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Sample records for epidural blood patches

  1. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis after repeat epidural blood patch.

    PubMed

    Carlswärd, C; Darvish, B; Tunelli, J; Irestedt, L

    2015-08-01

    Epidural blood patching is an effective treatment for postdural puncture headache but has potential risks. Arachnoiditis is a very rare disabling condition and few cases have been described following an epidural blood patch. We present a case of chronic adhesive arachnoiditis in a parturient treated with a repeat epidural blood patch. A healthy 29-year-old woman had an accidental dural puncture following epidural insertion during labour. Initial treatment of postdural puncture headache with an epidural blood patch was ineffective and was therefore repeated. She gradually developed severe neurological symptoms consistent with arachnoiditis confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Despite intensive multimodal treatment with analgesics and physiotherapy, her neurological condition remains unresolved two years later. This serious but rare complication should encourage caution when treating parturients with postdural puncture headache with a repeat epidural blood patch. PMID:26119259

  2. Epidural Blood Patch Using Manometry for Sinking Skin Flap Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turner, James D; Farmer, Justin L; Dobson, Sean W

    2016-06-01

    We describe here a 55-year-old male patient with a medical history significant for chronic back pain and substance abuse with cocaine who sustained a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage after a fall from a roof while acutely intoxicated on cocaine requiring decompressive hemicraniectomy and cranioplasty that was complicated by an epidural abscess requiring a repeat craniectomy. He was diagnosed with sinking skin flap syndrome consistent with altered mental status and a sunken skin flap with increased midline shift. Despite treatment with Trendelenburg positioning and appropriate fluid management, the patient continued to decline, and an epidural blood patch was requested for treatment. After placement of the epidural blood patch using manometry in the epidural space, the patient's neurologic status improved allowing him to ultimately receive a cranioplasty. The patient is now able to perform several of his activities of daily living and communicate effectively. PMID:27075425

  3. Fluoroscopically-guided epidural blood patch for spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manish; Giampetro, David M; Kalapos, Paul; Caldwell, Julia C

    2015-01-01

    We present three patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension who failed conservative treatment and were treated with image-guided epidural blood patch close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak site. Each patient achieved significant long-term improvement of clinical symptoms and CSF leak related image findings. PMID:26702220

  4. Transient bladder and fecal incontinence following epidural blood patch

    PubMed Central

    Palomero-Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; Palacio-Abinzada, Francisco J.; Campollo, Sara Chacón; Laporta-Báez, Yolanda; Mendez Cendón, Jose Carlos; López-García, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Epidural blood patch (EBP) is the currently accepted treatment of choice for postdural puncture headache because of its high initial success rates and infrequent complications. Many authors recommended a small volume (10-20 mL) of blood to be delivered for an effective EBP. Here, we report an obstetric patient who developed a transient bladder and fecal incontinence after 19 mL of blood EBP at L1 -L2 level. Since the magnetic resonance image did not demonstrate any definitive spinal cord lesion, the exact mechanism remains unclear. We suggest that accumulation of blood performed at L1 to L2 level in a closed relationship with the sacral cord, may have trigger a significant pressure elevation of the epidural space at this level, resulting in a temporal spinal cord-related injury in the sacral cord. PMID:26543470

  5. Postpartum spinal subdural hematoma: irrelevant epidural blood patch: a case report.

    PubMed

    Choe, Won Joo; Kim, Ji Yeon; Yeo, Hyeok Jae; Kim, Jun Hyun; Lee, Sang-Il; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jang Su; Kim, Jung Won

    2016-04-01

    We report a healthy patient with postpartum headache and neck stiffness which were diagnosed as symptoms of pseudoaneurysm of vertebral artery. She had received a Cesarean section under the spinal anesthesia, and complaint of headache and neck stiffness. Epidural blood patches were done twice, but symptoms persisted. Eight days later, she experienced sensory disturbance and emergent laminectomy was done. When persistent postpartum headache occurs after epidural blood patch, more precise differential diagnosis should be made and considering other possible pathologies. PMID:27066211

  6. Postpartum spinal subdural hematoma: irrelevant epidural blood patch: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Hyeok Jae; Lee, Sang-Il; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jang Su; Kim, Jung Won

    2016-01-01

    We report a healthy patient with postpartum headache and neck stiffness which were diagnosed as symptoms of pseudoaneurysm of vertebral artery. She had received a Cesarean section under the spinal anesthesia, and complaint of headache and neck stiffness. Epidural blood patches were done twice, but symptoms persisted. Eight days later, she experienced sensory disturbance and emergent laminectomy was done. When persistent postpartum headache occurs after epidural blood patch, more precise differential diagnosis should be made and considering other possible pathologies. PMID:27066211

  7. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension and single entry multi-site epidural blood patch.

    PubMed

    Murphy, David; Chandna, Arjun; Laing, Andrew; MacFarlane, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The syndrome of spontaneous intracranial hypotension is often difficult to treat. Unfortunately, cerebrospinal fluid leaks are often numerous and difficult to detect radiologically. Multiple entries to the spinal epidural space, in an effort to alleviate symptoms, are therefore sometimes necessary. This case report details two patients treated successfully with a single lumbar entry point and the administration of a continuous multi-site epidural blood patch via a mobile catheter and their subsequent follow-up. These procedures are based on that first published by Ohtonari et al. in 2012. It is, to our knowledge, the first undertaken in Australasia. PMID:26396625

  8. Transient monoplegia and paraesthesia after an epidural blood patch for a spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alvin Ho-Kwan; Li, Lai-Fung; So, Vincent Ching; Leung, May Ka-Mei; Lui, Wai-Man

    2015-09-01

    We describe the very rare complication of new onset complete paralysis and numbness of one limb after an epidural blood patch in a 36-year-old woman. Intracranial hypotension resulting from a spinal cerebrospinal fluid fistula may be treated by epidural injection of autologous blood that is, a blood patch. This is usually a safe and effective procedure. The woman's muscle strength of hip flexion, extension, ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion decreased from 5/5 to 0/5 following the procedure. After symptom onset, an MRI of her spine showed no compressive or ischaemic lesions amenable to urgent intervention. The cause of neurological deficit was at that time unknown and steroids were administered. Her symptoms persisted for about 2 days and gradually improved. In this paper, the management plan and the course of this rare and alarming complication is reported. PMID:25986178

  9. [Epidural blood patch to treat severe postdural puncture headache after ambulatorysurgery].

    PubMed

    Galindo Palazuelos, M; Díaz Setién, N

    2010-04-01

    We report a case of postdural puncture headache (PDPH) after outpatient hysteroscopy under spinal anesthesia in which a 25-gauge Whitacre needle was used. Symptoms of PDPH appeared 6 hours after surgery. The headache improved with oral caffein and intravenous corticosteroids and the patient was discharged after 24 hours. Later, she was attended twice in the emergency departments of 2 hospitals, where she received conventional treatment (analgesics and corticosteroids). Eleven days after the surgical procedure, an epidural blood patch was performed. Within 12 hours the incapacitating symptoms had improved markedly and resolution was complete 2 months after surgery. PDPH worthy of blood patch treatment is a rare complication of spinal anesthesia with pencil-point needles. Clear diagnostic protocols are required if satisfactory treatment is not to be delayed and unnecessary suffering is to be prevented. PMID:20499802

  10. Successful treatment of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak headache with fluoroscopically guided epidural blood patch: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Fattouh, Maher; Dews, Teresa; Kapural, Leonardo; Malak, Osama; Mekhail, Nagy

    2003-12-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a rare clinical entity that may result in disabling headaches. It occurs as a result of dural defects, and the initial symptoms resemble those of postdural puncture headache. However, the positional headache can later evolve into a persistent chronic daily headache. The diagnosis of spontaneous CSF leak can be very challenging, but increasing awareness and improved diagnostic techniques are yielding ever more cases. When conservative management fails, the pain management clinician is called upon to administer an epidural blood patch. The success of this technique is dependent upon accurate diagnosis of the site of leakage and targeted epidural administration of the blood patch to this area. In this report, we describe four consecutive cases that were referred to our pain management department over an 18-month period and were successfully treated with site-directed epidural blood patches. PMID:14750917

  11. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Treated with a Targeted CT-Guided Epidural Blood Patch

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Inês; Marques, Inês Brás; Ferreira, Rogério; Cordeiro, Miguel; Sousa, Lívia

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an important cause of new daily persistent headache. It is thought to be due to spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, which probably have a multifactorial etiology. The classic manifestation of SIH is an orthostatic headache, but other neurological symptoms may be present. An epidural blood patch is thought to be the most effective treatment, but a blind infusion may be ineffective. We describe the case of a young man who developed an acute severe headache, with pain worsening when assuming an upright posture and relief gained with recumbency. No history of previous headache, recent cranial or cervical trauma, or invasive procedures was reported. Magnetic resonance imaging showed pachymeningeal enhancement and other features consistent with SIH and pointed towards a cervical CSF leak site. After failure of conservative treatment, a targeted computer tomography-guided EBP was performed, with complete recovery. PMID:26981128

  12. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Treated with a Targeted CT-Guided Epidural Blood Patch.

    PubMed

    Correia, Inês; Marques, Inês Brás; Ferreira, Rogério; Cordeiro, Miguel; Sousa, Lívia

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an important cause of new daily persistent headache. It is thought to be due to spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, which probably have a multifactorial etiology. The classic manifestation of SIH is an orthostatic headache, but other neurological symptoms may be present. An epidural blood patch is thought to be the most effective treatment, but a blind infusion may be ineffective. We describe the case of a young man who developed an acute severe headache, with pain worsening when assuming an upright posture and relief gained with recumbency. No history of previous headache, recent cranial or cervical trauma, or invasive procedures was reported. Magnetic resonance imaging showed pachymeningeal enhancement and other features consistent with SIH and pointed towards a cervical CSF leak site. After failure of conservative treatment, a targeted computer tomography-guided EBP was performed, with complete recovery. PMID:26981128

  13. [Management of transient radicular pain after receiving an epidural blood patch for headaches due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Melo, M C; Revuelta, M E; Santeularia, T; Genové, M; Català, E

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache is an uncommon disease that resolves spontaneously in most of the cases and in a short period of time. The initial treatment should be symptomatic. In some patients the symptomatology is extremely disabling, and in these cases both the diagnosis and treatment may be performed by an epidural blood patch. A 49-year-old Caucasian woman, with no previous record of epidural or intrathecal puncture, consulted in the Emergency Department complaining of a 9-day history of frontal headache and diplopia, along with nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache. Considering the symptomatology and the uncontrolled pain, the Pain Unit of our hospital performed an epidural blood patch. In the first 24h the patient reported a remarkable relief of both headache and diplopia but developed a left lumbar radiculopathy that was treated successfully with supportive measures. Transient lumbar radiculopathy is a common and acceptable event secondary to the use of epidural blood patch as a treatment for spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache. PMID:25698607

  14. A Case of Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: The Role of Dynamic CT Myelography and Epidural Blood Patch in Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yogesh; Hooda, Kusum; Li, Shuo; Karol, Ian; Muro, Gerard J

    2015-10-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) most commonly results from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks in the upper spinal canal. Alterations in the equilibrium between the volumes of intracranial blood and CSF lead to compensatory dilatation of the vascular spaces, mostly on the venous side. Dynamic computerized tomogram (CT) myelography can be very helpful in diagnosing the site of a CSF leak in the spinal canal. Subsequently, the site of the leak can be sealed with epidural blood patch (EBP). PMID:26630707

  15. Facial nerve paralysis and partial brachial plexopathy after epidural blood patch: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shahien, Radi; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2011-01-01

    We report a complication related to epidural analgesia for delivery in a 24- year-old woman who was admitted with mild pre-eclampsia and for induction of labor. At the first postpartum day she developed a postdural puncture headache, which was unresponsive to conservative measures. On the fifth day an epidural blood patch was done, and her headache subsided. Sixteen hours later she developed paralysis of the right facial nerve, which was treated with prednisone. Seven days later she complained of pain in the left arm and the posterior region of the shoulder. She was later admitted and diagnosed with partial brachial plexopathy. PMID:21386953

  16. Epidural Blood Patch Performed for Severe Intracranial Hypotension Following Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery. Retrospective Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Kalhorn, Stephen P.; Snell, Jamaal T.; Lieber, Bryan A.; Agarwal, Nitin; Huang, Paul P.; Sutin, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) can occur following lumbar drainage for clipping of an intracranial aneurysm. We observed 3 cases of IH, which were all successfully treated by epidural blood patch (EBP). Herein, the authors report our cases. PMID:27065093

  17. Epidural Blood Patch Performed for Severe Intracranial Hypotension Following Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery. Retrospective Series and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tanweer, Omar; Kalhorn, Stephen P; Snell, Jamaal T; Wilson, Taylor A; Lieber, Bryan A; Agarwal, Nitin; Huang, Paul P; Sutin, Kenneth M

    2015-12-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) can occur following lumbar drainage for clipping of an intracranial aneurysm. We observed 3 cases of IH, which were all successfully treated by epidural blood patch (EBP). Herein, the authors report our cases. PMID:27065093

  18. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome treated with a double epidural blood patch.

    PubMed

    Beleña, J M; Nuñez, M; Yuste, J; Plaza-Nieto, J F; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Serrano, S

    2012-11-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is considered to be a very rare disease. It is characterised by an orthostatic headache in the absence of a past history of a trauma or a dural puncture. SIH is caused by a spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage demonstrated by neuroradiological studies in most of the patients. Conservative treatment usually includes bed rest, hydration and administration of caffeine or steroids. However, when the patient is refractory to the conservative treatment, an epidural blood patch (EBP) is performed. We report a 34-year-old woman with SIH and no neuroradiologically demonstrable clear point of CSF leakage, who was treated with a double EBP at two different levels (lumbar and thoracic) in the same procedure. The patient was successfully managed, and she was still asymptomatic at the 18 months follow-up. After review of literature, we observed that execution of a double EBP at the same time is not a common procedure for treatment of SIH. We consider that simultaneous use of two EBP could be useful as a novel treatment in those cases of SIH without demonstration of CSF leakage. PMID:22834896

  19. Predictors of the Treatment Response of Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension to an Epidural Blood Patch.

    PubMed

    Karm, Myong-Hwan; Choi, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Doohwan; Park, Jun Young; Yun, Hye Joo; Suh, Jeong Hun

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is characterized by postural headache because of low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radioisotope (RI) cisternography can be used to identify the site of a CSF leakage. Although autologous epidural blood patch (EBP) is a very effective treatment modality, some patients require a repeat autologous EBP. We investigated whether autologous EBP responses correlate with surrogate markers of quantitative findings.All cases of autologous EBP for SIH from January 2006 to December 2014 were enrolled. The demographic variables, number of EBPs, pain scores, RI cisternography (early visualization of bladder activity), and MRI findings (subdural fluid collections, pachymeningeal enhancement, engorgement of venous structures, pituitary hyperemia, and sagging of the brain) were reviewed.Patients with early bladder activity on RI cisternography had a tendency to need a higher number of autologous EBPs. Only sagging of the brain and no other variables showed a statistically significant negative correlation with the number of autologous EBPs.The response to autologous EBP may be related to the radiologic findings of early bladder activity on RI cisternography and sagging of the brain on MRI. PMID:27149484

  20. Predictors of the Treatment Response of Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension to an Epidural Blood Patch

    PubMed Central

    Karm, Myong-Hwan; Choi, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Doohwan; Park, Jun Young; Yun, Hye Joo; Suh, Jeong Hun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is characterized by postural headache because of low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radioisotope (RI) cisternography can be used to identify the site of a CSF leakage. Although autologous epidural blood patch (EBP) is a very effective treatment modality, some patients require a repeat autologous EBP. We investigated whether autologous EBP responses correlate with surrogate markers of quantitative findings. All cases of autologous EBP for SIH from January 2006 to December 2014 were enrolled. The demographic variables, number of EBPs, pain scores, RI cisternography (early visualization of bladder activity), and MRI findings (subdural fluid collections, pachymeningeal enhancement, engorgement of venous structures, pituitary hyperemia, and sagging of the brain) were reviewed. Patients with early bladder activity on RI cisternography had a tendency to need a higher number of autologous EBPs. Only sagging of the brain and no other variables showed a statistically significant negative correlation with the number of autologous EBPs. The response to autologous EBP may be related to the radiologic findings of early bladder activity on RI cisternography and sagging of the brain on MRI. PMID:27149484

  1. Cervical CT scan-guided epidural blood patches for spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Maingard, Julian; Giles, Lauren; Marriott, Mark; Phal, Pramit M

    2015-12-01

    We describe two patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH), presenting with postural headache due to C1-C2 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Both patients were refractory to lumbar epidural blood patching (EBP), and subsequently underwent successful CT scan-guided cervical EBP. SIH affects approximately 1 in 50,000 patients, with females more frequently affected. Its associated features are variable, and as such, misdiagnosis is common. Therefore, imaging plays an important role in the diagnostic workup of SIH and can include MRI of the brain and spine, CT myelogram, and radionuclide cisternography. In patients with an established diagnosis and confirmed CSF leak, symptoms will usually resolve with conservative management. However, in a select subgroup of patients, the symptoms are refractory to medical management and require more invasive therapies. In patients with cervical leaks, EBP in the cervical region is an effective management approach, either in close proximity to, or directly targeting a dural defect. CT scan-guided cervical EBP is an effective treatment approach in refractory SIH, and should be considered in those patients who are refractory to conservative management. PMID:26209918

  2. Targeted CT-Guided Epidural Blood Patch for Treatment of Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Due to Calcified Intradural Thoracic Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, V.; Sreedher, G.; Rothfus, W.E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Calcified thoracic intradural disc herniations have recently been reported as a cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). We report successful treatment of SIH with a targeted CT-guided epidural blood patch. A 57-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a two-week history of progressively debilitating headache. CT and MRI of the brain showed findings consistent with intracranial hypotension and MRI of the spine showed findings consistent with CSF leak. Subsequent CT myelogram of the thoracic spine confirmed the presence of CSF leak and calcified disc herniations at the T6-7, T7-8 and T8-9 levels indenting the ventral dura and spinal cord. The calcified disc herniation at T6-7 had an intradural component and was therefore the most likely site of the CSF leak. Under CT fluoroscopic guidance, a 20-gauge Tuohy needle was progressively advanced into the dorsal epidural space at T6-7. After confirmation of needle tip position, approximately 18cc of the patient's own blood was sterilely removed from an arm vein and slowly re-injected into the dorsal epidural space. With satisfactory achievement of clot formation, the procedure was terminated. The patient tolerated the procedure well. The next morning, his symptoms had completely resolved and he was neurologically intact. At five-week follow up, he was symptom-free. Targeted epidural blood patch at the site of presumed CSF leak can be carried out in a safe and effective manner using CT fluoroscopic guidance and can be an effective alternative to open surgical management in selected patients. PMID:23472734

  3. Thoracic epidural blood patch with high volume blood for cerebrospinal fluid leakage of cervical spine (C2-3) complicated with spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yi-Shan; Ju, Da-Tong; Chiu, Tai-Hsiang; Huang, Yi-Hsuan; Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Wu, Zhi-Fu

    2015-09-01

    Acute and chronic subdural hemorrhage in a 33 year old woman with severe headache from occipital to frontal regions and dull neck pain was diagnosed on magnetic resonance image, which revealed cerebrospinal fluid leakage at C2-3 with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Successful treatment was performed by epidural blood patch from the level of T7-T8 with injection of 20 mL of autologous blood. PMID:26209024

  4. Epidural blood patch for spontaneous intracranial hypotension with chronic subdural haematoma: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Jin, Dan; Pan, Kong-Han

    2016-08-01

    Spinal leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is considered to be the primary cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). Subdural haematoma (SDH) is a serious complication of SIH. This current report presents a case of bilateral SDH with SIH that was treated with epidural blood patching (EBP). A 43-year-old male complained of experiencing orthostatic headaches for 2 months without neurological signs. The patient worsened in a local hospital and was transferred to the Sir Run Run Hospital. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral SDH with a midline shift. The patient underwent emergency trephination in the left frontal temporal region. Postoperative magnetic resonance myelography showed a CSF leak originating at the T11-L2 level. As a consequence of clinical deterioration of the patient, EBP was subsequently performed at the T12-L1 level. The headache was rapidly relieved and later the SDH was completely absorbed. This case report and literature review aims to remind clinicians that SIH can cause SDH and that EBP is a viable treatment option. PMID:27225863

  5. Treatment of Refractory Postdural Puncture Headache after Intrathecal Drug Delivery System Implantation with Epidural Blood Patch Procedures: A 20-Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Bendel, Markus A; Moeschler, Susan M; Qu, Wenchun; Hanley, Eugerie; Neuman, Stephanie A; Eldrige, Jason S; Hoelzer, Bryan C

    2016-01-01

    A recent publication reported the incidence of postdural puncture headache (PDPH) in conjunction with intrathecal drug delivery system (IDDS) implantation to be nearly 23 percent. Many patients responded to conservative measures but a percentage needed invasive treatment with an epidural blood patch (EBP). There is limited data to describe the technical details, success rates, and complications associated with EBP in this population. This study aims to provide a retrospective report of EBP for patients suffering from PDPH related to IDDS implantation. A chart review established a cohort of patients that required EBP in relation to a PDPH after IDDS implantation. This cohort was evaluated for demographic data as well as details of the EBP including technical procedural data, success rates, and complications. All patients received a trial of conservative therapy. Standard sterile technique and skin preparation were utilized with no infectious complications. The EBP was placed below the level of the IDDS catheter in 94% of procedures. Fluoroscopy was utilized in each case. The mean EBP volume was 18.6 cc and median time of EBP was day 7 after implant. There were no complications associated with EBP. EBP appears to be an effective intervention in this subset of PDPH patients. PMID:27597897

  6. Treatment of Refractory Postdural Puncture Headache after Intrathecal Drug Delivery System Implantation with Epidural Blood Patch Procedures: A 20-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Moeschler, Susan M.; Qu, Wenchun; Hanley, Eugerie; Neuman, Stephanie A.; Eldrige, Jason S.; Hoelzer, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    A recent publication reported the incidence of postdural puncture headache (PDPH) in conjunction with intrathecal drug delivery system (IDDS) implantation to be nearly 23 percent. Many patients responded to conservative measures but a percentage needed invasive treatment with an epidural blood patch (EBP). There is limited data to describe the technical details, success rates, and complications associated with EBP in this population. This study aims to provide a retrospective report of EBP for patients suffering from PDPH related to IDDS implantation. A chart review established a cohort of patients that required EBP in relation to a PDPH after IDDS implantation. This cohort was evaluated for demographic data as well as details of the EBP including technical procedural data, success rates, and complications. All patients received a trial of conservative therapy. Standard sterile technique and skin preparation were utilized with no infectious complications. The EBP was placed below the level of the IDDS catheter in 94% of procedures. Fluoroscopy was utilized in each case. The mean EBP volume was 18.6 cc and median time of EBP was day 7 after implant. There were no complications associated with EBP. EBP appears to be an effective intervention in this subset of PDPH patients. PMID:27597897

  7. Lumbar blood patching for proximal CSF leaks: where does the blood go?

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Cassie; Amukotuwa, Shalini; Chapman, Caron; Batchelor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Epidural blood patching (EBP) is an important therapeutic approach in managing spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. The mechanism of action of blood patching is likely to be twofold; fluid replacement having an immediate tamponade effect and the proximal flow of blood products having a 'plug' effect. The negative pressure gradient within the epidural space may be important to the rostral flow of injected blood and is possibly increased in intracranial hypotension. PMID:25721827

  8. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: Targeted or blind blood patch.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this review is to determine the efficacy and optimal strategy for epidural blood patch placement in the treatment of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. We present a 37-year-old man who developed a 4 week duration postural headache without sustaining significant trauma. The diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension with associated subdural hygromas was confirmed with lumbar puncture and radiologic imaging. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is generally due to cerebrospinal fluid leak from the thecal sac or nerve root sleeves, although the cause of leakage is unknown. In our patient, the site of leakage was identified at cervical C1-C2 level in the spine on myelography. Conservative management with repeated epidural blood patches was successful in symptom relief and complete resolution of cerebrospinal fluid leak and subdural hygromas. We reviewed the literature for efficacy of blood patches delivered directly to the site of leakage (targeted) or to the lumbar or thoracic spine away from the site of leakage or where the site cannot be determined (blind). No clear evidence exists on comparative efficacy due to paucity of randomized trials. However, epidural blood patches in general result in positive outcomes with overall efficacy near 90%. Some trials have suggested greater efficacy for targeted rather than blind epidural blood patches, but randomized studies and long-term prognosis remain to be evaluated. PMID:26461907

  9. Two cases of medically-refractory spontaneous orthostatic headaches with normal cerebrospinal fluid pressures responding to epidural blood patching: Intracranial hypotension versus hypovolemia and the need for clinical awareness.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Kaukab M; Prakash, Sudeep; Majumdar, S S; Banerji, Anup

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypovolemia syndrome requires a high index of suspicion and meticulous history taking, demonstration of low CSF pressure and/or neuroimaging features. A 31-year-old male, presented with subacute onset moderate occipital and sub-occipital headaches precipitated by upright posture and relieved on recumbency and neck pain for 2 years. There was no trauma, cranial/spinal surgery. Clinical examination was normal and CSF opening pressure and laboratory study were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain showed thin subdural hygroma. Another patient, 41-year-old male presented with 1 month of subacute onset severe bifrontal throbbing orthostatic headaches (OHs). CSF opening pressure was normal. Contrast MRI brain showed the presence of bilateral subdural hygromas, diffuse meningeal enhancement, venous distension, sagging of the brain, and tonsillar herniation. We report two cases of "spontaneous OHs" with normal CSF pressures who were successfully treated with epidural blood patching after poor response to conservative management. PMID:24339614

  10. Traumatic anterior cervical pseudomeningocele causing intracranial hypotension successfully treated with blood patch: case report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Edwin A; Eckel, Laurence J; Diehn, Felix E; Schwartz, Kara M; Hunt, Christopher H; Daniels, David J

    2015-09-01

    Cervical pseudomeningocele is a rare complication of trauma. It develops when an extradural collection of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) develops after a dural breach. The authors present the unusual case of a 33-year-old man with progressive headache, neck pain, mental status changes, and cardiopulmonary instability after polytrauma sustained from a motorcycle-versus-deer collision, without improvement during a 5-day hospitalization. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a collection of CSF anterior to the cervical thecal sac compatible with an anterior cervical pseudomeningocele. A nontargeted epidural blood patch was performed with subsequent resolution of the patient's symptoms. Anterior cervical pseudomeningoceles are usually asymptomatic; however, these lesions can cause orthostatic headaches, neck pain, and cardiopulmonary compromise, as it did in the featured patient. Pseudomeningoceles should be included in the differential diagnosis for posttrauma patients with progressive neurological decline or postural headache, and blood patch may be an effective minimally invasive treatment. PMID:26023899

  11. Increased apoptosis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) during general and epidural anaesthesia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Simeonova, Galina P; Slavov, Emil; Usunov, Roustislav; Halacheva, Krasimira; Dinev, Dinco N

    2008-12-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the hypothesis that perioperative lymphocytopenia was due to apoptosis of these cells induced by either halothane or epidural anaesthesia in dogs. The relationship between apoptosis induction and plasma concentrations of the stress hormone cortisol and the cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-10 was examined as well. The study was performed on 22 healthy mongrel dogs, equal numbers from both genders, weighing 18.3 +/- 2.9 kg, and aged between 3-5 years. Dogs were divided in three groups. Eight of the animals were anaesthetized with halothane, another eight received epidural anaesthesia using lidocaine, and six served as controls. Venous blood samples were obtained immediately before (0 minute) anaesthesia, during deep anaesthesia (120 minute), and on the next day (24 hour) in order to determine the following parameters: the total lymphocyte counts, the percentage of apoptotic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by flow cytometry, plasma concentrations of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and plasma cortisol levels by radioimmune assay. Both halothane and epidural anaesthesia in dogs induces apoptosis of PBMC with slight decrease in total lymphocyte counts. These immunomodulatory effects were transient and faded till the 24th hour. Concerning the mechanism of inducing lymphocyte apoptosis by general or epidural anaesthesia, it seemed that neither cortisol, nor the tested cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-10 were implicated in this process. Further investigations are necessary to confirm this assumption. PMID:18491210

  12. Distribution in cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and lymph of epidurally injected morphine and inulin in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, P.A.; Yaksh, T.L.

    1986-06-01

    We describe procedures for catheterizing the epidural space, the azygos vein, and the thoracic lymph duct of dogs without using fluoroscopy. The success rates of the procedures were 100, 80, and 50%, respectively (n = 10). To assess the validity of the model, /sup 3/H-morphine and unlabeled morphine (2 mg) were injected epidurally in ten dogs. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), azygos venous blood, arterial blood, and lymph were sampled before and 5, 20, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 min after injection. During the first 20 min, morphine levels in the azygos vein were about three and ten times greater than arterial and lymphatic levels, respectively (n = 3; P less than 0.01). Morphine levels were significantly greater in the azygos vein (n = 8) and the femoral artery (n = 10) during the first 20 and 60 min than they were later, respectively (P less than 0.05). In the lymph (n = 5), the levels of morphine at 60 min were statistically greater (P less than 0.05) than levels at 4, 5, and 6 hr. At no time were the concurrent arterial and lymph levels different from each other. In the lumbar CSF, the morphine peak concentration was reached 5-60 min after epidural injection and ranged between 5 and 93 micrograms/ml. In the CSF, the levels of morphine were significantly greater during the first 20 min than later (n = 7; P less than 0.05). The washout of the lumbar CSF curve for morphine appeared to be fitted by a two-compartment open model. The t1/2-alpha and t1/2-beta values were 14.7 +/- 7.2 min and 106 +/- 45 min, respectively (mean +/- SD). Cumulative percentages of the epidural dose of morphine passed into the azygos system within the first 5, 20, 60, and 120 min after injection were calculated to be 4.0 +/- 2.1, 23.5 +/- 14.6, 49.2 +/- 34.2, and 55.9 +/- 35.3, respectively (mean +/- SD; n = 8).

  13. Venoconstrictor agents mobilize blood from different sources and increase intrathoracic filling during epidural anesthesia in supine humans

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton-Hicks, M.; Hoeck, A.S.; Stuehmeier, K.D.A.; Arndt, J.O.

    1987-03-01

    The authors studied the effects of dihydroergotamine (DHE) and etilefrine hydrochloride (E) on the regional distribution of /sup 99m/Tc-marked erythrocytes during epidural anesthesia in eight supine men to determine if vasoactive agents with venoconstrictor action would enhance cardiac filling during epidural anesthesia. Radioactivity was recorded with a gamma camera, and its distribution determined in the thorax, abdomen, and limbs. Arterial and central venous pressure, heart rate, and calf volume by plethysmography were measured. During epidural anesthesia with a sensory block up to T4/5, DHE (7.5 micrograms/kg) reduced the radioactivity, i.e., blood volume, in both the innervated (-5.9 +/- 3.5%) and denervated muscle/skin (-16.9 +/- 7%) regions, and increased it in both the intrathoracic (+7.0 +/- 2.3%), and splanchnic vasculature (+4.2 +/- 3.2). In contrast, E (6 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) decreased the blood volume most markedly in the splanchnic region (-5.4 +/- 0.7%) and increased it in the thorax (+2 +/- 0.6%). All these changes were statistically significant. The combined effects were estimated to be equivalent to a transfusion of nearly 1.01 of blood. Both drugs reversed the hypotensive action of epidural anesthesia. During epidural anesthesia, DHE preferentially constricted the capacitance vessels in skeletal muscle and skin irrespective of the state of innervation, whereas E preferentially constricted the splanchnic vasculature. In the doses used, the two agents replenished in an additive fashion the central circulation during epidural anesthesia.

  14. Visualization of extradural blood patch for post lumbar puncture headache by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, A G; Beards, S C; Jackson, A; Horsman, E L

    1993-02-01

    We describe a case of post lumbar puncture headache treated by extradural blood patch. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large extradural haematoma extending over four spinal segments and extending out through the neural outlet foramina. There was significant compression of the thecal sac, supporting the theory that extradural blood patch causes tamponade at the site of dural puncture. The spread of clot was predominantly upwards from the injection site and subarachnoid extension of blood was also demonstrated. PMID:8435271

  15. Targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) through a single catheter access site for treatment of a cerebral spinal fluid leak causing spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Woolen, Sean; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S; Chaudhary, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) usually occurs in the setting of a spontaneous cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak. We report the first description of a case of SIH caused by a CSF leak which improved after a targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) at the right T1-T2 level. An 81-year-old woman presented with an orthostatic headache for 6 days. MRI of the brain with contrast demonstrated low lying cerebellar tonsils, an engorged transverse sinus flow void, bifrontal small subdural fluid collections, and diffuse dural enhancement. CT myelography showed extravasation of intrathecal contrast at the right T1-T2 level. A targeted epidural patch was performed by injection of n-BCA through a catheter at the right T1-T2 level. After treatment, the patient's symptoms immediately improved and she was without a headache at 1-year follow-up. PMID:26038380

  16. Targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) through a single catheter access site for treatment of a cerebral spinal fluid leak causing spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Woolen, Sean; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S; Chaudhary, Neeraj

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) usually occurs in the setting of a spontaneous cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak. We report the first description of a case of SIH caused by a CSF leak which improved after a targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) at the right T1-T2 level. An 81-year-old woman presented with an orthostatic headache for 6 days. MRI of the brain with contrast demonstrated low lying cerebellar tonsils, an engorged transverse sinus flow void, bifrontal small subdural fluid collections, and diffuse dural enhancement. CT myelography showed extravasation of intrathecal contrast at the right T1-T2 level. A targeted epidural patch was performed by injection of n-BCA through a catheter at the right T1-T2 level. After treatment, the patient's symptoms immediately improved and she was without a headache at 1-year follow-up. PMID:26047904

  17. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension following epidural anesthesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    An, X; Wu, S; He, F; Li, C; Fang, X

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of refractory spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) following epidural anesthesia. In this case, typical clinical symptoms and concomitant use of regional anesthesia led to the misdiagnosis of SIH as post-dural puncture headache (PDPH). A 56-year-old man received a successful appendectomy under epidural anesthesia performed at a T11-T12 intravertebral space. About 20 h later, the patient started complaining about orthostatic headache when getting up from his lying position, then a PDPH was diagnosed. However, the patient did not respond well to conservative treatment. Three months later, the first epidural blood patch was performed at the L3-L4 level, however, the patient still had an orthostatic headache. Five days later, spine magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple meningeal diverticulum in the cervicothoracic junction, and computerized tomography myelography demonstrated a C5-C6 spinal dural tear suggesting cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Finally, the patient was diagnosed as SIH and received a second epidural blood patch at the T2-T3 level and responded with improvements in symptomatology. The patient was then discharged, and at a 2-year follow-up, he had fully recovered except for some remaining neck stiffness. This case illustrates that SIH was misdiagnosed as PDPH because of the common clinical symptoms and potentially confounding events (epidural/spinal anesthesia and assumption that it was a case of PDPH). It is important to carefully observe patients in such conditions and promptly conduct suitable diagnostic tests. For a successful treatment of SIH, a timely epidural blood patch should be considered as soon as the diagnosis is established. PMID:26939569

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of extradural blood patches: appearances from 30 min to 18 h.

    PubMed

    Beards, S C; Jackson, A; Griffiths, A G; Horsman, E L

    1993-08-01

    We have used magnetic resonance imaging to examine five patients treated with extradural blood patches for persistent post lumbar puncture headache. Images were obtained between 30 min and 18 h after patching. Extradural blood patch injection produced a focal haematoma mass around the injection site which initially compressed the thecal sac and nerve roots. The main bulk of the extradural clot extended only three to five spinal segments from the injection site, although small amounts of blood spread more distally. Spread from the injection site was principally cephalad. Mass effect was present at 30 min and 3 h, but clot resolution had occurred by 7 h, leaving a thick layer of mature clot over the dorsal part of the thecal sac. Eighteen hours after injection only small widely distributed clots, adherent to the thecal sac, were demonstrated. Extensive leakage of blood from the injection site into the subcutaneous tissues was present in all patients. PMID:8123389

  19. A new approach using high volume blood patch for prevention of post-dural puncture headache following intrathecal catheter pump exchange

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, Susanne; Vielhaber, Stefan; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Abdulla, Walied

    2015-01-01

    Background: In an observational study, complications of intrathecal catheter pumps necessitating surgical exchange were analyzed. Also the use of a high-volume prophylactic epidural blood patch (EBP) during surgery for preventing post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) with a follow-up for 1 year is described. Materials and Methods: In 22 patients with refractory chronic pain of cancer/noncancer origin or severe spasticity, who were receiving intrathecal morphine including adjuvants or baclofen for symptom relief, catheter exchange with or without pump was performed. In patients with documented symptoms of PDPH following initial intrathecal catheter implantation, a prophylactic EBP with a high blood volume was used for PDPH prevention during surgery. Catheters were replaced using 40 mL EBP before entering dural space at a speed of 5mL/min into the epidural space. Patients were asked to quantify pain experience and functional ability. Results: From a sample of 72 patients admitted for catheter exchange with or without pump, 22 patients (33%) (12 male, 10 female) had a history of PDPH following initial implantation. Diagnostic and therapeutic measures occurring with malfunction of intrathecal catheter pump systems were described. Twenty-one patients were successfully treated with prophylactic EBP, while one patient could not be properly evaluated because of intracranial bleeding as the underlying disease. Conclusions: A new approach using a high-volume prophylactic EBP for preventing PDPH following catheter exchange is presented. The efficacy and safety of this technique for 1 year follow-up have been evaluated and was found to be safe and potentially effective. PMID:26157652

  20. Novel Wearable Device for Blood Leakage Detection during Hemodialysis Using an Array Sensing Patch.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi-Chun; Lim, Bee-Yen; Ciou, Wei-Siang; Wu, Ming-Jui

    2016-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) is a clinical treatment that requires the puncturing of the body surface. However, needle dislodgement can cause a high risk of blood leakage and can be fatal to patients. Previous studies proposed several devices for blood leakage detection using optical or electrical techniques. Nonetheless, these methods used single-point detection and the design was not suitable for multi-bed monitoring. This study proposed a novel wearable device for blood leakage monitoring during HD using an array sensing patch. The array sensing patch combined with a mapping circuit and a wireless module could measure and transmit risk levels. The different risk levels could improve the working process of healthcare workers, and enhance their work efficiency and reduce inconvenience due to false alarms. Experimental results showed that each point of the sensing array could detect up to 0.1 mL of blood leakage and the array sensing patch supports a risk level monitoring system up to 8 h to alert healthcare personnel of pertinent danger to the patients. PMID:27294927

  1. Novel Wearable Device for Blood Leakage Detection during Hemodialysis Using an Array Sensing Patch

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yi-Chun; Lim, Bee-Yen; Ciou, Wei-Siang; Wu, Ming-Jui

    2016-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) is a clinical treatment that requires the puncturing of the body surface. However, needle dislodgement can cause a high risk of blood leakage and can be fatal to patients. Previous studies proposed several devices for blood leakage detection using optical or electrical techniques. Nonetheless, these methods used single-point detection and the design was not suitable for multi-bed monitoring. This study proposed a novel wearable device for blood leakage monitoring during HD using an array sensing patch. The array sensing patch combined with a mapping circuit and a wireless module could measure and transmit risk levels. The different risk levels could improve the working process of healthcare workers, and enhance their work efficiency and reduce inconvenience due to false alarms. Experimental results showed that each point of the sensing array could detect up to 0.1 mL of blood leakage and the array sensing patch supports a risk level monitoring system up to 8 h to alert healthcare personnel of pertinent danger to the patients. PMID:27294927

  2. Chemical epidural abscess: case report.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, N; Dreyfus, P M

    1971-06-01

    Spinal epidural abscess accompanies blood-borne infection, vertebral osteomyelitis, or an overlying cutaneous source of infection. This report documents the development of non-infective epidural abscess where the inflammatory response was induced by the highly irritant contents (keratin and cholesterol) of an underlying epidermoid. This was associated with aseptic meningitis. PMID:5571318

  3. Chemical epidural abscess: case report

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, N.; Dreyfus, P. M.

    1971-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess accompanies blood-borne infection, vertebral osteomyelitis, or an overlying cutaneous source of infection. This report documents the development of non-infective epidural abscess where the inflammatory response was induced by the highly irritant contents (keratin and cholesterol) of an underlying epidermoid. This was associated with aseptic meningitis. Images PMID:5571318

  4. Characterization of the Threshold Response of Initiation of Blood Clotting to Stimulus Patch Size

    PubMed Central

    Kastrup, Christian J.; Shen, Feng; Runyon, Matthew K.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2007-01-01

    This article demonstrates that the threshold response of initiation of blood clotting to the size of a patch of stimulus is a robust phenomenon under a wide range of conditions and follows a simple scaling relationship based on the Damköhler number. Human blood and plasma were exposed to surfaces patterned with patches presenting clotting stimuli using microfluidics. Perturbations of the complex network of hemostasis, including temperature, variations in the concentration of stimulus (tissue factor), and the absence or inhibition of individual components of the network (factor IIa, factor V, factor VIII, and thrombomodulin), did not affect the existence of this response. A scaling relationship between the threshold patch size and the timescale of reaction for clotting was supported in numerical simulations, a simple chemical model system, and experiments with human blood plasma. These results may be useful for understanding the spatiotemporal dynamics of other autocatalytic systems and emphasize the relevance of clustering of proteins and lipids in the regulation of signaling processes. PMID:17586576

  5. The efficacy and economical benefits of blood patch pleurodesis in secondary spontaneous pneumothorax patients

    PubMed Central

    Alpay, Levent; Metin, Serda; Kıral, Hakan; Demir, Mine; Yalçinsoy, Murat; Baysungur, Volkan; Yalçinkaya, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prolonged air leak in secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP) patients remains one of the biggest challenges for thoracic surgeons. This study investigates the feasibility, effectiveness, clinical outcomes, and economical benefits of the autologous blood patch pleurodesis method in SSP. Material and methods First-episode SSP patients undergoing autologous blood patch pleurodesis for resistant air leak following underwater-seal thoracostomy, between January 2010 and June 2013 were taken into the study. Timing and success rate of pleurodesis, recurrence, additional intervention, hospital length of stay, and complications that occurred during follow-up were examined from medical records, retrospectively. Results Thirty-one (27 male, 4 female) SSP patients with expanded lungs on chest X-ray and resistant air leak on the 3rd post-interventional day were enrolled. Mean age was 53.7 ± 18.9 years (range: 23-81). Twenty-four patients were treated with tube thoracostomy, 2 with pezzer drain, and 5 with 8 F pleural catheter. 96.8% success was achieved; air leak in 29 of 31 patients (93.5%) ceased within the first 24 hours. No procedure-related complication such as fever, pain or empyema was seen. Late pneumothorax recurrence occurred in 4 (12.9%) patients; 1 treated with talc pleurodesis where the other 3 necessitated surgical intervention. Conclusions Autologous blood patch pleurodesis is a safe, effective, and easily performed procedure with no need of any additional equipment or extra cost. This method can be applied to all patients with radiologically expanded lungs and continuous air leak after 48 hours following water-seal drainage thoracostomy, to reduce hospital stay duration, unnecessary surgical interventions, and the expenses. PMID:27212974

  6. Epidural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... hematoma is bleeding between the inside of the skull and the outer covering of the brain (called ... An epidural hematoma is often caused by a skull fracture during childhood or adolescence. This type of ...

  7. Fatal fentanyl patch misuse in a hospitalized patient with a postmortem increase in fentanyl blood concentration.

    PubMed

    Moore, Philip W; Palmer, Robert B; Donovan, Joseph Ward

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-related mortality happens, even in healthcare settings. We describe serial postmortem fentanyl blood concentrations in a hospital inpatient who fatally abused transdermal fentanyl. This is a single-patient case report. A 42-year-old man with lymphoma was started on transdermal fentanyl therapy while hospitalized for chronic abdominal pain. The patient was last seen awake 1.3 h prior to being found apneic and cyanotic. During the resuscitation attempt, a small square-shaped film was removed from the patient's oropharynx. Femoral blood was collected 0.5 and 2 h postmortem, and the measured fentanyl concentration increased from 1.6 to 14 ng/mL. Study limitations include potential laboratory or collection errors and missing data. (i) Providers must be vigilant for signs of fentanyl patch abuse. (ii) Postmortem blood concentrations are not static postmortem, likely secondary to decreasing pH, increased aqueous solubility, and tissue redistribution, and are therefore unlikely to accurately represent antemortem blood concentrations. PMID:25041753

  8. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  9. Failure rate and complications associated with the use of spinal catheters for the management of inadvertent dural puncture in the parturient: a retrospective comparison with re-sited epidural catheters.

    PubMed

    Tien, Michael; Peacher, Dionne F; Franz, Amber M; Jia, Shawn Y; Habib, Ashraf S

    2016-05-01

    Objective To report on the failure rate of spinal catheters placed following inadvertent dural puncture (IDP) compared with re-sited epidural catheters in the obstetric population. Research design and methods Patients who experienced IDP during epidural or combined spinal epidural placement with 17 or 18 gauge Tuohy needles for labor analgesia between 2003 and 2014 were identified using our post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) database. Patients were categorized into two groups: those who had spinal catheters inserted and those who had epidural catheters re-sited. Main outcome measure Failure rate associated with spinal or re-sited epidural catheters (defined as need for repeat block or alternative analgesic modality). Secondary outcomes were incidence of PDPH, need for epidural blood patch (EBP), and adverse events. Results A total of 109 patients were included in the final analysis; 79 ultimately had spinal catheters and 30 ultimately had re-sited epidural catheters. There were no differences between spinal catheters and re-sited epidural catheters in failure rate (22% vs. 13%, P = 0.33), incidence of PDPH (73% vs. 60%, P = 0.24), need for EBP (42% vs. 30%, P = 0.28), number of headache days, or maximum headache scores. There was also no difference in the rate of adverse events including high block levels, hypotension, and fetal bradycardia (9% vs. 7%, P = 1.0) between the two groups. Conclusions There were no differences in failure rates, PDPH outcomes, or adverse events between spinal catheters and re-sited epidural catheters following IDP in parturients receiving labor analgesia. Limitations of the study include its single-center retrospective non-randomized design, and the uneven number of patients in the two groups with a relatively small number in the re-sited epidural catheter group. PMID:26818623

  10. Epidural lipomatosis and congenital small spinal canal in spinal anaesthesia: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Complications after lumbar anaesthesia and epidural blood patch have been described in patients with congenital small spinal canal and increased epidural fat or epidural lipomatosis. These conditions, whether occurring separately or in combination, require magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis and grading, but their clinical significance is still unclear. Case presentation A 35-year-old Caucasian woman who was undergoing a Caesarean section developed a longstanding L4-L5 unilateral neuropathy after the administration of spinal anaesthesia. There were several attempts to correctly position the needle, one of which resulted in paraesthesia. A magnetic resonance image revealed that the patient's bony spinal canal was congenitally small and had excess epidural fat. The cross-sectional area of the dural sac was then reduced, which left practically no free cerebrospinal fluid space. Conclusion The combination of epidural lipomatosis of varying degrees and congenital small spinal canal has not been previously discussed with spinal anaesthesia. Due to the low cerebrospinal fluid content of the small dural sac, the cauda equina becomes a firm system with a very limited possibility for the nerve roots to move away from the puncture needle when it is inserted into the dural sac. This constitutes risks of technical difficulties and neuropathies with spinal anaesthesia. PMID:20062767

  11. Effects of epidural lidocaine anesthesia on bulls during electroejaculation.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, A J; Waldner, C L; Cotter, B S; Gudmundson, J; Barth, A D

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether caudal epidural lidocaine anesthesia reduces a stress response to electroejaculation. In the 1st experiment, changes in cortisol and progesterone concentrations in serial blood samples were used to assess the stress response to restraint (control), transrectal massage, caudal epidural injection of saline, electroejaculation after caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, and electroejaculation without epidural lidocaine. In the 2nd experiment, behavioral responses were subjectively scored in bulls that were electroejaculated with or without caudal epidural lidocaine anesthesia. Cortisol and progesterone concentrations were significantly elevated after electroejaculation, whether or not bulls received caudal epidural anesthesia. Elevations in cortisol and progesterone were lower and fewer bulls vocalized during electroejaculation when given caudal epidural anesthesia; however, the differences were not significant. PMID:11272454

  12. Thoracic epidural anesthesia during coronary artery bypass surgery: effects on cardiac sympathetic activity, myocardial blood flow and metabolism, and central hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kirnö, K; Friberg, P; Grzegorczyk, A; Milocco, I; Ricksten, S E; Lundin, S

    1994-12-01

    The effects of high thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity, myocardial blood flow and metabolism, and central hemodynamics were studied in 20 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In 10 of the patients, TEA (T1-5 block) was used as an adjunct to a standardized fentanyl-nitrous oxide anesthesia. Hemodynamic measurements and blood sampling were performed after induction of anesthesia but prior to skin incision and after sternotomy. Assessment of total and cardiac sympathetic activity was performed by means of the norepinephrine kinetic approach. Prior to surgery, mean arterial pressure (MAP), great cardiac vein flow (GCVF), and regional myocardial oxygen consumption (Reg-MVO2) were lower in the TEA group compared to the control group. During sternotomy there was a pronounced increase in cardiac norepinephrine spillover, MAP, systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), GCVF, and Reg-MVO2 in the control group. These changes were clearly attenuated in the TEA group. None of the patients in the TEA group had metabolic (lactate) or electrocardiographic signs of myocardial ischemia. Three patients in the control group had indices of myocardial ischemia prior to and/or during surgery. We conclude that TEA attenuates the surgically mediated sympathetic stress response to sternotomy, thereby preventing the increase in myocardial oxygen demand in the pre-bypass period without jeopardizing myocardial perfusion. PMID:7978429

  13. Epidural hematoma after routine epidural steroid injection

    PubMed Central

    Alkhudari, Azzam M.; Malk, Craig S.; Rahman, Abed; Penmetcha, Taruna; Torres, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are few reported cases of an epidural spinal hematoma following interventional pain procedures. Case Description: We report a case of a spinal epidural hematoma in a patient with no known risk factors (e.g. coagulopathy), who underwent an epidural steroid injection (ESI) in the same anatomic location as two previously successful ESI procedures. Conclusion: Early detection was the key to our case, and avoiding sedation allowed the patient to recognize the onset of a new neurological deficit, and lead to prompt diagnosis as well as surgical decompression of the resultant hematoma. PMID:27213109

  14. Unusual cervical spine epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Liou, Jr-Han; Su, Yu-Jang

    2015-10-01

    A 48-year-old man presented to the emergency department with complain of severe neck pain and anterior chest pain. Intermittent fever in the recent 2 days was also noted. There is a track maker over his left side of neck. The laboratory examination showed leukocytosis and high C-reactive protein level. Urine drug screen was positive for opiate. Empirical antibiotic administration was given. Blood culture grew gram-positive cocci in chain, and there was no vegetation found by heart echocardiogram. However, progressive weakness of four limbs was noted, and patient even cannot stand up and walk. The patient also complained of numbness sensation over bilateral hands and legs, and lower abdomen. Acute urine retention occurred. We arranged magnetic resonance imaging survey, which showed evidence of inflammatory process involving the retropharyngeal spaces and epidural spaces from the skull base to the bony level of T5. Epidural inflammatory process resulted in compression of the spinal cord and bilateral neural foramen narrowing. Neurosurgeon was consulted. Operation with laminectomy and posterior fusion with bone graft and internal fixation was done. Culture of epidural abscess and 2 sets of blood culture all yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. For epidural abscess, the most common involved spine is lumbar followed by thoracic and cervical spine. Diagnosis and treatment in the drug abusers are still challenging because they lack typical presentation, drug compliance, and adequate follow-up and because it is hard to stop drug abuser habit. Significant improvement of neurological deficit can be expected in most spinal abscess in drug abusers after treatment. PMID:26298050

  15. Epidural analgesia in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Tan, T K

    1998-03-01

    An ideal analgesic for labour would preferably be non-invasive, as effective as spinals and epidurals without their attendant complications and is safe to mother and child and should not complicate the labour process. Analgesia for labouring women ranges from the use of opioid injections to invasive methods, chiefly epidural injections. Each has its advantages and drawbacks. This article provides a review of analgesic methods and techniques for labouring women. It focuses mainly on the role of epidurals, how it is utilised by anaesthetists and the differing methods of drug delivery through the epidural route. It discusses various concoctions of local anaesthetics and adjuvants used. The epidural route is probably the most effective and most commonly used invasive route for achieving analgesia during labour. Local anaesthetics of varying concentrations are administered as intermittent boluses or as a continuous infusion. Adjuvant drugs are able to enhance the quality and duration of the analgesia. Opioids including fentanyl and sufentanil, and clonidine are discussed. The use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia and combined spinal-epidural analgesia are reviewed. Ambulatory or mobile epidurals are increasingly popular. They are known to improve maternal satisfaction because of preservation of motor power. Ambulation may help with cervical dilatation and engagement, and abolition of backpain, among other advantages. This article describes the methods of establishing mobile epidurals and offers guidelines on safe ambulation and contraindications to its use. PMID:9663317

  16. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery. PMID:26294360

  17. Postinfarction Functional Recovery Driven by a Three-Dimensional Engineered Fibrin Patch Composed of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Santiago; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Bagó, Juli R.; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Férnandez, Marco A.; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Perea-Gil, Isaac; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research has been dedicated to restoring myocardial cell slippage and limiting ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We examined the ability of a three-dimensional (3D) engineered fibrin patch filled with human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to induce recovery of cardiac function after MI. The UCBMSCs were modified to coexpress luciferase and fluorescent protein reporters, mixed with fibrin, and applied as an adhesive, viable construct (fibrin-cell patch) over the infarcted myocardium in mice (MI-UCBMSC group). The patch adhered well to the heart. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging demonstrated early proliferation and differentiation of UCBMSCs within the construct in the postinfarct mice in the MI-UCBMSC group. The implanted cells also participated in the formation of new, functional microvasculature that connected the fibrin-cell patch to both the subjacent myocardial tissue and the host circulatory system. As revealed by echocardiography, the left ventricular ejection fraction and fractional shortening at sacrifice were improved in MI-UCBMSC mice and were markedly reduced in mice treated with fibrin alone and untreated postinfarction controls. In conclusion, a 3D engineered fibrin patch composed of UCBMSCs attenuated infarct-derived cardiac dysfunction when transplanted locally over a myocardial wound. Significance Ischemic heart failure (HF) is the end stage of many cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction. The only definitive treatment for HF is cardiac transplant, which is hampered by limited number of heart donors and graft rejection. In recent times, cellular cardiomyoplasty has been expected to repair infarcted myocardium by implantation of different sources of stem or progenitor cells. However, low cell survival and myocardial implantation rates have motivated the emergence of novel approaches with the objective of generating graftable cell-based implants. Here, the potential

  18. Peut-on réaliser une analgésie péridurale après un blood patch récent?

    PubMed Central

    Chkoura, Khalid; Kechna, Hicham; Loutid, Jaouad; Ouzad, Omar; Hachimi, Moulay Ahmed; Hannafi, Sidi Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Le blood patch constitue le traitement de référence du syndrome post ponction lombaire. Son efficacité a été démontrée par plusieurs essais randomisés comparant le BPE aux mesures conservatrices et au placebo. Il consiste en l'injection d'une quantité de sang autologue dans l'espace péridurale afin d'obturer la brèche dure-mérienne. La réalisation d'une analgésie péridurale après antécédent de blood patch est possible, malgré la persistance de questions sur les délais de retour à la normal de l'espace péridurale. Nous rapportons un cas où une analgésie péridurale a été réalisée avec succès trois semaines après un blood patch. PMID:26600909

  19. Salmon Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head. Salmon patches are different from port-wine stains (discussed as a separate topic) in that ... difference between a salmon patch and a port-wine stain. In the past, port-wine stains and ...

  20. Epidural lysis of adhesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E; Hurley, Robert W; Cohen, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  1. Epidural Lysis of Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E.; Hurley, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  2. [Subdural hematoma after dural puncture: fateful complication of epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Schott, M; Gehrke, A; Gaab, M; Jantzen, J-P

    2013-05-01

    Subdural hematoma may occur as rare, although intervention- specific complications of accidental dural puncture by neuroaxial block. Bleeding may be caused by rapid cerebrospinal fluid loss related to traction on fragile intracranial bridging veins. This article reports a case of postdural puncture headache in a 43-year-old woman after accidental dural puncture during attempted placement of an epidural catheter for induction of abortion. Bed rest, analgesics, theophylline and hydration were to no avail and only a blood patch improved the headaches. The patient presented 7 weeks later with headache and left-sided hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a right frontoparietal subdural intracranial hematoma which had to be surgically evacuated. The patient recovered completely. Intracranial hematoma is a rare but serious complication of central neuroaxial block. According to current German jurisdiction this risk must be addressed when informed consent is obtained. Intracranial hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of atypical headache and neurological signs (e.g. focal motor and sensory deficits and seizures) following neuroaxial block and adequate image diagnostics should be carried out without delay. PMID:23558719

  3. Spinal and epidural anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... your spinal cord. This is called the epidural space. The medicine numbs, or blocks feeling in a certain part of your body so that you cannot feel pain. The medicine begins to take effect in about 10 to 20 minutes. It works ...

  4. [Vertebral osteomyelitis associated with epidural block].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Esper, R; Cruz-Bautista, I

    2001-01-01

    Infectious complications after epidural anesthesia are infrequent and the most common are epidural and subdural abscess. We report one rare case of vertebral osteomyelitus associated with an epidural catheter and review the literature. PMID:11381807

  5. Epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure

    PubMed Central

    Walaszczyk, Malgorzata; Knapik, Piotr; Misiolek, Hanna; Korlacki, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Parents have the right to decide on behalf of their children and deny consent to regional anaesthesia. The investigators decided to investigate quality of postoperative analgesia in adolescents undergoing epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure. Material/Methods The study subjects were 61 adolescents aged 11–18 years who underwent pectus excavatum repair with the Nuss procedure. Patients were divided into epidural (n=41) and opioid (n=20) groups, depending on their parents’ consent to epidural catheter insertion. Intraoperatively, 0.5% epidural ropivacaine with fentanyl or intermittent intravenous injections of fentanyl were used. Postoperative analgesia was achieved with either epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine with fentanyl, or subcutaneous morphine via an intraoperatively inserted “butterfly” cannula. Additionally, both groups received metamizol and paracetamol. Primary outcome variables were postoperative pain scores (Numeric Rating Scale and Prince Henry Hospital Pain Score). Secondary outcome variables included hemodynamic parameters, additional analgesia and side effects. Results Heart rate and blood pressure values in the postoperative period were significantly higher in the opioid group. Pain scores requiring intervention were noted almost exclusively in the opioid group. Conclusions Denial of parental consent to epidural analgesia following the Nuss procedure results in significantly worse control of postoperative pain. Our data may be useful when discussing with parents the available anaesthetic techniques for exceptionally painful procedures. PMID:22037752

  6. Patch tests*

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarini, Rosana; Duarte, Ida; Ferreira, Alessandra Lindmayer

    2013-01-01

    Patch tests were introduced as a diagnostic tool in the late nineteenth century. Since then, they have improved considerably becoming what they are today. Patch tests are used in the diagnostic investigation of contact dermatitis worldwide. Batteries or series previously studied and standardized should be used in patch testing. The methodology is simple, but it requires adequate training for the results to be correctly interpreted and used. Despite having been used for over a century, it needs improvement like all other diagnostic techniques in the medical field. PMID:24474094

  7. Sequentially evolved bilateral epidural haematomas.

    PubMed

    Rochat, P; Johannesen, H H; Poulsgård, L; Bøgeskov, L

    2002-12-01

    Sequentially evolved bilateral epidural haematomas, where the second haematoma evolves after surgical removal of the first haematoma, are rarely reported. We report two cases of this entity. One patient was involved in a road traffic accident and the other was suffering from a head injury after an assault. CT scans showed that both patients had an unilateral epidural haematoma with a thin presumably epidural haemorrhage on the opposite side. Both patients were operated for their epidural haematomas, but did not improve after surgical treatment, and postoperative CT scans revealed evolving of an epidural haematoma on the opposite side. After evacuation of the second epidural haematoma both patients recovered quickly. Sequentially evolved bilateral epidural haematomas are rare, but must be considered in the postoperative intensive care treatment in patients with epidural haematomas. Both cases emphasize the need for intensive care monitoring after an operation for an epidural haematoma and the need for CT scans if the patient does not improve quickly after removal of the haematoma. This is especially important if a small contralateral haematoma is seen on the initial CT scan. PMID:12445923

  8. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  9. Epidural catheter with integrated light guides for spectroscopic tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Astorga, R. P.; West, S.; Putnis, S.; Hebden, J. C.; Desjardins, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Epidural catheters are used to deliver anesthetics and opioids for managing pain in many clinical scenarios. Currently, epidural catheter insertion is performed without information about the tissues that are directly ahead of the catheter. As a result, the catheter can be incorrectly positioned within a blood vessel, which can cause toxicity. Recent studies have shown that optical reflectance spectroscopy could be beneficial for guiding needles that are used to insert catheters. In this study, we investigate the whether this technique could benefit the placement of catheters within the epidural space. We present a novel optical epidural catheter with integrated polymer light guides that allows for optical spectra to be acquired from tissues at the distal tip. To obtain an initial indication of the information that could be obtained, reflectance values and photon penetration depth were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations, and optical reflectance spectra were acquired during a laminectomy of a swine ex vivo. Large differences between the spectra acquired from epidural adipose tissue and from venous blood were observed. The optical catheter has the potential to provide real-time detection of intravascular catheter placement that could reduce the risk of complications. PMID:24298420

  10. Long segment spinal epidural extramedullary hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Kanwaljeet; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Manmohan; Chandra, P. Sarat; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extramedullary hematopoiesis is defined as the formation of blood cells outside the bone marrow. It is a common manifestation of many chronic hemolytic anemias, and typically involves the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Only rarely is the spinal epidural space involved. Methods: We describe a 25-year-old male, known to have thalassemia intermedia, who presented with a 1-month history of stiffness and weakness in both lower extremities. On physical examination, he had palpable splenomegaly accompanied by spinal tenderness at the D5 level, weakness in both lower extremities, hyperactive bilateral Patellar and Achilles reflexes with bilateral Babinski responses, and a graded sensory loss to pin appreciation below D5. Results: The magnetic resonance (MR) study revealed a posterior, isointense and soft tissue epidural mass extending from D2 to D12 on both the T1- and T2-weighted images. These findings were consistent with the diagnosis of “red marrow,” and long-segment spinal epidural extramedullary hematopoiesis. Conclusions: Although extramedullary hematopoiesis is rarely encountered within the spinal canal, it should be considered among the differential diagnoses when a posterior compressive thoracic lesion contributes to myelopathy in a patient with a history of thalassemia intermedia and the accompanying chronic hemolytic anemia. PMID:24404404

  11. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air. PMID:26885305

  12. Incidence of intravascular penetration in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Furman, Michael B; Giovanniello, Michael T; O'Brien, Erin M

    2003-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN A prospective, observational, human, study was conducted. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the incidence of vascular penetration during fluoroscopically guided, contrast-enhanced transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, and to determine whether the observation of blood in the needle hub can be used to predict a vascular injection. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA Incorrectly placed intravascular cervical spinal injections result in medication flow systemically and not to the desired target. A recently published study demonstrates a high incidence of intravascular injections in transforaminal lumbosacral epidural injections. No studies so far have evaluated the incidence of vascular injections in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, nor have they calculated the ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict a vascular injection in the cervical spine.METHODS The incidence of fluoroscopically confirmed intravascular uptake of contrast was prospectively observed in 337 patients treated with cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections. The ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict intravascular injection was also investigated. For each subject, the injection level was chosen on the basis of the clinical scenario including history, physical examination, and review of imaging studies. Some patients had multilevel injections. Using fluoroscopic guidance, the authors placed a 25-gauge needle into the epidural space using a transforaminal approach according to accepted standard technique. Needle tip location was confirmed with biplanar imaging. The presence or absence of blood in the needle hub spontaneously ("flash") and after attempted aspiration by pulling back on the syringe's plunger was documented. Contrast then was injected under real-time fluoroscopy to determine whether the location of the needle tip was intravascular. The results were recorded in a prospective manner indicating the presence or absence of blood

  13. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... located outside the dural membrane. Steroids, anesthetics and anti-inflammatory medications are typically delivered in an epidural injection. ... create different effects for patients. Corticosteroids act as anti-inflammatory agents, reducing swelling and nerve irritation to allow ...

  14. Pericardial patch venoplasty heals via attraction of venous progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hualong; Wang, Mo; Foster, Trenton R; Hu, Haidi; He, Hao; Hashimoto, Takuya; Hanisch, Jesse J; Santana, Jeans M; Xing, Ying; Dardik, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Pericardial patches are commonly used during cardiovascular surgery to close blood vessels. In arteries, patches accumulate arterial progenitor cells; we hypothesized that venous patches would accumulate venous progenitor cells, in the absence of arterial pressure. We developed a novel rat inferior vena cava (IVC) venotomy model and repaired it with a pericardial patch. Cells infiltrated the patch to form a thick neointima by day 7; some cells were CD34(+)/VEGFR2(+) and CD31(+)/Eph-B4(+) consistent with development of venous identity in the healing patch. Compared to arterial patches, the venous patches had increased neointimal thickness at day 7 without any pseudoaneurysms. Addition of an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) to increase blood flow on the patch resulted in reduced patch neointimal thickness and proliferation, but neointimal thickness was not reversible with AVF ligation. These results show that rat patch venoplasty is a novel model of aggressive venous neointimal hyperplasia. PMID:27354544

  15. Failed epidural: causes and management.

    PubMed

    Hermanides, J; Hollmann, M W; Stevens, M F; Lirk, P

    2012-08-01

    Failed epidural anaesthesia or analgesia is more frequent than generally recognized. We review the factors known to influence the success rate of epidural anaesthesia. Reasons for an inadequate epidural block include incorrect primary placement, secondary migration of a catheter after correct placement, and suboptimal dosing of local anaesthetic drugs. For catheter placement, the loss of resistance using saline has become the most widely used method. Patient positioning, the use of a midline or paramedian approach, and the method used for catheter fixation can all influence the success rate. When using equipotent doses, the difference in clinical effect between bupivacaine and the newer isoforms levobupivacaine and ropivacaine appears minimal. With continuous infusion, dose is the primary determinant of epidural anaesthesia quality, with volume and concentration playing a lesser role. Addition of adjuvants, especially opioids and epinephrine, may substantially increase the success rate of epidural analgesia. Adjuvant opioids may have a spinal or supraspinal action. The use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia with background infusion appears to be the best method for postoperative analgesia. PMID:22735301

  16. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOR - CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Nada; Djaković, Ivka; Kličan-Jaić, Katarina; Rudman, Senka Sabolović; Ivanec, Željko

    2015-09-01

    Labor pain is one of the most severe pains. Labor is a complex and individual process with varying maternal requesting analgesia. Labor analgesia must be safe and accompanied by minimal amount of unwanted consequences for both the mother and the child, as well as for the delivery procedure. Epidural analgesia is the treatment that best meets these demands. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Society of Anesthesiologists, mother's demand is a reason enough for the introduction of epidural analgesia in labor, providing that no contraindications exist. The application of analgesics should not cease at the end of the second stage of labor, but it is recommended that lower concentration analgesics be then applied. Based on the latest studies, it can be claimed that epidural analgesia can be applied during the major part of the first and second stage of labor. According to previous investigations, there is no definitive conclusion about the incidence of instrumental delivery, duration of second stage of labor, time of epidural analgesia initiation, and long term outcomes for the newborn. Cooperation of obstetric and anesthesiology personnel, as well as appropriate technical equipment significantly decrease the need of instrumental completion of a delivery, as well as other complications encountered in the application of epidural analgesia. Our hospital offers 24/7 epidural analgesia service. The majority of pregnant women in our hospital were aware of the advantages of epidural analgesia for labor, however, only a small proportion of them used it, mainly because of inadequate level of information. PMID:26666104

  17. [Clinical criteria of acute epidural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, W P; Grössing, N

    1992-08-01

    In a retrospective study 368 epidural hematomas are presented, treated from 1970 until August 1991. The clinical course and manifestation of acute epidural hematomas is commented on by means of own cases. Assessing the success of treatment, it could be demonstrated that the prompter diagnosis reduced the lethal outcome of epidural hematoma to 6.6%. PMID:1413279

  18. Symptomatic lumbar epidural varices. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, G A; Weingarten, K; Lavyne, M H

    1994-05-01

    Lumbar epidural varices have been infrequently described in the literature and rarely accepted as a primary pathophysiological entity. The authors' total experience with symptomatic lumbar epidural varices over the last 15 years includes four cases (incidence 0.067% of all lumbar spine operations), two of which are described in detail in this paper. The mechanism for their formation is proposed: central disc herniations obstruct the anterior epidural venous flow leading to anterolateral caudal venous distention. Subsequent venous endothelial injury predisposes to varying degrees of phlebothrombosis. Decompression of partially thrombosed varices may occur during operative discectomy or spontaneously during regression of the nonoperated disc prolapse. Regression of the central disc herniation may also explain the "disappearing disc" phenomenon, in which patients with clinical and radiographic evidence of apparently large caudal disc herniations exhibit clinical and radiographic resolution. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the epidural varix depend upon the degree of thrombosis within this anomaly. A thrombosed varix is hyperintense on T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted images, whereas flowing blood is hypointense. The variable hypo- and hyperintensity on the T2-weighted MR imaging sequences correlate with a partially patent lumen within the varix. PMID:8169634

  19. Recent Advances in Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Maria; George, John E.; Seif, John; Farag, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia is a term that denotes all forms of central blocks, involving the spinal, epidural, and caudal spaces. Epidural anesthesia is a versatile technique widely used in anesthetic practice. Its potential to decrease postoperative morbidity and mortality has been demonstrated by numerous studies. To maximize its perioperative benefits while minimizing potential adverse outcomes, the knowledge of factors affecting successful block placement is essential. This paper will provide an overview of the pertinent anatomical, pharmacological, immunological, and technical aspects of epidural anesthesia in both adult and pediatric populations and will discuss the recent advances, the related rare but potentially devastating complications, and the current recommendations for the use of anticoagulants in the setting of neuraxial block placement. PMID:22174708

  20. Granisetron Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... patch. Each patch is stuck onto a thin plastic liner and a separate rigid plastic film. Do not open the pouch in advance, ... cut the patch into pieces. Peel the thin plastic liner off of the printed side of the ...

  1. Methylphenidate Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... still remove the patch at your regular patch removal time. Do not apply extra patches to make ... room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Do not refrigerate or ...

  2. Rivastigmine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... still remove the patch at your regular patch removal time. If it is almost time for the ... room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any patches ...

  3. Maternal and foetal outcome after epidural labour analgesia in high-risk pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Sukhen; Jain, Kajal; Bhardwaj, Neerja; Jain, Vanita; Samanta, Sujay; Saha, Rini

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Low concentration local anaesthetic improves uteroplacental blood flow in antenatal period and during labour in preeclampsia. We compared neonatal outcome after epidural ropivacaine plus fentanyl with intramuscular tramadol analgesia during labour in high-risk parturients with intrauterine growth restriction of mixed aetiology. Methods: Forty-eight parturients with sonographic evidence of foetal weight <1.5 kg were enrolled in this non-randomized, double-blinded prospective study. The epidural (E) group received 0.15% ropivacaine 10 ml with 30 μg fentanyl incremental bolus followed by 7–15 ml 0.1% ropivacaine with 2 μg/ml fentanyl in continuous infusion titrated until visual analogue scale was three. Tramadol (T) group received intramuscular tramadol 1 mg/kg as bolus as well as maintenance 4–6 hourly. Neonatal outcomes were measured with cord blood base deficit, pH, ionised calcium, sugar and Apgar score after delivery. Maternal satisfaction was also assessed by four point subjective score. Results: Baseline maternal demographics and neonatal birth weight were comparable. Neonatal cord blood pH, base deficit, sugar, and ionised calcium levels were significantly improved in the epidural group in comparison to the tramadol group. Maternal satisfaction (P = 0.0001) regarding labour analgesia in epidural group was expressed as excellent by 48%, good by 52% whereas it was fair in 75% and poor in 25% in the tramadol group. Better haemodynamic and pain scores were reported in the epidural group. Conclusion: Epidural labour analgesia with low concentration local anaesthetic is associated with less neonatal cord blood acidaemia, better sugar and ionised calcium levels. The analgesic efficacy and maternal satisfaction are also better with epidural labour analgesia. PMID:27013750

  4. Cabbage Patch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This Sojourner rover image of the Cabbage Patch shows small rounded objects on the surface that are about 3-4 cm across. Some of these are within excavations, which are about 0.5 cm wide. Several questions arise about the pebbles: Why are they rounded? Where did they come from? What do they mean?

    Geologists use MULTIPLE WORKING HYPOTHESES when attempting to explain observations. Some hypotheses that could account for the pebbles are: They were rounded during transport by waters of catastrophic floods and deposited on the Ares Vallis floodplain They were rounded by wave action on an ancient Martian beach They were rounded during glacial transport They are glasses that were produced by melting during impact cratering. The glass was first ejected from the crater, then molded into spherical shapes or drops as it traveled through the atmosphere, and finally was deposited at the sites They are spatter from lava flows They are nodules brought up from the deep Martian interior by lava flows or pyroclastic eruptions. They are concretions formed in sedimentary rocks They came from ancient conglomerate rocks. The pebbles were rounded by water action and subsequently lithified into conglomerate rocks. Later, the waters of catastrophic floods transported the conglomerates and deposited them on the Ares floodplain. The pebbles were then freed from the rocks by weathering. A combination of the above

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  5. Epidural anesthesia for pilonidal sinus surgery: ropivacaine versus levobupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Koltka, Emine Nursen; Devrim, Sibel; Tüfekçi, Sevil; Doğru, Serkan; Çelik, Melek

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidural anesthesia is one of the best options for lower abdominal and lower limb surgery. However, there have been insufficient reports regarding the use of epidural anesthesia for pilonidal sinus surgery. The present study was performed to compare the clinical profiles of epidural block performed with 0.75% levobupivacaine and 0.75% ropivacaine in this procedure. Methods Thirty patients undergoing pilonidal sinus surgery were randomly allocated into two groups: one group received levobupivacaine and the other received ropivacaine at 0.75% in a volume of 10 ml. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, the onset time of analgesia and duration of block, highest sensory block level, perioperative and postoperative side effects, and patients' and surgeons' satisfaction were recorded. Results Hemodynamic stability was maintained in both groups throughout surgery. The onset time of analgesia (the time from epidural injection of local anesthetic to reach L2 sensorial block) was 6.26 ± 3.49 min in the levobupivacaine group and 4.06 ± 1.75 min in the ropivacaine group (P = 0.116). The duration of sensorial block (time for regression of sensory block to L2) was 297.73 ± 70.94 min in group L and 332.40 ± 102.22 min in group R (P = 0.110). Motor block was not seen in any of the patients in the study groups. Patients' and surgeons' satisfaction with the anesthetic technique were mostly excellent in both groups. Conclusions In patients undergoing pilonidal sinus surgery, both levobupivacaine and ropivacaine produce rapid and excellent epidural block without leading to motor block or significant side effects. Although not statistically significant, the onset time of anesthesia was shorter and the duration of effect was longer with ropivacaine than with levobupivacaine in this study. PMID:25844132

  6. Cervical epidural abscess caused by brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulos, Christos; Kamposos, Panagiotis; Papaioannou, Ioanna; Niarou, Vasiliki

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old Greek lady presented with fever, arthralgias of knees, cervical and lumbar pain during the last month. On clinical examination the patient was found to have tenderness of the cervical and the lumbar spine with great motion restriction. The blood tests revealed high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, abnormal liver function tests and a positive rheumatoid factor. Serological test for Brucella was positive while cervical MRI revealed epidural abscess and spondylodiscitis. Conservative treatment with streptomycin (it was substituted by rifampicin after the third week) and doxycyclin for 4 months significantly improved her symptoms. The frequency as well as the diagnosis and management of this manifestation are discussed. PMID:23188848

  7. [Subcutaneous abscess following epidural catheterization].

    PubMed

    Radif, Ahmed; Dalsgaard, Lars Bech

    2009-06-01

    A case of subcutaneous abscess and meningitis symptoms after insertion of epidural catheter is presented. The symptoms were pain at the site of insertion two days after insertion, later fever and neck rigidity. Treatment is surgical intervention after appropriate diagnostics by magnetic resonance imaging, and administration of appropriate antibiotics. PMID:19500519

  8. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... ESI) is the delivery of powerful anti-inflammatory medicine directly into the space outside of the sac of fluid around your spinal cord. This area is called the epidural space. ESI is not the ... given just before childbirth or certain types of surgery.

  9. Granisetron Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... the patch. Each patch is stuck onto a thin plastic liner and a separate rigid plastic film. Do not open the pouch in advance, because ... to cut the patch into pieces. Peel the thin plastic liner off of the printed side ... one piece of the plastic film from the sticky side of the patch. Be ...

  10. Effects of lumbosacral epidural ketamine and lidocaine in xylazine-sedated cats.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, R; Benites, A P; Ferreira, J Z; Neto, J M N; Hermeto, L C

    2009-06-01

    In order to determine the analgesic and cardiovascular effects of the combination of epidural ketamine and lidocaine, 6 sedated cats were studied. Six healthy, young cats were used in a prospective randomised study. Each cat underwent 3 treatments, at least 1 week apart, via epidural injection: (1) ketamine (2.5 mg/kg), (2) lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg), and (3) ketamine (2.5 mg/kg) plus lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg). Epidural injections were administered through the lumbosacral space. Analgesia, motor block, sedation, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate and arterial oxygen saturation were measured. Rectal temperature was compared before and after sedation as well as after epidural administration of the drugs. Epidural administration of the ketamine/lidocaine combination induced prolonged analgesia extending from the coccygeal to the T13-L1 dermatomes, leading to severe ataxia. Cardiovascular effects were significant in all treatments: heart rate decreased, but there was a minimal reduction in arterial pressure. It was concluded that adding a dose of ketamine to epidural lidocaine in cats is feasible and effective. PMID:19831267

  11. Neurological complications associated with epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-05-01

    Multiple case reports of neurological complications resulting from intraarterial injection of corticosteroids have led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue a warning, requiring label changes, warning of serious neurological events, some resulting in death. The FDA has identified 131 cases of neurological adverse events, including 41 cases of arachnoiditis. A review of the literature reveals an overwhelming proportion of the complications are related to transforaminal epidural injections, of which cervical transforaminal epidural injections constituted the majority of neurological complications. Utilization data of epidural injections in the Medicare population revealed that cervical transforaminal epidural injections constitute only 2.4 % of total epidural injections and <5 % of all transforaminal epidural injections. Multiple theories have been proposed as the cause of neurological injury including particulate steroid, arterial intimal flaps, arterial dissection, dislodgement of plaque causing embolism, arterial muscle spasm, and embolism of a fresh thrombus following disruption of the intima. PMID:25795154

  12. Epidural Venous Plexus Engorgement: What Lies Beneath?

    PubMed Central

    Donmez, Fuldem Yildirim

    2015-01-01

    Epidural venous plexus engorgement may occur due to several conditions that prevent the normal venous circulation. Inferior vena cava agenesis is a very rare cause of epidural venous enlargement. We present a case with a very thin inferior vena cava and left iliac vein agenesis who presented with back pain due to epidural vein engorgement and lacked other venous problems such as deep vein thrombosis. PMID:25722912

  13. Whole Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Song, Jae Gyok; Ryu, Jae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male who had no underlying disease, including coagulopathy, underwent thoracotomy and bleeding control due to hemothorax. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred. Urgent spine magnetic resonance imaging showed a massive anterior spinal epidural hematoma from C2 to L1 level with different signal intensities, which was suspected to be staged hemorrhage. Hematoma evacuation with decompressive laminectomy was performed. The patient's neurologic deterioration was recovered immediately, and he was discharged without neurological deficits. A drug history of naftazone, which could induce a drug-induced platelet dysfunction, was revealed retrospectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of whole spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a young patient, with a history of hemorrhoid medication. PMID:24967052

  14. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Report.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a 12-year-old female, who presented with significant upper and lower extremities weakness preceded by pain around the neck and shoulder girdle. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed epidural hematoma extending from C6-T2 with characteristic heterogeneously hyperintensity on T2 and homogenously isointensity on T1. Emergent spinal decompression was performed. However, the patient remained substantially weak in her lower extremities and was wheelchair bound at 3 months postoperatively. We have discussed clinical features, predisposing events, pathogenesis and treatment guidelines described in the literature. We also aim to reinforce the notion of keeping a high degree of clinical suspicion to identify and intervene at the earliest stage to prevent the physically and socially challenging consequences of SSEH. PMID:27598898

  15. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga¸secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Background Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. Results The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Conclusion Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. PMID:27030718

  16. The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural analgesia in open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David; Bright, Elizabeth; London, N J M

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Complications of epidural catheterisation can cause significant morbidity. Epidural abscess following epidural catheterisation is rare and the reported incidence is variable. The purpose of this study was to review the incidence of epidural abscess in patients undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. PATIENTS AND METHODS A retrospective case note review of all patients having open AAA repair over a 5-year period. RESULTS A total of 415 patients underwent open AAA repair between January 2003 and March 2008. Of these, 290 were elective procedures and 125 were for ruptured aneurysms. Six patients underwent postoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the spine for clinical suspicion of an epidural abscess. Two of these (0.48%) had confirmed epidural abscess and two superficial infection at the epidural site. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural analgesia in patients undergoing open AAA repair within our department was 0.48%. Although a rare complication, epidural abscess can cause significant morbidity. Epidural abscesses rarely develop before the third postoperative day. PMID:19887020

  17. Oesophageal Doppler monitoring overestimates cardiac output during lumbar epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Leather, H A; Wouters, P F

    2001-06-01

    Oesophageal Doppler monitoring (ODM) has been advocated as a non-invasive means of measuring cardiac output (CO). However, its reliance upon blood flow measurement in the descending aorta to estimate CO is susceptible to error if blood flow is redistributed between the upper and lower body. We hypothesize that lumbar epidural anesthesia (LEA), which causes blood flow redistribution, causes errors in CO estimates. We compared ODM with thermodilution (TD) measurements in fourteen patients under general anaesthesia for radical prostatectomy, who had received an epidural catheter at the intervertebral level L2-L3. Coupled measurements of CO by means of the TD and ODM techniques were performed at baseline (general anaesthetic only) and after epidural administration of 10 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine. The two methods were compared using Bland-Altman analysis: before LEA there was a bias of -0.89 litre min(-1) with limits of agreement ranging between -2.67 and +0.88 litre min(-1). Following lumbar sympathetic block, bias became positive (+0.55 litre min(-1)) and limits of agreement increased to -3.21 and +4.30 litre min(-1). ODM measured a greater increase in CO after LEA (delta=+1.71 (1.19) litre min(-1) (mean (SD)) compared with TD (delta=+0.51 (0.70) litre min(-1)). We conclude that following LEA, measurements with the Oesophageal Doppler Monitor II overestimate CO and show unacceptably high variability. Blood flow redistribution may limit the value of ODM. PMID:11573585

  18. Computed tomographic staging of traumatic epidural bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-09-01

    The computed tomographic findings in 45 patients with post-traumatic epidural hemotomas are subdivided into three categories (acute, subacute, and chronic) and correlated with the severity of bleeding, clot formation, and clot resorption. Active epidural bleeding may be identified in acute cases.

  19. Paraplegia following lumbosacral steroid epidural injections.

    PubMed

    AbdeleRahman, Kader Tawfiq; Rakocevic, Goran

    2014-09-01

    Spinal cord ischemia is a rare but possible neurological complication following routine conservative treatment of lumbosacral radiculopathy. A case of a 46 year old woman with chronic L5 radiculopathy, who developed spinal cord ischemia following epidural steroid injection, is reported. Two months after the epidural injection, she required crutches for walking and had neurogenic bladder and bowel. PMID:25200706

  20. Scopolamine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... patch from its protective pouch. To expose the adhesive surface of the patch, the clear plastic protective ... peeled off and discarded. Contact with the exposed adhesive layer should be avoided to prevent contamination of ...

  1. Lidocaine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... that area. Use scissors to remove the outer seal from the package. Then pull apart the zipper seal. Remove up to three patches from the package and press the zipper seal tightly together. The remaining patches may dry out ...

  2. Metal Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F. (Inventor); Hodges, Richard E. (Inventor); Zawadzki, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a patch antenna comprises a planar conductive patch attached to a ground plane by a support member, and a probe connector in electrical communication with the conductive patch arranged to conduct electromagnetic energy to or from the conductive patch, wherein the conductive patch is disposed essentially parallel to the ground plane and is separated from the ground plane by a spacing distance; wherein the support member comprises a plurality of sides disposed about a central axis oriented perpendicular to the conductive patch and the ground plane; wherein the conductive patch is solely supported above the ground plane by the support member; and wherein the support member provides electrical communication between the planer conductive patch and the ground plane.

  3. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Perineural Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Pusat, Serhat; Kural, Cahit; Aslanoglu, Atilla; Kurt, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices are rare and usually mimick lumbar disc herniations. Back pain and radiculopathy are the main symptoms of lumbar epidural varices. Perineural cysts are radiologically different lesions and should not be confused with epidural varix. A 36-year-old male patient presented to us with right leg pain. The magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion at S1 level that was compressing the right root, and was interpreted as a perineural cyst. The patient underwent surgery via right L5 and S1 hemilaminectomy, and the lesion was coagulated and removed. The histopathological diagnosis was epidural varix. The patient was clinically improved and the follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed the absence of the lesion. Lumbar epidural varix should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of the cystic lesions which compress the spinal roots. PMID:23741553

  4. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  5. Epidural anesthesia and postoperatory analgesia with alpha-2 adrenergic agonists and lidocaine for ovariohysterectomy in bitches

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Virgínia H.; Carregaro, Adriano B.; Lopes, Carlize; Gehrcke, Martielo I.; Muller, Daniel C.M.; Garlet, Clarissa D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the viability and cardiorespiratory effects of the association of epidural alpha-2 adrenergic agonists and lidocaine for ovariohysterectomy (OH) in bitches. Forty-two bitches were spayed under epidural anesthesia with 2.5 mg/kg body weight (BW) of 1% lidocaine with adrenaline (CON) or in association with 0.25 mg/kg BW of xylazine (XYL), 10 μg/kg BW of romifidine (ROM), 30 μg/kg BW of detomidine (DET), 2 μg/kg BW of dexmedetomidine (DEX), or 5 μg/kg BW of clonidine (CLO). Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (fR) and arterial pressures were monitored immediately before and every 10 min after the epidural procedure. Blood gas and pH analysis were done before, and at 30 and 60 min after the epidural procedure. Animals were submitted to isoflurane anesthesia if they presented a slightest sign of discomfort during the procedure. Time of sensory epidural block and postoperative analgesia were evaluated. All animals in CON and DEX, 5 animals in ROM and CLO, 4 animals in XYL, and 3 in DET required supplementary isoflurane. All groups, except CLO, showed a decrease in HR. There was an increase in arterial pressures in all groups. Postoperative analgesia lasted the longest in XYL. None of the protocols were totally efficient to perform the complete procedure of OH; however, xylazine provided longer postoperative analgesia than the others. PMID:23277701

  6. Reporting of 'hypotension' after epidural analgesia during labour. Effect of choice of arm and timing of baseline readings.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Black, A M

    1998-02-01

    We studied 20 women in labour to see how reporting 'hypotension' after obstetric epidural analgesia is affected by position of the blood pressure cuff and baseline definition. Blood pressure was recorded from both arms simultaneously while the woman was semirecumbent and then in the left lateral position. Three readings were then taken after epidural bupivacaine, one left lateral and the remainder right lateral. Before the epidural, blood pressure in the dependent arm in the lateral position was similar to blood pressure in either arm in the semirecumbent position and an average of 10 mmHg (systolic) and 14 mmHg (diastolic) higher than blood pressure in the uppermost arm (p < or = 0.00005). This difference persisted in both lateral positions as epidural analgesia became established. Choosing different definitions of hypotension, baselines and arm to measure blood pressure resulted in 'hypotension rates' between 0% and 75%. For blood pressure measurement in the lateral position, the blood pressure cuff should be placed on the dependent arm. PMID:9534634

  7. Epidural haematoma and stroller-associated injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, A C; Fong, D

    1997-10-01

    We present a severe case of head injury in an infant associated with stroller use and review similar reports from the literature. A case report and a literature search of the Medline database from 1966 to 6/1996 using the terms 'perambulator', 'parm', 'stroller', or 'baby carriage'. Reports in English describing injuries associated with their use are reviewed. We report a case of epidural haematoma in a 10 months old girl who sustained the injury after falling from a stroller. Safety harnesses were not worn during the incident. There was no skull fracture. Complete recovery followed surgical evacuation of the blood clot. Five reports describing stroller-related injuries were found in the English literature. Most injuries were mild. Three cases of death were reported of which two were classified as child abuse. The prevalence of unintentional stroller-associated injury is not clear. Mild injury, mostly to the head region, is probably common. Life-threatening injuries are rare but these are potentially preventable if strollers are properly designed and safety recommendations are followed. PMID:9401893

  8. [Combined spinal and epidural analgesia in urology].

    PubMed

    Bovianska, N

    1995-01-01

    Combined spinal and epidural analgesia is a new concept in the field of regional anesthesia. It combines the positive qualities of spinal and epidural analgesia, and is performed by the "needle-in-needle" technique, described in the paper. This type of analgesia is practically implemented in the Clinical Center of Urology over the past few months, and shows encouraging results. This is a report on clinical experience had with 10 combined analgesia procedures, running a course free of any complications against the background of stable hemodynamics and respiration of the patients. The block induced is with 4-hour duration, and lends itself to prolongation through an epidural catheter. This renders the method variable and suited for postoperative analgesia too. The Espokan set technical devices used make puncture of the spinal-epidural space readily practicable. PMID:8648963

  9. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujin; Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-06-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  10. Epidural steroid warning controversy still dogging FDA.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Candido, Kenneth D; Singh, Vijay; Gharibo, Christopher G; Boswell, Mark V; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Falco, Frank J E; Grider, Jay S; Diwan, Sudhir; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    On April 23, 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a letter of warning that injection of corticosteroids into the epidural space of the spine may result in rare, but serious adverse events, including "loss of vision, stroke, paralysis, and death." The advisory also advocated that patients should discuss the benefits and risks of epidural corticosteroid injections with their health care professionals, along with the benefits and risks associated with other possible treatments. In addition, the FDA stated that the effectiveness and safety of the corticosteroids for epidural use have not been established, and the FDA has not approved corticosteroids for such use. To raise awareness of the risks of epidural corticosteroid injections in the medical community, the FDA's Safe Use Initiative convened a panel of experts including pain management experts to help define the techniques for such injections with the aim of reducing preventable harm. The panel was unable to reach an agreement on 20 proposed items related to technical aspects of performing epidural injections. Subsequently, the FDA issued the above referenced warning and a notice that a panel will be convened in November 2014. This review assesses the inaccuracies of the warning and critically analyzes the available literature. The literature has been assessed in reference to alternate techniques and an understanding of the risk factors when performing transforaminal epidural injections in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions, ultimately resulting in improved safety. The results of this review show the efficacy of epidural injections, with or without steroids, in a multitude of spinal ailments utilizing caudal, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar interlaminar approaches as well as lumbar transforaminal epidural injections . The evidence also shows the superiority of steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation utilizing caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches without any significant difference as

  11. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... fight infection and are part of your body's defense system. Platelets help blood to clot when you have a cut or wound. Bone marrow, the spongy material inside your bones, makes new blood cells. Blood cells ...

  12. Fentanyl Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain, pain after an operation or medical or dental procedure, or pain that can be controlled by medication that is ... transdermal patch.if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the ... to prevent or treat constipation while you are using fentanyl patches.

  13. Symptomatic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis After a Single Local Epidural Steroid Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, Chung Hong Kaur, Shaleen; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare disorder that can manifest with progressive neurological deficits. It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated epidural fat commonly associated with the administration of exogenous steroids associated with a variety of systemic diseases, endocrinopathies, and Cushing syndrome (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). Occasionally, spinal epidural lipomatosis may occur in patients not exposed to steroids or in patients with endocrinopathies, primarily in obese individuals (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). However, spinal lumbar epidural lipomatosis resulting from local steroid injection has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 45-year-old diabetic man with claudication that was probably due to symptomatic lumbar spinal lipomatosis resulting from a single local epidural steroid injection.

  14. Fluoroscopically guided tunneled trans-caudal epidural catheter technique for opioid-free neonatal epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Andrew D; Hughes, Elisabeth M

    2016-06-01

    Epidural analgesia confers significant perioperative advantages to neonates undergoing surgical procedures but may be very technically challenging to place using a standard interlaminar loss-of-resistance to saline technique given the shallow depth of the epidural space. Thoracic epidural catheters placed via the caudal route may reduce the risk of direct neural injury from needle placement, but often pose higher risks of infection and/or improper positioning if placed without radiographic guidance. We present a detailed method of placing a fluoroscopically guided, tunneled transcaudal epidural catheter, which may reduce both of these risks. The accuracy and precision of this technique often provides adequate analgesia to allow for opioid-free epidural infusions as well as significant reductions in systemic opioids through the perioperative period. Opioid-free analgesia using a regional anesthetic technique allows for earlier extubation and reduced perioperative sedation, which may have a less deleterious neurocognitive effect on the developing brain of the neonate. PMID:26896945

  15. A Survey of Patch Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhill, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Patch methods are someshow a response to the fact that surface geometry is local, that is, only small parts of a surface are created at a time. The two categories of patches, transfinite patches and finite dimensional patches are examined and a discussion of trivariate patches is presented.

  16. Idiopathic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis in the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Al-Omari, Ali A; Phukan, Rishabh D; Leonard, Dana A; Herzog, Tyler L; Wood, Kirkham B; Bono, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Overgrowth of epidural fat, known as spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL), can cause symptomatic compression of the spinal cord, conus medullaris, or cauda equina. Suggested predisposing factors such as obesity, steroid use, and diabetes mellitus have been based on a few reported cases, many of which were not surgically confirmed. There is a paucity of epidemiological data in surgically confirmed cases for this disorder. The purpose of this independently reviewed, retrospective, matched cohort analysis was to compare the demographics and incidence of comorbidities of patients who underwent lumbar decompression for SEL vs degenerative stenosis without SEL. Two surgeons' databases were reviewed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent decompression surgery for magnetic resonance imaging-verified, symptomatic lumbar SEL. A matched control group comprised an equal number of patients with degenerative stenosis (n=14). Demographic data, body mass index, symptom type/duration, comorbidities, complications, treatment history, and associated pathology were collected from medical records. Previously suggested risk factors, such as obesity, endocrinopathy, and epidural steroid injections, were not significantly different between the SEL and control groups. Furthermore, there were no differences in operative times, complications, or blood loss. The only noted difference between the 2 groups was the preoperative duration of symptoms, on average double in patients with SEL. This series represents the largest of its kind reported to date. Because symptom duration was the only difference noted, it is postulated to be the result of lack of awareness of SEL. Future prospective study in a larger group of patients is warranted. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):163-168.]. PMID:27018608

  17. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  18. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  19. Accidental epidural injection of thiopental in a dog.

    PubMed

    O'Kell, Allison L; Ambros, Barbara

    2010-03-01

    A 3-year-old Labrador retriever was presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine for a tibial plateau levelling osteotomy. While performing a pre-operative epidural, thiopental was inadvertently administered into the epidural space. Treatment included epidural saline flushing and intravenous methylprednisolone sodium succinate. No neurologic deficits were detected. PMID:20514256

  20. Accidental epidural injection of thiopental in a dog

    PubMed Central

    O’Kell, Allison L.; Ambros, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    A 3-year-old Labrador retriever was presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine for a tibial plateau levelling osteotomy. While performing a pre-operative epidural, thiopental was inadvertently administered into the epidural space. Treatment included epidural saline flushing and intravenous methylprednisolone sodium succinate. No neurologic deficits were detected. PMID:20514256

  1. Epidural cortical stimulation and aphasia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cherney, Leora R.; Harvey, Richard L.; Babbitt, Edna M.; Hurwitz, Rosalind; Kaye, Rosalind C.; Lee, Jaime B.; Small, Steven. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several methods of delivering cortical brain stimulation to modulate cortical excitability and interest in their application as an adjuvant strategy in aphasia rehabilitation after stroke is growing. Epidural cortical stimulation, although more invasive than other methods, permits high frequency stimulation of high spatial specificity to targeted neuronal populations. Aims First, we review evidence supporting the use of epidural cortical stimulation for upper limb recovery after focal cortical injury in both animal models and human stroke survivors. These data provide the empirical and theoretical platform underlying the use of epidural cortical stimulation in aphasia. Second, we summarize evidence for the application of epidural cortical stimulation in aphasia. We describe the procedures and primary outcomes of a safety and feasibility study (Cherney, Erickson & Small, 2010), and provide previously unpublished data regarding secondary behavioral outcomes from that study. Main Contribution In a controlled study comparing epidural cortical stimulation plus language treatment (CS/LT) to language treatment alone (LT), eight stroke survivors with nonfluent aphasia received intensive language therapy for 6 weeks. Four of these participants also underwent surgical implantation of an epidural stimulation device which was activated only during therapy sessions. Behavioral data were collected before treatment, immediately after treatment, and at 6 and 12 weeks following the end of treatment. The effect size for the primary outcome measure, the Western Aphasia Battery Aphasia Quotient, was benchmarked as moderate from baseline to immediately post-treatment, and large from baseline to the 12-week follow-up. Similarly, effect sizes obtained at the 12-week follow-up for the Boston Naming Test, the Communicative Effectiveness Index, and for correct information units on a picture description task were greater than those obtained immediately post treatment

  2. Unusual Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis and Lumbosacral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Picazo, David; Ramírez Villaescusa, José

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural lipomatosis is most frequently observed in patients on chronic steroid treatment. Only a few idiopathic epidural lipomatosis cases have been described. Material and Methods. 64-year-old male patient presented with low back pain and left leg pain. Later, the patient experienced neurogenic claudication and radicular pain in the left leg without urinary dysfunction. Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an abnormal fat tissue overgrowth in the epidural space with compression of the dural sac, degenerative disc disease at L4-L5 level, and instability at L5-S1. Endocrinopathic diseases and chronic steroid therapy were excluded. If conservative treatment failed, surgical treatment can be indicated. Results. After surgery, there was a gradual improvement in symptoms and signs, and six months later the patient returned to daily activities and was neurologically normal. Conclusion. In the absence of common causes of neurogenic claudication, epidural lipomatosis should be considered. The standard test for the diagnosis of epidural lipomatosis is magnetic resonance (MR). At first, conservative treatment must be considered; weight loss and the suspension of prior corticosteroid therapy are indicated. In the presence of neurological impairment, the operative treatment of wide surgical decompression must be performed soon after diagnosis. PMID:27069704

  3. Epidural methadone results in dose-dependent analgesia in cancer pain, further enhanced by epidural dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Lauretti, G R; Rizzo, C C; Mattos, A L; Rodrigues, S W

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate the role of epidural methadone-lidocaine in cancer pain combined or not to epidural dexamethasone. Methods: In all, 72 cancer patients, 32- to 67-year-old were randomized to six groups (n=12) and prospectively studied to examine analgesia and adverse effects for 3 weeks. Patients received single-dose protocol epidural test drugs: Control group (CG) received epidural 40-mg lidocaine diluted to 10-ml volume with saline. Dexamethasone group (DG) 40-mg lidocaine plus 10-mg dexamethasone. The 2.5MetG 2.5-mg epidural methadone with 40-mg lidocaine; the 5MetG, 5-mg epidural methadone plus 40-mg lidocaine, the 7.5MetG, 7.5-mg epidural methadone plus 40-mg lidocaine and finally the 7.5Met-DexG, 7.5-mg methadone with 40-mg lidocaine and 10-mg dexamethasone. Results: Groups CG, DG and 2.5MetG were similar regarding analgesia and side effects. Patients from 5MetG and 7.5MetG took 3±1 and 5±1 days, respectively, to restart oral morphine. Patients from 7.5MetDG took 14±2 to restart oral morphine (P<0.001). Daily somnolence and appetite improved in the 7.5MetDG during 2-week evaluation (P<0.005). Fatigue improved for both DG and 7.5MetDG during 2-week evaluation (P<0.005). By the third week of evaluation, all patients were similar. Conclusions: Epidural methadone plus lidocaine resulted in dose-dependent analgesia, further improved by epidural dexamethasone, which also improved fatigue. PMID:23322191

  4. Nicotine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... patches are used to help people stop smoking cigarettes. They provide a source of nicotine that reduces ... cause harm to the fetus.do not smoke cigarettes or use other nicotine products while using nicotine ...

  5. Diclofenac Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... and making sure not to cut the zipper seal just below it. Pull apart the zipper seal on the envelope and remove one patch. Reseal the envelope by squeezing the zipper seal together. Make sure the envelope is closed tightly ...

  6. Lidocaine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... patches are used to relieve the pain of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN; the burning, stabbing pains, or ... in your eye, wash it with plenty of water or saline solution. Wash your hands after handling ...

  7. Rotigotine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... that causes difficulties with movement, muscle control, and balance) including shaking of parts of the body, stiffness, slowed movements, and problems with balance. Rotigotine transdermal patches are also used to treat ...

  8. Methylphenidate Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... for ADHD, which may include counseling and special education. Make sure to follow all of your doctor's ... that was covered by the patch seizures motion tics or verbal tics believing things that are not ...

  9. DyninstAPI Patches

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-04-01

    We are seeking a code review of patches against DyninstAPI 8.0. DyninstAPI is an open source binary instrumentation library from the University of Wisconsin and University of Maryland. Our patches port DyninstAPI to the BlueGene/P and BlueGene/Q systems, as well as fix DyninstAPI bugs and implement minor new features in DyninstAPI.

  10. FNAL system patching design

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Jack; Lilianstrom, Al; Romero, Andy; Dawson, Troy; Sieh, Connie; /Fermilab

    2004-01-01

    FNAL has over 5000 PCs running either Linux or Windows software. Protecting these systems efficiently against the latest vulnerabilities that arise has prompted FNAL to take a more central approach to patching systems. Due to different levels of existing support infrastructures, the patching solution for linux systems differs from that of windows systems. In either case, systems are checked for vulnerabilities by Computer Security using the Nessus tool.

  11. Tunable circular patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, G.-L.; Sengupta, D. L.

    1985-10-01

    A method to control the resonant or operating frequencies of circular patch antennas has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. It consists of the placement of passive metallic or tuning posts at approximate locations within the input region of the antenna. Comparison of measured and analytical results seems to establish the validity of a theoretical model proposed to determine the input performance of such circular patch antennas.

  12. The Sacral Hiatus Approach for Drainage of Anterior Lumbo-Sacral Epidural Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, M.S.; Ospina, J.; Suzuki, S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Lumbosacral epidural abscesses are managed either conservatively with IV antibiotics or with open surgery, particularly in the presence of acute neurological symptoms. Their location makes it difficult for image-guided interventional approaches either for biopsy or evacuation. We report the sacral hiatus and canal as a corridor for image-guided minimally invasive abscess of lumbosacral epidural abscess for aspiration. A 56-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of six weeks of worsening low back pain. MRI of the patient’s lumbosacral spine showed osteomyelitis involving his L5, S1 vertebrae, L5-S1 discitis, as well as an anterior epidural abscess extending from L4-5 disc space to the S2 vertebral level. Blood cultures grew out gram-positive cocci. For drainage, a 5-French micropuncture kit was utilized to access the hiatus. Under fluoroscopic guidance a microwire was then advanced along the sacral canal. An 18-gauge needle curved to approximate the contours of the sacral canal was then advanced over the guidewire. Once anatomic access was established 2 ml of thick purulent material was aspirated. The patient tolerated the procedure well, and no focal nerve root symptoms were noted following the procedure. Image-guided aspiration of lumbosacral epidural abscesses can thus be carried out in a safe and effective manner using a sacral hiatus approach. PMID:22192554

  13. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  14. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  15. Retrograde Epidural Catheter Relieves Intractable Sacral Pain.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ruchir; Shodhan, Shivam; Hosny, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT) drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a "band of anesthesia" which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique. PMID:27162431

  16. Retrograde Epidural Catheter Relieves Intractable Sacral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ruchir; Shodhan, Shivam; Hosny, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT) drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a “band of anesthesia” which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique. PMID:27162431

  17. Postpartum septic sacroiliitis coincident with labour epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, J M

    2008-11-01

    A 22-year-old woman presented to hospital 10 days after emergency caesarean section with severe back pain, fever tachycardia and a raised C-reactive protein. She had received labour epidural analgesia and was investigated for an epidural abscess. After repeat magnetic resonance imaging she was ultimately diagnosed with septic sacroiliitis. Although an uncommon cause of back pain, pregnancy-associated sacroiliitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of post-epidural back pain, as the presentation and symptoms of an epidural infection and sacroiliitis are similar. We recommend imaging to include the sacroiliac joints when considering the diagnosis of an epidural collection. PMID:19115661

  18. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery. PMID:26597606

  19. Solitary spinal epidural cavernous haemangiomas as a rare cause of myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Shamji, Mohammed F

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas rarely occur in the spinal epidural space. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who presented with myelopathy secondary to spinal cord compression from a purely epidural lesion. The imaging characteristics of cavernous haemangiomas are unique, reflecting a highly vascular lesion. Key differentiating features from intracranial or intramedullary lesions include the lack of a surrounding hemosiderin ring and popcorn appearance. An urgent referral to a neurosurgeon is recommended given the possibility of acute neurological deterioration from intralesional haemorrhage, and good recovery from early surgical resection. Preoperative planning with thorough patient counselling and availability of matched blood is important, and an en bloc resection approach should be taken to minimise blood loss. In this case, the patient experienced complete recovery after surgical resection. No recurrence after complete resection has been reported in the literature. This suggests a good long-term outcome for the patient and that no early adjuvant therapy is necessary. PMID:26409007

  20. [Epidural angiolipoma and multiple familial lipomatosis].

    PubMed

    Bordet, R; Ghawche, F; Destée, A

    1991-01-01

    In a 35-year old woman presenting familial multiple lipomatosis, spastic paraparesis developed and became worse under tetracosactide therapy. Signs of spinal cord compression at T3 were present. CT and MRI revealed a fat-containing epidural tumour (angiolipoma). The association of angiolipoma with familial multiple lipomatosis has not yet been reported. This association supports the theory that angiolipomas are hamartomatous lesions. The deterioration observed under tetracosactide suggests that iatrogenic epidural lipomatosis is due to the development of a pre-existing lipoma. PMID:1775830

  1. Sperm Patch-Clamp

    PubMed Central

    Lishko, Polina; Clapham, David E.; Navarro, Betsy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2014-01-01

    Sperm intracellular pH and calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) are two central factors that control sperm activity within the female reproductive tract. As such, the ion channels of the sperm plasma membrane that alter intracellular sperm [Ca2+] and pH play important roles in sperm physiology and the process of fertilization. Indeed, sperm ion channels regulate sperm motility, control sperm chemotaxis toward the egg in some species, and may trigger the acrosome reaction. Until recently, our understanding of these important molecules was rudimentary due to the inability to patch-clamp spermatozoa and directly record the activity of these ion channels under voltage clamp. Recently, we overcame this technical barrier and developed a method for reproducible application of the patch-clamp technique to mouse and human spermatozoa. This chapter covers important aspects of application of the patch-clamp technique to spermatozoa, such as selection of the electrophysiological equipment, isolation of spermatozoa for patch-clamp experiments, formation of the gigaohm seal with spermatozoa, and transition into the whole-cell mode of recording. We also discuss potential pitfalls in application of the patch-clamp technique to flagellar ion channels. PMID:23522465

  2. Epidural abscess in an obstetric patient with patient-controlled epidural analgesia--a case report.

    PubMed

    Chiang, H L; Chia, Y Y; Chen, Y S; Hung, C C; Liu, K; Lo, Y

    2005-07-01

    We present the case of a 37-year-old pregnant woman who underwent a cesarean section due to previous cesarean delivery. Spinal anesthesia was performed at the L2-3 intervertebral space with an epidural catheter inserted at L1-2 for postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia. When the epidural catheter was removed on day three, an area of redness round the entry point was noted and the patient complained of low back pain, but was discharged from hospital. Later the same day, she felt backache so severe that she was unable to stand up or bend her body. She called for help and was sent to our emergency room. Physicians noted a small amount of discharge from the insertion site, and the body temperature was elevated to 38 degrees C. An anesthesiologist and an infectious disease specialist were consulted, and an epidural abscess was suspected. Urgent magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural abscess at L1-2. After five days of unsuccessful treatment with oxacillin, a 28-day course of vancomycin, followed by two months of oral fusidic acid, resulted in complete remission of the epidural abscess. The patient has remained free of neurologic deficit. PMID:15993774

  3. Fluoroscopic analysis of lumbar epidural contrast spread after retrograde interlaminar ventral epidural injection (RIVEI)

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji Seon; Woo, Jung Pil; Shim, Jae Hang

    2013-01-01

    Background Retrograde interlaminar ventral epidural injection (RIVEI) may hypothetically be more effective if the catheter is placed at the ventrocaudal aspect of the exiting nerve. We tested that hypothesis by measuring ventral and dorsal epidural contrast flow during RIVEI. Methods To perform RIVEI, a 17 G Tuohy needle was inserted to access the epidural space. A 19 G epidural catheter was inserted and advanced through the needle, passing in a caudal direction to the lower aspect of the contralateral pedicle. Fluoroscopic images were recorded at 1.5 ml increments of contrast. Based on the images of contrast dispersal, the extent of contrast spreading was assessed in 82 patients. Results All 82 patients (100%) injected with 3.0 ml contrast medium demonstrated ventral epidural spreading. Mean spreading level from the catheter tip was 2.21 ± 0.93 with 3.0 ml of contrast. Spreading to the superior aspect of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc was observed in 67/82 (81.7%) of RIVEIs with 3.0 ml of contrast injected into the ventral epidural space. We found that 3.0 ml of contrast reached the inferior aspect of the infra-adjacent intervertebral disc in 95.1% (78/82) of RIVEIs performed. Conclusions Our findings imply that a one-level RIVEI may be sufficient in situations where a two-level injection would currently be used. PMID:24363846

  4. The Influence of Oral Carbohydrate Solution Intake on Stress Response before Total Hip Replacement Surgery during Epidural and General Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Çeliksular, M. Cem; Saraçoğlu, Ayten; Yentür, Ercüment

    2016-01-01

    Objective The effects of oral carbohydrate solutions, ingested 2 h prior to operation, on stress response were studied in patients undergoing general or epidural anaesthesia. Methods The study was performed on 80 ASA I–II adult patients undergoing elective total hip replacement, which were randomized to four groups (n=20). Group G patients undergoing general anaesthesia fasted for 8 h preoperatively; Group GN patients undergoing general anaesthesia drank oral carbohydrate solutions preoperatively; Group E patients undergoing epidural anaesthesia fasted for 8 h and Group EN patients undergoing epidural anaesthesia drank oral carbohydrate solutions preoperatively. Groups GN and EN drank 800 mL of 12.5% oral carbohydrate solution at 24:00 preoperatively and 400 mL 2 h before the operation. Blood samples were taken for measurements of glucose, insulin, cortisol and IL-6 levels. Results The effect of preoperative oral carbohydrate ingestion on blood glucose levels was not significant. Insulin levels 24 h prior to surgery were similar; however, insulin levels measured just before surgery were 2–3 times higher in groups GN and EN than in groups G and E. Insulin levels at the 24th postoperative hour in epidural groups were increased compared to those at basal levels, although general anaesthesia groups showed a decrease. From these measurements, only the change in Group EN was statistically significant (p<0.05). Plasma cortisol levels at the 2nd peroperative hour were higher in epidural groups than in general anaesthesia groups. Both anaesthesia techniques did not have an effect on IL-6 levels. Conclusion We concluded that epidural anaesthesia suppressed stress response, although preoperative oral carbohydrate nutrition did not reveal a significant effect on surgical stress response. PMID:27366573

  5. Epidural analgesia, neonatal care and breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Zuppa, Antonio Alberto; Alighieri, Giovanni; Riccardi, Riccardo; Cavani, Maria; Iafisco, Alma; Cota, Francesco; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our study is to evaluate the correlation between epidural analgesia during labor, start of breastfeeding and type of maternal-neonatal care.Two different assistance models were considered: Partial and Full Rooming-in.In this cohort study, 2480 healthy infants were enrolled, 1519 in the Partial Rooming-in group and 1321 in the Full Rooming-in group; 1223 were born to women subjected to epidural analgesia in labor.In case of Partial Rooming-in the rate of exclusive or prevailing breastfeeding is significant more frequent in newborns born to mothers who didn't receive analgesia. Instead, in case of Full Rooming-in the rate of exclusive or prevailing breastfeeding is almost the same and there's no correlation between the use or not of epidural analgesia.The good start of lactation and the success of breastfeeding seems to be guaranteed by the type of care offered to the couple mother-infant, that reverses any possible adverse effects of the use of epidural analgesia in labor. PMID:25432659

  6. [A rare complication of labor epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Vazin, Mojgan Hosseini

    2008-06-16

    This case describes a patient who developed a complete right hemiparesis with ptosis of eyelid, trigeminus and facial paresis following a routine epidural analgesia for labor. A subdural deposit of the local anaesthetic might be the cause of these symptoms. The pathogenesis of these symptoms as well as the diagnoses and treatment of the condition is discussed. PMID:18565319

  7. STS-62 crew patch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The STS-62 crew patch depicts the world's first reusable spacecraft on its sixteenth flight. Columbia is in its entry-interface attitude as it prepares to return to Earth. The varied hues of the rainbow on the horizon connote the varied, but complementary, nature of all the payloads united on this mission. The upward-pointing vector shape of the patch is symbolic of America's reach for excellence in its unswerving pursuit to explore the frontiers of space. The brilliant sunrise just beyond Columbia suggests the promise that research in space holds for the hopes and dreams of future generations. The STS-62 insignia was designed by Mark Pestana.

  8. Image inpainting by patch propagation using patch sparsity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zongben; Sun, Jian

    2010-05-01

    This paper introduces a novel examplar-based inpainting algorithm through investigating the sparsity of natural image patches. Two novel concepts of sparsity at the patch level are proposed for modeling the patch priority and patch representation, which are two crucial steps for patch propagation in the examplar-based inpainting approach. First, patch structure sparsity is designed to measure the confidence of a patch located at the image structure (e.g., the edge or corner) by the sparseness of its nonzero similarities to the neighboring patches. The patch with larger structure sparsity will be assigned higher priority for further inpainting. Second, it is assumed that the patch to be filled can be represented by the sparse linear combination of candidate patches under the local patch consistency constraint in a framework of sparse representation. Compared with the traditional examplar-based inpainting approach, structure sparsity enables better discrimination of structure and texture, and the patch sparse representation forces the newly inpainted regions to be sharp and consistent with the surrounding textures. Experiments on synthetic and natural images show the advantages of the proposed approach. PMID:20129864

  9. Nitroglycerin Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... verapamil (Calan, Isoptin); ergot-type medications such as bromocriptine (Parlodel), cabergoline, dihydroergotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal), ... at any time, especially if you have been drinking alcoholic beverages. To ... during your treatment with nitroglycerin patches.you should know that you ...

  10. Pharmacokinetics of lidocaine delivered from a transmucosal patch in children.

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Andrea; Wilson, Stephen; Weaver, Joel S.; Moursi, Amr M.

    2002-01-01

    The DentiPatch lidocaine transoral delivery system (Noven Pharmaceuticals) is indicated for mild topical anesthesia of mucosal membranes in the mouth. The DentiPatch is a mucoadhesive patch containing 46.1 mg of lidocaine (20% concentration). Current studies in adults report that DentiPatch application produces very low plasma concentrations of lidocaine. However, it is not known what plasma levels are obtained when the same dosage is used in children. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the plasma lidocaine concentrations generated by the DentiPatch are within a safe range for children. The sample in this study was 11 children aged 2-7 years requiring general anesthesia for comprehensive dental care. A lidocaine DentiPatch was placed on the buccal mucosa above the maxillary incisors for 5 minutes. Blood samples were drawn before placing the DentiPatch and at various time intervals after removing it. Blood samples were analyzed by fluorescence polarization immunoassay to determine the plasma concentrations of lidocaine and its major metabolite, monoethylglycinexylidide. The lidocaine and monoethylglycinexylidide absorbed from the DentiPatch did not reach toxic plasma levels in children. However, plasma concentrations were much higher than in adults and were high enough to require inclusion in the calculation of total lidocaine administered to a pediatric patient. Images Figure 1 PMID:15384296

  11. [Effects of epidural analgesia combined with general anesthesia on hemodynamics during neck surgery].

    PubMed

    Arakawa, M; Amemiya, N; Nagai, K; Kato, S; Goto, F

    1993-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of epidural analgesia combined with general anesthesia on hemodynamics. Thirty patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of cancer of the neck were studied. The patients were divided into two groups of those who received epidural analgesia combined with general anesthesia group (Group 1) and those with general anesthesia alone (Group 2). Blood pressure was not different between the groups. But heart rate and rate pressure products in Group 1 were significantly lower than those of Group 2. CVP in Group 1 increased significantly to 10.1 +/- 2.9 mmHg during surgery from 6.8 +/- 1.8 mmHg at the beginning of the surgery. There was no difference in intraoperative blood loss and the amount of fluid infused between the two groups. These results suggest that epidural anesthesia combined with general anesthesia is effective to stabilize hemodynamics during cervical surgery, but we have to be careful about using local anesthetics during long cervical procedures, because it increases CVP which might result from the depression of cardiac function. PMID:8230698

  12. The effect of epidural anaesthesia with 1% lidocaine on the pressor response to dynamic exercise in man.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, D B; Brennum, J; Sztuk, F; Hansen, O B; Clifford, P S; Bach, F W; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Mitchell, J H; Secher, N H

    1993-01-01

    1. In order to examine the sensitivity to local anaesthetics of afferent neural feedback from working muscle during dynamic exercise, sixteen subjects cycled for 12 min before and after epidural anaesthesia using 1% lidocaine. The presence of afferent neural blockade was verified by elimination of the blood pressure response to a cold pressor test, laser-induced evoked potentials and increases in pain detection and tolerance thresholds of the foot. Conversely, epidural anaesthesia had no effect on these variables in the unblocked skin areas or on electrically evoked potentials in blocked or unblocked skin. 2. During dynamic exercise, heart rate increased as did mean arterial pressure and cardiac output. Mean arterial pressure remained at the exercise level during post-exercise ischaemia, but heart rate and cardiac output decreased while total peripheral resistance increased. Epidural anaesthesia did not significantly affect these variables during rest, dynamic exercise, post-exercise ischaemia or recovery. 3. The results of this study show that, in order to affect blood pressure during dynamic exercise, epidural anaesthesia must block the pressor response to post-exercise ischaemia. The implication of these data is that complete or almost complete block of group III and/or group IV muscle afferents is necessary to inhibit the pressor response to dynamic exercise in man. PMID:8308749

  13. Lab in a needle for epidural space identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, B.; Micco, A.; Ricciardi, A.; Amorizzo, E.; Mercieri, M.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2016-05-01

    This work relies on the development of a sensorized medical needle with an all-optical guidance (Lab in a Needle) system for epidural space identification. The device is based on the judicious integration of a Fiber Bragg grating sensor inside the lumen of an epidural needle to discriminate between different types of tissue and thus providing continuous and real time measurements of the pressure experienced by the needle tip during its advancement. Experiments carried out on an epidural training phantom demonstrate the validity of our approach for the correct and effective identification of the epidural space.

  14. Key safety considerations when administering epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Benyamin, Ramsin M

    2015-01-01

    Neurological and other complications of epidural steroid injections have been widely discussed in recent years. Consequently, the US FDA issued a warning about serious neurological events, some resulting in death, and consequently is requiring label changes. Neurological adverse events numbering 131, including 41 cases of arachnoiditis, have been identified by the FDA, and 700 cases of fungal meningitis following injection of contaminated steroids. A review of the literature reveals an overwhelming proportion of the complications are related to transforaminal epidural injections, with the majority of them to cervical transforaminal epidural injections. This perspective describes the prevalence of administering epidural injections, complications, pathoanatomy, mechanism of injury and various preventive strategies. PMID:26059467

  15. [Patch testing: historical aspects].

    PubMed

    Lachapelle, J-M

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the key points in the history of patch testing, which spans more than a century, starting with the first description of the method by J. Jadassohn in 1895. Special attention is paid to the contribution of French schools in this field, which led to the foundation of the Groupe d'études et de recherches en dermato-allergologie (GERDA). PMID:19686889

  16. Polymer concrete patching manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, J. J.; Bartholomew, J.

    1982-06-01

    The practicality of using polymer concrete to repair deteriorated portland cement concrete bridge decks and pavements was demonstrated. This manual outlines the procedures for using polymer concrete as a rapid patching material to repair deteriorated concrete. The process technology, materials, equipment, and safety provisions used in manufacturing and placing polymer concrete are discussed. Potential users are informed of the various steps necessary to insure successful field applications of the material.

  17. Epidural Abscess Masquerading as Lateral Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Brodner, David C.; Cutler, Jeff; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants, the evacuation of the sinus, or the use of medical treatment alone surrounds the treatment of lateral sinus thrombosis. Treatment of an epidural abscess associated with coalescent mastoiditis is much less controversial-drainage is usually recommended. The differing treatments of these complications mandate accurate diagnosis. The advent of more sophisticated radiological studies has facilitated diagnosis of these complications; however, tests are not infallible. We present three cases in which preoperative imaging demonstrates an epidural abscess mimicking lateral sinus thrombosis by compression of the vessel. A false-positive computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study may lead to the wrong diagnosis and, consequently, improper treatment. In light of this possibility, we recommend surgical exploration in all such cases. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171148

  18. Salmonella Typhi Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ying Ying; Chen, John L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of Salmonella infection. We report a case of a 57-year-old transgender male who presented with lower back pain for a period of one month following a fall. Physical examination only revealed tenderness over the lower back with no neurological deficits. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine revealed a spondylodiscitis at T10-T11 and T12-L1 and right posterior epidural collection at the T9-T10 level. He underwent decompression laminectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion of T8 to L3 vertebrae. Intraoperatively, he was found to have acute-on-chronic osteomyelitis in T10 and T11, epidural abscess, and discitis in T12-L1. Tissue and wound culture grew Salmonella Typhi and with antibiotics susceptibility guidance he was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for a period of six weeks. He recovered well with no neurological deficits. PMID:27034871

  19. Growing vortex patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowdy, Darren; Marshall, Jonathan

    2004-08-01

    This paper demonstrates that two well-known equilibrium solutions of the Euler equations—the corotating point vortex pair and the Rankine vortex—are connected by a continuous branch of exact solutions. The central idea is to "grow" new vortex patches at two stagnation points that exist in the frame of reference of the corotating point vortex pair. This is done by generalizing a mathematical technique for constructing vortex equilibria first presented by Crowdy [D. G. Crowdy, "A class of exact multipolar vortices," Phys. Fluids 11, 2556 (1999)]. The solutions exhibit several interesting features, including the merging of two separate vortex patches via the development of touching cusps. Numerical contour dynamics methods are used to verify the mathematical solutions and reveal them to be robust structures. The general issue of how simple vortex equilibria can be continued continuously to more complicated ones with very different vortical topologies is discussed. The solutions are examples of exact solutions of the Euler equations involving multiple interacting vortex patches.

  20. Clonidine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... agonist hypotensive agents. It works by decreasing your heart rate and relaxing the blood vessels so that blood ... Your doctor may ask you to check your pulse (heart rate) daily and will tell you how ...

  1. Clonidine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... agonist hypotensive agents. It works by decreasing your heart rate and relaxing the blood vessels so that blood ... doctor may ask you to check your pulse (heart rate) daily and will tell you how rapid it ...

  2. Con-Patch: When a Patch Meets Its Context.

    PubMed

    Romano, Yaniv; Elad, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Measuring the similarity between the patches in images is a fundamental building block in various tasks. Naturally, the patch size has a major impact on the matching quality and on the consequent application performance. Under the assumption that our patch database is sufficiently sampled, using large patches (e.g., 21 × 21 ) should be preferred over small ones (e.g., 7 × 7 ). However, this dense-sampling assumption is rarely true; in most cases, large patches cannot find relevant nearby examples. This phenomenon is a consequence of the curse of dimensionality, stating that the database size should grow exponentially with the patch size to ensure proper matches. This explains the favored choice of small patch size in most applications. Is there a way to keep the simplicity and work with small patches while getting some of the benefits that large patches provide? In this paper, we offer such an approach. We propose to concatenate the regular content of a conventional (small) patch with a compact representation of its (large) surroundings-its context. Therefore, with a minor increase of the dimensions (e.g., with additional ten values to the patch representation), we implicitly/softly describe the information of a large patch. The additional descriptors are computed based on a self-similarity behavior of the patch surrounding. We show that this approach achieves better matches, compared with the use of conventional-size patches, without the need to increase the database-size. Also, the effectiveness of the proposed method is tested on three distinct problems: 1) external natural image denoising; 2) depth image super-resolution; and 3) motion-compensated frame-rate up conversion. PMID:27295669

  3. Con-Patch: When a Patch Meets Its Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Yaniv; Elad, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Measuring the similarity between patches in images is a fundamental building block in various tasks. Naturally, the patch-size has a major impact on the matching quality, and on the consequent application performance. Under the assumption that our patch database is sufficiently sampled, using large patches (e.g. 21-by-21) should be preferred over small ones (e.g. 7-by-7). However, this "dense-sampling" assumption is rarely true; in most cases large patches cannot find relevant nearby examples. This phenomenon is a consequence of the curse of dimensionality, stating that the database-size should grow exponentially with the patch-size to ensure proper matches. This explains the favored choice of small patch-size in most applications. Is there a way to keep the simplicity and work with small patches while getting some of the benefits that large patches provide? In this work we offer such an approach. We propose to concatenate the regular content of a conventional (small) patch with a compact representation of its (large) surroundings - its context. Therefore, with a minor increase of the dimensions (e.g. with additional 10 values to the patch representation), we implicitly/softly describe the information of a large patch. The additional descriptors are computed based on a self-similarity behavior of the patch surrounding. We show that this approach achieves better matches, compared to the use of conventional-size patches, without the need to increase the database-size. Also, the effectiveness of the proposed method is tested on three distinct problems: (i) External natural image denoising, (ii) Depth image super-resolution, and (iii) Motion-compensated frame-rate up-conversion.

  4. Comparison of continuous epidural infusion and programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yunan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Jinlu; Yang, Ruimin; Liu, Jingchen

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate differences between continuous epidural infusion (CEI) and programmed intermittent epidural bolus (IEB) analgesia for the Chinese parturients undergoing spontaneous delivery and to approach their safety to parturients and neonates. Methods Two hundred healthy American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II, term (≥37 weeks’ gestation), nulliparous women who requested analgesia for labor were recruited. Epidural analgesia was initiated with a solution of 0.15% ropivacaine 10 mL and maintained with 0.1% ropivacaine mixed with sufentanil 0.3 μg/mL by CEI at a rate of 5 mL/h combined with a patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture or IEB of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture combined with a PCEA bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture. The lockout interval was 20 minutes in each arm between the CEI and the IEB group. After 20 minutes of first dosage, visual analog scale (VAS) score was obtained every 60 minutes. The maternal and fetal outcome and total consumption of analgesic solution were compared. Results There was no difference in demographic characteristics, duration of first and second stages, delivery methods, sensory block, fetal Apgar scores, and the maternal outcomes between the CEI and IEB groups. There was a significant difference in VAS scores and epidural ropivacaine total consumption between the two groups (IEB vs CEI: 51.27±9.61 vs 70.44±12.78 mg, P<0.01). Conclusion The use of programmed IEB mixed with PCEA improved labor analgesia compared to CEI mixed with PCEA, which could act as maintenance mode for epidural labor analgesia. PMID:27471390

  5. Epidural labour analgesia using Bupivacaine and Clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Syal, K; Dogra, RK; Ohri, A; Chauhan, G; Goel, A

    2011-01-01

    Background: To compare the effects of addition of Clonidine (60 μg) to Epidural Bupivacaine (0.125%) for labour analgesia, with regard to duration of analgesia, duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section, foetal outcome, patient satisfaction and side effects. Patients & Methods: On demand, epidural labour analgesia was given to 50 nulliparous healthy term parturients (cephalic presentation), divided in two groups randomly. Group I received bupivacaine (0.125%) alone, whereas Group II received bupivacaine (0.125%) along with Clonidine (60 μg). 10 ml of 0.125% bupivacaine was injected as first dose and further doses titrated with patient relief (Numerical Rating Scale <3). Top ups were given whenever Numerical Rating Scale went above 5. Results: There was statistically significant prolongation of duration of analgesia in Group II, with no difference in duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section or foetal outcome. Also clonidine gave dose sparing effect to bupivacaine and there was better patient satisfaction without any significant side effects in Group II. Conclusion: Clonidine is a useful adjunct to bupivacaine for epidural labour analgesia and can be considered as alternative to opioids. PMID:21804714

  6. Bilateral interpleural versus lumbar epidural bupivacaine-morphine analgesia for upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Demian, Atef D; Wahba, Ashraf M; Atia, Emad M; Hussein, Sami H

    2003-10-01

    This randomized study was designed to compare the effectiveness of bilateral interpleural analgesia with lumbar epidural analgesia, on postoperative pain relief in upper abdominal surgery. The studied patients were randomely allocated into either interpleural group "IP" (n = 15) or epidural group "EP" (n = 15). In "IP" group, preanesthetic bilateral interpleural block was done using a mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (0.8 mg/kg) and 2 mg morphine diluted to 50 ml saline for each side. In "EP" group, the same mixture-diluted in 20 ml saline-was injected in the epidural space (L2-3). The general anesthetic technique was the same in both groups. Hemodynamic, gasometric, verbal pain score (VPS) values and complications were compared in both techniques. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) readings were in the accepted normal range in the perioperative period although significant lower readings were detected in "EP" group. No significant differences were displayed in blood gasometric variables between the two groups. There were considerable level of analgesia in both groups in the postoperative period although "EP" analgesia was superior to "IP". More pain free patients (9 versus 4) and significant lower consumption of nalbuphine were detected in "EP" group. The results of this study indicate that bilateral "IP" analgesia may offer a satisfactory analgesia for upper abdominal surgery when the use of other analgesic techniques may be contraindicated. PMID:14740589

  7. Foetal heart rate deceleration with combined spinal-epidural analgesia during labour: a maternal haemodynamic cardiac study.

    PubMed

    Valensise, Herbert; Lo Presti, Damiano; Tiralongo, Grazia Maria; Pisani, Ilaria; Gagliardi, Giulia; Vasapollo, Barbara; Frigo, Maria Grazia

    2016-06-01

    To understand the mechanisms those are involved in the appearance of foetal heart rate decelerations (FHR) after the combined epidural analgesia in labour. Observational study done at University Hospital for 86-term singleton pregnant women with spontaneous labour. Serial bedside measurement of the main cardiac maternal parameters with USCOM technique; stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO) and total vascular resistances (TVR) inputting systolic and diastolic blood pressure before combined epidural analgesia and after 5', 10', 15' and 20 min. FHR was continuously recorded though cardiotocography before and after the procedure. Correlation between the appearance of foetal heart rate decelerations and the modification of maternal haemodynamic parameters. Fourteen out of 86 foetuses showed decelerations after the combined spino epidural procedure. No decelerations occurred in the women with low TVR (<1000 dyne/s/cm(-5)) at the basal evaluation. FHR abnormalities were concentrated in 39 women who presented elevated TVR values at the basal evaluation (>1200 dyne/s/cm(-5)). Soon after the epidural procedure, the absence of increase in SV and CO was observed in these women. No variations in systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were found. The level of TVR before combined epidural analgesia in labour may indicate the risk of FHR abnormalities after the procedure. Low TVR (<1000 dyne/s/cm(-5)) showed a reduced risk of FHR abnormalities. FHR decelerations seem to occur in women without the ability to upregulate SV and CO in response to the initial effects of analgesia. PMID:26333691

  8. Patch antenna terahertz photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Palaferri, D.; Todorov, Y. Chen, Y. N.; Madeo, J.; Vasanelli, A.; Sirtori, C.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.

    2015-04-20

    We report on the implementation of 5 THz quantum well photodetector exploiting a patch antenna cavity array. The benefit of our plasmonic architecture on the detector performance is assessed by comparing it with detectors made using the same quantum well absorbing region, but processed into a standard 45° polished facet mesa. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in responsivity, polarization insensitivity, and background limited performance. Peak detectivities in excess of 5 × 10{sup 12} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W have been obtained, a value comparable with that of the best cryogenic cooled bolometers.

  9. Paraplegia after epidural-general anesthesia in a Morquio patient with moderate thoracic spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Krane, Elliot J.; Tomatsu, Shunji; Theroux, Mary C.; Lee, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We describe an instance in which complete paraplegia was evident immediately postoperatively after apparently uneventful lumbar epidural-general anesthesia in a patient with Morquio Type A syndrome (Morquio A) with moderate thoracic spinal stenosis. Clinical features A 16-yr-old male with Morquio A received lumbar epidural-general anesthesia for bilateral distal femoral osteotomies. Preoperative imaging had revealed a stable cervical spine and moderate thoracic spinal stenosis with a mild degree of spinal cord compression. Systolic blood pressure (BP) was maintained within 20% of the pre-anesthetic baseline value. The patient sustained a severe thoracic spinal cord infarction. The epidural anesthetic contributed to considerable delay in the recognition of the diagnosis of paraplegia. Conclusion This experience leads us to suggest that, in patients with Morquio A, it may be prudent to avoid the use of epidural anesthesia without very firm indication, to support BP at or near baseline levels in the presence of even moderate spinal stenosis, and to avoid flexion or extension of the spinal column in intraoperative positioning. If the spinal cord/column status is unknown or if the patient is known to have any degree of spinal stenosis, we suggest that the same rigorous BP support practices that are typically applied in other patients with severe spinal stenosis, especially stenosis with myelomalacia, should apply to patients with Morquio A and that spinal cord neurophysiological monitoring should be employed. In the event that cord imaging is not available, e.g., emergency procedures, it would be prudent to assume the presence of spinal stenosis. PMID:25323122

  10. Idiopathic Lumbar Epidural Lipomatosis Mimicking Disc Herniation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Duran, Efe; Ilik, Kemal; Acar, Turker; Yıldız, Melda

    2016-05-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare condition which is described as the accumulation of fat in the extradural territory and often causes dural impingement. Spinal epidural lipomatosis has been implicated in causing a variety of neurologic impairments ranging from back pain, radiculopathy, claudication, myelopathy or even cauda equina syndrome. We report a 46-year-old female with obesity and a history of chronic back pain and radiculopathy who developed idiopathic Spinal epidural lipomatosis diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this report is to present a case of spinal epidural lipomatosis presenting with symptomatic cord compression and also remind this rare condition as a the differential diagnosis of epidural lesions in patients with risk factors. PMID:27309484

  11. Postoperative pain relief with epidural buprenorphine versus epidural butorphanol in laparoscopic hysterectomies: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Dona Elsa; Ganapathi, P.; Anish Sharma, N. G.; Shankaranarayana, P.; Aiyappa, D. S.; Nazim, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of postoperative analgesia with epidural buprenorphine and butorphanol tartrate. Methods: Sixty patients who were scheduled for elective laparoscopic hysterectomies were randomly enrolled in the study. At the end of the surgery, in study Group A 1 ml (0.3 mg) of buprenorphine and in Group B 1 ml (1 mg) of butorphanol tartrate both diluted to 10 ml with normal saline was injected through the epidural catheter. Visual analog pain scales (VAPSs) were assessed every hour till the 6th h, then 2nd hourly till the 12th h. To assess sedation, Ramsay sedation score was used. The total duration of postoperative analgesia was taken as the period from the time of giving epidural drug until the patients first complain of pain and the VAPS is more than 6. Patients were observed for any side effects such as respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting, hypotension, bradycardia, pruritus, and headache. Results: Buprenorphine had a longer duration of analgesia when compared to butorphanol tartrate (586.17 ± 73.64 vs. 342.53 ± 47.42 [P < 0.001]). Nausea, vomiting (13% vs. 10%), and headache (20% vs. 13%) were more in buprenorphine group; however, sedation score and pruritus (3% vs. 6%) were found to be more with butorphanol. Conclusion: Epidural buprenorphine significantly reduced pain and increased the quality of analgesia with a longer duration of action and was a better alternative to butorphanol for postoperative pain relief. PMID:26957696

  12. Statistics for Patch Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingee, K. L.

    2016-06-01

    In the application of remote sensing it is common to investigate processes that generate patches of material. This is especially true when using categorical land cover or land use maps. Here we view some existing tools, landscape pattern indices (LPI), as non-parametric estimators of random closed sets (RACS). This RACS framework enables LPIs to be studied rigorously. A RACS is any random process that generates a closed set, which encompasses any processes that result in binary (two-class) land cover maps. RACS theory, and methods in the underlying field of stochastic geometry, are particularly well suited to high-resolution remote sensing where objects extend across tens of pixels, and the shapes and orientations of patches are symptomatic of underlying processes. For some LPI this field already contains variance information and border correction techniques. After introducing RACS theory we discuss the core area LPI in detail. It is closely related to the spherical contact distribution leading to conditional variants, a new version of contagion, variance information and multiple border-corrected estimators. We demonstrate some of these findings on high resolution tree canopy data.

  13. Tiling Motion Patches.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyunglyul; Kim, Manmyung; Hwang, Youngseok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-05-01

    Simulating multiple character interaction is challenging because character actions must be carefully coordinated to align their spatial locations and synchronized with each other. We present an algorithm to create a dense crowd of virtual characters interacting with each other. The interaction may involve physical contacts, such as hand shaking, hugging, and carrying a heavy object collaboratively. We address the problem by collecting deformable motion patches, each of which describes an episode of multiple interacting characters, and tiling them spatially and temporally. The tiling of motion patches generates a seamless simulation of virtual characters interacting with each other in a non-trivial manner. Our tiling algorithm uses a combination of stochastic sampling and deterministic search to address the discrete and continuous aspects of the tiling problem. Our tiling algorithm made it possible to automatically generate highly-complex animation of multiple interacting characters. We achieved the level of complexity far beyond the current state-of-the-art animation techniques could generate, in terms of the diversity of human behaviors and the spatial/temporal density of interpersonal interactions. PMID:23669532

  14. Tiling motion patches.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyunglyul; Kim, Manmyung; Hwang, Youngseok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-11-01

    Simulating multiple character interaction is challenging because character actions must be carefully coordinated to align their spatial locations and synchronized with each other. We present an algorithm to create a dense crowd of virtual characters interacting with each other. The interaction may involve physical contacts, such as hand shaking, hugging, and carrying a heavy object collaboratively. We address the problem by collecting deformable motion patches, each of which describes an episode of multiple interacting characters, and tiling them spatially and temporally. The tiling of motion patches generates a seamless simulation of virtual characters interacting with each other in a nontrivial manner. Our tiling algorithm uses a combination of stochastic sampling and deterministic search to address the discrete and continuous aspects of the tiling problem. Our tiling algorithm made it possible to automatically generate highly complex animation of multiple interacting characters. We achieve the level of interaction complexity far beyond the current state of the art that animation techniques could generate, in terms of the diversity of human behaviors and the spatial/temporal density of interpersonal interactions. PMID:24029911

  15. Patched Conic Trajectory Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brooke Anderson; Wright, Henry

    2012-01-01

    PatCon code was developed to help mission designers run trade studies on launch and arrival times for any given planet. Initially developed in Fortran, the required inputs included launch date, arrival date, and other orbital parameters of the launch planet and arrival planets at the given dates. These parameters include the position of the planets, the eccentricity, semi-major axes, argument of periapsis, ascending node, and inclination of the planets. With these inputs, a patched conic approximation is used to determine the trajectory. The patched conic approximation divides the planetary mission into three parts: (1) the departure phase, in which the two relevant bodies are Earth and the spacecraft, and where the trajectory is a departure hyperbola with Earth at the focus; (2) the cruise phase, in which the two bodies are the Sun and the spacecraft, and where the trajectory is a transfer ellipse with the Sun at the focus; and (3) the arrival phase, in which the two bodies are the target planet and the spacecraft, where the trajectory is an arrival hyperbola with the planet as the focus.

  16. Management of infiltrating spinal epidural angiolipoma

    PubMed Central

    Nadi, Mustafa M.; Nadi, Arwa M.; Zabara, Mohammad Y.; Ahmad, Tahani M.

    2015-01-01

    Angiolipomas of the spine are rare benign tumors commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. The present report describes a case of spinal angiolipoma with thoracic mediastinal extension in a 50-year-old woman. She presented with a long-standing history of mid-back pain with progressive lower extremities weakness. An MRI showed a heterogeneously enhancing mass located in the posterior epidural space of the thoracic spine with mediastinal extension. Histopathological examination demonstrated features consistent with spinal angiolipoma. This report emphasizes the diagnosis and therapeutic management options of infiltrating spinal angiolipomas. PMID:25864069

  17. Bright patches on Ariel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Distinct bright patches are visible on Ariel, the brightest of Uranus' five largest satellites. Voyager 2 obtained this image Jan. 22, 1986, from a distance of 2.52 million kilometers (1.56 million miles). The clear-filter image, obtained with the narrow-angle camera, shows a resolution of 47 km (29 miles). Ariel is about 1,300 km (800 mi) in diameter. This image shows several distinct bright areas that reflect nearly 45 percent of the incident sunlight; on average, the satellite displays a reflectivity of about 25-30 percent. The bright areas are probably fresh water ice, perhaps excavated by impacts. The south pole of Ariel is slightly off center of the disk in this view. Voyager 2 will obtain its best views of the satellite on Jan. 24, at a closest-approach distance of 127,000 km (79,000 mi). The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  18. Granuloma annulare, patch type.

    PubMed

    Victor, Frank C; Mengden, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    A 64-year-old man was referred to the Bellevue Hospital Center Dermatology Clinic for evaluation of an asymptomatic eruption on his left inner arm, which had been present for 4 months and was unresponsive to topical anti-fungal therapy. One month after the initial eruption, 2 similar, asymptomatic lesions appeared on the right inner arm. The lesions were slowly expanding. A biopsy specimen from the left medial arm was consistent with interstitial granuloma annulare. The patient's clinical presentation was consistent with patch-type granuloma annulare. He was treated with a mid-potency topical glucocorticoid twice daily for 4 weeks without benefit. Since the eruption was asymptomatic, treatment was discontinued. PMID:18627757

  19. Buprenorphine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... other condition that caused high pressure inside your skull; biliary tract disease; slowed heartbeat; low blood pressure; ... overdose may include the following: small, pinpoint pupils (black circles in the center of the eye) extreme ...

  20. Diclofenac Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... transdermal diclofenac may cause swelling, ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestines. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  1. Depth of the thoracic epidural space in children.

    PubMed

    Masir, F; Driessen, J J; Thies, K C; Wijnen, M H; van Egmond, J

    2006-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia in anaesthetized children requires a meticulous technique and may have an increased success rate when the distance between skin and epidural space is known. The objective of this observational study was to measure the skin to epidural distance (SED) during thoracic epidural puncture in 61 children. The epidural puncture was performed using the loss of resistance technique with saline 0.9%. The distance from the needle tip to the point where the needle emerged from the skin was measured. The post-operative analgesia parameters were also measured. Skin to epidural distance correlated significantly with the age and weight of the children. The equation for the relation between SED (cm) and age was 2.15 + (0.01 x months) and for SED vs weight was 1.95 + (0.045 x kg). Despite considerable variability among individuals, the observed correlation of SED with both age and weight shows that this parameter may be helpful to guide thoracic epidural puncture in anaesthetized children. PMID:17067139

  2. Low-dose combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for cesarean delivery: a comparison of three plain local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Coppejans, H C; Vercauteren, M P

    2006-01-01

    The new local anesthetics have been poorly studied for intrathecal use during Cesarean section surely in low doses and in combination with an opioid substance. The purpose of the present study was to compare bupivacaine and the newer local anesthetics in equipotent doses. During the induction of combined spinal-epidural anesthesia, 91 elective Cesarean section patients were randomly assigned to receive a spinal injection of either 10 mg ropivacaine or 6.6 mg bupivacaine or levobupivacaine both combined with sufentanil 3.3 microg. After securing the epidural catheter patients were turned to the supine position respecting a 15 degrees left lateral tilt. The three local anesthetics were compared with respect to sensory and motor block, the need for epidural supplementation, the severity of hypotension and neonatal outcome. More patients in bupivacaine had a Bromage-3 motor block at incision. The ropivacaine group required additional local anesthetics by the epidural route in 23% of the cases versus 10% in the bupivacaine group and 9% with levobupivacaine. This caused the interval between the spinal injection and the end of surgery to be longer in the ropivacaine group. Hemodynamic values were comparable between the three groups although a trend towards better systolic blood pressures and a lower incidence of severe hypotension were noticed in favor of levobupivacaine. Apgar scores and umbilical pH values did not differ. When performing a low-dose combined spinal-epidural technique for Cesarean section, the present study confirms that the new local anesthetics can be used successfully, induce less motor block but that ropivacaine requires at least a 50% larger dose than bupivacaine or levobupivacaine. PMID:16617756

  3. General versus epidural anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Ulutas, Murat; Secer, Mehmet; Taskapilioglu, Ozgur; Karadas, Soner; Akyilmaz, Ahmet Aykut; Baydilek, Yunus; Kocamer, Betul; Ozboz, Ayse; Boyaci, Suat

    2015-08-01

    This study was a retrospective analysis of 850 lumbar microdiscectomy (LMD) under epidural anesthesia (EA; n=573) or general anesthesia (GA; n=277) performed by the same surgeon and paid by invoice to the Social Security Institution of the Turkish Republic between April 2003 and May 2013. Although GA is the most frequently used method of anesthesia during LMD, the choice of regional anesthetia (epidural, spinal or a combination of these) differs between surgeons and anesthetists. Studies have reported that EA in surgery for lumbar disc herniation may be more reliable than GA, as it enables the surgeon to communicate with the patient during surgery, but few studies have compared the costs of these two anesthetic methods in LMD. We found that EA patient costs were significantly lower than GA patient costs (p<0.01) and there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the time spent in the operating room (p<0.01). There was no difference in the duration of surgery (p>0.05). The anesthetic method used during LMD affected the complication rate, cost and efficiency of operating room use. We suggest that EA is an anesthetic method that can contribute to health care cost savings and enable LMD to be completed with less nerve root manipulation and more comfort, efficacy, reliability and cost efficiency without affecting the success rate of the surgical procedure. PMID:26067543

  4. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia for labor.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Stephen H; Carvalho, Brendan

    2009-03-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) for labor was introduced into clinical practice 20 yr ago. The PCEA technique has been shown to have significant benefits when compared with continuous epidural infusion. We conducted a systematic review using MEDLINE and EMBASE (1988-April 1, 2008) of all randomized, controlled trials in parturients who received PCEA in labor in which one of the following comparisons were made: background infusion versus none; ropivacaine versus bupivacaine; high versus low concentrations of local anesthetics; and new strategies versus standard strategies. The outcomes of interest were maternal analgesia, satisfaction, motor block, and the incidence of unscheduled clinician interventions. A continuous background infusion improved maternal analgesia and reduced unscheduled clinician interventions. Larger bolus doses (more than 5 mL) may provide better analgesia compared with small boluses. Low concentrations of bupivacaine or ropivacaine provide excellent analgesia without significant motor block. Many strategies with PCEA can provide effective labor analgesia. High volume, dilute local anesthetic solutions with a continuous background infusion appear to be the most successful strategy. Research into new delivery strategies, such as mandatory programmed intermittent boluses and computerized feedback dosing, is ongoing. PMID:19224805

  5. Cervical Epidural Abscess Mimicking as Stroke - Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Velpula, Jagan Mohana Reddy; Gakhar, Harinder; Sigamoney, Kohilavani; Bommireddy, Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a common provisional diagnosis in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with unilateral neurological deficit. Cervical epidural abscess (CEA) may also present clinically with a unilateral neurological deficit. Objects: To highlight the inherent problems with diagnosing cervical epidural abscess and possible consequences of delay in diagnosis. Case Report: We would like to highlight two cases provisionally diagnosed as stroke. Both cases turned out to be cervical epidural abscesses. The delay in diagnosis and treatment led to suboptimal outcome in both cases. Summary: Cases with suspected stroke who deteriorate while under treatment or whose diagnosis is doubtful should have MRI whole spine in order to avoid potential complications. PMID:24551026

  6. Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in β-thalassaemia intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Hoi; Li, Allen; Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old man known to have β-thalassaemia intermedia since childhood presented with bilateral lower limb weakness after spinal anaesthesia for an elective minor operation of his left leg. MRI and CT scans were performed to rule out acute epidural haematoma; coincidental imaging features of marrow hyperplasia and spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis were found. This article will present and discuss the imaging features, differential diagnosis, management and literature review of the rare occurrence of extramedullary haematopoiesis in the spinal epidural space. PMID:24390965

  7. [Epidural extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Rafael; Bernal-García, Luis Miguel; Pineda-Palomo, Manuel; Botana-Fernández, Marcos; Gilete-Tejero, Ignacio Javier; Cabezudo-Artero, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a malignant tumour of the bone that sometimes presents extraskeletal involvement, with the epidural location being rare. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with paresthesia, paresis and urinary retention. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an epidural mass from C6 to D3. Laminectomy from C7 to D2 and partial resection of the lesion was performed. Pathological analysis was consistent with Ewing sarcoma. The patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy, without evidence of disease at 8 months follow-up. A review of the literature on all published cases of extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma with epidural involvement is presented. PMID:25497289

  8. Stability of patch test allergens.

    PubMed

    Joy, Nicole Marie; Rice, Kristen R; Atwater, Amber Reck

    2013-01-01

    Patch testing is widely used in evaluating suspected contact dermatitis. One major component of a quality patch test result is a dependable, predictable allergen supply. The allergen needs to be present at a sufficient concentration to elicit a reaction in an allergic patient. To better understand the stability of patch-test allergens, we completed a systematic review of the literature. We found that there is variability in stability among patch-test allergens and that although a few have been shown to be stable, many degrade when in storage. In most cases, expiration dates should be honored. In addition, allergen panels should be prepared as close to the time of patch test application as is possible. PMID:24030367

  9. Nonintubated Thoracoscopic Lobectomy for Lung Cancer Using Epidural Anesthesia and Intercostal Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Hui; Chan, Kuang-Cheng; Liu, Ying-Ju; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chen, Ke-Cheng; Cheng, Ya-Jung; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intubated general anesthesia with single-lung ventilation has been considered mandatory for thoracoscopic lobectomy for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Few reports of thoracoscopic lobectomy without tracheal intubation are published, using either thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) or intercostal blockade. The comparisons of perioperative outcomes of nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy using epidural anesthesia and intercostal blockade are not reported previously. From September 2009 to August 2014, a total of 238 patients with lung cancer who underwent nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy were recruited from our prospectively maintained database of all patients undergoing nonintubated thoracoscopic surgery using TEA or intercostal blockade. A multiple regression analysis, adjusting for preoperative variables, was performed to compare the perioperative outcomes of the 2 anesthesia methods. Overall, 130 patients underwent nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy using epidural anesthesia whereas 108 had intercostal blockade. The 2 groups were similar in demographic data, except for sex, preoperative lung function, physical status classification, and history of smoking. After adjustment for the preoperative variables, nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy using intercostal blockade was associated with shorter durations of anesthetic induction and surgery (P < 0.001). Furthermore, hemodynamics were more stable with less use of vasoactive drugs (odds ratio: 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27 to 1.04; P = 0.064) and less blood loss (mean difference: −55.2 mL; 95% CI, −93 to −17.3; P = 0.004). Postoperatively, the 2 groups had comparable incidences of complications. Patients in the intercostal blockade group had a shorter average duration of chest tube drainage (P = 0.064) but a similar average length of hospital stay (P = 0.569). Conversion to tracheal intubation was required in 13 patients (5.5%), and no in-hospital mortality occurred

  10. P07.06A CASE OF BING-NEEL SYNDROME PRESENTING AS EPIDURAL METASTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Rigamonti, A.; Melzi, P.; Vismara, D.; Rossi, G.; Tetto, A.; Salmaggi, A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2005, a 63 year-old man with prior hypertension, started to complain persistent asthenia and weight loss. Blood tests revealed anemia and hypergammaglobulinemia. Immunoelectrophoresis confirmed the presence of monoclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM) with kappa light chain (34 g/L) in the serum. Multiple retroperitoneal lymphoadenopathies were detected. Bone marrow examination disclosed lymphoplasmocytic proliferation with small lymphocytes and plasmacytoid lymphocytes. The patient received 6 cycles of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab from November 2005 to July 2006 with partial remission. Maintenance therapy with monthly administration of rituximab was then performed from October 2006 to January 2007. In July 2011 a relapse occured and chemotheraphy with 2-CdA cladribine and rituximab was introduced with complete response. In January 2014 the patient came to our attention complaining a 2 month hystory of difficulties in walking, stifness in the legs, hand clumsiness and episodic urinary urgency. Neurological examination showed mild paraparesis, reduced proprioception in the legs without sensory levels, diffuse hyper-reflexia, bilateral Babinski sign and increased tone in the legs. Serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation confirmed a gamma band and monoclonal Ig M kappa light chains. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination revealed 96 cells/mm3 with 90% of lymphocytes, low glucose concentration (31 mg/dL) and increased protein level (1288 mg/dl). CSF cytology and flow cytometry proved negative for malignancy, there was T cell CD5+ predominance in the cells seen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed leptomeningeal enhancement along the brainstem. MRI of the spinal cord showed an enhancing epidural mass spanning levels C2-C4 causing spinal cord compression and associated with mild hyperintensity in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sequences at this level, moreover leptomeningeal enahncement along inferior cervical and upper dorsal spinal

  11. Ethinyl Estradiol and Norelgestromin Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... the skin. One patch is applied once a week for 3 weeks, followed by a patch-free week. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, ... new patch on the same day of the week (the Patch Change Day). Apply a new patch ...

  12. An injectable extracellular matrix for the reconstruction of epidural fat and the prevention of epidural fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Yi; Liu, Tse-Ying; Chen, Mei-Hsiu; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Chen, Ming-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Extensive epidural fibrosis is a common complication following spinal surgery and can cause pain and limited mobility. In the present study, a novel biomimetic approach was developed to prevent postsurgical adhesion of the dura. We aimed to reconstruct epidural fat, which prevents scar-tissue adhesion, through the development of an injectable decellularized adipose matrix (DAM)-containing hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel loaded with adipose stromal cells (ASCs). Injectable DAM was prepared from porcine adipose tissue by four freeze-thaw cycles with subsequent pepsin digestion. Residual analyses confirmed the efficacy of detergent-free decellularization, while most sulfated glycosaminoglycans and collagen were preserved. The Transwell migration assay demonstrated the anti-infiltrative property of the DAM-containing HA hydrogel. After 14 d of 3D culture, the DAM-containing HA hydrogel showed inductive potential in the adipogenic differentiation of ASCs. For an in vivo study, the ASC-loaded DAM-containing HA hydrogel (DAM/ASC-incorporated HA hydrogel) was injected into adult laminectomized male rats, and the results were assessed by microscopic histological examination. The in vivo data indicated that HA hydrogel, DAM, and ASCs were all required for the ability of the engineered fat tissue to block the invasion of the fibrous tissue. Our results suggested that this injectable DAM/ASC-incorporated HA hydrogel has potential applications in minimally invasive surgery for soft-tissue reconstruction and epidural fibrosis prevention. PMID:27271471

  13. Edge of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    On the night of 4 December 2013, a sequence of polar cap patches was captured by an all-sky airglow imager (ASI) in Longyearbyen, Norway (78.1°N, 15.5°E). The 630.0 nm airglow images from the ASI of 4 second exposure time, oversampled the emission of natural lifetime (with quenching) of at least ˜30 sec, introduce no observational blurring effects. By using such high-quality ASI images, we succeeded in visualizing an asymmetry in the gradients between the leading/trailing edges of the patches in a 2-D fashion. The gradient in the leading edge was found to be 2-3 times steeper than that in the trailing edge. We also identified fingerlike structures, appearing only along the trailing edge of the patches, whose horizontal scale size ranged from 55 to 210 km. These fingers are considered to be manifestations of plasma structuring through the gradient-drift instability (GDI), which is known to occur only along the trailing edge of patches. That is, the current 2-D observations visualized, for the first time, how GDI stirs the patch plasma and such a mixing process makes the trailing edge more gradual. This result strongly implies a close connection between the GDI-driven plasma stirring and the asymmetry in the large-scale shape of patches and then suggests that the fingerlike structures can be used as markers to estimate the fine-scale structure in the plasma flow within patches.

  14. Imaging diagnosis--Spinal epidural hemangiosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Añor, Sònia

    2014-01-01

    An 8-year-old, male Boxer was examined for an acute onset of ambulatory paraparesis. Neurologic examination was consistent with a T3-L3 myelopathy. Myelography revealed an extradural spinal cord compression in the region of the T10-T13 vertebrae. On magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a well-defined epidural mass lesion was detected. The mass was mildly hyperintense on T1-weighted, hyperintense on T2-weighted and STIR images compared to normal spinal cord and enhanced strongly and homogenously. Postmortem examination confirmed a primary epidural hemangiosarcoma. Findings indicated that the MRI characteristics of spinal epidural hemangiosarcoma may mimic other lesions including meningioma and epidural hemorrhages/hematomas of non-neoplastic etiology. PMID:23815770

  15. Epidural morphine for outpatients with severe anginal pain.

    PubMed Central

    Clemensen, S E; Thayssen, P; Hole, P

    1987-01-01

    Seven patients who had chronic coronary artery disease and had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery still suffered from anginal attacks several times daily despite optimal medical treatment. An epidural system of analgesia was implanted subcutaneously and treatment with epidural morphine started. The morphine was administered by the patients themselves or members of their family. During a median observation time of four months (range three to 11) all patients were free of pain while receiving this treatment. Images p476-a PMID:2435345

  16. Use of sedation and ropivacaine-morphine epidural for femoral head and neck ostectomy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Aarnes, T K; Hubbell, J A E; Hildreth, B E

    2014-06-01

    A five-year-old male German shepherd dog presented with traumatic craniodorsal luxation of the right coxofemoral joint with pre-existing moderate hip dysplasia. A femoral head and neck ostectomy was performed. The patient was sedated with acepromazine and morphine administered intramuscularly. A lumbosacral epidural was performed using a combination of morphine and ropivacaine. Intraoperatively, an infusion of medetomidine, morphine, lidocaine, and ketamine was administered intravenously, and oxygen was administered via facemask. Heart rate, respiratory rate and oscillometric arterial blood pressures were monitored. Postoperatively, carprofen was administered once subcutaneously. On the day of hospital discharge, carprofen and tramadol were administered orally every 12 hours. Twenty-one days later, the dog was doing well and the surgical staples were removed. Sedation with acepromazine and morphine, administration of an epidural containing morphine and ropivacaine, and intraoperative sedation with medetomidine, morphine, lidocaine and ketamine were suitable for femoral head and neck ostectomy. PMID:24602054

  17. Delayed Onset of Subdural Hematoma following Epidural Catheter Breakage

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Gotoh, Momokazu; Nishiwaki, Kimitoshi; Nagao, Yoshimasa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objectives To describe a case of delayed-onset spinal hematoma following the breakage of a spinal epidural catheter. Methods The authors describe the clinical case review. Results A 64-year-old woman had undergone epidural anesthesia 18 years before she was referred to our hospital because of lower-back pain and lower neurologic deficit with leg pain. The clinical examination showed the presence of a fragment of an epidural catheter in the thoracolumbar canal, as assessed by computed tomography, and a spinal hematoma that compressed the spinal cord at the same spinal level, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical removal of the epidural catheter and decompression surgery were performed. The patient exhibited substantial clinical improvement 1 month after surgery; she achieved a steady gait without the need for a cane and had no leg pain. Conclusion This is the first report of delayed onset of spinal hematoma following the breakage of an epidural catheter. Generally, when the breakage of an epidural catheter occurs without symptoms, follow-up alone is recommended. However, because spinal hematoma might exhibit a late onset, the possibility of this complication should be considered when deciding whether to remove the catheter fragment. We believe that in our patient, there could be a relationship between the catheter fragment and subdural hematoma, and catheter breakage could have been a risk factor for the spinal hematoma. PMID:26835209

  18. Effect of epidural analgesia on the primary cesarean rate.

    PubMed

    Gribble, R K; Meier, P R

    1991-08-01

    There is some concern that providing parturients with epidural analgesia increases the likelihood of cesarean delivery. Because of the widespread interest in cesarean rates and the expanding use of epidural analgesia, we believed that this contention should be assessed. Hospital records were reviewed to determine the primary cesarean rate for 1084 parturients who delivered at our institution during 15 months in which there was a 24-hour "on demand" epidural service. This was compared with our primary cesarean rate during 15 months in which epidural analgesia was not available, even on physician request. Because of the characteristics of our institution, this control group consisted of patients from the same population base managed by the same eight obstetricians using the same management techniques. For patients in labor, the primary cesarean rate overall was 9.0% before and 8.2% after the epidural service began (P = .626). When subpopulations based on parity and indication for cesarean delivery were studied, there were no significant changes in the cesarean rate. These results demonstrate that the availability of on-demand epidural analgesia for patients in labor did not increase the primary cesarean rate, either in the aggregate or for any of the subpopulations studied. PMID:2067767

  19. [Update on prevention of epidural adhesion after lumbar laminectomy].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ming-xuan; Hong, Dun

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative epidural adhesion is one of the most common causes of failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), which can lead to back and leg pain or neurological deficit. Prevention of epidural adhesion after laminectomy is critical for improving the outcomes of lumbar surgery. The main origins of epidural fibrosis are raw surface of erector muscles and rupture fibers of intervertebral disc. The main current preventive methods for epidural adhesion include the usage of implants, chemicals and low dose radiation. However, most of them are still in experiment period. There are still controversies on the clinic usage of autograft free fat, ADCON-L, and Mitomycin C (MMC). The optimal implants are characteristics of better biocompatibility, degradable absorption and capability of existing for a certain period in body. The optimal medicine should have good effect on anti-desmoplasia, less side effects and long half-life. Besides, the combination of biodegradable medical film and drug and the mixture of two or more medical films are also the research frontlines of epidural adhesion. Further researches are required to explore new materials and drugs with stable and most favorable effect in preventing epidural adhesion. PMID:26757539

  20. Comparison of epidural oxycodone and epidural morphine for post-caesarean section analgesia: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Ban Leong; Kwok, Sarah Carol; Mathur, Deepak; Ithnin, Farida; Newton-Dunn, Clare; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sultana, Rehena; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Epidural morphine after caesarean section may cause moderate to severe pruritus in women. Epidural oxycodone has been shown in non-obstetric trials to reduce pruritus when compared to morphine. We hypothesised that epidural oxycodone may reduce pruritus after caesarean section. Methods: A randomised controlled trial was conducted in pregnant women at term who underwent caesarean section with combined spinal-epidural technique initiated with intrathecal fentanyl 15 μg. Women received either epidural morphine 3 mg or epidural oxycodone 3 mg via the epidural catheter after delivery. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 24 h after caesarean section. The secondary outcomes were the pruritus scores, treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), pain scores and maternal satisfaction. Results: One hundred women were randomised (group oxycodone O = 50, morphine M = 50). There was no difference between Group O and M in the incidence of pruritus (n [%] 28 [56%] vs. 31 [62%], P = 0.68) and the worst pruritus scores (mean [standard deviation] 2.6 (2.8) vs. 3.3 [3.1], P = 0.23), respectively. Both groups had similar pain scores at rest (2.7 [2.3] vs. 2.0 [2.7], P = 0.16) and sitting up (5.0 [2.3] vs. 4.6 [2.4], P = 0.38) at 24 h. Pruritus scores were lower at 4–8, 8–12 and 12–24 h with oxycodone, but pain scores were higher. Both groups had a similar need for treatment of PONV and maternal satisfaction with analgesia. Conclusion: There was no difference in the incidence of pruritus at 24 h between epidural oxycodone and morphine. However, pruritus scores were lower with oxycodone between 4 and 24 h after surgery with higher pain scores in the same period. PMID:27053782

  1. Creation of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Polar cap patches, which are islands of enhanced plasma density drifting anti-sunward, are one of the outstanding phenomena in the polar cap F region ionosphere. In the last decade, data from all-sky airglow imagers have been extensively used for better understanding the propagation of patches in the central polar cap region. But still, it has been rather difficult to capture the birth of patches in their generation region near the dayside cusp, because, in most places, the dayside part of the polar cap ionosphere is sunlit even in winter. In Longyearbyen (78.1N, 15.5E), Norway, however, optical observations are possible near the dayside cusp region in a limited period around the winter solstice. This enables us to directly image how polar cap patches are born in the cusp. In this paper, we present a few intervals of daytime optical observations, during which polar cap patches were generated within the field-of-view of an all-sky imager in Longyearbyen. During all the intervals studied here, we identified several signatures of poleward moving auroral forms (PMAF) in the equatorward half of the field-of-view, which are known as ionospheric manifestations of dayside reconnection. Interestingly, patches were directly produced from such poleward moving auroral signatures and propagated poleward along the anti-sunward convection near the cusp. In the literature, Lorentzen et al. (2012) first reported such a direct production of patches from PMAFs. During the current observations, however, we succeeded in tracking the propagation of patches until they reached the poleward edge of the field-of-view of the imager. This confirms that the faint airglow structures produced from PMAFs were actually transported for a long distance towards the central polar cap area; thus, polar cap patches were produced. From this set of observations, we suggest that polar cap patches during moderately disturbed conditions (i.e, non-storm time conditions) can be directly produced by the

  2. Patterns of epidural progression following postoperative spine stereotactic body radiotherapy: implications for clinical target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Michael W; Thibault, Isabelle; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Yu, Eugene; John Cho, B C; Letourneau, Daniel; Lee, Young; Yee, Albert; Fehlings, Michael G; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT The authors performed a pattern-of-failure analysis, with a focus on epidural disease progression, in patients treated with postoperative spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). METHODS Of the 70 patients with 75 spinal metastases (cases) treated with postoperative spine SBRT, there were 26 cases of local disease recurrence and 25 cases with a component of epidural disease progression. Twenty-four of the 25 cases had preoperative epidural disease with subsequent epidural disease progression, and this cohort was the focus of this epidural-specific pattern-of-failure investigation. Preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up MRI scans were reviewed, and epidural disease was characterized based on location according to a system in which the vertebral anatomy is divided into 6 sectors, with the anterior compartment comprising Sectors 1, 2, and 6, and the posterior compartment comprising Sectors 3, 4, and 5. RESULTS Patterns of epidural progression are reported specifically for the 24 cases with preoperative epidural disease and subsequent epidural progression. Epidural disease progression within the posterior compartment was observed to be significantly lower in those with preoperative epidural disease confined to the anterior compartment than in those with preoperative epidural disease involving both anterior and posterior compartments (56% vs 93%, respectively; p = 0.047). In a high proportion of patients with epidural disease progression, treatment failure was found in the anterior compartment, including both those with preoperative epidural disease confined to the anterior compartment and those with preoperative epidural disease involving both anterior and posterior compartments (100% vs. 73%, respectively). When epidural disease was confined to the anterior compartment on the preoperative and postoperative MRIs, no epidural disease progression was observed in Sector 4, which is the most posterior sector. Postoperative epidural disease characteristics

  3. Formulation Optimization of Arecoline Patches

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pao-Chu; Tsai, Pi-Ju; Lin, Shin-Chen; Huang, Yaw-Bin

    2014-01-01

    The response surface methodology (RSM) including polynomial equations has been used to design an optimal patch formulation with appropriate adhesion and flux. The patch formulations were composed of different polymers, including Eudragit RS 100 (ERS), Eudragit RL 100 (ERL) and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (PVP), plasticizers (PEG 400), and drug. In addition, using terpenes as enhancers could increase the flux of the drug. Menthol showed the highest enhancement effect on the flux of arecoline. PMID:24707220

  4. Microscopic epidural lesions in goats given repeated epidural injections of morphine: use of a modified autopsy procedure.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J J; Svendsen, O; Andersen, H B

    1986-01-01

    Epidural catheterization was performed in six goats. Five days later either saline or 20 mg (5 mg/ml) preservative free morphine was injected epidurally once daily for 8 days. The goats were sacrificed 4, 24 or 48 hours after the last injection. The lumbar part of columna was removed in toto for microscopic examination of the spinal cord and the entire epidural space after decalcification and transverse sectioning. After saline, minimal changes including a fibrous membrane surrounding the catheter, scattered fat cell necrosis, scattered small focal cell infiltrations and occasionally focal haemorrhages were seen. After morphine the changes were considerably more severe including diffuse cellular inflammatory reaction in the epidural space, fat cell necrosis, occasionally focal exudative inflammation and chronic inflammatory reaction in the vicinity of the fibrous membrane demarcating position of the catheter. It is concluded that the present modified autopsy procedure permits microscopic examination of the epidural space. It has been shown that repeated administration of morphine caused tissue damage in the epidural space of goats. The human predictability of the results obtained is unknown. However, the results are encouraging for investigations with similar procedure in humans. PMID:3953294

  5. Severe Scapular Pain Following Unintentional Cervical Epidural Air Injection.

    PubMed

    Henthorn, Randall W; Murray, Kerra

    2016-03-01

    This a unique case of severe scapular pain following unintentional epidural space air injection during epidural steroid injection.A 70-year-old woman presented for a fluoroscopically guided C7-T1 interlaminar epidural steroid injection. Three injection attempts were made using the loss of resistance with air technique. On the first attempt the epidural space was entered, but contrast injection showed that the needle was intravenous. On the second attempt an equivocal loss of resistance with air was perceived and 5 mL of air was lost from the syringe. The needle was withdrawn and redirected, and upon the third needle passage the contrast injection showed appropriate epidural space filling up to the C4-5 level. Injection of betamethasone mixed in lidocaine was initially uneventful.However, 20 minutes post-injection the patient experienced sudden sharp and continuous pain along the medial edge of the scapula. After failing to respond to multiple intravascular analgesics, the patient was transferred to the emergency room. Her pain subsided completely following an intravenous diazepam injection. Cervical spine computerized tomography showed obvious air in the posterior epidural space from C4-5 to C6-7 as well as outside the spinal canal from (C4-T2). Having recovered fully, she was discharged the following morning. In reviewing the procedure, the equivocal loss of resistance on the second passage was actually a true loss of resistance to epidural space and air was unintentionally injected. Surprisingly, severe scapular pain resulted in a delayed manner after the steroid solution was injected. The authors theorize that unintentional prefilling of the epidural space with air prior to the injection of the subsequent steroid mixture added sufficient pressure to the epidural space to cause right-sided C4 nerve root stretching/entrapment and ensuing radicular pain to the right scapular border. The subsequent intravenous diazepam provided cervical muscle relaxation and

  6. Demonstration of an instrumented patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M.; Renaud, G.; Backman, D.; Genest, M.; Delannoy, M.

    2007-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of various strain measurement techniques at detecting the disbonding of a composite repair patch and then using this information to validate a new capacitance based disbond detection technique. The instrumented repair patch was parametrically designed with the help of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software to have a stress concentration at its tip. This stress concentration was designed to produce a disbond during fatigue testing, without the need for the introduction of any foreign material to create an artificial disbond condition. The aluminum substrate was grit blasted and the instrumented patch was bonded using FM ®73 adhesive, and was cured following the recommendations of the manufacturer. The geometric characteristics of the patch followed standard repair guidelines for such variables as material selection, taper angles and loading conditions, with the exception of the area designed for premature disbond. All test specimens were inspected using non-destructive testing technique (ultrasound pulse echo) to guarantee that no disbonding had occurred during curing of the specimen. The specimens were placed under fatigue loading to induce a disbond condition between the aluminum substrate and the patch. The specimens were cyclically loaded and strain gauges bonded to strategic locations on the aluminum and composite patch surface to be able to measure changes in surface strains as the disbond progressed. A Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system was also used to measure full field strains over the gauge length of the coupon. The DIC results were compared with the strain gauge data and were used to provide a qualitative measure of the load transfer in the bonded specimen, which clearly demonstrated the change in surface strain that occurred as the composite patch disbonded from the aluminum substrate. Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) was also used to measure surface strains on the

  7. Circulatory collapse following epidural bolus for Caesarean section a profound vasovagal reaction? A case report

    PubMed Central

    Oddby, Eva; Hein, Anette; Jakobsson, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Reduced blood pressure is commonly seen associated to spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean section and efforts to reduce its occurrence and its magnitude is common practice. Cardiovascular collapse requiring cardio-pulmonary resuscitation after putting the spinal/epidural block for Caesarean section is however a rare but most dramatic event. Presentation of case We describe a case with sudden short loss of circulation, circulatory collapse, short after start of emergency Caesarean section in top up epidural anaesthesia (3 + 12 ml ropivaciane 7.5 mg/ml), requiring CPR. The neonate was delivered during CPR with Apgar 1, 10, 10 at 1, 5 and 10 min. Circulation was restored following 60–90 s of CPR and administration of 0.5 mg adrenaline. No cardioversion was administered sinus rhythm was regained spontaneously. The mother and child had a further uncomplicated course. No signs of cardiac damage/anomaly, emboli, septicaemia, pereclampisa or local anaesthetic toxicity was found. The patient had prior to the decision about Caesarean section had fever and was subsequently relatively dehydrated. Discussion The patient had a fast return of sinus rhythm following birth of the child, without cardioversion. None of common causes for cardiac arrest was found and the patient an uncomplicated post Caesarean section course. The combination of epidural induced sympathetic block and reduced preload possibly triggered a Bezold-Jarisch reflex with a profound vasovagal reaction. Concluiosn A structured plan for the handling of cardiovascular crisis must be available wherever Caesarean section are performed. Adequate volume loading, left tilt and vigilant control of circulation following regional block performance is of outmost importance. PMID:27100952

  8. Antinociceptive effects of epidural buprenorphine or medetomidine, or the combination, in conscious cats.

    PubMed

    Steagall, P V M; Millette, V; Mantovani, F B; Gilbert, P; Luna, S P L; Duke-Novakovski, T

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the antinociceptive effects of epidural buprenorphine (EB), epidural medetomidine (EM) or epidural buprenorphine-medetomidine (EBM). Eight cats were studied. Thermal thresholds (TT) were measured by increasing the temperature of a probe placed on the thorax. Mechanical thresholds (MT) were measured through inflation of a modified blood pressure bladder to the cat's forelimb. After baseline measurements, EB (0.02 mg/kg), EM (0.01 mg/kg) or half of the doses of each drug (EBM) were administered. Data were analysed using anova (P < 0.05) and 95% confidence interval (CI). TT increased from 30 min to 1 h after EB and at 45 min after EM. MT increased from 45 min to 2 h after EB, from 15 min to 1 h after EM and at 30, 45 min and at 2 h after EBM. MT were significantly lower after EB than EM at 30 min. TT were above the upper 95%CI from 15 min to 24 h after EB, from 15 min to 4 h after EM and from 15 min to 8 h after EBM. MT were above the upper 95%CI from 15 min to 5 h, and at 8, 12 and 24 h after EB, from 15 min to 6 h after EM and from 15 min to 6 h and at 12 and 24 h after EBM. All treatments had similar onset. Overall, EB presented longer period of action than EBM and EM. The same magnitude of analgesia was achieved, but with fewer side effects when EBM was compared with EM. PMID:19754915

  9. Continuous thoracic epidural anesthesia induces segmental sympathetic block in the awake rat.

    PubMed

    Freise, Hendrik; Anthonsen, Sören; Fischer, Lars G; Van Aken, Hugo K; Sielenkämper, Andreas W

    2005-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) is used increasingly in critical care, especially for cardiac and intestinal sympathetic block. In this study we evaluated cardiorespiratory function and sympathetic activity in a new model of continuous TEA in awake rats. Thirteen rats received epidural saline control (CON) or bupivacaine 0.5% epidural infusion (EPI) at 15 microl/h for 2 h on day 1 and day 3. Mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate, arterial PCO2, and motor score were recorded at baseline and after 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. Skin temperature was measured at front paws, high-thoracic, mid-thoracic, and low-thoracic, hind paws, and the proximal and distal tail. Changes in sympathetic activity were assessed by skin temperature changes from baseline (DeltaT). In the EPI group, hemodynamics and respiration remained unchanged and only mild motor deficits occurred. DeltaT in thoracic segments was higher in the EPI than in the CON group (P <0.001 at all times at high-thoracic, mid-thoracic, and low-thoracic segments). Skin temperature decreased in the distal tail in the EPI group, e.g., after 90 min DeltaT=-0.86 +/- 0.25 degrees C (EPI) versus 0.4 +/- 0.12 degrees C (CON) (P <0.05 at 60, 90, and 120 min). DeltaT on day 3 was comparable to day 1. TEA induced stable segmental sympathetic block without cardiorespiratory and motor side effects in awake rats. This new technique may be applied in prolonged models of critical illness. PMID:15616087

  10. Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    French, Cynthia A; Cong, Xiaomei; Chung, Keun Sam

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of epidural analgesia during labor, no consensus has been reached among obstetric and anesthesia providers regarding its effects on breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between labor epidural analgesia and breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published in 1990 or thereafter, using the search term breastfeeding combined with epidural, labor epidural analgesia, labor analgesia, or epidural analgesia Of 117 articles, 23 described empirical studies specific to labor epidural analgesia and measured a breastfeeding outcome. Results were conflicting: 12 studies showed negative associations between epidural analgesia and breastfeeding success, 10 studies showed no effect, and 1 study showed a positive association. Most studies were observational. Of 3 randomized controlled studies, randomization methods were inadequate in 2 and not evaluable in 1. Other limitations were related to small sample size or inadequate study power; variation and lack of information regarding type and dosage of analgesia or use of other intrapartum interventions; differences in timing, definition, and method of assessing breastfeeding success; or failure to consider factors such as mothers' intention to breastfeed, social support, siblings, or the mother's need to return to work or school. It is also unclear to what extent results are mediated through effects on infant neurobehavior, maternal fever, oxytocin release, duration of labor, and need for instrumental delivery. Clinician awareness of factors affecting breastfeeding can help identify women at risk for breastfeeding difficulties in order to target support and resources effectively. PMID:27121239

  11. Periodicities of polar cap patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Aoki, T.

    2013-01-01

    A highly sensitive all-sky electron multiplier charge-coupled device airglow imager has been operative in Longyearbyen, Norway since October 2011. The imager captures 630.0 nm all-sky images with an exposure time of 4 s, which is about 10 times shorter than that achieved by conventional cooled CCD imagers. This allows us to visualize the structure of polar cap patches without blurring effects and better estimate their periodicities. We present, as one of the first results from the imager, an event of successive appearance of patches on the night of 21 December 2011. A time series of the optical intensity at zenith showed modulations having two distinguished periods, one at 40 min and the other at 5-12 min. One possible explanation is that such a coexistence of two different periodicities is a manifestation of simultaneous occurrence of patch generation processes on the 40 min periodicity was created by large-scale reconfiguration of the dayside convection pattern while the 5-12 min modulations were closely associated with mechanisms driven by pulsed reconnection on the dayside magnetopause. Such a combined effect of multiple patch generation processes may play a role in structuring patches; thus, it would be of particular importance for evaluating the space weather effects in the trans-ionospheric communications environment in the polar cap.

  12. Diabetic foot complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta, Maddalena; Imbriaco, Chiara; Rigolon, Riccardo; Mingolla, Lucia; Zamboni, Federica; Dal Molin, Francesca; Cioccoloni, Dario; Sanga, Viola; Bruti, Massimiliano; Brocco, Enrico; Conti, Michela; Ravenna, Giorgio; Perrone, Fabrizia; Stoico, Vincenzo; Bonora, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vertebral osteomyelitis (or spondylodiscitis) is steadily increasing in Western countries and often results from hematogenous seeding, direct inoculation during spinal surgery, or contiguous spread from an infection in the adjacent soft tissue. We present the case of a 67-year-old white patient with type 2 diabetes who went to Hospital for high fever, back pain, and worsening of known infected ulcers in the left foot. Despite intravenous antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement of the foot infection, high fever and lower back pain continued. Bone biopsy and two consecutive blood cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. A spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, revealing serious osteomyelitis in L4 and L5 complicated by an epidural abscess. Contiguous or other distant focuses of infection were not identified. In this case, diabetic foot could be considered as a primary distant focus for vertebral osteomyelitis. Clinicians should consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a ‘possible’ diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by foot infection that is associated with fever and lower back pain. Learning points Vertebral osteomyelitis is increasing in Western countries, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary focus of infection is the genitourinary tract followed by skin, soft tissue, endocarditis, bursitis, septic arthritis, and intravascular access. Diabetic foot could be a rare primary focus of infection for vertebral osteomyelitis, and, however, vertebral osteomyelitis could be a serious, albeit rare, complication of diabetic foot. Clinicians should keep in mind the many potential complications of diabetic foot ulcerations and consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a “possible” diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes and foot ulcers associated with nonspecific symptoms such as lower back pain. Early diagnosis and correct management of vertebral osteomyelitis are crucial to improve clinical outcomes

  13. [A case of tracheal intubation for apnea with epidural opioid in recovery room after operation under general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Kentaro; Uno, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Kazuna

    2013-10-01

    We report a 68-year-old, American Society of Anesthesiologists Class I (ASA I), female patient scheduled for malignant uterine adnexal tumor surgery and revascularization for ovarian cancer. An epidural catheter was inserted at T12-L1 for 5 cm. Anesthesia was induced with remifentanil (0.25 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)), sevoflurane (5%) and rocuronium (30 mg). Anesthesia was satisfactorily maintained after intubation with sevoflurane (1.5%) and remifentanil (0.2 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)). We extubated the patient because spontaneous breathing and consciousness were observed. We intubated the patient immediately for apnea that occurred after extubation. The patient made an uneventful recovery after naloxone administration. In pharmacokinetic simulation, on the assumption that epidural administrated fentanyl was carried to blood content promptly, effect concentration to cause respiratory depression was not reached. Postoperative apnea was rationalized as follows; tardy respiratory depression with the epidural administration, and unexpected dosage of the residual fentanyl in the catheter. PMID:24228465

  14. Pentoxifylline Inhibits Epidural Fibrosis in Post-Laminectomy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelten, Bilal; Erdogan, Hakan; Antar, Veysel; Sanel, Selim; Tuncdemir, Matem; Kutnu, Muge; Karaoglan, Alper; Orki, Tulay

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effectiveness of intramuscular pentoxifylline in the prevention of postoperative fibrosis. Material/Methods We divided 16 adult Wistar albino rats into 2 equal groups: treatment and control. Both groups underwent L1 vertebral total laminectomy to expose the dura. The intramuscular treatment group received pentoxifylline. Four weeks later, epidural fibrosis was studied in both groups using electron microscopy, light microscopy, histology, biochemistry, and macroscopy. Results The evaluation of epidural fibrosis in the 2 groups according to macroscopic (p<0.01) assessment and light microscopy revealed that epidural scar tissue formation was lower in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.001) and the number of fibroblasts was also decreased significantly in the pentoxifylline-treated group (p<0.05). More immature fibers were demonstrated in the treatment group by electron microscopy in comparison with the control group. In biochemical analysis, a statistically significant decrease was detected in hydroxyproline, which indicates fibrosis and myeloperoxidase activity, and shows an inflammatory response (P<0.001). Conclusions Systemic pentoxifylline application prevents postoperative epidural fibrosis and adhesions with various mechanisms. Our study is the first to present evidence of experimental epidural fibrosis prevention with pentoxifylline. PMID:26974057

  15. Spontaneous thoracic epidural hematoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Rasim; Ekşi, Murat Şakir

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma is a rare neurosurgical emergency in respect of motor and sensory loss. Identifiable reasons for spontaneous hemorrhage are vascular malformations and hemophilias. We presented a case of spontaneous epidural hematoma in an 18-year-old female patient who had motor and sensory deficits that had been present for 1 day. On MRI, there was spinal epidural hematoma posterior to the T2-T3 spinal cord. The hematoma was evacuated with T2 hemilaminectomy and T3 laminectomy. Patient recovered immediately after the surgery. Literature review depicted 112 pediatric cases (including the presented one) of spinal epidural hematoma. The female/male ratio is 1.1:2. Average age at presentation is 7.09 years. Clinical presentations include loss of strength, sensory disturbance, bowel and bladder disturbances, neck pain, back pain, leg pain, abdominal pain, meningismus, respiratory difficulty, irritability, gait instability, and torticollis. Most common spinal level was cervicothoracic spine. Time interval from symptom onset to clinical diagnosis varied from immediate to 18 months. Spinal epidural hematoma happened spontaneously in 71.8 % of the cases, and hemophilia was the leading disorder (58 %) in the cases with a definable disorder. Partial or complete recovery is possible after surgical interventions and factor supplementations. PMID:26033378

  16. Posterior epidural fibrotic mass associated with Baastrup’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eui-Chan; Lee, Han-Jun; Kim, Jae Yoon; Yang, Jae Jun

    2010-01-01

    A few reports have demonstrated rare cases of Baastrup’s disease that involve epidural cysts that cause dural compression. However, there have been no reports of a midline epidural fibrotic mass being associated with Baastrup’s disease. A 60-year-old man presented with neurogenic claudication that had lasted for 5 years. Radiography showed anterolisthesis at the L4–L5 level, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated severe stenosis due to a posterior noncystic mass, and the linear fluid signal tracked into the posterior epidural space at the L4–L5 level. A cleft in the ligamentum flavum was identified by probe at surgery, and this enabled the probe to be inserted into the epidural space without excising ligamentum flavum. Histological analysis showed that the fibrotic mass consisted of a collagen matrix that had a cystic component and exhibited a peripheral inflammatory reaction. This report shows that it is possible for an extended epidural cystic mass that occurs in Baastrup’s disease to change over time through peripheral inflammation into a cyst-containing fibrotic mass. PMID:20063020

  17. Epidural infusions of sufentanil with and without bupivacaine: comparison with diamorphine-bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Black, A M; Wolf, A; McKenzie, I M; Tonkin, P A; Inglis, S T; Prys-Roberts, C

    1994-07-01

    The requirements for supplementary 3 ml epidural injections of bupivacaine 0.5% (top-ups) were used in a randomized double-blind study to compare the effects of five types of thoracic epidural infusions given at 2.5 ml h-1 for the first 24 h after major surgery to the upper abdomen in 99 patients and the lower abdomen in 72. The infusions were: bupivacaine 0.167% alone; diamorphine 0.167 mg ml-1 (0.417 mg h-1) in bupivacaine 0.167%; sufentanil 2 micrograms ml-1 (5 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; and sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in normal saline. The patients who had upper abdominal surgery were on average older than those having lower abdominal surgery and a larger proportion of them were female. They received on average fewer top-ups. After both upper and lower abdominal surgery, epidural infusions of bupivacaine alone required the most frequent supplementation (inter-quartile range 6-14 top-ups in 24 h) and the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures required the fewest (interquartile range 0-12 top-ups in 24 h). The infusions of sufentanil without bupivacaine were significantly less effective than the sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures after upper (but not lower) abdominal surgery. Although the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures were indistinguishable in analgesic effectiveness after either upper or lower abdominal surgery, the lower (5 micrograms h-1) dose rate of sufentanil gave a significantly higher average breathing rate and lower average PaCO2 for the first 24 h after lower (but not upper) abdominal surgery. Blood samples were taken (as an afterthought) from 11 patients receiving sufentanil 10 micrograms h-1, just before the epidural infusion was stopped. The concentrations were mostly above the range for systemic analgesia, but below the values that would have been expected if a steady state had been achieved. PMID:7925334

  18. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Epidural Clonidine vs Bupivacaine for Pain Control During and After Lower Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Guirguis, Maged; DeWood, Mark S.; Zaky, Sherif S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists produce safe and effective analgesia, but most investigations studying the analgesic effect of alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists postoperatively included previous or concomitant administration of other analgesics. Because clonidine potentiates the effect of these drugs, its own intrinsic analgesic effect has been difficult to establish. This study was designed to compare the intraoperative and postoperative effects of epidural clonidine vs bupivacaine for patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Methods This randomized controlled trial included 40 patients aged 18-50 who were scheduled for elective lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group I (n=20) received epidural clonidine; Group II (n=20) received epidural bupivacaine. Intraoperative and postoperative hemodynamics, pain scores, and complications were monitored. Results Mean pain scores were significantly lower in Group I compared to Group II (1.5 ± 0.5 compared to 3.4 ± 1.0, respectively) in the first 12 hours after surgery. Sedation was more prominent in Group I until 9 hours after surgery. Opioid requirements were significantly lower in Group I. Respiratory rate was similar in the 2 groups. Group I had larger decreases from baseline in systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure than Group II. Heart rate in Group I was reduced from baseline, while it was increased in Group II. Less postoperative nausea and vomiting, urinary retention, pruritus, and shivering were observed in Group I. Conclusion Compared to bupivacaine, epidural clonidine provided effective intraoperative and postoperative analgesia in selected patients, resulting in a decreased intravenous pain medication requirement and prolonged duration of analgesia after epidural infusion was discontinued. PMID:26130975

  19. Haemodynamic effects of thoracic epidural anaesthesia during proximal aortic cross-clamping in pigs.

    PubMed

    Aadahl, P; Saether, O D; Stenseth, R; Myhre, H O

    1995-01-01

    Cross-clamping (XC) of the thoracic aorta induces a hyperdynamic circulation proximal to the aortic clamp. In this investigation, the effects of thoracic epidural anaesthesia (TEA) on the haemodynamic response to XC were studied in pigs. Seventeen pigs were anaesthetized with ketamine, and the thoracic aorta was cross-clamped for 30 minutes. In eight of the animals (TEA-group) a thoracic epidural block (3 ml 0.5% bupivacaine) was added to the general anaesthesia. Prior to XC there was a lower heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO) and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) in the TEA-group compared to the nine animals with general anasthesia only (control-group). During XC there was an increase in HR, CO, SvO2 and proximal aortic blood pressure (PPROX) in both groups, without differences between groups. Following aortic declamping central venous pressure (CVP), pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) increased in both groups. Fifteen minutes after declamping, one animal in each group died. It was concluded that in this experimental model, TEA combined with general anaesthesia did not modify the haemodynamic response to XC of the thoracic aorta. PMID:7725879

  20. Postoperative analgesia in children: A comparison of three different doses of caudal epidural morphine

    PubMed Central

    Baduni, Neha; Sanwal, Manoj Kumar; Vajifdar, Homay; Agarwala, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal epidural block is the most commonly used neuraxial block in children. Morphine has been used as a caudal additive for more than three decades. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and duration of analgesia of three different doses of caudal epidural morphine (CEM), and to find out the incidence of side effects. Material and Methods: This study was conducted on 75 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I and II, aged 2-12 years, undergoing lower abdominal and urogenital surgeries. Patients were randomly allocated to one of the three groups according to the dose of morphine. Group I received 30 μg/kg, group II 50 μg/kg, and group III 70 μg/kg. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram, pain score, sedation score, duration of analgesia, and side-effects were noted. Results: The mean duration of analgesia was 8.63 h in group I, 13.36 h in group II and 19.19 h in group III. Respiratory depression was noted in three patients in group III. One patient in group I had itching. One patient each in groups I, II, and III had nausea/vomiting. Conclusion: CEM significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia, though with a higher dose the risk of respiratory depression should always be kept in mind. PMID:27275053

  1. Epidural infection: Is it really an abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We reviewed the literature regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Methods: Utilizing PubMed, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature on SEAs. Results: SEA remains a difficult infectious process to diagnose. This is particularly true in the early stages, when patients remain neurologically intact, and before the classic triad of fever, back pain, and neurologic deficit develop. However, knowledge of risk factors, obtaining serologic markers, and employing magnetic resonance scans facilitate obtaining a prompt and accurate diagnosis. In patients without neurologic deficits, lone medical therapy may prove effective. Conclusions: More prevalent over the previous three decades, SEA remains a rare but deleterious infectious process requiring prompt identification and treatment. Historically, identification of SEA is often elusive, diagnosis is delayed, and clinicians contend that surgical debridement is the cornerstone of treatment. Early surgery leads to more favorable outcomes and preserves neurologic function, particularly in the early stages of disease when minimal or no neurologic deficits are present. The advent of improved imaging modalities, diagnostic techniques, and multidrug antimicrobial agents has enabled medical/spinal surgical consultants to more rapidly diagnose SEA and institute more effective early medical treatment (e.g., data suggest that lone medical therapy may prove effective in the early management of SEA). PMID:23248757

  2. Computational modeling of epidural cortical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-12-01

    Epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) is a developing therapy to treat neurological disorders. However, it is not clear how the cortical anatomy or the polarity and position of the electrode affects current flow and neural activation in the cortex. We developed a 3D computational model simulating ECS over the precentral gyrus. With the electrode placed directly above the gyrus, about half of the stimulus current flowed through the crown of the gyrus while current density was low along the banks deep in the sulci. Beneath the electrode, neurons oriented perpendicular to the cortical surface were depolarized by anodic stimulation, and neurons oriented parallel to the boundary were depolarized by cathodic stimulation. Activation was localized to the crown of the gyrus, and neurons on the banks deep in the sulci were not polarized. During regulated voltage stimulation, the magnitude of the activating function was inversely proportional to the thickness of the CSF and dura. During regulated current stimulation, the activating function was not sensitive to the thickness of the dura but was slightly more sensitive than during regulated voltage stimulation to the thickness of the CSF. Varying the width of the gyrus and the position of the electrode altered the distribution of the activating function due to changes in the orientation of the neurons beneath the electrode. Bipolar stimulation, although often used in clinical practice, reduced spatial selectivity as well as selectivity for neuron orientation.

  3. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  4. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  5. Innovative approaches to neuraxial blockade in children: The introduction of epidural nerve root stimulation and ultrasound guidance for epidural catheter placement

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Ban CH

    2006-01-01

    Continuous epidural blockade remains the cornerstone of pediatric regional anesthesia. However, the risk of catastrophic trauma to the spinal cord when inserting direct thoracic and high lumbar epidural needles in anesthetized or heavily sedated pediatric patients is a concern. To reduce this risk, research has focused on low lumbar or caudal blocks (ie, avoiding the spinal cord) and threading catheters from distal puncture sites in a cephalad direction. However, with conventional epidural techniques, including loss-of-resistance for localization of the needle, optimal catheter tip placement is difficult to assess because considerable distances are required during threading. Novel approaches include electrical epidural stimulation for physiological confirmation and segmental localization of epidural catheters, and ultrasound guidance for assessing related neuroanatomy and real-time observation of the needle puncture and, potentially, catheter advancement. The present article provides a brief and focused review of these two advances, and outlines recent clinical experiences relevant to pediatric epidural anesthesia. PMID:16960634

  6. Thoracic epidural anesthesia improves functional recovery from myocardial stunning in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Rolf, N; Van de Velde, M; Wouters, P F; Möllhoff, T; Weber, T P; Van Aken, H K

    1996-11-01

    The effects of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on the contractile performance of ischemic and postischemic myocardium have not been well investigated. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of TEA on severity and duration of myocardial stunning in an experimental model for sublethal acute myocardial ischemia. Seven dogs were chronically instrumented for measurement of heart rate (HR), left atrial (LAP), aortic and left ventricular pressure (LVP), LV dP/dtmax' and myocardial wall-thickening fraction (WTF). An occluder around the left anterior descending artery (LAD) allowed induction of reversible LAD ischemia. TEA was performed with lidocaine 4 mg/kg through a chronically implanted epidural catheter at the second thoracic level. Regional myocardial blood flow was determined with colored microspheres. Two experiments were performed in a cross-over design on separate days: Experiment 1, induction of 10 min of LAD ischemia without TEA; and Experiment 2, induction of 10 min of LAD ischemia with TEA. WTF was measured at baseline (BL) and predetermined time points until complete recovery from ischemic dysfunction occurred. LAD ischemia caused a significant decrease of LAD-WTF with (-28% +/- 5.1% versus BL) and without TEA (-15.5% +/- 5.3% versus BL). After 3 h of reperfusion, WTF as percent of BL values was significantly higher with TEA (P < 0.001). BL values of WTF were reached after 24 h with TEA and after more than 48 h without TEA (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences for mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), LVP, LAP, and LVdP/dtmax between the groups during ischemia and reperfusion. In nonischemic myocardium TEA caused an increase of subendocardial blood flow. During ischemia neither the subendocardial/subepicardial nor the occluded/ normal zone blood flow was affected by TEA. TEA attenuates myocardial stunning in conscious dogs. This finding is consistent with data regarding a reduction of infarct size due to TEA. PMID

  7. Smart patch piezoceramic actuator issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven F.; Denoyer, Keith K.; Yost, Brad

    1993-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory is undertaking the challenge of finding new and innovative ways to integrate sensing, actuation, and the supporting control and power electronics into a compact self-contained unit to provide vibration suppression for a host structure. This self-contained unit is commonly referred to as a smart patch. The interfaces to the smart patch will be limited to standard spacecraft power and possibly a communications line. The effort to develop a smart patch involves both contractual and inhouse programs which are currently focused on miniaturization of the electronics associated with vibrational control using piezoceramic sensors and actuators. This paper is comprised of two distinct parts. The first part examines issues associated with bonding piezoceramic actuators to a host structure. Experimental data from several specimens with varying flexural stiffness are compared to predictions from two piezoelectric/substructure coupling models, the Blocked Force Model and the Uniform Strain Model with Perfect Bonding. The second part of the paper highlights a demonstration article smart patch created using the insights gained from inhouse efforts at the Phillips Laboratory. This demonstration article has self contained electronics on the same order of size as the actuator powered by a voltage differential of approximately 32 volts. This voltage is provided by four rechargeable 8 volt batteries.

  8. Smart patch piezoceramic actuator issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Steven F.; Denoyer, Keith K.; Yost, Brad

    1993-02-01

    The Phillips Laboratory is undertaking the challenge of finding new and innovative ways to integrate sensing, actuation, and the supporting control and power electronics into a compact self-contained unit to provide vibration suppression for a host structure. This self-contained unit is commonly referred to as a smart patch. The interfaces to the smart patch will be limited to standard spacecraft power and possibly a communications line. The effort to develop a smart patch involves both contractual and inhouse programs which are currently focused on miniaturization of the electronics associated with vibrational control using piezoceramic sensors and actuators. This paper is comprised of two distinct parts. The first part examines issues associated with bonding piezoceramic actuators to a host structure. Experimental data from several specimens with varying flexural stiffness are compared to predictions from two piezoelectric/substructure coupling models, the Blocked Force Model and the Uniform Strain Model with Perfect Bonding. The second part of the paper highlights a demonstration article smart patch created using the insights gained from inhouse efforts at the Phillips Laboratory. This demonstration article has self contained electronics on the same order of size as the actuator powered by a voltage differential of approximately 32 volts. This voltage is provided by four rechargeable 8 volt batteries.

  9. Profound motor blockade with epidural ropivacaine following spinal bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Buggy, D J; Allsager, C M; Coley, S

    1999-09-01

    Ropivacaine, a relatively new amide local anaesthetic, reputedly produces less motor block than equivalent doses of bupivacaine, potentially combining high-quality analgesia with the ability to ambulate. We report two cases of prolonged, profound motor block with patient-controlled epidural analgesia using 0.1% ropivacaine, following spinal bupivacaine for Caesarean section. As there was no evidence of inadvertent intrathecal ropivacaine administration or of any neurological injury, we hypothesise that epidural ropivacaine may interact with intrathecal bupivacaine to prolong its effect. PMID:10460566

  10. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Zizka, J; Eliás, P; Michl, A; Harrer, J; Cesák, T; Herman, A

    2001-01-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. PMID:11471620

  11. Geographic Variation in Epidural Steroid Injection Use in Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Friedly, Janna; Chan, Leighton; Deyo, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background: The rates of epidural steroid injections have increased dramatically over time, with conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of epidural steroid injections for the treatment of various low-back pain disorders. Given the uncertainty about their role, we sought to evaluate the geographic variation in the use of epidural steroid injections for low back pain within the United States. We also sought to determine whether greater rates of epidural steroid injections are associated with lower rates of lumbar surgery. Methods: We used the 2001 Medicare Physician Part-B claims to examine the geographic variation in the use of epidural steroid injections. Current Procedural Technology codes were used to identify the number of procedures performed as well as the percentage of injections that were fluoroscopically guided. Procedure rates were analyzed with use of several geographic indicators, including state, United States Census Bureau regions (Northeast, South, Midwest, and West), and health referral regions as defined by the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care. Results: In 2001, there was a 7.7-fold difference between the state with the lowest rate (Hawaii at 5.2 per 1000) and the state with the highest rate (Alabama at 39.9 per 1000). The variation among health referral regions, which are smaller in size, was even greater, with an 18.4-fold difference from 5.6 per 1000 in Honolulu, Hawaii, to 103.6 per 1000 in Palm Springs, California. Higher statewide rates of epidural steroid injections were associated with significantly higher rates of lumbar surgery (p = 0.001). In areas with high injection rates, a significantly higher percentage of patients who sought care for low back pain received injections (p < 0.001). In addition, in areas with high injection rates, a significantly higher percentage of patients who presented with low back pain received both injections and lumbar surgery within the same year (p < 0.001). Conclusions: There is substantial geographic

  12. Epidural hematoma after thoracic epidural analgesia in a patient treated with ketorolac, mefenamic acid, and naftazone: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Dae Geun; Kim, Seok-Kon; Kim, Juri

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male undergoing thoracotomy and bleeding control received a preoperative thoracic epidural for postoperative analgesia. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred and urgent magnetic resonance imaging showed massive anterior epidural hematoma. During laminectomy and decompression, platelet dysfunction was diagnosed and preoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs medications were supposed to the cause of platelet dysfunction. After infusion of ten units of platelet concentrate, coagulopathy was improved. We should be more careful to drugs with antiplatelet effect when using regional analgesia. PMID:24729848

  13. Patient-Controlled Epidural Analgesia or Multimodal Pain Regimen with Periarticular Injection After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jules-Elysee, Kethy M.; Goon, Amanda K.; Westrich, Geoffrey H.; Padgett, Douglas E.; Mayman, David J.; Ranawat, Amar S.; Ranawat, Chitranjan S.; Lin, Yi; Kahn, Richard L.; Bhagat, Devan D.; Goytizolo, Enrique A.; Ma, Yan; Reid, Shane C.; Curren, Jodie; YaDeau, Jacques T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The optimal postoperative analgesia after primary total hip arthroplasty remains in question. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) with use of a multimodal pain regimen including periarticular injection (PAI). We hypothesized that PAI would lead to earlier readiness for discharge, decreased opioid consumption, and lower pain scores. Methods: Forty-one patients received PAI, and forty-three patients received PCEA. Preoperatively, both groups were administered dexamethasone (6 mg, orally). The PAI group received a clonidine patch and sustained-release oxycodone (10 mg), while the PCEA group had placebo. Both groups received combined spinal-epidural anesthesia and used an epidural pain pump postoperatively; the PAI group had normal saline solution, while the PCEA group had bupivacaine and hydromorphone. The primary outcome, readiness for discharge, required the discontinuation of the epidural, a pain score of <4 (numeric rating scale) without parenteral narcotics, normal eating, minimal nausea, urination without a catheter, a dry surgical wound, no acute medical problems, and the ability to independently transfer and walk 12.2 m (40 ft). Results: The mean time to readiness for discharge (and standard deviation) was 2.4 ± 0.7 days (PAI) compared with 2.3 ± 0.8 days (PCEA) (p = 0.86). The mean length of stay was 3.0 ± 0.8 days (PAI) compared with 3.1 ± 0.7 days (PCEA) (p = 0.46). A significant mean difference in pain score of 0.74 with ambulation (p = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 1.31) and 0.80 during physical therapy (p = 0.03; 95% CI, 0.09 to 1.51) favored the PCEA group. The mean opioid consumption (oral morphine equivalents in milligrams) was significantly higher in the PAI group on postoperative day 0 (43 ± 21 compared with 28 ± 23; p = 0.002) and postoperative days 0 through 2 (136 ± 59 compared with 90 ± 79; p = 0.004). Opioid-Related Symptom

  14. A Comparison of Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia With Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Management After Major Gynecologic Oncologic Surgeries: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Farnaz; Rasooli, Sousan; Baybordi, Ali; Golzari, Samad E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain after major open gynecologic surgeries requires appropriate pain management. Objectives: This study aimed at comparing perioperative patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) and patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) after gynecologic oncology surgeries. Patients and Methods: In this clinical trial study, 90 patients with American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) class I or II scheduled for gynecologic oncologic surgeries were randomly allocated to two groups (45 patients each group) to receive: patient-controlled epidural analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl (PCEA group), or patient controlled intravenous analgesia (IV PCA group) with fentanyl, pethidine and ondansetron. Postoperative pain was assessed over 48 hours using the visual analog scale (VAS). The frequency of rescue analgesia was recorded. Occurrence of any concomitant events such as nausea, vomiting, ileus, purities, sedation and respiratory complications were recorded postoperatively. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in demographic data including; age, weight, ASA physical status, duration of surgery, intraoperative bleeding, and the amount of blood transfusion (P > 0.05), between the two studied groups. Severity of postoperative pain was not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05); however, after first patient mobilization, pain was significantly lower in the epidural group than the IV group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the incidence of complications such as nausea, vomiting, purities or ileus (P > 0.05). Nevertheless, the incidence and severity of sedation was significantly higher in the IV group (P < 0.001). Respiratory depression was higher in the IV group than the epidural group; this difference, however, was not significant (P = 0.11). In the epidural group, only 10 patients (22.2%) had mild and transient lower extremities parenthesis. Conclusions

  15. Translaminar lumbar epidural endoscopy: anatomy, technique, and indications.

    PubMed

    De Antoni, D J; Claro, M L; Poehling, G G; Hughes, S S

    1996-06-01

    This article describes a new technique to achieve access to the epidural space via a direct posterior portal. This minimally invasive technique allows treatment of disc protrusions and extrusions with full visualization and minimal dissection of the paraspinal musculature. Hemostasis, visualization, and triangulation is performed with standard arthroscopic instrumentation. The anatomy of, indications for, and advantages of this techniques are described. PMID:8783828

  16. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords "Upper cervical epidural abscess," "C1 osteomyelitis," "C2 osteomyelitis," "C1 epidural abscess," "C2 epidural abscess." We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  17. Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment of Acute Epidural Hematoma: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. Although minimally invasive surgical treatment of acute epidural hematoma attracts increasing attention, no generalized indications for the surgery have been adopted. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of minimally invasive surgery in acute epidural hematoma with various hematoma volumes. Methods. Minimally invasive puncture and aspiration surgery were performed in 59 cases of acute epidural hematoma with various hematoma volumes (13–145 mL); postoperative follow-up was 3 months. Clinical data, including surgical trauma, surgery time, complications, and outcome of hematoma drainage, recovery, and Barthel index scores, were assessed, as well as treatment outcome. Results. Surgical trauma was minimal and surgery time was short (10–20 minutes); no anesthesia accidents or surgical complications occurred. Two patients died. Drainage was completed within 7 days in the remaining 57 cases. Barthel index scores of ADL were ≤40 (n = 1), 41–60 (n = 1), and >60 (n = 55); scores of 100 were obtained in 48 cases, with no dysfunctions. Conclusion. Satisfactory results can be achieved with minimally invasive surgery in treating acute epidural hematoma with hematoma volumes ranging from 13 to 145 mL. For patients with hematoma volume >50 mL and even cerebral herniation, flexible application of minimally invasive surgery would help improve treatment efficacy. PMID:27144170

  18. Epidural morphine analgesia in Guillain Barré syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Genis, D; Busquets, C; Manubens, E; Dávalos, A; Baró, J; Oterino, A

    1989-01-01

    Severe pain is a frequent symptom in the Guillain Barré syndrome and can be intense, long lasting and with no response to the usual analgesics, including parenteral opiates. Epidural analgesia using morphine chloride in low doses has satisfactorily relieved pain in this disease in nine patients. PMID:2795070

  19. Epidural abscess with associated spondylodiscitis following prostatic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Dobson, G; Cowie, C J A; Holliman, D

    2015-07-01

    Spondylodiscitis is often iatrogenic in nature. We report the case of a 69-year-old man presenting with spondylodiscitis and associated epidural abscess following transrectal ultrasonography guided prostate biopsy despite ciprofloxacin cover. To our knowledge, this is the first case of spondylodiscitis secondary to fluoroquinolone resistant Escherichia coli. PMID:26264110

  20. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords “Upper cervical epidural abscess,” “C1 osteomyelitis,” “C2 osteomyelitis,” “C1 epidural abscess,” “C2 epidural abscess.” We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  1. Epidural dexamethasone for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy: A dose ranging and safety evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    Hefni, Amira Fathy; Mahmoud, Mohamed Sidky; Al Alim, Azza Atef Abd

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Number of studies revealed that epidural bupivacaine-dexamethasone has the same analgesic potency as bupivacaine-fentanyl with opioid sparing and antiemetic effects. Different doses of dexamethasone were used in different studies. This study was designed to evaluate the optimum dose of epidural dexamethasone for post-operative analgesia. Materials and Methods: In this double-blinded randomized controlled study, we evaluated the efficiency and safety of different doses of epidural dexamethasone for post-operative analgesia in 160 patients aged 45-60 years scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy. Patient were randomly allocated into four groups to receive a total volume of 10 ml epidural plain bupivacaine 0.25% in the control group (Group D0) with either 4 mg dexamethasone in (Group D4) or 6 mg dexamethasone in (Group D6) or 8 mg dexamethasone in (Group D8). Patients then received general anesthesia. Sedation, satisfaction and visual analog pain scores (VAS) at rest and with effort were measured post-operatively. Meperidine was administered when VAS > or = 4. Intra-operative fentanyl dose, post-operative meperidine consumption and the time to first analgesic requirement were recorded by a blinded observer. Blood glucose was measured pre-operatively and at 4 h and 8 h after study drug administration. Wound healing and infection were assessed after 1 week. Results: Intraoperative fentanyl requirements were comparable among groups. The time to first analgesic requirement was significantly prolonged 5.5 times in D8 Group but only 1.5 times in D6 and D4 Groups more than the analgesic duration in the control Group D0, with a P < 0.01. There was a significant reduction in post-operative meperidine consumption during the first 24 h in the D8 (75%) in comparison with D6 and D4 Groups (50%), respectively, (P < 0.01) and the control Group D0 (0%) (P < 0.01). VAS scores were significantly lower and patient satisfaction score was significantly higher in the D8 and

  2. Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma: A case series of seven cases

    PubMed Central

    Esene, Ignatius Ngene; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Nosseir, Mohamed; Fayed, Zeiad Y; Seoud, Khaled; El Bahy, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangiomas (PSECHs) are rare vascular lesions with about 100 cases reported. Herein, we present a case series of 7 PSECHs discussing their clinical presentation, radiological characteristics, surgical technique and intraoperative findings, pathological features, and functional outcome. Materials and Methods: We retrieved from the retrolective databases of the senior authors, patients with pathologically confirmed PSECH operated between January 2002 and November 2015. From their medical records, the patients’ sociodemographic, clinical, radiological, surgical, and histopathological data were retrieved and analyzed. Results: The mean age of the seven cases was 50.3 years. Four were females. All the five cases (71.4%) in the thoracic spine had myelopathy and the 2 (28.6%) lumbar cases had sciatica. Local pain was present in all the cases. All the lesions were isointense on T1-weighted images, hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and in five cases there was strong homogeneous enhancement. In six cases (85.7%), classical laminectomy was done; lesions resected in one piece in five cases. Total excision was achieved in all the cases. Lesions were thin-walled dilated blood vessels, lined with endothelium, and engorged with blood and with scanty loose fibrous stroma. The median follow-up was 12 months (range: 1–144 months). All patients gradually improved neurologically and achieved a good outcome with no recurrence at the last follow-up. Conclusion: PSECH although rare is increasing reported and ought to be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions. Early surgical treatment with total resection is recommended as would result in a good prognosis.

  3. OpenSSO Project Patches

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-06-08

    These are patches to Sun Microsystems open source OpenSSO project to fix various bugs and incorporate changes for Sandia and NNSA to use the product including fixes to improve OpenSSO's authentication and authorization abilities. These fixes will then by incorporated by Sun into their Sun Access Manager product, which is used by various DOE/NNSA plants and labs. Having Sun maintain these changes will relieve SNL and DOE from the cost of maintaining the changes themselves.

  4. Acoustic puncture assist device: A novel technique to identify the epidural space

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mokaddam, MA; Al-Harbi, MK; El-Jandali, ST; Al-Zahrani, TA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD) is designed to detect and signal the loss of resistance during the epidural procedure. We aimed to evaluate this device in terms of successful identification of the epidural space and the incidence of accidental dural puncture. Patients and Methods: Following Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent obtained from all patients, 200 adult patients (107 males) American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III who underwent lower limb orthopedic surgery under lumbar epidural anesthesia using APAD were enrolled in the study. APAD system was connected to the epidural needle using normal saline prefilled extension tube. Numbers of successful epidural attempts and accidental dural tap were documented. Results: The mean values of the depth of epidural space and the time to perform epidural puncture were 5.8 ± 1.0 cm and 3.3 ± 1.4 min, respectively. In 63% of patients, epidural puncture was successful from the first attempt and in 1% it was successful from the fourth attempt. Epidural anesthesia by APAD was successful in 198 cases (99 %). Dural tap occurred in 2 cases (1%). Conclusions: Using APAD, the success of identifying the epidural space was high and reliable. PMID:27051369

  5. Comparative study for better adjuvant with ropivacaine in epidural anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Pramila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Better adjuvants for epidural analgesia are still evolving. Dexmedetomidine that is alpha-2 agonist can be used as an adjuvant in epidural analgesia and anesthesia. Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of dexmedetomidine versus clonidine in combination with ropivacaine in epidural anesthesia on intraoperative and postoperative analgesia, to find out the better adjuvant for regional anesthesia. Settings and Design: Randomized control trial. Materials and Methods: Sixty adult patients (18–60 years) with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 1/ASA 2 grade and undergoing lower abdominal and lower limbs surgeries were included and randomized into three groups of 20 patients each. Group 1 - received ropivacaine with normal saline. Group 2 - received ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine. Group 3 - received ropivacaine with clonidine. Statistical Analysis: Mean and Standard deviation were calculated. All the data were analyzed using analysis of variance and Chi-square test. The value of P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: All the three groups were comparable with respect to age, sex, and ASA grade. There was statistically significant mean time to reach T10 sensory block level (15.8, 5.7, 9.6 min in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively). The maximum duration of analgesia was statistically higher in Group 2 patients (383.7 vs. 365.3 and 280.5 min in Group 3 and Group 1, respectively). The mean time to reach motor block was significantly shorter in Group 2. Side effects were comparable in all groups with statistically insignificant fall in mean arterial pressure and hypotension was noted with Group 2. Conclusion: We concluded that the patients receiving the addition of dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine in epidural anesthesia had a faster onset and longer duration of sensory and motor blockade. Dexmedetomidine in comparison to clonidine had acceptable sedation and hemodynamic stability and minimal dose requirement make very effective adjuvant

  6. Caudal epidural steroid injection: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Murakibhavi, V. G.; Khemka, Aditya G.

    2011-01-01

    Study design: Prospective study. Study rationale: A recurrent phenomenon, the lifetime prevalence of low back pain has been reported as 54%–80%, while annual prevalence ranges from 15%–45%.1 It is also associated with enormous economic, societal, and health impact.2 India, being a developing country, has its problem compounded by the occupational compulsions in parts of the rural areas.3 For some interventional therapies, like epidural steroid injections, utilization rates have increased dramatically.4,5,6,7,8,9 They have become one of the most commonly performed interventions in the United States for low back pain with radiculopathy.10 Clinical question: Multiple systematic reviews,11 a meta-analysis,12 several guidelines,13 health technology assessments by insurers, and local medical review policies and coverage decisions have been published. However, controversy continues regarding the effectiveness of epidural steroid injections. In addition three types of epidurals, namely interlaminar, transforaminal, and caudal, with variable results complicate the picture for practice of interventional pain management. The underlying mechanism of action of epidurally administered steroid and local anesthetic injections is still not well understood and compounds the problem.14 Objective: To evaluate and update the effects of caudal epidural injection in the management of chronic low back pain and sciatica. Final Class of evidence-treatment Yes Study design:  RCT •  Cohort  Case control  Case series Methods  Concealed allocation (RCT) •  Intention to treat (RCT) •  Blinded/independent evaluation of primary outcome •  F/U ≥ 85% •  Adequate sample size • Control for confounding Overall class of evidence II The definiton of the different classes of evidence is available here. PMID:23230402

  7. Postoperative coagulopathy after live related donor hepatectomy: Incidence, predictors and implications for safety of thoracic epidural catheter

    PubMed Central

    Karna, ST; Pandey, CK; Sharma, S; Singh, A; Tandon, M; Pandey, VK

    2015-01-01

    Background: Coagulopathy after living donor hepatectomy (LDH) may endanger donor safety during removal of thoracic epidural catheter (TEC). The present study was conducted to evaluate the extent and duration of immediate postoperative coagulopathy after LDH. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of perioperative record of LDH over three years was conducted after IRB approval. Variables such as age, gender, BMI, ASA classification, liver volume on CT scan, preoperative and postoperative INR, platelet count (PC) and ALT of each donor for five days was noted. In addition, duration of surgery, remnant as percentage total liver volume (Remnant%), blood loss, day of peak in PC and INR were also noted. Coagulopathy was defined as being present if INR exceeded 1.5 or platelet count fell below 1 × 105/mm3 on any day. Data was analyzed using SPSS 20 for Windows. Between group comparison was made using the Student ‘t’ test for continuous variables and chi square test for categorical variables. Univariate analysis was done. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to find independent factor associated with coagulopathy. Results: Eighty four (84) donors had coagulopathy on second day (mean INR 1.9 ± 0.42). Low BMI, % of remnant liver and duration of surgery were independent predictors of coagulopathy. Right lobe hepatectomy had more coagulopathy than left lobe and low BMI was the only independent predictor. There was no correlation of coagulopathy with age, gender, blood loss, presence of epidural catheter, postoperative ALT or duration of hospital stay. High INR was the main contributor for coagulopathy. Conclusions: Coagulopathy is seen after donor hepatectomy. We recommend removal of the epidural catheter after the fifth postoperative day when INR falls below 1.5. PMID:26119437

  8. Patching. Restitching business portfolios in dynamic markets.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, K M; Brown, S L

    1999-01-01

    In turbulent markets, businesses and opportunities are constantly falling out of alignment. New technologies and emerging markets create fresh opportunities. Converging markets produce more. And of course, some markets fade. In this landscape of continuous flux, it's more important to build corporate-level strategic processes that enable dynamic repositioning than it is to build any particular defensible position. That's why smart corporate strategists use patching, a process of mapping and remapping business units to create a shifting mix of highly focused, tightly aligned businesses that can respond to changing market opportunities. Patching is not just another name for reorganizing; patchers have a distinctive mindset. Traditional managers see structure as stable; patching managers believe structure is inherently temporary. Traditional managers set corporate strategy first, but patching managers keep the organization focused on the right set of business opportunities and let strategy emerge from individual businesses. Although the focus of patching is flexibility, the process itself follows a pattern. Patching changes are usually small in scale and made frequently. Patching should be done quickly; the emphasis is on getting the patch about right and fixing problems later. Patches should have a test drive before they're formalized but then be tightly scripted after they've been announced. And patching won't work without the right infrastructure: modular business units, fine-grained and complete unit-level metrics, and companywide compensation parity. The authors illustrate how patching works and point out some common stumbling blocks. PMID:10387579

  9. Efficacy of single dose epidural morphine versus intermittent low-dose epidural morphine along with bupivacaine for postcaesarean section analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Kiran; Agarwal, Navneet; Agrawal, V. K.; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Mahender

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obstetric anesthesia presents a challenge to the anesthesiologist. The effective pain management allows the partu-rient adequate degree of comfort and promotes physical reco-very and a sense of well being. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy and side effects of 1.20 mg single-dose epidural morphine (Group 1) versus intermittent 12 hourly epidural morphine (0.5 mg) with bupivacaine (Group2) for postoperative analgesia in lower segment caesarean section cases. Results: Each group consisted of 36 patients. Demographic characteristics of two groups were comparable and differences among them were not statistically significant. Mean duration of analgesia was significantly longer in group one patients (16.5±2.5h) in comparison to group two patients (11.5±1.5h). Mean highest visual analog scales (VAS scale) was significantly lower (3.2±0.9) in group one patients in comparison of group two (6.7±0.8) patients. Only 43% patient in group one required supplementary perenteral analgesic (Paracetamole/Diclofenac) and 71% required epidural morphine/bupivacaine in group two. Mean number of supplementary perenteral analgesic required in group one was 0.7 and it was 1.8 in group two. There was no significant difference in nausea, vomiting, itching, and pruritis in two groups of patients. Conclusion: Our study showed that the use of single dose epidural morphine is associated with lower pain scores at rest and movement when compared to intermittent epidural morphine with bupivacaine in postcaesarean section analgesia. PMID:25885497

  10. Single-dose paravertebral blockade versus epidural blockade for pain relief after open renal surgery: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Moawad, Hazem Ebrahem; Mousa, Sherif Abdo; El-Hefnawy, Ahmed S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Paravertebral block (PVB) has been an established technique for providing analgesia to the chest and abdomen. We conducted the current study to compare single-dose PVB versus single-dose epidural blockade (EP) for pain relief after renal surgery. Methods: Eighty patients scheduled for renal surgery were randomly assigned into two groups according to the analgesic technique, PVB group or EP group. General anesthesia was induced for all patients. Postoperative pain was assessed over 24 h using 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Postoperative total pethidine consumption was recorded. Any postoperative events, such as nausea, vomiting, shivering, or respiratory complications, were recorded. Hemodynamics and blood gasometry were also recorded. Results: EP group showed significant decrease of both heart rate and mean blood pressure at most of the operative periods when compared with PVB group. There was no difference in total rescue analgesic consumption. Postoperative VAS showed no significant difference between the studied groups. Postoperative events were comparable in both the groups. Conclusion: Single injection PVB resulted in similar analgesia but greater hemodynamic stability than epidural analgesia in patients undergoing renal surgery, therefore this technique may be recommended for patients with coexisting circulatory disease. PMID:23717235

  11. Epidural buprenorphine or morphine for the relief of head and neck cancer pain.

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Y.; Utsumi, T.; Tanioka, H.; Rigor, B. M.

    1991-01-01

    We present three cases in which epidural buprenorphine or morphine was used for intractable cancer pain of the head and neck. Excellent pain relief and minimal side effects offered by epidural opioids were of significant benefit. The use of epidural opioids prior to the administration of high doses of oral morphine may be the treatment of choice for pain from malignancy of the head and neck, especially when there is tumor extension or distant metastasis. PMID:1811431

  12. Spinal osteotomy in the presence of massive lumbar epidural scarring.

    PubMed

    Arlet, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The combination of Massive epidural scarring and spinal deformity represents the ultimate challenge for the spinal deformity surgeon. This is observed more and more as the population is aging and the number of spine surgery is increasing. In assessing the patient with spinal deformity and epidural scarring, one should carry out a thorough medical work up including Dexa scan, comorbidities, and in most cases a Myelo-CT scan that will identify the extent of the previous fusion, the fixed or semi-rigid nature of the deformity with complete anterior fusion or only bone bridges, the evaluation of the previous instrumentation (if present) with possible screw misplacement, or halo around the screws, the extent of the previous laminectomy, the spinal stenosis and possible arachnoiditis and or meningocele. Once the requirement of deformity correction has been established with specific attention to the pelvic incidence and amount of lordosis required two basic choices can be made. The first one is to perform the spine realignment outside the massive epidural scarring whether this will be performed through simple posterior osteotomies, TLIF combined with Smith-Petersen osteotomies or Pedicle subtraction osteotomies. One should not forget about all the possibilities of an anterior or lateral approach to the spine that can also judiciously realign the spine at the level or at distance of the massive epidural scarring. These anterior realignments have to be supplemented with posterior fixation and or osteotomies. The other alternative is to perform the spine osteotomy at the level of the massive epidural scarring preferably at the junction of normal dura and epidural scar. Working around the dura that will require to be thinned down before the osteotomy is performed represents another challenge where incidental durotomies are not infrequent. During the closing of the osteotomy the dura may not be as giving as a normal dura and too aggressive closure of the osteotomy may not be

  13. Can We Prevent a Postoperative Spinal Epidural Hematoma by Using Larger Diameter Suction Drains?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hak; Chang, Byung Kwon; Lee, Jae Il

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidural hematoma is a rare but serious complication. According to previous studies, it is not prevented by suction drains. This study evaluated the following alternative hypothesis: the larger the diameter of a suction drain, the less the remaining epidural hematoma after spinal surgery. Methods This was a randomized prospective study. Patients who underwent posterior lumbar decompression and instrumented fusion were divided into two groups: the large drain (LD, 2.8-mm-diameter tube) and small drain (SD, 1.6-mm-diameter tube) groups according to the diameter of the suction drains. All patients were consecutive and allocated alternately according to the date of operations. Suction drains were removed on day 3 and magnetic resonance imaging was performed on day 7 postoperatively. The size of remaining hematomas was measured by the degree of thecal sac compression in cross section using the following 4-point numeric scale: G1, less than one quarter; G2, between one quarter and half; G3, more than half; and G4, more than subtotal obstruction. Results There were 39 patients with LDs and 38 with SDs. They did not differ significantly in terms of sex, number of fusion segments, revision or not, antiplatelet medication, intraoperative injection of tranexamic acid. However, patient age differed significantly between the two groups (LD, 63.3 years and < SD, 68.6 years; p = 0.007). The two groups did not differ significantly in terms of prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet number, blood loss, or operation duration. However, platelet function analysis exhibited a significant difference (LD, 164.7 seconds and < SD, 222.3 seconds; p = 0.002). The two blinded readers showed high consistency (Kappa value = 0.740; p = 0.000). The results of reader 1 were as follows: LD and SD had 21 and 21 cases of G1, 9 and 11 cases of G2, 6 and 6 cases of G3, and 3 and 0 cases of G4, respectively. The results of reader 2 were as follows: LD and SD had 22

  14. Improving effectiveness of coke oven patching

    SciTech Connect

    Withrow, J.A.; McCollum, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    An effective patching program is essential to protect the battery against severe damage which would result from air, foul gas, and fuel gas leaks; and to keep it in operating condition for a reasonable life span. In addition to that basic purpose of patching, other areas such as heating efficiency, coke quality, and emissions performance can benefit from an effective program. Clairton Works and US Steel Research have made improvements in the patching program in several broad categories: equipment used for application of patching material, the patching material itself, and practices used in administration of the patching program. The equipment changes include a pusher machine ram-mounted roof patching unit and a new type of patching buggy for use with materials which tend to settle or cake. New materials have been formulated which develop a ceramic bond on the oven refractories and provide superior adherance. Battery Temperature Profiles, Charging Surveys, and Stack Observation Reports are used on a regular basis to identify critical areas for patching beyond those which can be identified by operating personnel on an incidental basis. This paper reviews each of these improvements in Clairton's patching program in terms of the equipment, materials, and practices per se and also discusses the results of implementing these changes.

  15. Histopathological Alterations after Single Epidural Injection of Ropivacaine, Methylprednizolone Acetate, or Contrast Material in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsou, Maria-Chrysanthi; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Demetrios; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Kelekis, Alexis

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The consequences from the injection of different types of drugs in the epidural space remains unknown. Increasing evidence suggests that localized inflammation, fibrosis, and arachnoiditis can complicate sequential epidural blockades, or even epidural contrast injection. We investigate the in vivo effect of epidural injections in the epidural space in an animal model. Materials and Methods: A group of ten male adult pigs, five punctures to each at distinct vertebral interspaces under general anesthesia, were examined, testing different drugs, used regularly in the epidural space (iopamidol, methylprednisolone acetate, ropivacaine). Each site was marked with a percutaneous hook wire marker. Histological analysis of the epidural space, the meninges, and the underlying spinal cord of the punctured sites along with staining for caspase-3 followed 20 days later. Results: The epidural space did not manifest adhesions or any other pathology, and the outer surface of the dura was not impaired in any specimen. The group that had the contrast media injection showed a higher inflammation response compared to the other groups (P = 0.001). Positive staining for caspase-3 was limited to <5% of neurons with all substances used. Conclusion: No proof of arachnoiditis and/or fibrosis was noted in the epidural space with the use of the above-described drugs. A higher inflammation rate was noted with the use of contrast media.

  16. Accuracy of pulse oximeter perfusion index in thoracic epidural anesthesia under basal general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zifeng; Zhang, Jianhai; Xia, Yunfei; Deng, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the change of PVI after thoracic epidural block on the basis of general anesthesia. Methods: In 26 patients undergoing elective upper abdominal operations, changes of SVI, PVI, SVV, PPV and CVP were monitored immediately before and 10 minutes after T8-9 thoracic epidural anesthesia on the basis of general anesthesia. The definition was that patients with ΔSVI greater than 10% belonged to response group to epidural block. Results: Before epidural block, the PVI, SVV and PPV baseline values in patients of response group were significantly higher than those in patients of non-response group. PVI, SVV and PPV after epidural block were significantly higher than immediately before epidural block (P < 0.001). PVI, SVV and PPV baseline values immediately before epidural block were positively correlated with ΔSVI; the correlation coefficients were 0.70, 0.71 and 0.63, respectively, P ≤ 0.001. The optimal critical values for PVI, SVV and PPV to predict response to T8-9 gap epidural block under general anesthesia were 16% (sensitivity 80%, specificity 92%), 13% (sensitivity 90%, specificity 62%) and 12% (sensitivity 90%, specificity 77%), respectively. Conclusion: PVI can be used as a noninvasive indictor to monitor volume change after thoracic epidural block on the basis of general anesthesia. PMID:25126171

  17. [Involuntary Movement of Bilateral Lower Limbs Caused by Epidural Anesthesia: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Toki, Keiko; Yokose, Masashi; Miyashita, Tetsuya; Sato, Hitoshi; Fujimoto, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Sayoko; Goto, Takahisa

    2016-06-01

    Regional anesthesia, especially epidural anesthesia, rarely causes involuntary movement Here we present a case of a patient who demonstrated myoclonus-like involuntary movement of the lower limbs during continuous infusion of ropivacaine, fentanyl, and droperidol through the thoracic epidural catheter. This movement disappeared when the epidural infusion was stopped, but reappeared when the epidural infusion was restarted. Naloxone did not eliminate the movement The patient was thereafter discharged uneventfully. This case and other reports in the literature suggest that involuntary movement associated with regional anesthesia is rare and self-limiting. However, careful consideration should be given to exclude other, potentially dangerous complications. PMID:27483662

  18. ERTS-1 anomalous dark patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Through combined use of imagery from ERTS-1 and NOAA-2 satellites was found that when the sun elevation exceeds 55 degrees, the ERTS-1 imagery is subject to considerable contamination by sunlight even though the actual specular point is nearly 300 nautical miles from nadir. Based on sea surface wave slope information, a wind speed of 10 knots will theoretically provide approximately 0.5 percent incident solar reflectance under observed ERTS multispectral scanner detectors. This reflectance nearly doubles under the influence of a 20 knot wind. The most pronounced effect occurs in areas of calm water where anomalous dark patches are observed. Calm water at distances from the specular point found in ERTS scenes will reflect no solar energy to the multispectral scanner, making these regions stand out as dark areas in all bands in an ocean scene otherwise comprosed by a general diffuse sunlight from rougher ocean surfaces. Anomalous dark patches in the outer parts of the glitter zones may explain the unusual appearance of some scenes.

  19. Exogenous pigment in Peyer's patches

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, N.A.; Crocker, P.R.; Smith, A.P.; Levison, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Dark brown granular pigment was found consistently in macrophages in the deep aspect of adult Peyer's patches. Tissue sections from intestinal resections of 35 patients with a variety of pathologic diagnoses and of seven postmortem cases with no evidence of gastrointestinal disease were examined for the presence of this pigment. It was found in all patients over the age of 6 years (34 cases) but was not found in any children below that age (eight cases). Scanning electron microscopy with secondary and backscattered electron imaging and x-ray energy spectroscopy were performed on routine histologic sections. The pigmented macrophages contained aluminum and silicon, diffusely present throughout the cytoplasm, and numerous discrete foci of titanium. Pigment containing these same elements has also been found around dilated submucosal lymphatics, in mesenteric lymph nodes, and in some transmural inflammatory aggregates of Crohn's disease. The pigment probably is derived from the diet and actively taken up by Peyer's patches, which are able to incorporate inert particulate matter.

  20. Effect of parecoxib combined with thoracic epidural analgesia on pain after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiao-Min; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Ding, Ming; Liu, Qiu-A-Xue

    2016-01-01

    Background Thoracotomy results in severe postoperative pain potentially leading to chronic pain. We investigated the potential benefits of intravenous parecoxib on postoperative analgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). Methods Eighty-six patients undergoing thoracic surgery were randomized into two groups. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) was used until chest tubes were removed. Patients received parecoxib (group P) or placebo (group C) intravenously just 0.5 h before the operation and every 12 h after operation for 3 days. The intensity of pain was measured by using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and recorded at 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, 72 h after operation. The valid number of PCA, the side effects and the overall satisfaction to analgesic therapy in 72 h were recorded. Venous blood samples were taken before operation, the 1st and 3rd day after operation for plasma cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α level. The occurrence of residual pain was recorded using telephone questionnaire 2 and 12 months after surgery. Results Postoperative pain scores at rest and on coughing were significantly lower with the less valid count of PCA and greater patient satisfaction in group P (P<0.01). Adverse effect and the days fit for discharge were comparable between two groups. The cortisol levels in placebo group were higher than parecoxib group at T2. The level of ACTH both decreased in two groups after operation but it was significantly lower in group P than that in group C. There were no changes in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels before and after analgesia at T1 and T2 (P>0.05). The occurrence of residual pain were 25% and 51.2% separately in group P and C 3 months postoperatively (P<0.05). Conclusions Intravenous parecoxib in multimodal analgesia improves postoperative analgesia provided by TEA, relieves stress response after thoracotomy, and may restrain the development of chronic pain. PMID:27162662

  1. Long-term survival in a dog with meningoencephalitis and epidural abscessation due to Actinomyces species.

    PubMed

    Song, Rachel B; Vitullo, Carina A; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Daniels, Joshua B

    2015-07-01

    A 2-year-old, female spayed Golden Retriever dog was presented to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center for evaluation of ataxia, cervical pain, 1 episode of acute collapse, dull mentation, and inappetence. Physical examination revealed an elevated temperature of 39.7°C and severe cervical pain. Blood work revealed a mature neutrophilia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed nondegenerative neutrophilic pleocytosis with no infectious agents. A presumptive diagnosis of steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis was made, and corticosteroid therapy was started. The patient improved initially but experienced a vestibular episode characterized by falling and vertical nystagmus. A magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed an epidural abscess in the cervical vertebral canal and diffuse meningeal enhancement in the brain and cranial cervical spine. Abscess drainage revealed degenerate neutrophils and several filamentous, branching organisms. Culture of the initial CSF using an enrichment broth revealed growth of a Gram-positive organism 5 days after fluid collection. The isolate was identified by partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing as Actinomyces spp. The patient was successfully treated with long-term antibiotics. Our study reports the long-term survival after medical treatment of bacterial meningoencephalitis and epidural abscessation due to Actinomyces sp. infection in a dog. Bacterial meningoencephalitis should be included as a differential diagnosis in patients with cervical pain and fever, even when a nondegenerative neutrophilic pleocytosis is found on CSF analysis. Culture of the CSF with use of an enrichment broth should be considered in all cases of neutrophilic pleocytosis to rule out infections of the central nervous system. PMID:26069224

  2. [Epidural abscess due to a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain with primary resistance to isoniazid and ethambutol].

    PubMed

    Sener, Alper; Akçalı, Alper; Karatağ, Ozan; Koşar, Sule; Değirmenci, Yıldız; Akman, Tarık

    2012-10-01

    Tuberculosis is primarily characterized by pulmonary involvement, however, one third of the cases exhibit extrapulmonary tuberculosis. In this report, a case of epidural abscess due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis with primary resistance to isoniazid and ethambutol was presented. A 57-year-old male patient was admitted to emergency service with ten days history of weakness in legs, disability of walking and fever. Neurological examination revealed paraplegia of lower extremities, numbness distal to T2 disc level and hyperactivity of deep tendon reflexes indicating transverse myelitis. Laboratory findings were as follows; ESR: 74 mm/hour, CRP: 22 g/L, ALT: 42 IU/L, AST: 45 IU/L and white blood cell count 23.000/mm3 (45% polymorphonuclear leukocyte, 45% lymphocyte, 10% monocyte). Spinal magnetic resonance imaging showed a fusiform abscess localized at anterior epidural space and extending along levels of C5-6 and C6-7. The longitudinal dimension of the abscess was 3 cm. The lesion was hypointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2 weighted MRI images with prominent rim shaped contrast enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. At fourth day of hospitalization the patient underwent neurosurgical management. M.tuberculosis was isolated from the cultures of operation material by Mycobacteria Growth Incubator Tube system (MGIT, BBL; BD, USA) on the 12th day. The isolate was found susceptible to streptomycin and rifampisin, but resistant to isoniazid and ethambutol. The treatment was initiated with rifampicin 600 mg/day, pyrazinamid 2 g/day, ethambutol 1.5 g/day and levofloxacin 500 mg/day. At the end of second month levofloxacin 500 mg/day and rifampisin 600 mg/day combination was sustained and total treatment period was planned as nine months. As far as the national literature was considered, this was the first case of extrapulmonary tuberculosis with primary resistance to isoniazid and ethambutol. PMID:23188583

  3. [CHARACTERISTICS OF COMBINED ANESTHESIA WITH EPIDURAL COMPONENTE DEPENDING ON VEGETATIVE NERVOUS SYSTEM TYPE].

    PubMed

    Hasanov, F J; Aslanov, A A; Muradov, N F; Namazova, K N

    2016-01-01

    The research objective was to study the characteristics of combined anesthesia with epidural componente (CAEC) depending on vegetative nervous system type (VNS) in patients who underwent large scale traumatic surgical operations on abdominal cavity organs. The scientific research was conducted in Anaesthesiology--Reanimation Department of the Scientific Surgical Centre named after acad. MA. Topchubashev, the Ministry of Health of the Azerbaijan Republic. The research objects were 69 patients who underwent operations in conditions of CAEC due to different serious surgical pathologies of abdominal cavity organs. VNS type was identified based on electroencephalogram, Cerdo Vegetative Index (CVI), Hildebrandt coefficient (HC) and single neurophysiological tests. The patients were divided into three groups depending on VNS type: I--normotonics--17 patients (24.7%), II--sympathatonics--25 patients (36.2%), and III--vagotonics--27 patients (39.1%). Blood adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol concentration were studied in 3 stages: I -preoperative, II--operation traumatic stage, III--the 1st postoperative days. The other indicators (heart rate, systolic blood pressure--SBP, dyastolic blood pressure--DBR average blood pressure--BP ave., pulse oximetry SpO₂, ECG, gases in blood and acid-base balance, electrolytes, blood glucose level, myocardium oxygen demand--MOD) were registered after 20 minutes and the 2nd day after operation besides the above stages. The research results indicated that it is possible to define the vegetative nervous system type superiority based on complex of single tests data, EEG, ECG, Cerdo Vegetative Index, Hildebrandt coefficient. CAEC can be considered optimun alternative of general anesthesia ensuring neurohumoral and hemodynamic stability in large scale, traumatic operations on abdominal cavity organs. Clinical course of CAEC is characterized by firmer hemodynamic and humoral stability in patients with functional balance of

  4. [Spinal epidural abscess as a complication of a finger infection].

    PubMed

    Ridderikhof, M L; van den Brink, W A; van Dalsen, A D; Kieft, H

    2008-06-21

    An 81-year-old man was treated with intravenous antibiotics for a soft tissue infection in a finger. Despite adequate antibiotic treatment, he developed signs of spinal cord injury caused by a cervical spinal epidural abscess. An emergency laminectomy was performed. The neurological impairment appeared to be irreversible, and the patient died. Spinal epidural abscess is a rare and serious complication ofa bacteraemia. It is often caused by an infection of the skin or soft tissue with Staphylococcus aureus. Given the risk of rapidly progressive and irreversible neurological damage, this complication must be treated as soon as possible. The treatment of choice is surgery. Conservative management with intravenous antibiotics is an option only under strict conditions. PMID:18624007

  5. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Isolated to the Thoracic Epidural Spine.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Benjamin; Talbott, Jason; Uzelac, Alina; Rehani, Bhavya

    2015-11-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare benign histiocytic disease that infrequently presents in the spine. We report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease isolated to the epidural thoracic spine in a 26-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the 15th reported case of isolated spinal disease and only the fourth case of isolated thoracic epidural disease. Given its rarity as well as non-specific symptoms and imaging findings, Rosai-Dorfman disease is often not considered and misdiagnosed on imaging studies. To help improve awareness of Rosai-Dorfman spinal disease, we review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. PMID:27252790

  6. Spontaneous spinal epidural hemorrhage from intense piano playing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Ju; Su, Fang Jy; Huang, Ying C; Chen, Shih-Han

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare but real neurosurgical emergency. It is caused by atraumatic rupture of the vertebral epidural vein that results in nerve root or spinal cord compression. Most cases of SSEH have a multifactorial etiology, including congenital and acquired coagulopathies; platelet dysfunction; vascular malformation; tumors; uncontrolled hypertension; pregnancy; and, very rarely, activities requiring Valsalva. Herein we reported the case of a young pianist who was attacked by SSEH during piano practice. Playing the piano is a joyful, relaxing entertainment; however, this musical activity can be a highly demanding physical and mental exercise for pianists. Emotional and expressive performance, especially in professional performing, has been reported to result in significant increase of sympathetic and decrease of parasympathetic activities and thus influence the cardiorespiratory variables. The increased biomechanical stress from fluctuating hemodynamics was thought to trigger the rupture of her spinal arteriovenous malformation. PMID:24418452

  7. The topographical anatomy of the lumbar epidural space.

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, I G; Harrison, G R

    1985-01-01

    Although clinically important, the lumbar epidural space is inconsistently described in textbooks of both anatomy and anaesthetics. This anatomical study of twelve cadavers was performed in an attempt to clarify the description of this region. The dura mater, which possesses a midline fold in a very few cases, is apposed to the walls of the vertebral canal, and attached to them by connective tissue, which is sufficient to allow for displacement of the dural sac during movement of the spine and venous engorgement. Between the dura mater and the vertebral canal is a thin layer of areolar tissue. This contains the internal vertebral venous plexus and a posterior deposit of fat which lies in a recess between the ligamenta flava. These findings are discussed in relation to previous studies in an attempt to arrive at a cohesive description of the epidural region. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:4077717

  8. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Isolated to the Thoracic Epidural Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Benjamin; Talbott, Jason; Uzelac, Alina; Rehani, Bhavya

    2015-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare benign histiocytic disease that infrequently presents in the spine. We report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease isolated to the epidural thoracic spine in a 26-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the 15th reported case of isolated spinal disease and only the fourth case of isolated thoracic epidural disease. Given its rarity as well as non-specific symptoms and imaging findings, Rosai-Dorfman disease is often not considered and misdiagnosed on imaging studies. To help improve awareness of Rosai-Dorfman spinal disease, we review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. PMID:27252790

  9. Complete nonsurgical resolution of a spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Silber, S H

    1996-07-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas (SSEH) are heralded by spinal pain and progressive cord compression syndromes which may lead to permanent neurological disability or death if emergent neurosurgical intervention is delayed. It therefore must be considered early in the differential diagnosis of acute spinal cord compression syndrome. A case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma presenting as an acute myelopathy in a clarinet player who chronically used a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication is presented. The case was remarkable for the rare complete spontaneous resolution of neurological function. Approximately 250 cases of SSEH have been reported in the medical literature, although only a handful of these patients have recovered spontaneously. This is the sixth report of such an event. The etiologies, contributing factors, disease progression, and treatment recommendations are discussed. PMID:8768163

  10. Lumbar spine osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Godhania, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with no previous medical history presented with abdominal and low back pain. Based on clinical and radiological findings he was diagnosed with L1/L2 osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Further history taking revealed recent use of acupuncture for treatment of mechanical back pain. The patient was treated conservatively with an extended course of antibiotics, monitored with repeat MRI scans and had a full recovery with no neurological deficit. This is the first reported case of epidural abscess formation and osteomyelitis after acupuncture in the UK. As acupuncture becomes more commonly used in western countries, it is important to be aware of this rare but serious complication. PMID:26976275

  11. Post-operative epidural analgesia: effects on lung volumes.

    PubMed

    Wahba, W M; Don, H F; Craig, D B

    1975-07-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the role of post-operative pain in reducing Functional Residual Capacity (FRC) and Vital Capacity (VC). The efficacy of post-operative epidural analgesia in reversing these changes was measured in eight subjects after upper abdominal operations. With pain, FRC and VC were 78 per cent and 37 per cent of control respectively. Following epidural analgesia, the values were 84 per cent and 55 per cent. These figures indicate the pain component in the post-operative reduction of these two lung capacities. This partial restoration may be of value in the prevention of post-operative pulmonary complications by avoiding closure of small airways during tidal breathing and by increasing the effectiveness of deep breathing and coughing in the removal of secretions and the reversal of atelectasis. PMID:1095163

  12. Salmonella typhimurium epidural empyema in an HIV-infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Hachfi, Wissem; Bellazreg, Foued; Ladib, Mohamed; Kaabia, Naoufel; Khalifa, Mabrouk; Krifa, Hedi; Letaief, Amel

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella focal intracranial infections are reported rarely. They tend to occur in immunocompromised patients. We present here a case of Salmonella typhimurium epidural empyema, with osteomyelitis of the adjacent frontal bone, in a 37-year-old human immunodeficiency virus positive man who presented with a three-day history of headache, fever, and sweats. He was treated successfully with antibiotics and surgical drainage. PMID:24470883

  13. Subdural Hematoma as a Consequence of Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tracy M.; Elsayed, Kareem S.; Kane, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Regional spinal and epidural anesthesia are used commonly in operative procedures. While the most frequent complication, postdural puncture headache (PDPH), is a clinically diagnosed positional headache that is usually self-limited, subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a potentially fatal complication that cannot be missed. We report a case of an otherwise healthy female who presented with persistent positional headache and was ultimately found to have a large subdural hematoma with midline shift requiring surgical evacuation. PMID:26697237

  14. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Prostatic Small Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Solitary, spinal epidural metastasis (SEM) that is not related to vertebral metastasis is very rare. And solitary SEM from prostatic cancer is rarely found in previously published reports. However, it is clinically significant due to the possibility of neurologic dysfunction, and it can be assessed by MRI. In this report, we show a case of solitary SEM arising from prostatic small cell carcinoma detected by MRI. PMID:27413569

  15. Electrochemical cell with a cadmium patch electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, A.E.; Bloom, S.M.; Hoffman, A.; Norland, K.

    1980-01-22

    A cadmium patch laminar electrode, comprising a dispersion of particulate cadmium in a binder matrix on a conductive plastic substrate is prepared by contacting a zinc patch electrode comprising a dispersion of particulate zinc in a binder matrix on a conductive plastic substrate with an aqueous solution of a cadmium salt. The cadmium patch electrode can be used in a primary electrochemical cell such as that employing a manganese dioxide cathode and a cadmium chloride electrolyte.

  16. Multi-Mode Broadband Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A multi-mode broad band patch antenna is provided that allows for the same aperture to be used at independent frequencies such as reception at 19 GHz and transmission at 29 GHz. Furthermore, the multi-mode broadband patch antenna provides a ferroelectric film that allows for tuning capability of the multi-mode broadband patch antenna over a relatively large tuning range. The alternative use of a semiconductor substrate permits reduced control voltages since the semiconductor functions as a counter electrode.

  17. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Christodoulou, Christos George; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-01-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  18. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, Christos George; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-07-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  19. Evaluation of the Neurological Safety of Epidural Milnacipran in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung Mo; Shin, Mee Ran; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kang, Hyun; Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Kim, Baek Hui; Lim, Young Jin; Lee, Sang Chul

    2012-01-01

    Background Milnacipran is a balanced serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor with minimal side effects and broad safety margin. It acts primarily on the descending inhibitory pain pathway in brain and spinal cord. In many animal studies, intrathecal administration of milnacipran is effective in neuropathic pain management. However, there is no study for the neurological safety of milnacipran when it is administered neuraxially. This study examined the neurotoxicity of epidural milnacipran by observing behavioral and sensory-motor changes with histopathological examinations of spinal cords in rats. Methods Sixty rats were divided into 3 groups, with each group receiving epidural administration of either 0.3 ml (3 mg) of milnacipran (group M, n = 20), 0.3 ml of 40% alcohol (group A, n = 20), or 0.3 ml of normal saline (group S, n = 20). Results There were no abnormal changes in the behavioral, sensory-motor, or histopathological findings in all rats of groups M and S over a 3-week observation period, whereas all rats in group A had abnormal changes. Conclusions Based on these findings, the direct epidural administration of milnacipran in rats did not present any evidence of neurotoxicity in behavioral, sensory-motor and histopathological evaluations. PMID:23091683

  20. Efficacy of continuous epidural block in acute herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo Na; Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Eung Don

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate efficacy of continuous epidural block for prevent postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) progression in cases of acute herpes zoster with severe pain and also to identify predictive factors for PHN in such conditions. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of patients with herpes zoster who underwent continuous epidural block between March 2013 and October 2015. Time points were set as 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after zoster onset. PHN was defined as the presence of pain with NRS ≥3 at certain time points. The incidence of developing PHN was 38.1%, 27.0%, and 19.0% 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after zoster onset, respectively. Age and duration of catheterization were predictive factors for PHN at 1 month. Age, duration of catheterization, and NRS at first visit were identified as predictive factors for PHN at 3 months. Presence of diabetes, duration of catheterization, and NRS during catheterization were significant predictive factors for PHN at 6 months. The incidence of PHN is higher in zoster patients with severe pain that requires continuous epidural block compared to incidence in the general population. Advanced age and severe initial pain intensity were predictive factors of PHN development. Prolonged catheterization resulting from weak response to treatment strongly suggested progression to PHN. PMID:27512887

  1. Transdermal fentanyl patches in small animals.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Erik H; Egger, Christine M

    2004-01-01

    Fentanyl citrate is a potent opioid that can be delivered by the transdermal route in cats and dogs. Publications regarding transdermal fentanyl patches were obtained and systematically reviewed. Seven studies in cats and seven studies in dogs met the criteria for inclusion in this review. Dogs achieved effective plasma concentrations approximately 24 hours after patch application. Cats achieved effective plasma concentrations 7 hours after patch application. In dogs, transdermal fentanyl produced analgesia for up to 72 hours, except for the immediate 0- to 6-hour postoperative period. In cats, transdermal fentanyl produced analgesia equivalent to intermittent butorphanol administration for up to 72 hours following patch application. PMID:15533967

  2. Investigation of Effects of Epidural Anaesthesia Combined with General Anaesthesia on the Stress Response in Patients Undergoing Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sağlık, Yeliz; Yazıcıoğlu, Dilek; Çiçekler, Osman; Gümüş, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of general anaesthesia and general+epidural anaesthesia on the stress response which was evaluated with the adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, insulin, and glucose levels and the haemodynamic parameters. Methods Forty two, American Society of Anesthesiologists physiologic status I–II, patients undergoing hip and knee arthroplasty were randomized into two groups; general anaesthesia (Group G) and general anaesthesia+epidural anaesthesia (Group E). Epidural anaesthesia: patients in Group E received epidural anaesthesia with 0.5% bupivacaine, a lumbar epidural catheter was placed and after achieving sensorial block at T10 dermatome, general anaesthesia was commenced. General anaesthesia was standardized in both groups. Further, plasma ACTH, cortisol, insulin and glucose levels were determined at preoperative=t1, after the surgical incision=t2, postoperative 2nd hour=t3 and postoperative 24th hour=t4. Perioperative heart rate, blood pressures, pain scores and morphine consumption were also determined. Results ACTH levels were higher in Group G than Group E [Group G, t2: 71.4±39.9 pg mL−1, t3: 578.6±566.1 pg mL−1, Group E, t2: 20.2±16.2 pg mL−1, t3: 56.3±73.6 pg mL−1 (p<0.001)]. Cortisol, was higher in Group G compared with Group E [Group G, t3: 33.4±13.1 μg dL−1, t4: 34.1±22.5 μg dL−1, Group E, t3: 19.1±10.3 μg dL−1, t4: 21.3±8.1 μg dL−1 (p=0.001 and p=0.002)]. The insulin levels were higher compared with the baseline values at t3, and glucose was higher at t3 and t4 in both groups. Haemodynamic parameters were stable in Group E, and pain scores and morphine consumption were higher in Group G than in Group E. Conclusion Our results suggest that epidural anaesthesia combined with general anaesthesia suppressed the stress response, which was evaluated with ACTH, cortisol levels and haemodynamic parameters; however, this method was ineffective to attenuate the increase in glucose and insulin

  3. Epidural versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia after Pediatric Thoracotomy for Malignancy: A Preliminary Review.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Katherine W; Dalton, Brian G; Millspaugh, Daniel L; Thomas, Priscilla G; St Peter, Shawn David

    2016-08-01

    Introduction The use of thoracic epidural is standard in adult thoracotomy patients facilitating earlier mobilization, deep breathing, and minimizing narcotic effects. However, a recent randomized trial in pediatric patients who undergo repair of pectus excavatum suggests patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) produces a less costly, minimally invasive postoperative course compared with epidural. Given that thoracotomy is typically less painful than pectus bar placement, we compared the outcomes of epidural to PCA for pain management after pediatric thoracotomy. Methods A retrospective review of 17 oncologic thoracotomies was performed at a children's hospital from 2004 to 2013. Data points included operative details, epidural or PCA use, urinary catheterization, days to regular diet, days to oral pain regimen, postoperative pain scores, length of stay, and anesthesia charges. Patients were excluded if they did not have epidural or PCA following thoracotomy. Results Six thoracotomies were managed with an epidural and 11 with a PCA. Three epidural patients were opiate naïve compared with two with a PCA. The most common indication for thoracotomy was metastatic osteosarcoma (n = 13). When comparing epidural to PCA, there was no significant difference in days to removal of Foley catheter, regular diet, oral pain control, length of stay, or total operating room time. Postoperative pain scores were also comparable. The mean anesthesia charges were significantly higher in patients with an epidural than with a PCA. Conclusion Epidural catheter and PCA provided comparable pain relief and objective recovery course in children who underwent thoracotomy for oncologic disease; however, epidural catheter placement was associated with increased anesthesia charges, suggesting that PCA is a noninvasive, cost-effective alternative. PMID:26018213

  4. The use of combined spinal-epidural technique to compare intrathecal ziconotide and epidural opioids for trialing intrathecal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Amitabh; Loh, Jeffrey; Puttanniah, Vinay; Malhotra, Vivek

    2013-03-01

    SUMMARY Choosing the initial medications for intrathecal delivery is often confusing and not standardized. We describe a novel way for using a combined spinal-epidural technique to compare two first-line medications for intrathecal delivery; ziconotide and morphine (or hydromorphone). Five patients with intractable chronic or cancer pain were elected to have an intrathecal drug delivery system implanted for pain management. Each patient was given a 3-day inpatient trial with the combined spinal-epidural technique. The Visual Analog Scale, Numerical Rating Scale, short-term McGill questionnaire and opioid consumption were monitored daily. The results were used to develop a paradigm to describe how ziconotide can be used in practice. PMID:24645996

  5. Hydromyelia secondary to spinal epidural abscess. A case report.

    PubMed

    Saponiero, R; Toriello, A; Locatelli, G; Narciso, N; Posteraro, L; Panza, M P; Napoli, A N; Romano, F; Pugliese, N D

    2010-06-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare condition that can be fatal if untreated. Risk factors are immunocompromised states as well as spinal procedures including epidural anesthesia and spinal surgery. The signs and symptoms of SEA are nonspecific and can range from low back pain to sepsis. The treatment of choice is surgical decompression followed by four to six weeks of antibiotic therapy. The most common causative organism in SEA is staphylococcus aureus and spread is usually haematogenous or contiguous from psoas, paraspinal or retropharyngeal abscesses. The exact mechanism by which an epidural abscess causes spinal cord damage is unclear. In fact, the damage is often out of proportion to the degree of compression demonstrated radiologically. There is only a report of a patient with syrinx formation secondary to epidural abscess. We describe the case of a 48-year-old woman with a two-week history of thoracic back pain and evidence of dorsal SEA probably from contiguous psoas abscess. Neurological examination revealed flaccid paraplegia and loss of sphincter control. A spinal MRI scan with Gd-enhancement revealed focal high intensity signal in the T2-weighted and FLAIR images at the level of the vertebral bodies in segments D3-D11. The patient was treated with posterior decompression and drainage of the SEA, but with a poor outcome. Six weeks after the onset of symptoms, an MRI scan showed a newly-formed hydromyelia formation from D4 to D8. The case reported is the second to describe hydromyelia formation secondary to epidural abscess and a poor outcome, experiencing partial improvement without recovery. For this reason, we confirmed that the essential problem of SEA lies in the need for early diagnosis, because the early signs and symptoms may be vague and the "classic" triad of back pain, fever and variable neurological deficits occur in only 13% of patients by the time of diagnosis. Only timely treatment will avoid or reduce permanent neurological deficits

  6. Patch voltage clamp of squid axon membrane.

    PubMed

    Fishman, H M

    1975-12-01

    A small area (patch) of the external surface of a squid axon can be "isolated" electrically from the surrounding bath by means of a pair of concentric glass pipettes. The seawater-filled inner pipette makes contact with the axon and constitutes the external access to the patch. The outer pipette is used to direct flowing sucrose solution over the area surrounding the patch of membrane underlying the inner pipette. Typically, sucrose isolated patches remain in good condition (spike amplitude greater than 90 mV) for periods of approximately one half hour. Patches of axon membrane which had previously been exposed to sucrose solution were often excitable. Membrane survival of sucrose treatment apparently arises from an outflow of ions from the axon and perhaps satellite cells into the interstitial cell space surrounding the exolemma. Estimate of the total access resistance (electrode plus series resistance) to the patch is about 100 komega (7 omega cm2). Patch capacitance ranges from 10-100 pF, which suggests areas of 10(-4) to 10(-5) cm2 and resting patch resistances of 10-100 Momega. Shunt resistance through the interstitial space exposed to sucrose solution, which isolates the patch, is typically 1-2 Momega. These parameters indicate that good potential control and response times can be achieved on a patch. Furthermore, spatial uniformity is demonstrated by measurement of an exoplasmic isopotential during voltage clamp of an axon patch. The method may be useful for other preparations in which limited membrane area is available or in special instances such as in the measurement of membrane conduction noise. PMID:1214276

  7. Tissue blood flow mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    The operating principles of Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging (LDPI) for visualization of the tissue blood perfusion are explained. Using this emerging technology skin perfusion has been investigated in healthy volunteers and in patients with various conditions that affect skin blood flow. LDPI is anticipated to be particularly useful in evaluation of peripheral circulation in diabetics, as an objective tool in irritancy patch testing, assessment of burnt skin and visualization of spot-wise hyperperfusion in breast skin in association with carcinoma.

  8. HotPatch Web Gateway: Statistical Analysis of Unusual Patches on Protein Surfaces

    DOE Data Explorer

    Pettit, Frank K.; Bowie, James U. [DOE-Molecular Biology Institute

    HotPatch finds unusual patches on the surface of proteins, and computes just how unusual they are (patch rareness), and how likely each patch is to be of functional importance (functional confidence (FC).) The statistical analysis is done by comparing your protein's surface against the surfaces of a large set of proteins whose functional sites are known. Optionally, HotPatch can also write a script that will display the patches on the structure, when the script is loaded into some common molecular visualization programs. HotPatch generates complete statistics (functional confidence and patch rareness) on the most significant patches on your protein. For each property you choose to analyze, you'll receive an email to which will be attached a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors (temp. factors) are replaced by patch indices; and the PDB file's Header Remarks will give statistical scores and a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors are replaced by the raw values of the property used for patch analysis (for example, hydrophobicity instead of hydrophobic patches). [Copied with edits from http://hotpatch.mbi.ucla.edu/

  9. Gravity Survey of the Rye Patch KGRA, Rye Patch, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcdonald, M. R.; Gosnold, W. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Rye Patch Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) is located in Pershing County Nevada on the west side of the Humboldt Range and east of the Rye Patch Reservoir approximately 200 km northeast of Reno, Nevada. Previous studies include an earlier gravity survey, 3-D seismic reflection, vertical seismic profiling (VSP) on a single well, 3-D seismic imaging, and a report of the integrated seismic studies. Recently, Presco Energy conducted an aeromagnetic survey and is currently in the process of applying 2-D VSP methods to target exploration and production wells at the site. These studies have indicated that geothermal fluid flow primarily occurs along faults and fractures and that two potential aquifers include a sandstone/siltstone member of the Triassic Natchez Pass Formation and a karst zone that occurs at the interface between Mesozoic limestone and Tertiary volcanics. We hypothesized that addition of a high-resolution gravity survey would better define the locations, trends, lengths, and dip angles of faults and possible solution cavity features. The gravity survey encompassed an area of approximately 78 km2 (30 mi2) within the boundary of the KGRA along with portions of 8 sections directly to the west and 8 sections directly to the east. The survey included 203 stations that were spaced at 400 m intervals. The simple Bouguer anomaly patterns were coincident with elevation, and those patterns remained after terrain corrections were performed. To remove this signal, the data were further processed using wave-length (bandpass) filtering techniques. The results of the filtering and comparison with the recent aeromagnetic survey indicate that the location and trend of major fault systems can be identified using this technique. Dip angles can be inferred by the anomaly contour gradients. By further reductions in the bandpass window, other features such as possible karst solution channels may also be recognizable. Drilling or other geophysical methods such as a

  10. Nonanalgesic benefits of combined thoracic epidural analgesia with general anesthesia in high risk elderly off pump coronary artery bypass patients

    PubMed Central

    Zawar, Bhanu Prakash; Mehta, Yatin; Juneja, Rajiv; Arora, Dheeraj; Raizada, Arun; Trehan, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Epidural anesthesia is a central neuraxial block technique with many applications. It is a versatile anesthetic technique, with applications in surgery, obstetrics and pain control. Its versatility means it can be used as an anesthetic, as an analgesic adjuvant to general anesthesia, and for postoperative analgesia. Off pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery triggers a systemic stress response as seen in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA), combined with general anesthesia (GA) attenuates the stress response to CABG. There is Reduction in levels of Plasma epinephrine, Cortisol and catecholamine surge, tumor necrosis factor-Alpha(TNF ά), interleukin-6 and leucocyte count. Design: A prospective randomised non blind study. Setting: A clinical study in a multi specialty hospital. Participants: Eighty six patients. Material and Methods/intervention: The study was approved by hospital research ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients were randomised to receive either GA plus epidural (study group) or GA only (control group). Inclusion Criteria (for participants) were -Age ≥ 70 years, Patient posted for OPCAB surgery, and patient with comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, renal dysfunction). Serum concentration of Interlukin: – 6, TNF ά, cortisol, Troponin – I, CK-MB, and HsCRP (highly sensitive C reactive protein), was compared for both the group and venous blood samples were collected and compared just after induction, at day 2, and day 5 postoperatively. Time to mobilization, extubation, total intensive care unit stay and hospital stay were noted and compared. Independent t test was used for statistical analysis. Primary Outcomes: Postoperative complications, total intensive care unit stay and hospital stay. Secondary Outcome: Stress response. Result: Study group showed

  11. Postoperative urinary retention in a dog following morphine with bupivacaine epidural analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Herperger, L J

    1998-01-01

    Urinary retention, overflow incontinence, and subsequent detrusor atony were observed following surgery in which a morphine with bupivacaine epidural injection was used for perioperative analgesia. The premise that the urinary retention may have been due to the effects of the morphine component of the epidural is discussed, along with other possible causes. PMID:9789679

  12. A Case of Extensive Sacral Decubitus Ulcer Complicated by an Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Mai; Hiratsuka, Munehisa; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We herein report a 62-year-old man with an extensive sacral decubitus ulcer complicated by an epidural abscess. An epidural abscess is a rare disease, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a deep infection with decubitus. Moreover, the diagnosis may be late in such instances and should be carefully considered when a patient has paralysis.

  13. Immunoisolation Patch System for Cellular Transplantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An immunoisolation patch system, and particularly a patch system comprising multiple immunoisolation microcapsules, each encapsulating biological material such as cells for transplantation, which can be used in the prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of disease in large animals and humans without the need for immunosuppression.

  14. Transdermal patches: history, development and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Michael N; Kalia, Yogeshvar N; Horstmann, Michael; Roberts, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Transdermal patches are now widely used as cosmetic, topical and transdermal delivery systems. These patches represent a key outcome from the growth in skin science, technology and expertise developed through trial and error, clinical observation and evidence-based studies that date back to the first existing human records. This review begins with the earliest topical therapies and traces topical delivery to the present-day transdermal patches, describing along the way the initial trials, devices and drug delivery systems that underpin current transdermal patches and their actives. This is followed by consideration of the evolution in the various patch designs and their limitations as well as requirements for actives to be used for transdermal delivery. The properties of and issues associated with the use of currently marketed products, such as variability, safety and regulatory aspects, are then described. The review concludes by examining future prospects for transdermal patches and drug delivery systems, such as the combination of active delivery systems with patches, minimally invasive microneedle patches and cutaneous solutions, including metered-dose systems. PMID:25560046

  15. Bulkhead interface chassis for optical fiber patching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, M.

    1985-06-01

    An optical fiber patch panel was designed to meet the changing needs of optical fiber communication link installations. This paper deals with the specification and construction details of the Bulkhead Interface Chassis patch panel. Included is ordering information for the commercial parts needed and shop drawings of the pieces to be machined.

  16. Epidural bleeding after ACL reconstruction under regional anaesthesia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Poultsides, Lazaros A; Gougoulias, Nikolaos E; Liakou, Paraskevi D; Karachalios, Theofilos S; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Epidural bleeding as a complication of catheterization or epidural catheter removal is often associated with perioperative thromboprophylaxis especially in adult reconstructive surgery. Case presentation We report on a case of a 19 years old male athlete that underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, receiving low molecular weight heparin for thromboprophylaxis and developed an epidural hematoma and subsequent cauda equina syndrome two days after removal of the epidural catheter. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed an epidural hematoma from the level of L3 to L4. Emergent decompression and hematoma evacuation resulted in patient's significant neurological improvement immediately postoperatively. Conclusion A high index of clinical suspicion and surgical intervention are necessary to prevent such potentially disabling complications especially after procedures on a day-case basis and early patient's discharge. PMID:19829853

  17. The C2 ganglion sectioning epidural approach to craniocervical junction chordoma: a technical case report.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Naoshi; Matsushima, Toshio; Kawashima, Masatou; Hikita, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In chordoma, complete surgical removal of the epidural tumor should be the first choice of treatment. Numerous surgical approaches to clival chordoma have been described: anterior approaches, lateral approaches, and posterolateral approaches. A multistaged operation with a combination of these approaches is generally performed. We used three approaches to remove a clival chordoma extending from the lower clivus anteriorly to the anterior perivertebral space and inferiorly to the C2 level. The epidural posterolateral approach through the vertebral artery (VA)-C2 interval space after resection of the C2 dorsal ganglion was the most effective. To our knowledge, the epidural posterolateral approach below VA, referred to as C2 ganglion sectioning epidural approach has not been reported as an independent approach in detail. We report a two-year-old girl with a lower clival chordoma which has been excised using C2 ganglion sectioning epidural approach. PMID:23287329

  18. Tendon graft substitutes-rotator cuff patches.

    PubMed

    Coons, David A; Alan Barber, F

    2006-09-01

    Over the past few years, many biologic patches have been developed to augment repairs of large or complex tendon tears. These patches include both allograft and xenografts. Regardless of their origins, these products are primarily composed of purified type I collagen. Many factors should be considered when choosing an augmentation patch including tissue origin, graft processing, cross-linking, clinical experience, and physical properties. The purpose of this article is to familiarize the sports medicine community with several tendon augmentation grafts: GraftJacket (Wright Medical Technology, Arlington, TN), CuffPatch (Organogenesis, Canton, MA, licensed to Arthrotek, Warsaw, IN), Restore (Depuy, Warsaw, IN), Zimmer Collagen Repair (Permacol) patch (Tissue Science Laboratories Covington, GA, licensed to Zimmer, Warsaw, IN), TissueMend (TEI Biosciences, Boston, MA, licensed to Stryker Howmedica Osteonics, Kalamazoo, MI), OrthoADAPT (Pegasus Biologics, Irvine, CA), and BioBlanket (Kensey Nash, Exton, PA). PMID:17135966

  19. Engineered Tissue Patch for Cardiac Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianyi

    2015-01-01

    Opinion statement Cell therapy can be administered via injections delivered directly into the myocardium or as engineered cardiac tissue patches, which are the subject of this review. Engineered cardiac patches can be created from sheets of interconnected cells or by suspending the cells in a scaffold of material that is designed to mimic the native extracellular matrix. The sheet-based approach produces patches with well-aligned and electronically coupled cardiomyocytes, but cell-containing scaffolds are more readily vascularized by the host's circulatory system and, consequently, are currently more suitable for applications that require a thicker patch. Cell patches can also be modified for the co-delivery of peptides that may promote cell survival and activate endogenous repair mechanisms; nevertheless, techniques for controlling inflammation, limiting apoptosis, and improving vascular growth need continue to be developed to make it a therapeutic modality for patients with myocardial infarction. PMID:26122908

  20. Safe patch version 0.9 user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, M

    1999-03-01

    The SafePatch version 0.9 provides automated analysis of network-based computer systems to determine the status of security patches and distributes needed patches. SafePatch determines what patches need to be installed and what patches are installed on a system. SafePatch will distribute needed patches to the remote system for later installation. For those patches that are installed, SafePatch checks the permissions and ownership of the files referenced in the patch and reports on the attributes that differ from those recommended by the patch. SafePatch also ensures that the system software is authentic (that is, belonging to either a release of an operating system or a patch). The process SafePatch uses to authenticate the software on a system is more reliable and secure than other vendor-specific tools. SafePatch compares the remote system's files with the files from the patches to determine what is actually installed and what needs to be installed. This approach ensures accurate reporting of a system's patch status. It also allows SafePatch to identify files that do not belong to either the original system distribution (for example, Solaris 2.5) or to any patch. These unidentified files may be customized or trojan. Either way these files should be investigated further to determine their exact origin.

  1. An in vitro comparison of the electrical conducting properties of multiport versus single-port epidural catheters for the epidural stimulation test.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ban C H; Sze, Corey K C

    2005-11-01

    Effective conduction of electricity through a catheter is essential for the success of the epidural stimulation test. In this in vitro study we examined the electrical conductivity of single and multiport epidural catheters (with and without embedded metal elements) after being primed with normal saline. Seven different types of 19-gauge catheters (n = 5), either single-port or multiport catheters, with or without embedded metal elements, were studied. The proximal end of each epidural catheter was connected to the cathode of a nerve stimulator via an electrode adapter. The catheter, primed with normal saline, was placed at the bottom of a syringe filled with 5 different volumes of saline (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 mL) and attached to an electrode adapter. The voltage of the peripheral nerve stimulator was measured using an oscilloscope. The electrical resistance between the proximal and distal end of the catheter was calculated using Ohm's Law. In catheters without metal elements the electrical resistances were too high to be measured. In catheters that had metal elements, the mean electrical resistances of the same catheter design (single-port or multiport) were similar. However, the electrical resistances of the multiport metal reinforced epidural catheters were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than the single-port metal coil reinforced epidural catheters. The volume of saline in the syringe had no impact on the measured electrical resistances. This study suggests that multiport metal reinforced epidural catheters have low electrical resistances and, thus, are a reasonable alternative to single-port catheters for transmitting sufficient current for performing the epidural stimulation test. On the other hand, epidural catheters without metal elements (single-port or multiport) are not suitable for performing the stimulation test. PMID:16244025

  2. Image Quality Assessment Based on Inter-Patch and Intra-Patch Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fei; Lu, Zongqing; Wang, Can; Sun, Wen; Xia, Shu-Tao; Liao, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a full-reference (FR) image quality assessment (IQA) scheme, which evaluates image fidelity from two aspects: the inter-patch similarity and the intra-patch similarity. The scheme is performed in a patch-wise fashion so that a quality map can be obtained. On one hand, we investigate the disparity between one image patch and its adjacent ones. This disparity is visually described by an inter-patch feature, where the hybrid effect of luminance masking and contrast masking is taken into account. The inter-patch similarity is further measured by modifying the normalized correlation coefficient (NCC). On the other hand, we also attach importance to the impact of image contents within one patch on the IQA problem. For the intra-patch feature, we consider image curvature as an important complement of image gradient. According to local image contents, the intra-patch similarity is measured by adaptively comparing image curvature and gradient. Besides, a nonlinear integration of the inter-patch and intra-patch similarity is presented to obtain an overall score of image quality. The experiments conducted on six publicly available image databases show that our scheme achieves better performance in comparison with several state-of-the-art schemes. PMID:25793282

  3. Nicotine patches in pregnant smokers: randomised, placebo controlled, multicentre trial of efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Grangé, Gilles; Jacob, Nelly; Tanguy, Marie-Laure

    2014-01-01

    reported median compliance rate was 85% (interquartile range 56-99%) in the nicotine patch group and 83% (56-95%) in the placebo patch group, assessed at 1016 visits. The mean birth weight was 3065 g (SE 44 g) in the nicotine patch group and 3015 g (SE 44 g) in the placebo patch group (P=0.41). Diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in the nicotine patch group than in the placebo patch group. The frequency of serious adverse events was similar between the groups, although more non-serious adverse reactions, mainly of skin, occurred in the nicotine patch group. Conclusion The nicotine patch did not increase either smoking cessation rates or birth weights despite adjustment of nicotine dose to match levels attained when smoking, and higher than usual doses. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00507975. PMID:24627552

  4. Patch shape, connectivity, and foraging by oldfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus).

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John, L.; Danielson, Brent J

    2005-06-01

    We examined how corridors and patch shape affect foraging by the oldfield mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) by deploying foraging trays and live traps in experimental landscapes with 3 different patch types: patches connected with a corridor, unconnected patches with projecting corridorlike portions (winged patches), and unconnected rectangular patches. Corridors did not lead to different levels of activity of P. polionotus among the 3 patch types. Rather, corridors influenced activity by changing patch shape: foraging in seed trays and total number of captures of P. polionotus tended to be greater at the patch center than at the patch edge, but only in connected and winged patches where corridors or wings increased the amount of patch edge relative to the amount of core habitat in the patch. P. polionotus avoided open microhabitats near the patch edge in winged and connected patches, but not open microhabitats near the patch interior, suggesting that predation risk caused shifts in foraging near edges in connected and winged patches. Foraging in corridors and wings was generally low, suggesting that both are high-risk habitats where predation risk is not ameliorated by proximity to vegetative cover. By changing patch shape, corridors caused changes in within-patch activity of P. polionotus, changing foraging patterns and potentially altering the dynamics of P. polionotus and the seeds they consume.

  5. Oracle Applications Patch Administration Tool (PAT) Beta Version

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-01-04

    PAT is a Patch Administration Tool that provides analysis, tracking, and management of Oracle Application patches. This includes capabilities as outlined below: Patch Analysis & Management Tool Outline of capabilities: Administration Patch Data Maintenance -- track Oracle Application patches applied to what database instance & machine Patch Analysis capture text files (readme.txt and driver files) form comparison detail report comparison detail PL/SQL package comparison detail SQL scripts detail JSP module comparison detail Parse and loadmore » the current applptch.txt (10.7) or load patch data from Oracle Application database patch tables (11i) Display Analysis -- Compare patch to be applied with current Oracle Application installed Appl_top code versions Patch Detail Module comparison detail Analyze and display one Oracle Application module patch. Patch Management -- automatic queue and execution of patches Administration Parameter maintenance -- setting for directory structure of Oracle Application appl_top Validation data maintenance -- machine names and instances to patch Operation Patch Data Maintenance Schedule a patch (queue for later execution) Run a patch (queue for immediate execution) Review the patch logs Patch Management Reports« less

  6. Oracle Applications Patch Administration Tool (PAT) Beta Version

    SciTech Connect

    2002-01-04

    PAT is a Patch Administration Tool that provides analysis, tracking, and management of Oracle Application patches. This includes capabilities as outlined below: Patch Analysis & Management Tool Outline of capabilities: Administration Patch Data Maintenance -- track Oracle Application patches applied to what database instance & machine Patch Analysis capture text files (readme.txt and driver files) form comparison detail report comparison detail PL/SQL package comparison detail SQL scripts detail JSP module comparison detail Parse and load the current applptch.txt (10.7) or load patch data from Oracle Application database patch tables (11i) Display Analysis -- Compare patch to be applied with current Oracle Application installed Appl_top code versions Patch Detail Module comparison detail Analyze and display one Oracle Application module patch. Patch Management -- automatic queue and execution of patches Administration Parameter maintenance -- setting for directory structure of Oracle Application appl_top Validation data maintenance -- machine names and instances to patch Operation Patch Data Maintenance Schedule a patch (queue for later execution) Run a patch (queue for immediate execution) Review the patch logs Patch Management Reports

  7. Epidural anesthesia improves pancreatic perfusion and decreases the severity of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Samira M; Andres, Axel; Morel, Philippe; Schiffer, Eduardo; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Bühler, Leo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the safety of epidural anesthesia (EA), its effect on pancreatic perfusion and the outcome of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: From 2005 to August 2010, patients with predicted severe AP [Ranson score ≥ 2, C-reactive protein > 100 or necrosis on computed tomography (CT)] were prospectively randomized to either a group receiving EA or a control group treated by patient controlled intravenous analgesia. Pain management was evaluated in the two groups every eight hours using the visual analog pain scale (VAS). Parameters for clinical severity such as length of hospital stay, use of antibiotics, admission to the intensive care unit, radiological/clinical complications and the need for surgical necrosectomy including biochemical data were recorded. A CT scan using a perfusion protocol was performed on admission and at 72 h to evaluate pancreatic blood flow. A significant variation in blood flow was defined as a 20% difference in pancreatic perfusion between admission and 72 h and was measured in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. RESULTS: We enrolled 35 patients. Thirteen were randomized to the EA group and 22 to the control group. There were no differences in demographic characteristics between the two groups. The Balthazar radiological severity score on admission was higher in the EA group than in the control group (mean score 4.15 ± 2.54 vs 3.38 ± 1.75, respectively, P = 0.347) and the median Ranson scores were 3.4 and 2.7 respectively (P = NS). The median duration of EA was 5.7 d, and no complications of the epidural procedure were reported. An improvement in perfusion of the pancreas was observed in 13/30 (43%) of measurements in the EA group vs 2/27 (7%) in the control group (P = 0.0025). Necrosectomy was performed in 1/13 patients in the EA group vs 4/22 patients in the control group (P = 0.63). The VAS improved during the first ten days in the EA group compared to the control group (0.2 vs 2.33, P = 0.034 at 10 d). Length

  8. Disorganized Cortical Patches Suggest Prenatal Origin of Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain tissue revealed patch-like areas of disorganized neurons. Arrows show a patch of decreased or absent ... autistic brain is speckled with patches of abnormal neurons, according to research partially funded by the National ...

  9. Effect of magnesium infusion on thoracic epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Mitra, Koel; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Roy, Suddhadeb; Sarkar, Aniruddha; Kundu, Sudeshna; Goswami, Anupam; Sarkar, Uday Narayan; Sanki, Prakash; Mitra, Ritabrata

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Patients of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) having an ASA status III or more are likely to be further downgraded by surgery to critical levels of pulmonary function. Aim: To compare the efficacy of thoracic epidural block with (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination and (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination with adjunctive intravenous magnesium infusion for the relief of postoperative pain in patients undergoing LVRS. Methods: Patients were operated under general anesthesia. Thirty minutes before the anticipated completion of skin closure in both groups, (Group A and Group B) 7 ml of (0.125%) bupivacaine calculated as 1.5 ml/thoracic segment space for achieving analgesia in dermatomes of T4, T5, T6, T7, and T8 segments, along with fentanyl 50 μg (0.5 ml), was administered through the catheter, activating the epidural block, and the time was noted. Thereafter, in patients of Group A, magnesium sulfate injection 30 mg/kg i.v. bolus was followed by infusion of magnesium sulfate at 10 mg/kg/hr and continued up to 24 hours. Group B was treated as control. Results and Analysis: A significant increase in the mean and maximum duration of analgesia in Group A in comparison with Group B (P<0.05) was observed. Total epidural dose of fentanyl and bupivacaine required in Group A was significantly lower in comparison with Group B in 24 hours. Discussion: Requirement of total doses of local anesthetics along with opioids could be minimized by magnesium infusion; therefore, the further downgradation of patients of LVRS may be prevented. Conclusion: Intravenous magnesium can prolong opioid-induced analgesia while minimizing nausea, pruritus, and somnolence. PMID:21655018

  10. Deformation of vortex patches by boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, A.; Johnson, E. R.; Morrison, P. J.

    2013-02-01

    The deformation of two-dimensional vortex patches in the vicinity of fluid boundaries is investigated. The presence of a boundary causes an initially circular patch of uniform vorticity to deform. Sufficiently far away from the boundary, the deformed shape is well approximated by an ellipse. This leading order elliptical deformation is investigated via the elliptic moment model of Melander, Zabusky, and Styczek [J. Fluid Mech. 167, 95 (1986), 10.1017/S0022112086002744]. When the boundary is straight, the centre of the elliptic patch remains at a constant distance from the boundary, and the motion is integrable. Furthermore, since the straining flow acting on the patch is constant in time, the problem is that of an elliptic vortex patch in constant strain, which was analysed by Kida [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 50, 3517 (1981), 10.1143/JPSJ.50.3517]. For more complicated boundary shapes, such as a square corner, the motion is no longer integrable. Instead, there is an adiabatic invariant for the motion. This adiabatic invariant arises due to the separation in times scales between the relatively rapid time scale associated with the rotation of the patch and the slower time scale associated with the self-advection of the patch along the boundary. The interaction of a vortex patch with a circular island is also considered. Without a background flow, the conservation of angular impulse implies that the motion is again integrable. The addition of an irrotational flow past the island can drive the patch towards the boundary, leading to the possibility of large deformations and breakup.

  11. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  12. Inflammation and Epidural-Related Maternal Fever: Proposed Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Pervez; David, Anna L; Fernando, Roshan; Ackland, Gareth L

    2016-05-01

    Intrapartum fever is associated with excessive maternal interventions as well as higher neonatal morbidity. Epidural-related maternal fever (ERMF) contributes to the development of intrapartum fever. The mechanism(s) for ERMF has remained elusive. Here, we consider how inflammatory mechanisms may be modulated by local anesthetic agents and their relevance to ERMF. We also critically reappraise the clinical data with regard to emerging concepts that explain how anesthetic drug-induced metabolic dysfunction, with or without activation of the inflammasome, might trigger the release of nonpathogenic, inflammatory molecules (danger-associated molecular patterns) likely to underlie ERMF. PMID:27101499

  13. Routine patch testing with paraben esters.

    PubMed

    Menné, T; Hjorth, N

    1988-09-01

    Paraben esters are the most widely used preservatives in cosmetics and topical medicaments. Their sensitization potential is low, based on both experimental and human experience. A paraben mixture is included in the ICDRG standard series, and in patch test studies, approximately 1% of eczema patients react to it. The present study confirms this frequency in 8020 patients patch tested consecutively. Testing with the individual paraben esters was employed as confirmation, which makes it unlikely that the excited skin syndrome is a significant problem in this context. It remains undetermined whether the present paraben mixture is the optimal patch test material for diagnosing paraben sensitivity. PMID:3191679

  14. Electrostatic patch potentials in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between interacting surfaces. The force can be minimized by applying a potential to one of the two surfaces. However, electrostatic patch potentials remain and contribute an additional force which can obscure the Casimir force signal. We will discuss recent measurements of patch potentials made with Heterodyne Amplitude-Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy that suggest patches could be responsible for >1% of the signal in some Casimir force measurements, and thus make the distinction between different theoretical models of the Casimir force (e.g. a Drude-model or a plasma-model for the dielectric response) difficult to discern.

  15. Koch fractal boundary patch over reactive impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy V, Venkateshwar; Sarma, N. V. S. N.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the enhancement of bandwidth and miniaturization for patch antennas. Introduction of fractal structure (Square Koch) over reactive impedance surface (RIS) is used to enhance impedance bandwidth while minimizing the patch size. Comparison has been made with those of a single-layer (sub1) antenna and the corresponding dual-layer (RIS) antenna. Approximately double the impedance bandwidth is achieved with the proposed RIS Square Koch antenna 1 when compared with Square Koch antenna 1without RIS. There is a 55 % reduction in the patch size. The simulated results indicate that the presented antennas provide gain of about 2.5dBi over the entire band of frequencies.

  16. Investigating Birth Control: Comparing Oestrogen Levels in Patients Using the Ortho Evra[R] Patch versus the Ortho-Cyclen[R] Pill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurent, Theresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent drug studies have investigated the incidence of blood clots among patients using the Ortho Evra[R] birth control patch. In this article, the author describes an investigation of oestrogen levels in the body resulting from the application of the Ortho Evra[R] birth control patch versus daily use of Ortho-Cyclen[R] birth control pills.…

  17. Interrater Reliability of the Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis Classification: A Histopathologic Study in the Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Jirarattanaphochai, Kitti; Sumananont, Chat; Wittayapairoj, Kriangkrai; Sukhonthamarn, Kamolsak

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Agreement study. Purpose To validate the interrater reliability of the histopathological classification of the post-laminectomy epidural fibrosis in an animal model. Overview of Literature Epidural fibrosis is a common cause of failed back surgery syndrome. Many animal experiments have been developed to investigate the prevention of epidural fibrosis. One of the common outcome measurements is the epidural fibrous adherence grading, but the classification has not yet been validated. Methods Five identical sets of histopathological digital files of L5-L6 laminectomized adult Sprague-Dawley rats, representing various degrees of postoperative epidural fibrous adherence were randomized and evaluated by five independent assessors masked to the study processes. Epidural fibrosis was rated as grade 0 (no fibrosis), grade 1 (thin fibrous band), grade 2 (continuous fibrous adherence for less than two-thirds of the laminectomy area), or grade 3 (large fibrotic tissue for more than two-thirds of the laminectomy area). A statistical analysis was performed. Results Four hundred slides were independently evaluated by each assessor. The percent agreement and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between each pair of assessors varied from 73.5% to 81.3% and from 0.81 to 0.86, respectively. The overall ICC was 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.86). Conclusions The postoperative epidural fibrosis classification showed almost perfect agreement among the assessors. This classification can be used in research involving the histopathology of postoperative epidural fibrosis; for example, for the development of preventions of postoperative epidural fibrosis or treatment in an animal model. PMID:26240719

  18. Efficacy of Epidural Injections in the Treatment of Lumbar Central Spinal Stenosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan David; Manchikanti, Kavita; Boswell, Mark; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Hirsch, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lumbar central spinal stenosis is common and often results in chronic persistent pain and disability, which can lead to multiple interventions. After the failure of conservative treatment, either surgical or nonsurgical modalities such as epidural injections are contemplated in the management of lumbar spinal stenosis. Evidence Acquisition: Recent randomized trials, systematic reviews and guidelines have reached varying conclusions about the efficacy of epidural injections in the management of central lumbar spinal stenosis. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of all three anatomical epidural injection approaches (caudal, interlaminar, and transforaminal) in the treatment of lumbar central spinal stenosis. A systematic review was performed on randomized trials published from 1966 to July 2014 of all types of epidural injections used in the management of lumbar central spinal stenosis. Methodological quality assessment and grading of the evidence was performed. Results: The evidence in managing lumbar spinal stenosis is Level II for long-term improvement for caudal and lumbar interlaminar epidural injections. For transforaminal epidural injections, the evidence is Level III for short-term improvement only. The interlaminar approach appears to be superior to the caudal approach and the caudal approach appears to be superior to the transforaminal one. Conclusions: The available evidence suggests that epidural injections with local anesthetic alone or with local anesthetic with steroids offer short- and long-term relief of low back and lower extremity pain for patients with lumbar central spinal stenosis. However, the evidence is Level II for the long-term efficacy of caudal and interlaminar epidural injections, whereas it is Level III for short-term improvement only with transforaminal epidural injections. PMID:25789241

  19. Ethinyl Estradiol and Norelgestromin Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... contraceptive patch is a very effective method of birth control, but it does not prevent the spread of ... period, you must use a backup method of birth control (such as a condom and/or a spermicide) ...

  20. Scattering from arbitrarily shaped microstrip patch antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, David G.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, Capers R.

    1992-01-01

    The scattering properties of arbitrarily shaped microstrip patch antennas are examined. The electric field integral equation for a current element on a grounded dielectric slab is developed for a rectangular geometry based on Galerkin's technique with subdomain rooftop basis functions. A shape function is introduced that allows a rectangular grid approximation to the arbitrarily shaped patch. The incident field on the patch is expressed as a function of incidence angle theta(i), phi(i). The resulting system of equations is then solved for the unknown current modes on the patch, and the electromagnetic scattering is calculated for a given angle. Comparisons are made with other calculated results as well as with measurements.

  1. Timing and prognosis of surgery for spinal epidural abscess: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The nonsurgical versus surgical management of spinal epidural abscesses (SEAs) remains controversial. Even with the best preoperative screening for multiple risk factors, high nonoperative failure rates are attended by considerable morbidity (e.g., irreversible paralysis) and mortality. Therefore, the focus remains on early surgery. Methods: Most papers promote early recognition of the clinical triad (e.g., fever [50%], spinal pain [92–100%], and neurological deficits [47%]) for SEA. They also identify SEA-related risk factors for choosing nonsurgical versus surgical approaches; advanced age (>65 or 80), diabetes (15–30%), cancer, intravenous drug abuse (25%), smoking (23%), elevated white blood cell count (>12.5), high C-reactive protein >115, positive blood cultures, magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomographic documented cord compression, and significant neurological deficits (e.g., 19–45%). Results: Surgical options include: decompressions, open versus minimally invasive biopsy/culture/irrigation, or fusions. Up to 75% of SEA involve the thoracolumbar spine, and 50% are located ventrally. Wound cultures are positive in up to 78.8% of cases and are often (60%) correlated with positive blood cultures. The most typical offending organism is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, followed by methicillin sensitive S. aureus. Unfortunately, the failure rates for nonoperative treatment of SEA remain high (e.g., 41–42.5%), contributing to significant morbidity (22% risk of permanent paralysis), and mortality (3–25%). Conclusion: The vast majority of studies advocated early surgery to achieve better outcomes for treating SEA; this avoids high failure rates (41–42.5%) for nonoperative therapy, and limits morbidity/mortality rates. PMID:26605109

  2. An evaluation of patch connectivity measures.

    PubMed

    Prugh, Laura R

    2009-07-01

    Measuring connectivity is critical to the study of fragmented populations. The three most commonly used types of patch connectivity measures differ substantially in how they are calculated, but the performance of these measures has not been broadly assessed. Here I compare the ability of nearest neighbor (NN), buffer, and incidence function model (IFM) measures to predict the patch occupancy and colonization patterns of 24 invertebrate, reptile, and amphibian metapopulations. I predicted that NN measures, which have been criticized as being overly simplistic, would be the worst predictors of species occupancy and colonization. I also predicted that buffer measures, which sum the amount of habitat in a radius surrounding the focal patch, would have intermediate performance, and IFM measures, which take into account the areas and distances to all potential source patches, would perform best. As expected, the simplest NN measure (distance to the nearest habitat patch, NHi) was the poorest predictor of patch occupancy and colonization. Contrary to expectations, however, the next-simplest NN measure (distance to the nearest occupied [source] patch, NSi) was as good a predictor of occupancy and colonization as the best-performing buffer measure and the general IFM measure Si. In contrast to previous studies suggesting that area-based connectivity measures perform better than distance-based ones, my results indicate that the exclusion of vacant habitat patches from calculations is the key to improved measure performance. I highlight several problems with the parameterization and use of IFM measures and suggest that models based on NSi are equally powerful and more practical for many conservation applications. PMID:19688936

  3. Aspects and applications of patched grid calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, Robert W.; Switzer, George F.; Thomas, James L.

    1991-01-01

    Patched grid calculations within the framework of an implicit, flux vector split upwind/relaxation algorithm for the Euler equations are presented. Aspects of computing on patched grids are discussed including the effect of a metric-discontinuous interface on the convergence rate of the algorithm, and the effect of curvature along an interface. Applications to a converging-diverging nozzle including effects of choking and bypass slots in two dimensions are presented.

  4. An Active Learning Algorithm for Control of Epidural Electrostimulation.

    PubMed

    Desautels, Thomas A; Choe, Jaehoon; Gad, Parag; Nandra, Mandheerej S; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Tai, Yu-Chong; Edgerton, V Reggie; Burdick, Joel W

    2015-10-01

    Epidural electrostimulation has shown promise for spinal cord injury therapy. However, finding effective stimuli on the multi-electrode stimulating arrays employed requires a laborious manual search of a vast space for each patient. Widespread clinical application of these techniques would be greatly facilitated by an autonomous, algorithmic system which choses stimuli to simultaneously deliver effective therapy and explore this space. We propose a method based on GP-BUCB, a Gaussian process bandit algorithm. In n = 4 spinally transected rats, we implant epidural electrode arrays and examine the algorithm's performance in selecting bipolar stimuli to elicit specified muscle responses. These responses are compared with temporally interleaved intra-animal stimulus selections by a human expert. GP-BUCB successfully controlled the spinal electrostimulation preparation in 37 testing sessions, selecting 670 stimuli. These sessions included sustained autonomous operations (ten-session duration). Delivered performance with respect to the specified metric was as good as or better than that of the human expert. Despite receiving no information as to anatomically likely locations of effective stimuli, GP-BUCB also consistently discovered such a pattern. Further, GP-BUCB was able to extrapolate from previous sessions' results to make predictions about performance in new testing sessions, while remaining sufficiently flexible to capture temporal variability. These results provide validation for applying automated stimulus selection methods to the problem of spinal cord injury therapy. PMID:25974925

  5. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease. PMID:26275629

  6. Cervical Epidural Abscess: Rare Complication of Bacterial Endocarditis with Streptococcus Viridans: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Although many patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complain of joint, muscle, and back pain, infections at these sights are rare. The incidence of spinal abscess in cervical spine complicating endocarditis is very rare. Although the surgical management is the mainstay of treatment, conservative treatment can get success in selected patients. We report a patient with cervical epidural abscess due to Streptococcus viridans endocarditis. Both epidural abscess and IE were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics for 8 weeks, with recovery. It is important to remind spinal epidural abscess can occur in those patients with bacterial endocarditis. PMID:25883665

  7. Cervical epidural abscess: rare complication of bacterial endocarditis with streptococcus viridans: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Doh, Jae-Won

    2015-03-01

    Although many patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complain of joint, muscle, and back pain, infections at these sights are rare. The incidence of spinal abscess in cervical spine complicating endocarditis is very rare. Although the surgical management is the mainstay of treatment, conservative treatment can get success in selected patients. We report a patient with cervical epidural abscess due to Streptococcus viridans endocarditis. Both epidural abscess and IE were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics for 8 weeks, with recovery. It is important to remind spinal epidural abscess can occur in those patients with bacterial endocarditis. PMID:25883665

  8. Epidural pneumatosis associated with spontaneous pneumomediastinum: a rare complication of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Healy, Mary-Louise; O'Shea, Donal; Crowley, Rachel K

    2016-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum and epidural pneumatosis are rare complications of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). These result from the emesis and hyperventilation associated with DKA which lead to alveolar rupture and air escape into the mediastinal and epidural spaces. These complications are often asymptomatic and resolve with the correction of the underlying metabolic abnormality. Oesophageal contrast studies are only required if oesophageal perforation is suspected in patients presenting with persistent vomiting and chest pain. We report the rare association of pneumomediastinum and epidural pneumatosis complicating DKA in a 19-year-old female patient. PMID:27451054

  9. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Suppression and Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome as a Complication of Epidural Steroid Injections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections are well accepted as a treatment for radicular back pain in appropriate candidates. While overall incidence of systemic side effects has not been well established, at least five biochemically proven cases of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome have been reported as complications of epidural steroid treatment. We present an additional case of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome and adrenal suppression in a middle-aged woman who received three epidural steroid injections over a four-month period. We review this case in the context of previous cases and discuss diagnostic and management issues. PMID:23991341

  10. Pulse Dynamics in Endocytic Protein Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Anders; Wang, Xinxin

    2015-03-01

    During the process of endocytosis in yeast, submicron-sized protein patches assemble, exert forces on the membrane to bend it, and finally disassemble. The patches contain an initial coat that establishes the endocytic site and binds cargo, polymers of the protein actin, ``nucleation-promoting factors'' (NPFs) that catalyze actin polymerization, and curvature-generating proteins. We model the dynamics of protein patches in yeast using a variant of the activator-inhibitor ``Fitzhugh-Nagumo'' model. We treat NPFs as the activator, and polymerized actin as the inhibitor, on the basis of findings that the lifetime of NPF patches is extended when actin polymerization is inhibited. Using this model, we find that as the polymerization rate is reduced, there is a discontinuous transition from protein pulses to persistent patches. We also find, surprisingly, that in some parameter regimes reducing the polymerization rate can increase the polymerized-actin content of the patch. We present data for NPF dynamics budding yeast, which confirm some of the predictions of the model. Supported by NIH under Grant R01-GM107667.

  11. Montage of Apollo Crew Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This montage depicts the flight crew patches for the manned Apollo 7 thru Apollo 17 missions. The Apollo 7 through 10 missions were basically manned test flights that paved the way for lunar landing missions. Primary objectives met included the demonstration of the Command Service Module (CSM) crew performance; crew/space vehicle/mission support facilities performance and testing during a manned CSM mission; CSM rendezvous capability; translunar injection demonstration; the first manned Apollo docking, the first Apollo Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA), performance of the first manned flight of the lunar module (LM); the CSM-LM docking in translunar trajectory, LM undocking in lunar orbit, LM staging in lunar orbit, and manned LM-CSM docking in lunar orbit. Apollo 11 through 17 were lunar landing missions with the exception of Apollo 13 which was forced to circle the moon without landing due to an onboard explosion. The craft was,however, able to return to Earth safely. Apollo 11 was the first manned lunar landing mission and performed the first lunar surface EVA. Landing site was the Sea of Tranquility. A message for mankind was delivered, the U.S. flag was planted, experiments were set up and 47 pounds of lunar surface material was collected for analysis back on Earth. Apollo 12, the 2nd manned lunar landing mission landed in the Ocean of Storms and retrieved parts of the unmanned Surveyor 3, which had landed on the Moon in April 1967. The Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) was deployed, and 75 pounds of lunar material was gathered. Apollo 14, the 3rd lunar landing mission landed in Fra Mauro. ALSEP and other instruments were deployed, and 94 pounds of lunar materials were gathered, using a hand cart for first time to transport rocks. Apollo 15, the 4th lunar landing mission landed in the Hadley-Apennine region. With the first use of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), the crew was bale to gather 169 pounds of lunar material. Apollo 16, the 5th lunar

  12. Inosculation and perfusion of pre-vascularized tissue patches containing aligned human microvessels after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Sonja B; Mattia, Donald J; Wendel, Jacqueline S; Schaefer, Jeremy A; Ye, Lei; Guzman, Pilar A; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2016-08-01

    A major goal of tissue engineering is the creation of pre-vascularized tissues that have a high density of organized microvessels that can be rapidly perfused following implantation. This is especially critical for highly metabolic tissues like myocardium, where a thick myocardial engineered tissue would require rapid perfusion within the first several days to survive transplantation. In the present work, tissue patches containing human microvessels that were either randomly oriented or aligned were placed acutely on rat hearts post-infarction and for each case it was determined whether rapid inosculation could occur and perfusion of the patch could be maintained for 6 days in an infarct environment. Patches containing self-assembled microvessels were formed by co-entrapment of human blood outgrowth endothelial cells and human pericytes in fibrin gel. Cell-induced gel contraction was mechanically-constrained resulting in samples with high densities of microvessels that were either randomly oriented (with 420 ± 140 lumens/mm(2)) or uniaxially aligned (with 940 ± 240 lumens/mm(2)) at the time of implantation. These patches were sutured onto the epicardial surface of the hearts of athymic rats following permanent ligation of the left anterior descending artery. In both aligned and randomly oriented microvessel patches, inosculation occurred and perfusion of the transplanted human microvessels was maintained, proving the in vivo vascularization potential of these engineered tissues. No difference was found in the number of human microvessels that were perfused in the randomly oriented (111 ± 75 perfused lumens/mm(2)) and aligned (173 ± 97 perfused lumens/mm(2)) patches. Our results demonstrate that tissue patches containing a high density of either aligned or randomly oriented human pre-formed microvessels achieve rapid perfusion in the myocardial infarct environment - a necessary first-step toward the creation of a thick, perfusable heart patch. PMID

  13. Short-term monocular patching boosts the patched eye’s response in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei; Baker, Daniel H.; Simard, Mathieu; Saint-Amour, Dave; Hess, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Several recent studies have demonstrated that following short-term monocular deprivation in normal adults, the patched eye, rather than the unpatched eye, becomes stronger in subsequent binocular viewing. However, little is known about the site and nature of the underlying processes. In this study, we examine the underlying mechanisms by measuring steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) as an index of the neural contrast response in early visual areas. Methods: The experiment consisted of three consecutive stages: a pre-patching EEG recording (14 minutes), a monocular patching stage (2.5 hours) and a post-patching EEG recording (14 minutes; started immediately after the removal of the patch). During the patching stage, a diffuser (transmits light but not pattern) was placed in front of one randomly selected eye. During the EEG recording stage, contrast response functions for each eye were measured. Results: The neural responses from the patched eye increased after the removal of the patch, whilst the responses from the unpatched eye remained the same. Such phenomena occurred under both monocular and dichoptic viewing conditions. Conclusions: We interpret this eye dominance plasticity in adult human visual cortex as homeostatic intrinsic plasticity regulated by an increase of contrast-gain in the patched eye. PMID:26410580

  14. Analgesia in post-thoracotomy patients: Comparison between thoracic epidural and thoracic paravertebral blocks

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Goswami, Anupam; Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Sarbapalli, Debabrata; Pal, Ranabir; Kar, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute postoperative pain can cause detrimental effects on multiple organ systems, leading to chronic pain syndromes. Objective: To compare thoracic epidural block (TEB) and paravertebral block (PVB) for relief of postoperative pain in adult patients undergoing thoracotomy. Materials and Methods: In this randomized, single-blinded, prospective study, 60 adult patients of both sexes, belonging to ASA physical status I and II, were scheduled for elective thoracotomy under general anesthesia. They were randomly divided into two groups, A and B of 30 each, who were comparable in terms of demographic parameters and body weight. Group A received TEB and Group B received PVB. All the patients underwent thoracotomy under general anesthesia using a uniform standard anesthetic technique. Thirty minutes before the anticipated end of skin suture, blocks were activated in both the groups with 7.5 ml for TEB and 15 ml for thoracic PVB of 0.25% bupivacaine, along with 1 ml of fentanyl for postoperative analgesia. Results: Patients receiving PVB for postoperative analgesia experienced better analgesia than those receiving TEB from the immediate postoperative period that lasted longer. Intragroup comparison showed that in the cases receiving TEB, there was a significant statistical difference in preoperative and postoperative values with regard to the mean systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean arterial pressure and mean pulse rate. However, in patients receiving PVB, significant difference in preoperative and postoperative values was seen in mean SBP only. Conclusions: We observed longer duration of analgesia with PVB compared to TEB. PMID:25885234

  15. Infectious Spondylodiscitis, Epidural Phlegmon, and Psoas Abscess Complicating Diabetic Foot Infection: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, Nicole; Pratt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Few published case reports have cited vertebral osteomyelitis as a sequela of a diabetic foot infection. The purpose of the present report is to increase awareness of a potentially severe complication of diabetic foot ulceration: vertebral osteomyelitis and associated pathologic features. We present the case of a 63-year-old male with right calcaneal osteomyelitis who developed acute onset lower back pain with concomitant fever and chills. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed L4-L5 vertebral osteomyelitis, a T9-L1 epidural abscess, and a right psoas muscle abscess secondary to hematogenous seeding from the calcaneus. The patient underwent right partial calcanectomy, spinal and right psoas abscess incision and drainage, and direct lumbar interbody fusion of L4-L5 with a right iliac crest allograft. All bone, blood, and abscess cultures were positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. After the surgery, the patient's pain resolved in his back and hip and he regained full right lower extremity function. The 1-year follow-up examination revealed that the patient had vertebral arthritis but was able to perform his activities of daily living with a walker and cane. It is important to recognize the potential complications of diabetic foot ulcerations and be aware of the identifying symptoms and treatment options for this condition to prevent significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:25128309

  16. Encapsulated Unresolved Subdural Hematoma Mimicking Acute Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Soo; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Kwon, Chang-Young

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) has been uncommonly reported. To our knowledge, a few cases of lentiform ASDH have been reported. The mechanism of encapsulated ASDH has been studied but not completely clarified. Encapsulated lentiform ASDH on a computed tomography (CT) scan mimics acute epidural hematoma (AEDH). Misinterpretation of biconvex-shaped ASDH on CT scan as AEDH often occurs and is usually identified by neurosurgical intervention. We report a case of an 85-year-old man presenting with a 2-day history of mental deterioration and right-sided weakness. CT scan revealed a biconvex-shaped hyperdense mass mixed with various densities of blood along the left temporoparietal cerebral convexity, which was misinterpreted as AEDH preoperatively. Emergency craniectomy was performed, but no AEDH was found beneath the skull. In the subdural space, encapsulated ASDH was located. En block resection of encapsulated ASDH was done. Emergency craniectomy confirmed that the preoperatively diagnosed AEDH was an encapsulated ASDH postoperatively. Radiologic studies of AEDH-like SDH allow us to establish an easy differential diagnosis between AEDH and ASDH by distinct features. More histological studies will provide us information on the mechanism underlying encapsulated ASDH. PMID:27169052

  17. Thoracic epidural analgesia: a new approach for the treatment of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Windisch, Olivier; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Giraud, Raphaël; Morel, Philippe; Bühler, Léo

    2016-01-01

    This review article analyzes, through a nonsystematic approach, the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) with a focus on the effects of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on the disease. The benefit-risk balance is also discussed. AP has an overall mortality of 1 %, increasing to 30 % in its severe form. The systemic inflammation induces a strong activation of the sympathetic system, with a decrease in the blood flow supply to the gastrointestinal system that can lead to the development of pancreatic necrosis. The current treatment for severe AP is symptomatic and tries to correct the systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the multiorgan dysfunction. Besides the removal of gallstones in biliary pancreatitis, no satisfactory causal treatment exists. TEA is widely used, mainly for its analgesic effect. TEA also induces a targeted sympathectomy in the anesthetized region, which results in splanchnic vasodilatation and an improvement in local microcirculation. Increasing evidence shows benefits of TEA in animal AP: improved splanchnic and pancreatic perfusion, improved pancreatic microcirculation, reduced liver damage, and significantly reduced mortality. Until now, only few clinical studies have been performed on the use of TEA during AP with few available data regarding the effect of TEA on the splanchnic perfusion. Increasing evidence suggests that TEA is a safe procedure and could appear as a new treatment approach for human AP, based on the significant benefits observed in animal studies and safety of use for human. Further clinical studies are required to confirm the clinical benefits observed in animal studies. PMID:27141977

  18. Does High Thoracic Epidural Analgesia with Levobupivacaine Preserve Myocardium? A Prospective Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Serife Gokbulut; Karadeniz, Umit; Ozturk, Burcin; Yavas, Soner; Biricik, Dilan; Saydam, Gul Sevim; Erdemli, Ozcan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Our study aimed to compare HTEA and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in patients undergoing coronary bypass graft surgery (CABG), based on haemodynamic parameters and myocardial functions. Materials and Methods. The study included 34 patients that were scheduled for elective CABG, who were randomly divided into 2 groups. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with total intravenous anesthesia in both groups while intravenous PCA with morphine was administered in Group 1 and infusion of levobupivacaine was administered from the beginning of the anesthesia in Group 2 by thoracic epidural catheter. Blood samples were obtained presurgically, at 6 and 24 hours after surgery for troponin I, creatinine kinase-MB (CK-MB), total antioxidant capacity, and malondialdehyde. Postoperative pain was evaluated every 4 hours until 24 hours via VAS. Results. There were significant differences in troponin I or CK-MB values between the groups at postsurgery 6 h and 24 h. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure in Group 1 were significantly higher than in Group 2 at all measurements. Cardiac index in Group 2 was significantly higher than in Group 1 at all measurements. Conclusion. Patients that underwent CABG and received HTEA had better myocardial function and perioperative haemodynamic parameters than those who did not receive HTEA. PMID:25918718

  19. Protective effects of thoracic epidural anesthesia on hypoxia-induced acute lung injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LIJUN; CANG, JING; XUE, ZHANGGANG

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the effect of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on hypoxia-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is currently unknown. In the present study, a rabbit acute lung injury model was established to investigate the effects of TEA on inflammatory factors, pulmonary surfactant and ultrastructure. A total of 56 rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups (n=14 per group): Control group (Group C), hypoxia group (Group H), sevoflurane group (Group S) and combined sevoflurane-epidural anesthesia group (Group ES). The ALI model was considered to have been successfully induced when the ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen was <300. The correct placement of a catheter for TEA was confirmed using epidurography. ALI was maintained for 3 h. Arterial blood samples were collected from all groups during spontaneous breathing (T0) and at 3 h after ALI induction (T5) in order to evaluate the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was harvested to determine the total phospholipid, saturated phosphatidylcholine and total protein levels. Furthermore, the dry/wet weight ratio and the mRNA expression levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 in the lung tissue were determined using ELISA. In addition, light and transmission electron microscopy and histological techniques were used to examine the morphology of alveolar type II cells in the rat lung tissue. The results indicate that changes of serum IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 levels following ALI were consistent with the changes in the mRNA expression levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 in the lung tissue. TEA attenuated these changes and thus reduced the severity of the ALI. In addition, TEA improved the alveolar structure, reduced the number of polymorphonuclear cells and mitigated the damage of lamellar bodies. In summary, the results of the present study indicate that TEA reduces lung tissue damage by inhibiting systemic and local inflammation, decreasing the

  20. Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetics of Levobupivacaine Used for Epidural Anesthesia in Patients with Liver Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ran, Juhong; Wang, Yanping; Li, Fangkun; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Minyu

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to study the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of levobupivacaine used for epidural anesthesia in patients with liver dysfunction. Twenty patients aged 20-60, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) graded I-III according to the ASA guidelines, scheduled for elective upper abdominal surgery, were included in the study. They were divided into two groups of ten each. In group I, the patients with liver dysfunction were included, whereas group II was composed of those with normal liver function. In both groups, anesthesia was induced by general anesthesia combined with epidural block, given by T 8-9 interspace injection of 1.8 mg kg(-1) levobupivacaine (0.75 %) with 5 μg mL(-1) of adrenaline in 1.5 min. The sensory and motor blockade indices were recorded for 30 min after the injection. The plasma concentration of levobupivacaine was determined by high performance liquid chromatography from 0 to 1440 min after the injection and pharmacokinetics of the drug were calculated. The onset and recovery time from the sensory block in the two groups were similar with no significant difference (P > 0.05). The maximum spread of anesthetic effect, the number of spinal segments regressed, onset time, and degree of motor block after the injection were also insignificantly different in the two groups. The plasma levobupivacaine concentration/time curve of the liver dysfunction (group I) was significantly higher than that of the controls (group II). In the liver dysfunction patients, the volume of distribution (V/F) was significantly increased, the elimination rate, i.e., half-life (t 1/2β ), was prolonged, and the elimination rate constants (K 12 and K 10) were significantly decreased (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The patients with liver dysfunction injected with 0.75 % levobupivacaine exhibited normal onset and recovery time of the sensory and motor blocks within 30 min. However, in these patients, the metabolism of

  1. Needle Tip Position and Bevel Direction Have No Effect in the Fluoroscopic Epidural Spreading Pattern in Caudal Epidural Injections: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Won Kyoung; Kim, Ah Na; Lee, Pil Moo; Park, Cheol Hwan; Kim, Jae Hun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Caudal epidural steroid injections (CESIs) are an effective treatment for pain. If the injection spreads in a specific pattern depending on the needle position or bevel direction, it would be possible to inject the agent into a specific and desired area. Objectives. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to determine if the needle position and bevel direction have any effect on the epidural spreading pattern in CESI. Methods. Demographic data of the patient were collected. During CESI, the needle position (middle or lateral) and direction (ventral or dorsal) were randomly allocated. Following fluoroscope-guided injection of 4 mL contrast media and 10 mL of injectates, the epidural spreading patterns (ventral or dorsal, bilateral or lateral) were imaged. Results. In the 210 CESIs performed, the needle tip position and bevel direction did not influence the epidural spreading patterns at L4-5 and L5-S1 disc levels. A history of Lumbar spine surgery was associated with a significantly limited spread to each disc level. A midline needle tip position was more effective than the lateral position in spreading to the distant disc levels. Conclusions. Neither the needle tip position nor the bevel direction affected the epidural drug spreading pattern during CESI. PMID:27445609

  2. Methods of Making and Using Shape Memory Polymer Composite Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    A method of repairing a composite component having a damaged area including: laying a composite patch over the damaged area: activating the shape memory polymer resin to easily and quickly mold said patch to said damaged area; deactivating said shape memory polymer so that said composite patch retains the molded shape; and bonding said composite patch to said damaged part.

  3. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder of the cervical spine mimicking an epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Wewel, Joshua T; Harbhajanka, Aparna; Kasliwal, Manish K; Ahuja, Sumeet K; Loew, Jerome M; Fontes, Ricardo B

    2016-07-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a recognized complication following solid organ and stem cell transplants with subsequent immunosuppression and is the most common malignancy complicating solid organ transplantation. Improved survival and use of aggressive immunosuppression following solid organ transplants have led to increased diagnosis of PTLD. Nevertheless, spinal involvement in PTLD is extremely rare. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PTLD causing epidural spinal cord compression of the cervical spine, mimicking the imaging and pathology of an epidural abscess. The patient underwent posterior and subsequent anterior decompression and stabilization. Rarity of occurrence of PTLD in the spine with absence of diagnostic imaging features may preclude differentiating it from the more commonly occurring lesions such as epidural abscess which occurs in a similar clinical setting. As the management strategy and overall prognosis are dramatically different, the importance of considering PTLD in the differential diagnosis for epidural spinal cord compression in a transplant recipient patient cannot be overemphasized. PMID:26916907

  4. Spontaneous ventral spinal epidural hematoma in a child: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ratre, Shailendra; Yadav, Yadram; Choudhary, Sushma; Parihar, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is very uncommon cause of spinal cord compression. It is extremely rare in children and is mostly located in dorsal epidural space. Ventral spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is even rarer, with only four previous reports in childrens. We are reporting fifth such case in a 14 year old male child. He presented with history of sudden onset weakness and sensory loss in both lower limbs with bladder bowel involvment since 15 days. There was no history of trauma or bleeding diasthesis. On clinical examination he had spastic paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of dorsal spine was suggestive of ventral spinal epidural hematoma extending from first to sixth dorsal vertebrae. Laminectomy of fourth and fifth dorsal vertebrae and complete evacuation of hematoma was done on the same day of admission. Postoperatively the neurological status was same. PMID:27114667

  5. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bustoros, Mark; Thomas, Cheddhi; Frenster, Joshua; Modrek, Aram S; Bayin, N Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Rosen, Gerald; Schiff, Peter B; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  6. The effects of epidural analgesia on the course and outcome of labour.

    PubMed

    Finster, M; Santos, A C

    1998-09-01

    The potential effects of epidural analgesia on the progress and outcome of labour have been the subject of lasting controversy. Retrospective reviews indicate that epidurals are associated with longer labours and/or an increase in the incidence of instrumental or operative delivery. Similar results were obtained in non-randomized prospective studies. None of them established a causal relationship, because without randomization the selection bias cannot be ruled out. Other factors, such as premature rupture of membranes and maternal socioeconomic status, may affect the outcome of labour. It was also reported that introduction of the on-demand epidural service did not increase the primary caesarean section rate. The few prospective randomized studies are contradictory and not very reliable owing to small patient populations and high cross-over rates. There is, however, unanimity among the authors regarding the superiority of pain relief provided by epidural blocks over systemically administered opioids. PMID:10023433

  7. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  8. Suspected epidural morphine analgesia induced chronic urinary and bowel dysfunction in a cat.

    PubMed

    Song, Rachel B; Cross, Johnny R; Golder, Francis J; Callan, Mary Beth

    2011-08-01

    A 12-year-old male castrated domestic shorthair developed chronic urinary retention, constipation and a decreased perineal reflex following a single lumbo-sacral epidural injection of morphine during general anesthesia. Similar adverse effects have been reported in humans following epidural analgesia, but this is the first reported case of both urinary and bowel dysfunction in a cat purportedly from an epidural. The cat was medically managed with manual bladder expressions, intermittent enemas, and various medications including bethanechol, cisapride and stool softeners. The cat continues to have long-term neurologic dysfunction 15 months post-onset. This case report describes a rare but serious potential risk of lumbo-sacral epidural injections in cats. PMID:21571562

  9. Computed tomographic epidurography: an aid to understanding deformation of the lumbar dural sac by epidural injections.

    PubMed

    Fukushige, T; Kano, T; Sano, T; Irie, M

    1999-09-01

    Local anaesthetics injected into the epidural space may deform the dural sac to a variable degree, thereby contributing to variability in the extent of the block. We investigated deformation of the lumbar dural sac after injection into the lumbar epidural space. The subjects were 26 patients with low-back pain who underwent lumbar epidurography and computed tomographic (CT) epidurography, of whom seven also underwent myelography and computed tomographic myelography. The epidural space was entered via the sacral hiatus in 24 patients and through the L5/S1 interspace in two patients. Ten millilitres of local anaesthetic was then injected into the epidural space followed by 20 mL of contrast medium. Computed tomographic epidurography was undertaken approximately 30-min after the epidural injection at the mid-vertebral and mid-discal levels from the first lumbar through to the first sacral vertebrae. The dural sac usually showed an oval or hexagonal shape on the transverse views at the first and second lumbar vertebral levels, and the shape of an inverted triangle below the level of the third lumbar vertebra. A median line of translucency was also observed on the posteroanterior epidurographic view in 25 of the 26 patients. This line was though to be a manifestation of the dural deformation to the inverted triangle. Dural sac deformation usually shows a specific pattern, although there are individual variations. Dural deformability is an important consideration in any analysis of the spread of epidural block or of the changes of epidural pressure after epidural injection of local anaesthetics. PMID:10549463

  10. A Novel Virus-Patch Dynamic Model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu-Xing; Yang, Xiaofan

    2015-01-01

    The distributed patch dissemination strategies are a promising alternative to the conventional centralized patch dissemination strategies. This paper aims to establish a theoretical framework for evaluating the effectiveness of distributed patch dissemination mechanism. Assuming that the Internet offers P2P service for every pair of nodes on the network, a dynamic model capturing both the virus propagation mechanism and the distributed patch dissemination mechanism is proposed. This model takes into account the infected removable storage media and hence captures the interaction of patches with viruses better than the original SIPS model. Surprisingly, the proposed model exhibits much simpler dynamic properties than the original SIPS model. Specifically, our model admits only two potential (viral) equilibria and undergoes a fold bifurcation. The global stabilities of the two equilibria are determined. Consequently, the dynamical properties of the proposed model are fully understood. Furthermore, it is found that reducing the probability per unit time of disconnecting a node from the Internet benefits the containment of electronic viruses. PMID:26368556

  11. A Novel Virus-Patch Dynamic Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lu-Xing; Yang, Xiaofan

    2015-01-01

    The distributed patch dissemination strategies are a promising alternative to the conventional centralized patch dissemination strategies. This paper aims to establish a theoretical framework for evaluating the effectiveness of distributed patch dissemination mechanism. Assuming that the Internet offers P2P service for every pair of nodes on the network, a dynamic model capturing both the virus propagation mechanism and the distributed patch dissemination mechanism is proposed. This model takes into account the infected removable storage media and hence captures the interaction of patches with viruses better than the original SIPS model. Surprisingly, the proposed model exhibits much simpler dynamic properties than the original SIPS model. Specifically, our model admits only two potential (viral) equilibria and undergoes a fold bifurcation. The global stabilities of the two equilibria are determined. Consequently, the dynamical properties of the proposed model are fully understood. Furthermore, it is found that reducing the probability per unit time of disconnecting a node from the Internet benefits the containment of electronic viruses. PMID:26368556

  12. Patch-primitive driven compressive ghost imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuemei; Suo, Jinli; Yue, Tao; Bian, Liheng; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-05-01

    Ghost imaging has rapidly developed for about two decades and attracted wide attention from different research fields. However, the practical applications of ghost imaging are still largely limited, by its low reconstruction quality and large required measurements. Inspired by the fact that the natural image patches usually exhibit simple structures, and these structures share common primitives, we propose a patch-primitive driven reconstruction approach to raise the quality of ghost imaging. Specifically, we resort to a statistical learning strategy by representing each image patch with sparse coefficients upon an over-complete dictionary. The dictionary is composed of various primitives learned from a large number of image patches from a natural image database. By introducing a linear mapping between non-overlapping image patches and the whole image, we incorporate the above local prior into the convex optimization framework of compressive ghost imaging. Experiments demonstrate that our method could obtain better reconstruction from the same amount of measurements, and thus reduce the number of requisite measurements for achieving satisfying imaging quality. PMID:25969205

  13. Characterizing the morphology of protein binding patches.

    PubMed

    Malod-Dognin, Noël; Bansal, Achin; Cazals, Frédéric

    2012-12-01

    Let the patch of a partner in a protein complex be the collection of atoms accounting for the interaction. To improve our understanding of the structure-function relationship, we present a patch model decoupling the topological and geometric properties. While the geometry is classically encoded by the atomic positions, the topology is recorded in a graph encoding the relative position of concentric shells partitioning the interface atoms. The topological-geometric duality provides the basis of a generic dynamic programming-based algorithm comparing patches at the shell level, which may favor topological or geometric features. On the biological side, we address four questions, using 249 cocrystallized heterodimers organized in biological families. First, we dissect the morphology of binding patches and show that Nature enjoyed the topological and geometric degrees of freedom independently while retaining a finite set of qualitatively distinct topological signatures. Second, we argue that our shell-based comparison is effective to perform atomic-level comparisons and show that topological similarity is a less stringent than geometric similarity. We also use the topological versus geometric duality to exhibit topo-rigid patches, whose topology (but not geometry) remains stable upon docking. Third, we use our comparison algorithms to infer specificity-related information amidst a database of complexes. Finally, we exhibit a descriptor outperforming its contenders to predict the binding affinities of the affinity benchmark. The softwares developed with this article are availablefrom http://team.inria.fr/abs/vorpatch_compatch/. PMID:22806945

  14. A prospective cohort study of intrathecal versus epidural analgesia for patients undergoing hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Kasivisvanathan, Ramanathan; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Prout, Jeremy; Clevenger, Ben; Fusai, Giuseppe K; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective observational study was to compare peri/post-operative outcomes of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) versus intrathecal morphine and fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia (ITM+fPCA) for patients undergoing a hepatic resection (HR). Method Patients undergoing elective, one-stage, open HR for benign and malignant liver lesions, receiving central neuraxial block as part of the anaesthetic, in a high-volume hepato-pancreato-biliary unit, were included in the study. The primary outcome measure was post-operative length of stay (LoS). Results A total of 73 patients (36 TEA and 37 ITM+fPCA) were included in the study. The median (IQR) post-operative LoS was 13 (11–15) and 11 (9–13) days in the TEA and ITM+fPCA groups, respectively (P = 0.011). There was significantly lower median intra-operative central venous pressure (P < 0.001) and blood loss (P = 0.017) in the TEA group, and a significant reduction in the time until mobilization (P < 0.001), post-operative intra-venous fluid/vasopressor requirement (P < 0.001/P = 0.004) in the ITM+fPCA group. Pain scores were lower at a clinically significant level 12 h post-operatively in the TEA group (P < 0.001); otherwise there were no differences out to day five. There were no differences in quality of recovery or postoperative morbidity/mortality between the two groups. Conclusion ITM+fPCA provides acceptable post-operative outcomes for HR, but may also increase the incidence of intra-operative blood loss in comparison to TEA. PMID:24467320

  15. Lumbar spinal epidural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary venous drainage after endoscopic lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Toshiharu; Wada, Takeshi; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) with perimedullary venous drainage are rare. This report describes a case of lumbar epidural AVF in a patient with a history of endoscopic lumbar discectomy at the same level 8 years prior to presenting with progressive myelopathy secondary to retrograde venous reflux into the perimedullary vein. A 69-year-old man presented with progressive lower extremity weakness and sensory disturbance and loss of sphincter control 8 years after endoscopic lumbar discectomy for a disc herniation at L4–5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal cord edema and dilated intradural perimedullary vessels. Spinal angiography revealed an epidural AVF at the site of the previous endoscopic lumbar surgery with intradural perimedullary venous drainage. The fistula was successfully occluded via endovascular transarterial embolization, and the patient had stabilization of his neurological deficits. Lumbar spinal epidural AVFs, especially those associated with iatrogenic trauma, are rare. Endoscopic surgical procedure can occlude the epidural venous plexus and disturb venous drainage, thereby inducing local venous hypertension and leading to epidural AVF with perimedullary venous drainage. This type of pathology should be considered within the differential diagnosis of delayed neurological deterioration after spinal surgery. PMID:25948114

  16. Optical fiber guided needle insertion to localize epidural space in porcine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yin; Ting, Chien Kun; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Chen, Pin-Tarng; Chan, Kwok-Hon

    2010-02-01

    A novel optical method of guiding epidural catheter insertion is introduced due to high failure rate of traditional technique for epidural blocks. Experiments of ex-vivo and in-vivo in porcine were performed. In the ex-vivo study the optically reflective spectra of identified porcine tissues were obtained. By which wavelengths of 650 nm and 532 nm were selected to differentiate epidural space and ligamentum flavum. Then the typical stylet of an insertion needle set was replaced by a specially designed hollow stylet which contained optical fibers served for tissue illumination and receiving reflected light from tissue in the in-vivo experiment in pigs. The data was promising with mean magnitudes for 650 nm and 532 nm and their ratio at epidural space and ligamentum flavum were 3.565+/-0.194, 2.542+/-0.145, 0.958+/-0.172 and 3.842+/-0.191, 2.563+/-0.131, 1.228+/-0.244 respectively. Paired t test showed that significant differences occurred between epidural spaces and ligamentum flavum in both 650nm (p<0.001), 532nm (p=0.014) and their ratio (p <0.001). Two-way ANOVA for reflective lights of 650 and 532 nm indicates no significant difference at the different puncture sites for ligamentum flavum and epidural space (all p>0.05).

  17. Anaesthetists' experiences with the early labour epidural recommendation for obese parturients: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Va, Eley; Lk, Callaway; Aaj, van Zundert; J, Lipman; C, Gallois

    2016-09-01

    Caring for obese pregnant women presents challenges for all medical professionals. Despite a lack of supporting evidence, expert opinion and international guidelines suggest early labour epidural insertion for obese women. Anecdotally this is not supported by all anaesthetists. This qualitative study explored the experiences of anaesthetists regarding early epidural analgesia in obese parturients, to answer the research question: Are anaesthetists consistent in how they apply early epidural analgesia in obese parturients? Personal in-depth interviews with 42 specialist anaesthetists working in south-east Queensland, Australia, were completed between February and April, 2015. Leximancer™ text analysis software applied a validated algorithm to the data to identify themes and concepts. The major themes were explored by the first author to answer the research question. Three major themes were identified: the demands associated with caring for obese women; concern regarding the anaesthetic technique used in obese women; and the importance of communication with obstetric staff. Disagreement regarding interpretation and application of early epidural analgesia was identified within this group of anaesthetists. These anaesthetists were inconsistent in how they interpreted and applied early epidural analgesia for obese parturients, with some questioning the validity of the practice. The combination of uncertainty, urgency and technical difficulty presented by obese parturients provoked anxiety in these clinicians, particularly the anticipation of unplanned general anaesthesia. Consistent anaesthetic practice could improve the implementation of early epidural analgesia in obese parturients. PMID:27608347

  18. Epidural catheter fixation. A comparison of subcutaneous tunneling versus device fixation technique

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashima; Parasa, Sujay Kumar; Tejvath, Kiran; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The technique of securing the epidural catheter has a major bearing on the efficacy of epidural analgesia. Specific fixator devices, for e.g., Lockit epidural catheter clamp, which successfully prevents catheter migration, are available. The possibility of catheter snapping and surgical retrieval has been reported with tunneling of catheters. These techniques have not been compared for safety, efficacy and appropriateness of achieving secure epidural catheter fixation in the postoperative period. Material and Methods: A total of 200 patients who required postoperative epidural analgesia were included. They were randomized into two groups: Group I (n = 100) in whom epidural catheters were tunneled vertically in the paravertebral subcutaneous tissue and group II (n = 100) wherein a Lockit device was used to fix the catheter. Likert score was used to quantify patient's comfort during procedure. The techniques were compared for migration, catheter dislodgement, local trauma, catheter snapping and catheter obstruction. Results: 12% of tunneled catheters had migrated significantly outward. 22% of patients had erythema and 77% had significant procedural discomfort in group I. In group II, 3% catheters had kinked and 14% had erythema from device adhesive. Conclusion: Our results support the use of Lockit device as a safe and comfortable fixation device compared to subcutaneous tunneling of catheters. PMID:27006544

  19. Microbial examination of kidney lithotripter tub water and epidural anesthesia catheters.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G L; Roberts, J T; O'Brien, A; Kelleher, M; Dretler, S P; Battit, G E; Hopkins, C C

    1986-04-01

    Kidney lithotripsy patients frequently receive epidural anesthesia via indwelling epidural catheters. In our hospital, patients are immersed in a tub of warm, continuously-flowing tap water. The epidural catheter-entry site is covered by a transparent occlusive dressing. To determine the risk of microbial colonization of the epidural catheter during lithotripsy, we performed quantitative cultures of tub water and semiquantitative cultures of catheters in 63 lithotripsy procedures. Most of the tub water organisms were typical tap water and skin flora isolates. Total colony counts were generally low with no significant progression during the course of serial procedures. Forty-two epidural catheters were cultured; 34 (81%) were sterile, 8 (19%) were colonized with small numbers of flavobacteria or coagulase-negative staphylococci. Only four catheters had organisms present on catheter segments covered by the transparent occlusive dressing (in each case there was a single colony forming unit per semiquantitative plate) and these organisms were probable contaminants. We conclude that with our current lithotripsy procedures, the risk for the development of epidural catheter-associated infection seems to be low. PMID:3634759

  20. Antinociceptive effects of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine in healthy ponies.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Johannes P A M; Menke, Eveline S; Doornenbal, Arie; Back, Willem; Hellebrekers, Ludo J

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine in ponies. Antinociceptive effects of epidural ropivacaine were evaluated by means of mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNTs) at several spinal levels in conscious ponies. The effects of ropivacaine on nociceptive afferent transmission to the spinal cord were also assessed by measuring spinal cord somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in anaesthetised ponies. Ataxia scores were determined in conscious ponies to assess the effects on motor function. A randomised, placebo controlled, double blind cross-over design was used. Low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine led to increases in MNTs at various anatomical locations with a maximum effect at the lumbosacral and sacrococcygeal regions, both with respect to increase in threshold and duration of effect. Analysis of SSEPs showed that epidural ropivacaine influenced both Aβ- and Aδ-mediated afferent transmission to the spinal cord at the level of the lumbosacral junction. Ponies showed mild ataxia after low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine, but all ponies remained standing. Application of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine provided safe and efficacious antinociceptive effects in conscious and anaesthetised ponies, and could therefore be a valuable addition to multimodal analgesic protocols in Equidae. PMID:22398129

  1. Role of Epidural and Patient-Controlled Analgesia in Site-Specific Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamiński, Jan P.; Pai, Ajit; Ailabouni, Luay; Marecik, Slawomir J.; Prasad, Leela M.; Abcarian, Herand

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Limited data are available comparing epidural and patient-controlled analgesia in site-specific colorectal surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate 2 modes of analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic right colectomy (RC) and low anterior resection (LAR). Methods: Prospectively collected data on 433 patients undergoing laparoscopic or laparoscopic-assisted colon surgery at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed from March 2004 to February 2009. Patients were divided into groups undergoing RC (n = 175) and LAR (n = 258). These groups were evaluated by use of analgesia: epidural analgesia, “patient-controlled analgesia” alone, and a combination of both. Demographic and perioperative outcomes were compared. Results: Epidural analgesia was associated with a faster return of bowel function, by 1 day (P < .001), in patients who underwent LAR but not in the RC group. Delayed return of bowel function was associated with increased operative time in the LAR group (P = .05), patients with diabetes who underwent RC (P = .037), and patients after RC with combined analgesia (P = .011). Mean visual analogue scale pain scores were significantly lower with epidural analgesia compared with patient-controlled analgesia in both LAR and RC groups (P < .001). Conclusion: Epidural analgesia was associated with a faster return of bowel function in the laparoscopic LAR group but not the RC group. Epidural analgesia was superior to patient-controlled analgesia in controlling postoperative pain but was inadequate in 28% of patients and needed the addition of patient-controlled analgesia. PMID:25419110

  2. The pathogenesis of spinal epidural abscess: microangiographic studies in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Feldenzer, J A; McKeever, P E; Schaberg, D R; Campbell, J A; Hoff, J T

    1988-07-01

    An experimental model of spinal epidural abscess was developed in rabbits by injecting Staphylococcus aureus into the posterior thoracolumbar epidural space. This model has been shown to reproduce the neurological, bacteriological, and radiological aspects of the human disease. In this study, the effect of the infectious epidural mass on the vasculature of the spinal cord in paraplegic rabbits was studied using microangiographic techniques. The normal vascular anatomy of the rabbit spinal cord was defined in control experiments. Vascular proliferation was demonstrated in the epidural space surrounding the abscesses. Anterior and paired posterior spinal arteries remained patent in paraplegic rabbits with mild or moderate spinal cord compression and in some cases of severe compression. In animals with severe compression, the anterior epidural venous plexus remained patent, but the dorsal spinal vein was occluded. Occlusion of perforating arteries occurred only with extreme spinal cord compression. These data indicate that the initial neurological deficit associated with experimental spinal epidural abscess is not due to vascular thrombosis. PMID:2454302

  3. Spinal subdural haematoma in a parturient after attempted epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lao, T T; Halpern, S H; MacDonald, D; Huh, C

    1993-04-01

    We report a case of spinal subdural haematoma with neurological deficit in a 36-yr-old woman following Caesarean section for severe preeclampsia and placental abruption. She had been taking chronic trifluoperazine treatment for depression. Her activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) was 49 sec (normal = 26-36) but all other tests of coagulation were normal. Epidural anaesthesia was attempted but, despite a negative test dose, injection of local anaesthetic resulted in a generalized seizure and general anaesthesia was induced. Seventy-two hours after delivery, she was found to have bilateral leg weakness, urinary incontinence, absent rectal sphincter tone and asymmetrical leg reflexes. The diagnosis of spinal haematoma was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. She underwent emergency laminectomy and made a full neurological recovery. PMID:8485794

  4. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results. PMID:27062173

  5. The role of epidural anesthesia and analgesia in postoperative outcome.

    PubMed

    Grass, J A

    2000-06-01

    There is increasing evidence to support the hypothesis that epidural anesthesia and analgesia (EAA) can improve surgical outcome by reducing postoperative morbidity and hastening recovery. Likely benefits include decreased incidence of cardiac complications in high-risk patients; lower incidence of pulmonary complications, specifically pneumonia, atelectasis, and hypoxemia in patients at risk for pulmonary complications; lower incidence of vascular graft occlusion after lower extremity revascularization; lower incidence of DVT and pulmonary embolus; suppression of the neuroendocrine stress response; and earlier return of gastrointestinal function. Nonetheless, large multicenter prospective randomized studies are required to more definitively assess the impact of EAA on morbidity and mortality, ICU time, length of hospitalization, and cost of healthcare. PMID:10935017

  6. Fault-patch stress-transfer efficiency in presence of sub-patch geometric complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, Olaf; Mai, Martin

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that faults are not planar surfaces. Instead they exhibit self-similar or self-affine properties that span a wide range of spatial (sub-micrometer to tens-of-kilometer). This geometric fault roughness has a distinct impact on amount and distribution of stresses/strains induced in the medium and on other portions of the fault. However, when numerically simulated (for example in multi-cycle EQ rupture simulations or Coulomb failure stress calculations) this roughness is largely ignored: individual fault patches --the incremental elements that build the fault surface in the respective computer models-- are planar and fault roughness at this and lower spatial scales is not considered. As a result, the fault-patch stress-transfer efficiency may be systematically too large in those numerical simulations with respect to the "actual" efficiency level. Here, we investigate the effect of sub-patch geometric complexity on fault-patch stress-transfer efficiency. For that, we sub-divide a fault patch (e.g., 1x1km) into a large number of sub-patches (e.g., 20x20m) and determine amount of induced stresses at selected positions around that patch for different levels and realizations of fault roughness. For each fault roughness level, we compute mean and standard deviation of the induced stresses, enabling us to compute the coefficient of variation. We normalize those values with stresses from the corresponding single (planar) fault patch, providing scaling factors and their variability for stress transfer efficiency. Given a certain fault roughness that is assumed for a fault, this work provides the means to implement the sub-patch fault roughness into investigations based on fault-patch interaction schemes.

  7. Comparative acceptance of three transdermal nitroglycerin placebo patches.

    PubMed

    Rayment, C M; Kaul, A F; Garfield, J M

    1985-06-01

    Factors that might affect patient acceptance of transdermal drug-delivery system patches were evaluated in healthy volunteers using placebo patches. Placebo transdermal nitroglycerin patches (Transderm-Nitro 5 placebo, Ciba Pharmaceutical Company; Nitro-Dur 10 cm2 placebo, Key Pharmaceuticals; and Nitrodisc 5 placebo, Searle Laboratories) were supplied by the manufacturers. Eighty-two healthy subjects were randomly assigned to begin using one of the three brands of patches. Using a Latin-square crossover design, subjects applied each brand of patch daily for five days and crossed over to the other brands on study days 6 and 11. At the end of each study phase, subjects completed a written questionnaire designed to evaluate their overall acceptance of each brand of patch. A total of 80 subjects completed all three phases of the study. According to forced rank preference, 84% of subjects preferred the Ciba patch to one of the other two brands. Subjects judged the Ciba patch to be the easiest of the three brands to use and reported significantly fewer side effects and skin irritation while using the Ciba patch; they also preferred the size of the Ciba patch and experienced significantly fewer problems with adherence of the Ciba patch. A significant percentage of subjects indicated that they would prefer a transdermal patch over tablets or ointment. Most subjects preferred the Ciba patch over the Key patch or Searle patch. PMID:3925770

  8. Catheter-Based Transepidural Approach to Cervical and Thoracic Posterior and Perineural Epidural Spaces: A Cadaveric Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Khan, Asif A.; Sohail, Amna; Saed, Aveen; Jadhav, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Approaching the cervical and high thoracic level epidural space through transepidural route from lumbar region represents a method to lower the occurrence of complications associated with direct approach. The authors performed a cadaveric pilot project to determine the feasibility of various catheter-based manipulation and cephalad advancement using the transepidural route. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Two cadavers were used to determine the following: 1. Ability to place a guide sheath over a guidewire using a percutaneous approach within the posterior lumbar epidural space; 2. The highest vertebral level catheter can be advanced within the posterior epidural space; 3. Ability to cross midline within the posterior epidural space; and 4. Ability to catheterize the perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. RESULTS We were able to advance the catheters up to the level of cervical vertebral level of C2 within the posterior epidural space under fluoroscopic guidance from a sheath inserted via oblique parasagittal approach at the lumbar L4–L5 intervertebral space. We were able to cross midline within the posterior epidural space and catheterize multiple perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical vertebral level of C2, C3, and C4 on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. We also catheterized multiple epidural sheaths that surround the nerve roots exiting at the thoracic vertebral level on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. CONCLUSIONS We were able to advance a catheter or microcatheter up to the cervical vertebral level within the posterior epidural space and catheterize the perineural epidural sheath of the nerve root exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. Such observations support further exploration of percutaneous catheter based transepidural approach to cervical and thoracic dorsal epidural spaces for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26060530

  9. Dimensionality reduction via locally reconstructive patch alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi; Yin, Jun; Zhu, Jie; Jin, Zhong

    2012-07-01

    Based on the local patch concept, we proposed locally reconstructive patch alignment (LRPA) for dimensionality reduction. For each patch, LRPA aims to find the low-dimensional subspace in which the reconstruction error of the within-class nearest neighbors is minimized and the reconstruction error of the between-class nearest neighbors is maximized. LRPA preserves the local structure hidden in the high-dimensional space. More importantly, LRPA has natural connections with linear regression classification (LRC). While LRC uses reconstruction errors as the classification rule, a sample can be classified correctly when the within-class reconstruction error is minimal. The goal of LRPA makes it cooperate well with LRC. The experimental results on the extended Yale B (YALE-B), AR, PolyU finger knuckle print, and the palm print databases demonstrate LRPA plus LRC is an effective and robust pattern-recognition system.

  10. Easier patch testing with TRUE Test.

    PubMed

    Fischer, T; Maibach, H I

    1989-03-01

    TRUE Test, a standardized, ready-to-apply patch test system, is made from polyester covered with a film of allergens incorporated in a hydrophilic polymer. The patches are mounted on nonwoven cellulose tape with acrylic adhesive, covered with siliconized plastic, and packed in an air-tight and light-impermeable envelope. When the test strip is taped on the skin, perspiration hydrates the film and transforms it to a gel, which causes the allergen to be released. The first panel of 12 allergens and allergen mixes is standardized and tested for stability in vitro and in vivo. The accuracy of the test panel has been certified in international multicenter studies by comparing it with present patch test techniques. A second panel of 11 more allergens was completed in 1988. The two test panels include the full standard panel of the North American Contact Dermatitis Group. PMID:2918115

  11. Patch-Clamp Fluorometry: Electrophysiology meets Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Kusch, Jana; Zifarelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters are membrane proteins whose functions are driven by conformational changes. Classical biophysical techniques provide insight into either the structure or the function of these proteins, but a full understanding of their behavior requires a correlation of both these aspects in time. Patch-clamp and voltage-clamp fluorometry combine spectroscopic and electrophysiological techniques to simultaneously detect conformational changes and ionic currents across the membrane. Since its introduction, patch-clamp fluorometry has been responsible for invaluable advances in our knowledge of ion channel biophysics. Over the years, the technique has been applied to many different ion channel families to address several biophysical questions with a variety of spectroscopic approaches and electrophysiological configurations. This review illustrates the strength and the flexibility of patch-clamp fluorometry, demonstrating its potential as a tool for future research. PMID:24655500

  12. Boolean Operations with Prism Algebraic Patches.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Chandrajit; Paoluzzi, Alberto; Portuesi, Simone; Lei, Na; Zhao, Wenqi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a symbolic-numeric algorithm for Boolean operations, closed in the algebra of curved polyhedra whose boundary is triangulated with algebraic patches (A-patches). This approach uses a linear polyhedron as a first approximation of both the arguments and the result. On each triangle of a boundary representation of such linear approximation, a piecewise cubic algebraic interpolant is built, using a C(1)-continuous prism algebraic patch (prism A-patch) that interpolates the three triangle vertices, with given normal vectors. The boundary representation only stores the vertices of the initial triangulation and their external vertex normals. In order to represent also flat and/or sharp local features, the corresponding normal-per-face and/or normal-per-edge may be also given, respectively. The topology is described by storing, for each curved triangle, the two triples of pointers to incident vertices and to adjacent triangles. For each triangle, a scaffolding prism is built, produced by its extreme vertices and normals, which provides a containment volume for the curved interpolating A-patch. When looking for the result of a regularized Boolean operation, the 0-set of a tri-variate polynomial within each such prism is generated, and intersected with the analogous 0-sets of the other curved polyhedron, when two prisms have non-empty intersection. The intersection curves of the boundaries are traced and used to decompose each boundary into the 3 standard classes of subpatches, denoted in, out and on. While tracing the intersection curves, the locally refined triangulation of intersecting patches is produced, and added to the boundary representation. PMID:21516262

  13. The potential contributing effect of ketorolac and fluoxetine to a spinal epidural hematoma following a cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection: a case report and narrative review.

    PubMed

    Chien, George C Chang; McCormick, Zack; Araujo, Marco; Candido, Kenneth D

    2014-01-01

    Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections (ESIs) are commonly performed as one part of a multi-modal analgesic regimen in the management of upper extremity radicular pain. Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare complication with a reported incidence ranging from 1.38 in 10,000 to 1 in 190,000 epidurals. Current American Society of Regional Anesthesia (ASRA), American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP), and the International Spine Intervention Society (ISIS) recommendations are that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) do not need to be withheld prior to epidural anesthesia. We report a case wherein intramuscular ketorolac and oral fluoxetine contributed to a SEH and tetraplegia following a cervical interlaminar (ESI). A 66 year-old woman with chronic renal insufficiency and neck pain radiating into her right upper extremity presented for evaluation and was deemed an appropriate CESI candidate. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multi-level neuroforaminal stenosis and degenerative intervertebral discs. Utilizing a loss of resistance to saline technique, an 18-gauge Tuohy-type needle entered the epidural space at C6-7. After negative aspiration, 4 mL of saline with 80 mg of methyl-prednisolone was injected. Immediately thereafter, the patient reported significant spasmodic-type localized neck pain with no neurologic status changes. A decision was made to administer 30 mg intramuscular ketorolac as treatment for the spasmodic-type pain. En route home, she developed a sudden onset of acute tetraplegia. She was brought to the emergency department for evaluation including platelet and coagulation studies which were normal. MRI demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from C5 to T7. She underwent a bilateral C5-T6 laminectomy with epidural hematoma evacuation and was discharged to an acute inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Chronic renal insufficiency, spinal stenosis, female gender, and increasing age have been

  14. Delayed Presentation of a Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess of Dental Origin after a Fall in an Elderly Patient.

    PubMed

    Bodman, Alexa; Riordan, Margaret; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses are an uncommon cause of spinal cord injury but, depending on the size and presence of neurological deficits, urgent neurosurgical intervention may be required. We present a unique case of a patient presenting with a spinal epidural collection several days after a fall. While a spinal epidural hematoma was suspected based on the patient's history and MRI findings, a spinal epidural abscess was found during surgery. The patient underwent laminectomy and instrumented fusion with successful treatment of her infection. PMID:27382529

  15. Delayed Presentation of a Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess of Dental Origin after a Fall in an Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Margaret; Chin, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses are an uncommon cause of spinal cord injury but, depending on the size and presence of neurological deficits, urgent neurosurgical intervention may be required. We present a unique case of a patient presenting with a spinal epidural collection several days after a fall. While a spinal epidural hematoma was suspected based on the patient’s history and MRI findings, a spinal epidural abscess was found during surgery. The patient underwent laminectomy and instrumented fusion with successful treatment of her infection. PMID:27382529

  16. Effects of thoracic epidural analgesia with morphine or bupivacaine on lower oesophageal motility--an experimental study in man.

    PubMed

    Thorén, T; Carlsson, E; Sandmark, S; Wattwil, M

    1988-07-01

    Lower oesophageal peristalsis and lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) pressure during thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) were studied in 20 healthy volunteers. After oesophageal manometric baseline recordings, 10 volunteers received 4 mg epidural morphine. The other ten received 0.5% bupivacaine epidurally in sufficient amounts to block the sympathetic innervation of the oesophagus. Thereafter oesophageal manometry was repeated. During epidural morphine oesophageal peristalsis, resting LOS pressure and the contraction of LOS after swallowing did not change, but the relaxation of the LOS in response to swallowing decreased significantly (P less than 0.01). Following TEA with bupivacaine, neither distal oesophageal peristalsis nor LOS pressure changed. PMID:3414347

  17. Patch testing with cement containing iron sulfate.

    PubMed

    Bruze, M; Fregert, S; Gruvberger, B

    1990-01-01

    Addition of iron sulfate to cement means transformation of water-soluble hexavalent chromium into nonwater-soluble trivalent chromium. This has been the basis for preventive measures concerning sensitization to hexavalent chromium (chromate) in cement. For some years, iron sulfate has been added to cement manufactured in the Scandinavian countries. In the present in vivo study, cements with and without iron sulfate were compared concerning their capacity to elicit allergic patch-test reactions in eight chromate-hypersensitive individuals. No patch-test reactions were obtained from a water extract of cement with iron sulfate when appropriately buffered. PMID:2137395

  18. Lightweight Material Patches Allow for Quick Repairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc., of Dayton, Ohio, has been the recipient of 16 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with NASA with a variety of different focuses, including projects like creating inflatable structures for radio frequency antennas and, most recently, healable polymer matrix composites for future space vehicles. One of its earlier SBIR contracts, with Kennedy Space Center, led to the development of a new type of structural patch for a variety of consumer uses: Rubbn Repair, for automotive uses; and Rec Repair for the outdoors and adventure market. Both are flexible, heat-activated structural patches.

  19. A new domain decomposition method with overlapping patches for ultrascale simulations: Application to biological flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, L.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    2010-08-01

    We address the failure in scalability of large-scale parallel simulations that are based on (semi-)implicit time-stepping and hence on the solution of linear systems on thousands of processors. We develop a general algorithmic framework based on domain decomposition that removes the scalability limitations and leads to optimal allocation of available computational resources. It is a non-intrusive approach as it does not require modification of existing codes. Specifically, we present here a two-stage domain decomposition method for the Navier-Stokes equations that combines features of discontinuous and continuous Galerkin formulations. At the first stage the domain is subdivided into overlapping patches and within each patch a C0 spectral element discretization (second stage) is employed. Solution within each patch is obtained separately by applying an efficient parallel solver. Proper inter-patch boundary conditions are developed to provide solution continuity, while a Multilevel Communicating Interface (MCI) is developed to provide efficient communication between the non-overlapping groups of processors of each patch. The overall strong scaling of the method depends on the number of patches and on the scalability of the standard solver within each patch. This dual path to scalability provides great flexibility in balancing accuracy with parallel efficiency. The accuracy of the method has been evaluated in solutions of steady and unsteady 3D flow problems including blood flow in the human intracranial arterial tree. Benchmarks on BlueGene/P, CRAY XT5 and Sun Constellation Linux Cluster have demonstrated good performance on up to 96,000 cores, solving up to 8.21B degrees of freedom in unsteady flow problem. The proposed method is general and can be potentially used with other discretization methods or in other applications.

  20. Fatal intravenous fentanyl abuse: four cases involving extraction of fentanyl from transdermal patches.

    PubMed

    Tharp, Amy M; Winecker, Ruth E; Winston, David C

    2004-06-01

    The transdermal fentanyl system delivers a specific dose at a constant rate. Even after the prescribed application time has elapsed, enough fentanyl remains within a patch to provide a potentially lethal dose. Death due to the intravenous injection of fentanyl extracted from transdermal patches has not been previously reported. We present 4 cases in which the source of fentanyl was transdermal patches and was injected. In all of these cases, the victim was a white male who died at home. Case 1 was a 35-year-old with no known history of drug use, who was found by his wife on the floor of his workshop. Police recovered a fentanyl patch, needle, and syringe at the scene. Case 2 was a 38-year-old with a known history of drug use whose family claimed that he was in a treatment program that used fentanyl patches for unknown reasons. His brother found him dead in bed, and law enforcement officers found a hypodermic needle beside the body; a ligature around his left hand, and apparent needle marks between his first and second digits were also noted. Case 3 was a 42-year-old with a recent attempted suicide via overdose who was found dead at his home. An empty box of fentanyl patches, Valium, Ritalin, and 2 syringes were found at the scene. Case 4 was a 39-year-old found by his mother, who admitted to removing a needle with attached syringe from the decedent's arm. Medications at the scene included hydrocodone, alprazolam, zolpidem, and fentanyl patches. All reported deaths were attributed to fentanyl intoxication, with blood concentrations ranging from 5 to 27 microg/L. PMID:15166776

  1. The effects of thoracic epidural anesthesia on functional recovery from myocardial stunning in propofol-anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Rolf, N; Meissner, A; Van Aken, H; Weber, T P; Hammel, D; Möllhoff, T

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on myocardial stunning during propofol anesthesia. Six dogs were chronically instrumented for measurement of left atrial, aortic, and left ventricular pressure, maximal rate of increase of left ventricular pressure, and myocardial wall-thickening fraction (WTF). Myocardial blood flow was determined with colored microspheres. Experiments were performed on separate days with 1) 10 min of left anterior descending artery (LAD) ischemia during propofol anesthesia without TEA, and 2) 10 min of LAD ischemia during propofol anesthesia with TEA. WTF was measured as baseline (BL) prior to propofol anesthesia and at predetermined time points until complete recovery from stunning. Propofol anesthesia caused a significant decrease of WTF in the LAD-perfused myocardium (LAD-WTF) compared to BL in awake animals. LAD ischemia led to a further significant decrease of LAD-WTF. There were no significant differences in LAD-WTF between the two experimental conditions at any of the time points measured. TEA did not change subendocardial blood flow in nonischemic myocardium. During ischemia neither the subendocardial/subepicardial nor the occluded/normal zone blood flow ratio were affected by TEA. After myocardial ischemia during propofol anesthesia TEA does not affect functional recovery of stunned myocardium in dogs. PMID:9085946

  2. Renin and ovarian vascularization in cows with follicular cysts after epidural administration of a GnRH analogue.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, A; Minoia, G; Trisolini, C; Mutinati, M; Spedicato, M; Manca, R; Sciorsci, R L

    2009-12-01

    The ovarian renin-angiotensin system may play an important role in follicular growth and maturation, as well as in the process of ovulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of administration of a GnRH analogue to cows with ovarian follicular cysts on plasma renin concentrations and ovarian vascularization. This study was performed with 60 Friesian cows, which were diagnosed with follicular cysts, and randomly allocated into two groups: group A (treatment; n=30) received 2ml of lecirelin (Dalmarelin((R)) - Fatro), per head via sacro-coccygeal epidural, and group B (control; n=30) received 2ml saline solution (0.9% NaCl) per head by the same route. Blood samples were immediately collected prior to administration (T0) and then 24h (T1), 48h (T2) and 8 days (T3) after administration of the treatment, for both groups. Ovarian vascularization was evaluated utilizing Power Doppler on these same days in 10 animals from each group. The number of pixels detected by Power Doppler was used as an indicator of the degree of vascularization. Plasma renin concentrations remained relatively constant for the control (group B) animals, but increased as the sampling period progressed (NS) for the treated cows (group A). Similarly, there were no changes in ovarian vascularization (number of pixels) for the control cows, but vascularization increased throughout the sampling period in the treated animals. The number of pixels associated with cysts was significantly higher for treated compared to control cows at 24h after treatment (P<0.001). The epidural administration of a GnRH analogue was determined to be a highly effective therapy for follicular cysts (regression occurred in 82% of treated cows within 8+/-2 days after treatment, but in none of the control cows), which also enhanced ovarian vascularization. PMID:19361938

  3. The knowledge and attitudes of nonanesthesia nurses regarding postoperative epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Sandie, C L; Heindel, L J

    1999-10-01

    The provision of epidural analgesia for postoperative pain control offers many patient benefits and has become commonplace on many nursing units. Since nurses are responsible for the day-to-day management of patients receiving epidural analgesia, their knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding this technique are pivotal to its success. Therefore, the purpose of the present descriptive study was to examine the knowledge base, attitudes, and clinical practice of registered nurses (N = 85) regarding postoperative epidural analgesia as managed by an acute pain service (APS). Information was obtained from a survey distributed via a convenience sample to all nurses working on 6 units in a large military teaching facility. We developed the "Epidural Knowledge and Attitude Survey" using the nursing literature on epidural analgesia. The survey consisted of a demographics section, true/false (T/F) questions, multiple choice (M/C) questions, an attitude section, and a comment section. These sections addressed the nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and practices in regard to epidural pharmacology, management, and adverse effects, as well as their general satisfaction with the APS of their facility. Data were analyzed statistically using means, standard deviations, percentages, forward step-wise linear regression, the Fisher-Irwin (exact) test, the chi 2 test, and analysis of variance with Bonferroni multiple comparisons. A P value of < .05 was considered statistically significant. Results of the study demonstrated that the respondents attained a 78% overall correct score on T/F questions and 38% on M/C questions. The attitude section illustrated that 73% of nurses had "positive" attitudes toward epidural analgesia. Correct management of patients receiving epidural analgesia was being practiced by 77% of nurses. The satisfaction with the APS at this facility was 32% "very satisfied" and 62% "somewhat satisfied." The demographic characteristics that best predicted a higher score

  4. In patients undergoing thoracic surgery is paravertebral block as effective as epidural analgesia for pain management?

    PubMed

    Scarci, Marco; Joshi, Abhishek; Attia, Rizwan

    2010-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: in patients undergoing thoracic surgery is paravertebral block (PVB) as effective as epidural analgesia for pain management? Altogether >184 papers were found using the reported search, seven of which represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. All studies agreed that PVB is at least as effective as epidural analgesia for pain control post-thoracotomy. In one paper, the visual analogue pain score (VAS) at rest and on cough was significantly lower in the paravertebral group (P=0.02 and 0.0001, respectively). Pulmonary function, as assessed by peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), was significantly better preserved in the paravertebral group. The lowest PEFR as a fraction of preoperative control was 0.73 in the paravertebral group in contrast with 0.54 in the epidural group (P<0.004). Oximetric recordings were better in the paravertebral group (96%) compared to the epidural group (95%) (P=0.0001). Another article reported that statistically significant differences (forced vital capacity 46.8% for PVB and 39.3% for epidural group P<0.05; forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) 48.4% in PVB group and 35.9% in epidural group, P<0.05) were reached in day 2 and continued until day 3. Plasma concentrations of cortisol, as marker of postoperative stress, increased markedly in both groups, but the increment was statistically different in favour of the paravertebral group (P=0.003). Epidural block was associated with frequent side-effects [urinary retention (42%), nausea (22%), itching (22%) and hypotension (3%) and, rarely, respiratory depression (0.07%)]. Additionally, it prolonged operative time and was associated with technical failure or displacement (8%). Epidurals were also related to a higher complication rate (atelectasis/pneumonia) compared to the PVB (2 vs. 0). PVB was found to be of equal efficacy to epidural anaesthesia, but with a

  5. Formulation Design and Development of a Unani Transdermal Patch for Antiemetic Therapy and Its Pharmaceutical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The Transdermal Drug Delivery System (TDDS) is one of the novel routes for systemic delivery of drugs through intact skin. A transdermal patch (TP) is a medicated patch that is placed on skin for delivery of medication through skin into the blood stream. The aim of present study was to formulate and evaluate a Unani transdermal patch that could be used for antiemetic therapy. The incorporation of Unani ingredients, namely, Khardal (Brassica nigra), Zanjabeel (Zingiber officinale), Podina (Mentha arvensis), and Sirka (Vinegar) were envisaged. The TP was prepared by solvent evaporation technique and was evaluated for organoleptic characteristics and other physicochemical properties, such as thickness, weight uniformity, folding endurance, moisture content, drug content, and tolerability and acceptability of patch. The in vitro permeation study of the patch was carried out through Franz diffusion cell using egg shell membrane as barrier membrane. Phosphate buffer pH 7.4 was used as dissolution medium and the temperature was maintained at 37 ± 1°C. The in vitro permeation study of the prepared TP indicated a time dependent increase in drug release throughout the study. The percentage of cumulative drug release was found to be 77.38% in 24 hours. The study shows a new approach to work in Unani pharmaceutics. PMID:27403377

  6. Formulation Design and Development of a Unani Transdermal Patch for Antiemetic Therapy and Its Pharmaceutical Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mohd Nauman; Idris, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The Transdermal Drug Delivery System (TDDS) is one of the novel routes for systemic delivery of drugs through intact skin. A transdermal patch (TP) is a medicated patch that is placed on skin for delivery of medication through skin into the blood stream. The aim of present study was to formulate and evaluate a Unani transdermal patch that could be used for antiemetic therapy. The incorporation of Unani ingredients, namely, Khardal (Brassica nigra), Zanjabeel (Zingiber officinale), Podina (Mentha arvensis), and Sirka (Vinegar) were envisaged. The TP was prepared by solvent evaporation technique and was evaluated for organoleptic characteristics and other physicochemical properties, such as thickness, weight uniformity, folding endurance, moisture content, drug content, and tolerability and acceptability of patch. The in vitro permeation study of the patch was carried out through Franz diffusion cell using egg shell membrane as barrier membrane. Phosphate buffer pH 7.4 was used as dissolution medium and the temperature was maintained at 37 ± 1°C. The in vitro permeation study of the prepared TP indicated a time dependent increase in drug release throughout the study. The percentage of cumulative drug release was found to be 77.38% in 24 hours. The study shows a new approach to work in Unani pharmaceutics. PMID:27403377

  7. Essential oil based polymeric patch development and evaluating its repellent activity against mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Dhiman, Sunil; Borah, Somi; Rabha, Bipul; Chaurasia, Aashwin Kumar; Veer, Vijay

    2015-07-01

    Essential oil based insect repellents are environment friendly and provide dependable personal protection against the bites of mosquitoes and other blood-sucking insects. In the present study, optimized mixture of three essential oils was embedded into the ethylcellulose (EC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP K-30) polymers to develop essential oils based patch type mosquito repellent formulation. The developed formulation was characterized for various physico-chemical properties, oil release efficiency and essential oil-polymer interaction. Repellent activity of the formulation was evaluated against Ae. (S) albopictus mosquitoes and compared with commercially available synthetic insecticide based mosquito repellent cream Odomos(®) in the laboratory. The developed patches were 100% flat and there was no interaction between oil components and the excipients. Patches were smooth, homogenous and provided excellent mosquito repellent activity comparable to Odomos(®) under laboratory condition. Morphological and physico-chemical characterization indicated that the formulation was stable and suitable with the polymeric combination. The patch formulation did not show any inhalation toxicity in experimental Wistar rat. The repellent patches developed and evaluated currently, may provide a suitable, eco-friendly, acceptable and safe alternative to the existing synthetic repellent formulations for achieving protection against mosquitoes. PMID:25861938

  8. Intra-articular drug delivery from an optimized topical patch containing teriflunomide and lornoxicam for rheumatoid arthritis treatment: does the topical patch really enhance a local treatment?

    PubMed

    Xi, Honglei; Cun, Dongmei; Xiang, Rongwu; Guan, Yanli; Zhang, Yuxiu; Li, Yuanru; Fang, Liang

    2013-07-10

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often bear joint destruction and symptomatic pain. The aim of this work is to develop a compound transdermal patch containing teriflunomide (TEF) and lornoxicam (LOX) to transport these drugs across the skin with the isochronous permeation rates for RA therapy and investigate intra-articular delivery of TEF and LOX following transdermal patches applied topically. The salts of TEF and LOX with organic amines diethylamine (DEtA), triethylamine (TEtA), diethanolamine (DEA), triethanolamine (TEA) and N-(2'-hydroxy-ethanol)-piperdine (NP) were prepared to improve the skin permeation of the parent drug. The optimized patch formulation is obtained from a 3-factor, 2-level central composite design. After topical application of the optimized compound patch to only one knee joint in rabbit, intra-articular delivery of TEF and LOX on the application site was compared with that on the non-application site. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the optimized compound patch were evaluated using the adjuvant arthritis model and the pain model induced by acetic acid, respectively. The in vitro experiment results showed that the amine salts of TEF and LOX, especially TEF-TEtA and LOX-TEtA, enhanced the skin permeation of TEF and LOX from the transdermal patch system. The optimal formulation successfully displayed isochronous permeation rates for TEF and LOX across rabbit skin, and was defined with 5% of TEF-TEtA, 10% of LOX-TEtA and 15% of azone. The in vivo study showed that TEF and LOX from transdermal patches were transferred into skin, ligament and fat pad on the application site by direct diffusion and on the non-application site by the redistribution of systemic blood supply, while local absorption of TEF and LOX in synovial fluid originated from the systemic blood supply rather than direct diffusion. In the RA rat model, the results of swelling inhibition on primary arthritis of bilateral hind paws further confirmed the above

  9. The success rate and complications of awake caudal epidural bupivacaine alone or in combination with intravenous midazolam and ketamine in pre-term infants

    PubMed Central

    Seyedhejazi, Mahin; Mashhoori, Majed; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Shekhzadeh, Daryoush; Taghizadieh, Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study is to compare the success rate and complications of caudal epidural bupivacaine alone or in combination with intravenous (IV) midazolam and ketamine in awake infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind, clinical trial study, 90 infants (aged below 3 months and weight below 5 kg) with American Society of Anaesthesiologists I-II, were divided into three groups of each 30: Group 1 received bupivacaine 0.25%, 1 mL/kg for caudal epidural block; Groups 2 and 3 received caudal block with same dose bupivacaine along with IV pre-treatment with midazolam 0.1 mg/kg or IV midazolam 0.1 mg/kg and ketamine 0.3 mg/kg, respectively. Results: The success rates in Groups 2 and 3 were 93.3% and 93.1%, respectively, compared with a caudal block with bupivacaine alone 80%; P = 0.015). There was no significant difference among the three groups in terms of mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures and mean heart rate at intervals of 0, 20, 40 and 60 min (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the pain scores >3 on the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale at three intervals (30, 60 and 120 min) after surgery among the three groups. The complications such as apnoea or desaturation were not found in any of the studied groups. Conclusions: Adding IV ketamine and/or midazolam to bupivacaine caudal epidural block in the conscious infants can positively affect block success rate. PMID:26712287

  10. Soil, Seeds, and the Pumpkin Patch!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Marianne; Vowell, Julie

    2013-01-01

    "Soil, Seeds, and the Pumpkin Patch!" is an integrated unit designed to provide elementary school teachers with ideas for using hands-on activities, fostering inquiry and valuable discussion, and using technology as a learning tool. This unit integrates science with language arts, mathematics, literature, and technology. During this unit, students…

  11. Juno Microwave Radiometer Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, N.; Chen, J.; Focardi, P.; Hodges, R.; Hughes, R.; Jakoboski, J.; Venkatesan, J.; Zawadzki, M.

    2009-01-01

    Juno is a mission in the NASA New Frontiers Program with the goal of significantly improving our understanding of the formation and structure of Jupiter. This paper discusses the modeling and measurement of the two patch array antennas. An overview of the antenna architecture, design and development at JPL is provided, along with estimates of performance and the results of measurements.

  12. Perturbation analysis for patch occupancy dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; Nichols, James D.; McIntyre, Carol L.; Ferraz, Goncalo; Hines, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Perturbation analysis is a powerful tool to study population and community dynamics. This article describes expressions for sensitivity metrics reflecting changes in equilibrium occupancy resulting from small changes in the vital rates of patch occupancy dynamics (i.e., probabilities of local patch colonization and extinction). We illustrate our approach with a case study of occupancy dynamics of Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nesting territories. Examination of the hypothesis of system equilibrium suggests that the system satisfies equilibrium conditions. Estimates of vital rates obtained using patch occupancy models are used to estimate equilibrium patch occupancy of eagles. We then compute estimates of sensitivity metrics and discuss their implications for eagle population ecology and management. Finally, we discuss the intuition underlying our sensitivity metrics and then provide examples of ecological questions that can be addressed using perturbation analyses. For instance, the sensitivity metrics lead to predictions about the relative importance of local colonization and local extinction probabilities in influencing equilibrium occupancy for rare and common species.

  13. Multimode Broad-Band Patch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2003-01-01

    Microstrip patch antennas of a proposed type would be tunable over broad wavelength ranges. These antennas would be attractive for use in a variety of microwave communication systems in which there are requirements for transmission and/or reception at multiple, widely separated frequencies. Prior efforts to construct tunable microstrip patch antennas have involved integration of microstrip circuitry with, variously, ferrite films with magneticfield tuning, solid-state electronic tuning devices, or piezoelectric tuning actuators. Those efforts have been somewhat successful, but have yielded tuning ranges of 20 percent and smaller much smaller than needed in typical practical cases. Like prior microstrip patch antennas (both tunable and non-tunable), the proposed antennas would have instantaneous bandwidths of about 1 percent of their nominal or resonance frequencies. However, these would be tunable over much broader frequency ranges as much as several octaves, depending on specific designs. They could be fabricated relatively simply and inexpensively by use of conventional photolithography, and without need for integration with solid-state electronic or piezoelectric control devices. An antenna as proposed (see figure) would include a microstrip patch radiating element on a thin ferroelectric film on a semiconductor substrate with a ground-plane conductor on the underside of the substrate. The ferroelectric film could be, for example, SrTiO3 with a thickness of the order of 1 or 2 micrometers.

  14. Comparison of Transforaminal and Parasagittal Epidural Steroid Injections in Patients With Radicular Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Masoud; Aryani, Mohamad Reza; Momenzadeh, Sirus; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir; Esmilijah, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidural steroid injection (ESI), including transforaminal (TF) epidural injections and interlaminar (IL) epidural steroid injections are commonly performed procedures for the management of lumbosacral radicular pain. Parasagittal interlaminar (PIL) approach could enable higher ventral epidural spread, with fewer complications than TF. Objectives: This study aims to compare the effectiveness of PIL and TF ESI in relieving the pain and disability of patients with lumbosacral pain. Patients and Methods: This prospective study enrolled 64 patients, aged between 18 to 75 years, with a diagnosis of low back pain and unilateral lumbosacral radicular pain. The patients were randomized to receive fluoroscopically guided epidural injection, through either the PIL or TF approach. Patients were evaluated for effective pain relief [numerical rating scale (NRS) < 3] by 0 - 10 numeric rating scale (NRS) and functional improvement by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results: Effective pain relief [numeric rating scale (NRS) < 3] was observed in 77.3% (95% CI: 67‒90.5%) of patients in PIL group and 74.2% (95% CI: 62.4 - 89.4%) of patients in the TF group (P = 0.34), at 4 weeks. Mean NRS score was not significantly different between the PIL group compared to the TF group, at 4 weeks (P = 0.19). Number of patients with improved disability (measured by ODI < 20%) was not significantly different in PIL group (78% of cases) compared to the TF group (76% of cases), at 4 weeks (P = 0.21). There were no adverse effects observed in any of our patients. Conclusions: The PIL epidural injection is as effective as TF epidural injection in improving pain and functional status, in patients with chronic lumbosacral low back pain, due to disc degeneration. PMID:26587400

  15. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided epidural access at the lumbo-sacral space in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa; Busoni, Valeria; Carrozzo, Maria Valentina; Sandersen, Charlotte; Gabriel, Annick; Bolen, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Epidural injections are commonly performed blindly in veterinary medicine. The aims of this study were to describe the lumbosacral ultrasonographic anatomy and to assess the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique in dogs. A cross sectional anatomic atlas of the lumbosacral region and ex vivo ultrasound images were obtained in two cadavers to describe the ultrasound anatomy and to identify the landmarks. Sixteen normal weight canine cadavers were used to establish two variations of the technique for direct ultrasound-guided injection, using spinal needles or epidural catheters. The technique was finally performed in two normal weight cadavers, in two overweight cadavers and in five live dogs with radiographic abnormalities resulting of the lumbosacral spine. Contrast medium was injected and CT was used to assess the success of the injection. The anatomic landmarks to carry out the procedure were the seventh lumbar vertebra, the iliac wings, and the first sacral vertebra. The target for directing the needle was the trapezoid-shaped echogenic zone between the contiguous articular facets of the lumbosacral vertebral canal visualized in a parasagittal plane. The spinal needle or epidural catheter was inserted in a 45° craniodorsal-caudoventral direction through the subcutaneous tissue and the interarcuate ligament until reaching the epidural space. CT examination confirmed the presence of contrast medium in the epidural space in 25/25 dogs, although a variable contamination of the subarachnoid space was also noted. Findings indicated that this ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique is feasible for normal weight and overweight dogs, with and without radiographic abnormalities of the spine. PMID:25187175

  16. Gabapentin vs pregabalin as a premedication in lower limb orthopaedics surgery under combined spinal epidural technique

    PubMed Central

    Khetarpal, Ranjana; Kataria, Amar Parakash; Bajaj, Samita; Kaur, Harjinder; Singh, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pregabalin and gabapentin are the gamma-aminobutyric acid analogs used as a part of multimodal analgesic regimen. Aim: To compare the postoperative analgesic benefits of gabapentin or pregabalin as a premedication for lower limb orthopedic surgery under combined spinal-epidural techniques. Settings and Design: Randomized double-blind study. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 patients were divided into three groups: G, P, C who received gabapentin 1200 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, and placebo, respectively 1.5 h before surgery. All patients received combined spinal-epidural block with 3 ml of 0.5% intrathecal bupivacaine. Assessment of pain was made with visual analog scale (VAS). Postoperative analgesia was provided with epidural top-ups with 2.5 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and fentanyl 25 μg when VAS >3. Rescue analgesia in the form of injection diclofenac (75 mg) intramuscularly was given if VAS >3 even after epidural top-up. A total number of epidural top-ups, rescue analgesia, pain-free interval postspinal anesthesia, and sedation score were noted. Statistical Analysis: This was done using SPSS version 17. Mean and standard deviation were calculated using Chi-square test and analysis of variance. Results: The total postoperative analgesic time was 7.23 h in Group G, 14.80 h in Group P, and 4.17 h in Group C. A total number of epidural top-ups were 2.43 in Group G, 0.77 in Group P, and 4.43 in Group C. Conclusion: Pregabalin 300 mg and gabapentin 1200 mg significantly reduce the need of postoperative rescue analgesia, epidural top-ups, and increase the duration of postspinal anesthesia without altering hemodynamics with sedation as a major side effect. PMID:27212758

  17. The Effects of Rifampin, Povidone-Iodine and Hydrogen Peroxide on the Formation of Epidural Fibrosis in the Experimental Epidural Fibrosis Model.

    PubMed

    Kizilay, Zahir; Cetin, Nesibe Kahraman; İsmailoglu, Özgur; Yılmaz, Ali; Omurlu, İmran Kurt; Coskun, Mehmet Erdal; Aktaş, Serdar

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of direct application of rifampin, povidone-iodine, and hydrogen peroxide on the formation of epidural fibrosis in rats. Forty-eight adult male Wistar albino rats were equally and randomly divided into four groups (laminectomy, topical rifampin, topical povidone-iodine, and topical hydrogen peroxide). Laminectomy was performed at the T12 level in all rats. Four weeks later, the extent of epidural fibrosis was assessed both macroscopically and histopathologically. ANOVA test was used for the evaluation of dural thickness. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for the pathology and macroscopic evaluation. Chi-square test was used for evaluation of the arachnoid involvement. p value <0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. Our data revealed that topical application of both povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide were effective in reducing epidural fibrosis formation. The results of our study provide the experimental evidence of the preventive effects of topical application of povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide over epidural fibrosis. PMID:27251380

  18. Patch burning: implications on water erosion and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Ozaslan Parlak, Altingul; Parlak, Mehmet; Blanco-Canqui, Humberto; Schacht, Walter H; Guretzky, John A; Mamo, Martha

    2015-05-01

    Patch burning can be a potential management tool to create grassland heterogeneity and enhance forage productivity and plant biodiversity, but its impacts on soil and environment have not been widely documented. In summer 2013, we studied the effect of time after patch burning (4 mo after burning [recently burned patches], 16 mo after burning [older burned patches], and unburned patches [control]) on vegetative cover, water erosion, and soil properties on a patch-burn experiment established in 2011 on a Yutan silty clay loam near Mead, NE. The recently burned patches had 29 ± 8.0% (mean ± SD) more bare ground, 21 ± 1.4% less canopy cover, and 40 ± 11% less litter cover than older burned and unburned patches. Bare ground and canopy cover did not differ between the older burned and unburned patches, indicating that vegetation recovered. Runoff depth from the older burned and recently burned patches was 2.8 times (19.6 ± 4.1 vs. 7.1 ± 3.0 mm [mean ± SD]) greater than the unburned patches. The recently burned patches had 4.5 times greater sediment loss (293 ± 89 vs. 65 ± 56 g m) and 3.8 times greater sediment-associated organic C loss (9.2 ± 2.0 vs. 2.4 ± 1.9 g m) than the older burned and unburned patches. The recently burned patches had increased daytime soil temperature but no differences in soil compaction and structural properties, dissolved nutrients, soil C, and total N concentration relative to older burned and unburned patches. Overall, recently burned patches can have reduced canopy and litter cover and increased water erosion, but soil properties may not differ from older burn or unburned patches under the conditions of this study. PMID:26024270

  19. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE - Fort Delaware, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  20. Thoracic epidural anesthesia: Effects on splanchnic circulation and implications in Anesthesia and Intensive care

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Laici, Cristiana; Bardi, Tommaso; Faenza, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the currently available evidence on thoracic epidural anesthesia effects on splanchnic macro and microcirculation, in physiologic and pathologic conditions. METHODS: A PubMed search was conducted using the MeSH database. Anesthesia, Epidural was always the first MeSH heading and was combined by boolean operator AND with the following headings: Circulation, Splanchnic; Intestines; Pancreas and Pancreatitis; Liver Function Tests. EMBASE, Cochrane library, ClinicalTrials.gov and clinicaltrialsregister.eu were also searched using the same terms. RESULTS: Twenty-seven relevant studies and four ongoing trials were found. The data regarding the effects of epidural anesthesia on splanchnic perfusion are conflicting. The studies focusing on regional macro-hemodynamics in healthy animals and humans undergoing elective surgery, demonstrated no influence or worsening of regional perfusion in patients receiving thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA). On the other hand most of the studies focusing on micro-hemodynamics, especially in pathologic low flow conditions, suggested that TEA could foster microcirculation. CONCLUSION: The available studies in this field are heterogeneous and the results conflicting, thus it is difficult to draw decisive conclusions. However there is increasing evidence deriving from animal studies, that thoracic epidural blockade could have an important role in modifying tissue microperfusion and protecting microcirculatory weak units from ischemic damage, regardless of the effects on macro-hemodynamics. PMID:25685727

  1. Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections

    SciTech Connect

    Deli, Martin; Mateiescu, Serban Busch, Martin; Becker, Jan Garmer, Marietta Groenemeyer, Dietrich

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 {+-} 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 {+-} 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  2. A comparison of epidural catheters with or without subcutaneous injection ports for treatment of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    de Jong, P C; Kansen, P J

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of technical complications of epidural catheters with subcutaneous injection ports to percutaneous epidural catheters without ports, fixed only by adhesive dressing. We reviewed 149 patients who received 250 epidural catheters for treatment of cancer pain during a 3 1/2-yr period from January 1, 1989, to June 30, 1992. Of the 250 catheters, 52 were provided with subcutaneous injection ports and 198 were percutaneous catheters. Of the 198 percutaneous catheters, 41 were tunneled for a short distance; the remainder entered the skin at the dorsal midline. In the percutaneous group 21% of the catheters became dislodged. In the injection port group, there were no catheter dislodgements. The overall incidence of infections was similar in both groups (13.6%). When we indexed the infection rate to catheter-days, the number of infections per 1000 catheter-days in the injection port group was half that of the percutaneous group (2.86 infections versus 5.97 for percutaneous catheters). No injection port became infected during the first 70 days of treatment, whereas in the percutaneous group infections occurred as early as the first week. Within the percutaneous group the complication rate in the tunneled epidural catheters was as high as in the nontunneled. We conclude that injection ports reduce the complication rate of epidural catheters, particularly catheter dislodgement and early infections. PMID:8267188

  3. Efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone in providing postoperative analgesia: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jebaraj, B; Khanna, P; Baidya, DK; Maitra, S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dexamethasone is a potent anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antiemetic drug. Individual randomized controlled trials found a possible benefit of epidural dexamethasone. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to estimate the benefit of epidural dexamethasone on postoperative pain and opioid consumption and to formulate a recommendation for evidence-based practice. Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized controlled trials comparing the analgesic efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone combination, with local anesthetic alone for postoperative pain management after abdominal surgery, were planned to be included in this meta-analysis. PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, and Central Register of Clinical Trials of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL) databases were searched for eligible controlled trials using the following search words: “Epidural”, “dexamethasone”, and “postoperative pain”, until February 20, 2015. Results: Data from five randomized control trials have been included in this meta-analysis. Epidural dexamethasone significantly decreased postoperative morphine consumption (mean difference −7.89 mg; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −11.66 to −3.71) and number of patients required postoperative rescue analgesic boluses (risk ratio: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.41-0.63). Conclusion: The present data shows that the addition of dexamethasone to local anesthetic in epidural is beneficial for postoperative pain management. PMID:27375389

  4. [The effect of epidural injection with morphine on the post-thoracotomy respiratory function].

    PubMed

    Itoi, K; Reshad, K; Hirata, T; Takahashi, Y; Muro, K

    1989-11-01

    Patients undergoing thoracotomy experience severe post-operative pain and marked respiratory impairment, which causes pulmonary atelectasis and pneumonia. The effects of epidural injection on postoperative pain and respiratory function were examined in this study. The group undergoing epidural injection of 3 mg morphine (at the end of operation, 09oo and 21oo for the next 3 days) included 37 patients, while the control group involved 16. The number of required analgesics on the operating day and next three days were compared between the two groups. And postoperative vital capacity (VC), forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), maximum mean flow (MMF) were compared with preoperative value. Patients receiving epidural morphine required significantly less analgesics throughout the postoperative periods (p less than 0.01). The morphine injected group had significantly better value in VC and FEV1 in the first two postoperative day (p less than 0.01), while significance were seen only in the first postoperative day in MMF (p less than 0.01). It seems that epidural morphine is highly effective in alleviating pain and improving respiratory function in post-thoracotomy patients. These effects help the expectoration of sputum especially in senile patients. As the side-effects of epidural morphine, urinary retention, nausea, vomiting and itching were seen in few patients. No serious side effect such as hypotension or ventilatory depression were seen. PMID:2614115

  5. Ventricular patch endocarditis caused by Propionibacterium acnes: advantages of gallium scanning.

    PubMed

    Vandenbos, F; Roger, P M; Mondain-Miton, V; Dunais, B; Fouché, R; Kreitmann, P; Carles, D; Migneco, O; Dellamonica, P

    2001-11-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a weakly pathogenic commensal of the skin. When isolated from blood cultures it is often considered a contaminant. However, P. acnes may be responsible for severe infections and its role in certain cases of infectious endocarditis has now been definitely established.(1) We report a case of endocarditis due to P. acnes stemming from a ventricular patch and revealed by a gallium 67 scan. PMID:11869063

  6. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly, Junonia coenia

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, N.

    1999-01-22

    Study hypothesized that corridors increase patch colonization by Junonia coenia regardless of insects initial distance from patch, as the butterfly is known to move between patches preferentially through corridors. Neither corridor nor distance had significant effect on patch colonization, but significant interaction between presence or absence of corridors and distance. One critical factor is interpatch distance which may determine the relative effectiveness of corridors and other landscape configurations.

  7. Doppler sonographic examination of uterine and placental perfusion in cows in the last month of gestation and effects of epidural anesthesia and isoxsuprine.

    PubMed

    Kim-Egloff, C; Hässig, M; Bruckmaier, R; Bleul, U

    2016-03-15

    The massive increase in size of the fetus and uterus in the last trimester is accompanied by an increasing demand for nutrients and oxygen, and it is assumed that this demand is met by increasing uterine and fetal perfusion. The goals of this study were to measure the perfusion of the uterine arteries and the placentomes in the last month of gestation and to investigate the effect of epidural anesthesia and isoxsuprine on perfusion. During the last month of gestation, eight Braunvieh cows underwent nine color Doppler sonographic examinations of the uterine arteries to determine diameter (DM), pulse rate (PR), resistance index, time-averaged maximum blood flow velocity (TAMV), and blood flow volume (BFV), and power-mode Doppler sonography was used to determine perfusion of placentomes. The PR increased (P < 0.001), and the BFV and TAMV of the ipsilateral uterine artery decreased between 4.5 and 0.5 weeks prepartum (BFV, 236.8 ± 65.80 and 208 ± 41.52 cm(3)/s, P < 0.01; TAMV, 140.0 ± 26.53 cm/s and 125.2 ± 18.46 cm/s, P < 0.05). After sonographic examination, the cows received epidural administration of local anesthetic (100-mg lidocaine) in the sacrococcygeal space or isoxsuprine (200 mg/cow, iv), and the sonographic measurements were repeated 30 minutes later. After epidural anesthesia, the TAMV and BFV of the contralateral uterine artery increased by 5.4% (P < 0.05) and 7.9% (P < 0.01). In the placentomes of the gravid uterine horn, the relative placentome perfusion and the color pixel grading (Cp) increased by 10.1% (P < 0.05) and 11.5% (P < 0.01) after epidural anesthesia. After isoxsuprine, the DM, PR, and BFV increased by 4.7%, 49.3%, and 16.9% in the ipsilateral uterine artery and by 10.8%, 48.7%, and 22.8%, respectively in the contralateral uterine artery. The TAMV of the ipsilateral uterine artery increased by 7.1% (P < 0.01), and the resistance index decreased in both uterine arteries (ipsilateral 24.2%, contralateral 14

  8. Evaluating Femoral-Sciatic Nerve Blocks, Epidural Analgesia, and No Use of Regional Analgesia in Dogs Undergoing Tibia-Plateau-Leveling-Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Boscan, Pedro; Wennogle, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This is a retrospective study evaluating femoral-sciatic nerve blocks (FSBs), epidural analgesia, and non-regional analgesia (NRA) in dogs undergoing tibia-plateau-leveling-osteotomy surgery. Thirty-five records met the criteria for each of the FSB and epidural analgesia groups. Seventeen anesthesia records met the criteria for the NRA or control group. The parameters reported were: isoflurane vaporizer setting, rescue analgesia/anesthesia drugs received, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and recovery quality (0-4, with 0 being poor and 4 being good). Rescue analgesia-anesthesia during surgery was performed with either fentanyl, ketamine, or propofol. A larger percentage of dogs in the NRA group required rescue analgesia during surgery. The FSB group had a higher recovery quality with median (95% confidence interval of four (±0.3) when compared to two (±0.8) in NRA (p < 0.01). No difference between groups was observed on any other parameter reported. As part of a multimodal analgesia approach for tibia-plateau-leveling-osteotomy surgery, the use of femoral and sciatic nerves blocks with bupivacaine appears to be an alternative technique to help with analgesia and anesthesia during surgery. PMID:26808436

  9. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly Junonia coenia

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Haddad

    2000-06-01

    Habitat corridors have been proposed to reduce patch isolation and increase population persistence in fragmented landscapes. This study tested whether patch colonization was increased by the presence and various length corridors. The specific butterfly species tested has been shown to use corridors, however, the results indicate that neither the distance between patches or the presence of a corridor influenced colonization.

  10. On the evolution of patch-type dependent immigration.

    PubMed

    Gyllenberg, Mats; Kisdi, Éva; Weigang, Helene C

    2016-04-21

    Empirical studies of dispersal indicate that decisions to immigrate are patch-type dependent; yet theoretical models usually ignore this fact. Here, we investigate the evolution of patch-type dependent immigration of a population inhabiting and dispersing in a heterogeneous landscape, which is structured by patches of low and high reward. We model the decision to immigrate in detail from a mechanistic underpinning. With the methods of adaptive dynamics, we derive both analytical and numerical results for the evolution of immigration when life-history traits are patch-type dependent. The model exhibits evolutionary branching in a wide parameter range and the subsequent coevolution can lead to a stable coexistence of a generalist, settling in patches of any type, and a specialist that only immigrates into patches of high reward. We find that individuals always settle in the patches of high reward, in which survival until maturation, relative fecundity and emigration probability are high. We investigate how the probability to immigrate into patches of low reward changes with model parameters. For example, we show that immigration into patches of low reward increases when the emigration probability in these patches increases. Further, immigration into patches of low reward decreases when the patches of high reward become less safe during the dispersal season. PMID:26860659

  11. Analytical Side-to-Side Related Anastomotic Strategies and Artery Patching

    PubMed Central

    Roussis, P.C; Giannakopoulos, A.E; Charalambous, H.P

    2015-01-01

    Suture line stress concentration and intimal hyperplasia are related to the long-term complications of end-toside and side-to-side anastomosis. Several factors, such as hemodynamic effects, biological activities and the mechanical properties of the blood vessels, are identified to influence the problem. Yet, it is not completely clear which are the factors that influence most the long-term complications and in what specific way. This study aims to examine if elastic (compliance) mismatch increases the stress concentration and intimal thickening at the suture line. Better compliance may be obtained by using grafts with similar mechanical properties to the host artery or by anastomosis techniques that utilize vein patches and cuffs (Taylor-patch and Miller-cuff anastomosis). The anastomosis model used in this study is a circular cylindrical system consisting of two semi-cylinders, interconnected by two hinges. The internal blood pressure is applied on the arterial walls. The static and dynamic responses are analytically derived in terms of radial and tangential displacements, internal forces and strains of the two blood vessels and rotation of their cross-section. Results suggest that increased elastic mismatch between the artery and the graft may promote elevated intimal thickening due to large incompatible angles at the junction, whereas there is no correlation between elastic mismatch and elevated stress concentration at the suture line. Another interesting application of the present model is the patching of arteries as applied in carotid endarterectomy. PMID:25949745

  12. American crew patch of the ASTP mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This is the American crew patch of the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) scheduled for July 1975. Of circular design, the patch as a colored border area, outlined in red, with the names of the five crewmen and the words Apollo in English and Soyuz in Russian around an artist's concept of the Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft about to dock in Earth orbit. The bright Sun and the blue and white Earth are in the background. The white stars on the blue background represent American Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, Vance D. Brand, and Donald K. Slayton. The dark gold stars on the red background represent Soviet Cosmonauts Aleskey A. Leonov, and Valeriy N. Kubasov.

  13. Congenital neuroblastoma with symptoms of epidural compression at birth.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, A R; De Ioris, M A; De Grandis, E; Podda, M; Cellini, M; Sorrentino, S; De Bernardi, B; Paladini, D; Gandolfo, C

    2016-03-01

    The occurrence of congenital neuroblastoma presenting at birth with symptoms of epidural compression secondary to spinal canal invasion is rare. Almost all cases reported in the literature have survived from the tumor but suffer severe sequelae, with the exception of the 2 most recently described whose birth was anticipated. The 3 cases of this article have been followed for a minimum of 5 years with the aim to describe their definitive late complications. In none of these cases had the routine ultrasound scan performed in third trimester of pregnancy discovered a tumor mass, nor had it shown abnormal fetal movements. All had leg hypotonia detected on the first day of life. In all, both primary and intraspinal tumors responded well to chemotherapy. All survive with motor deficit and severe bladder dysfunction despite early physiotherapy. Scoliosis has developed in the case with the longest follow-up. The description of these patients enforces the importance of early diagnosis of tumor masses in late pregnancy. Neonatologists should be aware of this rare clinical entity and take it into account in the differential diagnosis with other conditions of early-onset hypotonia. On the other hand, obstetric sonologists should be aware of the possibility to detect such rare tumors in late pregnancy, as anticipation of delivery may reduce the risk of late sequelae. PMID:26901768

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Reirradiation for Recurrent Epidural Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Floyd, Scott; Wong, Eric; Jeyapalan, Suriya; Groff, Michael; Kasper, Ekkehard

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: When patients show progression after conventional fractionated radiation for spine metastasis, further radiation and surgery may not be options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been successfully used in treatment of the spine and may be applicable in these cases. We report the use of SBRT for 60 consecutive patients (81 lesions) who had radiological progressive spine metastasis with epidural involvement after previous radiation for spine metastasis. Methods and Materials: SBRT was used with fiducial and vertebral anatomy-based targeting. The radiation dose was prescribed based on the extent of spinal canal involvement; the dose was 8 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 = 24 Gy when the tumor did not touch the spinal cord and 5 to 6 Gy x 5 = 25 to 30 Gy when the tumor abutted the cord. The cord surface received up to the prescription dose with no hot spots in the cord. Results: The median overall survival was 11 months, and the median progression-free survival was 9 months. Overall, 93% of patients had stable or improved disease while 7% of patients showed disease progression; 65% of patients had pain relief. There was no significant toxicity other than fatigue. Conclusions: SBRT is feasible and appears to be an effective treatment modality for reirradiation after conventional palliative radiation fails for spine metastasis patients.

  15. Analysis of Inadvertent Intradiscal Injections during Lumbar Transforaminal Epidural Injection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Mun; Bae, Jin Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, there have been several case reports and retrospective studies about the incidence of intradiscal (ID) injection during transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI). Inadvertent ID injection is not a rare complication, and it carries the risk of developing diskitis, although there has been no report of diskitis after TFESI. We prospectively evaluated the incidence of inadvertent ID injection during lumbar TFESI and analyzed the contributing factors. Methods Ten patients received 2-level TFESI, and the remaining 229 patients received 1-level TFESI. When successful TFESI was performed, 2 ml of contrast dye was injected under real-time fluoroscopy to check for any inadvertent ID spread. A musculoskeletal radiologist analyzed all magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of patients who demonstrated inadvertent ID injection. When reviewing MRIs, the intervertebral foramen level where ID injection occurred was carefully examined, and any anatomical structure which narrowing the foramen was identified. Results Among the 249 TFESI, we identified 6 ID injections; thus, there was an incidence of 2.4%. Four patients had isthmic spondylolisthesis, and the level of spondylolisthesis coincided with the level of ID injection. We further examined the right or left foramen of the spondylolisthesis level and identified the upward migrated disc material that was narrowing the foramen. Conclusions Inadvertent ID injection during TFESI is not infrequent, and pain physicians must pay close attention to the type and location of disc herniation. PMID:24748946

  16. Lumbar discogram resulting from lumbar interlaminar epidural injection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeffrey; Kwa, Andre

    2004-06-01

    Lumbar discography is a diagnostic modality to determine whether the intervertebral disc is the cause of pain. The injection of radiopaque contrast into the nucleus pulposus of the disc can reveal the internal details of the disc. We describe a case of inadvertent lumbar discogram resulting from an attempted lumbar interlaminar epidural injection at L5-S1 under fluoroscopy. The patient did not have a postdural puncture headache or nerve root irritation. The potential triangle in the lateral aspect of spinal cord may be the explanation for this situation, because this triangle is composed of the exiting nerve root laterally, the lateral margin of the dura medially, and the pedicle as its base. The L5-S1 disc is located in the center of the triangle. In our case, the Tuohy needle was placed possibly in the center of the triangle, too laterally to puncture the dura. Hence, the patient did not suffer from postdural puncture headache. The needle was probably inferior to the nerve root, and no obvious nerve root trauma or irritation occurred. This potential triangle may provide alternative access for lumbar discography at the L5-S1 level. PMID:15261324

  17. Thoracic Epidural Teratoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Jennifer L.; Grant, Ryan A.; Huttner, Anita J.; Duncan, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Spinal teratomas comprise a rare subset of spinal cord tumors, and here, we describe an even rarer childhood thoracic extradural–intracanalicular teratoma. The clinical presentation, management, and pathophysiology of these tumors are reviewed to promote recognition and guide treatment of these lesions. METHODS We report the case of a 21-month-old boy who presented with marked spasticity, as well as failure to ambulate and meet motor milestones. Additionally, we provide a literature review of spinal teratomas, including their clinical presentation, work-up, pathophysiology, and underlying genetics. Results An MRI of the spine revealed a large dorsal epidural tumor extending from T3 to T10 with heterogeneous contrast enhancement and severe spinal cord compression. The tumor was resected revealing a cystic mass with tissue resembling hair, muscle, as well as cartilage; pathology confirmed the diagnosis of teratoma. Gross total resection was achieved, and the child eventually gained ambulatory function. CONCLUSIONS Given that spinal teratomas are rare entities that can present with significant neurologic compromise, they must remain on clinicians’ differentials. Unfortunately, the exact origin of these tumors remains inconclusive and requires further investigation. PMID:24940089

  18. Atypical scabies presenting as annular patches.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Delwar

    2014-01-01

    Scabies is a common parasitic disease that can be recognized by the development of itchy lesions and a predilection for certain places on the body. It may infrequently present with patchy lesions. We report a patient with well-defined annular patches. Histopathology showed an egg of the scabies mite in the epidermis. Treatment with permethrin cream resulted in complete resolution of her disease. PMID:22967356

  19. Design of an innovative magnetostrictive patch actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinquemani, S.; Giberti, H.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetostrictive actuators can be profitably used to reduce vibration in structures. However, this technology has been exploited only to develop inertial actuators, while patches actuators have not been ever used in practice. Patches actuators consist on a layer of magnetostrictive material, which has to be stuck to the surface of the vibrating structure, and on a coil surrounding the layer itself. However, the presence of the winding severely limits the use of such devices. As a matter of fact, the scientific literature reports only theoretical uses of such actuators, but, in practice it does not seem they were ever used. This paper presents an innovative solution to improve the structure of the actuator patches, allowing their use in several practical applications. The principle of operation of these devices is rather simple. The actuator patch is able to generate a local deformation of the surface of the vibrating structure so as to introduce an equivalent damping that dissipates the kinetic energy associated to the vibration. This deformation is related to the behavior of the magnetostrictive material immersed in a variable magnetic field generated by the a variable current flowing in the winding. Contrary to what suggested in the theoretical literature, the designed device has the advantage of generating the variable magnetic field no longer in close proximity of the material, but in a different area, thus allowing a better coupling. The magnetic field is then conveyed through a suitable ferromagnetic structure to the magnetostrictive material. The device has been designed and simulated through FEA. Results confirm that the new configuration can easily overcome all the limits of traditional devices.

  20. Blood Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Blood disorders affect one or more parts of the blood and prevent ...

  1. Nanowired three-dimensional cardiac patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvir, Tal; Timko, Brian P.; Brigham, Mark D.; Naik, Shreesh R.; Karajanagi, Sandeep S.; Levy, Oren; Jin, Hongwei; Parker, Kevin K.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2011-11-01

    Engineered cardiac patches for treating damaged heart tissues after a heart attack are normally produced by seeding heart cells within three-dimensional porous biomaterial scaffolds. These biomaterials, which are usually made of either biological polymers such as alginate or synthetic polymers such as poly(lactic acid) (PLA), help cells organize into functioning tissues, but poor conductivity of these materials limits the ability of the patch to contract strongly as a unit. Here, we show that incorporating gold nanowires within alginate scaffolds can bridge the electrically resistant pore walls of alginate and improve electrical communication between adjacent cardiac cells. Tissues grown on these composite matrices were thicker and better aligned than those grown on pristine alginate and when electrically stimulated, the cells in these tissues contracted synchronously. Furthermore, higher levels of the proteins involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling are detected in the composite matrices. It is expected that the integration of conducting nanowires within three-dimensional scaffolds may improve the therapeutic value of current cardiac patches.

  2. Nanowired three-dimensional cardiac patches.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Tal; Timko, Brian P; Brigham, Mark D; Naik, Shreesh R; Karajanagi, Sandeep S; Levy, Oren; Jin, Hongwei; Parker, Kevin K; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S

    2011-11-01

    Engineered cardiac patches for treating damaged heart tissues after a heart attack are normally produced by seeding heart cells within three-dimensional porous biomaterial scaffolds. These biomaterials, which are usually made of either biological polymers such as alginate or synthetic polymers such as poly(lactic acid) (PLA), help cells organize into functioning tissues, but poor conductivity of these materials limits the ability of the patch to contract strongly as a unit. Here, we show that incorporating gold nanowires within alginate scaffolds can bridge the electrically resistant pore walls of alginate and improve electrical communication between adjacent cardiac cells. Tissues grown on these composite matrices were thicker and better aligned than those grown on pristine alginate and when electrically stimulated, the cells in these tissues contracted synchronously. Furthermore, higher levels of the proteins involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling are detected in the composite matrices. It is expected that the integration of conducting nanowires within three-dimensional scaffolds may improve the therapeutic value of current cardiac patches. PMID:21946708

  3. Analgesia after Epidural Dexamethasone is Further Enhanced by IV Dipyrone, but Not IV Parecoxibe Following Minor Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Righeti, Claudia CF; Kitayama, Antonio T

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural administration of dexamethasone has been suggested for pain control after minor orthopedic surgery. This study was conducted to assess its efficacy after such surgery, combined or not to IV dipyrone, IV parecoxibe or their combination. Methods 91 patients were randomly assigned to seven groups. Patients were submitted to spinal bupivacaine anesthesia combined to epidural administration of either 10 ml saline or 10 mg dexamethasone diluted to 10-ml volume. Patients also received 10 ml IV saline or 1 gr dipyrone and/or 40 mg parecoxibe diluted to 10 ml with saline. Control group (CG) received epidural and IV saline. Dexamethasone group (DexG) received epidural dexamethasone and IV saline. Dipyrone group (DipG) received epidural saline and IV dipyrone. Dex-Dip G received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone. Parecoxibe group (ParG) received epidural saline and IV parecoxibe. Dex-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV parecoxibe. Finally, Dex-Dip-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone plus IV parecoxibe. Results The CG expressed 4h of analgesia and sooner requested pain killer. DexG was similar to DipG or ParG or Dex-ParG (7-hours), and they requested less ketoprofen compared to the CG (P < 0.05). However, the Dex-DipG and the Dex-Dip-ParG resulted in longer time to demand pain killer (17-hours) and less ketoprofen consumption in 24-hours (P < 0.002). Adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusions The analgesia secondary to epidural dexamethasone was enhanced by IV dipyrone, while no effects were observed by the addition of IV parecoxibe. PMID:25317284

  4. Emergency surgery for epidural abcess secondary to sacral fistula after laparoscopic proctectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zeitoun, Jeremie; Menahem, Benjamin; Fohlen, Audrey; Lebreton, Gil; Lubrano, Jean; Alves, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old man presented via the emergency department with a few days history of abdominal and colic occlusion symptoms. He presented signs of sepsis, midline lumbar spine tenderness and reduced hip flexion. Computer tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed a presacral collection contiguous with the posterior part of the colo-rectal anastomosis, and MRI lumbar spine revealed abscess invation into the epidural space. He underwent a laparotomy with washout of the presacral abscess and a colostomy with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotic therapy. At 3 weeks after initial presentation he had made a full clinical recovery with progressive radiological resolution of the epidural abscess. The objective of the case report is to highlight a unique and clinically significant complication of a rare post-operative complication after rectal surgery and to briefly discuss other intra-abdominal sources of epidural abscess. PMID:27421299

  5. Reversal of tetraplegia in a patient with haematogenous cervical epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Katonis, Pavlos; Souvatzis, Xenia; Tsavalas, Nikolaos; Alpantaki, Kalliopi

    2011-08-01

    Pyogenic haematogenous cervical epidural abscess complicated by tetraplegia is an uncommon entity, but its clinical importance overshadows its rarity. Predisposing risk factors for spinal epidural abscess include diabetes, intravenous drug abuse, liver disease, renal failure, malignancy, HIV, infection elsewhere, rheumatoid conditions, trauma and a number of spinal interventions. Lack of recovery and death are much more frequent when complete paralysis exists since more than 24 to 48 hours. Most authors combine decompressive laminectomy and antibiotics. Anterior decompression and needle aspiration are rarely used, the former more specifically in case of anterior abscess formation. A high index of suspicion along with reliance on gadolinium-enhanced MRI is essential to diagnose the pathology and institute appropriate treatment on an individual basis. The authors report on a diabetic male patient who developed a cervical epidural abscess with tetraplegia after dental extraction. He was treated within six hours by one stage anterior/posterior decompression and fusion, with complete recovery. PMID:21954768

  6. HbSC Disease and Spontaneous Epidural Hematoma with Kernohan's Notch Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Yogarajah, Meera; Agu, Chidozie Charles; Sivasambu, Bhradeev; Mittler, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous (nontraumatic) acute epidural hematoma is a rare and poorly understood complication of sickle cell disease. A 19-year-old African American male with hemoglobin SC disease (HbSC) presented with generalized body aches and was managed for acute painful crisis. During his hospital stay he developed rapid deterioration of his mental status and computed topography revealed a spontaneous massive epidural hematoma with mass effect and midline shift with Kernohan's notch phenomena for which urgent craniotomy and evacuation was done. We report the first case of HbSC disease associated with catastrophic epidural hematoma progressing to transtentorial herniation and Kernohan's notch phenomena within few hours with rapid clinical deterioration. The etiopathogenesis and the rare presentation are discussed in detail in this case report. PMID:26576305

  7. Epidural anaesthesia through caudal catheters for inguinal herniotomies in awake ex-premature babies.

    PubMed

    Peutrell, J M; Hughes, D G

    1993-02-01

    Ex-premature babies are at risk of apnoea after surgery. Regional anaesthesia has been used as an alternative to general anaesthesia for some surgical procedures in the belief that it may be safer. However, single dose caudal epidural and subarachnoid anaesthetics have a duration of action which may be insufficient for some operations. The level and duration of anaesthesia can be extended if local anaesthetic is given through an epidural catheter. In addition, the dose needed to provide adequate anaesthesia may be lower because the local anaesthetic is given at an appropriate segmental level. We report our experience of caudal epidural anaesthesia in nine, awake ex-premature babies who were having inguinal herniotomies. The anaesthesia was excellent in six babies. Two babies cried briefly with peritoneal or spermatic cord traction. One other baby needed supplementation with nitrous oxide in oxygen in order to complete the surgery. The majority of babies slept throughout surgery. There were no reported postoperative complications. PMID:8460759

  8. An unusual case of spinal cord compression from concomitant spinal epidural lipomatosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzai, Hasib; Khalil, Ali; Mitchell, Ruth A.; Kwok, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) results from an abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated fat within the epidural space and is a rare cause of spinal cord compression, which needs to be considered with a high index of suspicion. It most commonly occurs secondary to chronic corticosteroid use and endocrinopathies. Idiopathic cases are highly associated with obesity. We report an unusual case of idiopathic thoracic SEL in a 69-year-old male, with an adjacent infiltrative Hodgkin's lymphoma and associated vertebral crush fracture, which resulted in ataxia and sensory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging scans displayed extensive SEL and an infiltrative disease process causing thoracic cord compression. Surgical decompression confirmed the presence of extensive epidural lipomatosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma and subsequently led to improvement in neurological symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of concomitant SEL with an adjacent Hodgkin's lymphoma resulting in cord compression. PMID:26962199

  9. Primary Failure of Thoracic Epidural Analgesia in Training Centers: The Invisible Elephant?

    PubMed

    Tran, De Q H; Van Zundert, Tom C R V; Aliste, Julian; Engsusophon, Phatthanaphol; Finlayson, Roderick J

    2016-01-01

    In teaching centers, primary failure of thoracic epidural analgesia can be due to multiple etiologies. In addition to the difficult anatomy of the thoracic spine, the conventional end point-loss-of-resistance-lacks specificity. Furthermore, insufficient training compounds the problem: learning curves are nonexistent, pedagogical requirements are often inadequate, supervisors may be inexperienced, and exposure during residency is decreasing. Any viable solution needs to be multifaceted. Learning curves should be explored to determine the minimal number of blocks required for proficiency. The problem of decreasing caseload can be tackled with epidural simulators to supplement in vivo learning. From a technical standpoint, fluoroscopy and ultrasonography could be used to navigate the complex anatomy of the thoracic spine. Finally, correct identification of the thoracic epidural space should be confirmed with objective, real-time modalities such as neurostimulation and waveform analysis. PMID:27035462

  10. Successful introduction of modified dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia in a bovine referral center

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Miho; Miyagawa, Toshiharu; Kobayashi, Hayato; Takahashi, Toshihiko; Kishi, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the successful use of modified dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia with a fixed volume of anesthetic in a bovine referral center. Among the 130 Holstein cattle scheduled for flank surgery, 90 cattle received a mixed anesthetic consisting of 1 ml of xylazine hydrochloride and 3 ml of lidocaine hydrochloride by modified dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia. Eighteen cattle with dehydration and/or lameness received a mixed anesthetic containing 0.5 ml of xylazine and 3 ml of lidocaine. Infiltration anesthesia was performed in 22 cattle whose epidural space could not be reached in order to perform the flank surgery. The surgeries began about 12 min after the administration of the anesthetic and lasted for about 36 min. The modified method using a fixed volume of anesthetic was successfully introduced and effectively used in a bovine referral center. This modified method will allow veterinarians to save time and effort, thus lowering the cost of each surgery. PMID:17519573

  11. Neurologic Complication Following Spinal Epidural Anesthesia in a Patient with Spinal Intradural Extramedullary Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Won

    2010-01-01

    Paraplegia following spinal epidural anesthesia is extremely rare. Various lesions for neurologic complications have been documented in the literature. We report a 66-year-old female who developed paraplegia after left knee surgery for osteoarthritis under spinal epidural anesthesia. In the recovery room, paraplegia and numbness below T4 vertebra was checked. A magnetic resonance image (MRI) scan showed a spinal thoracic intradural extramedullary (IDEM) tumor. After extirpation of the tumor, the motor weakness improved to the grade of 3/5. If a neurologic deficit following spinal epidural anesthesia does not resolve, a MRI should be performed without delay to accurately diagnose the cause of the deficit and optimal treatment should be rendered for the causative lesion. PMID:21430985

  12. Micro devices using shape memory polymer patches for mated connections

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Fitch, Joseph P.

    2000-01-01

    A method and micro device for repositioning or retrieving miniature devices located in inaccessible areas, such as medical devices (e.g., stents, embolic coils, etc.) located in a blood vessel. The micro repositioning or retrieving device and method uses shape memory polymer (SMP) patches formed into mating geometries (e.g., a hoop and a hook) for re-attachment of the deposited medical device to a catheter or guidewire. For example, SMP or other material hoops are formed on the medical device to be deposited in a blood vessel, and SMP hooks are formed on the micro device attached to a guidewire, whereby the hooks on the micro device attach to the hoops on the medical device, or vice versa, enabling deposition, movement, re-deposit, or retrieval of the medical device. By changing the temperature of the SMP hooks, the hooks can be attached to or released from the hoops located on the medical device. An exemplary method for forming the hooks and hoops involves depositing a sacrificial thin film on a substrate, patterning and processing the thin film to form openings therethrough, depositing or bonding SMP materials in the openings so as to be attached to the substrate, and removing the sacrificial thin film.

  13. A survey on informed consent process for epidural analgesia in labor pain in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nan-Ju; Sim, Jiyeon; Lee, Mi Soon; Han, Sun Sook; Lee, Hwa Mi

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a legal obligation to explain the procedure and use of epidural analgesia in labor primarily due to the possibility of potential risks and associated complications. The present study details on the survey carried out to ascertain the current status of obtaining informed consent (IC) for explaining the epidural analgesia in labor. Methods The present study is based on a survey through a telephone questionnaire that covered all the hospitals in Korea where the anesthesiologists' belonged to and are registered with Korean Society of Anesthesiologists. The questionnaire included questions pertaining to administration of epidural analgesia to a parturient, information on different steps of obtaining an IC, whether patient status was evaluated, when the consent was obtained, and the reasons behind, if the consent had not being given. Results A total of 1,434 respondents took part in the survey, with a response rate of 97% (1,434/1,467). One hundred seventy-four hospitals had conducted epidural analgesia on the parturient. The overall rate of obtaining IC for epidural analgesia during labor was 85%, of which only 13% was conducted by anesthesiologists. The rate of evaluating preoperative patient status was 74%, of which 45% was conducted by anesthesiologists. Almost all of the consent was obtained prior to the procedure. Conclusions The rate of obtaining IC for epidural analgesia in labor is relatively high (85%) in Korea. However, it is necessary to discuss the content of the consent and the procedure followed for obtaining IC during the rapid progress of labor. PMID:20651996

  14. Surgical resection of epidural disease improves local control following postoperative spine stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Omair, Ameen; Masucci, Laura; Masson-Cote, Laurence; Campbell, Mikki; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Parent, Amy; Letourneau, Daniel; Yu, Eugene; Rampersaud, Raja; Massicotte, Eric; Lewis, Stephen; Yee, Albert; Thibault, Isabelle; Fehlings, Michael G.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-01-01

    Background Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is increasingly being applied to the postoperative spine metastases patient. Our aim was to identify clinical and dosimetric predictors of local control (LC) and survival. Methods Eighty patients treated between October 2008 and February 2012 with postoperative SBRT were identified from our prospective database and retrospectively reviewed. Results The median follow-up was 8.3 months. Thirty-five patients (44%) were treated with 18–26 Gy in 1 or 2 fractions, and 45 patients (56%) with 18–40 Gy in 3–5 fractions. Twenty-one local failures (26%) were observed, and the 1-year LC and overall survival (OS) rates were 84% and 64%, respectively. The most common site of failure was within the epidural space (15/21, 71%). Multivariate proportional hazards analysis identified systemic therapy post-SBRT as the only significant predictor of OS (P = .02) and treatment with 18–26 Gy/1 or 2 fractions (P = .02) and a postoperative epidural disease grade of 0 or 1 (0, no epidural disease; 1, epidural disease that compresses dura only, P = .003) as significant predictors of LC. Subset analysis for only those patients (n = 48/80) with high-grade preoperative epidural disease (cord deformed) indicated significantly greater LC rates when surgically downgraded to 0/1 vs 2 (P = .0009). Conclusions Postoperative SBRT with high total doses ranging from 18 to 26 Gy delivered in 1–2 fractions predicted superior LC, as did postoperative epidural grade. PMID:24057886

  15. Epidural loss-of-resistance biomechanics: an open pilot cadaver study

    PubMed Central

    McKay, William P; Rosser, Timothy; Kriegler, Stefan; Mohamed, Adel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We measured dynamic biomechanics of loss-of-resistance (LOR) epidural placement in prone cadavers, focussing on the period immediately following LOR, to estimate forces acting on the tissue of the epidural space. Methods An epidural syringe with 17G Hustead needle was instrumented to track force on the plunger, pressure in the chamber, and movement of barrel and plunger. Insertions were attempted in five formalin-preserved cadavers from T2–3 to L4–5, using LOR with saline or air, and confirmed with X-ray. Results Sixteen insertions were successful. Soft tissues in formalin-preserved cadavers are much harder than in living humans. With continuous pressure on the plunger, fluid thrust through the needle at the point of LOR was significantly greater (P = 0.005) with saline (mean ± standard deviation [95% confidence intervals]: 19.3 ± 14.9 [8.3 to 30.3] N); than with air (0.17 ± 0.25 [0 to 0.39] N). Stress exerted on epidural tissue was similar (air = 7792 ± 920 [6986 to 8598] Pa; saline = 7378 ± 3019 [5141 to 9614] Pa); and in both cases was greater than the stress exerted by cerebrospinal fluid pushing outwardly on the dura (4800 Pa). Conclusion Formalin-preserved cadavers are too stiff to make them an experimental model from which we can generalize to live humans, although we were successful in entering the epidural space and testing the instrumentation for further studies on live animals or humans. Continuous pressure on the plunger while advancing the epidural needle may “blow” the dura away from the needle tip and help prevent dural puncture. Better results are seen with saline rather than air. PMID:22915876

  16. Negligible Effect of Perioperative Epidural Analgesia Among Patients Undergoing Elective Gastric and Pancreatic Resections

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhruvil R.; Brown, Erin; Russo, Jack E.; Li, Chin-Shang; Martinez, Steve R.; Coates, Jodi M.; Bold, Richard J.; Canter, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background There are conflicting data regarding improvements in postoperative outcomes with perioperative epidural analgesia. We sought to examine the effect of perioperative epidural analgesia versus intravenous narcotic analgesia on perioperative outcomes including pain control, morbidity, and mortality in patients undergoing gastric and pancreatic resections. Methods We evaluated 169 patients from 2007 to 2011 who underwent open gastric and pancreatic resections for malignancy at a university medical center. Emergency, traumatic, pediatric, enucleations, and disseminated cancer cases were excluded. Clinicopathologic data were reviewed among epidural (E) and non-epidural (NE) patients for their association with perioperative endpoints. Results 120 patients (71%) received an epidural, and 49 (29%) did not. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in mean pain scores at each of the four days (days 0-3) among E ( 3.2 ± 2.7, 3.2 ± 2.3, 2.3 ± 1.9, and 2.1 ± 1.9, respectively) and NE patients ( 3.7 ± 2.7, 3.4 ± 1.9, 2.9 ± 2.1, and 2.4 ± 1.9, respectively). Within each of the E and NE patient groups, there were significant differences (P < 0.0001) in mean pain scores from day 0 to day 3 (P < 0.0001). 69% of E patients also received intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Ileus (13% E vs. 8% NE), pneumonia (12% E vs. 8% NE), venous thromboembolism (6% E vs. 4% NE), length of stay [ 11.0±12.1(8,4-107) E vs. 12.2±10.7(7,3-54) NE], overall morbidity (36% E vs. 39% NE), and mortality (4% E vs. 2% NE) were not significantly different. Conclusions Routine use of epidurals in this group of patients does not appear to be superior to PCA. PMID:23345053

  17. Effects of Systemic and Local Interferon Beta-1a on Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Işık, Semra; Doğan, Şeref; Özgün, Gonca; Ocakoğlu, Gökhan; Uğraş, Nesrin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Level 1 randomized controlled study. Purpose To investigate the effects of systemic and local interferon-beta-1a (IFN-β-1a) on prevention of epidural fibrosis using histopathological parameters. Overview of Literature Epidural fibrosis involves fibroblastic invasion of nerve roots into the epidural space. Formation of dense fibrous tissue causes lumbar and radicular pain. Many surgical techniques and several materials have been proposed in the literature, but no study has assessed the effect of IFN-β-1a on prevention of epidural fibrosis. Methods Forty-eight adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups of eight: sham group, control group, systemic 44 μg IFN-β-1a group and 22 μg IFN-β-1a group (after laminectomy and discectomy, 0.28 mL and 0.14 mL IFN-β-1a applied subcutaneously three times for a week, respectively), local 44 μg IFN-β-1a group (laminectomy and discectomy, followed by 0.28 mL IFN-β-1a on the surgical area), and local 22 μg IFN-β-1a group (laminectomy and discectomy, followed by 0.14 mL IFN-β-1a on the surgical area). All rats were sacrificed after 4 weeks and groups were evaluated histopathologically. Results Compared with sham and control groups, significantly less epidural fibrosis, dural adhesion, and fibroblast cell density were observed in the local and systemic 44 μg IFN-β-1a groups. No other differences were evident between the local and systemic groups. Conclusions IFN-β-1a is effective in preventing epidural fibrosis with systemic and local application. PMID:27340517

  18. Blood sugar test - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink a certain amount of glucose ( oral glucose tolerance test ) How the Test will Feel When the ... a fasting blood glucose, HbA1c test , or glucose tolerance test , depending on your random blood glucose test ...

  19. [Experimental bases of a new method of epidural anesthesia in patients with closed thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Belopukhov, A M; Anisimov, O G; Safin, R R

    2002-01-01

    The thoracic epidural block is the most effective method of anesthesia in patients with a closed mechanical trauma of the chest. But this method is associated with a risk of damage of the spinal cord. So it can be used but by highly qualified specialists. The authors have worked out a method of anesthesia of the thoracic segments based on the phenomenon of hydrolock. It is more simple, safe, easy for any specialist able to use the technique of routine lumbar epidural block. PMID:12638497

  20. Combined Spinal Epidural Anaesthesia with BiPAP-Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Jadon, Ashok; Sinha, Neelam; Agarwal, Prashant S

    2009-01-01

    Summary We report three cases where BiPAP (bi-level positive airway pressure) was used with CSEA (combined spinal epidural anaesthesia) to over come the hypoventilation due to preoperative poor respiratory reserves and additive effect of sedation. Combination of BiPAP with spinal, epidural and CSEA have been used successfully in patients of severe COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) for various surgical procedures. This combination provides safe alternative to conventional general anaesthesia, as it avoids need for postoperative ventilatory support and its deleterious effects. PMID:20640212

  1. Low dose combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia for caesarean section in a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pirlet, M; Baird, M; Pryn, S; Jones-Ritson, M; Kinsella, S M

    2000-07-01

    A patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy was scheduled for elective caesarean section after stabilization on medical therapy. Wer performed a combined spinal epidural using one ml 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (5 mg) with 0.3 mg diamorphine for the spinal. The epidural was topped up with 10 mL bupivacaine 0.5%. Significant haemodynamic changes consisted of reduction in heart rate and hypotension after the spinal, and tachycardia after delivery. The benefits and risks of this approach are discussed. PMID:15321091

  2. Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Tarbé de Saint Hardouin, A-L; Grévent, D; Sainte-Rose, C; Angoulvant, F; Chéron, G

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma is uncommon in children, making rapid diagnosis difficult. In this report, we present a case of traumatic cervical epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy, diagnosed with computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Management was conservative and the lesion regressed spontaneously. The presentation in childhood is often nonspecific. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing these lesions. Conservative treatment has to be considered in cases with a benign clinical course and provided that the patient is followed up neurologically with repeated MRI. PMID:27266638

  3. [Effective epidural anesthesia for cesarean section in parturient woman with type I mucopolysaccharidosis (Hurler's syndrome)].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis is genetically determined disease caused by the deficiency of one of the lysosomal enzymes involved in the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) breakdown pathway. This metabolic block leads to the accumulation of GAG in various organs and tissues and affects nerve system, eyes, internal organs and musculoskeletal system. The reviewer of various articles on pubmed showed only one article about epidural anesthesia in patient with type I mucopolysaccharidosis. Our observation allows to consider that epidural anesthesia with ropivacaine is possible and safe in patients with type I mucopolysaccharidosis. PMID:22379910

  4. Cervical epidural analgesia in a case of oral cancer undergoing reconstructive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mulimani, Sridevi M; Talikoti, Dayanand G

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of successful administration of cervical epidural analgesia in combination with general anaesthesia for a 50-year-old male patient of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with carcinoma of tongue undergoing reconstructive surgery. Cervical epidural analgesia was provided with intermittent doses of 0.25% bupivacaine intraoperatively in addition to general anaesthesia and intermittent doses of 0.125% bupivacaine with tramodol 1 mg/kg postoperatively. It provides marked decrease in requirement of anaesthetic drugs, rapid recovery, reduced intensive care unit stay, and less pulmonary complications. PMID:22174475

  5. Treatment of postherpetic neuralgia using a thoracic transforaminal epidural steroid injection.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Priyesh; Maher, Patrick; Singh, Jaspal Ricky

    2015-04-01

    A 64-year-old male patient with a history of herpes zoster exposure presented with severe, constant, burning pain in the left T10 dermatome consistent with postherpetic neuralgia. Previous treatment included oral and topical medications as well as an intercostal nerve block; however, these treatment options did not provide significant relief. The patient was treated with a single-level T10 thoracic transforaminal epidural steroid injection for refractory postherpetic neuralgia. He reported complete resolution of his symptoms at 2- and 12-week follow-ups. This case illustrates transforaminal epidural steroid injections may be a successful treatment option for postherpetic neuralgia. PMID:25479280

  6. Comparison of Perioperative Outcomes for Epidural versus Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia after Radical Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Andrew G.; Sfakianos, John P.; Puttanniah, Vinay G.; Bochner, Bernard H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia after various operations has been associated with earlier return of bowel function and thus decrease the length of stay (LOS). The primary aim of this study was to compare LOS after radical cystectomy between patients who received epidural analgesia versus those who received intravenous patient controlled analgesia. Our secondary analysis included the assessment of other metrics such as total opioid requirements, pain scores, return of bowel function and complication rates between the two groups. Methods We conducted a retrospective review using the electronic medical records of 308 patients who underwent radical cystectomies at Memorial Sloan Kettering between 2006 and 2011. We aimed to understand if epidural analgesia was associated with a reduced length of stay compared to patient controlled intravenous opioid analgesia. We also aimed to identify performance improvements as a function of epidural analgesia status using various metrics such as pain management, bowel function return, and complication rates. We used both univariate and multivariable analyses to identify if epidural analgesia was associated with meaningful differences in the aforementioned metrics. Results Median age at radical cystectomy, body mass index, sex, ASA score, and T stage were similar for both groups. For our primary objective of LOS, we found no significant difference between the two cohorts (8 vs 7 days, p=0.2). Analysis of our secondary outcome measures revealed that epidural analgesia use was associated with less total opioid requirement for the first three post-operative days (p=0.0001). Additionally, epidural analgesia was found to be associated with improved post-operative pain scores compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia on post-operative days 1 (p=0.0001) and 2 (p=0.004), and there was a slight improvement on post-operative day 3, but this was not significant (p=0.77). In contrast, we found no

  7. Spinal Epidural Varices, a great Mimic of Intervertebral Disc Prolapse - A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    V, Raghavendra; Haridas, Papanaik; Kumar, Anand; K, Ajith

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Epidural venous plexus enlargement, presenting with low back pain and radiculopathy, is an uncommon cause of nerve roots impingement. This condition commonly mimics a herniated nucleus pulposus radiologically. The radiological diagnosis is often missed and the diagnosis is made during the surgery. We are hereby presenting 2 such cases of epidural varices mimicking intervertebral disc prolapse with lumbar radiculopathy. Case Report: Case 1: 43 yr old female presented with acute exacerbation of low back ache and significant right L5–S1 radiculopathy without neurological deficit. MRI reported as L5-S1 disc prolapse. Intra-operatively engorged dilated epidural vein seen compressing S1 nerve root. Associated Disc bulge removed and Coagulative ablation of the dilated epidural vein was performed Case 2: 45 year old male manual labourer presented with backache with left sided sciatica since 8 months, increased in severity since past 1month associated with sensory blunting in L5 and S1 dermatomes. Neurologic examination revealed normal muscle power in his lower extremities. Sensations was blunted in L5 and S1 dermatomes. MRI was reported as L5-S1 disc prolapsed compressing left S1 nerve root. Decompression of the L5–S1 intervertebral space was performed through a left –sidelaminotomy. Large, engorged serpentine epidural veins was found in the axilla of S1 nerve root, compressing it. Coagulative ablation of the dilated epidural vein was performed. Retrospectively, features of epidural varices were noted in the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans. Both patients had significant improvement in radiculopathy immediate postoperatively, and sensory symptoms resolved over the next 6 weeks in second case. At recent follow up, both patients had significant relief of symptoms and no recurrent radicular symptoms. Conclusion: An abnormal dilated epidural venous plexus that mimics a herniated lumbar disc is a rare entity. This pathology should be always kept

  8. Imaging diagnosis-magnetic resonance imaging findings of an intracranial epidural tuberculoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Ródenas, Sergio; Foradada, Laia; Lloret, Albert; Pérez de Val, Bernat; Añor, Sònia

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is highly sensitive for detecting tuberculomas in human patients but the specificity of the MR imaging features is low. Misdiagnosis with intracranial neoplasia is common, especially with dural-based lesions or lesions located in the epidural space. We describe the MR imaging characteristics of an intracranial epidural tuberculoma caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a dog. The intracranial mass and skull flat bone lysis and erosion are similar to those described in human caseating tuberculomas and can mimic intracranial neoplastic disease. PMID:22702644

  9. Analytical solutions for rotating vortex arrays involving multiple vortex patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowdy, Darren; Marshall, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    A continous two-parameter family of analytical solutions to the Euler equations are presented representing a class of steadily rotating vortex arrays involving N+1 interacting vortex patches where N ≥ 3 is an integer. The solutions consist of a central vortex patch surrounded by an N-fold symmetric alternating array of satellite point vortices and vortex patches. One of the parameters governs the size of the central patch, the other governs the size of the N satellite patches. In the limit where the areas of the satellite vortex patches tend to zero, the solutions degenerate to the exact solutions of Crowdy (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 469, 2002, p. 209). Limiting states are found in which cusps form only on the central patch, only on the satellite patches, or simultaneously on both central and satellite patches. Contour dynamics simulations are used to check the mathematical solutions and test their robustness. The linear stability of a class of "point-vortex models" (in which the patches are replaced by point vortices) are also studied in order to examine the stability of the distributed-vorticity configurations to pure-displacement modes. On the other hand, a desingularization of all point vortices to Rankine vortices leads to a class of "quasi-equilibria" consisting purely of interacting vortex patches close to hydrodynamic equilibrium.

  10. Transcatheter patch occlusion of experimental atrial septal defects.

    PubMed

    Sideris, Eleftherios B; Sideris, Chrysoula E; Stamatelopoulos, Stamatis F; Moulopoulos, Spyridon D

    2002-11-01

    The effectiveness and safety of transcatheter patch atrial septal defect (ASD) occlusion were studied in 20 piglets. Experimental atrial septal defects were created by foramen ovale dilation. ASDs were corrected by polyurethane patches of two types (flat and sleeve). Specially made balloon catheters supported the patches for periods varying from 1 to 6 days; after this period, the supporting catheters were withdrawn and the patches were released. All transcatheter patches were safely embedded in the atrial septum 48 hr or more after implantation. All defects were fully occluded. One patch became infected. The transcatheter patch experimental ASD occlusion method was found effective and safe, potentially applicable in the occlusion of human ASDs. PMID:12410521

  11. Development and evaluation of a tampering resistant transdermal fentanyl patch.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bing; Engqvist, Håkan; Bredenberg, Susanne

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing number of misuse and abuse of opioids, the resistance to tampering becomes an important attribute for transdermal opioid patches. In this study, drug-containing geopolymer granules were integrated into an adhesive matrix to improve the resistance of fast drug release against some common abuse techniques. Bench testing showed that fentanyl loaded geopolymer granules had better resistance to tampering compared to a commercial fentanyl patch. Moreover, in a pilot in vivo study on a few rats, the granules showed potential to give similar drug plasma concentrations as the commercial fentanyl patch. After integrating geopolymer granules into an adhesive matrix, the new patch showed a better resistance against the investigated tampering tests compared with the commercially available patch. In this study, we showed that incorporating drug loaded geopolymer granules into a patch adhesive has potential to improve the resistance of the fentanyl patch against tampering without compromising the drug release. PMID:25913120

  12. Lack of potentiation with felbinac patch on the convulsive toxicity of enoxacin in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, H; Noma, S; Kawakami, J; Sawada, Y; Iga, T

    1996-07-01

    We investigated the possible potentiation of the convulsive toxicity of enoxacin (ENX) by the concomitant topical application of a felbinac (FLB) patch in rats. A felbinac patch (Seltouch; 0.5%, 3 cm x 4 cm) was attached on the back of rats where their hair has been removed. ENX was infused from the left jugular vein at 8 h after the application of FLB patch under an unanesthetized and unstrained condition. Blood, CSF and brain samples were collected at the occurrence of convulsion, and ENX concentrations of each part were determined. As a result, no significant potentiation by FLB patch was found in the onset time of convulsion or in the ENX concentration of each part. Moreover, based on the assumption that there are no inter-species differences in ENX concentration in the brain at the occurrence of a convulsion (Cbr), the predicted plasma ENX concentration required to elicit convulsions in humans, which was estimated from the Cbr and Kp value of ENX in the brain of rats, was 20 times higher than the therapeutic plasma level. PMID:8839976

  13. Stress field sensitivity of a composite patch repair as a result of varying patch thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siener, Michael P.

    The feasibility of increasing the efficiency of a composite scarf joint and, hence, of the composite patch repair, was investigated by using single lap joint configurations based on a variety of patch material thicknesses and stiffnesses, and testing for the elastic response and the strength capability. Stress analyses of these configurations were carried out and compared to the results from tests. It was found that, by reorienting plies in the principal stress direction, it is possible to reduce the number of plies and thickness required to form a usable composite repair patch. The results also show that it may be necessary to incorporate the nonlinear adhesive behavior into the model to account for the extensional response of the adherends.

  14. The lucid interval associated with epidural bleeding: evolving understanding.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to elucidate the evolution of our understanding of the term "lucid interval." A number of texts were reviewed to assess their suitability for analysis. The primary requirement was that the text contain detailed descriptions of a series of patients. Details of the clinical course, the findings and timing of surgery, and, when relevant, the time of death and postmortem findings were required. Books written by Henri-François Le Dran, Percival Pott, and James Hill fulfilled these criteria. Surgical findings included the presence and type of fractures, changes in the bone, separation of periosteum, malodorous or purulent material, tense brain, and hematoma. Postmortem findings supplemented and/or complemented the surgical findings. The courses of the patients were then tabulated, and the correlation between different clinical and operative findings was thereby determined. Our understanding of a lucid interval began in the early 18th century with the work of Henri-François Le Dran and Percival Pott in London. They did not, however, demonstrate an interval without symptoms between trauma and deterioration in patients with epidural hematomas (EDHs). The interval they described was longer than usually expected with EDHs and occurred exclusively in patients who had a posttraumatic infection. In 1751, James Hill, from Dumfries, Scotland, described the first hematoma-related lucid interval in a patient with a subdural hematoma. The first case of a lucid interval associated with an EDH was described by John Abernethy. In the 19th century, Jonathan Hutchinson and Walter Jacobson described the interval as it is known today, in cases of EDH. The most recent work on the topic came from studies in Cincinnati and Oslo, where it was demonstrated that bleeding can separate dura mater and that hemorrhage into the epidural space can be shunted out via the veins. This shunting could delay the accumulation of a hematoma and thus the rise in intracranial pressure

  15. Ethnic differences in the use of intrapartum epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obstetric epidural analgesia (EA) is widely applied, but studies have reported that its use may be less extensive among immigrant women or those from minority ethnic groups. Our aim was to examine whether this was the case in our geographic area, which contains an important immigrant population, and if so, to describe the different components of this phenomenon. Methods Cross-sectional observational study. Setting: general acute care hospital, located in Marbella, southern Spain. Analysis of computer records of deliveries performed from 2004 to 2010. Comparison of characteristics of deliveries according to the mothers’ geographic origins and of vaginal deliveries noting whether EA was received, using univariate and bivariate statistical analysis and multiple logistic regression (MLR). Results A total of 21,034 deliveries were recorded, and 37.4% of these corresponded to immigrant women. EA was provided to 61.1% of the Spanish women and to 51.5% of the immigrants, with important variations according to geographic origin: over 52% of women from other European countries and South America received EA, compared with around 45% of the African women and 37% of the Asian women. These differences persisted in the MLR model after adjusting for the mother's age, type of labor initiation, the weight of the neonate and for single or multiple gestation. With the Spanish patients as the reference category, all the other countries of origin presented lower probabilities of EA use. This was particularly apparent for the patients from Asia (OR 0.38; 95%CI 0.31-0.46), Morocco (OR 0.49; 95%CI 0.43-0.54) and other Africa (OR 0.55; 95%CI 0.37-0.81). Conclusions We observed a different use of EA in vaginal deliveries, according to the geographic origin of the women. The explanation for this involves a complex set of factors, depending both on the patient and on the healthcare staff. PMID:22818255

  16. Epidural Fibrosis after Lumbar Disc Surgery: Prevention and Outcome Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Razek, Naglaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design This is a prospective, randomized, controlled study designed and conducted over 10 years from 2002 to 2012. Purpose The study aimed to monitor the effect of suction drains (SD) on the incidence of epidural fibrosis (EF) and to test, if the use of SD alone, SD with local steroids application, SD combined with fat grafts and local steroids application, or SD combined with fat grafts and without local steroids application, would improve outcome. Overview of Literature EF contributes to significant unsatisfactory failed-back syndrome. Efforts have been tried to reduce postoperative EF, but none were ideal. Methods Between September 2002 and 2012, 290 patients with symptomatic unilateral or bilateral, single-level lumbar disc herniation were included in the study. Two groups were included, with 165 patients in group I (intervention group) and 125 patients in group II (control group). Group I was subdivided into four subgroups: group Ia (SD alone), group Ib (SD+fat graft), group Ic (SD+local steroids), and group Id (SD+fat graft+local steroids). Results The use of SD alone or combined with only fat grafts, fats grafts and local steroids application, or only local steroids application significantly improved patient outcome and significantly reduced EF as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Conclusions This study has clearly demonstrated the fact that the use of suction drainage alone or combined with only fat grafts, fats grafts and local steroids application, or only local steroids application significantly improved patient outcome with respect to pain relief and functional outcome and significantly reduced EF as measured by an MRI. A simple grading system of EF on MRI was described. PMID:26097652

  17. Distribution of Methylene Blue after Injection into the Epidural Space of Anaesthetized Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Xavier; García, Felix; Ferrer, Rosa Isabel; Santos, Laura; Aguilar, Adrià; Andaluz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the distribution of different volumes of methylene blue solution injected into the epidural space in anaesthetized pregnant and non-pregnant sheep, to evaluate its cranial distribution and to compare between them. Fifteen pregnant and fifteen non-pregnant sheep were included in the study. Sheep were anaesthetized and received 0.05, 0.1, or 0.2 mL/kg of a lumbosacral epidural solution containing 0.12% methylene blue in 0.9% saline. Thirty minutes after the epidural injection, the ewes were euthanized. The extension of the dye within the epidural space was measured, and the correlation between the volume of the dye injected and the number of stained vertebrae was evaluated. The cranial migration of the dye between pregnant and non-pregnant sheep was also compared. The results show that the volume of methylene blue injected epidurally into pregnant and non-pregnant sheep correlated directly with its cephalic distribution into the epidural space; and a volume of 0.1 mL/kg or 0.2 mL/kg stained up to the first lumbar segment in pregnant and non-pregnant sheep, respectively. Also, the results suggest that the volume of drugs administered into the epidural space of pregnant sheep should be half the volume that would be used in non-pregnant sheep. PMID:24709655

  18. Wideband Patch Antenna for Land based Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, R. P. S.; Dutt, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an irregular pentagon shaped patch antenna has been presented. The proposed antenna operates over a wide band in frequency range from 12 to 26 GHz with VSWR < 2. It has a partial ground plane with two-inverted L and one I shaped slots in the radiation patch to attain wide bandwidth. The antenna consists of FR4 epoxy as a dielectric substrate with dielectric constant 4.4 and loss tangent 0.002. The size of the antenna is 30 × 30 × 1.57 mm3 and is fed by the microstrip line. The size of the fabricated proposed antenna is smaller than that of the antenna under reference (elliptical radiating patch with defected ground plane). The simulation has been done using high frequency structure simulator (HFSS) which is a finite element method (FEM) based tool. The proposed antenna exhibits the return loss of 21.85, 28.03 and 29.14 dB and gain of 6.6, 5.67 and 7.0 dB at resonant frequencies 16.7, 19.00 and 21.4 GHz, respectively. The bandwidth of the antenna is 10 GHz with normalized radiation efficiencies of 65, 69 and 70 % at corresponding resonant frequencies. The measured results of the fabricated proposed antenna have been compared with the simulated results and there has been a close agreement between both the results. Also the simulated results of the proposed antenna have been compared with the antenna under reference and it is found that the performance of the proposed antenna is far better. The proposed antenna can be used for land based vehicles in both Ku-band (12-18 GHz) and K-band (18-26 GHz).

  19. Contact Dermatitis, Patch Testing, and Allergen Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Burkemper, Nicole M

    2015-01-01

    In patients presenting with a complaint of rash, contact dermatitis is often the underlying diagnosis making it an entity with which health care providers should be familiar. Contact dermatitis can be divided into irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. In a patient suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis, patch testing can be done to identify specific allergens. Education focused on allergen avoidance and safe products is an integral part of treatment for the contact dermatitis patient. Knowledge of the most common allergens is helpful for clinicians to be able to provide this education. PMID:26455061

  20. Biological cell controllable patch-clamp microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penmetsa, Siva; Nagrajan, Krithika; Gong, Zhongcheng; Mills, David; Que, Long

    2010-12-01

    A patch-clamp (PC) microchip with cell sorting and positioning functions is reported, which can avoid drawbacks of random cell selection or positioning for a PC microchip. The cell sorting and positioning are enabled by air bubble (AB) actuators. AB actuators are pneumatic actuators, in which air pressure is generated by microheaters within sealed microchambers. The sorting, positioning, and capturing of 3T3 cells by this type of microchip have been demonstrated. Using human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 as the model, experiments have been demonstrated by this microchip as a label-free technical platform for real-time monitoring of the cell viability.

  1. Aspects and applications of patched grid calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, R. W.; Switzer, G. F.; Thomas, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Patched grid calculations within the framework of an implicit, flux-vector split upwind/relaxation algorithm for the Euler equations are presented. The effect of a metric-discontinuous interface on the convergence rate of the algorithm is discussed along with the spatial accuracy of the solution and the effect of curvature along an interface. Results are presented and discussed for the free-stream problem, shock reflection problem, supersonic inlet with a 5 degree ramp, aerodynamically choked inlet, and three-dimensional analytic forebody.

  2. Complex suicide with homemade nicotine patches.

    PubMed

    Lardi, C; Vogt, S; Pollak, S; Thierauf, A

    2014-03-01

    Suicide by self-poisoning is rather common around the world. This paper presents an exceptional complex suicide in which nicotine was applied in the form of self-made patches soaked with an extraction from fine-cut tobacco. In addition, the 51-year-old suicide victim took a lethal dose of diphenhydramine. Toxicological analysis also revealed the presence of tetrazepam in subtherapeutic concentrations. The scene of death suggested an autoerotic accident at first, as the body was tied with tapes, cables and handcuffs. As a result of the entire investigations, the fatality had to be classified as a suicidal intoxication by nicotine and diphenhydramine. PMID:24439154

  3. Exploring factors influencing patient request for epidural analgesia on admission to labor and delivery in a predominantly Latino population.

    PubMed

    Orejuela, Francisco J; Garcia, Tiffany; Green, Charles; Kilpatrick, Charlie; Guzman, Sara; Blackwell, Sean

    2012-04-01

    Ethnic disparities in labor pain management exist. Our purpose is to identify patients' attitudes and beliefs about epidural analgesia in order to develop a culturally competent educational intervention. A prospective observational study was conducted in patients admitted for vaginal delivery between July 1st-31st, 2009. Inclusion criteria were: singleton, term, cephalic, normal fetal heart tracing and no contraindications for epidural. Patients were surveyed regarding their wishes for analgesia, and their reasons for declining epidural. The obstetrics physician performed pain management counseling as is usually done. Patients were asked again about their choice for analgesia. Likert scale questionnaires were used. Wilcoxon signed ranked test was used for categorical variables. Logistic regression was performed to look for predictors of epidural request. Fifty patients were interviewed. Average age was (27.9 ± 6.7), gestational age (39.3 ± 1.3), and a median parity of 2 (range 0-6). 72% declined epidural upon admission, and 61% after counseling (P = 0.14). Most common reasons for declined epidural were 'women should cope with labor pain' (57%), 'fear of back pain' (54%) and 'family/friends advise against epidural' (36%). Acculturation was assessed by years living in the US (10 ± 6.3), preferred language (Spanish 80%) and ethnic self-identification (Hispanic 98%). 38% were high school graduates. In multivariate logistic regression, graduation from high school was the only variable associated to request for epidural in labor (OR 4.94, 95% CI 1.6-15.1). Educational level is associated to requesting an epidural in labor. Knowledge of patients' fears and expectations is essential to develop adequate counseling interventions. PMID:21267656

  4. Vomiting blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... first part of the small intestine, or esophagus Blood clotting disorders Defects in the blood vessels of the ... as a complete blood count (CBC), blood chemistries, blood clotting tests, and liver function tests Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) (placing ...

  5. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  6. Blood transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... homologous blood donation. Many communities have a blood bank at which any healthy person can donate blood. ... to arrange with your hospital or local blood bank before your surgery to have directed donor blood. ...

  7. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both ...

  8. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats

    PubMed Central

    Hermeto, Larissa C.; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C.; Jardim, Paulo H.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13–L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  9. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats.

    PubMed

    Hermeto, Larissa C; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C; Jardim, Paulo H A

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13-L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  10. Efficacy of low-dose epidural anaesthesia in surgery of the anal canal--a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kausalya, R; Jacob, R

    1994-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare in terms of patient comfort, surgical requirements and anaesthetic safety, the difference between epidural and general anaesthesia in patients undergoing surgery of the anal canal. The study was undertaken on 50 adult patients undergoing anal surgery. By random allocation 25 were given a general anaesthetic while 25 were given a low-dose epidural using 0.375% bupivacaine. Advantages and disadvantages of both methods were noted in the study. It was concluded that low-dose epidural is a more effective means of providing analgesia, while maintaining adequate sphincter tone for surgery on the anal canal, than general anaesthesia. PMID:8210019

  11. A simple and cheap alternative to spring loaded syringe for the identification of epidural space.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Naveen; Jangra, Anil

    2008-04-01

    A simple and cheap alternative to spring-loaded syringe for the identification of epidural space is described. It is easily assembled using a syringe and a rubber band. This assembly is reusable and is especially useful for beginners. PMID:18453501

  12. Eisenmenger's syndrome in pregnancy: Use of epidural anesthesia and analgesia for elective cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Lipi; Pani, Nibedita; Samantaray, Ramesh; Nayak, Kalyani

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a pregnant patient with a large ventricular septal defect (VSD) and pulmonary artery hypertension, presented to the hospital and underwent elective cesarean section under epidural anesthesia and postoperative analgesia. The procedure was uneventful till the patient was discharged on 10th day. PMID:25190960

  13. Eisenmenger's syndrome in pregnancy: Use of epidural anesthesia and analgesia for elective cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Lipi; Pani, Nibedita; Samantaray, Ramesh; Nayak, Kalyani

    2014-07-01

    We describe a case of a pregnant patient with a large ventricular septal defect (VSD) and pulmonary artery hypertension, presented to the hospital and underwent elective cesarean section under epidural anesthesia and postoperative analgesia. The procedure was uneventful till the patient was discharged on 10(th) day. PMID:25190960

  14. Spinal epidural abscess complicating vertebral osteomyelitis: an insidious cause of deteriorating spinal cord function.

    PubMed

    Lee, H J; Bach, J R; White, R E

    1992-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess may complicate vertebral osteomyelitis. The purpose of this report is to discuss its course in two patients with sensory/motor and cognitive impairment and to demonstrate the need for its early detection. Delayed detection may lead to spinal cord injury or meningitis. It may also delay functional return and hinder intensive rehabilitation efforts. Two patients are presented. PMID:1545229

  15. Arachnoiditis following caudal epidural injections for the lumbo-sacral radicular pain.

    PubMed

    Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Swamy, Girish Nanjunda; Yallappa, Sachin; Bommireddy, Rajendra

    2013-12-01

    Caudal epidural steroid injection is a very common intervention in treatment of low back pain and sciatica symptoms. Although extensively used, it is not devoid of complications. A few reports of chemical and infective arachnoiditis exist following lumbar epidural anaesthesia, but none following a caudal epidural steroid injection.We report a case of arachnoiditis following caudal epidural steroid injections for lumbar radiculopathy. The patient presented with contralateral sciatica, worsening low back pain and urinary retention few days following the injection, followed by worsening motor functions in L4/L5/S1 myotomes with resultant dense foot drop. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging suggested infective arachnoiditis with diffuse enhancement and clumping of the nerve roots within the lumbar and sacral thecal sac. As the number of injections in the management of back pain and lumbo-sacral radicular pain is increasing annually, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of this potentially dangerous complication and educate the patients appropriately. PMID:24353855

  16. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report. PMID:26844816

  17. Epidural volume extension: A novel technique and its efficacy in high risk cases.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Akhilesh Kumar; Singh, Rajeev Ratan; Anupam, Rudra Pratap; Ganguly, S; Tomar, Gaurav Singh

    2012-01-01

    We present a unique case series restricting ourselves only to the high-risk case of different specialities who underwent successful surgery in our Institute by using epidural volume extension's technique using 1 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine and 25 μg of fentanyl. PMID:25885627

  18. Acute Motor Weakness of Opposite Lower Extremity after Percutaneous Epidural Neuroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yong Seok; Park, Cheon Hee; Wee, Sang Woo; Sin, Sung Sik; Kim, Joon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, percutaneous epidural neuroplasty has become widely used to treat radicular pain caused by spinal stenosis or a herniated intervertebral disc. A 19-year-old female patient suffering from left radicular pain caused by an L4-L5 intervertebral disc herniation underwent percutaneous epidural neuroplasty of the left L5 nerve root using a Racz catheter. After the procedure, the patient complained of acute motor weakness in the right lower leg, on the opposite site to where the neuroplasty was conducted. Emergency surgery was performed, and swelling of the right L5 nerve root was discovered. The patient recovered her motor and sensory functions immediately after the surgery. Theoretically, the injection of a large volume of fluid in a patient with severe spinal stenosis during epidural neuroplasty can increase the pressure on the opposite side of the epidural space, which may cause injury of the opposite nerve by barotrauma from a closed compartment. Practitioners should be aware of this potential complication. PMID:25852837

  19. A carbohydrate polymer that effectively prevents epidural fibrosis at laminectomy sites in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wujek, J R; Ahmad, S; Harel, A; Maier, K H; Roufa, D; Silver, J

    1991-11-01

    We demonstrate that a carbohydrate polymer, designated GL402, effectively inhibits epidural fibrosis in a rat laminectomy model. A total laminectomy in Lewis rats was performed at lumbar vertebrae 3 and 5. GL402 or phosphate buffer solutions in gelatin sponges were applied to the laminectomy sites. Epidural fibrosis was measured, using a double-blind protocol, 2 weeks postoperatively either by gross anatomical evaluation (blunt dissection) or by histological evaluation. Local application of GL402 produced nearly complete inhibition of epidural fibrosis, whereas extensive scar formation and bone growth occurred after local application of buffer or other purported anti-fibrotics. In laminectomy sites treated with GL402 the dura mater was essentially free of adhering fibrosis and bone growth was dramatically decreased. With reduction of postlaminectomy fibrosis, the spinal nerve roots are more mobile and therefore may be less prone to recurrent nerve root compression. The dramatic reduction of epidural fibrosis by GL402 will make reoperative disc surgery safer due to greater accessibility of the laminectomy site. This compound may be useful in preventing surgical adhesions in other sites as well. PMID:1748197

  20. Epidural fentanyl does not influence intravenous PCA requirements in the post-caesarean patient.

    PubMed

    Sevarino, F B; McFarlane, C; Sinatra, R S

    1991-05-01

    Forty ASA physical status I or II patients scheduled for elective Caesarean delivery were studied to determine the effect of epidural fentanyl on post-Caesarean delivery analgesic requirements as administered by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Following delivery of the infant, under epidural anaesthesia with lidocaine 2% with 1/200,000 epinephrine, patients were randomly assigned to receive either 10 ml of preservative-free normal saline via the epidural catheter or 100 micrograms of fentanyl with 8 ml preservative-free normal saline in a double-blinded fashion. On arrival in the post-anesthesia recovery room (PAR), patients were provided with intravenous PCA meperidine 12.5 mg every eight minutes as needed. Patients were visited at intervals over the next 24 hr to determine if any differences in narcotic requirements, demands for narcotics, or severity of pain were noted. No differences were observed in any values between the groups. It is concluded that a single bolus of epidural fentanyl does not provide an advantage for postoperative pain relief in this patient population. PMID:2065412

  1. Midline lumbar ganglion/synovial cyst mimicking an epidural tumor: case report and review of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Azzam, C J

    1988-08-01

    A case of a midline lumbar extradural ganglion/synovial cyst causing lumbar canal stenosis and mimicking an epidural tumor is presented. The lesion was demonstrated by a magnetic resonance imaging study, and relief of symptoms was achieved with decompressive laminectomy and total removal of the mass. The pathogenesis of lumbar ganglion/synovial cyst is reviewed. PMID:2972941

  2. Patch forest: a hybrid framework of random forest and patch-based segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhongliu; Gillies, Duncan

    2016-03-01

    The development of an accurate, robust and fast segmentation algorithm has long been a research focus in medical computer vision. State-of-the-art practices often involve non-rigidly registering a target image with a set of training atlases for label propagation over the target space to perform segmentation, a.k.a. multi-atlas label propagation (MALP). In recent years, the patch-based segmentation (PBS) framework has gained wide attention due to its advantage of relaxing the strict voxel-to-voxel correspondence to a series of pair-wise patch comparisons for contextual pattern matching. Despite a high accuracy reported in many scenarios, computational efficiency has consistently been a major obstacle for both approaches. Inspired by recent work on random forest, in this paper we propose a patch forest approach, which by equipping the conventional PBS with a fast patch search engine, is able to boost segmentation speed significantly while retaining an equal level of accuracy. In addition, a fast forest training mechanism is also proposed, with the use of a dynamic grid framework to efficiently approximate data compactness computation and a 3D integral image technique for fast box feature retrieval.

  3. Laser-assisted patch clamping: a methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Laser microsurgery can be used to perform both cell biological manipulations, such as targeted cell ablation, and molecular genetic manipulations, such as genetic transformation and chromosome dissection. In this report, we describe a laser microsurgical method that can be used either to ablate single cells or to ablate a small area (1-3 microns diameter) of the extracellular matrix. In plants and microorganisms, the extracellular matrix consists of the cell wall. While conventional patch clamping of these cells, as well as of many animal cells, requires enzymatic digestion of the extracellular matrix, we illustrate that laser microsurgery of a portion of the wall enables patch clamp access to the plasma membrane of higher plant cells remaining situated in their tissue environment. What follows is a detailed description of the construction and use of an economical laser microsurgery system, including procedures for single cell and targeted cell wall ablation. This methodology will be of interest to scientists wishing to perform cellular or subcellular ablation with a high degree of accuracy, or wishing to study how the extracellular matrix affects ion channel function.

  4. Emulsified halothane produces long-term epidural anesthetic effect: a study in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengshan; Liao, Daqing; Liu, Jin; Xiao, Lin; Guo, Jiao; Yi, Mingliang; Zhou, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that volatile anesthetics could produce local anesthesia. Emulsified isoflurane at 8% has been reported to produce epidural anesthetic effect in rabbits. This study was designed to investigate the long-term epidural anesthetic effect of emulsified halothane in rabbits. In this study, 40 healthy adult rabbits (weighting 2.0-2.5 kg) with an epidural catheter were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10/group), receiving epidural administration of 1% lidocaine (lido group), 8% emulsified isoflurane 1ml (8% E-iso group), 8% emulsified halothane (8% E-Halo group) and 12% emulsified halothane (12% E-Halo group). After administration, sensory and motor functions as well as consciousness state were assessed until 60 minutes after sensory and motor function returned to its baseline or at least for 180 min. After epidural anesthesia, all the rabbits were continuously observed for 7 days and sacrificed for pathological evaluations. As a result, all the four study solutions produced typical epidural anesthesia. Onset times of sensory and motor function blockade were similar among the four groups (P>0.05). Duration of sensory blockade in 12% E-Halo group (83±13 min) was significantly longer than other groups: 51±12 min in 8% E-Halo group (P<0.01), 57±8 min in 8% E-iso group (P<0.01) and 47±9 min in lido group (P<0.01). Duration of sensory blockade in 8% E-iso group is longer than lido group (P<0.05). Duration of motor blockade in 12% E-Halo group (81±12 min) was also significantly longer than other groups: 40±8 min in 8% E-Halo group (P<0.01), 37±3 min in 8% E-iso group (P<0.01), 37±6 min in lido group (P<0.01). Normal consciousness was found in the rabbits from 8% E-Halo, 8% E-iso and lido groups while there were four rabbits in 12% E-Halo group (4/10) showed a light sedation. For all the rabbits, no pathological injury was found. The present study demonstrates that emulsified halothane produces reversible concentration

  5. A Comparison of Efficacy of Segmental Epidural Block versus Spinal Anaesthesia for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Nandanwar, Avinash S; Patil, Yogita; Baheti, Vidyasagar H.; Tanwar, Harshwardhan V.; Patwardhan, Sujata K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is done under general anaesthesia in most of the centres. Associated complications and cost are higher for general anaesthesia than for regional anaesthesia. Present study is designed to compare the efficacy of epidural block versus spinal anaesthesia with regards to intraoperative mean arterial pressure, heart rate, postoperative pain intensity, analgesic requirement, Postoperative complications and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing PCNL. Materials and Methods After taking Ethical Committee clearance, patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups using table of randomization (n= 40 each) Group E- Epidural block, Group S- Spinal block. Various parameters like intraoperative mean arterial pressure, heart rate, postoperative pain intensity, analgesic requirement, postoperative complications and patient satisfaction were studied in these groups. Statistical Analysis Quantitative data was analysed using unpaired t-test and qualitative data was analysed using chi-square test. Results Twenty four times in Epidural as compared to fifteen times in spinal anaesthesia two or more attempts required. Mean time (min) required to achieve the block of anaesthesia in group E and group S was 15.45±2.8 and 8.52±2.62 min respectively. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) at 5 min, 10 min and 15 min were significantly lower in spinal group as compared to epidural group. After 30 minutes, differences were not significant but still MAP was lower in spinal group. After 30 minutes difference in heart rate between two groups was statistically significant and higher rate recorded in spinal group till the end of 3 hours. Postoperative VAS score was significantly higher in spinal group and 4 hours onwards difference was highly significant. Postoperative Nausea Vomiting (PONV) Score was significantly higher in spinal group as compared to epidural group. Conclusion For PCNL, segmental epidural block is better than spinal anaesthesia in terms

  6. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour: randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    PubMed Central

    Bloemenkamp, Kitty W; Franssen, Maureen T; Papatsonis, Dimitri N; Hajenius, Petra J; Hollmann, Markus W; Woiski, Mallory D; Porath, Martina; van den Berg, Hans J; van Beek, Erik; Borchert, Odette W H M; Schuitemaker, Nico; Sikkema, J Marko; Kuipers, A H M; Logtenberg, Sabine L M; van der Salm, Paulien C M; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Lopriore, Enrico; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; le Cessie, Saskia; van Lith, Jan M; Struys, Michel M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine women’s satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. Design Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. Setting 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants Women with an intermediate to high obstetric risk with an intention to deliver vaginally. To exclude a clinically relevant difference in satisfaction with pain relief of more than 10%, we needed to include 1136 women. Because of missing values for satisfaction this number was increased to 1400 before any analysis. We used multiple imputation to correct for missing data. Intervention Before the onset of active labour consenting women were randomised to a pain relief strategy with patient controlled remifentanil or epidural analgesia if they requested pain relief during labour. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was satisfaction with pain relief, measured hourly on a visual analogue scale and expressed as area under the curve (AUC), thus providing a time weighted measure of total satisfaction with pain relief. A higher AUC represents higher satisfaction with pain relief. Secondary outcomes were pain intensity scores, mode of delivery, and maternal and neonatal outcomes. Analysis was done by intention to treat. The study was defined as an equivalence study for the primary outcome. Results 1414 women were randomised, of whom 709 were allocated to patient controlled remifentanil and 705 to epidural analgesia. Baseline characteristics were comparable. Pain relief was ultimately used in 65% (447/687) in the remifentanil group and 52% (347/671) in the epidural analgesia group (relative risk 1.32, 95% confidence interval 1.18 to 1.48). Cross over occurred in 7% (45/687) and 8% (51/671) of women, respectively. Of women primarily treated with remifentanil, 13% (53/402) converted to epidural analgesia, while in women primarily treated with epidural analgesia 1% (3/296) converted to remifentanil. The

  7. Quantized image patches co-occurrence matrix: a new statistical approach for texture classification using image patch exemplars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhonghua; Wang, Jingyan; Li, Yongping; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Chao

    2011-06-01

    The statistical distribution of image patch exemplars has been shown to be an effective approach to texture classification. In this paper, the joint distribution of pairs of patches for texture classification from single images is investigated. We developed a statistical method of examining texture that considers the spatial relationship of image patches, which is called the quantized patches co-occurrence matrix (QPCM). In our method, the images are first slipt into small image patches, and then the patches are quantized to the closest patch cluster centers (textons) which is learned form training images. By calculating how often pairs of patches with specific quantized values (texton labels) and in a specified spatial relationship occur in an image, we create the QPCM for images representation. Moreover, we developed a fusion framework for texture classification by fusing 4 QPCM functions with specified neighboring spatial relationship and 3 other statistical representations of image patches, which is called QPCM-SVM classifier. The effectiveness of the proposed texture classification methodology is demonstrated via an extensive consistent evaluation in standard benchmarks that clearly shows better performance against state-of-the-art statistical approach using image patch exemplars.

  8. Patch size has no effect on insect visitation rate per unit area in garden-scale flower patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbuzov, Mihail; Madsen, Andy; Ratnieks, Francis L. W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies investigating the effect of flower patch size on insect flower visitation rate have compared relatively large patches (10-1000s m2) and have generally found a negative relationship per unit area or per flower. Here, we investigate the effects of patch size on insect visitation in patches of smaller area (range c. 0.1-3.1 m2), which are of particular relevance to ornamental flower beds in parks and gardens. We studied two common garden plant species in full bloom with 6 patch sizes each: borage (Borago officinalis) and lavender (Lavandula × intermedia 'Grosso'). We quantified flower visitation by insects by making repeated counts of the insects foraging at each patch. On borage, all insects were honey bees (Apis mellifera, n = 5506 counts). On lavender, insects (n = 737 counts) were bumble bees (Bombus spp., 76.9%), flies (Diptera, 22.4%), and butterflies (Lepidoptera, 0.7%). On both plant species we found positive linear effects of patch size on insect numbers. However, there was no effect of patch size on the number of insects per unit area or per flower and, on lavender, for all insects combined or only bumble bees. The results show that it is possible to make unbiased comparisons of the attractiveness of plant species or varieties to flower-visiting insects using patches of different size within the small scale range studied and make possible projects aimed at comparing ornamental plant varieties using existing garden flower patches of variable area.

  9. Death by band-aid: fatal misuse of transdermal fentanyl patch.

    PubMed

    Bakovic, Marija; Nestic, Marina; Mayer, Davor

    2015-11-01

    We present a case of fatal intoxication by the application of a transdermal fentanyl patch upon a superficial bleeding abrasion of a 2-year-old girl. The grandmother discovered the body of the child in bed at approximately 7 a.m. External examination revealed a properly developed, nourished, and hydrated child, with some vomit in the nostrils and inside the mouth. There was no evidence of trauma besides small contusions and abrasions on the knees, with a patch placed over the largest abrasion. Closer inspection revealed that this was transdermal fentanyl patch. Internal examination and microscopic analysis revealed regurgitation of stomach content, cerebral and pulmonary edema, and liver congestion. Toxicology analysis revealed trace levels of fentanyl in the blood just above the limit of detection (2 ng/mL), while concentrations in the urine, liver, and kidney were approximately 102, 28, and 10 ng/mL, respectively. Investigation discovered that the child injured her knee while playing the evening before. The grandmother applied the patch to cover the injury, unaware that she had used a fentanyl transdermal patch instead of simple band-aid. Although fatal intoxications are uncommon among young children in high-income countries, it is of major interest to raise awareness of such events especially since a great majority of these are preventable. The presented case points at the need for more thorough education of users and more strict rules in prescribing and handling of this potent medicine. As well, we find this case to be a useful contribution to the evaluation of postmortem fentanyl concentrations in fatal intoxication in a small child. PMID:26055040

  10. Influence of habitat quality, population size, patch size, and connectivity on patch-occupancy dynamics of the middle spotted woodpecker.

    PubMed

    Robles, Hugo; Ciudad, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Despite extensive research on the effects of habitat fragmentation, the ecological mechanisms underlying colonization and extinction processes are poorly known, but knowledge of these mechanisms is essential to understanding the distribution and persistence of populations in fragmented habitats. We examined these mechanisms through multiseason occupancy models that elucidated patch-occupancy dynamics of Middle Spotted Woodpeckers (Dendrocopos medius) in northwestern Spain. The number of occupied patches was relatively stable from 2000 to 2010 (15-24% of 101 patches occupied every year) because extinction was balanced by recolonization. Larger and higher quality patches (i.e., higher density of oaks >37 cm dbh [diameter at breast height]) were more likely to be occupied. Habitat quality (i.e., density of large oaks) explained more variation in patch colonization and extinction than did patch size and connectivity, which were both weakly associated with probabilities of turnover. Patches of higher quality were more likely to be colonized than patches of lower quality. Populations in high-quality patches were less likely to become extinct. In addition, extinction in a patch was strongly associated with local population size but not with patch size, which means the latter may not be a good surrogate of population size in assessments of extinction probability. Our results suggest that habitat quality may be a primary driver of patch-occupancy dynamics and may increase the accuracy of models of population survival. We encourage comparisons of competing models that assess occupancy, colonization, and extinction probabilities in a single analytical framework (e.g., dynamic occupancy models) so as to shed light on the association of habitat quality and patch geometry with colonization and extinction processes in different settings and species. PMID:22268847

  11. Suspended-Patch Antenna With Inverted, EM-Coupled Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    An improved suspended-patch antenna has been designed to operate at a frequency of about 23 GHz with linear polarization and to be one of four identical antennas in a rectangular array. The antenna includes a parasitic patch on top of a suspended dielectric superstrate, an active patch on top of a suspended dielectric substrate, a microstrip on the bottom of the dielectric substrate, and a ground plane. The microstrip, the ground plane, the airgap between them, and the dielectric substrate together constitute a transmission line that has an impedance of 50 Ohm and is electromagnetically (EM) coupled to the active patch. The parasitic patch is, in turn, excited by the active patch. The microstrip feed is characterized as inverted because the microstrip is on the bottom of the substrate, whereas microstrips are usually placed on the tops of dielectric substrates

  12. A Case of Patch Stage of Kaposi’s Sarcoma and Discussion of the Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kak, Ipshita; Salama, Samih; Gohla, Gabriella; Naqvi, Asghar; Alowami, Salem

    2016-01-01

    A 55 year old HIV positive male had a skin lesion biopsy which showed atypical vascular proliferation within the superficial and deep dermis with mild atypia of lining endothelial cells. A sparse lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate surrounding the irregular vascular channels was noted. Immunohistochemistry highlighted the atypical blood vessels with the vascular markers CD31, CD34 and Factor VIII. The differential diagnosis included unusual vascular or lymphatic proliferations, stasis dermatitis, kaposiform hemangioendothelioma, progressive lymphangioma and angiosarcoma with focal Kaposi’s sarcoma features. Characteristic human herpes virus-8 positive staining helped support the diagnosis of patch stage of Kaposi’s sarcoma. Herein, we discuss the case findings, differential diagnosis and characteristic histological findings associated with the patch stage of Kaposi’s sarcoma which can be an elusive diagnosis. PMID:27134709

  13. SafePatch for Windows Version 1.0 User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, D; Meier, T

    2003-05-01

    SafePatch for Windows provides automated analysis of network-based Microsoft Windows{trademark} computer systems to determine the status of security patches. SafePatch determines what patches need to be installed on a system or group of systems. SafePatch collects and packages the necessary patches and the script to install those patches for the selected remote systems. SafePatch for Windows also supports browsing the Microsoft{trademark} patch database and the viewing of the bulletins associated with the patches.

  14. Efficacy of the methoxyflurane as bridging analgesia during epidural placement in laboring parturient

    PubMed Central

    Anwari, Jamil S.; Khalil, Laith; Terkawi, Abdullah S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Establishing an epidural in an agitated laboring woman can be challenging. The ideal pain control technique in such a situation should be effective, fast acting, and short lived. We assessed the efficacy of inhalational methoxyflurane (Penthrox™) analgesia as bridging analgesia for epidural placement. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four laboring women who requested epidural analgesia with pain score of ≥7 enrolled in an observational study, 56 of which completed the study. The parturients were instructed to use the device prior to the onset of uterine contraction pain and to stop at the peak of uterine contraction, repeatedly until epidural has been successfully placed. After each (methoxyflurane inhalation-uterine contraction) cycle, pain, Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS), nausea and vomiting were evaluated. Maternal and fetal hemodynamics and parturient satisfaction were recorded. Results: The mean baseline pain score was 8.2 ± 1.5 which was reduced to 6.2 ± 2.0 after the first inhalation with a mean difference of 2.0 ± 1.1 (95% confidence interval 1.7-2.3, P < 0.0001), and continued to decrease significantly over the study period (P < 0.0001). The RASS scores continuously improved after each cycle (P < 0.0001). Only 1 parturient from the cohort became lightly sedated (RASS = −1). Two parturients vomited, and no significant changes in maternal hemodynamics or fetal heart rate changes were identified during treatment. 67% of the parturients reported very good or excellent satisfaction with treatment. Conclusion: Penthrox™ provides rapid, robust, and satisfactory therapy to control pain and restlessness during epidural placement in laboring parturient. PMID:26543451

  15. Decoding continuous limb movements from high-density epidural electrode arrays using custom spatial filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marathe, A. R.; Taylor, D. M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Our goal was to identify spatial filtering methods that would improve decoding of continuous arm movements from epidural field potentials as well as demonstrate the use of the epidural signals in a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) system in monkeys. Approach. Eleven spatial filtering options were compared offline using field potentials collected from 64-channel high-density epidural arrays in monkeys. Arrays were placed over arm/hand motor cortex in which intracortical microelectrodes had previously been implanted and removed leaving focal cortical damage but no lasting motor deficits. Spatial filters tested included: no filtering, common average referencing (CAR), principle component analysis, and eight novel modifications of the common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm. The spatial filtering method and decoder combination that performed the best offline was then used online where monkeys controlled cursor velocity using continuous wrist position decoded from epidural field potentials in real time. Main results. Optimized CSP methods improved continuous wrist position decoding accuracy by 69% over CAR and by 80% compared to no filtering. Kalman decoders performed better than linear regression decoders and benefitted from including more spatially-filtered signals but not from pre-smoothing the calculated power spectra. Conversely, linear regression decoders required fewer spatially-filtered signals and were improved by pre-smoothing the power values. The ‘position-to-velocity’ transformation used during online control enabled the animals to generate smooth closed-loop movement trajectories using the somewhat limited position information available in the epidural signals. The monkeys’ online performance significantly improved across days of closed-loop training. Significance. Most published BMI studies that use electrocorticographic signals to decode continuous limb movements either use no spatial filtering or CAR. This study suggests a

  16. Decoding continuous limb movements from high-density epidural electrode arrays using custom spatial filters

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, A R.; Taylor, D M

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to identify spatial filtering methods that would improve decoding of continuous arm movements from epidural field potentials as well as demonstrate the use of the epidural signals in a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) system in monkeys. Approach Eleven spatial filtering options were compared offline using field potentials collected from 64-channel high-density epidural arrays in monkeys. Arrays were placed over arm/hand motor cortex in which intracortical microelectrodes had previously been implanted and removed leaving focal cortical damage but no lasting motor deficits. Spatial filters tested included: no filtering, common average referencing (CAR), principle component analysis (PCA), and eight novel modifications of the common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm. The spatial filtering method and decoder combination that performed the best offline was then used online where monkeys controlled cursor velocity using continuous wrist position decoded from epidural field potentials in real time. Main results Optimized CSP methods improved continuous wrist position decoding accuracy by 69% over CAR and by 80% compared to no filtering. Kalman decoders performed better than linear regression decoders and benefitted from including more spatially-filtered signals but not from pre-smoothing the calculated power spectra. Conversely, linear regression decoders required fewer spatially-filtered signals and were improved by pre-smoothing the power values. The ‘position-to-velocity’ transformation used during online control enabled the animals to generate smooth closed-loop movement trajectories using the somewhat limited position information available in the epidural signals. The monkeys’ online performance significantly improved across days of closed-loop training. Significance Most published BMI studies that use electrocortographic signals to decode continuous limb movements either use no spatial filtering or CAR. This study suggests a

  17. Epidural analgesia with morphine or buprenorphine in ponies with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced carpal synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Gabrielle C.; Carregaro, Adriano B.; Gehrcke, Martielo I.; De La Côrte, Flávio D.; Lara, Valéria M.; Pozzobon, Ricardo; Brass, Karin E.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the analgesia effects of the epidural administration of 0.1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) of morphine or 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine in ponies with radiocarpal joint synovitis. Six ponies were submitted to 3 epidural treatments: the control group (C) received 0.15 mL/kg BW of a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution; group M was administered 0.1 mg/kg BW of morphine; and group B was administered 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine, both diluted in 0.9% NaCl to a total volume of 0.15 mL/kg BW administered epidurally at 10 s/mL. The synovitis model was induced by injecting 0.5 ng of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the left or right radiocarpal joint. An epidural catheter was later introduced in the lumbosacral space and advanced up to the thoracolumbar level. The treatment started 6 h after synovitis induction. Lameness, maximum angle of carpal flexion, heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, and intestinal motility were evaluated before LPS injection (baseline), 6 h after LPS injection (time 0), and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after treatments. Although the model of synovitis produced clear clinical signs of inflammation, the lameness scores in group C were different from the baseline for only up to 12 h. Both morphine and buprenorphine showed a reduction in the degree of lameness starting at 0.5 and 6 h, respectively. Reduced intestinal motility was observed at 0.5 h in group M and at 0.5 to 1 h in group B. Epidural morphine was a more effective analgesic that lasted for more than 12 h and without side effects. It was concluded that morphine would be a valuable analgesic option to alleviate joint pain in the thoracic limbs in ponies. PMID:21731186

  18. The efficacy and safety of low dose epidural butorphanol on postoperative analgesia following cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, K; Rahman, T R; Singh, S N; Bhattarai, B; Basnet, N; Khaniya, S

    2008-01-01

    Butorphanol is considered an effective and safe analgesic after cesarean delivery but is associated with profound dose-dependent sedation. Somnolence may cause hindrance in early mother-baby interaction. This study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy and to monitor side-effects of low doses (0.5 mg and 0.75 mg) of epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine compared to bupivacaine alone in parturients following cesarean delivery. One hundred and twenty parturients (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2) undergoing cesarean delivery were allocated into three groups: group 1 received epidural 0.125% bupivacaine while group 2 and 3 received an additional 0.5 mg and 0.75 mg butorphanol respectively. A combined spinal, epidural technique was used. Spinal anaesthesia was used for surgery. The epidural route was used for postoperative analgesia with the study drug. Onset, duration and quality of analgesia, lowest visual analogue scales (VAS) score, and side effects were noted. The onset and duration of analgesia in group 2 (4.1+/-2.6 min and 202.4+/-62.8 min) and group 3 (4.0+/-2.5 min and 192.3+/-69.1 min) were significantly different (P<0.01) from group 1 (6.6+/-2.7 min and 145.7+/-89.6 min). The quality of analgesia in terms of time to first independent movement and satisfactory VAS were statistically better (P<0.01) in group 2 (3.9+/-0.3 hour and 8.1+/-0.1 mm) and group 3 (3.8+/-0.4 hour and 8.1+/-0.9 mm) than in group 1 (5.2+/-0.4 hour and 6.3+/-1.3 mm). The incidence of sedation was 5% in all the three groups. A lower dose of epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine produces a significantly earlier onset, longer duration and better quality of analgesia than bupivacaine does. PMID:18709032

  19. The Impact of Epidural Steroid Injections on the Outcomes of Patients Treated for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Radcliff, Kristen; Hilibrand, Alan; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Delasotta, Lawrence; Rihn, Jeffrey; Zhao, Wenyan; Vaccaro, Alexander; Albert, Todd J.; Weinstein, James N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) is a prospective, multicenter study of operative versus nonoperative treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. It has been suggested that epidural steroid injections may help improve patient outcomes and lower the rate of crossover to surgical treatment. Methods: One hundred and fifty-four patients included in the intervertebral disc herniation arm of the SPORT who had received an epidural steroid injection during the first three months of the study and no injection prior to the study (the ESI group) were compared with 453 patients who had not received an injection during the first three months of the study or prior to the study (the No-ESI group). Results: There was a significant difference in the preference for surgery between groups (19% in the ESI group compared with 56% in the No-ESI group, p < 0.001). There was no difference in primary or secondary outcome measures at four years between the groups. A higher percentage of patients changed from surgical to nonsurgical treatment in the ESI group (41% versus 12% in the No-ESI, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Patients with lumbar disc herniation treated with epidural steroid injection had no improvement in short or long-term outcomes compared with patients who were not treated with epidural steroid injection. There was a higher prevalence of crossover to nonsurgical treatment among surgically assigned ESI-group patients, although this was confounded by the increased baseline desire to avoid surgery among patients in the ESI group. Given these data, we concluded that more studies are necessary to establish the value of epidural steroid injection for symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22739998

  20. Thoracic epidural analgesia for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Yatin; Vats, Mayank; Sharma, Munish; Arora, Reetesh; Trehan, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    The benefits of thoracic epidural analgesia in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting are well documented. However, the literature available on the role of high thoracic epidural analgesia (HTEA) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery is scarce. We conducted a randomized clinical trial to establish whether HTEA is beneficial in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing elective OPCAB surgery. After institutional ethics board approval and informed consent, 62 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing elective OPCAB were randomly grouped into two (n = 31 each). Both groups received general anesthesia (GA), but in the HTEA group patients, TEA was also administered. Standardized surgical and anesthetic techniques were used for both the groups. Pulmonary function tests were performed pre-operatively, 6 h and 24 h post-extubation and on days 2, 3, 4 and 5 along with arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) analysis. Time for extubation (h) and time for oxygen withdrawal (h) were recorded. Pain score was assessed by the 10-cm visual analogue scale. All hemodynamic/oxygenation parameters were noted. Any complications related to the TEA were also recorded. Patients in the HTEA group were extubated earlier (10.8 h vs. 13.5 h, P < 0.01) and their oxygen withdrawal time was also significantly lower (26.26 h vs. 29.87 h, P < 0.01). The VAS score, both at rest and on coughing, was significantly lower in the HTEA group at all times, post-operatively (P < 0.01). The forced vital capacity improved significantly at 6 h post-operatively in the HTEA group (P = 0.026) and remained significantly higher thereafter. A similar trend was observed in forced expiratory volume in the first second on day 2 in the HTEA group (P = 0.024). We did not observe any significant side-effects/mortality in either group. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing