczak, Mitchell Scott; Burkhalter, Kristen L; Miller, Myrna M

    2015-12-01

    Sandfly fever group viruses in the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae) are widely distributed across the globe and are a cause of disease in military troops and indigenous peoples. We assessed the laboratory sensitivity and specificity of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay, a rapid dipstick assay designed to detect sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV) and Toscana virus (TOSV) against a panel of phleboviruses. The assay detected SFNV and TOSV, as well as other phleboviruses including Aguacate, Anahanga, Arumowot, Chagres, and Punta Toro viruses. It did not detect sandfly fever Sicilian, Heartland, Rio Grande, or Rift Valley fever viruses. It did not produce false positive results in the presence of uninfected sand flies (Lutzomyia longipalpis) or Cache Valley virus, a distantly related bunyavirus. Results from this laboratory evaluation suggest that this assay may be used as a rapid field-deployable assay to detect sand flies infected with TOSV and SFNV, as well as an assortment of other phleboviruses. PMID:26675463

  18. Evaluation of dengue fever reports during an epidemic, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Vega, Liliana; Pacheco, Oscar; de la Hoz-Restrepo, Fernando; Díaz-Quijano, Fredi Alexander

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the validity of dengue fever reports and how they relate to the definition of case and severity. METHODS Diagnostic test assessment was conducted using cross-sectional sampling from a universe of 13,873 patients treated during the fifth epidemiological period in health institutions from 11 Colombian departments in 2013. The test under analyses was the reporting to the National Public Health Surveillance System, and the reference standard was the review of histories identified by active institutional search. We reviewed all histories of patients diagnosed with dengue fever, as well as a random sample of patients with febrile syndromes. The specificity and sensitivity of reports were estimated for this purpose, considering the inverse of the probability of being selected for weighting. The concordance between reporting and the findings of the active institutional search was calculated using Kappa statistics. RESULTS We included 4,359 febrile patients, and 31.7% were classified as compatible with dengue fever (17 with severe dengue fever; 461 with dengue fever and warning signs; 904 with dengue fever and no warning signs). The global sensitivity of reports was 13.2% (95%CI 10.9;15.4) and specificity was 98.4% (95%CI 97.9;98.9). Sensitivity varied according to severity: 12.1% (95%CI 9.3;14.8) for patients presenting dengue fever with no warning signs; 14.5% (95%CI 10.6;18.4) for those presenting dengue fever with warning signs, and 40.0% (95%CI 9.6;70.4) for those with severe dengue fever. Concordance between reporting and the findings of the active institutional search resulted in a Kappa of 10.1%. CONCLUSIONS Low concordance was observed between reporting and the review of clinical histories, which was associated with the low reporting of dengue fever compatible cases, especially milder cases. PMID:26039392

  19. Evaluation of dengue fever reports during an epidemic, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Romero-Vega, Liliana; Pacheco, Oscar; de la Hoz-Restrepo, Fernando; Díaz-Quijano, Fredi Alexander

    2014-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the validity of dengue fever reports and how they relate to the definition of case and severity. METHODS Diagnostic test assessment was conducted using cross-sectional sampling from a universe of 13,873 patients treated during the fifth epidemiological period in health institutions from 11 Colombian departments in 2013. The test under analyses was the reporting to the National Public Health Surveillance System, and the reference standard was the review of histories identified by active institutional search. We reviewed all histories of patients diagnosed with dengue fever, as well as a random sample of patients with febrile syndromes. The specificity and sensitivity of reports were estimated for this purpose, considering the inverse of the probability of being selected for weighting. The concordance between reporting and the findings of the active institutional search was calculated using Kappa statistics. RESULTS We included 4,359 febrile patients, and 31.7% were classified as compatible with dengue fever (17 with severe dengue fever; 461 with dengue fever and warning signs; 904 with dengue fever and no warning signs). The global sensitivity of reports was 13.2% (95%CI 10.9;15.4) and specificity was 98.4% (95%CI 97.9;98.9). Sensitivity varied according to severity: 12.1% (95%CI 9.3;14.8) for patients presenting dengue fever with no warning signs; 14.5% (95%CI 10.6;18.4) for those presenting dengue fever with warning signs, and 40.0% (95%CI 9.6;70.4) for those with severe dengue fever. Concordance between reporting and the findings of the active institutional search resulted in a Kappa of 10.1%. CONCLUSIONS Low concordance was observed between reporting and the review of clinical histories, which was associated with the low reporting of dengue fever compatible cases, especially milder cases. PMID:26039392

  20. Fever and acute phase reactants in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, H.; van Gool, J.; Deutz, N. E.

    1988-01-01

    In rats synthesis of some acute phase reactants can be induced by a combination of corticosteroids and adrenaline. During fever both hormones show high plasma levels. We studied the effect of fever induced by intra-cerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of PGE2 on the acute phase response. Fever was continuously recorded and 24 h after induction acute phase reactant (APR) response was measured as indicated by the rise of alpha-macrofetoprotein (alpha M FP, alpha 2 macroglobulin of the rat). Controls received 0.9% saline i.c.v. Controls did not develop fever (dTmax less than or equal to 1 degree C) nor did they show significant APR response. The maximal rise in body temperature after PGE2 (2.6 +/- 0.7 degrees C) correlated significantly with the rise in alpha M FP concentration 24 h later. Adrenalectomy prevented the APR response completely but the magnitude of the fever reaction remained the same (2.1 +/- 0.3 degrees C). alpha-Blockade gave a smaller fever response but had no effect on the APR response. In alpha- and beta-blockade, fever response was normal but no APR response was obtained. Destroying the sympathetic nerve supply to the liver with 6-OH dopamine retarded the fever response but again APR response was not impeded. In order to differentiate between the role of fever as such and the effect of PGE2 on APR synthesis, we used heat exposure to induce hyperthermia in normal rats who showed an APR response comparable with that after i.c.v. PGE2. Pretreatment with sodium salicylate before inducing hyperthermia led to a variable rise in alpha M FP. Fever as such, without tissue injury, induces an APR response. The pathway to this effect probably involves circulating corticosterone and adrenaline, possibly via a beta-receptor mediated stimulation. PMID:2460123

  1. Pontiac fever: an operational definition for epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Tossa, Paul; Deloge-Abarkan, Magali; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Hartemann, Philippe; Mathieu, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    Background Pontiac fever is usually described in epidemic settings. Detection of Pontiac fever is a marker of an environmental contamination by Legionella and should thereby call for prevention measures in order to prevent outbreak of Legionnaire's disease. The objective of this study is to propose an operational definition of Pontiac fever that is amenable to epidemiological surveillance and investigation in a non epidemic setting. Methods A population of 560 elderly subjects residing in 25 nursing homes was followed during 4 months in order to assess the daily incidence of symptoms associated, in the literature, with Pontiac fever. The water and aerosol of one to 8 showers by nursing home were characterized combining conventional bacterial culture of Legionella and the Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) technique that used oligonucleotides probes specific for Legionellaceae. A definition of Pontiac fever was devised based on clinical symptoms described in epidemic investigations and on their timing after the exposure event. The association between incidence of Pontiac fever and shower contamination levels was evaluated to test the relevance of this definition. Results The proposed definition of Pontiac fever associated the following criteria: occurrence of at least one symptom among headache, myalgia, fever and shivers, possibly associated with other 'minor' symptoms, within three days after a shower contaminated by Legionella, during a maximum of 8 days (minimum 2 days). 23 such cases occurred during the study (incidence rate: 0.125 cases per person-year [95% CI: 0.122–0.127]). A concentration of Legionella in water equal to or greater than 104.L-1 (FISH method) was associated with a significant increase of incidence of Pontiac fever (p = 0.04). Conclusion Once validated in other settings, the proposed definition of Pontiac fever might be used to develop epidemiological surveillance and help draw attention on sources of Legionella. PMID:16646972

  2. The creation and evacuation of a large-volume sediment bar in a coastal ephemeral stream, NW Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, N.; Greenbaum, N.

    2009-12-01

    An unusual 240 mm rainstorm and consequent major flood (peak discharge 110 m3s-1) with an estimated recurrence interval of about 50 years occurred on Dec. 31, 1998 in Nahal Me'arot, an ungauged 25 km2 coastal ephemeral stream in Mt. Carmel, NW Israel. The flood caused morphological modifications along the channel, including intensive stripping of the channel bed and floodplain along several segments and deposition of large gravel bars downstream of these segments. One of such segments served as a study reach; composed of a massive, coarse, 200 m long gravel-bar formed downstream of a segment (150 m long) that was deeply scoured. The bar’s stratigraphy consisted of a very coarse gravel lag, well sorted on the surface overlying much finer sediment characterized by sandy layers mixed with gravel among different types of facies. The difference between its volume and the scoured reach upstream was only 20% (1270 m3 compared to 1010 m3) signifying that scour and aggradation occurred in proximity due to an abrupt gradient change. The diverse sedimentary configurations of the pits and thickness made spatial correlation difficult even when pits were in the same x-section. Despite the initial impression that the bar was stable and a prominent bedform feature for years to come, a careful examination proved otherwise. The initial recovery of the channel started when dense low shrub vegetation re-stabilized along the affected reaches a year later. Two smaller floods, 3 and 4 years later, evacuated and reworked most of the sediment until it lost most of its volume. Using the Lisle and Church (2002) decay function we portray the rapid evacuation of the bar despite the channel inactivity between floods. The study suggests that the flood's large impact and disturbance was local, short-lived and the channel almost returned to its pre-flood state within about 4 years.

  3. Spatio-temporal complexity of chimpanzee food: How cognitive adaptations can counteract the ephemeral nature of ripe fruit.

    PubMed

    Janmaat, Karline R L; Boesch, Christophe; Byrne, Richard; Chapman, Colin A; Goné Bi, Zoro B; Head, Josephine S; Robbins, Martha M; Wrangham, Richard W; Polansky, Leo

    2016-06-01

    Ecological complexity has been proposed to play a crucial role in primate brain-size evolution. However, detailed quantification of ecological complexity is still limited. Here we assess the spatio-temporal distribution of tropical fruits and young leaves, two primary chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) foods, focusing on the predictability of their availability in individual trees. Using up to 20 years of information on monthly availability of young leaf, unripe and ripe fruit in plant species consumed by chimpanzees from tropical forests in East, Central, and West Africa, we estimated: (1) the forest-wide frequency of occurrence of each food type and (2) the predictability of finding ripe fruit-bearing trees, focusing on the timing, frequency, and amount of ripe fruit present. In all three forests, at least half of all encountered trees belonged to species that chimpanzees were known to feed on. However, the proportion of these trees bearing young leaves and fruit fluctuated widely between months. Ripe fruit was the most ephemeral food source, and trees that had more than half of their crown filled were at least nine times scarcer than other trees. In old growth forests only one large ripe fruit crop was on average encountered per 10 km. High levels of inter-individual variation in the number of months that fruit was present existed, and in some extreme cases individuals bore ripe fruit more than seven times as often as conspecifics. Some species showed substantially less variation in such ripe fruit production frequencies and fruit quantity than others. We hypothesize that chimpanzees employ a suite of cognitive mechanisms, including abilities to: (1) generalize or classify food trees; (2) remember the relative metrics of quantity and frequency of fruit production across years; and (3) flexibly plan return times to feeding trees to optimize high-energy food consumption in individual trees, and efficient travel between them. Am. J. Primatol. 78:626-645, 2016. © 2016

  4. Emission standards versus immission standards for assessing the impact of urban drainage on ephemeral receiving water bodies.

    PubMed

    Freni, Gabriele; Mannina, Giorgio; Viviani, Gaspare

    2010-01-01

    In the past, emission standard indicators have been adopted by environmental regulation authorities in order to preserve the quality of a receiving water body. Such indicators are based on the frequency or magnitude of a polluted discharge that may be continuous or intermittent. In order to properly maintain the quality of receiving waters, the Water Framework Directive, following the basic ideas of British Urban Pollution Manual, has been established. The Directive has overtaken the emission-standard concept, substituting it with the stream-standard concept that fixes discharge limits for each polluting substance depending on the self-depurative characteristics of receiving waters. Stream-standard assessment requires the deployment of measurement campaigns that can be very expensive; furthermore, the measurement campaigns are usually not able to provide a link between the receiving water quality and the polluting sources. Therefore, it would be very useful to find a correlation between the quality status of the natural waters and the emission-based indicators. Thus, this study is aimed to finding a possible connection between the receiving water quality indicators drawn by environmental regulation authorities and emission-based indicators while considering both continuous (i.e. from the wastewater treatment plants) and intermittent pollution discharges (mainly from combined sewer overflows). Such research has been carried out by means of long-term analysis adopting a holistic modelling approach. The different parts of the integrated urban drainage system were modelled by a parsimonious integrated model. The analysis was applied to an ephemeral river bounding Bologna (Italy). The study concluded that the correlation between receiving water quality and polluting emissions cannot be generally stated. Nevertheless, specific analyses on polluting emissions were pointed out in the study highlighting cause-effect link between polluting sources and receiving water quality

  5. Genetic analysis of an ephemeral intraspecific hybrid zone in the hypervariable tree, Metrosideros polymorpha, on Hawai'i Island.

    PubMed

    Stacy, E A; Johansen, J B; Sakishima, T; Price, D K

    2016-09-01

    Intraspecific hybrid zones involving long-lived woody species are rare and can provide insights into the genetic basis of early-diverging traits in speciation. Within the landscape-dominant Hawaiian tree, Metrosideros polymorpha, are morphologically distinct successional varieties, incana and glaberrima, that dominate new and old lava flows, respectively, below 1200 me on volcanically active Hawai'i Island, with var. glaberrima also extending to higher elevations and bogs. Here, we use morphological measurements on 86 adult trees to document the presence of an incana-glaberrima hybrid zone on the 1855 Mauna Loa lava flow on east Hawai'i Island and parent-offspring analysis of 1311 greenhouse seedlings from 71 crosses involving 72 adults to estimate heritabilities and genetic correlations among vegetative traits. Both the variation in adult leaf pubescence at the site and the consistency between adult and offspring phenotypes suggest the presence of two hybrid classes, F1s and var. incana backcrosses, as would be expected on a relatively young lava flow. Nine nuclear microsatellite loci failed to distinguish parental and hybrid genotypes. All four leaf traits examined showed an additive genetic basis with moderate to strong heritabilities, and genetic correlations were stronger for the more range-restricted var. incana. The differences between varieties in trait values, heritabilities and genetic correlations, coupled with high genetic variation within but low genetic variation between varieties, are consistent with a multi-million-year history of alternating periods of disruptive selection in contrasting environments and admixture in ephemeral hybrid zones. Finally, the contrasting genetic architectures suggest different evolutionary trajectories of leaf traits in these forms. PMID:27301333

  6. Field study and simulation of diurnal temperature effects on infiltration and variably saturated flow beneath an ephemeral stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ronan, A.D.; Prudic, D.E.; Thodal, C.E.; Constantz, J.

    1998-01-01

    Two experiments were performed to investigate flow beneath an ephemeral stream and to estimate streambed infiltration rates. Discharge and stream-area measurements were used to determine infiltration rates. Stream and subsurface temperatures were used to interpret subsurface flow through variably saturated sediments beneath the stream. Spatial variations in subsurface temperatures suggest that flow beneath the streambed is dependent on the orientation of the stream in the canyon and the layering of the sediments. Streamflow and infiltration rates vary diurnally: Stream flow is lowest in late afternoon when stream temperature is greatest and highest in early morning when stream temperature is least. The lower afternoon streamflow is attributed to increased infiltration rates; evapotranspiration is insufficient to account for the decreased streamflow. The increased infiltration rates are attributed to viscosity effects on hydraulic conductivity from increased stream temperatures. The first set of field data was used to calibrate a two-dimensional variably saturated flow model that includes heat transport. The model was calibrated to (1) temperature fluctuations in the subsurface and (2) infiltration rates determined from measured stream flow losses. The second set of field data was to evaluate the ability to predict infiltration rates on the basis of temperature measurements alone. Results indicate that the variably saturated subsurface flow depends on downcanyon layering of the sediments. They also support the field observations in indicating that diurnal changes in infiltration can be explained by temperature dependence of hydraulic conductivity. Over the range of temperatures and flows monitored, diurnal stream temperature changes can be used to estimate streambed infiltration rates. It is often impractical to maintain equipment for determining infiltration rates by traditional means; however, once a model is calibrated using both infiltration and temperature data

  7. Super-earth Detection and "Planet Fever"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pont, Frederic; Aigrain, S.; Zucker, S.

    2009-09-01

    Radial-velocity spectrographs and space transit searches have become sensitive enough to detect planets only a few times more massive than the Earth - the telluric planets or "super-Earths." We are getting one step nearer to knowing how common are Earth analogs. There is a catch however: many of the super-Earth detections are very close to the detection thresholds, and intrinsic stellar variations are an important source of false positive with both the radial velocity and transit technique. In preparation for the coming harvest of new detections, it seems worth attempting to develop some vaccine against the most extreme strands of "planet fever," the contagious disease of seeing extra-solar planet in any signal.

  8. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Richards, Guy A; Weyer, Jacqueline; Blumberg, Lucille H

    2015-09-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) include a diverse array of diseases caused by a broad range of viruses transmitted from various animal hosts and originating from almost all the continents in the world. These are potentially fatal and highly transmissible diseases without specific treatments or prophylactic vaccines. As has been demonstrated during the Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, the consequences of VHFs are not limited to specific countries - they may become epidemic, and may have considerable economic impact and disrupt local public health and social service structures. Intensive public health intervention is necessary to contain these diseases. Here we provide a concise overview of the VHFs that are of current public health importance to South Africa. PMID:26428973

  9. Doctors' Knowledge of Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers.

    PubMed

    Lisk, Clifford; Snell, Luke; Haji-Coll, Michael; Ellis, Jayne; Sufi, Saaidullah; Raj, Rohit; Sharma, A; Smith, C

    2015-01-01

    Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers (VHF) such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) are of increasing concern to clinicians and public heath bodies across Europe and America due to the on-going epidemic in West Africa. We conducted an online study to assess clinicians' knowledge of VHF across six hospital sites in London. This showed suboptimal knowledge of Public Health England guidance, EVD epidemiology and the risk factors for acquiring VHF. Knowledge about VHF was dependent on seniority of grade with the most junior grade of doctors performing worse in several areas of the survey. Poor knowledge raises concerns that those at risk of VHF will be inappropriately risk stratified and managed. Education of doctors and other healthcare professionals about VHF is necessary to address these knowledge gaps. PMID:26305080

  10. Epidemiology and Pathogenesis of Bolivian Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Michael; Grant, Ashley; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    The etiologic agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), Machupo virus (MACV) is reported to have a mortality rate of 25 to 35%. First identified in 1959, BHF was the cause of a localized outbreak in San Joaquin until rodent population controls were implemented in 1964. The rodent Calomys collosus was identified as the primary vector and reservoir for the virus. Multiple animal models were considered during the 1970’s with the most human-like disease identified in Rhesus macaques but minimal characterization of the pathogenesis has been published since. A reemergence of reported BHF cases has been reported in recent years, which necessitates the further study and development of a vaccine to prevent future outbreaks. PMID:24636947

  11. Viruses Causing Hemorrhagic Fever. Safety Laboratory Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are diseases caused by viruses which belong to different families, many of them causing severe diseases. These viruses may produce different symptomatology together with a severe multisystem syndrome, and the final result might be the production of hemorrhages in several sites of the body. The majority of them have no other treatment than supportive therapy, although some antiviral drugs can be used in some circumstances. Transmission of VHF has been demonstrated through contact with animal vectors or person-to-person through the contact with body fluids. No risk of transmission has been found during the incubation period, but when the viral load is high the risk of transmission is greatest. Both health care and clinical laboratory workers must safely handle patients and specimens by taking all required precautions during their management. PMID:27014378

  12. Threat of dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever to Egypt from travelers.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Khalil, Hazem H M; Morsy, Ayman T A; Morsy, Tosson A

    2011-08-01

    Dengue (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fevers (DHF) are present in urban and suburban areas in the Americas, South-East Asia, the Eastern Mediterranean and the Western Pacific, but dengue fever is present mainly in the rural areas of Africa. Several factors have combined to produce epidemiological conditions in developing countries in the tropics and subtropics that favour viral transmission by the main mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti as the rapid population growth, rural-urban migration, inadequate basic urban infrastructure (eg. the unreliable water supply leading householders to store water in containers close to homes) and the increase in volume of solid waste, such as discarded plastic containers and other abandoned items which provide larval habitats in urban areas. Geographical expansion of the mosquito has been aided by the international commercial trade particularly in used car-tyres which easily accumulate rainwater. Increased air travel and the breakdown of vector control measures have also contributed greatly to the global burden of dengue and DH fevers. The presence of Ae. aegypti and endemicity of DF and DHF in the neighbor- ing regional countries must be in mind of the Public Health Authorities. PMID:21980768

  13. Rheumatic fever in Samoa: education as prevention.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lori B; Allen, Marvin; Lesa, Ropeti Fa'afetai; Richardson, Glenn E; Eggett, Dennis L

    2011-03-01

    The incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and its sequela rheumatic heart disease (RHO) is disproportionately high among the children of Western Samoa. Basic symptoms of ARF include fever, joint pain, and a sore throat. The condition of strep throat, if left untreated, may initiate an immune response which can damage the heart and become RHD. Primary prevention currently consists of educating locally trained nurses to detect strep throat and dispense antibiotics as necessary. The concept of targeting proximal caregivers with prevention information has not been explored. Health behavior theories offer methodology for the development, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion programs. This study incorporates the interpersonal level of the ecological model (EM) in conjunction with the four elements of the social change model (SCM) which are critical thinking, fundamental skills, cultural sensitivity, and action. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that an educational prevention program can be effective in disseminating pertinent information regarding ARF prevention. This study followed a matched-pairs, same subject design, using a pre-/post-survey as the observational tool in which to measure the effectiveness of the presentation. The question that targeted trust of health care workers showed a statistically significant increase (p = < .0001) from approximately 50% in the pre-survey to 73% in the post-survey. The question regarding antibiotic treatment was slightly significant for the pre-survey (p = 0.0428), but showed increased statistical significance for the post-survey (p -< 0.0001). Responses targeting the contagious factor changed in significance between the pre- and post-survey from p = .009 to p = < .001. The response change for the question targeting the possibility of a child contracting a sore throat as school changed from p = .0123 to p = < < .0001. These findings support the use of a basic and inexpensive educational

  14. Channel Transmission Loss Studies During Ephemeral Flow Events: ER-5-3 Channel and Cambric Ditch, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.J. Miller; S.A. Mizell; R.H. French; D.G. Meadows; M.H. Young

    2005-10-01

    Transmission losses along ephemeral channels are an important, yet poorly understood, aspect of rainfall-runoff prediction. Losses occur as flow infiltrates channel bed, banks, and floodplains. Estimating transmission losses in arid environments is difficult because of the variability of surficial geomorphic characteristics and infiltration capacities of soils and near-surface low-permeability geologic layers (e.g., calcrete). Transmission losses in ephemeral channels are nonlinear functions of discharge and time (Lane, 1972), and vary spatially along the channel reach and with soil antecedent moisture conditions (Sharma and Murthy, 1994). Rainfall-runoff models used to estimate peak discharge and runoff volume for flood hazard assessment are not designed specifically for ephemeral channels, where transmission loss can be significant because of the available storage volume in channel soils. Accuracy of the flow routing and rainfall-runoff models is dependent on the transmission loss estimate. Transmission loss rate is the most uncertain parameter in flow routing through ephemeral channels. This research, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) and conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), is designed to improve understanding of the impact of transmission loss on ephemeral flood modeling and compare various methodologies for predicting runoff from rainfall events. Various applications of this research to DOE projects include more site-specific accuracy in runoff prediction; possible reduction in size of flood mitigation structures at the NTS; and a better understanding of expected infiltration from runoff losses into landfill covers. Two channel transmission loss field experiments were performed on the NTS between 2001 and 2003: the first was conducted in the ER-5-3 channel (Miller et al., 2003), between March and June 2001, and the second was conducted in the Cambric Ditch (Mizell et al., 2005), between April

  15. Yellow fever cases in Asia: primed for an epidemic.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Sean; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Lim, Poh Lian

    2016-07-01

    There is currently an emerging outbreak of yellow fever in Angola. Cases in infected travellers have been reported in a number of other African countries, as well as in China, representing the first ever documented cases of yellow fever in Asia. There is a large Chinese workforce in Angola, many of whom may be unvaccinated, increasing the risk of ongoing importation of yellow fever into Asia via busy commercial airline routes. Large parts of the region are hyperendemic for the related Flavivirus dengue and are widely infested by Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito vector of urban yellow fever transmission. The combination of sustained introduction of viraemic travellers, an ecology conducive to local transmission, and an unimmunized population raises the possibility of a yellow fever epidemic in Asia. This represents a major global health threat, particularly in the context of a depleted emergency vaccine stockpile and untested surveillance systems in the region. In this review, the potential for a yellow fever outbreak in Asia is discussed with reference to the ecological and historical forces that have shaped global yellow fever epidemiology. The limitations of surveillance and vector control in the region are highlighted, and priorities for outbreak preparedness and response are suggested. PMID:27156836

  16. Fever management practices of neuroscience nurses: what has changed?

    PubMed

    Rockett, Hannah; Thompson, Hilaire J; Blissitt, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Current evidence shows that fever and hyperthermia are especially detrimental to patients with neurologic injury, leading to higher rates of mortality, greater disability, and longer lengths of stay. Although clinical practice guidelines exist for ischemic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury, they lack specificity in their recommendations for fever management, making it difficult to formulate appropriate protocols for care. Using survey methods, the aims of this study were to (a) describe how nursing practices for fever management in this population have changed over the last several years, (b) assess if institutional protocols and nursing judgment follow published national guidelines for fever management in neuroscience patients, and (c) explore whether nurse or institutional characteristics influence decision making. Compared with the previous survey administered in 2007, there was a small increase (8%) in respondents reporting having an institutional fever protocol specific to neurologic patients. Temperatures to initiate treatment either based on protocols or nurse determination did not change from the previous survey. However, nurses with specialty certification and/or working in settings with institutional awards (e.g., Magnet status or Stroke Center Designation) initiated therapy at a lower temperature. Oral acetaminophen continues to be the primary choice for fever management, followed by ice packs and fans. This study encourages the development of a stepwise approach to neuro-specific protocols for fever management. Furthermore, it shows the continuing need to promote further education and specialty training among nurses and encourage collaboration with physicians to establish best practices. PMID:25634653

  17. Environmental Transmission of Typhoid Fever in an Urban Slum

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, Alastair I.; Cosmas, Leonard; Macharia, Daniel; Fields, Barry; Bigogo, Godfrey; Mugoh, Maina; John-Stewart, Grace; Walson, Judd L.; Wakefield, Jonathan; Montgomery, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Enteric fever due to Salmonella Typhi (typhoid fever) occurs in urban areas with poor sanitation. While direct fecal-oral transmission is thought to be the predominant mode of transmission, recent evidence suggests that indirect environmental transmission may also contribute to disease spread. Methods Data from a population-based infectious disease surveillance system (28,000 individuals followed biweekly) were used to map the spatial pattern of typhoid fever in Kibera, an urban informal settlement in Nairobi Kenya, between 2010–2011. Spatial modeling was used to test whether variations in topography and accumulation of surface water explain the geographic patterns of risk. Results Among children less than ten years of age, risk of typhoid fever was geographically heterogeneous across the study area (p = 0.016) and was positively associated with lower elevation, OR = 1.87, 95% CI (1.36–2.57), p <0.001. In contrast, the risk of typhoid fever did not vary geographically or with elevation among individuals less than 6b ten years of age. Conclusions Our results provide evidence of indirect, environmental transmission of typhoid fever among children, a group with high exposure to fecal pathogens in the environment. Spatially targeting sanitation interventions may decrease enteric fever transmission. PMID:26633656

  18. Assessing Yellow Fever Risk in the Ecuadorian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Izurieta, Ricardo O; Macaluso, Maurizio; Watts, Douglas M; Tesh, Robert B; Guerra, Bolivar; Cruz, Ligia M; Galwankar, Sagar; Vermund, Sten H

    2009-01-01

    This study reports results of a cross-sectional study based on interviews and seroepidemiological methods to identify risk factors for yellow fever infection among personnel of a military garrison in the Amazonian rainforest. Clinical symptoms and signs observed among yellow fever cases are also described. Humoral immune response to yellow fever, Mayaro, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, Oropouche, and dengue 2 infection was assessed by evaluating IgM and IgG specific antibodies. A yellow fever attack rate of 13% (44/341, with 3 fatal cases) was observed among military personnel. Signs of digestive track bleeding (14.6%) and hematuria (4.9%) were observed among the yellow fever cases. In 32.2% of the cases, we measured high levels of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase with maximum levels of 6,830 and 3,500, respectively. Signs of bleeding or jaundice were observed in some cases, and high levels of transaminases were seen. The epidemiological and laboratory investigations demonstrated that the military personnel were affected by a yellow fever outbreak. The association between clearing the rainforest and also being at the detachments with yellow fever infection confirms that clearing is the main factor in the jungle model of transmission, which takes place deep in the Amazonian rainforest. PMID:20300380

  19. Fever management practices of neuroscience nurses: national and regional perspectives.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hilaire J; Kirkness, Catherine J; Mitchell, Pamela H; Webb, Deborah J

    2007-06-01

    Neuroscience patients with fever may have worse outcomes than those who are afebrile. However, neuroscience nurses who encounter this common problem face a translational gap between patient-outcomes research and bedside practice because there is no current evidence-based standard of care for fever management of the neurologically vulnerable patient. The aim of this study was to determine if there are trends in national practices for fever and hyperthermia management of the neurologically vulnerable patient. A 15-item mailed questionnaire was used to determine national and regional trends in fever and hyperthermia management and decision making by neuroscience nurses. Members of the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses were surveyed (N = 1,225) and returned 328 usable surveys. Fewer than 20% of respondents reported having an explicit fever management protocol in place for neurologic patients, and 12.5% reported having a nonspecific patient protocol available for fever management. Several clear and consistent patterns in interventions for fever and hyperthermia management were seen nationally, including acetaminophen administration at a dose of 650 mg every 4 hours, ice packs, water cooling blankets, and tepid bathing. However, regional differences were seen in intervention choices and initial temperature to treat. PMID:17591411

  20. Lassa fever in West African sub-region: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ogbu, O; Ajuluchukwu, E; Uneke, C J

    2007-03-01

    Lassa fever is an acute viral zoonotic illness caused by Lassa virus, an arenavirus known to be responsible for a severe haemorrhagic fever characterised by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting and, chest and abdominal pain. The virus exhibits persistent, asymptomatic infection with profuse urinary virus excretion in the ubiquitous rodent vector, Mastomys natalensis. Lassa fever is endemic in West Africa and has been reported from Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia, and Nigeria. Some studies indicate that 300,000 to 500,000 cases of Lassa fever and 5000 deaths occur yearly across West Africa. Studies reported in English, that investigated Lassa fever with reference to West Africa were identified using the Medline Entrez-PubMed search and were used for this review. The scarcity of resources available for health care delivery system and the political instability that characterise the West African countries would continue to impede efforts for the control of Lassa fever in the sub-region. There is need for adequate training of health care workers regarding diagnostics, intensive care of patients under isolation, contact tracing, adequate precautionary measures in handling infectious laboratory specimens, control of the vector as well as care and disposal of infectious waste. PMID:17378212

  1. The Nahal Oz Reservoir dam-break flood: Geomorphic impact on a small ephemeral loess-channel in the semi-arid Negev Desert, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Nathaniel; Sholker, Ofer; Roskin, Joel; Greenbaum, Noam

    2014-04-01

    The Nahal Oz Reservoir — in the coastal, semi-arid southwestern Israel was designed to enhance local irrigation of crops using reclaimed sewage water during the dry summer months. On March 2001, part of the western dike of the reservoir was breached and generated a flow release of 3.5 ∗ 106 m3 of secondary irrigation water that was channeled down the 1st order ephemeral loess stream (Nahal Yare'akh). The consequent 12-hour flood surge, with an estimated peak discharge of 1000 m3s- 1, inflicted severe loess erosion, agricultural, property and infrastructural damage downstream ($6 million).

  2. Modelling the contribution of ephemeral gully erosion under different soil management in an olive orchard microcatchment using the AnnAGNPS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguas, E. V.; Bingner, R.; Yuan, Y.; Gómez, J. A.

    2010-05-01

    In Spain, few studies have been carried out to explore the erosion caused by processes other than inter-rill and rill erosion, such as gully and ephemeral gully erosion, especially because most of the available studies have evaluated the erosion at the plot scale. A study was undertaken into the environmental and economic impact of different soil management strategies, spontaneous grass cover with and without gully control (SC/SCGC) or conventional tillage with and without gully control (T/TGC), based on the experimental results obtained in an 6.1 ha olive crop microcatchment. Initially, two years of rainfall-runoff-sediment load data series, (34 events) recorded under the current management (SCGC), was used for the calibration of the AnnAGNPS model at event and monthly scales providing suitable adjustments of runoff, peak flow and sediment loads (E >70, r >0.85). Ephemeral gullies were also identified using aerial orthophotography and field work. The module of the AnnAGNPS model for simulating ephemeral gully generation and the tillage operations based on a bibliographical review were used to compare different scenarios and to perform a 10 year-analysis. The results showed mean runoff coefficients of 10.0% for SC/SCGC and of 3.2% for T/TGC while the average sediment loads were 2.0 t.ha-1year-1 (SCGC), 3.5 t.ha-1year-1 (SC), 3.3 t.ha-1year-1 (TGC) and 4 t.ha-1year-1 (T). Significant differences in sediment sources (rill/inter-rill erosion and ephemeral gullies) were evaluated between SC (46% of gully contribution) and T (19% of gully contribution), in order to optimize the environmental and economic effort required in each case. Finally, the annual costs associated with soil losses were estimated (< 1 €.ha-1year-1). SC was the most profitable alternative for soil management. Despite the additional reduction in soil losses of the SCGC approach, the higher cost of its implementation and the minor effect on yield losses in the medium term suggest that without

  3. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis as a manifestation of familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Shigetsuna; Honma, Masaru; Igawa, Satomi; Tsuji, Hitomi; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Migita, Kiyoshi; Ida, Hiroaki; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease, which is characterized by recurrent and paroxysmal fever, peritonitis, arthritis, myalgia, and skin rashes. Although various skin lesions such as "erysipelas-like erythema", urticaria, nonspecific purpura, and subcutaneous nodules have been described, cutaneous vasculitis is rare. We report a Japanese case of sporadic FMF accompanied by cutaneous arteritis at the time of febrile attacks of FMF. Gene analysis revealed M694I mutation in a single allele of the MEFV gene, and oral colchicine successfully controlled both periodic fever and subcutaneous nodules of arteritis. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis repeatedly emerging with febrile attacks should be included among the skin manifestations of FMF. PMID:25109905

  4. Inflammation and Epidural-Related Maternal Fever: Proposed Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Pervez; David, Anna L; Fernando, Roshan; Ackland, Gareth L

    2016-05-01

    Intrapartum fever is associated with excessive maternal interventions as well as higher neonatal morbidity. Epidural-related maternal fever (ERMF) contributes to the development of intrapartum fever. The mechanism(s) for ERMF has remained elusive. Here, we consider how inflammatory mechanisms may be modulated by local anesthetic agents and their relevance to ERMF. We also critically reappraise the clinical data with regard to emerging concepts that explain how anesthetic drug-induced metabolic dysfunction, with or without activation of the inflammasome, might trigger the release of nonpathogenic, inflammatory molecules (danger-associated molecular patterns) likely to underlie ERMF. PMID:27101499

  5. Can cycles of chills and fever resolve bipolar disorder mania?

    PubMed

    Setsaas, Audun; Vaaler, Arne Einar

    2014-01-01

    Treatment resistance is common in populations of patients with bipolar disorder stressing the need for new therapeutic strategies. Favourable effects of fever on mental disease have been noted throughout history. Today there is increasing evidence that immunological processes are involved in the pathophysiology of mental disorders. We present a case in which a patient with treatment resistant bipolar disorder mania seemingly recovered as a result of recurrent fever. This indicates that artificial fever might become a last resort therapy for treatment resistant mania. PMID:24728894

  6. Medicine in stamps-Ignaz Semmelweis and Puerperal Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ataman, Ahmet Doğan; Vatanoğlu-Lutz, Emine Elif; Yıldırım, Gazi

    2013-01-01

    Puerperal fever was common in mid-19th-century hospitals and often fatal, with mortality at 10%–35%. Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis was a Hungarian gynecologist who is known as a pioneer of antiseptic procedures. Semmelweis discovered that the incidence of puerperal fever could be drastically cut by the use of hand disinfection in obstetrical clinics. He is also described as the “savior of mothers” and “father of infection control”. This paper provides an overview on the process of preventing puerperal fever and the life story of the physician behind this attempt, Ignaz Semmelweis, through philately. PMID:24592068

  7. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers... Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps. (a) Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers. (1) The Director is responsible for the designation of yellow fever vaccination...

  8. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers... Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps. (a) Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers. (1) The Director is responsible for the designation of yellow fever vaccination...

  9. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers... Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps. (a) Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers. (1) The Director is responsible for the designation of yellow fever vaccination...

  10. Evaluation of regression methodology with low-frequency water quality sampling to estimate constituent loads for ephemeral watersheds in Texas.

    PubMed

    Toor, Gurpal S; Harmel, R Daren; Haggard, Brian E; Schmidt, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Water quality regulation and litigation have elevated the awareness and need for quantifying water quality and source contributions in watersheds across the USA. In the present study, the regression method, which is typically applied to large (perennial) rivers, was evaluated in its ability to estimate constituent loads (NO(3)-N, total N, PO(4)-P, total P, sediment) on three small (ephemeral) watersheds with different land uses in Texas. Specifically, regression methodology was applied with daily flow data collected with bubbler stage recorders in hydraulic structures and with water quality data collected with four low-frequency sampling strategies: random, rise and fall, peak, and single stage. Estimated loads were compared with measured loads determined in 2001-2004 with an autosampler and high-frequency sampling strategies. Although annual rainfall and runoff volumes were relatively consistent within watersheds during the study period, measured annual nutrient and sediment concentrations and loads varied considerably for the cultivated and mixed watersheds but not for the pasture watershed. Likewise, estimated loads were much better for the pasture watershed than the cultivated and mixed landuse watersheds because of more consistent land management and vegetation type in the pasture watershed, which produced stronger correlations between constituent loads and mean daily flow rates. Load estimates for PO(4)-P were better than for other constituents possibly because PO(4)-P concentrations were less variable within storm events. Correlations between constituent concentrations and mean daily flow rate were poor and not significant for all watersheds, which is different than typically observed in large rivers. The regression method was quite variable in its ability to accurately estimate annual nutrient loads from the study watersheds; however, constituent load estimates were much more accurate for the combined 3-yr period. Thus, it is suggested that for small

  11. The role of vegetation in the formation of anabranching channels in an ephemeral river, Northern plains, arid central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooth, Stephen; Nanson, Gerald C.

    2000-10-01

    As the distribution and abundance of vegetation in drylands is often controlled by the greater availability of water along river channels, riparian vegetation has the potential to influence significantly dryland river form, process and behaviour. This paper demonstrates how a small indigenous shrub, the inland teatree (Melaleuca glomerata), influences the formation and maintenance of anabranching channels in a reach of the ephemeral Marshall River, Northern Plains, arid central Australia. Here, the Marshall is characterized by ridge-form anabranching, where water and sediment are routed through subparallel, multiple channels of variable size which occur within a typically straight channel-train. Channels are separated by channel-train ridges - narrow, flow-aligned, vegetated features - or by wider islands. By providing a substantial element of boundary roughness, dense stands of teatrees growing on channel beds or atop the ridges and islands influence flow velocities, flow depths and sediment transport, resulting in flow diversion, bank and floodplain erosion, and especially sediment deposition. Ridges and islands represent a continuum of forms, and their formation and development can be divided into a three-stage sequence involving teatree growth and alluvial sedimentation.1Teatrees colonize a flat, sandy channel bed, initiating the formation of ridges by lee-side accretion. Individual ridges grow laterally, vertically and longitudinally and maintain a geometrically similar streamlined (lemniscate) form that presents minimum drag.2Individual ridges grow in size, and interact with neighbouring ridges, causing the lemniscate forms to become distorted. Ridges in the lee of other ridges tend to be protected from the erosive effects of floods and survive, whereas individual teatrees or small ridges exposed to flow concentrated between larger ridges, tend to be removed.3

  12. Differentiation of Acute Q Fever from Other Infections in Patients Presenting to Hospitals, the Netherlands1

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Elmer; Delsing, Corine E.; Sprong, Tom; Nabuurs-Franssen, Marrigje H.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating acute Q fever from infections caused by other pathogens is essential. We conducted a retrospective case–control study to evaluate differences in clinical signs, symptoms, and outcomes for 82 patients with acute Q fever and 52 control patients who had pneumonia, fever and lower respiratory tract symptoms, or fever and hepatitis, but had negative serologic results for Q fever. Patients with acute Q fever were younger and had higher C-reactive protein levels but lower leukocyte counts. However, a large overlap was found. In patients with an indication for prophylaxis, chronic Q fever did not develop after patients received prophylaxis but did develop in 50% of patients who did not receive prophylaxis. Differentiating acute Q fever from other respiratory infections, fever, or hepatitis is not possible without serologic testing or PCR. If risk factors for chronic Q fever are present, prophylactic treatment is advised. PMID:26196955

  13. When your baby or infant has a fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... is hot or stuffy, a fan may help. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) help lower fever in ... always check the instructions on the package. Take acetaminophen every 4 to 6 hours. Take ibuprofen every ...

  14. Typhoid fever & vaccine development: a partially answered question

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, Sandhya A.; Lahiri, Amit; Negi, Vidya Devi; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2012-01-01

    Typhoid fever is a systemic disease caused by the human specific Gram-negative pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi). The extra-intestinal infections caused by Salmonella are very fatal. The incidence of typhoid fever remains very high in impoverished areas and the emergence of multidrug resistance has made the situation worse. To combat and to reduce the morbidity and mortality caused by typhoid fever, many preventive measures and strategies have been employed, the most important being vaccination. In recent years, many Salmonella vaccines have been developed including live attenuated as well as DNA vaccines and their clinical trials have shown encouraging results. But with the increasing antibiotic resistance, the development of potent vaccine candidate for typhoid fever is a need of the hour. This review discusses the latest trends in the typhoid vaccine development and the clinical trials which are underway. PMID:22446857

  15. Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever in travelers returning from Egypt, 2010.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Fabrizio; Castilletti, Concetta; Di Caro, Antonino; Capobianchi, Maria R; Nisii, Carla; Suter, Fredy; Rizzi, Marco; Tebaldi, Alessandra; Goglio, Antonio; Passerini Tosi, Cristiana; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2010-12-01

    Two travelers returning to Italy from southern Egypt were hospitalized with a fever of unknown origin. Test results showed infection with Alkhurma virus. The geographic distribution of this virus could be broader than previously thought. PMID:21122237

  16. Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in Travelers Returning from Egypt, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Carletti, Fabrizio; Castilletti, Concetta; Di Caro, Antonino; Capobianchi, Maria R.; Nisii, Carla; Suter, Fredy; Rizzi, Marco; Tebaldi, Alessandra; Goglio, Antonio; Tosi, Cristiana Passerini

    2010-01-01

    Two travelers returning to Italy from southern Egypt were hospitalized with a fever of unknown origin. Test results showed infection with Alkhurma virus. The geographic distribution of this virus could be broader than previously thought. PMID:21122237

  17. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif; Gupta, N D; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2013-07-01

    Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen and also positive immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies for DENV. Patient was diagnosed as a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever and was immediately referred for appropriate management. This case report emphasizes the importance of taking correct and thorough medical history. PMID:24174736

  18. Rocky mountain spotted fever on the arm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is a disease transmitted to humans by a tick bite. The spots begin as flat (macular) red (erythematous) patches that may bleed into the skin, causing purplish spots (purpura). The disease ...

  19. Cavity Forming Pneumonia Due to Staphylococcus aureus Following Dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Nobuyuki; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Amano, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Yohei; Kosuge, Youko

    2015-11-01

    While visiting Malaysia, a 22-year-old previously healthy Japanese man developed myalgia, headache, and fever, leading to a diagnosis of classical dengue fever. After improvement and returning to Japan after a five day hospitalization, he developed productive cough several days after defervescing from dengue. Computed tomography (CT) thorax scan showed multiple lung cavities. A sputum smear revealed leukocytes with phagocytized gram-positive cocci in clusters, and grew an isolate Staphylococcus aureus sensitive to semi-synthetic penicillin; he was treated successfully with ceftriaxone and cephalexin. This second reported case of pneumonia due to S. aureus occurring after dengue fever, was associated both with nosocomial exposure and might have been associated with dengue-associated immunosuppression. Clinicians should pay systematic attention to bacterial pneumonia following dengue fever to establish whether such a connection is causally associated. PMID:26304914

  20. Streptococcal Infections, Rheumatic Fever and School Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Milton

    1979-01-01

    Because rheumatic fever is a potentially serious complication of a streptococcal sore throat which can lead to permanent heart disease, this article advocates the expansion of school health services in medically underserved areas. (JMF)