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Sample records for epidural patient-controlled analgesia

  1. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia for labor.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Stephen H; Carvalho, Brendan

    2009-03-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) for labor was introduced into clinical practice 20 yr ago. The PCEA technique has been shown to have significant benefits when compared with continuous epidural infusion. We conducted a systematic review using MEDLINE and EMBASE (1988-April 1, 2008) of all randomized, controlled trials in parturients who received PCEA in labor in which one of the following comparisons were made: background infusion versus none; ropivacaine versus bupivacaine; high versus low concentrations of local anesthetics; and new strategies versus standard strategies. The outcomes of interest were maternal analgesia, satisfaction, motor block, and the incidence of unscheduled clinician interventions. A continuous background infusion improved maternal analgesia and reduced unscheduled clinician interventions. Larger bolus doses (more than 5 mL) may provide better analgesia compared with small boluses. Low concentrations of bupivacaine or ropivacaine provide excellent analgesia without significant motor block. Many strategies with PCEA can provide effective labor analgesia. High volume, dilute local anesthetic solutions with a continuous background infusion appear to be the most successful strategy. Research into new delivery strategies, such as mandatory programmed intermittent boluses and computerized feedback dosing, is ongoing. PMID:19224805

  2. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results. PMID:27062173

  3. Role of Epidural and Patient-Controlled Analgesia in Site-Specific Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamiński, Jan P.; Pai, Ajit; Ailabouni, Luay; Marecik, Slawomir J.; Prasad, Leela M.; Abcarian, Herand

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Limited data are available comparing epidural and patient-controlled analgesia in site-specific colorectal surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate 2 modes of analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic right colectomy (RC) and low anterior resection (LAR). Methods: Prospectively collected data on 433 patients undergoing laparoscopic or laparoscopic-assisted colon surgery at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed from March 2004 to February 2009. Patients were divided into groups undergoing RC (n = 175) and LAR (n = 258). These groups were evaluated by use of analgesia: epidural analgesia, “patient-controlled analgesia” alone, and a combination of both. Demographic and perioperative outcomes were compared. Results: Epidural analgesia was associated with a faster return of bowel function, by 1 day (P < .001), in patients who underwent LAR but not in the RC group. Delayed return of bowel function was associated with increased operative time in the LAR group (P = .05), patients with diabetes who underwent RC (P = .037), and patients after RC with combined analgesia (P = .011). Mean visual analogue scale pain scores were significantly lower with epidural analgesia compared with patient-controlled analgesia in both LAR and RC groups (P < .001). Conclusion: Epidural analgesia was associated with a faster return of bowel function in the laparoscopic LAR group but not the RC group. Epidural analgesia was superior to patient-controlled analgesia in controlling postoperative pain but was inadequate in 28% of patients and needed the addition of patient-controlled analgesia. PMID:25419110

  4. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour: randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    PubMed Central

    Bloemenkamp, Kitty W; Franssen, Maureen T; Papatsonis, Dimitri N; Hajenius, Petra J; Hollmann, Markus W; Woiski, Mallory D; Porath, Martina; van den Berg, Hans J; van Beek, Erik; Borchert, Odette W H M; Schuitemaker, Nico; Sikkema, J Marko; Kuipers, A H M; Logtenberg, Sabine L M; van der Salm, Paulien C M; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Lopriore, Enrico; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; le Cessie, Saskia; van Lith, Jan M; Struys, Michel M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine women’s satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. Design Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. Setting 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants Women with an intermediate to high obstetric risk with an intention to deliver vaginally. To exclude a clinically relevant difference in satisfaction with pain relief of more than 10%, we needed to include 1136 women. Because of missing values for satisfaction this number was increased to 1400 before any analysis. We used multiple imputation to correct for missing data. Intervention Before the onset of active labour consenting women were randomised to a pain relief strategy with patient controlled remifentanil or epidural analgesia if they requested pain relief during labour. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was satisfaction with pain relief, measured hourly on a visual analogue scale and expressed as area under the curve (AUC), thus providing a time weighted measure of total satisfaction with pain relief. A higher AUC represents higher satisfaction with pain relief. Secondary outcomes were pain intensity scores, mode of delivery, and maternal and neonatal outcomes. Analysis was done by intention to treat. The study was defined as an equivalence study for the primary outcome. Results 1414 women were randomised, of whom 709 were allocated to patient controlled remifentanil and 705 to epidural analgesia. Baseline characteristics were comparable. Pain relief was ultimately used in 65% (447/687) in the remifentanil group and 52% (347/671) in the epidural analgesia group (relative risk 1.32, 95% confidence interval 1.18 to 1.48). Cross over occurred in 7% (45/687) and 8% (51/671) of women, respectively. Of women primarily treated with remifentanil, 13% (53/402) converted to epidural analgesia, while in women primarily treated with epidural analgesia 1% (3/296) converted to remifentanil. The

  5. Epidural abscess in an obstetric patient with patient-controlled epidural analgesia--a case report.

    PubMed

    Chiang, H L; Chia, Y Y; Chen, Y S; Hung, C C; Liu, K; Lo, Y

    2005-07-01

    We present the case of a 37-year-old pregnant woman who underwent a cesarean section due to previous cesarean delivery. Spinal anesthesia was performed at the L2-3 intervertebral space with an epidural catheter inserted at L1-2 for postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia. When the epidural catheter was removed on day three, an area of redness round the entry point was noted and the patient complained of low back pain, but was discharged from hospital. Later the same day, she felt backache so severe that she was unable to stand up or bend her body. She called for help and was sent to our emergency room. Physicians noted a small amount of discharge from the insertion site, and the body temperature was elevated to 38 degrees C. An anesthesiologist and an infectious disease specialist were consulted, and an epidural abscess was suspected. Urgent magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural abscess at L1-2. After five days of unsuccessful treatment with oxacillin, a 28-day course of vancomycin, followed by two months of oral fusidic acid, resulted in complete remission of the epidural abscess. The patient has remained free of neurologic deficit. PMID:15993774

  6. Comparison of Perioperative Outcomes for Epidural versus Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia after Radical Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Andrew G.; Sfakianos, John P.; Puttanniah, Vinay G.; Bochner, Bernard H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia after various operations has been associated with earlier return of bowel function and thus decrease the length of stay (LOS). The primary aim of this study was to compare LOS after radical cystectomy between patients who received epidural analgesia versus those who received intravenous patient controlled analgesia. Our secondary analysis included the assessment of other metrics such as total opioid requirements, pain scores, return of bowel function and complication rates between the two groups. Methods We conducted a retrospective review using the electronic medical records of 308 patients who underwent radical cystectomies at Memorial Sloan Kettering between 2006 and 2011. We aimed to understand if epidural analgesia was associated with a reduced length of stay compared to patient controlled intravenous opioid analgesia. We also aimed to identify performance improvements as a function of epidural analgesia status using various metrics such as pain management, bowel function return, and complication rates. We used both univariate and multivariable analyses to identify if epidural analgesia was associated with meaningful differences in the aforementioned metrics. Results Median age at radical cystectomy, body mass index, sex, ASA score, and T stage were similar for both groups. For our primary objective of LOS, we found no significant difference between the two cohorts (8 vs 7 days, p=0.2). Analysis of our secondary outcome measures revealed that epidural analgesia use was associated with less total opioid requirement for the first three post-operative days (p=0.0001). Additionally, epidural analgesia was found to be associated with improved post-operative pain scores compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia on post-operative days 1 (p=0.0001) and 2 (p=0.004), and there was a slight improvement on post-operative day 3, but this was not significant (p=0.77). In contrast, we found no

  7. Randomized clinical trial of local infiltration plus patient-controlled opiate analgesia vs. epidural analgesia following liver resection surgery

    PubMed Central

    Revie, Erica J; McKeown, Dermot W; Wilson, John A; Garden, O James; Wigmore, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Epidural analgesia is recommended for the provision of analgesia following major abdominal surgery. Continuous local anaesthetic wound infiltration may be an effective alternative. A prospective randomized trial was undertaken to compare these two methods following open liver resection. The primary outcome was length of time required to fulfil criteria for discharge from hospital. Methods Patients undergoing open liver resection were randomized to receive either epidural (EP group) or local anaesthetic wound infiltration plus patient-controlled opiate analgesia (WI group) for the first 2 days postoperatively. All other care followed a standardized enhanced recovery protocol. Time to fulfil discharge criteria, pain scores, physical activity measurements and complications were recorded. Results Between August 2009 and July 2010, 65 patients were randomized to EP (n= 32) or WI (n= 33). The mean time required to fulfil discharge criteria was 4.5 days (range: 2.5–63.5 days) in the WI group and 6.0 days (range: 3.0–42.5 days) in the EP group (P= 0.044). During the first 48 h following surgery, pain scores were significantly lower in the EP group both at rest and on movement. Resting pain scores within both groups were rated as mild (range: 0–3). There was no significant difference between the groups in time to first mobilization or overall complication rate (48.5% in the WI group vs. 58.1% in the EP group; P= 0.443). Conclusions Local anaesthetic wound infiltration combined with patient-controlled opiate analgesia reduces the length of time required to fulfil criteria for discharge from hospital compared with epidural analgesia following open liver resection. Epidural analgesia provides superior analgesia, but does not confer benefits in terms of faster mobilization or recovery. PMID:22882198

  8. Epidural versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia after Pediatric Thoracotomy for Malignancy: A Preliminary Review.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Katherine W; Dalton, Brian G; Millspaugh, Daniel L; Thomas, Priscilla G; St Peter, Shawn David

    2016-08-01

    Introduction The use of thoracic epidural is standard in adult thoracotomy patients facilitating earlier mobilization, deep breathing, and minimizing narcotic effects. However, a recent randomized trial in pediatric patients who undergo repair of pectus excavatum suggests patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) produces a less costly, minimally invasive postoperative course compared with epidural. Given that thoracotomy is typically less painful than pectus bar placement, we compared the outcomes of epidural to PCA for pain management after pediatric thoracotomy. Methods A retrospective review of 17 oncologic thoracotomies was performed at a children's hospital from 2004 to 2013. Data points included operative details, epidural or PCA use, urinary catheterization, days to regular diet, days to oral pain regimen, postoperative pain scores, length of stay, and anesthesia charges. Patients were excluded if they did not have epidural or PCA following thoracotomy. Results Six thoracotomies were managed with an epidural and 11 with a PCA. Three epidural patients were opiate naïve compared with two with a PCA. The most common indication for thoracotomy was metastatic osteosarcoma (n = 13). When comparing epidural to PCA, there was no significant difference in days to removal of Foley catheter, regular diet, oral pain control, length of stay, or total operating room time. Postoperative pain scores were also comparable. The mean anesthesia charges were significantly higher in patients with an epidural than with a PCA. Conclusion Epidural catheter and PCA provided comparable pain relief and objective recovery course in children who underwent thoracotomy for oncologic disease; however, epidural catheter placement was associated with increased anesthesia charges, suggesting that PCA is a noninvasive, cost-effective alternative. PMID:26018213

  9. A Comparison of Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia With Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Management After Major Gynecologic Oncologic Surgeries: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Farnaz; Rasooli, Sousan; Baybordi, Ali; Golzari, Samad E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain after major open gynecologic surgeries requires appropriate pain management. Objectives: This study aimed at comparing perioperative patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) and patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) after gynecologic oncology surgeries. Patients and Methods: In this clinical trial study, 90 patients with American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) class I or II scheduled for gynecologic oncologic surgeries were randomly allocated to two groups (45 patients each group) to receive: patient-controlled epidural analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl (PCEA group), or patient controlled intravenous analgesia (IV PCA group) with fentanyl, pethidine and ondansetron. Postoperative pain was assessed over 48 hours using the visual analog scale (VAS). The frequency of rescue analgesia was recorded. Occurrence of any concomitant events such as nausea, vomiting, ileus, purities, sedation and respiratory complications were recorded postoperatively. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in demographic data including; age, weight, ASA physical status, duration of surgery, intraoperative bleeding, and the amount of blood transfusion (P > 0.05), between the two studied groups. Severity of postoperative pain was not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05); however, after first patient mobilization, pain was significantly lower in the epidural group than the IV group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the incidence of complications such as nausea, vomiting, purities or ileus (P > 0.05). Nevertheless, the incidence and severity of sedation was significantly higher in the IV group (P < 0.001). Respiratory depression was higher in the IV group than the epidural group; this difference, however, was not significant (P = 0.11). In the epidural group, only 10 patients (22.2%) had mild and transient lower extremities parenthesis. Conclusions

  10. Epidural analgesia in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Tan, T K

    1998-03-01

    An ideal analgesic for labour would preferably be non-invasive, as effective as spinals and epidurals without their attendant complications and is safe to mother and child and should not complicate the labour process. Analgesia for labouring women ranges from the use of opioid injections to invasive methods, chiefly epidural injections. Each has its advantages and drawbacks. This article provides a review of analgesic methods and techniques for labouring women. It focuses mainly on the role of epidurals, how it is utilised by anaesthetists and the differing methods of drug delivery through the epidural route. It discusses various concoctions of local anaesthetics and adjuvants used. The epidural route is probably the most effective and most commonly used invasive route for achieving analgesia during labour. Local anaesthetics of varying concentrations are administered as intermittent boluses or as a continuous infusion. Adjuvant drugs are able to enhance the quality and duration of the analgesia. Opioids including fentanyl and sufentanil, and clonidine are discussed. The use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia and combined spinal-epidural analgesia are reviewed. Ambulatory or mobile epidurals are increasingly popular. They are known to improve maternal satisfaction because of preservation of motor power. Ambulation may help with cervical dilatation and engagement, and abolition of backpain, among other advantages. This article describes the methods of establishing mobile epidurals and offers guidelines on safe ambulation and contraindications to its use. PMID:9663317

  11. A comparison of thoracic or lumbar patient-controlled epidural analgesia methods after thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to compare patient-controlled thoracic or lumbar epidural analgesia methods after thoracotomy operations. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were prospectively randomized to receive either thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA group) or lumbar epidural analgesia (LEA group). In both groups, epidural catheters were administered. Hemodynamic measurements, visual analog scale scores at rest (VAS-R) and after coughing (VAS-C), analgesic consumption, and side effects were compared at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours postoperatively. Results The VAS-R and VAS-C values were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group at 2, 4, 8, and 16 hours after surgery (for VAS-R, P = 0.001, P = 0.01, P = 0.008, and P = 0.029, respectively; and for VAS-C, P = 0.035, P = 0.023, P = 0.002, and P = 0.037, respectively). Total 24-hour analgesic consumption was different between groups (175 +/- 20 mL versus 185 +/- 31 mL; P = 0.034). The comparison of postoperative complications revealed that the incidence of hypotension (21/57, 36.8% versus 8/63, 12.7%; P = 0.002), bradycardia (9/57, 15.8% versus 2/63, 3.2%; P = 0.017), atelectasis (1/57, 1.8% versus 7/63, 11.1%; P = 0.04), and the need for intensive care unit (ICU) treatment (0/57, 0% versus 5/63, 7.9%; P = 0.03) were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group. Conclusions TEA has beneficial hemostatic effects in comparison to LEA after thoracotomies along with more satisfactory pain relief profile. PMID:24885545

  12. Postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis and posterior spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Florian; Mutlak, Haitham; Tizi, Karima; Senft, Christian; Setzer, Matthias; Seifert, Volker; Weise, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The value of postoperative epidural analgesia after major spinal surgery is well established. Thus far, the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been denied to patients undergoing debridement and instrumentation in spondylodiscitis, with the risk of increased postoperative pain resulting in prolonged recovery. The value of PCEA with special regard to infectious complications remains to be clarified. The present study examined the value of postoperative PCEA in comparison with intravenous analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis undergoing posterior spinal surgery. METHODS Thirty-two patients treated surgically for spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine were prospectively included in a database and retrospectively reviewed for this study. Postoperative antibiotic treatment, functional capacity, pain levels, side effects, and complications were documented. Sixteen patients were given patient-demanded intravenous analgesia (PIA) followed by 16 patients assigned to PCEA. If PCEA was applied, the insertion of an epidural catheter was performed under the direct visual guidance of the surgeon at the end of the surgery. RESULTS Three patients intended for PCEA treatment were excluded due to predefined exclusion criteria. Postoperative pain was significantly lower in the PCEA group during the first 48 hours after surgery (p = 0.03). As determined by the trunk control test conducted at 8 (p < 0.001), 24 (p = 0.004), 48 (p = 0.015), 72 (p = 0.0031), and 96 hours (p < 0.001), patients in the PCEA treatment group displayed significantly increased mobilization capacity compared with those of the PIA group. Time until normal accomplishment of all mobilization maneuvers was reduced in the PCEA group compared with that in the PIA group (p = 0.04). No differences in complication rates were observed between the 2 groups (p = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS PCEA may reduce postoperative pain and lead to earlier achievement of functional capacity at a low

  13. Epidural Analgesia Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Pain Relief in Uterine Artery Embolization for Uterine Fibroids: A Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kooij, Sanne M. van der Moolenaar, Lobke M.; Ankum, Willem M.; Reekers, Jim A.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Hehenkamp, Wouter J. K.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the costs and effects of epidural analgesia (EDA) to those of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) for postintervention pain relief in women having uterine artery embolization (UAE) for systematic uterine fibroids. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) based on data from the literature by constructing a decision tree to model the clinical pathways for estimating the effects and costs of treatment with EDA and PCA. Literature on EDA for pain-relief after UAE was missing, and therefore, data on EDA for abdominal surgery were used. Outcome measures were compared costs to reduce one point in visual analogue score (VAS) or numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain 6 and 24 h after UAE and risk for complications. Results: Six hours after the intervention, the VAS was 3.56 when using PCA and 2.0 when using EDA. The costs for pain relief in women undergoing UAE with PCA and EDA were Euro-Sign 191 and Euro-Sign 355, respectively. The costs for EDA to reduce the VAS score 6 h after the intervention with one point compared with PCA were Euro-Sign 105 and Euro-Sign 179 after 24 h. The risk of having a complication was 2.45 times higher when using EDA. Conclusions: The results of this indirect comparison of EDA for abdominal surgery with PCA for UAE show that EDA would provide superior analgesia for post UAE pain at 6 and 24 h but with higher costs and an increased risk of complications.

  14. Predicting postoperative vomiting among orthopedic patients receiving patient-controlled epidural analgesia using SVM and LR

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsin-Yun; Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been applied to reduce postoperative pain in orthopedic surgical patients. Unfortunately, PCEA is occasionally accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The logistic regression (LR) model is widely used to predict vomiting, and recently support vector machines (SVM), a supervised machine learning method, has been used for classification and prediction. Unlike our previous work which compared Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) with LR, this study uses a SVM-based predictive model to identify patients with high risk of vomiting during PCEA and comparing results with those derived from the LR-based model. From January to March 2007, data from 195 patients undergoing PCEA following orthopedic surgery were applied to develop two predictive models. 75% of the data were randomly selected for training, while the remainder was used for testing to validate predictive performance. The area under curve (AUC) was measured using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC). The area under ROC curves of LR and SVM models were 0.734 and 0.929, respectively. A computer-based predictive model can be used to identify those who are at high risk for vomiting after PCEA, allowing for patient-specific therapeutic intervention or the use of alternative analgesic methods. PMID:27247165

  15. Predicting postoperative vomiting among orthopedic patients receiving patient-controlled epidural analgesia using SVM and LR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Yun; Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been applied to reduce postoperative pain in orthopedic surgical patients. Unfortunately, PCEA is occasionally accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The logistic regression (LR) model is widely used to predict vomiting, and recently support vector machines (SVM), a supervised machine learning method, has been used for classification and prediction. Unlike our previous work which compared Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) with LR, this study uses a SVM-based predictive model to identify patients with high risk of vomiting during PCEA and comparing results with those derived from the LR-based model. From January to March 2007, data from 195 patients undergoing PCEA following orthopedic surgery were applied to develop two predictive models. 75% of the data were randomly selected for training, while the remainder was used for testing to validate predictive performance. The area under curve (AUC) was measured using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC). The area under ROC curves of LR and SVM models were 0.734 and 0.929, respectively. A computer-based predictive model can be used to identify those who are at high risk for vomiting after PCEA, allowing for patient-specific therapeutic intervention or the use of alternative analgesic methods. PMID:27247165

  16. Patient-Controlled Epidural Analgesia or Multimodal Pain Regimen with Periarticular Injection After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jules-Elysee, Kethy M.; Goon, Amanda K.; Westrich, Geoffrey H.; Padgett, Douglas E.; Mayman, David J.; Ranawat, Amar S.; Ranawat, Chitranjan S.; Lin, Yi; Kahn, Richard L.; Bhagat, Devan D.; Goytizolo, Enrique A.; Ma, Yan; Reid, Shane C.; Curren, Jodie; YaDeau, Jacques T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The optimal postoperative analgesia after primary total hip arthroplasty remains in question. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) with use of a multimodal pain regimen including periarticular injection (PAI). We hypothesized that PAI would lead to earlier readiness for discharge, decreased opioid consumption, and lower pain scores. Methods: Forty-one patients received PAI, and forty-three patients received PCEA. Preoperatively, both groups were administered dexamethasone (6 mg, orally). The PAI group received a clonidine patch and sustained-release oxycodone (10 mg), while the PCEA group had placebo. Both groups received combined spinal-epidural anesthesia and used an epidural pain pump postoperatively; the PAI group had normal saline solution, while the PCEA group had bupivacaine and hydromorphone. The primary outcome, readiness for discharge, required the discontinuation of the epidural, a pain score of <4 (numeric rating scale) without parenteral narcotics, normal eating, minimal nausea, urination without a catheter, a dry surgical wound, no acute medical problems, and the ability to independently transfer and walk 12.2 m (40 ft). Results: The mean time to readiness for discharge (and standard deviation) was 2.4 ± 0.7 days (PAI) compared with 2.3 ± 0.8 days (PCEA) (p = 0.86). The mean length of stay was 3.0 ± 0.8 days (PAI) compared with 3.1 ± 0.7 days (PCEA) (p = 0.46). A significant mean difference in pain score of 0.74 with ambulation (p = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 1.31) and 0.80 during physical therapy (p = 0.03; 95% CI, 0.09 to 1.51) favored the PCEA group. The mean opioid consumption (oral morphine equivalents in milligrams) was significantly higher in the PAI group on postoperative day 0 (43 ± 21 compared with 28 ± 23; p = 0.002) and postoperative days 0 through 2 (136 ± 59 compared with 90 ± 79; p = 0.004). Opioid-Related Symptom

  17. Postoperative pain control using continuous i.m. bupivacaine infusion plus patient-controlled analgesia compared with epidural analgesia after major hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Lun-Hing, Edgar M; van Dam, Ronald M; Welsh, Fenella K S; Wells, John K G; John, Timothy G; Cresswell, Adrian B; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Rees, Myrddin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is debate concerning the best mode of delivery of analgesia following liver resection, with continuous i.m. infusion of bupivacaine (CIB) plus patient-controlled i.v. analgesia (PCA) suggested as an alternative to continuous epidural analgesia (CEA). This study compares these two modalities. Methods A total of 498 patients undergoing major hepatectomy between July 2004 and July 2011 were included. Group 1 received CIB + PCA (n = 429) and Group 2 received CEA (n = 69). Groups were analysed on baseline patient and surgical characteristics. Primary endpoints were pain severity scores and total opioid consumption. Secondary endpoints were pain management failures, need for rescue medication, postoperative (opioid-related) morbidity and hospital length of stay (LoS). Results In both groups pain was well controlled and >70% of patients had no or minimal pain on PoDs 1 and 2. The numbers of patients experiencing severe pain were similar in both groups: PoD 1 at rest: 0.3% in Group 1 and 0% in Group 2 (P = 1.000); PoD 1 on movement: 8% in Group 1 and 2% in Group 2 (P = 0.338); PoD 2 at rest: 0% in Group 1 and 2% in Group 2 (P = 0.126), and PoD 2 on movement: 5% in Group 1 and 5% in Group 2 (P = 1.000). Although the CIB + PCA group required more opioid rescue medication on PoD 0 (53% versus 22%; P < 0.001), they used less opioids on PoDs 0–3 (P ≤ 0.001), had lower morbidity (26% versus 39%; P = 0.018), and a shorter LoS (7 days versus 8 days; P = 0.005). Conclusions The combination of CIB + PCA provides pain control similar to that provided by CEA, but facilitates lower opioid consumption after major hepatectomy. It has the potential to replace epidural analgesia, thereby avoiding the occurrence of rare but serious complications. PMID:24151899

  18. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOR - CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Nada; Djaković, Ivka; Kličan-Jaić, Katarina; Rudman, Senka Sabolović; Ivanec, Željko

    2015-09-01

    Labor pain is one of the most severe pains. Labor is a complex and individual process with varying maternal requesting analgesia. Labor analgesia must be safe and accompanied by minimal amount of unwanted consequences for both the mother and the child, as well as for the delivery procedure. Epidural analgesia is the treatment that best meets these demands. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Society of Anesthesiologists, mother's demand is a reason enough for the introduction of epidural analgesia in labor, providing that no contraindications exist. The application of analgesics should not cease at the end of the second stage of labor, but it is recommended that lower concentration analgesics be then applied. Based on the latest studies, it can be claimed that epidural analgesia can be applied during the major part of the first and second stage of labor. According to previous investigations, there is no definitive conclusion about the incidence of instrumental delivery, duration of second stage of labor, time of epidural analgesia initiation, and long term outcomes for the newborn. Cooperation of obstetric and anesthesiology personnel, as well as appropriate technical equipment significantly decrease the need of instrumental completion of a delivery, as well as other complications encountered in the application of epidural analgesia. Our hospital offers 24/7 epidural analgesia service. The majority of pregnant women in our hospital were aware of the advantages of epidural analgesia for labor, however, only a small proportion of them used it, mainly because of inadequate level of information. PMID:26666104

  19. Secondary erythromelalgia successfully treated with patient-controlled epidural analgesia and interferon α-2b: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    LI, XINGZHI; LI, YAOMIN; QU, YAO; LU, LAIJIN

    2016-01-01

    Erythromelalgia (EM) is a debilitating neurovascular disease that is refractory to numerous treatment modalities. The present study reported the case of a 72-year-old woman diagnosed with EM secondary to polycythemia vera (PV), who was effectively treated with the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) and interferon α-2b therapy. The study aimed to provide clinical information on this condition based on the findings of the present case and previously-reported cases. PCEA containing local anesthetics and dexamethasone or fentanyl resulted in nearly complete relief of symptoms. Furthermore, continuous use of interferon α-2b for the treatment of the PV completely relieved the EM symptoms. In conclusion, PCEA and interferon α-2b may be promising treatments for EM secondary to PV. PMID:27168811

  20. Comparison of computer-integrated patient-controlled epidural analgesia with no initial basal infusion versus moderate basal infusion for labor and delivery: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Ban Leong; Woo, David; Leong, Wan Ling; Wang, Hao; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sia, Alex TH

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Computer-integrated patient-controlled epidural analgesia (CIPCEA) is a novel epidural drug delivery system. It automatically adjusts the basal infusion based on the individual's need for analgesia as labor progresses. Materials and Methods: This study compared the time-weighted local anesthetic (LA) consumption by comparing parturients using CIPCEA with no initial basal infusion (CIPCEA0) with CIPCEA with initial moderate basal infusion of 5 ml/H (CIPCEA5). We recruited 76 subjects after ethics approval. The computer integration of CIPCEA titrate the basal infusion to 5, 10, 15, or 20 ml/H if the parturient required respectively, one, two, three, or four patient demands in the previous hour. The basal infusion reduced by 5 ml/H if there was no demand in the previous hour. The sample size was calculated to show equivalence in LA consumption. Results: The time-weighted LA consumption between both groups were similar with CIPCEA0 group (mean [standard deviation (SD)] 8.9 [3.5] mg/H) compared to the CIPCEA5 group (mean [SD] 9.9 [3.5] mg/H), P = 0.080. Both groups had a similar incidence of breakthrough pain, duration of the second stage, mode of delivery, and patient satisfaction. However, more subjects in the CIPCEA0 group required patient self-bolus. There were no differences in fetal outcomes. Discussion: Both CIPCEA regimens had similar time-weighted LA consumption and initial moderate basal infusion with CIPCEA may not be required. PMID:25425774

  1. A Retrospective Observational Study Examining the Effect of Thoracic Epidural and Patient Controlled Analgesia on Short-term Outcomes in Blunt Thoracic Trauma Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Edward James; Lee, Geraldine Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Effective analgesia in the early stages after any major traumatic event remains pivotal to optimal trauma management. For patients with significant thoracic injuries, this is paramount to ensure ongoing efficient respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of analgesic modes in the management of patients with a primary thoracic injury and blunt mechanism of injury. By understanding variables that influence the use of varying analgesic modes and influence the development of pulmonary complications, there should be more uniform evidence-based prescription in the future. This retrospective study considered analgesic use in patients admitted after blunt thoracic injuries at one major trauma center over a 2-year period. Pulmonary complications measured included both infective and ventilator-associated failure. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify patient and injury severity characteristics and their association with respiratory complications. A total of 401 cases were reviewed and analyzed: 159 received Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA), 32 received PCA and epidural analgesia (EA), 6 received EA alone, and 204 received interval-administered analgesia. There were no significant differences in the rates of complication when compared between analgesic modes. Patients who developed pneumonia had significantly increased number of thoracic fractures and underlying organ injury (P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis highlighted duration of intercostal drain insertion (OR 1.377, P = 0.001) and premorbid cardiac disease (OR 2.624, P = 0.042) and ICU length of stay (OR: 1.146, P < 0.001) as significant predictors of developing pneumonia in this patient group. Examining the different analgesic modes, this study failed to identify a particular analgesic mode that was more effective in preventing pulmonary complications in blunt thoracic injuries. However, variables that may influence usage of different

  2. Patient-controlled intravenous analgesia as an alternative to epidural analgesia during labor: questioning the use of the short-acting opioid remifentanil. Survey in the French part of Belgium (Wallonia and Brussels).

    PubMed

    Lavand'homme, P; Roelants, F

    2009-01-01

    Childbirth ranks among the most intense experiences of acute pain. Neuraxial analgesia (i.e. epidural or combined spinal-epidural technique) is the most effective way to relieve that pain but it is contraindicated or impossible to perform for some parturients. We designed a survey of the current use of analgesic alternatives to epidural analgesia (EA) for labor pain, specifically the use of opioid patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA), in the French part of Belgium (Wallonia and Brussels). A questionnaire was mailed to the departmental chair of the hospitals with an obstetric unit, both in university and non-university centers (total of 53 centers). The questionnaire evaluated the availability of EA, the alternatives used when EA was contraindicated, the use of opioid-based PCIA for labor analgesia as well as opioid preference and doses, and finally the reasons for not using opioid PCIA. The response rate was 67.5% (36 centers). Among the responding hospitals, EA was available for 68% (range 25-85%) of labors and deliveries. When EA was not available or contraindicated, a parenteral opioid (piritramide, tramadol or pethidine) was proposed in 19% (7/36) of the centers, Entonox in 11% (4/36), a pudendal block by obstetricians in 28% (10/36) and non-pharmacologic alternatives (i.e. hypnosis, sophrology, baths and massages) in 19% (7/36). In 28% (10/36) of the centers however, no analgesic alternative was proposed. Opioid PCIA was employed in 36% (13/36) of the centers and for an additional 11% (4/36) only in case of intrauterine death. Remifentanil was the first choice (76.5% of the PCIA), followed by sufentanil (23.5%). Other opioids (piritramide, morphine, fentanyl) and ketamine were also administered by PCIA. Forty-five percents of the centers reported never using opioid PCIA by either lack of knowledge (7%), fear of maternal or fetal side effects (48%) and unability to provide a correct supervision of the parturient during PCIA use (48%), opposition from

  3. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga¸secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Background Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. Results The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Conclusion Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. PMID:27030718

  4. [Combined spinal and epidural analgesia in urology].

    PubMed

    Bovianska, N

    1995-01-01

    Combined spinal and epidural analgesia is a new concept in the field of regional anesthesia. It combines the positive qualities of spinal and epidural analgesia, and is performed by the "needle-in-needle" technique, described in the paper. This type of analgesia is practically implemented in the Clinical Center of Urology over the past few months, and shows encouraging results. This is a report on clinical experience had with 10 combined analgesia procedures, running a course free of any complications against the background of stable hemodynamics and respiration of the patients. The block induced is with 4-hour duration, and lends itself to prolongation through an epidural catheter. This renders the method variable and suited for postoperative analgesia too. The Espokan set technical devices used make puncture of the spinal-epidural space readily practicable. PMID:8648963

  5. Efficacy of Intrathecal Morphine Combined with Intravenous Analgesia versus Thoracic Epidural Analgesia after Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Park, Jin Ha; Kil, Hae Keum; Choi, Seung Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Epidural analgesia has been the preferred analgesic technique after major abdominal surgery. On the other hand, the combined use of intrathecal morphine (ITM) and intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IVPCA) has been shown to be a viable alternative approach for analgesia. We hypothesized that ITM combined with IVPCA is as effective as patient controlled thoracic epidural analgesia (PCTEA) with respect to postoperative pain control after conventional open gastrectomy. Materials and Methods Sixty-four patients undergoing conventional open gastrectomy due to gastric cancer were randomly allocated into the intrathecal morphine combined with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IT) group or patient-controlled thoracic epidural analgesia (EP) group. The IT group received preoperative 0.3 mg of ITM, followed by postoperative IVPCA. The EP group preoperatively underwent epidural catheterization, followed by postoperative PCTEA. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores were assessed until 48 hrs after surgery. Adverse effects related to analgesia, profiles associated with recovery from surgery, and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery were also evaluated. Results This study failed to demonstrate the non-inferiority of ITM-IVPCA (n=29) to PCTEA (n=30) with respect to VAS 24 hrs after surgery. Furthermore, the IT group consumed more fentanyl than the EP group did (1247.2±263.7 µg vs. 1048.9±71.7 µg, p<0.001). The IT group took a longer time to ambulate than the EP group (p=0.021) and had higher incidences of postoperative ileus (p=0.012) and pulmonary complications (p=0.05) compared with the EP group. Conclusion ITM-IVPCA is not as effective as PCTEA in patients undergoing gastrectomy, with respect to pain control, ambulation, postoperative ileus and pulmonary complications. PMID:24954344

  6. Comparison of continuous epidural infusion and programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yunan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Jinlu; Yang, Ruimin; Liu, Jingchen

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate differences between continuous epidural infusion (CEI) and programmed intermittent epidural bolus (IEB) analgesia for the Chinese parturients undergoing spontaneous delivery and to approach their safety to parturients and neonates. Methods Two hundred healthy American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II, term (≥37 weeks’ gestation), nulliparous women who requested analgesia for labor were recruited. Epidural analgesia was initiated with a solution of 0.15% ropivacaine 10 mL and maintained with 0.1% ropivacaine mixed with sufentanil 0.3 μg/mL by CEI at a rate of 5 mL/h combined with a patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture or IEB of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture combined with a PCEA bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture. The lockout interval was 20 minutes in each arm between the CEI and the IEB group. After 20 minutes of first dosage, visual analog scale (VAS) score was obtained every 60 minutes. The maternal and fetal outcome and total consumption of analgesic solution were compared. Results There was no difference in demographic characteristics, duration of first and second stages, delivery methods, sensory block, fetal Apgar scores, and the maternal outcomes between the CEI and IEB groups. There was a significant difference in VAS scores and epidural ropivacaine total consumption between the two groups (IEB vs CEI: 51.27±9.61 vs 70.44±12.78 mg, P<0.01). Conclusion The use of programmed IEB mixed with PCEA improved labor analgesia compared to CEI mixed with PCEA, which could act as maintenance mode for epidural labor analgesia. PMID:27471390

  7. Epidural analgesia, neonatal care and breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Zuppa, Antonio Alberto; Alighieri, Giovanni; Riccardi, Riccardo; Cavani, Maria; Iafisco, Alma; Cota, Francesco; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our study is to evaluate the correlation between epidural analgesia during labor, start of breastfeeding and type of maternal-neonatal care.Two different assistance models were considered: Partial and Full Rooming-in.In this cohort study, 2480 healthy infants were enrolled, 1519 in the Partial Rooming-in group and 1321 in the Full Rooming-in group; 1223 were born to women subjected to epidural analgesia in labor.In case of Partial Rooming-in the rate of exclusive or prevailing breastfeeding is significant more frequent in newborns born to mothers who didn't receive analgesia. Instead, in case of Full Rooming-in the rate of exclusive or prevailing breastfeeding is almost the same and there's no correlation between the use or not of epidural analgesia.The good start of lactation and the success of breastfeeding seems to be guaranteed by the type of care offered to the couple mother-infant, that reverses any possible adverse effects of the use of epidural analgesia in labor. PMID:25432659

  8. [A rare complication of labor epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Vazin, Mojgan Hosseini

    2008-06-16

    This case describes a patient who developed a complete right hemiparesis with ptosis of eyelid, trigeminus and facial paresis following a routine epidural analgesia for labor. A subdural deposit of the local anaesthetic might be the cause of these symptoms. The pathogenesis of these symptoms as well as the diagnoses and treatment of the condition is discussed. PMID:18565319

  9. Epidural labour analgesia using Bupivacaine and Clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Syal, K; Dogra, RK; Ohri, A; Chauhan, G; Goel, A

    2011-01-01

    Background: To compare the effects of addition of Clonidine (60 μg) to Epidural Bupivacaine (0.125%) for labour analgesia, with regard to duration of analgesia, duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section, foetal outcome, patient satisfaction and side effects. Patients & Methods: On demand, epidural labour analgesia was given to 50 nulliparous healthy term parturients (cephalic presentation), divided in two groups randomly. Group I received bupivacaine (0.125%) alone, whereas Group II received bupivacaine (0.125%) along with Clonidine (60 μg). 10 ml of 0.125% bupivacaine was injected as first dose and further doses titrated with patient relief (Numerical Rating Scale <3). Top ups were given whenever Numerical Rating Scale went above 5. Results: There was statistically significant prolongation of duration of analgesia in Group II, with no difference in duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section or foetal outcome. Also clonidine gave dose sparing effect to bupivacaine and there was better patient satisfaction without any significant side effects in Group II. Conclusion: Clonidine is a useful adjunct to bupivacaine for epidural labour analgesia and can be considered as alternative to opioids. PMID:21804714

  10. Ropivacaine 0.025% mixed with fentanyl 3.0 μg/ml and epinephrine 0.5 μg/ml is effective for epidural patient-controlled analgesia after cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shaul; Chhokra, Renu; Stein, Mark H; Denny, John T; Shah, Shruti; Mohiuddin, Adil; Naftalovich, Rotem; Zhao, Rong; Pashkova, Anna; Rolleri, Noah; Patel, Arpan G; Hunter-Fratzola, Christine W

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: We aimed to determine the ropivacaine concentration that provided adequate analgesia with early ambulation and minimal urinary retention or other side-effects when used with fentanyl and epinephrine for patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) after elective cesarean section. Material and Methods: Forty-eight patients were randomized to four groups in a double-blinded fashion. All groups received an initial 10 ml/h of epidural study solution for 24 h. The solution contained: 0.2, 0.1, 0.05, or 0.025% ropivacaine for Groups I-IV, respectively, with fentanyl 3.0 μg/ml and epinephrine 0.5 μg/ml. Patients could administer additional PCEA doses of 4 ml of their study solution with a lock-out time of 10 min. Overall satisfaction, side-effects, motor block, neurologic function, and pain using Visual Analog Scale were assessed. Results: Patients in all groups showed no difference in sedation, pruritus, nausea, vomiting, and uterine cramps. Pain scores at rest were lower for Group IV than Groups I-III (P < 0.001). Twelve, five, one, and zero patients could not ambulate in Groups I-IV, respectively. Nine, nine, two, and zero (III

  11. Recent Advances in Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Maria; George, John E.; Seif, John; Farag, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia is a term that denotes all forms of central blocks, involving the spinal, epidural, and caudal spaces. Epidural anesthesia is a versatile technique widely used in anesthetic practice. Its potential to decrease postoperative morbidity and mortality has been demonstrated by numerous studies. To maximize its perioperative benefits while minimizing potential adverse outcomes, the knowledge of factors affecting successful block placement is essential. This paper will provide an overview of the pertinent anatomical, pharmacological, immunological, and technical aspects of epidural anesthesia in both adult and pediatric populations and will discuss the recent advances, the related rare but potentially devastating complications, and the current recommendations for the use of anticoagulants in the setting of neuraxial block placement. PMID:22174708

  12. Comparison of Transversus Abdominis Plane Infiltration with Liposomal Bupivacaine versus Continuous Epidural Analgesia versus Intravenous Opioid Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Ayad, Sabry; Babazade, Rovnat; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Nadar, Vinayak; Lokhande, Chetan; Makarova, Natalya; Khanna, Rashi; Sessler, Daniel I.; Turan, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is considered the standard of care but cannot be provided to all patients Liposomal bupivacaine has been approved for field blocks such as transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks but has not been clinically compared against other modalities. In this retrospective propensity matched cohort study we thus tested the primary hypothesis that TAP infiltration are noninferior (not worse) to continuous epidural analgesia and superior (better) to intravenous opioid analgesia in patients recovering from major lower abdominal surgery. 318 patients were propensity matched on 18 potential factors among three groups (106 per group): 1) TAP infiltration with bupivacaine liposome; 2) continuous Epidural analgesia with plain bupivacaine; and; 3) intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA). We claimed TAP noninferior (not worse) over Epidural if TAP was noninferior (not worse) on total morphine-equivalent opioid and time-weighted average pain score (10-point scale) within first 72 hours after surgery with noninferiority deltas of 1 (10-point scale) for pain and an increase less of 20% in the mean morphine equivalent opioid consumption. We claimed TAP or Epidural groups superior (better) over IV PCA if TAP or Epidural was superior on opioid consumption and at least noninferior on pain outcome. Multivariable linear regressions within the propensity-matched cohorts were used to model total morphine-equivalent opioid dose and time-weighted average pain score within first 72 hours after surgery; joint hypothesis framework was used for formal testing. TAP infiltration were noninferior to Epidural on both primary outcomes (p<0.001). TAP infiltration were noninferior to IV PCA on pain scores (p = 0.001) but we did not find superiority on opioid consumption (p = 0.37). We did not find noninferiority of Epidural over IV PCA on pain scores (P = 0.13) and nor did we find superiority on opioid consumption (P = 0.98). TAP infiltration with liposomal bupivacaine and

  13. Postpartum septic sacroiliitis coincident with labour epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, J M

    2008-11-01

    A 22-year-old woman presented to hospital 10 days after emergency caesarean section with severe back pain, fever tachycardia and a raised C-reactive protein. She had received labour epidural analgesia and was investigated for an epidural abscess. After repeat magnetic resonance imaging she was ultimately diagnosed with septic sacroiliitis. Although an uncommon cause of back pain, pregnancy-associated sacroiliitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of post-epidural back pain, as the presentation and symptoms of an epidural infection and sacroiliitis are similar. We recommend imaging to include the sacroiliac joints when considering the diagnosis of an epidural collection. PMID:19115661

  14. Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    French, Cynthia A; Cong, Xiaomei; Chung, Keun Sam

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of epidural analgesia during labor, no consensus has been reached among obstetric and anesthesia providers regarding its effects on breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between labor epidural analgesia and breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published in 1990 or thereafter, using the search term breastfeeding combined with epidural, labor epidural analgesia, labor analgesia, or epidural analgesia Of 117 articles, 23 described empirical studies specific to labor epidural analgesia and measured a breastfeeding outcome. Results were conflicting: 12 studies showed negative associations between epidural analgesia and breastfeeding success, 10 studies showed no effect, and 1 study showed a positive association. Most studies were observational. Of 3 randomized controlled studies, randomization methods were inadequate in 2 and not evaluable in 1. Other limitations were related to small sample size or inadequate study power; variation and lack of information regarding type and dosage of analgesia or use of other intrapartum interventions; differences in timing, definition, and method of assessing breastfeeding success; or failure to consider factors such as mothers' intention to breastfeed, social support, siblings, or the mother's need to return to work or school. It is also unclear to what extent results are mediated through effects on infant neurobehavior, maternal fever, oxytocin release, duration of labor, and need for instrumental delivery. Clinician awareness of factors affecting breastfeeding can help identify women at risk for breastfeeding difficulties in order to target support and resources effectively. PMID:27121239

  15. Epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure

    PubMed Central

    Walaszczyk, Malgorzata; Knapik, Piotr; Misiolek, Hanna; Korlacki, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Parents have the right to decide on behalf of their children and deny consent to regional anaesthesia. The investigators decided to investigate quality of postoperative analgesia in adolescents undergoing epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure. Material/Methods The study subjects were 61 adolescents aged 11–18 years who underwent pectus excavatum repair with the Nuss procedure. Patients were divided into epidural (n=41) and opioid (n=20) groups, depending on their parents’ consent to epidural catheter insertion. Intraoperatively, 0.5% epidural ropivacaine with fentanyl or intermittent intravenous injections of fentanyl were used. Postoperative analgesia was achieved with either epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine with fentanyl, or subcutaneous morphine via an intraoperatively inserted “butterfly” cannula. Additionally, both groups received metamizol and paracetamol. Primary outcome variables were postoperative pain scores (Numeric Rating Scale and Prince Henry Hospital Pain Score). Secondary outcome variables included hemodynamic parameters, additional analgesia and side effects. Results Heart rate and blood pressure values in the postoperative period were significantly higher in the opioid group. Pain scores requiring intervention were noted almost exclusively in the opioid group. Conclusions Denial of parental consent to epidural analgesia following the Nuss procedure results in significantly worse control of postoperative pain. Our data may be useful when discussing with parents the available anaesthetic techniques for exceptionally painful procedures. PMID:22037752

  16. Fluoroscopically guided tunneled trans-caudal epidural catheter technique for opioid-free neonatal epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Andrew D; Hughes, Elisabeth M

    2016-06-01

    Epidural analgesia confers significant perioperative advantages to neonates undergoing surgical procedures but may be very technically challenging to place using a standard interlaminar loss-of-resistance to saline technique given the shallow depth of the epidural space. Thoracic epidural catheters placed via the caudal route may reduce the risk of direct neural injury from needle placement, but often pose higher risks of infection and/or improper positioning if placed without radiographic guidance. We present a detailed method of placing a fluoroscopically guided, tunneled transcaudal epidural catheter, which may reduce both of these risks. The accuracy and precision of this technique often provides adequate analgesia to allow for opioid-free epidural infusions as well as significant reductions in systemic opioids through the perioperative period. Opioid-free analgesia using a regional anesthetic technique allows for earlier extubation and reduced perioperative sedation, which may have a less deleterious neurocognitive effect on the developing brain of the neonate. PMID:26896945

  17. Effect of epidural analgesia on the primary cesarean rate.

    PubMed

    Gribble, R K; Meier, P R

    1991-08-01

    There is some concern that providing parturients with epidural analgesia increases the likelihood of cesarean delivery. Because of the widespread interest in cesarean rates and the expanding use of epidural analgesia, we believed that this contention should be assessed. Hospital records were reviewed to determine the primary cesarean rate for 1084 parturients who delivered at our institution during 15 months in which there was a 24-hour "on demand" epidural service. This was compared with our primary cesarean rate during 15 months in which epidural analgesia was not available, even on physician request. Because of the characteristics of our institution, this control group consisted of patients from the same population base managed by the same eight obstetricians using the same management techniques. For patients in labor, the primary cesarean rate overall was 9.0% before and 8.2% after the epidural service began (P = .626). When subpopulations based on parity and indication for cesarean delivery were studied, there were no significant changes in the cesarean rate. These results demonstrate that the availability of on-demand epidural analgesia for patients in labor did not increase the primary cesarean rate, either in the aggregate or for any of the subpopulations studied. PMID:2067767

  18. Negligible Effect of Perioperative Epidural Analgesia Among Patients Undergoing Elective Gastric and Pancreatic Resections

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhruvil R.; Brown, Erin; Russo, Jack E.; Li, Chin-Shang; Martinez, Steve R.; Coates, Jodi M.; Bold, Richard J.; Canter, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background There are conflicting data regarding improvements in postoperative outcomes with perioperative epidural analgesia. We sought to examine the effect of perioperative epidural analgesia versus intravenous narcotic analgesia on perioperative outcomes including pain control, morbidity, and mortality in patients undergoing gastric and pancreatic resections. Methods We evaluated 169 patients from 2007 to 2011 who underwent open gastric and pancreatic resections for malignancy at a university medical center. Emergency, traumatic, pediatric, enucleations, and disseminated cancer cases were excluded. Clinicopathologic data were reviewed among epidural (E) and non-epidural (NE) patients for their association with perioperative endpoints. Results 120 patients (71%) received an epidural, and 49 (29%) did not. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in mean pain scores at each of the four days (days 0-3) among E ( 3.2 ± 2.7, 3.2 ± 2.3, 2.3 ± 1.9, and 2.1 ± 1.9, respectively) and NE patients ( 3.7 ± 2.7, 3.4 ± 1.9, 2.9 ± 2.1, and 2.4 ± 1.9, respectively). Within each of the E and NE patient groups, there were significant differences (P < 0.0001) in mean pain scores from day 0 to day 3 (P < 0.0001). 69% of E patients also received intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Ileus (13% E vs. 8% NE), pneumonia (12% E vs. 8% NE), venous thromboembolism (6% E vs. 4% NE), length of stay [ 11.0±12.1(8,4-107) E vs. 12.2±10.7(7,3-54) NE], overall morbidity (36% E vs. 39% NE), and mortality (4% E vs. 2% NE) were not significantly different. Conclusions Routine use of epidurals in this group of patients does not appear to be superior to PCA. PMID:23345053

  19. The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural analgesia in open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David; Bright, Elizabeth; London, N J M

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Complications of epidural catheterisation can cause significant morbidity. Epidural abscess following epidural catheterisation is rare and the reported incidence is variable. The purpose of this study was to review the incidence of epidural abscess in patients undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. PATIENTS AND METHODS A retrospective case note review of all patients having open AAA repair over a 5-year period. RESULTS A total of 415 patients underwent open AAA repair between January 2003 and March 2008. Of these, 290 were elective procedures and 125 were for ruptured aneurysms. Six patients underwent postoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the spine for clinical suspicion of an epidural abscess. Two of these (0.48%) had confirmed epidural abscess and two superficial infection at the epidural site. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural analgesia in patients undergoing open AAA repair within our department was 0.48%. Although a rare complication, epidural abscess can cause significant morbidity. Epidural abscesses rarely develop before the third postoperative day. PMID:19887020

  20. Epidural morphine analgesia in Guillain Barré syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Genis, D; Busquets, C; Manubens, E; Dávalos, A; Baró, J; Oterino, A

    1989-01-01

    Severe pain is a frequent symptom in the Guillain Barré syndrome and can be intense, long lasting and with no response to the usual analgesics, including parenteral opiates. Epidural analgesia using morphine chloride in low doses has satisfactorily relieved pain in this disease in nine patients. PMID:2795070

  1. Patient-Controlled Epidural Levobupivacaine with or without Fentanyl for Post-Cesarean Section Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shin-Yan; Liu, Feng-Lin; Cherng, Yih-Giun; Fan, Shou-Zen; Leighton, Barbara L.; Chang, Hung-Chi; Chen, Li-Kuei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare the analgesic properties of levobupivacaine with or without fentanyl for patient-controlled epidural analgesia after Cesarean section in a randomized, double-blinded study. Methods. We enrolled American Society of Anesthesiologists class I/II, full-term pregnant women at National Taiwan University Hospital who received patient-controlled epidural analgesia after Cesarean section between 2009 and 2010. Eighty women were randomly assigned into two groups. In group A, the 40 subjects received drug solutions made of 0.6 mg/ml levobupivacaine plus 2 mcg/ml fentanyl, and in group B the 40 subjects received 1 mg/ml levobupivacaine. Maintenance was self-administered boluses and a continuous background infusion. Results. There were no significant differences in the resting and dynamic pain scales and total volume of drug used between the two groups. Patient satisfaction was good in both groups. Conclusion. Our study showed that pure epidural levobupivacaine can provide comparative analgesic properties to the levobupivacaine-fentanyl combination after Cesarean section. Pure levobupivacaine may serve as an alternative pain control regimen to avoid opioid-related adverse events in parturients. PMID:24982917

  2. Epidural methadone results in dose-dependent analgesia in cancer pain, further enhanced by epidural dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Lauretti, G R; Rizzo, C C; Mattos, A L; Rodrigues, S W

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate the role of epidural methadone-lidocaine in cancer pain combined or not to epidural dexamethasone. Methods: In all, 72 cancer patients, 32- to 67-year-old were randomized to six groups (n=12) and prospectively studied to examine analgesia and adverse effects for 3 weeks. Patients received single-dose protocol epidural test drugs: Control group (CG) received epidural 40-mg lidocaine diluted to 10-ml volume with saline. Dexamethasone group (DG) 40-mg lidocaine plus 10-mg dexamethasone. The 2.5MetG 2.5-mg epidural methadone with 40-mg lidocaine; the 5MetG, 5-mg epidural methadone plus 40-mg lidocaine, the 7.5MetG, 7.5-mg epidural methadone plus 40-mg lidocaine and finally the 7.5Met-DexG, 7.5-mg methadone with 40-mg lidocaine and 10-mg dexamethasone. Results: Groups CG, DG and 2.5MetG were similar regarding analgesia and side effects. Patients from 5MetG and 7.5MetG took 3±1 and 5±1 days, respectively, to restart oral morphine. Patients from 7.5MetDG took 14±2 to restart oral morphine (P<0.001). Daily somnolence and appetite improved in the 7.5MetDG during 2-week evaluation (P<0.005). Fatigue improved for both DG and 7.5MetDG during 2-week evaluation (P<0.005). By the third week of evaluation, all patients were similar. Conclusions: Epidural methadone plus lidocaine resulted in dose-dependent analgesia, further improved by epidural dexamethasone, which also improved fatigue. PMID:23322191

  3. Post-operative epidural analgesia: effects on lung volumes.

    PubMed

    Wahba, W M; Don, H F; Craig, D B

    1975-07-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the role of post-operative pain in reducing Functional Residual Capacity (FRC) and Vital Capacity (VC). The efficacy of post-operative epidural analgesia in reversing these changes was measured in eight subjects after upper abdominal operations. With pain, FRC and VC were 78 per cent and 37 per cent of control respectively. Following epidural analgesia, the values were 84 per cent and 55 per cent. These figures indicate the pain component in the post-operative reduction of these two lung capacities. This partial restoration may be of value in the prevention of post-operative pulmonary complications by avoiding closure of small airways during tidal breathing and by increasing the effectiveness of deep breathing and coughing in the removal of secretions and the reversal of atelectasis. PMID:1095163

  4. Patient-controlled analgesia: an appropriate method of pain control in children.

    PubMed

    McDonald, A J; Cooper, M G

    2001-01-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is an analgesic technique originally used in adults but now with an established role in paediatric practice. It is well tolerated in children as young as 5 years and has uses in postoperative pain as well as burns, oncology and palliative care. The use of background infusions is more frequent in children and improves efficacy; however, it may increase the occurrence of adverse effects such as nausea and respiratory depression. Monitoring involves measurement of respiratory rate, level of sedation and oxygen saturation. Efficacy is assessed by self-reporting, visual analogue scales, faces pain scales and usage patterns. This is optimally performed both at rest and on movement. The selection of opioid used in PCA is perhaps less critical than the appropriate selection of parameters such as bolus dose, lockout and background infusion rate. Moreover, opioid choice may be based on adverse effect profile rather than efficacy. The concept of PCA continues to be developed in children, with patient-controlled epidural analgesia, subcutaneous PCA and intranasal PCA being recent extensions of the method. There may also be a role for patient-controlled sedation. PCA, when used with adequate monitoring, is a well tolerated technique with high patient and staff acceptance. It can now be regarded as a standard for the delivery of postoperative analgesia in children aged >5 years. PMID:11354699

  5. Effect of parecoxib combined with thoracic epidural analgesia on pain after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiao-Min; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Ding, Ming; Liu, Qiu-A-Xue

    2016-01-01

    Background Thoracotomy results in severe postoperative pain potentially leading to chronic pain. We investigated the potential benefits of intravenous parecoxib on postoperative analgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). Methods Eighty-six patients undergoing thoracic surgery were randomized into two groups. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) was used until chest tubes were removed. Patients received parecoxib (group P) or placebo (group C) intravenously just 0.5 h before the operation and every 12 h after operation for 3 days. The intensity of pain was measured by using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and recorded at 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, 72 h after operation. The valid number of PCA, the side effects and the overall satisfaction to analgesic therapy in 72 h were recorded. Venous blood samples were taken before operation, the 1st and 3rd day after operation for plasma cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α level. The occurrence of residual pain was recorded using telephone questionnaire 2 and 12 months after surgery. Results Postoperative pain scores at rest and on coughing were significantly lower with the less valid count of PCA and greater patient satisfaction in group P (P<0.01). Adverse effect and the days fit for discharge were comparable between two groups. The cortisol levels in placebo group were higher than parecoxib group at T2. The level of ACTH both decreased in two groups after operation but it was significantly lower in group P than that in group C. There were no changes in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels before and after analgesia at T1 and T2 (P>0.05). The occurrence of residual pain were 25% and 51.2% separately in group P and C 3 months postoperatively (P<0.05). Conclusions Intravenous parecoxib in multimodal analgesia improves postoperative analgesia provided by TEA, relieves stress response after thoracotomy, and may restrain the development of chronic pain. PMID:27162662

  6. Dose-dependent attenuation of intravenous nalbuphine on epidural morphine-induced pruritus and analgesia after cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao-Kai; Chau, Siu-Wah; Shen, Ya-Chun; Sun, Yu-Ning; Tseng, Kuang-Yi; Long, Chen-Yu; Feng, Yu-Tung; Cheng, Kuang-I

    2014-05-01

    Epidural morphine in patient-controlled analgesia regimens controls postoperative pain well but easily induces pruritus and other epidural morphine-related side effects. With 90 pregnant American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status II females scheduled for elective cesarean delivery, the present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of patient-controlled antipruritus (PCP) use of intravenous nalbuphine-based regimens for attenuation of postoperative pruritus and related side effects in combination with epidural morphine patient-controlled analgesia with regard to the quality of postoperative pain management. Patients were randomly assigned to two nalbuphine groups (5 μg/kg/hour, Group N5 or 10 μg/kg/hour, Group N10) and bolus dose of 1.6 μg/kg for PCP or the control (normal saline) group. Comparable visual analog scale scores for rest pain at each measured time interval among the three groups demonstrated that adequate pain relief was offered; however, the cumulative dose of nalbuphine administered to the patients in Group N10 attenuated the analgesic effect of epidural morphine in moving pain at POh24 only. Fewer episodes and milder severity of pruritus were observed in patients in Groups N5 and N10 at all postoperative time intervals. Epidural morphine provided good postoperative pain relief but with incommodious side effects. In addition, intravenous nalbuphine not only attenuated the incidence of pruritus but also decreased total morphine consumption. In conclusion, intravenous administration of low-dose nalbuphine (5 μg/kg/hour) for PCP maintained analgesia produced by epidural morphine and offered low pruritus incidence. PMID:24751388

  7. Effect of magnesium infusion on thoracic epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Mitra, Koel; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Roy, Suddhadeb; Sarkar, Aniruddha; Kundu, Sudeshna; Goswami, Anupam; Sarkar, Uday Narayan; Sanki, Prakash; Mitra, Ritabrata

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Patients of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) having an ASA status III or more are likely to be further downgraded by surgery to critical levels of pulmonary function. Aim: To compare the efficacy of thoracic epidural block with (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination and (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination with adjunctive intravenous magnesium infusion for the relief of postoperative pain in patients undergoing LVRS. Methods: Patients were operated under general anesthesia. Thirty minutes before the anticipated completion of skin closure in both groups, (Group A and Group B) 7 ml of (0.125%) bupivacaine calculated as 1.5 ml/thoracic segment space for achieving analgesia in dermatomes of T4, T5, T6, T7, and T8 segments, along with fentanyl 50 μg (0.5 ml), was administered through the catheter, activating the epidural block, and the time was noted. Thereafter, in patients of Group A, magnesium sulfate injection 30 mg/kg i.v. bolus was followed by infusion of magnesium sulfate at 10 mg/kg/hr and continued up to 24 hours. Group B was treated as control. Results and Analysis: A significant increase in the mean and maximum duration of analgesia in Group A in comparison with Group B (P<0.05) was observed. Total epidural dose of fentanyl and bupivacaine required in Group A was significantly lower in comparison with Group B in 24 hours. Discussion: Requirement of total doses of local anesthetics along with opioids could be minimized by magnesium infusion; therefore, the further downgradation of patients of LVRS may be prevented. Conclusion: Intravenous magnesium can prolong opioid-induced analgesia while minimizing nausea, pruritus, and somnolence. PMID:21655018

  8. Patient-controlled oral analgesia versus nurse-controlled parenteral analgesia after caesarean section: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bonnal, A; Dehon, A; Nagot, N; Macioce, V; Nogue, E; Morau, E

    2016-05-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of early patient-controlled oral analgesia compared with parenteral analgesia in a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial of women undergoing elective caesarean section under regional anaesthesia. Seventy-seven women received multimodal paracetamol, ketoprofen and morphine analgesia. The woman having patient-controlled oral analgesia were administered four pillboxes on the postnatal ward containing tablets and instructions for self-medication, the first at 7 h after the spinal injection and then three more at 12-hourly intervals. Pain at rest and on movement was evaluated using an 11-point verbal rating scale at 2 h and then at 6-hourly intervals for 48 h. The pre-defined non-inferiority limit for the difference in mean pain scores (patient-controlled oral analgesia minus parenteral) was one. The one-sided 95% CI of the difference in mean pain scores was significantly lower than one at all time-points at rest and on movement, demonstrating non-inferiority of patient-controlled oral analgesia. More women used morphine in the patient-controlled oral analgesia group (22 (58%)) than in the parenteral group (9 (23%); p = 0.002). The median (IQR [range]) number of morphine doses in the patient-controlled oral analgesia group was 2 (1-3 [1-7]) compared with 1 (1-1 [1-2]); p = 0.006) in the parenteral group. Minor drug errors or omissions were identified in five (13%) women receiving patient-controlled oral analgesia. Pruritus was more frequent in the patient-controlled oral analgesia group (14 (37%) vs 6 (15%) respectively; p = 0.03), but no differences were noted for other adverse events and maternal satisfaction. After elective caesarean section, early patient-controlled oral analgesia is non-inferior to standard parenteral analgesia for pain management, and can be one of the steps of an enhanced recovery process. PMID:26931110

  9. Evaluation of use of electronic patient controlled analgesia pumps to improve patient safety in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; Mcintosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Yoon, Catherine; Luppi, Carol; Bane, Anne; Bates, David W

    2014-01-01

    Patient controlled analgesia (PCA) and Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) pumps are methods of pain control with complex smart infusion devices and are widely used in hospitals. Smart PCA/PCEA pumps can be programmed with the dose and rate of medications within pre-set ranges. However, adverse effects have been reported associated with these pumps' use. In this paper, we describe a prevalence observational study where observers used an electronic data collection tool to record pump settings and medications with PCA pumps, corresponding medication orders to identify errors. The results showed that there were many labeling and tubing change tag errors, which were a violation of hospital policy. A few potential harmful medication errors were identified but no critical errors. Study results suggest the importance of a standard process of PCA pump use. Next steps include implementing a safety bundle for improving PCA practice to support safe and effective pain management. PMID:24943538

  10. The role of epidural anesthesia and analgesia in postoperative outcome.

    PubMed

    Grass, J A

    2000-06-01

    There is increasing evidence to support the hypothesis that epidural anesthesia and analgesia (EAA) can improve surgical outcome by reducing postoperative morbidity and hastening recovery. Likely benefits include decreased incidence of cardiac complications in high-risk patients; lower incidence of pulmonary complications, specifically pneumonia, atelectasis, and hypoxemia in patients at risk for pulmonary complications; lower incidence of vascular graft occlusion after lower extremity revascularization; lower incidence of DVT and pulmonary embolus; suppression of the neuroendocrine stress response; and earlier return of gastrointestinal function. Nonetheless, large multicenter prospective randomized studies are required to more definitively assess the impact of EAA on morbidity and mortality, ICU time, length of hospitalization, and cost of healthcare. PMID:10935017

  11. Postoperative urinary retention in a dog following morphine with bupivacaine epidural analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Herperger, L J

    1998-01-01

    Urinary retention, overflow incontinence, and subsequent detrusor atony were observed following surgery in which a morphine with bupivacaine epidural injection was used for perioperative analgesia. The premise that the urinary retention may have been due to the effects of the morphine component of the epidural is discussed, along with other possible causes. PMID:9789679

  12. Epidural hematoma after thoracic epidural analgesia in a patient treated with ketorolac, mefenamic acid, and naftazone: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Dae Geun; Kim, Seok-Kon; Kim, Juri

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male undergoing thoracotomy and bleeding control received a preoperative thoracic epidural for postoperative analgesia. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred and urgent magnetic resonance imaging showed massive anterior epidural hematoma. During laminectomy and decompression, platelet dysfunction was diagnosed and preoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs medications were supposed to the cause of platelet dysfunction. After infusion of ten units of platelet concentrate, coagulopathy was improved. We should be more careful to drugs with antiplatelet effect when using regional analgesia. PMID:24729848

  13. Epidural analgesia is superior to local infiltration analgesia in children with cerebral palsy undergoing unilateral hip reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kjeldgaard Pedersen, Line; Nikolajsen, Lone; Rahbek, Ole; Uldall Duch, Birgitte; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne

    2016-04-01

    Background and purpose - Treatment of postoperative pain in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is a major challenge. We investigated the effect of epidural analgesia, high-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA), and an approximated placebo control on early postoperative pain in children with CP who were undergoing unilateral hip reconstruction. Patients and methods - Between 2009 and 2014, we included 18 children with CP. The first part of the study was a randomized double-blind trial with allocation to either LIA or placebo for postoperative pain management, in addition to intravenous or oral analgesia. In the second part of the study, the children were consecutively included for postoperative pain management with epidural analgesia in addition to intravenous or oral analgesia. The primary outcome was postoperative pain 4 h postoperatively using 2 pain assessment tools (r-FLACC and VAS-OBS) ranging from 0 to 10. The secondary outcome was opioid consumption over the 21-h study period. Results - The mean level of pain 4 h postoperatively was lower in the epidural group (r-FLACC: 0.7; VAS-OBS: 0.6) than in both the LIA group (r-FLACC: 4.8, p = 0.01; VAS-OBS: 5.2, p = 0.02) and the placebo group (r-FLACC: 5.2, p = 0.01; VAS-OBS: 6.5, p < 0.001). Corrected for body weight, the mean opioid consumption was lower in the epidural group than in the LIA group and the placebo group (both p < 0.001). Interpretation - Epidural analgesia is superior to local infiltration analgesia for early postoperative pain management in children with cerebral palsy who undergo unilateral hip reconstruction. PMID:26541479

  14. Epidural analgesia is superior to local infiltration analgesia in children with cerebral palsy undergoing unilateral hip reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kjeldgaard Pedersen, Line; Nikolajsen, Lone; Rahbek, Ole; Uldall Duch, Birgitte; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Treatment of postoperative pain in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is a major challenge. We investigated the effect of epidural analgesia, high-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA), and an approximated placebo control on early postoperative pain in children with CP who were undergoing unilateral hip reconstruction. Patients and methods — Between 2009 and 2014, we included 18 children with CP. The first part of the study was a randomized double-blind trial with allocation to either LIA or placebo for postoperative pain management, in addition to intravenous or oral analgesia. In the second part of the study, the children were consecutively included for postoperative pain management with epidural analgesia in addition to intravenous or oral analgesia. The primary outcome was postoperative pain 4 h postoperatively using 2 pain assessment tools (r-FLACC and VAS-OBS) ranging from 0 to 10. The secondary outcome was opioid consumption over the 21-h study period. Results — The mean level of pain 4 h postoperatively was lower in the epidural group (r-FLACC: 0.7; VAS-OBS: 0.6) than in both the LIA group (r-FLACC: 4.8, p = 0.01; VAS-OBS: 5.2, p = 0.02) and the placebo group (r-FLACC: 5.2, p = 0.01; VAS-OBS: 6.5, p < 0.001). Corrected for body weight, the mean opioid consumption was lower in the epidural group than in the LIA group and the placebo group (both p < 0.001). Interpretation — Epidural analgesia is superior to local infiltration analgesia for early postoperative pain management in children with cerebral palsy who undergo unilateral hip reconstruction. PMID:26541479

  15. The effectiveness of patient-controlled epidural analgesia with ropivacaine 0.165% with fentanyl 2.0 miroc g/ml or levobupivacaine 0.125% with fentanyl 2.0 micro g/ml as a method of postoperative analgesia after major orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Misiran, Karis Bin; Yahaya, Lenie Suryani Binti

    2013-02-01

    This prospective randomized single-blinded study was conducted to determine whether there were differences in consumption, demand dosing and postoperative analgesia quality between PCEA using ropivacaine and levobupivacaine. Seventy patients with ASA classification I and II aged 18 to 80 years old scheduled for elective total knee replacement or total hip replacement were studied. All patients received CSE and then were randomly allocated to receive either ropivacaine 0.165% (Group A) or levobupivacaine 0.125% (Group B) both added with fentanyl 2.0 mcro g/ml via epidural route. PCEA regime was offered for 48 hours with additional standard orthopaedic practice of oral analgesia (etoricoxib 120 mg OD and paracetamol 1.0 gm QID) on the second postoperative day. Basal infusion of PCEA was at 3.0 ml/hour and discontinued after 24 hours following started of PCEA. The consumption of local anaesthetics used within the first 24 hours (basal + demand) and 48 hours (total basal + total demand) were recorded. The VAS pain score, sedation score, side effects and vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate) were also recorded every four hours for 48 hours. This study showed that the total volume of drug used was significantly higher in Group A (163.31+/- 29.01 ml) than Group B (142.69 +/- 30.93ml) (p<0. 01). The mean dose of Group A for the first 48 hours after surgery was 251.43 +/- 70.02mg and was significantly greater than the mean dose of Group B (178.91 +/-42.33 mg) (p<0.01). The numbers of PCEA boluses delivered (D) and PCEA attempts (A) were higher in the Group A (22.37 +/-7.32 and 27.66 +/- 9.12) in contrast to Group B (17.63 +/- 7.71 and 24.40 +/- 11.51) but the differences were not statistically significant. The ratio D/A showed significantly higher in Group A (0.83 +/- 0.13) than Group B (0.74 +/- 0.15) (p<0. 02). The VAS pain score was similar for both groups. One patient in Group B had vomiting and there was no sedation, hypotension, pruritus or

  16. Fentanyl versus tramadol with levobupivacaine for combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Sharma, Sujata; Kumari, Pratibha; Sudha; Bali, Kusum

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neuraxial labor analgesia using new local anesthetics such as levobupivacaine has become very popular by virtue of the safety and lesser motor blockade caused by these agents. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) has become the preferred method for labor analgesia as it combines benefits of both spinal analgesia and flexibility of the epidural catheter. Adding opioids to local anesthetic drugs provide rapid onset and prolonged analgesia but may be associated with several maternal and fetal adverse effects. The purpose of this study is to compare fentanyl and tramadol used in CSEA in terms of duration of analgesia and frequency of the adverse fetomaternal outcome. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 primiparas with a singleton pregnancy in active labor were given CSEA after randomly allocating them in two groups of 30 each. Group I received intrathecal 2.5 mg levobupivacaine + 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top ups of 20 ml 0.125% solution of the same combination. Group II received 25 mg tramadol instead of fentanyl. Epidural top ups were given when parturient complained of two painful contractions (visual analogue scale ≥ 4). Data collected were demographic profile of the patients, analgesic qualities, side- effects and the fetomaternal outcome. Results: Patients in Group II had significantly prolonged analgesia (145 ± 9 minutes) than in Group I (95 ± 7 minutes). Patients receiving fentanyl showed rapid onset of analgesia, but there were more incidence of side-effects like shivering, pruritus, transient fetal bradycardia, hypotension, nausea and vomiting. Only side-effect in the tramadol group was nausea and vomiting. During labor, maternal satisfaction was excellent. Conclusions: Adding tramadol to local anesthetic provides prolonged analgesia with minimal side effects. Fentanyl, when used as adjuvant to local anesthetic, has a rapid onset of analgesia but has certain fetomaternal side-effects. PMID:26240543

  17. The knowledge and attitudes of nonanesthesia nurses regarding postoperative epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Sandie, C L; Heindel, L J

    1999-10-01

    The provision of epidural analgesia for postoperative pain control offers many patient benefits and has become commonplace on many nursing units. Since nurses are responsible for the day-to-day management of patients receiving epidural analgesia, their knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding this technique are pivotal to its success. Therefore, the purpose of the present descriptive study was to examine the knowledge base, attitudes, and clinical practice of registered nurses (N = 85) regarding postoperative epidural analgesia as managed by an acute pain service (APS). Information was obtained from a survey distributed via a convenience sample to all nurses working on 6 units in a large military teaching facility. We developed the "Epidural Knowledge and Attitude Survey" using the nursing literature on epidural analgesia. The survey consisted of a demographics section, true/false (T/F) questions, multiple choice (M/C) questions, an attitude section, and a comment section. These sections addressed the nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and practices in regard to epidural pharmacology, management, and adverse effects, as well as their general satisfaction with the APS of their facility. Data were analyzed statistically using means, standard deviations, percentages, forward step-wise linear regression, the Fisher-Irwin (exact) test, the chi 2 test, and analysis of variance with Bonferroni multiple comparisons. A P value of < .05 was considered statistically significant. Results of the study demonstrated that the respondents attained a 78% overall correct score on T/F questions and 38% on M/C questions. The attitude section illustrated that 73% of nurses had "positive" attitudes toward epidural analgesia. Correct management of patients receiving epidural analgesia was being practiced by 77% of nurses. The satisfaction with the APS at this facility was 32% "very satisfied" and 62% "somewhat satisfied." The demographic characteristics that best predicted a higher score

  18. A survey on informed consent process for epidural analgesia in labor pain in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nan-Ju; Sim, Jiyeon; Lee, Mi Soon; Han, Sun Sook; Lee, Hwa Mi

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a legal obligation to explain the procedure and use of epidural analgesia in labor primarily due to the possibility of potential risks and associated complications. The present study details on the survey carried out to ascertain the current status of obtaining informed consent (IC) for explaining the epidural analgesia in labor. Methods The present study is based on a survey through a telephone questionnaire that covered all the hospitals in Korea where the anesthesiologists' belonged to and are registered with Korean Society of Anesthesiologists. The questionnaire included questions pertaining to administration of epidural analgesia to a parturient, information on different steps of obtaining an IC, whether patient status was evaluated, when the consent was obtained, and the reasons behind, if the consent had not being given. Results A total of 1,434 respondents took part in the survey, with a response rate of 97% (1,434/1,467). One hundred seventy-four hospitals had conducted epidural analgesia on the parturient. The overall rate of obtaining IC for epidural analgesia during labor was 85%, of which only 13% was conducted by anesthesiologists. The rate of evaluating preoperative patient status was 74%, of which 45% was conducted by anesthesiologists. Almost all of the consent was obtained prior to the procedure. Conclusions The rate of obtaining IC for epidural analgesia in labor is relatively high (85%) in Korea. However, it is necessary to discuss the content of the consent and the procedure followed for obtaining IC during the rapid progress of labor. PMID:20651996

  19. Cervical epidural analgesia in a case of oral cancer undergoing reconstructive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mulimani, Sridevi M; Talikoti, Dayanand G

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of successful administration of cervical epidural analgesia in combination with general anaesthesia for a 50-year-old male patient of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with carcinoma of tongue undergoing reconstructive surgery. Cervical epidural analgesia was provided with intermittent doses of 0.25% bupivacaine intraoperatively in addition to general anaesthesia and intermittent doses of 0.125% bupivacaine with tramodol 1 mg/kg postoperatively. It provides marked decrease in requirement of anaesthetic drugs, rapid recovery, reduced intensive care unit stay, and less pulmonary complications. PMID:22174475

  20. Ethnic differences in the use of intrapartum epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obstetric epidural analgesia (EA) is widely applied, but studies have reported that its use may be less extensive among immigrant women or those from minority ethnic groups. Our aim was to examine whether this was the case in our geographic area, which contains an important immigrant population, and if so, to describe the different components of this phenomenon. Methods Cross-sectional observational study. Setting: general acute care hospital, located in Marbella, southern Spain. Analysis of computer records of deliveries performed from 2004 to 2010. Comparison of characteristics of deliveries according to the mothers’ geographic origins and of vaginal deliveries noting whether EA was received, using univariate and bivariate statistical analysis and multiple logistic regression (MLR). Results A total of 21,034 deliveries were recorded, and 37.4% of these corresponded to immigrant women. EA was provided to 61.1% of the Spanish women and to 51.5% of the immigrants, with important variations according to geographic origin: over 52% of women from other European countries and South America received EA, compared with around 45% of the African women and 37% of the Asian women. These differences persisted in the MLR model after adjusting for the mother's age, type of labor initiation, the weight of the neonate and for single or multiple gestation. With the Spanish patients as the reference category, all the other countries of origin presented lower probabilities of EA use. This was particularly apparent for the patients from Asia (OR 0.38; 95%CI 0.31-0.46), Morocco (OR 0.49; 95%CI 0.43-0.54) and other Africa (OR 0.55; 95%CI 0.37-0.81). Conclusions We observed a different use of EA in vaginal deliveries, according to the geographic origin of the women. The explanation for this involves a complex set of factors, depending both on the patient and on the healthcare staff. PMID:22818255

  1. Bilateral interpleural versus lumbar epidural bupivacaine-morphine analgesia for upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Demian, Atef D; Wahba, Ashraf M; Atia, Emad M; Hussein, Sami H

    2003-10-01

    This randomized study was designed to compare the effectiveness of bilateral interpleural analgesia with lumbar epidural analgesia, on postoperative pain relief in upper abdominal surgery. The studied patients were randomely allocated into either interpleural group "IP" (n = 15) or epidural group "EP" (n = 15). In "IP" group, preanesthetic bilateral interpleural block was done using a mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (0.8 mg/kg) and 2 mg morphine diluted to 50 ml saline for each side. In "EP" group, the same mixture-diluted in 20 ml saline-was injected in the epidural space (L2-3). The general anesthetic technique was the same in both groups. Hemodynamic, gasometric, verbal pain score (VPS) values and complications were compared in both techniques. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) readings were in the accepted normal range in the perioperative period although significant lower readings were detected in "EP" group. No significant differences were displayed in blood gasometric variables between the two groups. There were considerable level of analgesia in both groups in the postoperative period although "EP" analgesia was superior to "IP". More pain free patients (9 versus 4) and significant lower consumption of nalbuphine were detected in "EP" group. The results of this study indicate that bilateral "IP" analgesia may offer a satisfactory analgesia for upper abdominal surgery when the use of other analgesic techniques may be contraindicated. PMID:14740589

  2. Maternal and foetal outcome after epidural labour analgesia in high-risk pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Sukhen; Jain, Kajal; Bhardwaj, Neerja; Jain, Vanita; Samanta, Sujay; Saha, Rini

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Low concentration local anaesthetic improves uteroplacental blood flow in antenatal period and during labour in preeclampsia. We compared neonatal outcome after epidural ropivacaine plus fentanyl with intramuscular tramadol analgesia during labour in high-risk parturients with intrauterine growth restriction of mixed aetiology. Methods: Forty-eight parturients with sonographic evidence of foetal weight <1.5 kg were enrolled in this non-randomized, double-blinded prospective study. The epidural (E) group received 0.15% ropivacaine 10 ml with 30 μg fentanyl incremental bolus followed by 7–15 ml 0.1% ropivacaine with 2 μg/ml fentanyl in continuous infusion titrated until visual analogue scale was three. Tramadol (T) group received intramuscular tramadol 1 mg/kg as bolus as well as maintenance 4–6 hourly. Neonatal outcomes were measured with cord blood base deficit, pH, ionised calcium, sugar and Apgar score after delivery. Maternal satisfaction was also assessed by four point subjective score. Results: Baseline maternal demographics and neonatal birth weight were comparable. Neonatal cord blood pH, base deficit, sugar, and ionised calcium levels were significantly improved in the epidural group in comparison to the tramadol group. Maternal satisfaction (P = 0.0001) regarding labour analgesia in epidural group was expressed as excellent by 48%, good by 52% whereas it was fair in 75% and poor in 25% in the tramadol group. Better haemodynamic and pain scores were reported in the epidural group. Conclusion: Epidural labour analgesia with low concentration local anaesthetic is associated with less neonatal cord blood acidaemia, better sugar and ionised calcium levels. The analgesic efficacy and maternal satisfaction are also better with epidural labour analgesia. PMID:27013750

  3. Efficacy of single dose epidural morphine versus intermittent low-dose epidural morphine along with bupivacaine for postcaesarean section analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Kiran; Agarwal, Navneet; Agrawal, V. K.; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Mahender

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obstetric anesthesia presents a challenge to the anesthesiologist. The effective pain management allows the partu-rient adequate degree of comfort and promotes physical reco-very and a sense of well being. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy and side effects of 1.20 mg single-dose epidural morphine (Group 1) versus intermittent 12 hourly epidural morphine (0.5 mg) with bupivacaine (Group2) for postoperative analgesia in lower segment caesarean section cases. Results: Each group consisted of 36 patients. Demographic characteristics of two groups were comparable and differences among them were not statistically significant. Mean duration of analgesia was significantly longer in group one patients (16.5±2.5h) in comparison to group two patients (11.5±1.5h). Mean highest visual analog scales (VAS scale) was significantly lower (3.2±0.9) in group one patients in comparison of group two (6.7±0.8) patients. Only 43% patient in group one required supplementary perenteral analgesic (Paracetamole/Diclofenac) and 71% required epidural morphine/bupivacaine in group two. Mean number of supplementary perenteral analgesic required in group one was 0.7 and it was 1.8 in group two. There was no significant difference in nausea, vomiting, itching, and pruritis in two groups of patients. Conclusion: Our study showed that the use of single dose epidural morphine is associated with lower pain scores at rest and movement when compared to intermittent epidural morphine with bupivacaine in postcaesarean section analgesia. PMID:25885497

  4. Comparison of epidural oxycodone and epidural morphine for post-caesarean section analgesia: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Ban Leong; Kwok, Sarah Carol; Mathur, Deepak; Ithnin, Farida; Newton-Dunn, Clare; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sultana, Rehena; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Epidural morphine after caesarean section may cause moderate to severe pruritus in women. Epidural oxycodone has been shown in non-obstetric trials to reduce pruritus when compared to morphine. We hypothesised that epidural oxycodone may reduce pruritus after caesarean section. Methods: A randomised controlled trial was conducted in pregnant women at term who underwent caesarean section with combined spinal-epidural technique initiated with intrathecal fentanyl 15 μg. Women received either epidural morphine 3 mg or epidural oxycodone 3 mg via the epidural catheter after delivery. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 24 h after caesarean section. The secondary outcomes were the pruritus scores, treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), pain scores and maternal satisfaction. Results: One hundred women were randomised (group oxycodone O = 50, morphine M = 50). There was no difference between Group O and M in the incidence of pruritus (n [%] 28 [56%] vs. 31 [62%], P = 0.68) and the worst pruritus scores (mean [standard deviation] 2.6 (2.8) vs. 3.3 [3.1], P = 0.23), respectively. Both groups had similar pain scores at rest (2.7 [2.3] vs. 2.0 [2.7], P = 0.16) and sitting up (5.0 [2.3] vs. 4.6 [2.4], P = 0.38) at 24 h. Pruritus scores were lower at 4–8, 8–12 and 12–24 h with oxycodone, but pain scores were higher. Both groups had a similar need for treatment of PONV and maternal satisfaction with analgesia. Conclusion: There was no difference in the incidence of pruritus at 24 h between epidural oxycodone and morphine. However, pruritus scores were lower with oxycodone between 4 and 24 h after surgery with higher pain scores in the same period. PMID:27053782

  5. Eisenmenger's syndrome in pregnancy: Use of epidural anesthesia and analgesia for elective cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Lipi; Pani, Nibedita; Samantaray, Ramesh; Nayak, Kalyani

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a pregnant patient with a large ventricular septal defect (VSD) and pulmonary artery hypertension, presented to the hospital and underwent elective cesarean section under epidural anesthesia and postoperative analgesia. The procedure was uneventful till the patient was discharged on 10th day. PMID:25190960

  6. Eisenmenger's syndrome in pregnancy: Use of epidural anesthesia and analgesia for elective cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Lipi; Pani, Nibedita; Samantaray, Ramesh; Nayak, Kalyani

    2014-07-01

    We describe a case of a pregnant patient with a large ventricular septal defect (VSD) and pulmonary artery hypertension, presented to the hospital and underwent elective cesarean section under epidural anesthesia and postoperative analgesia. The procedure was uneventful till the patient was discharged on 10(th) day. PMID:25190960

  7. Epidural anesthesia and postoperatory analgesia with alpha-2 adrenergic agonists and lidocaine for ovariohysterectomy in bitches

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Virgínia H.; Carregaro, Adriano B.; Lopes, Carlize; Gehrcke, Martielo I.; Muller, Daniel C.M.; Garlet, Clarissa D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the viability and cardiorespiratory effects of the association of epidural alpha-2 adrenergic agonists and lidocaine for ovariohysterectomy (OH) in bitches. Forty-two bitches were spayed under epidural anesthesia with 2.5 mg/kg body weight (BW) of 1% lidocaine with adrenaline (CON) or in association with 0.25 mg/kg BW of xylazine (XYL), 10 μg/kg BW of romifidine (ROM), 30 μg/kg BW of detomidine (DET), 2 μg/kg BW of dexmedetomidine (DEX), or 5 μg/kg BW of clonidine (CLO). Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (fR) and arterial pressures were monitored immediately before and every 10 min after the epidural procedure. Blood gas and pH analysis were done before, and at 30 and 60 min after the epidural procedure. Animals were submitted to isoflurane anesthesia if they presented a slightest sign of discomfort during the procedure. Time of sensory epidural block and postoperative analgesia were evaluated. All animals in CON and DEX, 5 animals in ROM and CLO, 4 animals in XYL, and 3 in DET required supplementary isoflurane. All groups, except CLO, showed a decrease in HR. There was an increase in arterial pressures in all groups. Postoperative analgesia lasted the longest in XYL. None of the protocols were totally efficient to perform the complete procedure of OH; however, xylazine provided longer postoperative analgesia than the others. PMID:23277701

  8. A prospective cohort study of intrathecal versus epidural analgesia for patients undergoing hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Kasivisvanathan, Ramanathan; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Prout, Jeremy; Clevenger, Ben; Fusai, Giuseppe K; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective observational study was to compare peri/post-operative outcomes of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) versus intrathecal morphine and fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia (ITM+fPCA) for patients undergoing a hepatic resection (HR). Method Patients undergoing elective, one-stage, open HR for benign and malignant liver lesions, receiving central neuraxial block as part of the anaesthetic, in a high-volume hepato-pancreato-biliary unit, were included in the study. The primary outcome measure was post-operative length of stay (LoS). Results A total of 73 patients (36 TEA and 37 ITM+fPCA) were included in the study. The median (IQR) post-operative LoS was 13 (11–15) and 11 (9–13) days in the TEA and ITM+fPCA groups, respectively (P = 0.011). There was significantly lower median intra-operative central venous pressure (P < 0.001) and blood loss (P = 0.017) in the TEA group, and a significant reduction in the time until mobilization (P < 0.001), post-operative intra-venous fluid/vasopressor requirement (P < 0.001/P = 0.004) in the ITM+fPCA group. Pain scores were lower at a clinically significant level 12 h post-operatively in the TEA group (P < 0.001); otherwise there were no differences out to day five. There were no differences in quality of recovery or postoperative morbidity/mortality between the two groups. Conclusion ITM+fPCA provides acceptable post-operative outcomes for HR, but may also increase the incidence of intra-operative blood loss in comparison to TEA. PMID:24467320

  9. In patients undergoing thoracic surgery is paravertebral block as effective as epidural analgesia for pain management?

    PubMed

    Scarci, Marco; Joshi, Abhishek; Attia, Rizwan

    2010-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: in patients undergoing thoracic surgery is paravertebral block (PVB) as effective as epidural analgesia for pain management? Altogether >184 papers were found using the reported search, seven of which represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. All studies agreed that PVB is at least as effective as epidural analgesia for pain control post-thoracotomy. In one paper, the visual analogue pain score (VAS) at rest and on cough was significantly lower in the paravertebral group (P=0.02 and 0.0001, respectively). Pulmonary function, as assessed by peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), was significantly better preserved in the paravertebral group. The lowest PEFR as a fraction of preoperative control was 0.73 in the paravertebral group in contrast with 0.54 in the epidural group (P<0.004). Oximetric recordings were better in the paravertebral group (96%) compared to the epidural group (95%) (P=0.0001). Another article reported that statistically significant differences (forced vital capacity 46.8% for PVB and 39.3% for epidural group P<0.05; forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) 48.4% in PVB group and 35.9% in epidural group, P<0.05) were reached in day 2 and continued until day 3. Plasma concentrations of cortisol, as marker of postoperative stress, increased markedly in both groups, but the increment was statistically different in favour of the paravertebral group (P=0.003). Epidural block was associated with frequent side-effects [urinary retention (42%), nausea (22%), itching (22%) and hypotension (3%) and, rarely, respiratory depression (0.07%)]. Additionally, it prolonged operative time and was associated with technical failure or displacement (8%). Epidurals were also related to a higher complication rate (atelectasis/pneumonia) compared to the PVB (2 vs. 0). PVB was found to be of equal efficacy to epidural anaesthesia, but with a

  10. Does High Thoracic Epidural Analgesia with Levobupivacaine Preserve Myocardium? A Prospective Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Serife Gokbulut; Karadeniz, Umit; Ozturk, Burcin; Yavas, Soner; Biricik, Dilan; Saydam, Gul Sevim; Erdemli, Ozcan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Our study aimed to compare HTEA and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in patients undergoing coronary bypass graft surgery (CABG), based on haemodynamic parameters and myocardial functions. Materials and Methods. The study included 34 patients that were scheduled for elective CABG, who were randomly divided into 2 groups. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with total intravenous anesthesia in both groups while intravenous PCA with morphine was administered in Group 1 and infusion of levobupivacaine was administered from the beginning of the anesthesia in Group 2 by thoracic epidural catheter. Blood samples were obtained presurgically, at 6 and 24 hours after surgery for troponin I, creatinine kinase-MB (CK-MB), total antioxidant capacity, and malondialdehyde. Postoperative pain was evaluated every 4 hours until 24 hours via VAS. Results. There were significant differences in troponin I or CK-MB values between the groups at postsurgery 6 h and 24 h. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure in Group 1 were significantly higher than in Group 2 at all measurements. Cardiac index in Group 2 was significantly higher than in Group 1 at all measurements. Conclusion. Patients that underwent CABG and received HTEA had better myocardial function and perioperative haemodynamic parameters than those who did not receive HTEA. PMID:25918718

  11. The efficacy and safety of low dose epidural butorphanol on postoperative analgesia following cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, K; Rahman, T R; Singh, S N; Bhattarai, B; Basnet, N; Khaniya, S

    2008-01-01

    Butorphanol is considered an effective and safe analgesic after cesarean delivery but is associated with profound dose-dependent sedation. Somnolence may cause hindrance in early mother-baby interaction. This study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy and to monitor side-effects of low doses (0.5 mg and 0.75 mg) of epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine compared to bupivacaine alone in parturients following cesarean delivery. One hundred and twenty parturients (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2) undergoing cesarean delivery were allocated into three groups: group 1 received epidural 0.125% bupivacaine while group 2 and 3 received an additional 0.5 mg and 0.75 mg butorphanol respectively. A combined spinal, epidural technique was used. Spinal anaesthesia was used for surgery. The epidural route was used for postoperative analgesia with the study drug. Onset, duration and quality of analgesia, lowest visual analogue scales (VAS) score, and side effects were noted. The onset and duration of analgesia in group 2 (4.1+/-2.6 min and 202.4+/-62.8 min) and group 3 (4.0+/-2.5 min and 192.3+/-69.1 min) were significantly different (P<0.01) from group 1 (6.6+/-2.7 min and 145.7+/-89.6 min). The quality of analgesia in terms of time to first independent movement and satisfactory VAS were statistically better (P<0.01) in group 2 (3.9+/-0.3 hour and 8.1+/-0.1 mm) and group 3 (3.8+/-0.4 hour and 8.1+/-0.9 mm) than in group 1 (5.2+/-0.4 hour and 6.3+/-1.3 mm). The incidence of sedation was 5% in all the three groups. A lower dose of epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine produces a significantly earlier onset, longer duration and better quality of analgesia than bupivacaine does. PMID:18709032

  12. [About safety parameters for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) devices].

    PubMed

    Sardin, B; Lecour, N; Terrier, G; Grouille, D

    2012-10-01

    During the course of preparation of an opioid prescription, the nurse in charge became aware that the patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) syringe driver did not permit programming for the delivery as required: a maximum bolus number (Bmax) was indicated but only a maximum cumulative dose (Dcmax) could be programmed. The prescription dose criteria were consistent with the guidelines of the French societies of palliative care, anesthesiology, and reanimation (Société française d'accompagnement et de soins palliatifs [Sfap] and Société française d'anesthésie réanimation [Sfar]). A Dcmax dose simulation was programmed and used in order to test this problem. This highlighted the following four defects: bolus delivery is not controlled, leading to potential overdose. When Dcmax is reached, the continuous flow stops, triggering an end dose failure and a new programming step is needed to restart infusion, increasing the risk of programming errors. Human intervention is required to stop the alarm, identify and solve the problem. Finally, Dcmax leads to random dose delivery in place of the predictability of dose delivery expected for opioid administration. On the other hand, Bmax is a limited dose, administered only as a bolus and regulated by the lockout interval. When the Bmax dose is reached, no alarm is triggered, the basal flow continues, but no additional doses can be delivered. Bmax and Dcmax systems are not interchangeable. No comparative study between Bmax and Dcmax could be found, and Sfap and Sfar guidelines are not precise and did not take into consideration the safety aspects of dose delivery however some facts tend to prefer that Bmax. Most of the syringe driver devices are configured for the Dcmax, but not all of them, and the physician is often forced to use the parameter of the available device restricting the choice between Bmax and Dcmax. This is not justified, whether by scientific evidence, industrial, manufacturing or commercial standards. It

  13. The effects of epidural analgesia on the course and outcome of labour.

    PubMed

    Finster, M; Santos, A C

    1998-09-01

    The potential effects of epidural analgesia on the progress and outcome of labour have been the subject of lasting controversy. Retrospective reviews indicate that epidurals are associated with longer labours and/or an increase in the incidence of instrumental or operative delivery. Similar results were obtained in non-randomized prospective studies. None of them established a causal relationship, because without randomization the selection bias cannot be ruled out. Other factors, such as premature rupture of membranes and maternal socioeconomic status, may affect the outcome of labour. It was also reported that introduction of the on-demand epidural service did not increase the primary caesarean section rate. The few prospective randomized studies are contradictory and not very reliable owing to small patient populations and high cross-over rates. There is, however, unanimity among the authors regarding the superiority of pain relief provided by epidural blocks over systemically administered opioids. PMID:10023433

  14. Suspected epidural morphine analgesia induced chronic urinary and bowel dysfunction in a cat.

    PubMed

    Song, Rachel B; Cross, Johnny R; Golder, Francis J; Callan, Mary Beth

    2011-08-01

    A 12-year-old male castrated domestic shorthair developed chronic urinary retention, constipation and a decreased perineal reflex following a single lumbo-sacral epidural injection of morphine during general anesthesia. Similar adverse effects have been reported in humans following epidural analgesia, but this is the first reported case of both urinary and bowel dysfunction in a cat purportedly from an epidural. The cat was medically managed with manual bladder expressions, intermittent enemas, and various medications including bethanechol, cisapride and stool softeners. The cat continues to have long-term neurologic dysfunction 15 months post-onset. This case report describes a rare but serious potential risk of lumbo-sacral epidural injections in cats. PMID:21571562

  15. [Questionnaires on patient-controlled analgesia to the nursing staff in the surgical ward].

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Satoh, M; Suzuki, H; Shimohata, K; Fukuda, H; Seo, N

    2001-10-01

    Thirty-one nurses in the surgical ward engaged in delivering postoperative analgesia using patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) were asked to complete questionnaires on postoperative analgesia and PCA. Ninety-seven per cent of respondents agreed that the postoperative analgesia is beneficial for postoperative recovery, and answered that the desirable goal in postoperative analgesia is "no pain at rest". Not only "pain at movement" or "pain on coughing", but also "decreased conscious level while analgesia is achieved" were selected as undesirable conditions during postoperative course. Although no one had learned the concept of PCA in their nursing schools, 94 per cent of respondents approved PCA as a method for postoperative analgesia. Seventy seven per cent responded that PCA is effective in the pain relief during position change, pulmonary physiotherapy and induced early ambulation. In addition, 65 per cent of respondents chose PCA as a method for postoperative analgesia when they receive thoraco-abdominal surgery. On the other hand, some problems on pain management using PCA, such as taking care of patients' ambulation with carrying a PCA pump, extra time for instruction of PCA and extra support for patients' psychological state were listed. In conclusion, these results suggest that PCA is accepted as an excellent method for postoperative analgesia among our nurses in the surgical ward, and education in postoperative pain management including PCA is required in nursing school as well as after graduation. PMID:11712354

  16. Focused review: ropivacaine versus bupivacaine for epidural labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Beilin, Yaakov; Halpern, Stephen

    2010-08-01

    Neuraxial analgesia is frequently administered to women in labor. For many years, bupivacaine has been used because of its long duration of action, lack of excessive motor block, and minimal fetal and neonatal effects. However, bupivacaine is one of the most cardiotoxic local anesthetics in current use and motor block is still a problem. Many local anesthetics such as bupivacaine exist in 2 forms, levorotatory and dextrorotatory. Ropivacaine, an amide local anesthetic produced in the pure levorotatory form addresses some of the concerns related to bupivacaine. In this article, we present the literature comparing ropivacaine and bupivacaine to determine whether there is an advantage to using one of these local anesthetics for labor analgesia. We found that there is no advantage to the routine use of ropivacaine for labor analgesia. PMID:20529986

  17. [The characteristics of epidural analgesia during the removal of lumbar intervertebral disk hernias].

    PubMed

    Arestov, O G; Solenkova, A V; Lubnin, A Iu; Shevelev, I N; Konovalov, N A

    2000-01-01

    Epidural analgesia (EA) was used in 29 patients undergoing surgical removal of lumbar discal hernia. Marcain EA with controlled medicinal sleep and non-assisted breathing allowed to perform the whole operation in 27 patients. EA may be ineffective in combination of sequestrated disk hernia with scarry adhesive process. The technique of the operation demands a single use of the anesthetic drug which is potent enough to make blockade throughout the operation up to the end. PMID:10738758

  18. Efficacy of the methoxyflurane as bridging analgesia during epidural placement in laboring parturient

    PubMed Central

    Anwari, Jamil S.; Khalil, Laith; Terkawi, Abdullah S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Establishing an epidural in an agitated laboring woman can be challenging. The ideal pain control technique in such a situation should be effective, fast acting, and short lived. We assessed the efficacy of inhalational methoxyflurane (Penthrox™) analgesia as bridging analgesia for epidural placement. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four laboring women who requested epidural analgesia with pain score of ≥7 enrolled in an observational study, 56 of which completed the study. The parturients were instructed to use the device prior to the onset of uterine contraction pain and to stop at the peak of uterine contraction, repeatedly until epidural has been successfully placed. After each (methoxyflurane inhalation-uterine contraction) cycle, pain, Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS), nausea and vomiting were evaluated. Maternal and fetal hemodynamics and parturient satisfaction were recorded. Results: The mean baseline pain score was 8.2 ± 1.5 which was reduced to 6.2 ± 2.0 after the first inhalation with a mean difference of 2.0 ± 1.1 (95% confidence interval 1.7-2.3, P < 0.0001), and continued to decrease significantly over the study period (P < 0.0001). The RASS scores continuously improved after each cycle (P < 0.0001). Only 1 parturient from the cohort became lightly sedated (RASS = −1). Two parturients vomited, and no significant changes in maternal hemodynamics or fetal heart rate changes were identified during treatment. 67% of the parturients reported very good or excellent satisfaction with treatment. Conclusion: Penthrox™ provides rapid, robust, and satisfactory therapy to control pain and restlessness during epidural placement in laboring parturient. PMID:26543451

  19. Primary Failure of Thoracic Epidural Analgesia in Training Centers: The Invisible Elephant?

    PubMed

    Tran, De Q H; Van Zundert, Tom C R V; Aliste, Julian; Engsusophon, Phatthanaphol; Finlayson, Roderick J

    2016-01-01

    In teaching centers, primary failure of thoracic epidural analgesia can be due to multiple etiologies. In addition to the difficult anatomy of the thoracic spine, the conventional end point-loss-of-resistance-lacks specificity. Furthermore, insufficient training compounds the problem: learning curves are nonexistent, pedagogical requirements are often inadequate, supervisors may be inexperienced, and exposure during residency is decreasing. Any viable solution needs to be multifaceted. Learning curves should be explored to determine the minimal number of blocks required for proficiency. The problem of decreasing caseload can be tackled with epidural simulators to supplement in vivo learning. From a technical standpoint, fluoroscopy and ultrasonography could be used to navigate the complex anatomy of the thoracic spine. Finally, correct identification of the thoracic epidural space should be confirmed with objective, real-time modalities such as neurostimulation and waveform analysis. PMID:27035462

  20. Postoperative analgesia in children: A comparison of three different doses of caudal epidural morphine

    PubMed Central

    Baduni, Neha; Sanwal, Manoj Kumar; Vajifdar, Homay; Agarwala, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal epidural block is the most commonly used neuraxial block in children. Morphine has been used as a caudal additive for more than three decades. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and duration of analgesia of three different doses of caudal epidural morphine (CEM), and to find out the incidence of side effects. Material and Methods: This study was conducted on 75 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I and II, aged 2-12 years, undergoing lower abdominal and urogenital surgeries. Patients were randomly allocated to one of the three groups according to the dose of morphine. Group I received 30 μg/kg, group II 50 μg/kg, and group III 70 μg/kg. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram, pain score, sedation score, duration of analgesia, and side-effects were noted. Results: The mean duration of analgesia was 8.63 h in group I, 13.36 h in group II and 19.19 h in group III. Respiratory depression was noted in three patients in group III. One patient in group I had itching. One patient each in groups I, II, and III had nausea/vomiting. Conclusion: CEM significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia, though with a higher dose the risk of respiratory depression should always be kept in mind. PMID:27275053

  1. Effects of thoracic epidural analgesia with morphine or bupivacaine on lower oesophageal motility--an experimental study in man.

    PubMed

    Thorén, T; Carlsson, E; Sandmark, S; Wattwil, M

    1988-07-01

    Lower oesophageal peristalsis and lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) pressure during thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) were studied in 20 healthy volunteers. After oesophageal manometric baseline recordings, 10 volunteers received 4 mg epidural morphine. The other ten received 0.5% bupivacaine epidurally in sufficient amounts to block the sympathetic innervation of the oesophagus. Thereafter oesophageal manometry was repeated. During epidural morphine oesophageal peristalsis, resting LOS pressure and the contraction of LOS after swallowing did not change, but the relaxation of the LOS in response to swallowing decreased significantly (P less than 0.01). Following TEA with bupivacaine, neither distal oesophageal peristalsis nor LOS pressure changed. PMID:3414347

  2. A prospective observational study of maternal oxygenation during remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia use in labour.

    PubMed

    Messmer, A A; Potts, J M; Orlikowski, C E

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies of remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia during labour have shown high levels of maternal satisfaction, but concerns remain, especially over the side-effects of sedation and respiratory depression. We conducted a prospective observational study of maternal oxygen desaturation during remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia. Pulse oximetry values were recorded every eight s and later downloaded for analysis. A desaturation episode was defined as oxygen saturation < 90%. We collected 148 h of data in 61 women, during which we observed 176 desaturation episodes. These episodes occurred in 43 (70%) women. The median (IQR [range]) of the lowest saturation during each episode was 87 (85-89 [68-89])% with duration 16 (8-24 [8-104]) s. Supplementary oxygen reduced the time per hour spent with saturation < 90%, but not the depth or duration of individual episodes. Desaturation episodes were twice as common during the second stage of labour as compared with the first stage. Prior opioid administration, bolus size and use of nitrous oxide during patient-controlled analgesia use were not found to influence frequency, depth or duration of desaturation episodes. Although these findings suggest desaturation occurs more frequently during remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia than previously reported, the results are comparable with earlier oximetry studies of women who received nitrous oxide and pethidine during labour. PMID:26617275

  3. Evaluating Femoral-Sciatic Nerve Blocks, Epidural Analgesia, and No Use of Regional Analgesia in Dogs Undergoing Tibia-Plateau-Leveling-Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Boscan, Pedro; Wennogle, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This is a retrospective study evaluating femoral-sciatic nerve blocks (FSBs), epidural analgesia, and non-regional analgesia (NRA) in dogs undergoing tibia-plateau-leveling-osteotomy surgery. Thirty-five records met the criteria for each of the FSB and epidural analgesia groups. Seventeen anesthesia records met the criteria for the NRA or control group. The parameters reported were: isoflurane vaporizer setting, rescue analgesia/anesthesia drugs received, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and recovery quality (0-4, with 0 being poor and 4 being good). Rescue analgesia-anesthesia during surgery was performed with either fentanyl, ketamine, or propofol. A larger percentage of dogs in the NRA group required rescue analgesia during surgery. The FSB group had a higher recovery quality with median (95% confidence interval of four (±0.3) when compared to two (±0.8) in NRA (p < 0.01). No difference between groups was observed on any other parameter reported. As part of a multimodal analgesia approach for tibia-plateau-leveling-osteotomy surgery, the use of femoral and sciatic nerves blocks with bupivacaine appears to be an alternative technique to help with analgesia and anesthesia during surgery. PMID:26808436

  4. [Effects of epidural analgesia combined with general anesthesia on hemodynamics during neck surgery].

    PubMed

    Arakawa, M; Amemiya, N; Nagai, K; Kato, S; Goto, F

    1993-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of epidural analgesia combined with general anesthesia on hemodynamics. Thirty patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of cancer of the neck were studied. The patients were divided into two groups of those who received epidural analgesia combined with general anesthesia group (Group 1) and those with general anesthesia alone (Group 2). Blood pressure was not different between the groups. But heart rate and rate pressure products in Group 1 were significantly lower than those of Group 2. CVP in Group 1 increased significantly to 10.1 +/- 2.9 mmHg during surgery from 6.8 +/- 1.8 mmHg at the beginning of the surgery. There was no difference in intraoperative blood loss and the amount of fluid infused between the two groups. These results suggest that epidural anesthesia combined with general anesthesia is effective to stabilize hemodynamics during cervical surgery, but we have to be careful about using local anesthetics during long cervical procedures, because it increases CVP which might result from the depression of cardiac function. PMID:8230698

  5. Comparison of oxycodone and fentanyl for postoperative patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic gynecological surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joong-Ho; Lee, Chiu; Shin, Youngmin; Ban, Jong-Seouk; Lee, Ji-Hyang

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioids are widely used in boluses and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for postoperative pain control. In this study, we compared the effects of oxycodone and fentanyl on postoperative pain in patients with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after laparoscopic gynecological surgery. Methods Seventy-four patients undergoing elective total laparoscopic hysterectomy or laparoscopic myomectomy were randomly assigned to the administration of either fentanyl or oxycodone using IV-PCA (potency ratio 1 : 60). The cumulative dose administered in the patient-controlled mode during the initial 48 hours after the operation was measured. Patients were also assessed for postoperative pain severity, adverse effects, and patient satisfaction. Results No significant differences were observed in patient satisfaction with the analgesia during the postoperative period. Patients in the oxycodone group experienced significantly more dizziness compared to the fentanyl group. Patients in the oxycodone group showed significantly lower consumption of opioid in the patient-controlled mode (10.1 ± 8.5 ml vs. 16.6 ± 12.0 ml, P = 0.013). Conclusions Our data suggest that oxycodone and fentanyl demonstrated similar effects, and therefore oxycodone may be a good alternative to fentanyl in postoperative pain management. Further studies in various clinical settings will be needed to determine the adequate potency ratio. PMID:25844134

  6. Randomized study of intravenous fluid preload before epidural analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Pirlet, M; Mills, M S; Tuckey, J P; Thomas, T A

    2000-08-01

    We performed a randomized controlled trial of the effect of intravenous fluid preload on maternal hypotension and fetal heart rate (FHR) changes in labour after the first epidural injection. Group 1 (49 women) received 1 litre of crystalloid preload. Group 2 (46 women) received no preload. No statistically significant difference was shown between the two groups for either of the outcomes. Hypotension was found in three women in group 1 and five in group 2 (P = 0.4). Deterioration in FHR pattern was found in four women in group 1 and 11 in group 2 (P = 0.08). This study has not shown a significant increase in the incidence of hypotension when intravenous preload is omitted before epidural analgesia using a low concentration of bupivacaine during labour. Because of the clinical importance of the difference in the rate of FHR deterioration between the two groups, we continue to administer preload for high-risk cases. PMID:10992845

  7. Thoracic epidural analgesia to control malignant pain until viability in a pregnant patient

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Jaideep H; Gibson, Mary Elizabeth; Amaro-Driedger, David; Hussain, Mahammad N

    2016-01-01

    Management of nonobstetric pain in the pregnant patient presents unique challenges related to transplacental fetal exposure to opioids and the subsequent risk of neonatal withdrawal syndrome. We present the case of a pregnant patient suffering from the pain of a progressively enlarging thoracoabdominal sarcoma. Epidural analgesia (using local anesthetics with minimal opioid) was utilized over a span of weeks to manage oncologic pain, limiting fetal opioid exposure and culminating in the birth of a healthy infant. While nonobstetric abdominal pain during pregnancy is not that uncommon, neoplastic abdominal pain does appear to be rare. Combined local anesthetic and opioid continuous epidural infusion should be considered a viable option in the pain management approach to obstetric patients with nonobstetric pain associated with malignancy. PMID:27358573

  8. Perineal analgesia and hemodynamic effects of the epidural administration of meperidine or hyperbaric bupivacaine in conscious horses

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Epidural administration of bupivacaine and meperidine produces analgesia in several animal species and in humans. A prospective randomized study was conducted in 18 healthy horses to compare the effect of these 2 drugs administered by the epidural route. Animals were divided into 3 treatment groups of 6 animals each. All drugs were injected by the epidural route in all animals between the 1st and 2nd coccygeal vertebrae. Treatment 1 (BUP) — 0.06 mg/kg of body weight of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine; treatment 2 (MEP) — 0.6 mg/kg of body weight of 5% meperidine; treatment 3 (SS) — 0.9% saline solution (control group). Heart rate, arterial pressure, respiratory rate, rectal temperature, analgesia, sedation, and motor-blocking were determined before drug administration (baseline values); at 5, 10, 15, and 30 minutes after drug administration, and then at 30-minute intervals thereafter. Both hyperbaric bupivacaine and meperidine administered epidurally produced complete bilateral perineal analgesia in all horses. The onset of analgesia was 6, s = 2.6 minutes after injection of bupivacaine, as opposed to 9, s = 2 minutes after meperidine. The duration of analgesia was 240, s = 57 minutes for meperidine and 320, s = 30 minutes for bupivacaine. Heart and respiratory rates, arterial pressure, and rectal temperature did not change (P < 0.05) significantly from basal values after the epidural administration of bupivacaine, meperidine, or saline solution. To conclude, both bupivacaine and meperidine induced long-lasting perineal analgesia, with minimal cardiovascular effects. Analgesia was induced faster and lasted longer with bupivacaine. PMID:14992253

  9. The effects of immersion in water on labor, birth and newborn and comparison with epidural analgesia and conventional vaginal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mollamahmutoğlu, Leyla; Moraloğlu, Özlem; Özyer, Şebnem; Su, Filiz Akın; Karayalçın, Rana; Hançerlioğlu, Necati; Uzunlar, Özlem; Dilmen, Uğur

    2012-01-01

    Objective To document the practice of labour in water, to assess the effects of water immersion during labor and/or birth (labour stages 1, 2 and 3) on maternal, fetal and neonatal wellbeing and to compare the outcomes and safety with conventional vaginal deliveries and deliveries with epidural analgesia. Material and Methods Two-hundred and seven women electing for waterbirth (n=207) were compared with women having conventional vaginal deliveries (n=204) and vaginal deliveries with epidural analgesia (n=191). Demographic data, length of 1st, 2nd and 3rd stage of labor, induction and episiotomy requirements, perineal trauma, apgar scores, NICU requirements and VAS scores were noted. Results The 1st stage of labor was shorter in waterbirths compared with vaginal delivery with epidural analgesia but the 2nd and 3rd stage of labor were shortest in patients having waterbirth compared with conventional vaginal delivery and vaginal delivery with epidural analgesia. Patients having waterbirth had less requirement for induction and episiotomy but had more perineal laceration. All women having waterbirths had reduced analgesia requirements and had lower scores on VAS. There was no difference in terms of NICU admission between the groups. Apgar scores were comparable in both groups. There were no neonatal deaths or neonatal infections during the study. Conclusion The study demonstrates the advantages of labor in water in terms of reduction in 2nd and 3rd stage of labor, reduction in pain and obstetric intervention such as induction or amniotomy. PMID:24627674

  10. A double-blind randomised comparison of intravenous patient-controlled remifentanil with intramuscular pethidine for labour analgesia.

    PubMed

    Ng, T K T; Cheng, B C P; Chan, W S; Lam, K K; Chan, M T V

    2011-09-01

    In a prospective, double-blind, randomised controlled trial, we compared the efficacy of patient-controlled analgesia using remifentanil (25-30 μg per bolus) with intramuscular pethidine (50-75 mg) for labour analgesia in 69 parturients. Parturients receiving patient-controlled analgesia reported less pain than those receiving intramuscular pethidine throughout the study period (p < 0.001), with maximal reduction in visual analogue pain score at 2 h after commencement of analgesia (mean (SD) 20 (17) in the patient-controlled analgesia group and 36 (22) in the intramuscular pethidine group. The median (95% CI) time to the first request for rescue analgesics was significantly longer with patient-controlled analgesia (8.0 (6.8-9.2) h) compared with intramuscular pethidine (4.9 (3.8-5.4) h, p < 0.001). Maternal satisfaction scores were also higher with remifentanil compared with intramuscular pethidine (p= 0.001). There was no report of sedation, aponea or oxygen desaturation in either group, and Apgar scores were similar between groups. We conclude that patient-controlled analgesia with remifentanil provides better labour analgesia and maternal satisfaction than intramuscular pethidine. At this dose, maternal and fetal side effects were uncommon. PMID:21707564

  11. Exploring factors influencing patient request for epidural analgesia on admission to labor and delivery in a predominantly Latino population.

    PubMed

    Orejuela, Francisco J; Garcia, Tiffany; Green, Charles; Kilpatrick, Charlie; Guzman, Sara; Blackwell, Sean

    2012-04-01

    Ethnic disparities in labor pain management exist. Our purpose is to identify patients' attitudes and beliefs about epidural analgesia in order to develop a culturally competent educational intervention. A prospective observational study was conducted in patients admitted for vaginal delivery between July 1st-31st, 2009. Inclusion criteria were: singleton, term, cephalic, normal fetal heart tracing and no contraindications for epidural. Patients were surveyed regarding their wishes for analgesia, and their reasons for declining epidural. The obstetrics physician performed pain management counseling as is usually done. Patients were asked again about their choice for analgesia. Likert scale questionnaires were used. Wilcoxon signed ranked test was used for categorical variables. Logistic regression was performed to look for predictors of epidural request. Fifty patients were interviewed. Average age was (27.9 ± 6.7), gestational age (39.3 ± 1.3), and a median parity of 2 (range 0-6). 72% declined epidural upon admission, and 61% after counseling (P = 0.14). Most common reasons for declined epidural were 'women should cope with labor pain' (57%), 'fear of back pain' (54%) and 'family/friends advise against epidural' (36%). Acculturation was assessed by years living in the US (10 ± 6.3), preferred language (Spanish 80%) and ethnic self-identification (Hispanic 98%). 38% were high school graduates. In multivariate logistic regression, graduation from high school was the only variable associated to request for epidural in labor (OR 4.94, 95% CI 1.6-15.1). Educational level is associated to requesting an epidural in labor. Knowledge of patients' fears and expectations is essential to develop adequate counseling interventions. PMID:21267656

  12. Analgesia in post-thoracotomy patients: Comparison between thoracic epidural and thoracic paravertebral blocks

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Goswami, Anupam; Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Sarbapalli, Debabrata; Pal, Ranabir; Kar, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute postoperative pain can cause detrimental effects on multiple organ systems, leading to chronic pain syndromes. Objective: To compare thoracic epidural block (TEB) and paravertebral block (PVB) for relief of postoperative pain in adult patients undergoing thoracotomy. Materials and Methods: In this randomized, single-blinded, prospective study, 60 adult patients of both sexes, belonging to ASA physical status I and II, were scheduled for elective thoracotomy under general anesthesia. They were randomly divided into two groups, A and B of 30 each, who were comparable in terms of demographic parameters and body weight. Group A received TEB and Group B received PVB. All the patients underwent thoracotomy under general anesthesia using a uniform standard anesthetic technique. Thirty minutes before the anticipated end of skin suture, blocks were activated in both the groups with 7.5 ml for TEB and 15 ml for thoracic PVB of 0.25% bupivacaine, along with 1 ml of fentanyl for postoperative analgesia. Results: Patients receiving PVB for postoperative analgesia experienced better analgesia than those receiving TEB from the immediate postoperative period that lasted longer. Intragroup comparison showed that in the cases receiving TEB, there was a significant statistical difference in preoperative and postoperative values with regard to the mean systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean arterial pressure and mean pulse rate. However, in patients receiving PVB, significant difference in preoperative and postoperative values was seen in mean SBP only. Conclusions: We observed longer duration of analgesia with PVB compared to TEB. PMID:25885234

  13. Epidural analgesia with morphine or buprenorphine in ponies with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced carpal synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Gabrielle C.; Carregaro, Adriano B.; Gehrcke, Martielo I.; De La Côrte, Flávio D.; Lara, Valéria M.; Pozzobon, Ricardo; Brass, Karin E.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the analgesia effects of the epidural administration of 0.1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) of morphine or 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine in ponies with radiocarpal joint synovitis. Six ponies were submitted to 3 epidural treatments: the control group (C) received 0.15 mL/kg BW of a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution; group M was administered 0.1 mg/kg BW of morphine; and group B was administered 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine, both diluted in 0.9% NaCl to a total volume of 0.15 mL/kg BW administered epidurally at 10 s/mL. The synovitis model was induced by injecting 0.5 ng of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the left or right radiocarpal joint. An epidural catheter was later introduced in the lumbosacral space and advanced up to the thoracolumbar level. The treatment started 6 h after synovitis induction. Lameness, maximum angle of carpal flexion, heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, and intestinal motility were evaluated before LPS injection (baseline), 6 h after LPS injection (time 0), and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after treatments. Although the model of synovitis produced clear clinical signs of inflammation, the lameness scores in group C were different from the baseline for only up to 12 h. Both morphine and buprenorphine showed a reduction in the degree of lameness starting at 0.5 and 6 h, respectively. Reduced intestinal motility was observed at 0.5 h in group M and at 0.5 to 1 h in group B. Epidural morphine was a more effective analgesic that lasted for more than 12 h and without side effects. It was concluded that morphine would be a valuable analgesic option to alleviate joint pain in the thoracic limbs in ponies. PMID:21731186

  14. Analgesia after Epidural Dexamethasone is Further Enhanced by IV Dipyrone, but Not IV Parecoxibe Following Minor Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Righeti, Claudia CF; Kitayama, Antonio T

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural administration of dexamethasone has been suggested for pain control after minor orthopedic surgery. This study was conducted to assess its efficacy after such surgery, combined or not to IV dipyrone, IV parecoxibe or their combination. Methods 91 patients were randomly assigned to seven groups. Patients were submitted to spinal bupivacaine anesthesia combined to epidural administration of either 10 ml saline or 10 mg dexamethasone diluted to 10-ml volume. Patients also received 10 ml IV saline or 1 gr dipyrone and/or 40 mg parecoxibe diluted to 10 ml with saline. Control group (CG) received epidural and IV saline. Dexamethasone group (DexG) received epidural dexamethasone and IV saline. Dipyrone group (DipG) received epidural saline and IV dipyrone. Dex-Dip G received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone. Parecoxibe group (ParG) received epidural saline and IV parecoxibe. Dex-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV parecoxibe. Finally, Dex-Dip-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone plus IV parecoxibe. Results The CG expressed 4h of analgesia and sooner requested pain killer. DexG was similar to DipG or ParG or Dex-ParG (7-hours), and they requested less ketoprofen compared to the CG (P < 0.05). However, the Dex-DipG and the Dex-Dip-ParG resulted in longer time to demand pain killer (17-hours) and less ketoprofen consumption in 24-hours (P < 0.002). Adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusions The analgesia secondary to epidural dexamethasone was enhanced by IV dipyrone, while no effects were observed by the addition of IV parecoxibe. PMID:25317284

  15. Factors influencing the quality of postoperative epidural analgesia: an observational multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Wranicz, Piotr; Andersen, Hege; Nordbø, Arve; Kongsgaard, Ulf E

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural analgesia (EDA) is used widely for postoperative pain treatment. However, studies have reported a failure rate of EDA of up to 30%. We aimed to evaluate the quality of postoperative EDA in patients undergoing a laparotomy in five Norwegian hospitals. Methods This was a multicenter observational study in patients undergoing a laparotomy with epidural-based postoperative analgesia. Data were registered at three time points. Technical aspects, infusion rates, pain intensity, assessment procedures, side effects, and satisfaction of patients and health personnel were recorded. The use of other pain medications and coanalgesics was registered. Results Three hundred and seventeen patients were included. Pain control at rest was satisfactory in 89% of patients at 24 hours and in 91% at 48 hours. Pain control when coughing was satisfactory in 62% at 24 hours and in 59% at 48 hours. The spread of hypoesthesia was consistent for each individual patient but varied between patients. The hypoesthetic area was not associated with pain intensity, and the precision of the EDA insertion point was not associated with the pain score. Few side effects were reported. EDA was regarded as effective and functioning well by 64% of health personnel. Conclusion EDA was an effective method for postoperative pain relief at rest but did not give sufficient pain relief during mobilization. The use of cold stimulation to assess the spread of EDA had limited value as a clinical indicator of the efficacy of postoperative pain control. Validated tools for the control of EDA quality are needed. PMID:25206312

  16. Epidural Analgesia With Bupivacaine and Fentanyl Versus Ropivacaine and Fentanyl for Pain Relief in Labor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shanbin; Li, Bo; Gao, Chengjie; Tian, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of the combinational use of bupivacaine and fentanyl versus ropivacaine and fentanyl in epidural analgesia for labor. Multiple electronic databases were searched by using appropriate MeSH terms, and keywords for original research papers published before October 2014. Meta-analyses were based on mean differences between the groups as well as odds ratios. Statistical heterogeneity was tested by I2 index. Fifteen randomized controlled trials, recruiting 2097 parturient mothers overall, were selected for the meta-analyses. Concentrations of the preparations used (weight/volume; mean and standard deviations) were bupivacaine 0.1023% ± 0.0375%, ropivacaine 0.1095% ± 0.042%, and fentanyl 0.00021% ± 0.000089%. There were no statistically significant differences between both the combinations in the mean change in Visual Analog Score for pain during labor, incidence of instrumental or cesarean delivery, neonate Apgar score of <7, maternal satisfaction, duration of either first or second stage of labor, oxytocin use for induction, onset of analgesia, and duration of analgesia. Women who received ropivacaine and fentanyl had significantly lower incidence of motor blocks (odds ratio [95% CI] = 0.38 [0.30, 0.48] P < 0.00001, fixed effect and 0.38 [0.27, 0.54] P < 0.0001, random effects I2 30%) when compared with women who received bupivacaine and fentanyl. Incidence of side effects was similar for both the combinations. Analgesia with ropivacaine in combination with fentanyl at 0.1%:0.0002% ratio for labor pain relief is associated with lower incidence of motor blocks in comparison with analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl at similar ratio (0.1%: 0.0002%). PMID:26061307

  17. Evaluation of Efficacy of Epidural Clonidine with 0.5% Bupivacaine for Postoperative Analgesia for Orthopaedic Lower Limb Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Saravanan; Ganesan, Ilango

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of epidural clonidine in intra and postoperative analgesia, the level of sedation caused by clonidine and monitor its side effects. Materials and Methods Forty patients of ASA1 & ASA2 scheduled for lower limb orthopaediac surgeries were chosen for the study. Study group received 50μg of clonidine diluted to 1ml along with first dose of epidural injection and Control group received 1ml of normal saline along with first dose of epidural. Intra and postoperative vitals, verbal pain rating scale (VRS), sedation score and number of rescue anlgesics required postoperatively were noted. Patients received rescue analgesic when VRS was 1. Results Addition of clonidine to bupivacaine definitely improves the quality of analgesia by reducing the overall pain score, prolonging the duration of the time of first rescue analgesia and causing reduction of total analgesic consumption in the postoperative period without any hemodynamic instability. Sedation may be beneficial during the intraoperative period. Conclusion Epidural clonidine produces long lasting, good quality analgesia with good level of sedation and with minimal side effects. PMID:26500983

  18. Postoperative epidural analgesia for patients undergoing pectus excavatum corrective surgery: a 10-year retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Asad; Tse, Andrew; Paul, James E; Fitzgerald, Peter; Teh, Bernice

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Managing postoperative pain in patients undergoing minimally invasive pectus excavatum repair (Nuss procedure) is challenging but essential in facilitating ambulation and minimizing the length of stay. Although multiple epidural regimens with varying opioids are presently used for pain management, there is currently no clinical consensus regarding which epidural regimen provides the best analgesia outcomes with the fewest side effects. This 10-year retrospective cohort study was performed to compare the quality of analgesia and the incidence of side effects associated with the three most common epidural regimens used at a tertiary care children’s hospital, in patients undergoing the Nuss procedure. Methods Seventy-two pediatric patients were identified as having been treated with one of three epidural regimens for postoperative pain management following the Nuss procedure: Group A (n=12) received 0.125% bupivacaine and 5 µg/mL fentanyl, Group B (n=21) received 0.125% bupivacaine and 10 µg/mL hydromorphone, and Group C (n=39) received 0.1% ropivacaine and 20 µg/mL hydromorphone. Our primary outcome was maximal daily pain scores (numerical rating scale 0–10), with an analytical focus on postoperative day 1 scores. The primary outcome was analyzed using linear regression. The secondary outcomes included the length of stay, side-effect profiles as reflected by the number of treatments for nausea and pruritus, pain scores according to epidural site insertion, occurrence of breakthrough pain, and presence of severe pain throughout their hospital stay. Secondary outcomes were analyzed using linear or logistic regression adjusted for pain scores at baseline. The criterion for statistical significance was set a priori at alpha =0.05. Results Group A had significantly higher day-1 pain scores (score 5.42/10) than Group B (4.52/10; P=0.030) and Group C (4.49/10; P=0.015) after adjusting for baseline pain and age. No significant difference in maximum daily

  19. Foetal heart rate deceleration with combined spinal-epidural analgesia during labour: a maternal haemodynamic cardiac study.

    PubMed

    Valensise, Herbert; Lo Presti, Damiano; Tiralongo, Grazia Maria; Pisani, Ilaria; Gagliardi, Giulia; Vasapollo, Barbara; Frigo, Maria Grazia

    2016-06-01

    To understand the mechanisms those are involved in the appearance of foetal heart rate decelerations (FHR) after the combined epidural analgesia in labour. Observational study done at University Hospital for 86-term singleton pregnant women with spontaneous labour. Serial bedside measurement of the main cardiac maternal parameters with USCOM technique; stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO) and total vascular resistances (TVR) inputting systolic and diastolic blood pressure before combined epidural analgesia and after 5', 10', 15' and 20 min. FHR was continuously recorded though cardiotocography before and after the procedure. Correlation between the appearance of foetal heart rate decelerations and the modification of maternal haemodynamic parameters. Fourteen out of 86 foetuses showed decelerations after the combined spino epidural procedure. No decelerations occurred in the women with low TVR (<1000 dyne/s/cm(-5)) at the basal evaluation. FHR abnormalities were concentrated in 39 women who presented elevated TVR values at the basal evaluation (>1200 dyne/s/cm(-5)). Soon after the epidural procedure, the absence of increase in SV and CO was observed in these women. No variations in systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were found. The level of TVR before combined epidural analgesia in labour may indicate the risk of FHR abnormalities after the procedure. Low TVR (<1000 dyne/s/cm(-5)) showed a reduced risk of FHR abnormalities. FHR decelerations seem to occur in women without the ability to upregulate SV and CO in response to the initial effects of analgesia. PMID:26333691

  20. Epidural diamorphine infusions with and without 0.167% bupivacaine for post-operative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lowson, S M; Alexander, J I; Black, A M; Bambridge, A D

    1994-09-01

    Forty patients who underwent upper or mid-abdominal surgery were randomly allocated to receive a post-operative epidural infusion of 0.083 mg ml-1 of diamorphine in either 0.167% bupivacaine or 0.9% NaCl solution. The nursing staff, who were unaware of which solution was being infused, managed the patients' pain according to a standardized scheme. They adjusted the epidural infusion rates to 3, 5 or 7 ml h-1 according to the patient's hourly reports of pain on a four point verbal rating scale (none, mild, moderate or severe), aiming to use the lowest allowed infusion rate to prevent or reduce any pain that was more than mild. Additional analgesia was given as diclofenac 75 mg intramuscularly if the patients report moderate pain while on the highest infusion rate. The nurses were instructed to summon anaesthetic help if pain relief was still unsatisfactory after diclofenac, but this was never necessary. Diclofenac was needed by six patients receiving diamorphine in saline and one receiving diamorphine in bupivacaine (P < 0.05). The range of average hourly epidural infusion rates was constrained by design to between 3 and 7 ml h-1 but the median of these values was 5 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-saline group and 3.35 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group (P < 0.02). In patients receiving diamorphine in saline, a median of 6 (range 0-16) of the 24 h reports were of more than mild pain, whereas in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group, the corresponding figures were 2 (range 0-13) (P < 0.02)).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7988577

  1. Recovery of gastrointestinal function with thoracic epidural vs. systemic analgesia following gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Shi, W-Z; Miao, Y-L; Yakoob, M Y; Cao, J-B; Zhang, H; Jiang, Y-G; Xu, L-H; Mi, W-D

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this review was to systematically assess the effect of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) vs. systemic analgesia (SA) on the recovery of gastrointestinal (GI) function in patients following GI surgery. We performed a comprehensive literature search to identify randomized controlled trials of adult patients undergoing GI surgery, comparing the effect of two postoperative analgesia regimens. Patients postoperatively receiving local anesthesia-based TEA with or without opioids were compared to patients receiving opioid-based SA. The outcomes considered were times to GI function recovery, GI complications, and specific side effects. Twelve studies with 331 patients in the TEA group and 319 in the SA group were included. Compared to SA, TEA improved the GI recovery after GI procedures by shortening the time to first passage of flatus by 31.3 h, 95% confidence intervals (CIs): -33.2 to -29.4, P < 0.01; and shortening the time to first passage of stool by 24.1 h, 95% CIs: -27.2 to -20.9, P < 0.001. There was no difference between the groups in the incidence of anastomotic leakage and ileus. The occurrence of postoperative hypotension was relatively higher in the TEA group, risk ratio: 7.9, 95% CIs: 2.4 to 26.5, P = 0.001; other side effects (such as pruritus and vomiting) were similar in the two groups. There is evidence that TEA (compared to SA) improves the recovery of GI function after GI procedures without any increased risk of GI complications. To further confirm these effects, larger, better quality randomized controlled trials with standard outcome measurements are needed. PMID:25060245

  2. [Pressure Ulcer Caused by Long-term Keeping of the Same Body Position during Epidural Labour Analgesia].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Satoshi; Uchizaki, Sakiko; Mimura, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Mizuki; Akinaga, Chieko; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman (height: 153 cm, weight : 62.4 kg, non-pregnant weight : 52 kg, uniparous) without underlying diseases who developed pressure ulcer due to keeping a similar body position during long-term epidural delivery. Induction of childbirth was started in gestational week 40, causing reduction of fetal heart rate, which improved after adoption of a right lateral recumbent position. Severe contractions occurred and epidural labour analgesia was started. The fetal heart rate decreased again and induction of childbirth was suspended, but the right lateral recumbent position was maintained. Epidural administration was continued due to persistent contractions. Next morning, induction of childbirth was restarted and birth occurred in approximately 6 hours. The right lateral recumbent position was maintained for approximately 20 hours. At childbirth, a pressure ulcer was present in the intertrochanteric part of the right femur. The causes included insufficient knowledge of medical staff about the risk of pressure ulcer during epidural delivery, and no position change. A decreased sensation and blocked motor nerve caused by epidural anesthesia might have accelerated pressure ulcer development. This case suggests that preventive measures against pressure ulcer are required in epidural anesthesia in pregnant women. PMID:27483666

  3. Minimum local analgesic dose of plain ropivacaine vs. ropivacaine combined with sufentanil during epidural analgesia for labour.

    PubMed

    Palm, S; Gertzen, W; Ledowski, T; Gleim, M; Wulf, H

    2001-06-01

    We have used the up-and-down allocation technique to assess the relative analgesic potencies of epidural ropivacaine alone and ropivacaine combined with sufentanil 0.75 microg.ml-1 in 42 women requesting epidural analgesia in the first stage of labour. Parturients were randomly allocated to one of the two epidural solutions in a double-blind manner. The concentration of local anaesthetic was determined by the response of the previous parturient: an effective concentration (pain < or = 10 mm on a 10-cm visual analogue pain score within 30 min) resulted in a 0.01% decrease in the concentration of ropivacaine for the next parturient, an ineffective concentration resulted in a 0.01% increase. Minimum local analgesic concentration of ropivacaine alone was 0.13% (95% CI 0.12-0.13%) compared with 0.09% (95% CI 0.08-0.1%) for ropivacaine with sufentanil (p < 0.00001). PMID:11412157

  4. Reporting of 'hypotension' after epidural analgesia during labour. Effect of choice of arm and timing of baseline readings.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Black, A M

    1998-02-01

    We studied 20 women in labour to see how reporting 'hypotension' after obstetric epidural analgesia is affected by position of the blood pressure cuff and baseline definition. Blood pressure was recorded from both arms simultaneously while the woman was semirecumbent and then in the left lateral position. Three readings were then taken after epidural bupivacaine, one left lateral and the remainder right lateral. Before the epidural, blood pressure in the dependent arm in the lateral position was similar to blood pressure in either arm in the semirecumbent position and an average of 10 mmHg (systolic) and 14 mmHg (diastolic) higher than blood pressure in the uppermost arm (p < or = 0.00005). This difference persisted in both lateral positions as epidural analgesia became established. Choosing different definitions of hypotension, baselines and arm to measure blood pressure resulted in 'hypotension rates' between 0% and 75%. For blood pressure measurement in the lateral position, the blood pressure cuff should be placed on the dependent arm. PMID:9534634

  5. A Comparative Efficacy of Propacetamol and Ketorolac in Postoperative Patient Controlled Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Bong Ha; Park, Ji Hun; Choi, Jung Il; Kim, Woong Mo; Lee, Hyoung Gon; Cho, Soo Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketorolac has been used as a postoperative analgesia in combination with opioids. However, the use of ketorolac may produce serious side effects in vulnerable patients. Propacetamol is known to induce fewer side effects than ketorolac because it mainly affects the central nervous system. We compared the analgesic effects and patient satisfaction levels of each drug when combined with fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Methods The patients were divided into two groups, each with n = 46. The patients in each group were given 60 mg of ketorolac or 2 g of propacetamol (mixed with fentanyl) for 10 minutes. The patients were then given 180 mg of ketorolac or 8 g of propacetamol (mixed with fentanyl and ramosetron) through PCA. We assessed the visual analogue pain scale (VAS) at the time point immediately before administration (baseline) and at 15, 30, and 60 minutes, and 24 hours after administration. Also, the side effects of each regimen and each patient's degree of satisfaction were assessed. Results There was a significant decline in the VAS score in both groups (P < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in the VAS scores between the groups at each time point. Satisfaction scores between the groups showed no significant difference. Conclusions The efficacy of propacetamol is comparable to that of ketorolac in postoperative PCA with fentanyl. PMID:26175881

  6. [Acute respiratory distress subordinate to a morphine overdose during a frail elderly patient controlled analgesia].

    PubMed

    Ades, A; Compère, V; Abriou, C; Baert, O; Fourdrinier, V; Dureuil, B

    2009-04-01

    We describe a case-report of an 85-year-male patient with a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) after a total hip arthroplasty. Four hours after surgery, acute respiratory distress secondary to a morphine overdose occurred, requiring an antagonisation with naloxone. Morphine overdose during a PCA was always caused by a wrong use of the pump. In this case-report, no mistake of programming or administration's use was found. Too important morphine's doses managed in comparison with the patient's age and his renal failure could explain this morphine's accumulation and the respiratory distress. This observation reminds us the obligation to determine the optimal posology in accordance with the rate of glomerular filtration estimated by Cockcroft and Gault formula for patients using a PCA. PMID:19361945

  7. [Direct cost of connecting, maintaining and disconnecting patient-controlled analgesia pump].

    PubMed

    Gouvêa, Áquila Lopes; Lima, Antônio Fernandes Costa

    2014-02-01

    Quantitative research that aimed to identify the mean total cost (MTC) of connecting, maintaining and disconnecting patient-controlled analgesia pump (PCA) in the management of pain. The non-probabilistic sample corresponded to the observation of 81 procedures in 17 units of the Central Institute of the Clinics Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo. We calculated the MTC multiplying by the time spent by nurses at a unit cost of direct labor, adding the cost of materials and medications/solutions. The MTC of connecting was R$ 107.91; maintenance R$ 110.55 and disconnecting R$ 4.94. The results found will subsidize discussions about the need to transfer money from the Unified Health System to hospitals units that perform this technique of analgesic therapy and it will contribute to the cost management aimed at making efficient and effective decision-making in the allocation of available resources. PMID:24676115

  8. Treatment of medically and surgically refractory angina pectoris with high thoracic epidural analgesia: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Gramling-Babb, P; Miller, M J; Reeves, S T; Roy, R C; Zile, M R

    1997-06-01

    Surgical sympathectomy can relieve symptoms of angina in patients with refractory angina. However, in these high-risk patients this thoracic surgery may result in significant morbidity and mortality rates. Similar sympathetic blockade can now be produced with high thoracic epidural analgesia (HTEA). From September 1995 to August 1996, we treated 10 consecutive patients with HTEA. These eight men and two women, aged 58 +/- 5 years, with extensive three-vessel coronary disease and ejection fractions of 40% +/- 5%, had New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV angina despite medical therapy, including nitrates, beta-blockade, calcium channel blockade, and narcotics. HTEA was performed at the T1 through T4 levels with a catheter placed either percutaneously or surgically, with radiographic confirmation of catheter placement with an epidurogram or computed tomography scan. Bupivacaine (0.25% to 0.5%), an amide local anesthetic, was given as a bolus through the epidural catheter and then maintained either as a continuous infusion or an intermittent rebolus. The epidural catheter remained in place for 7 days in four patients, 14 days in three patients, and > or =90 days in three patients. Before consideration for HTEA, each patient was deemed unsuitable for or refused coronary bypass surgery and percutaneous coronary angioplasty and had NYHA class IV symptoms of angina. Seven of 10 patients required intravenous nitroglycerin and heparin and were unable to be discharged from the intensive care unit because of anginal symptoms. Two of these seven patients also required an intraaortic balloon pump for symptom control. After HTEA, all 10 patients had improved symptoms, with five patients improving to NYHA class II symptoms and five improving to NYHA class III. All seven patients receiving intravenous nitroglycerin, heparin, or intraaortic balloon pump support had these modalities discontinued. Six of these seven patients were subsequently discharged from the hospital. One

  9. Ropivacaine 0.25% versus bupivacaine 0.25% for continuous epidural analgesia in labor: a double-blind comparison.

    PubMed

    Stienstra, R; Jonker, T A; Bourdrez, P; Kuijpers, J C; van Kleef, J W; Lundberg, U

    1995-02-01

    We compared the effects of continuous epidural infusion of ropivacaine 0.25% with bupivacaine 0.25% on pain relief and motor block during labor, and on the neonate. Seventy-six full-term parturients in active labor requiring epidural analgesia were randomly allocated to receive either bupivacaine 0.25% or ropivacaine 0.25%. Fifteen minutes after a loading dose of 10 mL of the study drug, an epidural infusion with the same drug was started at 6-12 mL/h to maintain an adequate block. Top-up doses of 6-10 mL were given as required. At full cervical dilation, the epidural infusion was discontinued. The onset of pain relief (verbal scale), contraction pain (visual analog scale), intensity of motor block (modified Bromage scale), and duration of motor block were not statistically different between the groups. Apgar scores at 1 and 5 min after delivery were comparable. There was a higher proportion of the neonates in the ropivacaine group (26/31 = 84%) who had a neurologic and adaptive capacity score (NACS) > or = 35 2 h after delivery than in the bupivacaine group (18/29 = 62%). We conclude that ropivacaine 0.25% and bupivacaine 0.25% are equally effective for epidural pain relief during labor. Ropivacaine may have an advantage over bupivacaine regarding neonatal neurobehavioral performance during the first few hours after delivery, although further studies will be required to substantiate this. PMID:7818114

  10. Failed epidural: causes and management.

    PubMed

    Hermanides, J; Hollmann, M W; Stevens, M F; Lirk, P

    2012-08-01

    Failed epidural anaesthesia or analgesia is more frequent than generally recognized. We review the factors known to influence the success rate of epidural anaesthesia. Reasons for an inadequate epidural block include incorrect primary placement, secondary migration of a catheter after correct placement, and suboptimal dosing of local anaesthetic drugs. For catheter placement, the loss of resistance using saline has become the most widely used method. Patient positioning, the use of a midline or paramedian approach, and the method used for catheter fixation can all influence the success rate. When using equipotent doses, the difference in clinical effect between bupivacaine and the newer isoforms levobupivacaine and ropivacaine appears minimal. With continuous infusion, dose is the primary determinant of epidural anaesthesia quality, with volume and concentration playing a lesser role. Addition of adjuvants, especially opioids and epinephrine, may substantially increase the success rate of epidural analgesia. Adjuvant opioids may have a spinal or supraspinal action. The use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia with background infusion appears to be the best method for postoperative analgesia. PMID:22735301

  11. Thoracic epidural analgesia: a new approach for the treatment of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Windisch, Olivier; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Giraud, Raphaël; Morel, Philippe; Bühler, Léo

    2016-01-01

    This review article analyzes, through a nonsystematic approach, the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) with a focus on the effects of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on the disease. The benefit-risk balance is also discussed. AP has an overall mortality of 1 %, increasing to 30 % in its severe form. The systemic inflammation induces a strong activation of the sympathetic system, with a decrease in the blood flow supply to the gastrointestinal system that can lead to the development of pancreatic necrosis. The current treatment for severe AP is symptomatic and tries to correct the systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the multiorgan dysfunction. Besides the removal of gallstones in biliary pancreatitis, no satisfactory causal treatment exists. TEA is widely used, mainly for its analgesic effect. TEA also induces a targeted sympathectomy in the anesthetized region, which results in splanchnic vasodilatation and an improvement in local microcirculation. Increasing evidence shows benefits of TEA in animal AP: improved splanchnic and pancreatic perfusion, improved pancreatic microcirculation, reduced liver damage, and significantly reduced mortality. Until now, only few clinical studies have been performed on the use of TEA during AP with few available data regarding the effect of TEA on the splanchnic perfusion. Increasing evidence suggests that TEA is a safe procedure and could appear as a new treatment approach for human AP, based on the significant benefits observed in animal studies and safety of use for human. Further clinical studies are required to confirm the clinical benefits observed in animal studies. PMID:27141977

  12. A comparison between subpleural patient-controlled analgesia by bupivacaine and intermittent analgesia in post-operative thoracotomy: A double-blind randomized clinical trial*

    PubMed Central

    Goharian, Vahid; Tabatabaee, Sayyed Abbas; MozafarHashemi, Sayyed; Mohajery, Gholamreza; Ramezani, Mohammad Arash; Shabani, Fatemeh; MotevalliEmami, Zahra

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy of subpleural analgesia to reduce postoperative pain intensity in patients after lateral thoracotomy is controversial. In this study, we demonstrated the efficacy of two types of subpleural analgesia. METHODS: This prospective, controlled, randomized, double-blind trial was performed in Department of Thoracic Surgery of Alzahra Hospital associated with Isfahan University of Medical Sciences from June 2009 until August 2010. After posterolateral thoracotomy and admission to the ICU, patients were randomly assigned into two groups of subpleural patient-controlled analgesia (SPCA) (0.02 cc/kg/h of 0.5% bupivacaine) and subpleural intermittent analgesia (SIA) (0.1cc/kg/6h of 0.5% bupivacaine). The data regarding age, sex, visual analog scale (VAS) (at 8, 16 and 24 hours after initiation of analgesia), morphine consumption, systemic adverse effects, length of ICU and hospital stay, complications, public health service (PHS) criteria, and cost was recorded. Data was analyzed by Mann-Whitney U-test, repeated measured test, chi-square test and the Fisher's exact test. A p < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 90 patients. There were no significant differences in sex, age, weight, intraoperative analgesics, duration of one-lung ventilation, and adverse effects between the SPCA and SIA groups. Although pain scores were significantly reduced at 16 hours after the first subpleural instillation of bupivacaine 0.5% with patient-controlled analgesia, comparison between mean pain scores in the two groups at 8 and 24 hours after the first subpleural instillation of bupivacaine 0.5% revealed no significant difference. In addition, no significant difference was found in VAS scores at the three evaluated times (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Optimal use of SPCA bupivacaine for postoperative pain treatment is more effective in pain reduction than SIA bupivacaine. The consumption rate of opioid and bupivacaine was also decreased

  13. Intravenous Paracetamol Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia With Morphine for the Pain Management Following Diagnostic Knee Arthroscopy in Trauma Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Masoud; Esmaeelijah, Aliakbar; Golzari, Samad; Keyhani, Sohrab; Maserrat, Azita; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Ardehali, Seyed Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most patients undergoing outpatient surgeries have the unpleasant experience of high level pain after surgery. Compared with open surgeries, arthroscopic procedures are less painful; however, inadequate pain management could be associated with significant concerns. Opioids alone or in combination with local anesthetics are frequently used for diminishing postoperative pain using intravenous or epidural infusion pumps. Despite morphine various disadvantages, it is commonly used for controlling pain after surgery. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare intravenous paracetamol and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine for the pain management following diagnostic knee arthroscopy in trauma patients. Patients and Methods: Sixty trauma patients who were scheduled to undergo knee arthroscopy were randomly divided into two groups. Patients immediately received intravenous infusion of 1 g paracetamol within 15 minutes after surgery and every 6 hours to 24 hours in the paracetamol group. The patient-controlled analgesia group received morphine through PCA infusion pump at 2 mL/h base rate and 1mL bolus every 15 minutes. Pain level, nausea and vomiting, and sedation were measured and recorded during entering the recovery, 15 and 30 minutes after entering the recovery, 2, 6, and 24 hours after starting morphine pump infusion in the morphine and paracetamol in the paracetamol groups. Results: There was no significant difference regarding the pain level at different times after entering the recovery between the two groups. No one from the paracetamol group developed drug complications. However, 22.3% in the PCA morphine suffered from postoperative nausea; there was a statistically significant difference regarding the sedation level, nausea, and vomiting at various times between the two groups. Conclusions: Intravenous administration of paracetamol immediately after knee arthroscopy improved postoperative pain, decreased analgesic administration

  14. Nursing knowledge and beliefs regarding patient-controlled oral analgesia (PCOA).

    PubMed

    Sawhney, Monakshi; Maeda, Eri

    2013-12-01

    Patient-controlled oral analgesia (PCOA) allows patients to self-administer oral opioids for pain management. Advantages of PCOA include improved pain control with lower doses of opioids, decreased length of stay, increased patient satisfaction, and better functional outcomes than conventional nurse-administered oral analgesia. Sucessful PCOA programs are well described in the literature. However, nurses have concerns about allowing patients to self-administer opioids. The purpose of this study was to identify nurses' knowledge and beliefs regarding PCOA. Nurses who work at the Holland Orthopaedic and Arthritic Centre were asked to complete a survey exploring their beliefs regarding PCOA. The nurses were asked to complete the same survey twice: before an education program in February 2010, and 3 months after implementation of PCOA in June 2010. In February 2010, 74 nurses and in June 2010, 32 nurses participated in the survey. Some nurses (18%) had previous experience with PCOA. At both the pre-education and the postimplementation times, nurses thought that the PCOA program reduced wait times for analgesics and improved patient satisfaction with pain management. Before program implementation, negative beliefs included that patients on the PCOA program would lose their analgesics, would give their analgesics to visitors or other patients, and were at risk for having their analgesics stolen and that the nurse was liable if the patient's analgesics were lost or stolen. After program implementation, no nurse believed that patients would lose their analgesics or give their analgesics to visitors or other patients or that they were liable for lost or stolen analgesics. However, nurses continued to think that patients were at risk for having their analgesics stolen. We found that nurses were concerned that analgesics could be lost, misused, or stolen and that they would be liable for lost analgesics. These findings were consistent with literature discussing patients

  15. Long-Term Stability of Tramadol and Ketamine Solutions for Patient-Controlled Analgesia Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junfeng; Qin, Wengang; Chen, Fuchao; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Subanesthetic doses of ketamine as an adjuvant to tramadol in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for postoperative pain have been shown to improve the quality of analgesia. However, there are no such commercially available drug mixtures, and the stability of the combination has rarely been assessed. Material/Methods Admixtures were assessed for periods of up to 14 days at 4°C and 25°C. Three different mixtures of tramadol and ketamine (tramadol 5.0 mg/mL + ketamine 0.5 mg/mL, tramadol 5.0 mg/mL + ketamine 1.0 mg/mL, and tramadol 5.0 mg/mL + ketamine 2.0 mg/mL) were prepared in polyolefin bags by combining these 2 drugs with 0.9% sodium chloride (normal saline [NS]). The chemical stability of the admixtures was evaluated by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and by measurement of pH values. Solution appearance and color were assessed by observing the samples against black and white backgrounds. Solutions were considered stable if they maintained 90% of the initial concentration of each drug. Results The percentages of initial concentration of tramadol and ketamine in the various solutions remained above 98% when stored at 4°C or 25°C over the testing period. No changes in color or turbidity were observed in any of the prepared solutions. Throughout this period, pH values remained stable. Conclusions The results indicate that the drug mixtures of tramadol with ketamine in NS for PCA delivery systems were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags at 4°C or 25°C. PMID:26306476

  16. Effect of Dexmedetomidine Alone for Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia After Gynecological Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuqin; Liu, Wenjuan; Xu, Zan; Wang, Fumei; Zhang, Chuanfeng; Wang, Baosheng; Wang, Kaiguo; Yu, Jingui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gynecological laparoscopic surgery is minimally invasive compared with open surgical approaches, but postoperative pain is generally undermanaged. Pain management strategies related to the procedure-specific efficacy are needed. Many studies have shown that dexmedetomidine (DEX) has opioid-sparing properties. It is not clear whether DEX used alone for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) could reduce postoperative pain after an invasive procedure. We hypothesized that DEX alone would reduce postoperative pain in women patients undergoing an elective gynecological laparoscopic procedure. This CONSORT-prospective randomized controlled clinical study aimed to investigate the effects of DEX alone for intravenous PCA after gynecological laparoscopic operation. Forty women patients scheduled for elective gynecological laparoscopy were enrolled into the study at Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute and randomly allocated into two groups (n = 20 each). In the DEX group (group D), the intravenous PCA protocol was DEX 0.25 μg/kg/h diluted to 100 mL in 0.9% saline. In the fentanyl group (group F), the PCA protocol was fentanyl 20 μg/kg diluted to 100 mL in 0.9% saline. The primary outcome was the mean pain score on a visual analogue scale (VAS) at 6 hours after the operation. The secondary outcomes included the Ramsay sedation score, the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), satisfaction with pain control, and time to recovery of gastrointestinal function. There were no significant differences in the patients’ characteristics and intraoperative measurements (P > 0.05). No patients received rescue analgesic. The mean VAS scores at 6 hours post-operatively were not significantly different between the groups (P > 0.05). The incidence of PONV was less in group D than in group F (P < 0.05). The Ramsay sedation scores were not significantly between the groups (P > 0.05). Satisfaction with pain control was

  17. A pharmacokinetic approach to resolving spinal and systemic contributions to epidural alfentanil analgesia and side-effects.

    PubMed

    Coda, B A; Brown, M C; Schaffer, R L; Donaldson, G; Shen, D D

    1995-09-01

    A pilot study was conducted in 7 normal volunteers to demonstrate the feasibility of employing pharmacokinetic tailoring to achieve matching plasma opioid concentration-time curves after epidural (e.p.) and intravenous (i.v.) alfentanil administration. Each subject participated in 1 pretest and 2 test sessions. Our pain model was cutaneous electrical stimulation of the finger and toe, adjusted to produce a baseline pain report of 5 (strong pain on a 0-5 scale). On test day 1, subjects received e.p. alfentanil (750 micrograms) and an i.v. saline infusion. Serial measurements of analgesia, end tidal CO2, pupil size, subjective side effects, and plasma alfentanil concentrations were conducted before and at various time intervals over a 4-h period after alfentanil administration. On test day 2, subjects received e.p. saline and a pharmacokinetically tailored i.v. infusion (using individual pharmacokinetics determined on the pretest day) designed to achieve a plasma concentration-time profile identical to that observed on the epidural day. The same battery of effect measurements was administered as on the 1st test day. Plasma alfentanil was measured to verify the accuracy of the tailored infusion. Plasma alfentanil concentration profiles were nearly identical on both test days. Peak plasma alfentanil concentrations were near the reported minimum effective analgesic concentration (MEAC). Overall, analgesia was slightly greater with e.p. administration. Onset of pain relief was rapid, and duration was approximately 1.5 h with e.p. and 1 h with i.v. alfentanil. There were no differences in pupil size, ETCO2, or subjective side effects between e.p. versus i.v. administration. We conclude that systemic redistribution from the epidural space appears to account for most, but not all, of the analgesia. PMID:8657433

  18. Postoperative Pain Control for Total Knee Arthroplasty: Continuous Femoral Nerve Block Versus Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rui Min; Lim Tey, John Boon; Chua, Nicholas Hai Liang

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pain after total knee arthroplasty is severe and impacts functional recovery. Objectives: We performed a retrospective study, comparing conventional patient control analgesia (PCA) modalities versus continuous femoral nerve blockade (CFNB) for 1582 post-TKA (total knee arthroplasty) patients. Patients and Methods: Using our electronic acute pain service (APS) database, we reviewed the data of 579 patients who had received CFNBs compared with 1003 patients with intravenous PCA over 4 years. Results: Our results show that the incidence of a severe pain episode was higher in the PCA compared with the CFNB group. Lower pain scores were observed in the CFNB group compared with the PCA group from postoperative day (POD) 1 to 3, primarily due to lower rest pain scores in the CFNB group. Conclusions: Our study shows that there is improvement in pain scores, at rest and on movement, as well as a reduction in incidence of severe pain, in patients who receive CFNB versus those who receive intravenous PCA. PMID:24904807

  19. Patient Controlled Analgesia for Adults with Sickle Cell Disease Awaiting Admission from the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Josue; Jones, Sasia; Wakefield, Daniel; Grady, James; Andemariam, Biree

    2016-01-01

    Background. A treatment algorithm for sickle cell disease (SCD) pain in adults presenting to a single emergency department (ED) was developed prioritizing initiation of patient controlled analgesia (PCA) for patients awaiting hospitalization. Objectives. Evaluate the proportion of ED visits in which PCA was started in the ED. Methods. A two-year retrospective chart review of consecutive SCD pain ED visits was undertaken. Data abstracted included PCA initiation, low versus high utilizer status, pain scores, bolus opioid number, treatment times, and length of hospitalization. Results. 258 visits resulted in hospitalization. PCA was initiated in 230 (89%) visits of which 157 (68%) were initiated in the ED. Time to PCA initiation was longer when PCA was begun after hospitalization versus in the ED (8.6 versus 4.5 hours, p < 0.001). ED PCA initiation was associated with fewer opioid boluses following decision to admit and less time without analgesic treatment (all p < 0.05). Mean pain intensity (MPI) reduction did not differ between groups. Among visits where PCA was begun in the ED, low utilizers demonstrated greater MPI reduction than high utilizers (2.8 versus 2.0, p = 0.04). Conclusions. ED PCA initiation for SCD-related pain is possible and associated with more timely analgesic delivery. PMID:27445606

  20. Serial Peak Expiratory Flow Rates in Patients Undergoing Upper Abdominal Surgeries Under General Anaesthesia and Thoracic Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rammoorthi; Ribeiro, Karl SA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anaesthesia and upper abdominal surgeries alter lung compliance and functional residual capacity resulting from atelectasis. Upper abdominal surgeries also cause a decrease in peak expiratory flow rates, cough reflex due to pain limited inspiration. Aim This study aimed to study the effect of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on the peak expiratory flow rates in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgeries. Materials and Methods A total of 44 patients posted for elective surgery were enrolled. Group 1 patients received GA + 0.125% bupivacaine infusion TEA and Group 2 received GA + Inj. Diclofenac sodium 50 mg slow i.v. TID for Postoperative analgesia. Haemodynamics, VAS pain score, PEFR measurements were done at 60 minutes, 24 hours, 48 hours and 4 days after surgery in both groups. ABG analysis was taken pre operatively and 24 hours after surgery. Results The SBP and DBP values obtained at 60 minutes (p<0.016) 24 and 48 hours (p<0.001) and day 4 (p<0.02) postoperative showed highly significant difference between the two groups which indicate better haemodynamic parameters in patients receiving epidural analgesia. Postoperatively the difference in PEFR values at 60 minutes, 24 hour, 48 hour and day 4 were very highly significant. (p<0.001). Group1 had a 10.739% deficit on day 4 from its pre operative baseline value while group 2 showed a 34.825 % deficit which was very highly significant (p<0.001). The difference in VAS scores recorded at 60 minutes, 24 hours, 48 hours and day 4 post op were very highly statistically significant (p < 0.001). The ABG taken at 24 hours shows statistically significant difference with patients in group 2 showing decreased values in pCO2 and pO2 reflecting poorer ventilation and oxygenation. Conclusion Thoracic epidural analgesia provides superior analgesia, better cough reflex as seen by better PEFR values, were haemodynamically more stable and their ABG values were better than the NSAID group. PMID:27042561

  1. Multiple levels paravertebral block versus morphine patient-controlled analgesia for postoperative analgesia following breast cancer surgery with unilateral lumpectomy, and axillary lymph nodes dissection

    PubMed Central

    Fallatah, Summayah; Mousa, WF

    2016-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain after breast cancer surgery is not uncommon. Narcotic based analgesia is commonly used for postoperative pain management. However, the side-effects and complications of systemic narcotics is a significant disadvantage. Different locoregional anesthetic techniques have been tried including, single and multiple levels paravertebral block (PVB), which seems to have a significant reduction in immediate postoperative pain with fewer side-effects. The aim of this study was to compare unilateral multiple level PVB versus morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for pain relief after breast cancer surgery with unilateral lumpectomy and axillary lymph nodes dissection. Materials and Methods: Forty patients scheduled for breast cancer surgery were randomized to receive either preoperative unilateral multiple injections PVB at five thoracic dermatomes (group P, 20 patients) or postoperative intravenous PCA with morphine (group M, 20 patients) for postoperative pain control. Numerical pain scale, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, Time to first analgesic demand, 24-h morphine consumption side-effects and length of hospital stay were recorded. Results: PVB resulted in a significantly more postoperative analgesia, maintained hemodynamic, more significant reduction in nausea and vomiting, and shorter hospital stay compared with PCA patients. Conclusion: Multiple levels PVB is an effective regional anesthetic technique for postoperative pain management, it provides superior analgesia with less narcotics consumption, and fewer side-effects compared with PCA morphine for patients with breast cancer who undergo unilateral lumpectomy, with axillary lymph nodes dissection. PMID:26955304

  2. Serial Analgesic Consumptions and Predictors of Intravenous Patient-controlled Analgesia with Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To elucidate the dynamics of analgesic consumption regarding intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IVPCA) during postoperative period is rather complex partly due to between-patient variation and partly due to within-patient variation. A statistical method was proposed to classify serial analgesic consumption into different classifications that were further taken as the multiple outcomes on which to explore the associated predictors. Methods: We retrospectively included 3284 patients administrated by IVPCA for 3 days after surgery. A repeated measurement design corresponding to serial analgesic consumption variables defined as six-hour total analgesic consumptions was adopted. After determining the numbers of clusters, serial analgesic consumptions were classified into several homogeneous subgroups. Factors associated with new classifications were identified and quantified with a multinominal logistic regression model. Results: Three distinct analgesic classifications were aggregated, including “high”, ”middle” and “low” level of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. The mean analgesic consumptions on 12 successive analgesic consumptions at 6-hour interval of each classification consistently revealed a decreasing trend. As the trends were almost parallel with time, this suggests the time-invariant proportionality of analgesic consumption between the levels of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. Patient’s characteristics, like age, gender, weight, height, and cancer status, were significant factors associated with analgesic classifications. Surgical sites had great impacts on analgesic classifications. Discussion: The serial analgesic consumptions were simplified into 3 analgesic consumptions classifications. The identified predictors are useful to recognize patient’s analgesic classifications before using IVPCA. This study explored a new approach to analysing dynamic changes of postoperative analgesic consumptions. PMID:26710218

  3. Decision tree-based learning to predict patient controlled analgesia consumption and readjustment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Appropriate postoperative pain management contributes to earlier mobilization, shorter hospitalization, and reduced cost. The under treatment of pain may impede short-term recovery and have a detrimental long-term effect on health. This study focuses on Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA), which is a delivery system for pain medication. This study proposes and demonstrates how to use machine learning and data mining techniques to predict analgesic requirements and PCA readjustment. Methods The sample in this study included 1099 patients. Every patient was described by 280 attributes, including the class attribute. In addition to commonly studied demographic and physiological factors, this study emphasizes attributes related to PCA. We used decision tree-based learning algorithms to predict analgesic consumption and PCA control readjustment based on the first few hours of PCA medications. We also developed a nearest neighbor-based data cleaning method to alleviate the class-imbalance problem in PCA setting readjustment prediction. Results The prediction accuracies of total analgesic consumption (continuous dose and PCA dose) and PCA analgesic requirement (PCA dose only) by an ensemble of decision trees were 80.9% and 73.1%, respectively. Decision tree-based learning outperformed Artificial Neural Network, Support Vector Machine, Random Forest, Rotation Forest, and Naïve Bayesian classifiers in analgesic consumption prediction. The proposed data cleaning method improved the performance of every learning method in this study of PCA setting readjustment prediction. Comparative analysis identified the informative attributes from the data mining models and compared them with the correlates of analgesic requirement reported in previous works. Conclusion This study presents a real-world application of data mining to anesthesiology. Unlike previous research, this study considers a wider variety of predictive factors, including PCA demands over time. We analyzed

  4. Nurses' Perceptions and Attitudes Toward Use of Oral Patient-Controlled Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Riemondy, Susan; Gonzalez, Lorie; Gosik, Kirk; Ricords, Amy; Schirm, Victoria

    2016-04-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) administered intravenously is a generally well-accepted therapy by nurses and patients. PCA devices are now available for oral medications, allowing patients to self-administer pain pills without requesting them from the nurse. Successful introduction of new pain medication delivery devices can depend on nurses' knowledge and attitudes. The aim of this institutional review board approved project was to evaluate nurses' perceptions and attitudes toward using an oral PCA device for patients' pain. A 4-week study was designed and conducted at an academic medical center on an orthopedic unit and a women's health unit. Nurse participants received education on using the oral PCA device and were invited to complete a pre- and poststudy knowledge and attitude survey regarding pain management. Nurses and patients also completed a questionnaire about perceptions related to using the oral PCA device. Findings showed that nurses' attitudes toward using the oral PCA device were less favorable than those of patients, suggesting that nurses may require additional education for acceptance of this device. Results from 37 nurses showed improvement in overall knowledge and attitudes, from 70.8% pretest to 74.2% post-test. Although improvement was not statistically significant (p = .1637), two items showed significant improvement. Knowledge about the effectiveness of NSAIDS was 27.5% pretest compared with 60.0% post-test (p = .0028); and understanding about use of opioids in patients with a history of substance abuse was 50% pretest compared with 70% post-test (p = .0531). Helping nurses overcome the perceived barriers to use of an oral PCA device has potential implications for better pain management as well as enhanced patient satisfaction. PMID:27091584

  5. Epidural Analgesia With Bupivacaine and Fentanyl Versus Ropivacaine and Fentanyl for Pain Relief in Labor: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shanbin; Li, Bo; Gao, Chengjie; Tian, Yue

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of the combinational use of bupivacaine and fentanyl versus ropivacaine and fentanyl in epidural analgesia for labor. Multiple electronic databases were searched by using appropriate MeSH terms, and keywords for original research papers published before October 2014. Meta-analyses were based on mean differences between the groups as well as odds ratios. Statistical heterogeneity was tested by I² index. Fifteen randomized controlled trials, recruiting 2097 parturient mothers overall, were selected for the meta-analyses. Concentrations of the preparations used (weight/volume; mean and standard deviations) were bupivacaine 0.1023% ± 0.0375%, ropivacaine 0.1095% ± 0.042%, and fentanyl 0.00021% ± 0.000089%. There were no statistically significant differences between both the combinations in the mean change in Visual Analog Score for pain during labor, incidence of instrumental or cesarean delivery, neonate Apgar score of <7, maternal satisfaction, duration of either first or second stage of labor, oxytocin use for induction, onset of analgesia, and duration of analgesia. Women who received ropivacaine and fentanyl had significantly lower incidence of motor blocks (odds ratio [95% CI] = 0.38 [0.30, 0.48] P < 0.00001, fixed effect and 0.38 [0.27, 0.54] P < 0.0001, random effects I² 30%) when compared with women who received bupivacaine and fentanyl. Incidence of side effects was similar for both the combinations. Analgesia with ropivacaine in combination with fentanyl at 0.1%:0.0002% ratio for labor pain relief is associated with lower incidence of motor blocks in comparison with analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl at similar ratio (0.1%: 0.0002%). PMID:26061307

  6. Epidural dexamethasone for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy: A dose ranging and safety evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    Hefni, Amira Fathy; Mahmoud, Mohamed Sidky; Al Alim, Azza Atef Abd

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Number of studies revealed that epidural bupivacaine-dexamethasone has the same analgesic potency as bupivacaine-fentanyl with opioid sparing and antiemetic effects. Different doses of dexamethasone were used in different studies. This study was designed to evaluate the optimum dose of epidural dexamethasone for post-operative analgesia. Materials and Methods: In this double-blinded randomized controlled study, we evaluated the efficiency and safety of different doses of epidural dexamethasone for post-operative analgesia in 160 patients aged 45-60 years scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy. Patient were randomly allocated into four groups to receive a total volume of 10 ml epidural plain bupivacaine 0.25% in the control group (Group D0) with either 4 mg dexamethasone in (Group D4) or 6 mg dexamethasone in (Group D6) or 8 mg dexamethasone in (Group D8). Patients then received general anesthesia. Sedation, satisfaction and visual analog pain scores (VAS) at rest and with effort were measured post-operatively. Meperidine was administered when VAS > or = 4. Intra-operative fentanyl dose, post-operative meperidine consumption and the time to first analgesic requirement were recorded by a blinded observer. Blood glucose was measured pre-operatively and at 4 h and 8 h after study drug administration. Wound healing and infection were assessed after 1 week. Results: Intraoperative fentanyl requirements were comparable among groups. The time to first analgesic requirement was significantly prolonged 5.5 times in D8 Group but only 1.5 times in D6 and D4 Groups more than the analgesic duration in the control Group D0, with a P < 0.01. There was a significant reduction in post-operative meperidine consumption during the first 24 h in the D8 (75%) in comparison with D6 and D4 Groups (50%), respectively, (P < 0.01) and the control Group D0 (0%) (P < 0.01). VAS scores were significantly lower and patient satisfaction score was significantly higher in the D8 and

  7. The Impact of Labour Epidural Analgesia on the Childbirth Expectation and Experience at a Tertiary Care Center in Southern India.

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Hitanshu; Pandya, Sunil; Kolar, Geeta; Nirmalan, Praveen Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Labour epidural analgesia is increasingly used as a means of pain relief for women during labour and delivery. The significant pain during labour and delivery can be terrifying for mothers-to-be and the prospect of relief from pain can help reduce fear of childbirth to an extent. However, it is not necessary that reduced fear of childbirth may lead to an increased satisfaction with the childbirth experience. Aim: To determine the influence of labour epidural analgesia (LEA) on the experience of childbirth in pregnant women at a tertiary care center in southern India Materials and Methods: A pre-post interventional non-randomized study design at a tertiary care perinatal institute that used the Wijma Delivery Expectation and Experience questionnaires to determine baseline expectations of labour and childbirth and the actual experience in pregnant women. Labour analgesia was provided on maternal request or demand. Total and domain scores were compared between the two groups using non-parametric tests and a generalized linear repeated measures model after adjusting for factors that were found significant in the bivariate model. Results: The study included 235 pregnant women who opted for LEA and 219 pregnant women who opted against LEA. Overall, 37 (15.74%) of woman with LEA and 30 (13.70%) of women without LEA had a worse than expected experience of childbirth. Significant pain relief (p<0.001) was provided with LEA, however, the post-delivery scores did not differ significantly between the two groups (F=0.90, p=0.34) in a generalized linear repeated measures model. Conclusion: Maternal satisfaction with the process of childbirth is a complex dynamic that is not limited to the significant relief from pain provided by LEA. PMID:24783086

  8. The antinociceptive effects of epidural opiates in the cat: studies of the pharmacology and the effects of lipophilicity in spinal analgesia.

    PubMed

    Tung, A S; Yaksh, T L

    1982-04-01

    In cats implanted chronically with catheters in the lumbar epidural space, the pharmacology of the analgesia of 4 opiates, which varied widely in their physicochemical properties, was studied. Results revealed the following order of epidural analgesic potency as indicated by suppression of the spinally mediate skin twitch reflex: lofentanyl greater than morphine greater than L-methadone greater than meperidine greater than D-methadone. With the doses used in these experiments the duration of action was: morphine greater than lofentanyl greater than L-methadone = meperidine. In addition, antagonism of these effects by systemic naloxone and the development of tolerance after daily epidural administration of morphine were demonstrated. These data, jointly, indicate a specific receptor mechanism of action. We suggest that this animal model may be useful for the evaluation of new opiates and non-opiates to be given via the epidural route. PMID:7099701

  9. A Comparison of the Analgesia Efficacy and Side Effects of Paravertebral Compared with Epidural Blockade for Thoracotomy: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaoyin; Ren, Hao; Fu, Shukun; Li, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Objective The most recent systematic review and meta-analysis comparing the analgesic efficacy and side effects of paravertebral and epidural blockade for thoracotomy was published in 2006. Nine well-designed randomized trials with controversial results have been published since then. The present report constitutes an updated meta-analysis of this issue. Summary of Background Thoracotomy is a major surgical procedure and is associated with severe postoperative pain. Epidural analgesia is the gold standard for post-thoracotomy pain management, but has its limitations and contraindications, and paravertebral blockade is increasingly popular. However, it has not been decided whether the analgesic effect of the two methods is comparable, or whether paravertebral blockade leads to a lower incidence of adverse side effects after thoracotomy. Methods Two reviewers independently searched the databases PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (last performed on 1 February, 2013) for reports of studies comparing post-thoracotomy epidural analgesia and paravertebral blockade. The same individuals independently extracted data from the appropriate studies. Result Eighteen trials involving 777 patients were included in the current analysis. There was no significant difference in pain scores between paravertebral blockade and epidural analgesia at 4–8, 24, 48 hours, and the rates of pulmonary complications and morphine usage during the first 24 hours were also similar. However, paravertebral blockade was better than epidural analgesia in reducing the incidence of urinary retention (p<0.0001), nausea and vomiting (p = 0.01), hypotension (p<0.00001), and rates of failed block were lower in the paravertebral blockade group (p = 0.01). Conclusions This meta-analysis showed that PVB can provide comparable pain relief to traditional EPI, and may have a better side-effect profile for pain relief after thoracic surgery. Further high-powered randomized trials are to need to

  10. Efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone in providing postoperative analgesia: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jebaraj, B; Khanna, P; Baidya, DK; Maitra, S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dexamethasone is a potent anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antiemetic drug. Individual randomized controlled trials found a possible benefit of epidural dexamethasone. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to estimate the benefit of epidural dexamethasone on postoperative pain and opioid consumption and to formulate a recommendation for evidence-based practice. Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized controlled trials comparing the analgesic efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone combination, with local anesthetic alone for postoperative pain management after abdominal surgery, were planned to be included in this meta-analysis. PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, and Central Register of Clinical Trials of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL) databases were searched for eligible controlled trials using the following search words: “Epidural”, “dexamethasone”, and “postoperative pain”, until February 20, 2015. Results: Data from five randomized control trials have been included in this meta-analysis. Epidural dexamethasone significantly decreased postoperative morphine consumption (mean difference −7.89 mg; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −11.66 to −3.71) and number of patients required postoperative rescue analgesic boluses (risk ratio: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.41-0.63). Conclusion: The present data shows that the addition of dexamethasone to local anesthetic in epidural is beneficial for postoperative pain management. PMID:27375389

  11. Thoracic epidural analgesia for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Yatin; Vats, Mayank; Sharma, Munish; Arora, Reetesh; Trehan, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    The benefits of thoracic epidural analgesia in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting are well documented. However, the literature available on the role of high thoracic epidural analgesia (HTEA) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery is scarce. We conducted a randomized clinical trial to establish whether HTEA is beneficial in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing elective OPCAB surgery. After institutional ethics board approval and informed consent, 62 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing elective OPCAB were randomly grouped into two (n = 31 each). Both groups received general anesthesia (GA), but in the HTEA group patients, TEA was also administered. Standardized surgical and anesthetic techniques were used for both the groups. Pulmonary function tests were performed pre-operatively, 6 h and 24 h post-extubation and on days 2, 3, 4 and 5 along with arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) analysis. Time for extubation (h) and time for oxygen withdrawal (h) were recorded. Pain score was assessed by the 10-cm visual analogue scale. All hemodynamic/oxygenation parameters were noted. Any complications related to the TEA were also recorded. Patients in the HTEA group were extubated earlier (10.8 h vs. 13.5 h, P < 0.01) and their oxygen withdrawal time was also significantly lower (26.26 h vs. 29.87 h, P < 0.01). The VAS score, both at rest and on coughing, was significantly lower in the HTEA group at all times, post-operatively (P < 0.01). The forced vital capacity improved significantly at 6 h post-operatively in the HTEA group (P = 0.026) and remained significantly higher thereafter. A similar trend was observed in forced expiratory volume in the first second on day 2 in the HTEA group (P = 0.024). We did not observe any significant side-effects/mortality in either group. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing

  12. Nonanalgesic benefits of combined thoracic epidural analgesia with general anesthesia in high risk elderly off pump coronary artery bypass patients

    PubMed Central

    Zawar, Bhanu Prakash; Mehta, Yatin; Juneja, Rajiv; Arora, Dheeraj; Raizada, Arun; Trehan, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Epidural anesthesia is a central neuraxial block technique with many applications. It is a versatile anesthetic technique, with applications in surgery, obstetrics and pain control. Its versatility means it can be used as an anesthetic, as an analgesic adjuvant to general anesthesia, and for postoperative analgesia. Off pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery triggers a systemic stress response as seen in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA), combined with general anesthesia (GA) attenuates the stress response to CABG. There is Reduction in levels of Plasma epinephrine, Cortisol and catecholamine surge, tumor necrosis factor-Alpha(TNF ά), interleukin-6 and leucocyte count. Design: A prospective randomised non blind study. Setting: A clinical study in a multi specialty hospital. Participants: Eighty six patients. Material and Methods/intervention: The study was approved by hospital research ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients were randomised to receive either GA plus epidural (study group) or GA only (control group). Inclusion Criteria (for participants) were -Age ≥ 70 years, Patient posted for OPCAB surgery, and patient with comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, renal dysfunction). Serum concentration of Interlukin: – 6, TNF ά, cortisol, Troponin – I, CK-MB, and HsCRP (highly sensitive C reactive protein), was compared for both the group and venous blood samples were collected and compared just after induction, at day 2, and day 5 postoperatively. Time to mobilization, extubation, total intensive care unit stay and hospital stay were noted and compared. Independent t test was used for statistical analysis. Primary Outcomes: Postoperative complications, total intensive care unit stay and hospital stay. Secondary Outcome: Stress response. Result: Study group showed

  13. Profound motor blockade with epidural ropivacaine following spinal bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Buggy, D J; Allsager, C M; Coley, S

    1999-09-01

    Ropivacaine, a relatively new amide local anaesthetic, reputedly produces less motor block than equivalent doses of bupivacaine, potentially combining high-quality analgesia with the ability to ambulate. We report two cases of prolonged, profound motor block with patient-controlled epidural analgesia using 0.1% ropivacaine, following spinal bupivacaine for Caesarean section. As there was no evidence of inadvertent intrathecal ropivacaine administration or of any neurological injury, we hypothesise that epidural ropivacaine may interact with intrathecal bupivacaine to prolong its effect. PMID:10460566

  14. A Patient-Controlled Analgesia Adaptor to Mitigate Postsurgical Pain for Combat Casualties With Multiple Limb Amputation: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Pasquina, Paul F; Isaacson, Brad M; Johnson, Elizabeth; Rhoades, Daniel S; Lindholm, Mark P; Grindle, Garrett G; Cooper, Rory A

    2016-08-01

    The use of explosive armaments during Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn has resulted in a significant number of injured U.S. service members. These weapons often generate substantial extremity trauma requiring multiple surgical procedures to preserve life, limb, and restore function. For those individuals who require multiple surgeries, the use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) devices can be an effective way to achieve adequate pain management and promote successful rehabilitation and recovery during inpatient treatment. A subpopulation of patients are unable to independently control a PCA device because of severe multiple limb dysfunction and/or loss. In response to the needs of these patients, our team designed and developed a custom adaptor to assist service members who would otherwise not be able to use a PCA. Patient feedback of the device indicated a positive response, improved independence, and overall satisfaction during inpatient hospitalization. PMID:27483540

  15. Short and Long-Term Outcomes of Epidural or Intravenous Analgesia after Esophagectomy: A Propensity-Matched Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shengquan; Rong, Tiehua

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives As a well-established technique for postoperative pain relief, the benefits of epidural analgesia (EDA) have been under debate recently. This study aimed to determine whether EDA could improve perioperative outcomes and survival in patients undergoing esophagectomy. Methods From January 2010 to December 2012, 587 consecutive cases undergoing McKeown-type esohpageactomy were retrospectively identified from a prospectively maintained database. Results After propensity-matching, incorporating baseline characteristics, 178 cases were included in each group, and patients characteristics distributions were well-balanced between two groups. Compared with intravenous analgesia, the use of EDA significantly decreased the incidence of pneumonia from 32% to 19.7% (P = 0.008), and anastomotic leakage from 23.0% to 14.0% (P = 0.029). The change in CRP level of EDA group was significantly decreased (preoperative, 6.2 vs. 6.2; POD 1, 108.1 vs. 121.3; POD 3, 131.5 vs. 137.8; POD 7, 69.3 vs. 82.1 mg/L; P = 0.044). EDA patients had a significantly longer duration of indwelling urinary catheter (P<0.001), and lower levels in both systolic (P = 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (P<0.001). There weren't significant differences in overall survival (log-rank P = 0.47) and recurrence (Gray-test P = 0.46) between two groups. Conclusions These findings revealed that EDA could attenuate inflammatory response and reduce the incidence of pneumonia and anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy, at the price of delayed urinary catheter removal and lower blood pressure. EDA remains an important component of multimodal perioperative management after esophagectomy. PMID:27110939

  16. Butorphanol and Ketamine Combined in Infusion Solutions for Patient-Controlled Analgesia Administration: A Long-Term Stability Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fuchao; Xiong, Hui; Yang, Jinguo; Fang, Baoxia; Zhu, Jun; Zhou, Benhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine in subanesthetic dose added to butorphanol has been reported to give superior pain control when used for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) after surgery. However, this admixture is not available commercially and stability data applicable to hospital practice are limited. Material/Methods The butorphanol-ketamine admixtures were prepared in polyolefin bags and stored in the dark at 4°C, 25°C, or 37°C for 15 days. The initial concentrations were 50–150 microgram/ml for butorphanol and 1–4 mg/ml for ketamine, respectively. The stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay of drug concentrations. Results Over the 15 days, all solutions were clear in appearance, and no color change or precipitation was observed among the three temperatures. The percentages of initial concentration of each drug were over 95% during the study period, and the pH value did not change significantly. Conclusions The results indicate that the drug mixtures of butorphanol and ketamine in 0.9% sodium chloride injection were stable for 15 days when stored in polyolefin bags at 4°C, 25°C, or 37°C. PMID:25896429

  17. Morphine for Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia May Inhibit Delirium Tremens: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chia-Ta; Liao, Wen-Wei; Huang, William

    2015-10-01

    Alcoholism is common among trauma patients and often lacks the appropriate monitoring. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS), including delirium tremens (DT), can be associated with significant postoperative morbidity and mortality. However, appropriate acute pain management may protect against delirium; the administration of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV - PCA) may not only alleviate pain, but also reduce the incidence of post-operative delirium. IV-PCA is widely used today; however, little attention has been paid to its influence on the development of AWS or DT post-surgery. Here we present a case in which the administration of IV-PCA may have delayed the onset of DT that interfered with postoperative care and the initiation of psychiatric consultation. The literature was reviewed to determine the potential mechanisms behind the effects of IV-PCA on the onset of AWS or DT.IV-PCA may delay the onset of DT. It is imperative to take into consideration trauma patients' psychiatric history including answers to questions on alcoholism, so that when an IV-PCA is administered and then discontinued, adequate interventions to prevent further morbidity associated with AWS and DT can be initiated in sufficient time. PMID:26512587

  18. Stability of butorphanol-tropisetron mixtures in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for patient-controlled analgesia use.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Li, Peng; Yang, Jin-Guo; Zhou, Ben-Hong

    2015-02-01

    Tropisetron is an adjuvant for butorphanol used in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and has been reported to provide superior pain control. It is efficacious in reducing the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this admixture is not available commercially and stability data applicable to hospital practice are limited. This study aimed to describe the drug compounding and evaluates the long-term (up to 14 days) stability of butorphanol and tropisetron in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for PCA use.In this study, commercial solutions of butorphanol tartrate and tropisetron hydrochloride were combined and further diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride injection to final concentrations of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL. The polyolefin bags and glass bottles were stored at 4°C and 25°C for up to 14 days. The drug stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography assay of drug concentrations.The data obtained for admixtures prepared and stored at temperatures of 25°C and 4°C show the drugs have maintained at least 98% of the initial concentration. All solutions remained clear and colorless over the 14-day period, and the pH value did not change significantly.The results indicate that admixtures of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection solution were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags or glass bottles at 4°C and 25°C and protected from light. The infusion is feasible for manufacturing in pharmacy aseptic units and can be stored for up to 14 days for routine use in PCA infusions. PMID:25674732

  19. Stability of Butorphanol–Tropisetron Mixtures in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection for Patient-Controlled Analgesia Use

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fu-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Li, Peng; Yang, Jin-Guo; Zhou, Ben-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tropisetron is an adjuvant for butorphanol used in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and has been reported to provide superior pain control. It is efficacious in reducing the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this admixture is not available commercially and stability data applicable to hospital practice are limited. This study aimed to describe the drug compounding and evaluates the long-term (up to 14 days) stability of butorphanol and tropisetron in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for PCA use. In this study, commercial solutions of butorphanol tartrate and tropisetron hydrochloride were combined and further diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride injection to final concentrations of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL. The polyolefin bags and glass bottles were stored at 4°C and 25°C for up to 14 days. The drug stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography assay of drug concentrations. The data obtained for admixtures prepared and stored at temperatures of 25°C and 4°C show the drugs have maintained at least 98% of the initial concentration. All solutions remained clear and colorless over the 14-day period, and the pH value did not change significantly. The results indicate that admixtures of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection solution were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags or glass bottles at 4°C and 25°C and protected from light. The infusion is feasible for manufacturing in pharmacy aseptic units and can be stored for up to 14 days for routine use in PCA infusions. PMID:25674732

  20. Pain Levels Within 24 Hours After UFE: A Comparison of Morphine and Fentanyl Patient-Controlled Analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun S. Czuczman, Gregory J.; Nicholson, Wanda K.; Pham, Luu D.; Richman, Jeffrey M.

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the presence and severity of pain levels during 24 h after uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) for symptomatic leiomyomata and compare the effectiveness and adverse effects of morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) versus fentanyl PCA. We carried out a prospective, nonrandomized study of 200 consecutive women who received UFE and morphine or fentanyl PCA after UFE. Pain perception levels were obtained on a 0-10 scale for the 24-h period after UFE. Linear regression methods were used to determine pain trends and differences in pain trends between two groups and the association between pain scores and patient covariates. One hundred eighty-five patients (92.5%) reported greater-than-baseline pain after UFE, and 198 patients (99%) required IV opioid PCA. One hundred thirty-six patients (68.0%) developed nausea during the 24-h period. Seventy-two patients (36%) received morphine PCA and 128 (64%) received fentanyl PCA, without demographic differences. The mean dose of morphine used was 33.8 {+-} 26.7 mg, while the mean dose of fentanyl was 698.7 {+-} 537.4 {mu}g. Using this regimen, patients who received morphine PCA had significantly lower pain levels than those who received fentanyl PCA (p < 0.0001). We conclude that patients develop pain requiring IV opioid PCA within 24 h after UFE. Morphine PCA is more effective in reducing post-uterine artery embolization pain than fentanyl PCA. Nausea is a significant adverse effect from opioid PCA.

  1. Postoperative Pain and Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia-Related Adverse Effects in Young and Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jae Chul; Lee, Jinae; Kim, So Yeon; Choi, Sumin; Han, Dong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this retrospective analysis of 10,575 patients who used fentanyl-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after surgery, we evaluated difference between young and elderly patients on their characteristic of adverse effects. We reviewed the data collected from the patients who were provided IV-PCA for pain control following elective surgery under either general or spinal anesthesia between September 2010 and March 2014. Postoperative pain, incidence of PCA-related adverse effects, and risk factors for the need of rescue analgesics and antiemetics for postoperative 48 hours were analyzed. Pain intensity (numerical rating scale [NRS]) at postoperative 6 to 12 hours (4.68 vs 4.58, P < 0.01) and incidence of nausea or vomiting (23.8% vs 20.6%, P < 0.001) were higher in young patients, while incidence of PCA discontinuation (9.9% vs 11.5%, P < 0.01) and sedation (0.1% vs 0.7%, P < 0.001) was higher in elderly patients. Despite larger fentanyl dose used, a greater proportion of young patients required rescue analgesics (53.8% vs 47.9%, P < 0.001) while addition of ketorolac was effective in reducing postoperative pain. Despite lower incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), a larger proportion of elderly patients required rescue antiemetics (10.1% vs 12.2%, P < 0.001) while addition of ramosetron was effective in reducing PONV. In conclusion, when fentanyl-based IV-PCA is used for postoperative pain control, a larger proportion of young patients may require rescue analgesics while elderly patients may require more rescue antiemetics. The addition of ketorolac or ramosetron to the PCA of young and elderly patients can be effective to prevent rescue analgesics or antiemetics use. PMID:26559296

  2. Sex Differences in the Morphine-Sparing Effects of Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine in Patient-Controlled Analgesia Following General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Ge, Dong-Jian; Li, Jin-Yu; Qi, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported that intraoperative dexmedetomidine has morphine-sparing effects in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The present study was designed to investigate the possible sex differences in the morphine-sparing effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine following general anesthesia. A total of 223 patients scheduled for surgeries under general anesthesia were divided into female and male groups. Each group was then subdivided into 2 subgroups that were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During the first 24 hours postsurgery, both female and male PRD patients had lower scores on a visual analog scale (VAS) (fPRS vs fPRD, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01; mPRS mPRD, P < 0.05, P < 0.01, or P < 0.001) and consumed less morphine than their controls from the PRS group (fPRS vs fPRD, P = 0.0392; mPRS vs mPRD, P = 0.0041). Interestingly, the female PRD patients had similar VAS scores (fPRD vs mPRD, P > 0.05) and consumed comparable morphine compared to the male PRD patients (fPRD vs mPRD, P = 0.4238). However, when normalized to body weight, they consumed much more morphine than male PRD patients (fPRD vs mPRD, P < 0.001), and this effect was not seen in the PRS patients. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appeared to have a stronger morphine-sparing effect in controlling postoperative acute pain in male patients than in female patients. PMID:27149500

  3. Thoracic epidural analgesia in obese patients with body mass index of more than 30 kg/m2 for off pump coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Munish; Mehta, Yatin; Sawhney, Ravinder; Vats, Mayank; Trehan, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Perioperative Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) is an important part of a multimodal approach to improve analgesia and patient outcome after cardiac and thoracic surgery. This is particularly important for obese patients undergoing off pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB). We conducted a randomized clinical trial at tertiary care cardiac institute to compare the effect of TEA and conventional opioid based analgesia on perioperative lung functions and pain scores in obese patients undergoing OPCAB. Sixty obese patients with body mass index >30 kg/m2 for elective OPCAB were randomized into two groups (n=30 each). Patients in both the groups received general anesthesia but in group 1, TEA was also administered. We performed spirometry as preoperative assessment and at six hours, 24 hours, second, third, fourth and fifth day after extubation, along with arterial blood gases analysis. Visual analogue scale at rest and on coughing was recorded to assess the degree of analgesia. The other parameters observed were: time to endotracheal extubation, oxygen withdrawal time and intensive care unit length of stay. On statistical analysis there was a significant difference in Vital Capacity at six hours, 24 hours, second and third day postextubation. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second followed the same pattern for first four postoperative days and peak expiratory flow rate remained statistically high till second postoperative day. ABG values and PaO2/FiO2 ratio were statistically higher in the study group up to five days. Visual analogue scale at rest and on coughing was significantly lower till fourth and third postoperative day respectively. Tracheal extubation time, oxygen withdrawal time and ICU stay were significantly less in group 1. The use of TEA resulted in better analgesia, early tracheal extubation and shorter ICU stay and should be considered for obese patients undergoing OPCAB. PMID:20075532

  4. Music does not reduce alfentanil requirement during patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) use in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for renal stones.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, M S; Diaz, J E; Hernandez, V; Daza, E; Carr, D B

    1998-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of music on opioid requirements and pain levels during renal lithotripsy using alfentanil patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), we conducted a prospective, blinded, randomized controlled trial. Patients undergoing lithotripsy were instructed in PCA use and asked to rate their anxiety and select their preferred type of music. They were then premedicated with morphine and ketorolac and randomly allocated into two groups. Group 1 (n = 97) had music started 10 min before the procedure and maintained until 10 min after its conclusion. Group 2 (n = 96) had music begun at the conclusion of lithotripsy and continued for 10 min. Pain intensity, alfentanil requirement, side effects, quality of analgesia, patient satisfaction, and acceptance of the technique were evaluated. Demographics, alfentanil requirement, pain levels, side effects, quality of analgesia, and patient satisfaction were similar in both groups. The addition of music did not provide any benefit. This result raises the possibility that some nonpharmacologic therapies have minimal impact in settings where the painful stimulus is moderate to severe and adequate pharmacotherapy is available. PMID:9879163

  5. Adjunct High Frequency Transcutaneous Electric Stimulation (TENS) for Postoperative Pain Management during Weaning from Epidural Analgesia Following Colon Surgery: Results from a Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bjerså, Kristofer; Jildenstaal, Pether; Jakobsson, Jan; Egardt, Madelene; Fagevik Olsén, Monika

    2015-12-01

    The potential benefit of nonpharmacological adjunctive therapy is not well-studied following major abdominal surgery. The aim of the present study was to investigate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) as a complementary nonpharmacological analgesia intervention during weaning from epidural analgesia (EDA) after open lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomized to TENS and sham TENS during weaning from EDA. The effects on pain at rest, following short walk, and after deep breath were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) grading. Number of patients assessed was lower than calculated because of change in clinical routine. Pain scores overall were low. A trend of lower pain scores was observed in the active TENS group of patients; a statistical significance between the groups was found for the pain lying prone in bed (p < .05). This controlled pilot study indicates benefits of TENS use in postoperative pain management during weaning from EDA after open colon surgery. Further studies are warranted in order to verify the potential beneficial effects from TENS during weaning from EDA after open, lower abdominal surgery. PMID:26541070

  6. A Comparative Study of the Efficacy of IV Dexketoprofen, Lornoxicam, and Diclophenac Sodium on Postoperative Analgesia and Tramadol Consumption in Patients Receiving Patient-Controlled Tramadol

    PubMed Central

    Kılıçkaya, Refika; Güleç, Ersel; Ünlügenç, Hakkı; Gündüz, Murat; Işık, Geylan

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to compare the effects of dexketoprofen, lornoxicam, and diclophenac sodium on postoperative analgesia and tramadol consumption in patients receiving postoperative patient-controlled tramadol after a major abdominal surgery. Methods Eighty patients were randomized to receive one of the four study drugs. Patients in group dexketoprofen (DT) received IV 50 mg dexketoprofen, group lornoxicam (LR) received IV 8 mg lornoxicam, group diclophenac sodium (DS) received 75 mg IV diclophenac sodium and group saline (S) received 0.9% saline in 2 mL syringes, 20 min before the end of anaesthesia. A standardized (1 mg kg−1) dose of tramadol was routinely administered to all patients as the loading dose at the end of surgery. Postoperatively, whenever patients requested, they were allowed to use a tramadol patient-controlled analgesia device giving a bolus dose (0.2 mg kg−1) of tramadol. Pain, discomfort, and sedation scores, cumulative tramadol consumption, supplemental meperidine requirement, and side effects were recorded. Results Visual rating scale and patient discomfort scores were significantly lower in DT, LR and DS groups compared to those in in group S (p<0.001). Cumulative tramadol consumption was significantly lower in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-treated groups at each study period after the second postoperative hour than in group S (p<0.001). Supplemental meperidine requirement was significantly higher in group S at each study period after postoperative 30 min than in NSAID-treated groups (p<0.01). Conclusion After major abdominal surgery, adding IV diclophenac, lornoxicam or dexketoprofen to patient-controlled tramadol resulted in lower pain scores, smaller tramadol consumption, less rescue supplemental analgesic requirement, and fewer side effects compared with the tramadol alone group. PMID:27366491

  7. The efficacy of the time-scheduled decremental continuous infusion of fentanyl for postoperative patient-controlled analgesia after total intravenous anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Yeop; Park, Sung-Yong; Chang, Hyuk Soo; Nam, Si-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Background Intravenous fentanyl has been used for acute postoperative pain management, but has not always provided reliable adequate analgesia, including patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of time-scheduled decremental infusion of fentanyl for postoperative analgesia. Methods Ninety-nine patients, aged 20-65 years, undergoing laparoscopic-assisted hysterectomy using total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) were randomly assigned into one of the three groups. Their background infusions of fentanyl diluent (2 ml/hr of diluent was equivalent with 0.5 µg/kg/hr of fentanyl) with PCA were maintained at the fixed-rate of 2 ml/hr until the postoperative 24 hr (FX2-2-2), or at the decremental rates of 6.0, 4.0, 2.0 ml/hr (D6-4-2) and 8.0, 4.0, 2.0 ml/hr (D8-4-2). The visual analogue score (VAS), incidence of inadequate analgesia, frequency of PCA intervention, and side effects were evaluated. Results VAS was significantly higher in FX2-2-2 than in D6-4-2 and D8-4-2 until postoperative 3 hr (P < 0.05). After postoperative 4 hr, VAS was significantly higher in FX2-2-2 than D8-4-2 (P < 0.05). The incidence of inadequate analgesia of FX2-2-2 was significantly greater than D6-4-2 (P = 0.038) and D8-4-2 (P < 0.001) until postoperative 1 hr. None of the patients had ventilatory depression, and postoperative nausea and vomiting were not significant among the groups. Conclusions The time-scheduled decremental background infusion regimens of fentanyl, based on the pharmacokinetic model, could provide more effective postoperative pain management after TIVA, and the side effects and the risk for morbidity were not different from the fixed-rate infusion regimen. PMID:24427461

  8. Local infiltration analgesia in hip and knee arthroplasty: an emerging technique.

    PubMed

    Dillon, John P; Brennan, Louise; Mitchell, David

    2012-04-01

    The optimal form of post-operative analgesia in hip and knee arthroplasty is still debated. Traditionally, patient-controlled analgesia and epidural anaesthesia were used. Potential side-effects such as nausea, confusion, urinary retention, hypotension and immobility have resulted in the emergence of newer techniques that limit opioid use. Peripheral nerve blockade provides excellent analgesia but limits patient ability to ambulate in the immediate post-operative period. Local infiltrative analgesia (LIA) is an emerging technique that has shown to provide superior analgesia, higher patient satisfaction and earlier discharge from hospital when compared to some of the more traditional methods. This review article highlights the advantages of LIA in hip and knee arthroplasty surgery. We describe the technique used, including additional measures that aid early ambulation and discharge from hospital in this cohort of patients. PMID:22696983

  9. The ON-Q pain management system in elective gynecology oncologic surgery: Management of postoperative surgical site pain compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Dawn; Lee, Yoo Jin; Jo, Mi Hyun; Park, Hyun Jong; Lim, Ga Won; Cho, Hanbyoul; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Young Tae

    2013-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to compare postoperative surgical site pain in gynecologic cancer patients who underwent elective extended lower midline laparotomy and managed their pain with either the ON-Q pain management system (surgical incision site pain relief system, ON-Q pump) or an intravenous patient-controlled analgesia pump (IV PCA). Methods Twenty gynecologic cancer patients who underwent elective extended lower midline laparotomy were divided into two groups. One group received a 72-hour continuous wound perfusion of the local anesthetic ropivacaine (0.5%, study group) into the supraperitoneal layer of the abdominal incision through the ON-Q pump. The other group received intravenous infusion pump of patient-controlled analgesia (fentanyl citrate 20 mg/mL · kg+ondansetron hydrochloride 16 mg/8 mL+normal saline). Postoperative pain was assessed immediately and at 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after surgery using the visual analogue scale. Results Postoperative surgical site pain scores at 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery were lower in the ON-Q group than the IV PCA group. Pain scores at 24 hours and 48 hours after surgery were significantly different between the two groups (P=0.023, P<0.001). Overall painkiller administration was higher in the ON-Q group but this difference was not statistically significant (5.1 vs. 4.3, P=0.481). Conclusion This study revealed that the ON-Q pain management system is a more effective approach than IV PCA for acute postoperative surgical site pain relief after extended lower midline laparotomy in gynecologic cancer patients. PMID:24327987

  10. Sufentanil Sublingual Tablet System vs. Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia with Morphine for Postoperative Pain Control: A Randomized, Active-Comparator Trial

    PubMed Central

    Melson, Timothy I; Boyer, David L; Minkowitz, Harold S; Turan, Alparslan; Chiang, Yu-Kun; Evashenk, Mark A; Palmer, Pamela P

    2014-01-01

    Background Problems with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) are well known, including invasive route of delivery and pump programming errors. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with a novel sublingual sufentanil PCA system (sufentanil sublingual tablet system 15 mcg with a 20-minute lockout interval; SSTS) to IV PCA morphine sulfate 1 mg with a 6-minute lockout interval (IV PCA MS) for the management of acute postoperative pain. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, 48-hour non-inferiority study with optional extension to 72 hours at 26 U.S. sites enrolling patients scheduled for elective major open abdominal or orthopedic (hip or knee replacement) surgery. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients who responded “good” or “excellent” (collectively “success”) at the 48-hour timepoint on the Patient Global Assessment of method of pain control (PGA48). Results A total of 357 patients received study drug and 78.5% vs. 65.6% of patients achieved PGA48 “success” for SSTS vs. IV PCA MS, respectively, demonstrating non-inferiority (P < 0.001 using the one-side Z-test against the non-inferiority margin) as well as statistical superiority for treatment effect (P = 0.007). Patients using SSTS reported more rapid onset of analgesia and patient and nurse ease of care and satisfaction scores were higher than IV PCA MS. Adverse events were similar between the 2 groups; however, SSTS had fewer patients experiencing oxygen desaturations below 95% compared to IV PCA MS (P = 0.028). Conclusions Sufentanil sublingual tablet system is a promising new analgesic technology that may address some of the concerns with IV PCA. PMID:25155134

  11. PAin SoluTions In the Emergency Setting (PASTIES)—patient controlled analgesia versus routine care in emergency department patients with pain from traumatic injuries: randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, Mark; Squire, Rosalyn; Hayward, Chris; Ewings, Paul; Barton, Andy; Pritchard, Colin; Eyre, Victoria; Cocking, Laura; Benger, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is better than routine care in patients presenting to emergency departments with moderate to severe pain from traumatic injuries. Design Pragmatic, multicentre, parallel group, randomised controlled trial. Setting Five English hospitals. Participants 200 adults (71% (n=142) male), aged 18 to 75 years, who presented to the emergency department requiring intravenous opioid analgesia for the treatment of moderate to severe pain from traumatic injuries and were expected to be admitted to hospital for at least 12 hours. Interventions PCA (n=99) or nurse titrated analgesia (treatment as usual; n=101). Main outcome measures The primary outcome was total pain experienced over the 12 hour study period, derived by standardised area under the curve (scaled from 0 to 100) of each participant’s hourly pain scores, captured using a visual analogue scale. Pre-specified secondary outcomes included total morphine use, percentage of study period in moderate/severe pain, percentage of study period asleep, length of hospital stay, and satisfaction with pain management. Results 200 participants were included in the primary analyses. Mean total pain experienced was 47.2 (SD 21.9) for the treatment as usual group and 44.0 (24.0) for the PCA group. Adjusted analyses indicated slightly (but not statistically significantly) lower total pain experienced in the PCA group than in the routine care group (mean difference 2.7, 95% confidence interval −2.4 to 7.8). Participants allocated to PCA used more morphine in total than did participants in the treatment as usual group (mean 44.3 (23.2) v 27.2 (18.2) mg; mean difference 17.0, 11.3 to 22.7). PCA participants spent, on average, less time in moderate/severe pain (36.2% (31.0) v 44.1% (31.6)), but the difference was not statistically significant. A higher proportion of PCA participants reported being perfectly or very satisfied compared with the treatment as usual group (86

  12. Effects of Combined Spinal-Epidural Analgesia during Labor on Postpartum Electrophysiological Function of Maternal Pelvic Floor Muscle: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiao-Ming; Huang, Li; Lao, Cheng-Yi; Yang, Mei; Gao, Shan; Huang, Qiong-Yan; Yang, Wei; Zhu, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Di-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective Combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) is sometimes used for difficult births, but whether it contributes to postpartum pelvic muscle disorder is unclear. This randomized controlled trial examined whether CSEA given during labor affects the electrophysiological index of postpartum pelvic floor muscle function. Methods A consecutive sample of primiparous women who delivered vaginally at term were randomly assigned to a CSEA group (n = 143) and control group (n = 142) between June 2013 and June 2014. All were assessed 6–8 weeks later for electrophysiological function of pelvic floor muscle. Results The two groups were similar in the degree of muscle strength, muscle fatigue, and pelvic dynamic pressure of pelvic floor muscle. The CSEA and control groups showed similar proportions of women with normal muscle strength (score ≥4) in type I pelvic fibers (23.1% vs. 14.1%, P = 0.051) and type II pelvic fibers (28.0% vs. 24.6%, P = 0.524). The groups also contained similar proportions of women who showed no fatigue in type I fibers (54.5% vs. 48.6%, P = 0.315) or type II fibers (88.8% vs. 87.3%, P = 0.699). Similarly low proportions of women in the CSEA group and control group showed normal pelvic dynamic pressure (11.2% vs. 7.7%, P = 0.321). However, women in the CSEA group spent significantly less time in labor than those in the control group (7.25 vs. 9.52 h, P <0.001). Conclusions CSEA did not affect the risk of postpartum pelvic muscle disorder in this cohort of primiparous women who gave birth vaginally. A significant shorter duration of labour was observed in the CSEA-group. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02334150 PMID:26340002

  13. Physico-chemical stability of butorphanol-tramadol and butorphanol-fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia infusion solutions over 168 hours.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fuchao; Fang, Baoxia; Li, Peng; Zhu, Xuesong; Zhou, Benhong

    2014-08-01

    This study was to investigate the physical and chemical compatibility of butorphanol with tramadol or fentanyl in 0.9% sodium chloride injections for patient controlled analgesia administration. The solutions were prepared in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) infusion bags and stored without protected from light exposure at room temperature (25 degrees C) or refrigerated (4 degrees C). Over a period of 168 hours, stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay of drug concentrations. At both temperatures, admixtures of butorphanol-tramadol and butorphanol-fentanyl were clear in appearance, and no color change or precipitation was observed during the study period. The maximum losses obtained were lower than 5% for the three drugs after 168 hours of storage. The results indicate that, at ambient or refrigerated storage conditions, the drug mixtures of butorphanol-tramadol and butorphanol-fentanyl in 0.9% sodium chloride injections were physically and chemically stable for at least 168 hours when stored in PVC syringes. PMID:25158568

  14. Comparison of palonosetron with ondansetron in prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after gynecological laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Soo Yeong; Song, Dong Un; Lee, Ki Hyun; Song, Jae Wook; Kwon, Young Eun

    2013-01-01

    Background Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are common complications after anesthesia and surgery. This study was designed to compare the effects of palonosetron and ondansetron in preventing PONV in high-risk patients receiving intravenous opioid-based patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after gynecological laparoscopic surgery. Methods One hundred non-smoking female patients scheduled for gynecological laparoscopic surgery were randomly assigned into the palonosetron group (n = 50) or the ondansetron group (n = 50). Palonosetron 0.075 mg was injected as a bolus in the palonosetron group. Ondansetron 8 mg was injected as a bolus and 16 mg was added to the IV-PCA in the ondansetron group. The incidences of nausea, vomiting and side effects was recorded at 2 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h, postoperatively. Results There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidence of PONV during 72 h after operation. However, the incidence of vomiting was lower in the palonosetron group than in the ondansetron group (18% vs. 4%, P = 0.025). No differences were observed in use of antiemetics and the side effects between the groups. Conclusions The effects of palonosetron and ondansetron in preventing PONV were similar in high-risk patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopic surgery and receiving opioid-based IV-PCA. PMID:23459499

  15. Is a single low dose of intrathecal morphine a useful adjunct to patient-controlled analgesia for postoperative pain control following lumbar spine surgery? A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Yen, David; Turner, Kim; Mark, David

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies addressing intrathecal morphine (ITM) use following spine surgery have been published either involving the pediatric population, using mid- to high-dose ITM, or not in conjunction with morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether low-dose ITM is a useful adjunct to PCA for postoperative pain control following elective lumbar spine surgery in adults. METHODS: Thirty-two patients were enrolled in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial, and received either ITM or intrathecal placebo. Postoperatively, all patients were given a PCA pump and observed for the first 24 h in a step-down unit. Measurements of: total PCA morphine consumed in the first 24 h; intensity of pain; pruritus; nausea at 4 h, 8 h and 24 h; time to first ambulation; length of hospital stay; and occurrences of respiratory depression were recorded. RESULTS: The total PCA use was significantly lower in the ITM group. There were lower average pain scores in the ITM group, which increased to that of the intrathecal placebo group over 24 h; however, this failed to attain statistical significance. There were no differences in nausea, pruritus, time to first ambulation or hospital length stay. There were no cases of respiratory depression in either group. CONCLUSIONS: ITM may be a useful adjunct to PCA, but did not decrease time to ambulation or length of stay. PMID:25996764

  16. Efficacy of subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetics after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joonho; Haam, Seokjin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study compared the efficacy and side effects of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) with those of a subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetic (ON-Q system) in patients undergoing thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients who underwent thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer from January 2014 to August 2015 (36 in the IV-PCA group and 30 in the ON-Q group). The numeric pain intensity scale (NPIS), additional IV injections for pain control, side effects, and early discontinuation of the pain control device were compared. Results There were no differences in the general characteristics of the two groups. The NPIS scores gradually decreased with time (P<0.001), but the two groups had differences in pattern of NPIS scores (P=0.111). There were no differences in the highest NPIS score during admission (4.75±2.35 vs. 5.27±1.87, P=0.334) or the number of additional IV injections for pain control in the same period (0.72±0.94 for IV-PCA vs. 0.83±0.65 for ON-Q; P=0.575). Side effects such as nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness were significantly more frequent with IV-PCA (36.1% vs. 10.0%, P=0.014), and early discontinuation of the pain control device was more frequent in the IV-PCA group (33.3% vs. 6.7%, P=0.008). Conclusions The ON-Q system was equivalent to the IV-PCA for postoperative pain control after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer, and it also had fewer effects and early discontinuations. PMID:27499973

  17. Sex Differences in the Morphine-Sparing Effects of Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine in Patient-Controlled Analgesia Following General Anesthesia: A Consort-Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Ge, Dong-Jian; Li, Jin-Yu; Qi, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that intraoperative dexmedetomidine has morphine-sparing effects in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The present study was designed to investigate the possible sex differences in the morphine-sparing effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine following general anesthesia. A total of 223 patients scheduled for surgeries under general anesthesia were divided into female and male groups. Each group was then subdivided into 2 subgroups that were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During the first 24 hours postsurgery, both female and male PRD patients had lower scores on a visual analog scale (VAS) (fPRS vs fPRD, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01; mPRS mPRD, P < 0.05, P < 0.01, or P < 0.001) and consumed less morphine than their controls from the PRS group (fPRS vs fPRD, P = 0.0392; mPRS vs mPRD, P = 0.0041). Interestingly, the female PRD patients had similar VAS scores (fPRD vs mPRD, P > 0.05) and consumed comparable morphine compared to the male PRD patients (fPRD vs mPRD, P = 0.4238). However, when normalized to body weight, they consumed much more morphine than male PRD patients (fPRD vs mPRD, P < 0.001), and this effect was not seen in the PRS patients. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appeared to have a stronger morphine-sparing effect in controlling postoperative acute pain in male patients than in female patients. PMID:27149500

  18. The effect of combination treatment using palonosetron and dexamethasone for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting versus dexamethasone alone in women receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Seung-hwa; Yoo, Jae Hwa; Kim, Mun Gyu; Lee, Ki Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of palonosetron combined with dexamethasone for the prevention of PONV compared to dexamethasone alone in women who received intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) using fentanyl. Methods In this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 204 healthy female patients who were scheduled to undergo elective surgery under general anesthesia followed by IV-PCA for postoperative pain control were enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups: the PD group (palonosetron 0.075 mg and dexamethasone 5 mg IV; n = 102) and the D group (dexamethasone 5 mg IV; n = 102). The treatments were given after the induction of anesthesia. The incidence of nausea, vomiting, severity of nausea, and the use of rescue anti-emetics during the first 48 hours after surgery were evaluated. Results The incidence of PONV was significantly lower in the PD group compared with the D group during the 0-24 hours (43 vs. 59%) and 0-48 hours after surgery (45 vs. 63%) (P < 0.05). The severity of nausea during the 6-24 hours after surgery was significantly less in the PD group compared with the D group (P < 0.05). The incidence of rescue antiemetic used was significantly lower in the PD group than in the D group during the 0-6 hours after surgery (13.1 vs. 24.5%) (P < 0.05). Conclusions Palonosetron combined with dexamethasone was more effective in preventing PONV compared to dexamethasone alone in women receiving IV-PCA using fentanyl. PMID:26045930

  19. The analgesic effect of combined treatment with intranasal S-ketamine and intranasal midazolam compared with morphine patient-controlled analgesia in spinal surgery patients: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Riediger, Christine; Haschke, Manuel; Bitter, Christoph; Fabbro, Thomas; Schaeren, Stefan; Urwyler, Albert; Ruppen, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Ketamine is a well-known analgesic and dose-dependent anesthetic used in emergency and disaster medicine. Recently, a new formulation of S-ketamine, as an intranasal spray, was developed and tested in our institution in healthy volunteers. The authors investigated the effect of intranasal S-ketamine spray combined with midazolam intranasal spray in postoperative spinal surgery patients. Materials and methods In this prospective, computer-randomized, double-blinded noninferiority study in spinal surgery patients, the effects of intranasal S-ketamine and midazolam were compared with standard morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The primary end point was the numeric rating scale pain score 24 hours after surgery. Results Twenty-two patients finished this study, eleven in each group. There were similar numeric rating scale scores in the morphine PCA and the S-ketamine-PCA groups at 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery during rest as well as in motion. There were no differences in the satisfaction scores at any time between the groups. The number of bolus demands and deliveries was not significantly different. Discussion In our study, we found that an S-ketamine intranasal spray combined with intra-nasal midazolam was similar in effectiveness, satisfaction, number of demands/deliveries of S-ketamine and morphine, and number/severity of adverse events compared with standard intravenous PCA with morphine. S-ketamine can be regarded as an effective alternative for a traditional intravenous morphine PCA in the postoperative setting. PMID:25709497

  20. Surgically placed abdominal wall catheters on postoperative analgesia and outcomes after living liver donation.

    PubMed

    Khan, James; Katz, Joel; Montbriand, Janice; Ladak, Salima; McCluskey, Stuart; Srinivas, Coimbatore; Ko, Raynauld; Grant, David; Bradbury, Ashleene; LeManach, Yannick; Clarke, Hance

    2015-04-01

    Living donor liver resections are associated with significant postoperative pain. Epidural analgesia is the gold standard for postoperative pain management, although it is often refused or contraindicated. Surgically placed abdominal wall catheters (AWCs) are a novel pain modality that can potentially provide pain relief for those patients who are unable to receive an epidural. A retrospective review was performed at a single center. Patients were categorized according to their postoperative pain modality: intravenous (IV) patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), AWCs with IV PCA, or patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA). Pain scores, opioid consumption, and outcomes were compared for the first 3 postoperative days. Propensity score matches (PSMs) were performed to adjust for covariates and to confirm the primary analysis. The AWC group had significantly lower mean morphine-equivalent consumption on postoperative day 3 [18.1 mg, standard error (SE)=3.1 versus 28.2 mg, SE=3.0; P=0.02] and mean cumulative morphine-equivalent consumption (97.2 mg, SE=7.2 versus 121.0 mg, SE=9.1; P=0.04) in comparison with the IV PCA group; the difference in cumulative-morphine equivalent remained significant in the PSMs. AWC pain scores were higher than those in the PCEA group and were similar to the those in the IV PCA group. The AWC group had a lower incidence of pruritus and a shorter hospital stay in comparison with the PCEA group and had a lower incidence of sedation in comparison with both groups. Time to ambulation, nausea, and vomiting were comparable among all 3 groups. The PSMs confirmed all results except for a decrease in the length of stay in comparison with PCEA. AWCs may be an alternative to epidural analgesia after living donor liver resections. Randomized trials are needed to verify the benefits of AWCs, including the safety and adverse effects. PMID:25546011

  1. Postoperative continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine has comparable analgesic effects and fewer complications as compared to traditional patient-controlled analgesia with sufentanil in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Tang, Jun; Jin, Li; Li, Wei-Yan; Zhang, Li-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the postoperative analgesic effects of continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine with traditional patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with sufentanil after non-cardiac thoracotomy. Methods: One hundred and twenty adult patients undergoing open thoracotomy were recruited into this assessor-blinded, randomized study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive analgesia through a wound catheter placed below the fascia and connected to a 2 ml/h ropivacaine 0.5% (RWI group) or sufentanil PCA (SPCA group). Analgesia continued for 48 h. Visual analogue scores (VAS) at rest and movement, Ramsay scores and adverse effects were recorded at 2, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after surgery. Three months after discharge, patient’s satisfaction, residual pain and surgical wound complications were assessed. Results: General characteristics of patients were comparable between two groups. There were no statistical differences in the VAS scores and postoperative pethidine consumption between two groups (P > 0.05). However, when compared with SPCA group, the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness and respiratory depression, ICU stay and hospital expenditure reduced significantly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Patients’ satisfaction with pain management was also improved markedly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Continuous wound infusion with ropivacaine is effective for postoperative analgesia and has comparable effects to traditional PCA with sufentanil. Furthermore, this therapy may also reduce the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness, respiratory depression and decrease the ICU stay and hospital expenditure. PMID:26131121

  2. Pain control of thoracoscopic major pulmonary resection: is pre-emptive local bupivacaine injection able to replace the intravenous patient controlled analgesia?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee Chul; Lee, Ja-young; Ahn, Soyeon; Cho, Sukki; Kim, Kwhanmien; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this open-label, non-inferiority trial was to evaluate whether pre-emptive local bupivacaine injection (PLBI) can replace intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IV PCA) in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) major pulmonary resection. Methods A total of 86 patients scheduled for VATS segmentectomy/lobectomy were randomly assigned into two groups. The PLBI group (n=42) received 0.5% bupivacaine wound infiltration before skin incision, and the IV PCA group (n=44) received a continuous infusion of fentanyl with a basal rate of 10 µg/mL/h. Visual analogue scale (VAS; range, 0-10) was measured as the primary endpoint. The secondary endpoint was an additional use of analgesics and drug induced side effects. Results Both groups showed no difference in terms of age, sex, disease entity, operation time, chest tube indwelling time, and hospital stay. Serial pain scores between the PLBI and IV PCA groups demonstrated no statistical differences (non-inferiority margin; ΔVAS =1.0) (Recovery room: 8.3±2.1 vs. 8.5±1.7; Day 0: 5.1±1.6 vs. 5.2±1.4; Day 1: 3.5±1.6 vs. 3.3±1.2; Day 2: 2.7±1.3 vs. 2.5±1.2; Day 3: 2.3±1.3 vs. 2.1±1.5; 1 week after discharge: 3.0±1.7 vs. 2.8±1.5; 1 month: 1.9±1.2 vs. 2.3±1.4 and 2 months: 1.5±1.2 vs. 1.3±1.2; 95% confidential interval (CI) of ΔVAS <1.0; P>0.05). The mean one-additional usage of IV analgesics was needed in the PLBI group (3.3±2.1 vs. 2.3±1.3; P=0.03). The occurrence of nausea/vomiting was higher in the IV PCA group (12.5% vs. 38.9%; P=0.026) and 41.7% of IV PCA patients experienced drug side effects that required IV PCA removal within postoperative day (POD) 1. Conclusions PLBI is a simple, safe, effective, and economical method, which is not inferior to IV PCA in VATS major pulmonary resection. PMID:26716034

  3. The Assessment of Addition of Either Intravenous Paracetamol or Diclofenac Suppositories to Patient-Controlled Morphine Analgesia for Postgastrectomy Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Bameshki, Alireza; Peivandi Yazdi, Arash; Sheybani, Shima; Rezaei Boroujerdi, Hengameh; Taghavi Gilani, Mehryar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Major surgical procedures, such as gastrectomy, result in extensive postoperative pain, which can lead to increased morbidity, discomfort and dissatisfaction among the patients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding diclofenac suppositories or intravenous paracetamol, on morphine consumption and on the quality of postgastrectomy pain control. Patients and Methods: This randomized double blinded clinical trial was carried out in 90 patients with gastric cancer, who were candidates for gastrectomy, which were divided into three similar groups. The patients were transferred to an intensive care unit after the operation and received patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine, morphine PCA plus intravenous paracetamol 1 g, every 6 hours, and morphine PCA plus diclofenac suppositories, 100 mg every 8 hours. The patients were evaluated for up to 24 hours after the operation for the severity of pain, alertness, and opioid complications. Results: There was no significant difference in pain scores among the three groups (P values, after extubation, at 2, 4, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours were 0.72, 0.19, 0.21, 0.66, 0.54, 0.56, and 0.25, respectively), although morphine consumption was greater in the morphine group, compared with the other two groups (21.4 ± 7.7 mg in morphine group vs. 14.3 ± 5.8 mg in morphine-paracetamol group and 14.3 ± 3.9 in morphine-diclofenac group; P = 0.001). In morphine group, during the first 24 hours, the patients had lower levels of consciousness (P values, after extubation, at 2, 4, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hour were 0.6, 0.95, 0.28, 0.005, 0.027, 0.022 and 0.004 respectively), even though the incidence of complications was similar among the three groups. Conclusions: In this study, intravenous paracetamol or diclofenac suppositories, administered for postgastrectomy pain control, decreased morphine consumption by almost 32% and also improved alertness. Nevertheless, the amount of opioids did not affect

  4. Parenteral opioids for labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Campbell, David C

    2003-09-01

    Labor pain relief is an important aspect of women's health that has historically been neglected. Epidural analgesia is the only consistently effective method of labor pain relief and has recently undergone substantial improvements to address the concerns of both parturients and obstetric care providers. With increased physician awareness, these recent advances are becoming more widely accepted and routinely available for all laboring parturients. Unfortunately, an increasing number of women are presenting to maternity wards with an absolute contraindication to epidural labor analgesia. The present review will provide an outline of the recent developments in parenteral analgesic options which complement modern epidural analgesic techniques. Protocols for the initiation of "state-of-the-art" parenteral analgesic techniques are provided as a guide to facilitate effective, modern, parenteral labor analgesia. PMID:12972743

  5. Postoperative analgesia in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Falzone, Elisabeth; Hoffmann, Clément; Keita, Hawa

    2013-02-01

    Elderly people represent the fastest-growing segment of our society and undergo surgery more frequently than other age groups. Effective postoperative analgesia is essential in these patients because inadequate pain control after surgery is associated with adverse outcomes in elderly patients. However, management of postoperative pain in older patients may be complicated by a number of factors, including a higher risk of age- and disease-related changes in physiology and disease-drug and drug-drug interactions. Physiological changes related to aging need to be carefully considered because aging is individualized and progressive. Assessment of pain management needs to include chronological age, biological age with regard to renal, liver and cardiac functions, and the individual profile of pathology and prescribed medications. In addition, ways in which pain should be assessed, particularly in patients with cognitive impairment, must be considered. Cognitively intact older patients can use most commonly used unidimensional pain scales such as the visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), numeric rating scale (NRS) and facial pain scale (FPS). VRS and NRS are the most appropriate pain scales for the elderly. In older patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment, the VRS is a better tool. For severe cognitively impaired older patients, behavioural scales validated in the postoperative context, such as Doloplus-2 or Algoplus, are appropriate. For postoperative pain treatment, most drugs (e.g. paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, nefopam, tramadol, codeine, morphine, local anaesthetics), techniques (e.g. intravenous morphine titration, subcutaneous morphine, intravenous or epidural patient-controlled analgesia, intrathecal morphine, peripheral nerve block) and strategies (e.g. anticipated intraoperative analgesia or multimodal analgesia) used for acute pain management can be used in older patients. However, in view of pharmacokinetic

  6. Improvement of 'dynamic analgesia' does not decrease atelectasis after thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Boisseau, N; Rabary, O; Padovani, B; Staccini, P; Mouroux, J; Grimaud, D; Raucoules-Aimé, M

    2001-10-01

    There is still controversy concerning the beneficial aspects of 'dynamic analgesia' (i.e. pain while coughing or moving) on the reduction of postoperative atelectasis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) prevents these abnormalities as opposed to multimodal analgesia with i.v. patient controlled analgesia (i.v. PCA) after thoracotomy. Fifty-four patients undergoing thoracotomy (lung cancer) were randomly assigned to one of the two groups. Clinical respiratory characteristics, arterial blood gas, and pulmonary function tests (forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s) were obtained before surgery and on the next 3 postoperative days. Atelectasis was compared between the two groups by performing computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest at day 3. Postoperative respiratory function and arterial blood gas values were reduced compared with preoperative values (mean (SD) FEV1 day 0: 1.1 (0.3) litre; 1.3 (0.4) litre) but there was no significant difference between groups at any time. PCA and TEA provided a good level of analgesia at rest (VAS day 0: 21 (15/100); 8 (9/100)), but TEA was more effective for analgesia during mobilization (VAS day 0: 52 (3/100); 25 (17/100)). CT scans revealed comparable amounts of atelectasis (expressed as a percentage of total lung volume) in the TEA (7.1 (2.8)%) and in the i.v. PCA group (6.71 (3.2)%). There was no statistical difference in the number of patients presenting with at least one atelectasis of various types (lamellar, plate, segmental, lobar). PMID:11878725

  7. Comparison of the Efficacy and Safety of a Pharmacokinetic Model-Based Dosing Scheme Versus a Conventional Fentanyl Dosing Regimen For Patient-Controlled Analgesia Immediately Following Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seok-Joon; Lim, Hyeong-Seok; Kwon, Youn-Ju; Park, Se-Ung; Yi, Jung-Min; Chin, Ji-Hyun; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Conventional, intravenous, patient-controlled analgesia, which is only administered by demand bolus without basal continuous infusion, is closely associated with inappropriate analgesia. Pharmacokinetic model-based dosing schemes can quantitatively describe the time course of drug effects and achieve optimal drug therapy. We compared the efficacy and safety of a conventional dosing regimen for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia that was administered by demand bolus without basal continuous infusion (group A) versus a pharmacokinetic model-based dosing scheme performed by decreasing the dosage of basal continuous infusion according to the model-based simulation used to achieve a targeted concentration (group B) following robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy.In total, 70 patients were analyzed: 34 patients in group A and 36 patients in group B. The postoperative opioid requirements, pain scores assessed by the visual analog scale, and adverse events (eg, nausea, vomiting, pruritis, respiratory depression, desaturation, sedation, confusion, and urinary retention) were compared on admission to the postanesthesia care unit and at 0.5, 1, 4, 24, and 48 h after surgery between the 2 groups. All patients were kept for close observation in the postanesthesia care unit for 1 h, and then transferred to the general ward.The fentanyl requirements in the postanesthesia care unit for groups A and B were 110.0 ± 46.4 μg and 77.5 ± 35.3 μg, respectively. The pain scores assessed by visual analog scale at 0.5, 1, 4, and 24 h after surgery in group B were significantly lower than in group A (all P < 0.05). There were no differences in the adverse events between the 2 groups.We found that the pharmacokinetic model-based dosing scheme resulted in lower opioid requirements, lower pain scores, and no significant adverse events in the postanesthesia care unit following robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy in comparison with conventional dosing

  8. Use of infusion devices for epidural or intrathecal administration of spinal opioids.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J W

    1990-08-01

    The use of infusion devices for epidural or intrathecal administration of spinal opioids is described. The risks of infection and mechanical catheter complications, the need for escalating doses, reservoir volume, drug stability, and cost are practical considerations associated with use of both external and internal infusion systems. Use of patient criteria to identify suitable candidates for intraspinal administration of pain medication helps ensure successful management. The criteria for intraspinal delivery pumps are safety, accuracy, reliability, ease of management by the patient and the health-care professional, and compatibility of the drug with the pump components. The primary factors to consider when comparing pumps to be used for intraspinal delivery of pain medication are the volume and flow rate requirements of the devices. External portable infusion devices are classified according to the mechanism of operation into three primary groups: syringe pumps, peristaltic mechanisms, and elastomeric reservoir pumps. Portable patient-controlled analgesia pumps that have syringes, flexible reservoir bags, and elastomeric reservoirs have been developed. Implanted systems with flow rates that are preset at the factory make pain management more difficult when the patient requires changes or escalations in doses over time. A programmable implanted pump is available. Two advantages of continuous epidural or intrathecal infusion are (1) the peaks and valleys of pain relief with bolus injections are eliminated and (2) the need for multiple injections is reduced. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pumps enhance the efficacy of continuous infusions by allowing the patient to administer bolus doses to control acute pain. PMID:2202209

  9. Analgesia and satisfaction in childbirth (the Queen Charlotte's 1000 Mother Survey).

    PubMed

    Morgan, B M; Bulpitt, C J; Clifton, P; Lewis, P J

    1982-10-01

    Maternal satisfaction with the experience of childbirth was investigated in 1000 women having a vaginal delivery of a live child. Effective pain relief did not ensure a satisfactory birth experience. Epidural block produced the most effective analgesia but there were more dissatisfied women among the epidural patients than among those who did not receive this analgesia (p less than 0.05). Bad experience scores were evaluated one year later and were clearly related to a forceps delivery and long labour, both of which were more common in the epidural group. The desirability of an "epidural on demand" service should be tested against an "epidural when necessary" service. PMID:6126674

  10. Epidural fentanyl does not influence intravenous PCA requirements in the post-caesarean patient.

    PubMed

    Sevarino, F B; McFarlane, C; Sinatra, R S

    1991-05-01

    Forty ASA physical status I or II patients scheduled for elective Caesarean delivery were studied to determine the effect of epidural fentanyl on post-Caesarean delivery analgesic requirements as administered by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Following delivery of the infant, under epidural anaesthesia with lidocaine 2% with 1/200,000 epinephrine, patients were randomly assigned to receive either 10 ml of preservative-free normal saline via the epidural catheter or 100 micrograms of fentanyl with 8 ml preservative-free normal saline in a double-blinded fashion. On arrival in the post-anesthesia recovery room (PAR), patients were provided with intravenous PCA meperidine 12.5 mg every eight minutes as needed. Patients were visited at intervals over the next 24 hr to determine if any differences in narcotic requirements, demands for narcotics, or severity of pain were noted. No differences were observed in any values between the groups. It is concluded that a single bolus of epidural fentanyl does not provide an advantage for postoperative pain relief in this patient population. PMID:2065412

  11. The Optimal Dose of Prophylactic Intravenous Naloxone in Ameliorating Opioid-Induced Side Effects in Children Receiving Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia Morphine for Moderate to Severe Pain: A Dose Finding Study

    PubMed Central

    Monitto, Constance L.; Kost-Byerly, Sabine; White, Elizabeth; Lee, Carlton K. K.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Thompson, Carol; Yaster, Myron

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Opioid-induced side effects, such as pruritus, nausea, and vomiting are common and may be more debilitating than pain itself. A continuous low-dose naloxone infusion (0.25 µg/kg/h) ameliorates some of these side effects in many but not all patients without adversely affecting analgesia. We sought to determine the optimal dose of naloxone required to minimize opioid-induced side effects and to measure plasma morphine and naloxone levels in a dose escalation study. METHODS Fifty-nine pediatric patients (24 male/35 female; average age 14.2 ± 2.2 years) experiencing moderate to severe postoperative pain were started on IV patient-controlled analgesia morphine (basal infusion 20 µg/kg/h, demand dose 20 µg/kg, 5 doses/h) and a low-dose naloxone infusion (initial cohort: 0.05 µg/kg/h; subsequent cohorts: 0.10, 0.15, 0.25, 0.40, 0.65, 1, and 1.65 µg/kg/h). If 2 patients developed intolerable nausea, vomiting, or pruritus, the naloxone infusion was increased for subsequent patients. Dose/treatment success occurred when 10 patients had minimal side effects at a naloxone dose. Blood samples were obtained for measurement of plasma morphine and naloxone levels after initiation of the naloxone infusion, processed, stored, and measured by tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray positive ionization. RESULTS The minimum naloxone dose at which patients were successfully treated with a <10% side effect/failure rate was 1 µg/kg/h; cohort size varied between 4 and 11 patients. Naloxone was more effective in preventing pruritus than nausea and vomiting. Concomitant use of supplemental medicines to treat opioid-induced side effects was required at all naloxone infusion rates. Plasma naloxone levels were below the level of assay quantification (0.1 ng/mL) for infusion rates ≤0.15 µg/kg/h. At rates >0.25 µg/kg/h, plasma levels increased linearly with increasing infusion rate. In each dose cohort, patients who failed therapy had comparable or higher plasma naloxone

  12. Patient-controlled Analgesia in Intrathecal Therapy for Chronic Pain: Safety and Effective Operation of the Model 8831 Personal Therapy Manager with a Pre-implanted SynchroMed Infusion System.

    PubMed

    Maeyaert, Jan; Buchser, Eric; Van Buyten, Jean-Pierre; Rainov, Nikolai G; Becker, Ralf

    2003-07-01

    The Model 8831 Personal Therapy Manager (PTM) offers a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) option for the SynchroMed Infusion System (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN). The safety and effective operation of the PTM activator was evaluated in 45 patients in five European centers receiving intrathecal drug infusion for the treatment of chronic pain via a SynchroMed pump. The total volume of drug delivered intrathecally over a four-week follow-up period was calculated. Adverse events were recorded and pain levels were measured via the Visual Analog pain Scale (VAS), Brief Pain Inventory, and SF-12 Quality of Life scores. Patient satisfaction with the device and its instruction manual was also assessed by questionnaire. The expected and calculated intrathecal drug volumes (and therefore drug doses) were the same, demonstrating that the device worked as intended. There were no device-related serious adverse events. Overall, 96% of patients were satisfied with the activator. Patients appreciated being able to control their pain and considered the device and its instructions easy to use. The PTM was shown to be safe and functioning properly in the intrathecal treatment of pain. The successful addition of a PCA function to the SynchroMed system may create a new standard in intrathecal pain therapy. PMID:22151016

  13. Awakening from anesthesia using propofol or sevoflurane with epidural block in radical surgery for senile gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Chen; Wang, Lin; Cheng, Gao; Wu, Wei-Wei; Li, Yuan-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the awakening of the elderly patients from propofol intravenous general anesthesia or sevoflurane inhalation general anesthesia combined with epidural block after radical gastric cancer surgery. Method: Eighty cases receiving selective radical surgery for gastric cancer were included. They were aged 65-78 years and classified as ASA grade I-II. Using a random number table, the cases were divided into 4 groups (n = 20): propofol intravenous general anesthesia (P group), sevoflurane inhalation general anesthesia (S group), propofol intravenous general anesthesia combined with epidural block (PE group), and sevoflurane inhalation general anesthesia combined with epidural block (SE group). For P and PE group, target controlled infusion of propofol was performed; for S and SE group, sevoflurane was inhaled to induce and maintain general anesthesia; for PE and SE group, before general anesthesia induction, epidural puncture and catheterization at T7-8 was performed. After surgery, perform patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) or patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA), and maintain VAS ≤ 3. The recorded indicators were as follows: time to recovery of spontaneous respiration, time to awakening, time of endotracheal tube removal, time to orientation, time to achieve modified Aldrete scores ≥ 9, modified OAA/S and Aldrete scores upon endotracheal tube removal (T1), 5 min after removal (T2), 15 min after removal (T3) and 30 min after removal (T4), dose of intraoperative remifentanil, intraoperative hypotension, and emergence agitation. Results: Time to awakening, time of endotracheal tube removal, time to orientation, and time to achieve modified Aldrete scores ≥ 9 in PE and SE group were obviously shortened compared with P and S group (P < 0.05); modified OAA/S and Aldrete scores at T1 and T2 in PE and SE group were significantly higher than those in P and S group (P < 0.05), and the scores of SE group at T1 were much higher compared

  14. Local Infiltration Analgesia reduces pain and hospital stay after primary TKA: randomized controlled double blind trial.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Wani, Ajaz Majeed; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative analgesia following Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) with the use of parenteral opioids or epidural analgesia can be associated with important side effects. Good perioperative analgesia facilitates faster rehabilitation, improves patient satisfaction, and may reduce the hospital stay. We investigated the analgesic effect of a locally injected mixture of drugs, in a double blinded RCT in 80 primary TKA. They were randomized either to receive a periarticular mixture of drugs containing bupivacaine, ketorolac, morphine, and adrenalline or to receive normal saline. Visual analog scores (VAS) for pain (at rest and during activity) and for patient satisfaction and range of motion were recorded postoperatively. The patients who had received the periarticular injection used significantly less the Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA) after the surgery as compared to the control group. In addition, they had lower VAS for pain during rest and activity and higher visual analog scores for patient satisfaction 72 hours postoperatively. No major complication related to the drugs was observed. Intraoperative periarticular injection with multimodal drugs following TKA can significantly reduce the postoperative pain and hence the requirements for PCA and hospital stay, with no apparent risks. PMID:26790796

  15. Comparison of dexmedetomidine and midazolam for monitored anesthesia care combined with tramadol via patient-controlled analgesia in endoscopic nasal surgery: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Karaaslan, Kazim; Yilmaz, Fahrettin; Gulcu, Nebahat; Colak, Cemil; Sereflican, Murat; Kocoglu, Hasan

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Monitored anesthesia care (MAC) may be applied for septoplasty or endoscopic sinus surgery in which an adequate sedation and analgesia without respiratory depression are desired for comfort of both the patient and the surgeon. Several combinations with different agents have been used for this purpose in these patients. However, analgesic properties for these agents have not been reported. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic and sedative effects of dexmedetomidine or midazolam infusion combined with tramadol that was used via patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), and to document the effects of these drugs on early cognitive functions. Methods This prospective, randomized, double-blind, clinical study enrolled patients undergoing septoplasty or endoscopic sinus surgery at the Abant Izzet Baysal University Hospital, Bolu, Turkey, between February and September 2006. Patients were randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio into 1 of 2 groups: the dexmedetomidine group (group D) patients received IV dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg for 10 minutes followed by continuous infusion of 0.5 μg/kg · h−1; and the midazolam group (group M) patients were administered a loading dose of IV midazolam 40 μg/kg for 10 minutes followed by infusion at the rate of 50 μg/kg · h−1. A 1-minute bolus dose of IV tramadol (1.5 mg/kg) was administered in both groups 10 minutes after the administration of the primary drug, and continued via infusion using a PCA device. After baseline measurements, systolic arterial pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), oxygen saturation, and rate of respiration were recorded after the loading dose of study drug, after the bolus tramadol dose, at 10-minute intervals during the operation, and twice in the recovery rooms; 5 minutes after arrival and 5 minutes before discharge. Verbal rating score (VRS) and Ramsay sedation score were determined at baseline (after

  16. Randomized trial of epidural vs. subcutaneous catheters for managing pain after modified Nuss in adults

    PubMed Central

    Temkit, M’hamed; Ewais, MennatAllah M.; Luckritz, Todd C.; Stearns, Joshua D.; Craner, Ryan C.; Gaitan, Brantley D.; Ramakrishna, Harish; Thunberg, Christopher A.; Weis, Ricardo A.; Myers, Kelly M.; Merritt, Marianne V.; Rosenfeld, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum (MIRPE) is now performed in adults. Managing adult patients’ pain postoperatively has been challenging due to increased chest wall rigidity and the pressure required for supporting the elevated sternum. The optimal pain management regimen has not been determined. We designed this prospective, randomized trial to compare postoperative pain management and outcomes between thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) and bilateral subcutaneous infusion pump catheters (On-Q). Methods Patients undergoing MIRPE (modified Nuss) underwent random assignment to TEA or On-Q group. Both groups received intravenous, patient-controlled opioid analgesia, with concomitant delivery of local anesthetic. Primary outcomes were length of stay (LOS), opioid use, and pain scores. Results Of 85 randomly assigned patients, 68 completed the study [52 men, 76.5%; mean (range) age, 32.2 (20.0–58.0) years; Haller index, 5.9 (range, 3.0-26.7)]. The groups were equally matched for preoperative variables; however, the On-Q arm had more patients (60.3%). No significant differences were found between groups in mean daily pain scores (P=0.52), morphine-equivalent opioid usage (P=0.28), or hospital stay 3.5 vs. 3.3 days (TEA vs. On-Q; P=0.55). Thirteen patients randomized to TEA refused the epidural and withdrew from the study because they perceived greater benefit of the On-Q system. Conclusions Postoperative pain management in adults after MIRPE can be difficult. Both continuous local anesthetic delivery by TEA and On-Q catheters with concomitant, intravenous, patient-controlled anesthesia maintained acceptable analgesia with a reasonable LOS. In our cohort, there was preference for the On-Q system for pain management.

  17. Epidural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... hematoma is bleeding between the inside of the skull and the outer covering of the brain (called ... An epidural hematoma is often caused by a skull fracture during childhood or adolescence. This type of ...

  18. Postoperative pain relief with epidural buprenorphine versus epidural butorphanol in laparoscopic hysterectomies: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Dona Elsa; Ganapathi, P.; Anish Sharma, N. G.; Shankaranarayana, P.; Aiyappa, D. S.; Nazim, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of postoperative analgesia with epidural buprenorphine and butorphanol tartrate. Methods: Sixty patients who were scheduled for elective laparoscopic hysterectomies were randomly enrolled in the study. At the end of the surgery, in study Group A 1 ml (0.3 mg) of buprenorphine and in Group B 1 ml (1 mg) of butorphanol tartrate both diluted to 10 ml with normal saline was injected through the epidural catheter. Visual analog pain scales (VAPSs) were assessed every hour till the 6th h, then 2nd hourly till the 12th h. To assess sedation, Ramsay sedation score was used. The total duration of postoperative analgesia was taken as the period from the time of giving epidural drug until the patients first complain of pain and the VAPS is more than 6. Patients were observed for any side effects such as respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting, hypotension, bradycardia, pruritus, and headache. Results: Buprenorphine had a longer duration of analgesia when compared to butorphanol tartrate (586.17 ± 73.64 vs. 342.53 ± 47.42 [P < 0.001]). Nausea, vomiting (13% vs. 10%), and headache (20% vs. 13%) were more in buprenorphine group; however, sedation score and pruritus (3% vs. 6%) were found to be more with butorphanol. Conclusion: Epidural buprenorphine significantly reduced pain and increased the quality of analgesia with a longer duration of action and was a better alternative to butorphanol for postoperative pain relief. PMID:26957696

  19. Enhancing the Enhanced Recovery Program in Colorectal Surgery - Use of Extended-Release Epidural Morphine (DepoDur®)

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Rachael; Bright, Elizabeth; Mills, Patricia; Petty, Dawn; Alberts, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose DepoDur® is a single-dose extended-release morphine injection into the epidural space. It is not commonly used, but has many advantages over traditional analgesic regimens. We analyzed a number of these advantages in our case series in the context of the colorectal enhanced recovery program (ERP) and aimed to show that the ERP could be further enhanced by using DepoDur®. Methods We conducted a prospective audit of all patients undergoing open and laparoscopic colorectal procedures where DepoDur® was used between July 2010 and April 2012. Validated pain scores were used, and primary outcome measures were resting and dynamic pain, mobilization, and need for additional analgesia. Results Two hundred eighty patients were included in the case series. Good pain control was seen at 24 and 48 hours. Eighty-one percent of the patients required simple analgesia alone at 24 hours, and 62% required simple analgesia (paracetamol +/- nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) alone at 48 hours. Only a minority required additional oramorph and patient-controlled analgesia at 24 and 48 hours (19% at 24 hours and 38% at 48 hours). Seventy-nine percent of the patients were mobilized at 24 hours, and 88% of the patients were mobilized at 48 hours. Conclusion DepoDur® is an effective alternative to conventional pain management techniques and may have a role in further enhancing the ERP. PMID:25210688

  20. [Maternal behavior toward her newborn infant. Potential modification by peridural analgesia or childbirth preparation].

    PubMed

    Wagner, A; Grenom, A; Pierre, F; Soutoul, J H; Fabre-Nys, C; Krebhiel, D

    1989-01-01

    The effects of sophrology and epidural analgesia on early relationship between the mother and her child were studied on a simple of 190 deliveries. The mothers were observed during and just after delivery. Mothers who had been separated from their child before the end of the observation were excluded from the study. The patients had the choice between epidural analgesia or prenatal care with sophrology. Participation to prenatal courses has statistically a positive effect on the relation between the mother and her child (p less than 0.01). Instead, epidural analgesia and posture have very limited effect on this factor. However, a trend to more interaction is found in multipari and patients who didn't choose epidural analgesia. PMID:2928660

  1. Epidural morphine for outpatients with severe anginal pain.

    PubMed Central

    Clemensen, S E; Thayssen, P; Hole, P

    1987-01-01

    Seven patients who had chronic coronary artery disease and had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery still suffered from anginal attacks several times daily despite optimal medical treatment. An epidural system of analgesia was implanted subcutaneously and treatment with epidural morphine started. The morphine was administered by the patients themselves or members of their family. During a median observation time of four months (range three to 11) all patients were free of pain while receiving this treatment. Images p476-a PMID:2435345

  2. Impact of Epidural Failures on the Results of a Prospective, Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Desai, Amita; Alemayehu, Hanna; Weesner, Kathryn A; St Peter, Shawn D

    2016-04-01

    Introduction We conducted a prospective randomized trial to evaluate the merits of two established postoperative pain management strategies: thoracic epidural (EPI) versus patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with intravenous narcotics after minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum. Pain scores favored the EPI group for the first two postoperative days only. Critics of the trial suggest that if the epidural failure rate was not so high, results may have favored the EPI group. Therefore, we performed a subset analysis of the EPI group to evaluate the impact of these failures. Methods Patients for whom epidural catheter could not be placed or whose catheters were removed early owing to dysfunction were compared with those with well-functioning catheters. Those with well-functioning catheters were also compared with the PCA group. A two-tailed independent Student t-test and a two-tailed Fisher exact test were used where appropriate. Results Of 55 patients in the EPI group, 12 patients (21.8%) had failed placement or required early removal. Comparing those with failed placements with the rest of the group, there was no difference in daily visual analogue scale pain scores or measures of hospital course. Likewise, comparing those with well-functioning catheters only to those in the PCA group, the results of the trial are replicated in terms of pain scores, hospital course, and length of stay. Conclusion In patients with failed epidural therapy, there is no significant difference in postoperative hospital course. Comparing those with well-functioning catheters to those in the PCA group, trial results are replicated-that is, no significant difference in length of stay, time to regular diet, or time to transition to oral medications. Therefore, failure rate in the EPI group did not influence the results of the trial. PMID:25643246

  3. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  4. Anaesthetists' experiences with the early labour epidural recommendation for obese parturients: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Va, Eley; Lk, Callaway; Aaj, van Zundert; J, Lipman; C, Gallois

    2016-09-01

    Caring for obese pregnant women presents challenges for all medical professionals. Despite a lack of supporting evidence, expert opinion and international guidelines suggest early labour epidural insertion for obese women. Anecdotally this is not supported by all anaesthetists. This qualitative study explored the experiences of anaesthetists regarding early epidural analgesia in obese parturients, to answer the research question: Are anaesthetists consistent in how they apply early epidural analgesia in obese parturients? Personal in-depth interviews with 42 specialist anaesthetists working in south-east Queensland, Australia, were completed between February and April, 2015. Leximancer™ text analysis software applied a validated algorithm to the data to identify themes and concepts. The major themes were explored by the first author to answer the research question. Three major themes were identified: the demands associated with caring for obese women; concern regarding the anaesthetic technique used in obese women; and the importance of communication with obstetric staff. Disagreement regarding interpretation and application of early epidural analgesia was identified within this group of anaesthetists. These anaesthetists were inconsistent in how they interpreted and applied early epidural analgesia for obese parturients, with some questioning the validity of the practice. The combination of uncertainty, urgency and technical difficulty presented by obese parturients provoked anxiety in these clinicians, particularly the anticipation of unplanned general anaesthesia. Consistent anaesthetic practice could improve the implementation of early epidural analgesia in obese parturients. PMID:27608347

  5. Medial open transversus abdominis plane (MOTAP) catheters for analgesia following open liver resection: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The current standard for pain control following liver surgery is intravenous, patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) or epidural analgesia. We have developed a modification of a regional technique called medial open transversus abdominis plane (MOTAP) catheter analgesia. The MOTAP technique involves surgically placed catheters through the open surgical site into a plane between the internal oblique muscle and the transverse abdominis muscle superiorly. The objective of this trial is to assess the efficacy of this technique. Methods/design This protocol describes a multicentre, prospective, blinded, randomized controlled trial. One hundred and twenty patients scheduled for open liver resection through a subcostal incision will be enrolled. All patients will have two MOTAP catheters placed at the conclusion of surgery. Patients will be randomized to one of two parallel groups: experimental (local anaesthetic through MOTAP catheters) or placebo (normal saline through MOTAP catheters). Both groups will also receive IV PCA. The primary endpoint is mean cumulative postoperative opioid consumption over the first 2 postoperative days (48 hours). Secondary outcomes include pain intensity, patient functional outcomes, and the incidence of complications. Discussion This trial has been approved by the ethics boards at participating centres and is currently enrolling patients. Data collection will be completed by the end of 2014 with analysis mid-2015 and publication by the end of 2015. Trial registration The study is registered with http://clinicaltrials.gov ( NCT01960049; 23 September 2013) PMID:24950773

  6. [Current approaches to the analgesia of spontaneous child birth].

    PubMed

    Neĭmark, M I; Geronimus, V Iu

    2007-01-01

    The authors have compared various modes of spontaneous labor. Prolonged epidural infusion of naropine in combination with fentanyl has been found to cause a less motor block and therefore it may be used in the late first-to-second period of labor. Adequate analgesia ensures a smooth course of the second labor period and promotes the reduction in its duration and the correction of central hemodynamic and hormonal homeostastic disorders. The administration of moradol provides adequate analgesia of the first labor period, prevention, and elimination of abnormal labor activity, without exerting a depressive effect on maternal and neonatal respiration, which makes it possible to consider this procedure as an alternative mode of labor pain relief if there are contraindications to epidural analgesia. PMID:18330019

  7. Depth of the thoracic epidural space in children.

    PubMed

    Masir, F; Driessen, J J; Thies, K C; Wijnen, M H; van Egmond, J

    2006-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia in anaesthetized children requires a meticulous technique and may have an increased success rate when the distance between skin and epidural space is known. The objective of this observational study was to measure the skin to epidural distance (SED) during thoracic epidural puncture in 61 children. The epidural puncture was performed using the loss of resistance technique with saline 0.9%. The distance from the needle tip to the point where the needle emerged from the skin was measured. The post-operative analgesia parameters were also measured. Skin to epidural distance correlated significantly with the age and weight of the children. The equation for the relation between SED (cm) and age was 2.15 + (0.01 x months) and for SED vs weight was 1.95 + (0.045 x kg). Despite considerable variability among individuals, the observed correlation of SED with both age and weight shows that this parameter may be helpful to guide thoracic epidural puncture in anaesthetized children. PMID:17067139

  8. Comparative study for better adjuvant with ropivacaine in epidural anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Pramila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Better adjuvants for epidural analgesia are still evolving. Dexmedetomidine that is alpha-2 agonist can be used as an adjuvant in epidural analgesia and anesthesia. Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of dexmedetomidine versus clonidine in combination with ropivacaine in epidural anesthesia on intraoperative and postoperative analgesia, to find out the better adjuvant for regional anesthesia. Settings and Design: Randomized control trial. Materials and Methods: Sixty adult patients (18–60 years) with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 1/ASA 2 grade and undergoing lower abdominal and lower limbs surgeries were included and randomized into three groups of 20 patients each. Group 1 - received ropivacaine with normal saline. Group 2 - received ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine. Group 3 - received ropivacaine with clonidine. Statistical Analysis: Mean and Standard deviation were calculated. All the data were analyzed using analysis of variance and Chi-square test. The value of P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: All the three groups were comparable with respect to age, sex, and ASA grade. There was statistically significant mean time to reach T10 sensory block level (15.8, 5.7, 9.6 min in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively). The maximum duration of analgesia was statistically higher in Group 2 patients (383.7 vs. 365.3 and 280.5 min in Group 3 and Group 1, respectively). The mean time to reach motor block was significantly shorter in Group 2. Side effects were comparable in all groups with statistically insignificant fall in mean arterial pressure and hypotension was noted with Group 2. Conclusion: We concluded that the patients receiving the addition of dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine in epidural anesthesia had a faster onset and longer duration of sensory and motor blockade. Dexmedetomidine in comparison to clonidine had acceptable sedation and hemodynamic stability and minimal dose requirement make very effective adjuvant

  9. Effective analgesia after bilateral tubal ligation.

    PubMed

    Wittels, B; Faure, E A; Chavez, R; Moawad, A; Ismail, M; Hibbard, J; Principe, D; Karl, L; Toledano, A Y

    1998-09-01

    To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of local anesthetic infiltration, 20 parturients scheduled for elective minilaparotomy and bilateral tubal ligation with either spinal or epidural anesthesia participated in this prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind trial. All patients received intravenous (iv) metoclopramide 10 mg and ketorolac 60 mg intraoperatively, as well as preincisional infiltration of the infraumbilical skin incision with 0.5% bupivacaine. Infiltration of bilateral uterine tubes and mesosalpinx was performed either with 0.5% bupivacaine (n = 10) or isotonic sodium chloride solution (n = 10). Intravenous meperidine (25 mg every 3 minutes as needed) was given to treat pain in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). The total amount of meperidine administered in the PACU was significantly larger in the saline group than in the bupivacaine group. Pain scores at 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 minutes postoperatively and on the 7th postoperative day were significantly lower in the bupivacaine group than in the saline group. During tubal ligation, infiltration of uterine tubes and mesosalpinx with 0.5% bupivacaine significantly enhanced analgesia both immediately postoperatively and on the 7th postoperative day compared with infiltration with sodium chloride. In conclusion, this study proved that during bilateral tubal ligation with either spinal or epidural anesthesia, preemptive analgesia using iv ketorolac, iv metoclopramide, and infiltration of the incised skin and uterine tubes with 0.5% bupivacaine can eliminate pain, nausea, vomiting, or cramping and maintain good analgesia for 7 days postoperatively. PMID:9728841

  10. Epidural hematoma after routine epidural steroid injection

    PubMed Central

    Alkhudari, Azzam M.; Malk, Craig S.; Rahman, Abed; Penmetcha, Taruna; Torres, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are few reported cases of an epidural spinal hematoma following interventional pain procedures. Case Description: We report a case of a spinal epidural hematoma in a patient with no known risk factors (e.g. coagulopathy), who underwent an epidural steroid injection (ESI) in the same anatomic location as two previously successful ESI procedures. Conclusion: Early detection was the key to our case, and avoiding sedation allowed the patient to recognize the onset of a new neurological deficit, and lead to prompt diagnosis as well as surgical decompression of the resultant hematoma. PMID:27213109

  11. Gabapentin vs pregabalin as a premedication in lower limb orthopaedics surgery under combined spinal epidural technique

    PubMed Central

    Khetarpal, Ranjana; Kataria, Amar Parakash; Bajaj, Samita; Kaur, Harjinder; Singh, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pregabalin and gabapentin are the gamma-aminobutyric acid analogs used as a part of multimodal analgesic regimen. Aim: To compare the postoperative analgesic benefits of gabapentin or pregabalin as a premedication for lower limb orthopedic surgery under combined spinal-epidural techniques. Settings and Design: Randomized double-blind study. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 patients were divided into three groups: G, P, C who received gabapentin 1200 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, and placebo, respectively 1.5 h before surgery. All patients received combined spinal-epidural block with 3 ml of 0.5% intrathecal bupivacaine. Assessment of pain was made with visual analog scale (VAS). Postoperative analgesia was provided with epidural top-ups with 2.5 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and fentanyl 25 μg when VAS >3. Rescue analgesia in the form of injection diclofenac (75 mg) intramuscularly was given if VAS >3 even after epidural top-up. A total number of epidural top-ups, rescue analgesia, pain-free interval postspinal anesthesia, and sedation score were noted. Statistical Analysis: This was done using SPSS version 17. Mean and standard deviation were calculated using Chi-square test and analysis of variance. Results: The total postoperative analgesic time was 7.23 h in Group G, 14.80 h in Group P, and 4.17 h in Group C. A total number of epidural top-ups were 2.43 in Group G, 0.77 in Group P, and 4.43 in Group C. Conclusion: Pregabalin 300 mg and gabapentin 1200 mg significantly reduce the need of postoperative rescue analgesia, epidural top-ups, and increase the duration of postspinal anesthesia without altering hemodynamics with sedation as a major side effect. PMID:27212758

  12. Patient-controlled drug delivery for acute postoperative pain management: a review of current and emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    Viscusi, Eugene R

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative pain management has dramatically improved with the advent of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) delivery. The optimal PCA system would encompass several key characteristics, including consistent efficacy across a number of surgeries; safety of both the analgesic drug delivered and the delivery system; ease of setup, maintenance, and administration; patient comfort during analgesic delivery; avoidance of analgesic gaps; minimal invasiveness; and it would be associated with high patient satisfaction. Existing PCA modalities (using intravenous or epidural routes) encompass some of these characteristics (e.g., they have demonstrated efficacy across a number of surgeries); however, they are limited by the need for an indwelling catheter and the time and resources required for system setup and use. Device programming-related medication errors by hospital staff are an unfortunate risk, and could lead to significant harm. New PCA technologies are on the horizon that address some of the limitations to existing modalities; however, the added complexity of these newer systems are a concern, and their benefits and drawbacks remain to be assessed. These technologies include "smart" intravenous PCA infusion pumps to improve the safety of analgesic administration; needle-free options, such as the fentanyl HCl iontophoretic transdermal system for transdermal delivery; and a number of PCA devices for intranasal delivery, as well as several new options for patient-controlled regional analgesia. This review will discuss the benefits and drawbacks of both existing and emerging PCA modalities in the context of the ideal PCA system, and provide a critical evaluation of their use in postoperative settings. PMID:18299096

  13. Postoperative pain relief after hepatic resection in cirrhotic patients: the efficacy of a single small dose of ketamine plus morphine epidurally.

    PubMed

    Taurá, Pilar; Fuster, Josep; Blasi, Anabel; Martinez-Ocon, Julia; Anglada, Teresa; Beltran, Joan; Balust, Jaume; Tercero, Javier; Garcia-Valdecasas, Juan-Carlos

    2003-02-01

    In cirrhotic patients undergoing hepatic surgery, postoperative analgesia remains a challenge. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of a single dose of morphine combined with small-dose ketamine given epidurally for postoperative pain relief. One-hundred-four classification "Child A" cirrhotic patients were randomly assigned to two groups: 1) (MKG, n = 54): epidural morphine (3.5-5 mg) plus ketamine (20/30 mg); and 2) epidural morphine (3.5/5 mg) (MG, n = 50). The level of analgesia, side effects, psychomimetic and neurological disorders, additional analgesic needs, and overall quality of the analgesia were recorded. The mean duration of analgesia was longer in the MKG group (27.2 +/- 8 h versus 16.4 +/- 10 h; P < 0.05). In the MKG group, the visual analog scale (VAS) score began to be significantly lower from 14 h at rest and 12 h on coughing until the end of the study. The need for additional analgesia was also smaller in the MKG group (P < 0.05): at 24 h, only 10% of patients in the MKG group needed complementary analgesia, whereas in the MG group it was 100% (P = 0.003). Side effects were similar in both groups. Psychomimetic side effects and neurological disorders were not detected. These results suggest that postoperative analgesia provided by a single dose of epidural morphine with small-dose ketamine is effective in cirrhotic Child's A patients having major upper abdominal surgery. PMID:12538199

  14. Epidural catheter fixation. A comparison of subcutaneous tunneling versus device fixation technique

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashima; Parasa, Sujay Kumar; Tejvath, Kiran; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The technique of securing the epidural catheter has a major bearing on the efficacy of epidural analgesia. Specific fixator devices, for e.g., Lockit epidural catheter clamp, which successfully prevents catheter migration, are available. The possibility of catheter snapping and surgical retrieval has been reported with tunneling of catheters. These techniques have not been compared for safety, efficacy and appropriateness of achieving secure epidural catheter fixation in the postoperative period. Material and Methods: A total of 200 patients who required postoperative epidural analgesia were included. They were randomized into two groups: Group I (n = 100) in whom epidural catheters were tunneled vertically in the paravertebral subcutaneous tissue and group II (n = 100) wherein a Lockit device was used to fix the catheter. Likert score was used to quantify patient's comfort during procedure. The techniques were compared for migration, catheter dislodgement, local trauma, catheter snapping and catheter obstruction. Results: 12% of tunneled catheters had migrated significantly outward. 22% of patients had erythema and 77% had significant procedural discomfort in group I. In group II, 3% catheters had kinked and 14% had erythema from device adhesive. Conclusion: Our results support the use of Lockit device as a safe and comfortable fixation device compared to subcutaneous tunneling of catheters. PMID:27006544

  15. Effects of lumbosacral epidural ketamine and lidocaine in xylazine-sedated cats.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, R; Benites, A P; Ferreira, J Z; Neto, J M N; Hermeto, L C

    2009-06-01

    In order to determine the analgesic and cardiovascular effects of the combination of epidural ketamine and lidocaine, 6 sedated cats were studied. Six healthy, young cats were used in a prospective randomised study. Each cat underwent 3 treatments, at least 1 week apart, via epidural injection: (1) ketamine (2.5 mg/kg), (2) lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg), and (3) ketamine (2.5 mg/kg) plus lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg). Epidural injections were administered through the lumbosacral space. Analgesia, motor block, sedation, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate and arterial oxygen saturation were measured. Rectal temperature was compared before and after sedation as well as after epidural administration of the drugs. Epidural administration of the ketamine/lidocaine combination induced prolonged analgesia extending from the coccygeal to the T13-L1 dermatomes, leading to severe ataxia. Cardiovascular effects were significant in all treatments: heart rate decreased, but there was a minimal reduction in arterial pressure. It was concluded that adding a dose of ketamine to epidural lidocaine in cats is feasible and effective. PMID:19831267

  16. Analgesia after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Zoka

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses postoperative analgesia in patients with end-stage liver disease who have undergone liver transplantation (LT). Postoperative analgesia determines how patients perceive LT. Although important, this topic is underrepresented in the current literature. With an increased frequency of fast tracking in LT, efficient intra- and postoperative analgesia are undergoing changes. We herein review the current literature, compare the benefits and disadvantages of the therapeutic options, and make recommendations based on the current literature and clinical experience. PMID:26413222

  17. Epidural anesthesia for pilonidal sinus surgery: ropivacaine versus levobupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Koltka, Emine Nursen; Devrim, Sibel; Tüfekçi, Sevil; Doğru, Serkan; Çelik, Melek

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidural anesthesia is one of the best options for lower abdominal and lower limb surgery. However, there have been insufficient reports regarding the use of epidural anesthesia for pilonidal sinus surgery. The present study was performed to compare the clinical profiles of epidural block performed with 0.75% levobupivacaine and 0.75% ropivacaine in this procedure. Methods Thirty patients undergoing pilonidal sinus surgery were randomly allocated into two groups: one group received levobupivacaine and the other received ropivacaine at 0.75% in a volume of 10 ml. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, the onset time of analgesia and duration of block, highest sensory block level, perioperative and postoperative side effects, and patients' and surgeons' satisfaction were recorded. Results Hemodynamic stability was maintained in both groups throughout surgery. The onset time of analgesia (the time from epidural injection of local anesthetic to reach L2 sensorial block) was 6.26 ± 3.49 min in the levobupivacaine group and 4.06 ± 1.75 min in the ropivacaine group (P = 0.116). The duration of sensorial block (time for regression of sensory block to L2) was 297.73 ± 70.94 min in group L and 332.40 ± 102.22 min in group R (P = 0.110). Motor block was not seen in any of the patients in the study groups. Patients' and surgeons' satisfaction with the anesthetic technique were mostly excellent in both groups. Conclusions In patients undergoing pilonidal sinus surgery, both levobupivacaine and ropivacaine produce rapid and excellent epidural block without leading to motor block or significant side effects. Although not statistically significant, the onset time of anesthesia was shorter and the duration of effect was longer with ropivacaine than with levobupivacaine in this study. PMID:25844132

  18. Efficacy of low-dose epidural anaesthesia in surgery of the anal canal--a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kausalya, R; Jacob, R

    1994-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare in terms of patient comfort, surgical requirements and anaesthetic safety, the difference between epidural and general anaesthesia in patients undergoing surgery of the anal canal. The study was undertaken on 50 adult patients undergoing anal surgery. By random allocation 25 were given a general anaesthetic while 25 were given a low-dose epidural using 0.375% bupivacaine. Advantages and disadvantages of both methods were noted in the study. It was concluded that low-dose epidural is a more effective means of providing analgesia, while maintaining adequate sphincter tone for surgery on the anal canal, than general anaesthesia. PMID:8210019

  19. Continuous shoulder analgesia via an indwelling axillary brachial plexus catheter.

    PubMed

    Reuben, S S; Steinberg, R B

    2000-09-01

    Continuous interscalene brachial plexus blockade can provide anesthesia and analgesia in the shoulder region. Difficulty accessing the interscalene space and premature displacement of interscalene catheters may preclude their use in certain situations. We present two case reports in which a catheter was advanced from the axilla along the brachial plexus sheath to the interscalene space to provide continuous cervicobrachial plexus analgesia. In the first case report, previous neck surgery made the anatomic landmarks for performing an interscalene block very difficult. An epidural catheter was advanced from the axillary brachial plexus sheath to the interscalene space under fluoroscopic guidance. This technique provided both intraoperative analgesia for shoulder surgery as well as 24-hour postoperative analgesia by an infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine. In the second case report, a catheter was inserted in a similar fashion from the axillary to the interscalene space to provide 14 days of continuous analgesia in the management of complex regional pain syndrome. We have found that this technique allows us to secure the catheter more easily than with the traditional interscalene approach and thus prevents premature dislodgment. This approach may be a suitable alternative when either an interscalene or an infraclavicular catheter may not be inserted. PMID:11090734

  20. Novel delivery systems for postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Pamela P; Royal, Mike A; Miller, Ronald D

    2014-03-01

    Moderate-to-severe postoperative pain is usually controlled using a multimodal approach, including opioids. Intravenously administered patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) with opioids, popular for over 40 years, enables patients to control their level of analgesia and has advantages over a nurse-administered approach, including more satisfied patients and improved pain relief. Unfortunately, IV PCA has drawbacks such as device programming errors, medication prescribing errors, pump malfunction, limitations on patient mobility, IV patency issues, and transmission of infection. Furthermore, the setup of an infusion pump is often complex, time-consuming, and requires witnessed confirmation. Complicating IV PCA is the problem of commonly used compounds, morphine and hydromorphone, having significantly reduced brain/effector-site permeability and active metabolites, both of which create the risk of delayed adverse events. Novel patient-controlled modalities that incorporate rapid effector site-permeating opioids and non-invasive routes of administration offer great promise to enhance both patient and caregiver experiences with postoperative analgesia systems. PMID:24815968

  1. A comparison of epidural anaesthesia with lignocaine, bupivacaine and a lignocaine-bupivacaine mixture in cats.

    PubMed

    Lawal, F M; Adetunji, A

    2009-12-01

    A mixture of 2% lignocaine (LIG) and 0.5% bupivacaine (BUP), at respective dose rates of 2 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg (LIG-BUP), was compared to LIG (4 mg/kg) and BUP (1 mg/kg) for lumbosacral epidural anaesthesia in 5 sedated cats. Each cat received all 3 treatment regimens at 1-week intervals. The cats were premedicated with an intramuscular injection of atropine sulphate (0.04 mg/kg) and ketamine hydrochloride (10 mg/kg). Onset and duration of analgesia, and time to walking were determined. Associated changes in heart rate (HR), respiratory frequency (fR) and rectal temperature (RT) were recorded. Onset of analgesia with epidurally administered LIG-BUP (4.5 +/- 0.7 min), LIG (3.9 +/- 1.0 min) and BUP (5.0 +/- 1.0 min) was similar. Duration of analgesia with LIG-BUP (49.4 +/- 4.5 min) was significantly (P<0.05) longer than with LIG (40.2 +/- 1.0 min) but shorter than with BUP (79.4 +/- 6.3 min). There were no significant differences in times to standing with LIG-BUP (26.3 +/- 6.4 min), LIG (20.4 +/- 4.7 min) and BUP (22.6 +/- 10.3 min). Minimal changes were observed in HR, fR and RT. In conclusion, duration of analgesia produced by LIG-BUP was shorter compared with BUP but longer compared with LIG. Neither LIG nor LIG-BUP has any advantage over epidural BUP in terms of onset of analgesia, time to standing and physiological responses. Therefore, lumbosacral epidural administration of BUP appears to be the best choice for a long surgical procedure lasting more than 1 hour when compared with either LIG or LIG-BUP. PMID:20458866

  2. Epidural lysis of adhesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E; Hurley, Robert W; Cohen, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  3. Epidural Lysis of Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E.; Hurley, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  4. Effect of epidural clonidine on characteristics of spinal anaesthesia in patients undergoing gynaecological surgeries: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rachna; Rao, RS Raghavendra; Turai, Ashwini; Prabha, P; Shreyavathi, R; Harsoor, Karuna

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Combined spinal–epidural (CSE) anaesthesia is being increasingly used for effective post-operative analgesia. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of epidural clonidine on characteristics of spinal anaesthesia for gynaecological surgeries. Methods: This was a prospective randomised, double-blind, controlled study involving sixty patients belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I and II who underwent gynaecological surgeries were randomly divided into clonidine (C) group and saline (S) group of thirty each. All patients received CSE anaesthesia. Ten minutes before subarachnoid block (SAB), Group C received clonidine 150 μg diluted to 5 ml in normal saline (NS) and Group S received NS epidurally. Hyperbaric bupivacaine (15 mg) was administered intrathecally for both groups after epidural injection. Sensory and motor block characteristics, analgesia, sedation and haemodynamics were observed. Statistical analysis was performed using appropriate tests. Results: Epidural clonidine produced faster onset (37.83 ± 8.58 s in Group C compared to 50.33 ± 8.80 s in Group S, P = 0.001) and prolonged duration of sensory block (241.17±18.65 minutes in group C compared to 150.33±19.16 minutes in group S, P = 0.001). Time for two segment regression of sensory block was193.67 ± 19.82 min in Group C and 109.33 ± 18.56 min Group S (P < 0.001). The duration of analgesia was 299.00 ± 43.38 min in Group C and 152.50 ± 21.04 min in Group S (P < 0.001). Haemodynamics and sedation scores were comparable between two groups. Conclusion: Administration of clonidine epidurally, 10 min before SAB, caused early onset and prolonged duration of motor blockade and analgesia, without any significant post-operative complication. PMID:27330201

  5. Spinal and epidural anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... your spinal cord. This is called the epidural space. The medicine numbs, or blocks feeling in a certain part of your body so that you cannot feel pain. The medicine begins to take effect in about 10 to 20 minutes. It works ...

  6. [PROPHYLAXIS OF POSTOPERATIVE HYPERALGESIA, BASED ON MORPHOLOGICAL SUBSTANTIATION OF THE ANALGESIA METHOD].

    PubMed

    Dmytriyev, D V; Konoplytskyi, V S

    2016-03-01

    The investigation was conducted in 20 children, operated on for abdominal oncological diseases in a 2010-2015 yrs period, using various methods of analgesia. While application of a constant infusion of high doses of phentanyl--1-4 MKr/(kg x h) in perioperative period the occurrence of the opiate-induced hyperalgesia is possible with the accompanied morphological changes in intestinal wall; in anesthesia of a transverse abdominal muscle (a TAP-blockade) and combined spinal epidural analgesia such changes were not observed. PMID:27514091

  7. [Vertebral osteomyelitis associated with epidural block].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Esper, R; Cruz-Bautista, I

    2001-01-01

    Infectious complications after epidural anesthesia are infrequent and the most common are epidural and subdural abscess. We report one rare case of vertebral osteomyelitus associated with an epidural catheter and review the literature. PMID:11381807

  8. Effect of epidural bupivacaine on somatosensory evoked potentials after dermatomal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lund, C; Selmar, P; Hansen, O B; Hjortsø, N C; Kehlet, H

    1987-01-01

    The effect of lumbar epidural analgesia with plain bupivacaine, 0.5%, on early (less than 0.5 sec) somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) to electrical stimulation of the T-10, L-1, and S-1 dermatomes and the posterior tibial nerve was examined in eight patients. A decrease of the cortical amplitude and an increase in latency were seen, most pronounced at the L-1 level, but with only minor effect on the S-1 dermatome. No correlation was found between segmental level of analgesia and decrease in amplitude of the evoked potentials. Thus despite clinically adequate surgical anesthesia, the neural pathways as assessed by SEP were incompletely blocked except at the L1 dermatome near the epidural injection site. PMID:3800017

  9. The evolution of spinal/epidural neostigmine in clinical application: Thoughts after two decades

    PubMed Central

    Lauretti, Gabriela Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Since the first clinical application of analgesia following spinal anticholinesterase by 1940's, several clinical double-blind studies have been conducted to date, where intrathecal doses of neostigmine in humans ranged from 750 to 1 μg, due to side-effects. Conversely, epidural neostigmine has been evaluated in proportionally higher doses and represents an alternative, but still deserves more investigation concerning both acute and chronic pain, as it seems devoid of important side-effects. PMID:25558203

  10. Sequentially evolved bilateral epidural haematomas.

    PubMed

    Rochat, P; Johannesen, H H; Poulsgård, L; Bøgeskov, L

    2002-12-01

    Sequentially evolved bilateral epidural haematomas, where the second haematoma evolves after surgical removal of the first haematoma, are rarely reported. We report two cases of this entity. One patient was involved in a road traffic accident and the other was suffering from a head injury after an assault. CT scans showed that both patients had an unilateral epidural haematoma with a thin presumably epidural haemorrhage on the opposite side. Both patients were operated for their epidural haematomas, but did not improve after surgical treatment, and postoperative CT scans revealed evolving of an epidural haematoma on the opposite side. After evacuation of the second epidural haematoma both patients recovered quickly. Sequentially evolved bilateral epidural haematomas are rare, but must be considered in the postoperative intensive care treatment in patients with epidural haematomas. Both cases emphasize the need for intensive care monitoring after an operation for an epidural haematoma and the need for CT scans if the patient does not improve quickly after removal of the haematoma. This is especially important if a small contralateral haematoma is seen on the initial CT scan. PMID:12445923

  11. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  12. Epidural anesthesia improves pancreatic perfusion and decreases the severity of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Samira M; Andres, Axel; Morel, Philippe; Schiffer, Eduardo; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Bühler, Leo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the safety of epidural anesthesia (EA), its effect on pancreatic perfusion and the outcome of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: From 2005 to August 2010, patients with predicted severe AP [Ranson score ≥ 2, C-reactive protein > 100 or necrosis on computed tomography (CT)] were prospectively randomized to either a group receiving EA or a control group treated by patient controlled intravenous analgesia. Pain management was evaluated in the two groups every eight hours using the visual analog pain scale (VAS). Parameters for clinical severity such as length of hospital stay, use of antibiotics, admission to the intensive care unit, radiological/clinical complications and the need for surgical necrosectomy including biochemical data were recorded. A CT scan using a perfusion protocol was performed on admission and at 72 h to evaluate pancreatic blood flow. A significant variation in blood flow was defined as a 20% difference in pancreatic perfusion between admission and 72 h and was measured in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. RESULTS: We enrolled 35 patients. Thirteen were randomized to the EA group and 22 to the control group. There were no differences in demographic characteristics between the two groups. The Balthazar radiological severity score on admission was higher in the EA group than in the control group (mean score 4.15 ± 2.54 vs 3.38 ± 1.75, respectively, P = 0.347) and the median Ranson scores were 3.4 and 2.7 respectively (P = NS). The median duration of EA was 5.7 d, and no complications of the epidural procedure were reported. An improvement in perfusion of the pancreas was observed in 13/30 (43%) of measurements in the EA group vs 2/27 (7%) in the control group (P = 0.0025). Necrosectomy was performed in 1/13 patients in the EA group vs 4/22 patients in the control group (P = 0.63). The VAS improved during the first ten days in the EA group compared to the control group (0.2 vs 2.33, P = 0.034 at 10 d). Length

  13. [Analgesia for childbirth in a patient with factor V Leiden mutation].

    PubMed

    Puértolas Ortega, M; Izquierdo Villarroya, B; Oliva Perales, P; Lafuente Ojeda, N; Izquierdo Villarroya, J; Ruiz Pérez, R

    2007-01-01

    Factor V Leiden mutation is the most common congenital thrombophilic disorder, affecting between 5% and 8% of the Caucasian population. Pregnancy creates a state of hypercoagulability and all factors that increase the risk of thrombosis should be considered, as they may be cumulative. In recent years, the diagnosis of new allelic variants of thrombophilic states have increased the incidence of pregnant women receiving anticoagulant therapy, with the anesthetic considerations that implies. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman with heterozygous Leiden factor V mutation who was admitted with spontaneous amniorrhexis in the 38th week of gestation. She was taking low molecular weight heparin therapy. An epidural catheter was inserted to provide analgesia for labor, with all safety precautions to prevent an epidural hematoma. Epidural anesthesia is the technique of choice for obstetric labor in patients with hypercoagulability because of its effects of favoring blood flow and inhibiting clot formation. PMID:17319433

  14. A comparative study of epidural catheter colonization and infection in Intensive Care Unit and wards in a Tertiary Care Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Harde, Minal; Bhadade, Rakesh; Iyer, Hemlata; Jatale, Amol; Tiwatne, Sagar

    2016-02-01

    Infection is a potentially serious complication of epidural analgesia and with an increase in its use in wards there is a necessity to demonstrate its safety. We aimed to compare the incidence of colonization of epidural catheters retained for short duration (for 48 h) postoperative analgesia in postanesthesia care unit and wards. It was a prospective observational study done in a tertiary care teaching public hospital over a period of 2 years and included 400 patients with 200 each belonged to two groups PACU and ward. We also studied epidural tip culture pattern, skin swab culture at the entry point of the catheter, their relation to each other and whether colonization is equivalent to infection. Data were analyzed using statistical software GraphPad. Overall positive tip culture was 6% (24), of them 7% (14) were from PACU and 5% (10) were from ward (P = 0.5285). Positive skin swab culture was 38% (150), of them 20% (80) were from PACU and 18% (70) were from ward (P = 0.3526). The relation between positive tip culture and positive skin swab culture in same patients is extremely significant showing a strong linear relationship (95% confidence interval = 0.1053-0.2289). The most common microorganism isolated was Staphylococcus epidermidis. No patient had signs of local or epidural infection. There is no difference in the incidence of epidural catheter tip culture and skin swab culture of patients from the general ward and PACU. Epidural analgesia can be administered safely for 48 h in general wards without added risk of infection. The presence of positive tip culture is not a predictor of epidural space infection, and colonization is not equivalent to infection; hence, routine culture is not needed. Bacterial migration from the skin along the epidural track is the most common mode of bacterial colonization; hence, strict asepsis is necessary. PMID:27076712

  15. A comparative study of epidural catheter colonization and infection in Intensive Care Unit and wards in a Tertiary Care Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Harde, Minal; Bhadade, Rakesh; Iyer, Hemlata; Jatale, Amol; Tiwatne, Sagar

    2016-01-01

    Infection is a potentially serious complication of epidural analgesia and with an increase in its use in wards there is a necessity to demonstrate its safety. We aimed to compare the incidence of colonization of epidural catheters retained for short duration (for 48 h) postoperative analgesia in postanesthesia care unit and wards. It was a prospective observational study done in a tertiary care teaching public hospital over a period of 2 years and included 400 patients with 200 each belonged to two groups PACU and ward. We also studied epidural tip culture pattern, skin swab culture at the entry point of the catheter, their relation to each other and whether colonization is equivalent to infection. Data were analyzed using statistical software GraphPad. Overall positive tip culture was 6% (24), of them 7% (14) were from PACU and 5% (10) were from ward (P = 0.5285). Positive skin swab culture was 38% (150), of them 20% (80) were from PACU and 18% (70) were from ward (P = 0.3526). The relation between positive tip culture and positive skin swab culture in same patients is extremely significant showing a strong linear relationship (95% confidence interval = 0.1053–0.2289). The most common microorganism isolated was Staphylococcus epidermidis. No patient had signs of local or epidural infection. There is no difference in the incidence of epidural catheter tip culture and skin swab culture of patients from the general ward and PACU. Epidural analgesia can be administered safely for 48 h in general wards without added risk of infection. The presence of positive tip culture is not a predictor of epidural space infection, and colonization is not equivalent to infection; hence, routine culture is not needed. Bacterial migration from the skin along the epidural track is the most common mode of bacterial colonization; hence, strict asepsis is necessary. PMID:27076712

  16. [Fentanyl in peridural obstetrical analgesia. Evaluation after 4 years' use].

    PubMed

    Lévêque, C; Garen, C; Pathier, D; Mazuir, E; Maneglia, R; Janse-Marec, J; Cousin, M T

    1987-01-01

    7,500 deliveries occurred from the date of opening of the Maternity Hospital Jean-Rostand. 3,500 of these were conducted under epidural anaesthesia. At different stages prospective studies were carried out to recall the effect of adding fentanyl to bupivacaine when the epidural injection was made. A pharmacokinetic study. This shows that the levels in the mother and the fetus begin to coincide more with the number of doses that are given and pass from 0.3 after 50 micrograms have been administered to 0.5 after 100 micrograms have been administered and 0.7 after 150 micrograms have been administered. The fetal levels are far lower than those required to depress respiration. The half life of distribution through the circulation has been worked out at 4 minutes and the half for elimination of the drug at 460 minutes. The maternal levels show great fluctuations and late alterations. Analgesia is earlier, more complete and more prolonged when fentanyl is added. Fentanyl also masks irregularities. Undesirable effects such as tiredness, pruritus, nausea, vomiting and urinary retention occur infrequently and last only for short periods of time. No mother had respiratory depression. The doses of bupivacaine that had to be given were as a whole less when fentanyl was added. In 40% of cases it only required one injection to achieve analgesia throughout the whole labour. The length of labour and the number of caesarean operations carried out did not change.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3584862

  17. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  18. Analgesia in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Heesen, M.; Veeser, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An effective relief of labour pain has become an important part of obstetric medicine. Therefore regional nerve blocks, systemic analgesic and non-pharmacologic techniques are commonly used. This review article gives a summary of pathophysiology and anatomy of labour pain as well as advantages, disadvantages, risks and adverse reactions of analgesic techniques in newborns and parturients. Methods: We performed a selective literature search in Medline via PubMed using the search-terms “Analgesia” and “Obstetrics”. We also included the current guidelines of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Results: PDA and CSE are safe techniques for the relief of labour pain if contraindications are excluded. The risk for instrumental delivery but not for caesarean section is increased under neuraxial analgesia. PDA and CSE should be performed in an early stage of labour using low doses of local anaesthetics if possible. It is not necessary to wait for a defined cervical dilatation before starting neuraxial analgesia. Anesthesiologists and obstetricians should inform patients as soon as possible before the situation of stress during labour. Systemic opioid analgesia is a possible alternative for neuraxial techniques. Because of possible side effects systemic remifentanil analgesia should only be performed under continuous monitoring. Several nonpharmacologic methods can also relieve labour pain, but results of studies about their effectiveness are inconsistent. PMID:25264376

  19. Chemical epidural abscess: case report.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, N; Dreyfus, P M

    1971-06-01

    Spinal epidural abscess accompanies blood-borne infection, vertebral osteomyelitis, or an overlying cutaneous source of infection. This report documents the development of non-infective epidural abscess where the inflammatory response was induced by the highly irritant contents (keratin and cholesterol) of an underlying epidermoid. This was associated with aseptic meningitis. PMID:5571318

  20. Chemical epidural abscess: case report

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, N.; Dreyfus, P. M.

    1971-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess accompanies blood-borne infection, vertebral osteomyelitis, or an overlying cutaneous source of infection. This report documents the development of non-infective epidural abscess where the inflammatory response was induced by the highly irritant contents (keratin and cholesterol) of an underlying epidermoid. This was associated with aseptic meningitis. Images PMID:5571318

  1. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats

    PubMed Central

    Hermeto, Larissa C.; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C.; Jardim, Paulo H.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13–L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  2. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats.

    PubMed

    Hermeto, Larissa C; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C; Jardim, Paulo H A

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13-L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  3. Comparative analysis of epidural bupivacaine versus bupivacaine with dexmedetomidine for vaginal hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Karhade, Seema Shreepad; Acharya, Shilpa Amol; Harnagale, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dexmedetomidine a new drug, which is alpha-two agonist, is recommended by manufacturers as an adjuvant in epidural analgesia and anesthesia. Aims: To study the effects of dexmedetomidine on quality and efficacy of the epidural bupivacaine 0.5% for vaginal hysterectomies, by studying the onset of action, duration of action, highest dermatomal level achieved, degree of motor blockade, intraoperative and postoperative anesthesia and analgesia achieved. Setting and Design: Prospective randomized study. Materials and Methods: In this study, 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients requiring vaginal hysterectomy were enrolled. Patients were randomly divided into two groups - Group I: Control group receiving epidural bupivacaine 0.5% 15–20 ml only. Group II: Group receiving of epidural bupivacaine 0.5% 15–20 ml with dexmedetomidine 05 mcg/kg. Following parameters were noted: Time to onset of T10 dermatomal level, maximum sensory level achieved, time for complete motor block, time for two segmental dermatomes regression, regression to S1 dermatome, time for first rescue analgesic and total top ups required during study. Statistical Analysis: Mean and standard deviation was calculated. We used two independent sample t-test to find the P value. Software used STATA 13.0. Results: The demographic profile was comparable between the groups. There was significant difference between two groups (P < 0.001) regarding onset of analgesia to T10 (17.12 ± 2.44 vs. 10.14 ± 2.94), time to achieve complete motor block (27.16 ± 4.52 vs. 22.98 ± 4.78), which was earlier in dexmedetomidine with bupivacaine group. Prolonged postoperative analgesia, less rescue top ups and adequate sedation score was found with dexmedetomidine group. The intraoperative hemodynamic changes were comparable in both the groups. The incidence of dry mouth, shivering and nausea was more with the dexmedetomidine group. Conclusion: We conclude that epidural dexmedetomidine 0.5 µg

  4. Facial nerve paralysis and partial brachial plexopathy after epidural blood patch: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shahien, Radi; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2011-01-01

    We report a complication related to epidural analgesia for delivery in a 24- year-old woman who was admitted with mild pre-eclampsia and for induction of labor. At the first postpartum day she developed a postdural puncture headache, which was unresponsive to conservative measures. On the fifth day an epidural blood patch was done, and her headache subsided. Sixteen hours later she developed paralysis of the right facial nerve, which was treated with prednisone. Seven days later she complained of pain in the left arm and the posterior region of the shoulder. She was later admitted and diagnosed with partial brachial plexopathy. PMID:21386953

  5. The efficacy and safety of epidural dexmedetomidine and clonidine with bupivacaine in patients undergoing lower limb orthopedic surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Safiya I; Mahesh, Sarala B

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Alpha (α-2) adrenergic agonists have both analgesic and sedative properties when used as an adjuvant in regional anesthesia. A prospective randomized double-blind study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of epidural route and to compare the efficacy and clinical profile of dexmedetomidine and clonidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine with special emphasis on their quality of analgesia, sedation and the ability to provide the smooth intra-operative and postoperative course. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in prospective, randomized and double-blind manner. It included 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists Class I and II patients undergoing lower limb surgery under epidural anesthesia. Patients were randomly divided into Group A receiving 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine 15 ml with dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg and Group B receiving 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine 15 ml with clonidine 2 μg/kg epidurally. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks, duration of analgesia, sedation, and adverse effects were assessed. Results: Demographic data, surgical characteristics cardio-respiratory parameters, side-effect profile were comparable and statistically not significant in both the groups. However, sedation scores with dexmedetomidine were better than clonidine and turned out to be statistically significant. The onset times for sensory and motor blocks were significantly shorter in Group A as compared to Group B. The duration of analgesia and motor block was significantly longer in A Group as compared to Group B. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine is a superior neuraxial adjuvant to bupivacaine when compared to clonidine for early onset of analgesia, superior intra-operative analgesia, stable cardio-respiratory parameters, prolonged postoperative analgesia and providing patient comfort. PMID:27275050

  6. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... located outside the dural membrane. Steroids, anesthetics and anti-inflammatory medications are typically delivered in an epidural injection. ... create different effects for patients. Corticosteroids act as anti-inflammatory agents, reducing swelling and nerve irritation to allow ...

  7. Advancement of epidural catheter from lumbar to thoracic space in children: Comparison between 18G and 23G catheters

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Pawar, Dilip Kumar; Dehran, Maya; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds and Objectives: Lumbar-to-thoracic advancement of epidural catheter is a safe alternative to direct thoracic placement in children. In this prospective randomized study, success rate of advancement of two different types and gauges of catheter from lumbar-to-thoracic space were studied. Materials and Methods: Forty ASA I and II children (up to 6 years) undergoing thoracic or upper-abdominal surgery were allocated to either Group I (18G catheter) or Group II (23G catheter). After induction of general anesthesia a pre-determined length of catheter was inserted. Successful catheter placement was defined as the catheter tip within two segment of surgical incision in radio-contrast study. Intra-operative analgesia was provided by epidural bupivacaine and intravenous morphine. Post-operative analgesia was provided with epidural infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine+1mcg/ml fentanyl. Observations and Results: Catheter advancement was successful in 3 cases in Group I and 2 cases in Group II. Five different types of catheter positions were found on X-ray. Negative correlation was found between age and catheter advancement [significance (2-tailed) =0.03]. However, satisfactory post-operative analgesia was obtained in 35 cases. Positive correlation was found between infusion rate, the number of segment of gap between desired level and the level reached [significance (2-tailed) =0.00]. 23G catheter use was associated with more technical complications. Conclusion: Advancement of epidural catheter from lumbar to thoracic level was successful in only 10-15% cases but satisfactory analgesia could be provided by increasing the infusion rates. PMID:22345940

  8. Failure rate and complications associated with the use of spinal catheters for the management of inadvertent dural puncture in the parturient: a retrospective comparison with re-sited epidural catheters.

    PubMed

    Tien, Michael; Peacher, Dionne F; Franz, Amber M; Jia, Shawn Y; Habib, Ashraf S

    2016-05-01

    Objective To report on the failure rate of spinal catheters placed following inadvertent dural puncture (IDP) compared with re-sited epidural catheters in the obstetric population. Research design and methods Patients who experienced IDP during epidural or combined spinal epidural placement with 17 or 18 gauge Tuohy needles for labor analgesia between 2003 and 2014 were identified using our post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) database. Patients were categorized into two groups: those who had spinal catheters inserted and those who had epidural catheters re-sited. Main outcome measure Failure rate associated with spinal or re-sited epidural catheters (defined as need for repeat block or alternative analgesic modality). Secondary outcomes were incidence of PDPH, need for epidural blood patch (EBP), and adverse events. Results A total of 109 patients were included in the final analysis; 79 ultimately had spinal catheters and 30 ultimately had re-sited epidural catheters. There were no differences between spinal catheters and re-sited epidural catheters in failure rate (22% vs. 13%, P = 0.33), incidence of PDPH (73% vs. 60%, P = 0.24), need for EBP (42% vs. 30%, P = 0.28), number of headache days, or maximum headache scores. There was also no difference in the rate of adverse events including high block levels, hypotension, and fetal bradycardia (9% vs. 7%, P = 1.0) between the two groups. Conclusions There were no differences in failure rates, PDPH outcomes, or adverse events between spinal catheters and re-sited epidural catheters following IDP in parturients receiving labor analgesia. Limitations of the study include its single-center retrospective non-randomized design, and the uneven number of patients in the two groups with a relatively small number in the re-sited epidural catheter group. PMID:26818623

  9. [Clinical criteria of acute epidural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, W P; Grössing, N

    1992-08-01

    In a retrospective study 368 epidural hematomas are presented, treated from 1970 until August 1991. The clinical course and manifestation of acute epidural hematomas is commented on by means of own cases. Assessing the success of treatment, it could be demonstrated that the prompter diagnosis reduced the lethal outcome of epidural hematoma to 6.6%. PMID:1413279

  10. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia in Patients After Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain may lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia following abdominal colectomy surgeries. Eighty patients scheduled for abdominal colectomy surgery under general anesthesia were divided into 2 groups, which were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score right after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had a lower score in the visual analog scale (VAS) testing than their controls from the PRS group. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appears to promote the analgesic property of morphine-based PCA in patients after abdominal colectomy. PMID:26376397

  11. Serratus Anterior Plane (SAP) Block Used for Thoracotomy Analgesia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Okmen, Burcu Metin; Uysal, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Thoracotomy is a surgical technique used to reach the thoracic cavity. Management of pain due to thoracotomy is important in order to protect the operative respiratory reserves and decrease complications. For thoracotomy pain, blocks (such as thoracic epidural, paravertebral, etc.) and pleural catheterization and intravenous drugs (such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], and opioids, etc., can be used. We performed a serratus anterior plane (SAP) block followed by catheterization for thoracotomy pain. We used 20 ml 0.25% bupivacaine for analgesia in a patient who underwent wedge resection for a lung malignancy. We provided analgesia for a period of close to seven hours for the patient, whose postoperative VAS (visual analog scale) scores were recorded. We believe that an SAP block is effective and efficient for the management of pain after thoracotomy. PMID:27413485

  12. Serratus Anterior Plane (SAP) Block Used for Thoracotomy Analgesia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Okmen, Korgün; Okmen, Burcu Metin; Uysal, Serkan

    2016-07-01

    Thoracotomy is a surgical technique used to reach the thoracic cavity. Management of pain due to thoracotomy is important in order to protect the operative respiratory reserves and decrease complications. For thoracotomy pain, blocks (such as thoracic epidural, paravertebral, etc.) and pleural catheterization and intravenous drugs (such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], and opioids, etc., can be used. We performed a serratus anterior plane (SAP) block followed by catheterization for thoracotomy pain. We used 20 ml 0.25% bupivacaine for analgesia in a patient who underwent wedge resection for a lung malignancy. We provided analgesia for a period of close to seven hours for the patient, whose postoperative VAS (visual analog scale) scores were recorded. We believe that an SAP block is effective and efficient for the management of pain after thoracotomy. PMID:27413485

  13. [Subcutaneous abscess following epidural catheterization].

    PubMed

    Radif, Ahmed; Dalsgaard, Lars Bech

    2009-06-01

    A case of subcutaneous abscess and meningitis symptoms after insertion of epidural catheter is presented. The symptoms were pain at the site of insertion two days after insertion, later fever and neck rigidity. Treatment is surgical intervention after appropriate diagnostics by magnetic resonance imaging, and administration of appropriate antibiotics. PMID:19500519

  14. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... ESI) is the delivery of powerful anti-inflammatory medicine directly into the space outside of the sac of fluid around your spinal cord. This area is called the epidural space. ESI is not the ... given just before childbirth or certain types of surgery.

  15. Double blind comparison of combination of 0.1% ropivacaine and fentanyl to combination of 0.1% bupivacaine and fentanyl for extradural analgesia in labour

    PubMed Central

    Bawdane, Kishori Dhaku; Magar, Jyoti S; Tendolkar, Bharati A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Ropivacaine is considered as a safe alternative to bupivacaine for labor analgesia. The aim was to compare epidural ropivacaine and bupivacaine in intermittent doses for obstetric analgesia. Material and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study, 60 women in labor were randomly allocated to receive either bupivacaine 0.1% with fentanyl 2 μg/mL (BF), or ropivacaine 0.1% with fentanyl 2 μg/mL (RF). Bromage scale, loss of cold sensation to ether swab in midclavicular line, visual analog scale were used to test for motor block, sensory block and pain, respectively. Hemodynamic parameters, onset of analgesia, dose requirement of drug to produce analgesia, duration of labor, and incidence of side effects were also recorded. Data were expressed as mean ± standard deviation and analyzed using students unpaired t-test, Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U-tests at P < 0.05. Results: Both drugs were similar with respect to hemodynamic stability, onset of analgesia, quality of analgesia, sensory blockade, neonatal outcome, requirement of drugs, duration of labor, and incidence of side effects. Three parturient in bupivacaine (B-F) group had a motor block of Bromage 1 and were delivered using forceps. None of the parturient in ropivacaine (R-F) group had any motor block, and all had spontaneous vaginal delivery, but this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.081). Conclusions: Bupivacaine and ropivacaine provide equivalent analgesia in low (0.1%) concentration. PMID:27006539

  16. [Safe and Effective Analgesia with Bilateral Continuous TAP Block for a Patient with Marfan Syndrome after Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair].

    PubMed

    Katakura, Yumi; Sakurai, Asako; Endo, Masaru; Hamada, Takako; Nomoto, Mayuko; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takeda, Koji

    2016-06-01

    A patient with Marfan syndrome underwent emergency open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. She was referred to our department for postoperative analgesia. Taking the risk of possible dural ectasia into consideration, we avoided epidural block. Alternatively, we performed bilateral continuous transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block with sufficient analgesia. Lumbosacral dural ectasia is frequently observed in patients with Marfan syndrome. A few reports described that their fragile dura may contribute to an increased risk of dural puncture and postdural puncture headache (PDPH). Thus, in planning neuraxial block for a patient with Marfan syndrome, the possible consequences of lumbosacral dural ectasia should be considered. A case we herein present shows bilateral continuous TAP block could be a safe and effective alternative to epidural block. PMID:27483660

  17. Neurological complications associated with epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-05-01

    Multiple case reports of neurological complications resulting from intraarterial injection of corticosteroids have led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue a warning, requiring label changes, warning of serious neurological events, some resulting in death. The FDA has identified 131 cases of neurological adverse events, including 41 cases of arachnoiditis. A review of the literature reveals an overwhelming proportion of the complications are related to transforaminal epidural injections, of which cervical transforaminal epidural injections constituted the majority of neurological complications. Utilization data of epidural injections in the Medicare population revealed that cervical transforaminal epidural injections constitute only 2.4 % of total epidural injections and <5 % of all transforaminal epidural injections. Multiple theories have been proposed as the cause of neurological injury including particulate steroid, arterial intimal flaps, arterial dissection, dislodgement of plaque causing embolism, arterial muscle spasm, and embolism of a fresh thrombus following disruption of the intima. PMID:25795154

  18. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Epidural Clonidine vs Bupivacaine for Pain Control During and After Lower Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Guirguis, Maged; DeWood, Mark S.; Zaky, Sherif S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists produce safe and effective analgesia, but most investigations studying the analgesic effect of alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists postoperatively included previous or concomitant administration of other analgesics. Because clonidine potentiates the effect of these drugs, its own intrinsic analgesic effect has been difficult to establish. This study was designed to compare the intraoperative and postoperative effects of epidural clonidine vs bupivacaine for patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Methods This randomized controlled trial included 40 patients aged 18-50 who were scheduled for elective lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group I (n=20) received epidural clonidine; Group II (n=20) received epidural bupivacaine. Intraoperative and postoperative hemodynamics, pain scores, and complications were monitored. Results Mean pain scores were significantly lower in Group I compared to Group II (1.5 ± 0.5 compared to 3.4 ± 1.0, respectively) in the first 12 hours after surgery. Sedation was more prominent in Group I until 9 hours after surgery. Opioid requirements were significantly lower in Group I. Respiratory rate was similar in the 2 groups. Group I had larger decreases from baseline in systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure than Group II. Heart rate in Group I was reduced from baseline, while it was increased in Group II. Less postoperative nausea and vomiting, urinary retention, pruritus, and shivering were observed in Group I. Conclusion Compared to bupivacaine, epidural clonidine provided effective intraoperative and postoperative analgesia in selected patients, resulting in a decreased intravenous pain medication requirement and prolonged duration of analgesia after epidural infusion was discontinued. PMID:26130975

  19. Epidural Venous Plexus Engorgement: What Lies Beneath?

    PubMed Central

    Donmez, Fuldem Yildirim

    2015-01-01

    Epidural venous plexus engorgement may occur due to several conditions that prevent the normal venous circulation. Inferior vena cava agenesis is a very rare cause of epidural venous enlargement. We present a case with a very thin inferior vena cava and left iliac vein agenesis who presented with back pain due to epidural vein engorgement and lacked other venous problems such as deep vein thrombosis. PMID:25722912

  20. Postoperative pain relief using intermittent intrapleural analgesia following thoracoscopic anterior correction for progressive adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thoracoscopic anterior scoliosis instrumentation is a safe and viable surgical option for corrective fusion of progressive adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and has been performed at our centre on 205 patients since 2000. However, there is a paucity of literature reporting on or examining optimum methods of analgesia following this type of surgery. A retrospective study was designed to present the authors’ technique for delivering intermittent local anaesthetic boluses via an intrapleural catheter following thoracoscopic scoliosis surgery; report the pain levels that may be expected and any adverse effects associated with the use of intrapleural analgesia, as part of a combined postoperative analgesia regime. Methods Records for 32 patients who underwent thoracoscopic anterior correction for AIS were reviewed. All patients received an intrapleural catheter inserted during surgery, in addition to patient-controlled opiate analgesia and oral analgesia. After surgery, patients received a bolus of 0.25% bupivacaine every four hours via the intrapleural catheter. Patient’s perceptions of their pain control was measured using the visual analogue pain scale scores which were recorded before and after local anaesthetic administration and the quantity and time of day that any other analgesia was taken, were also recorded. Results 28 female and four male patients (mean age 14.5 ± 1.5 years) had a total of 230 boluses of local anaesthetic administered in the 96 hour period following surgery. Pain scores significantly decreased following the administration of a bolus (p < 0.0001), with the mean pain score decreasing from 3.66 to 1.83. The quantity of opiates via patient-controlled analgesia after surgery decreased steadily between successive 24 hours intervals after an initial increase in the second 24 hour period when patients were mobilised. One intrapleural catheter required early removal due to leakage; there were no other associated

  1. Whole Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Song, Jae Gyok; Ryu, Jae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male who had no underlying disease, including coagulopathy, underwent thoracotomy and bleeding control due to hemothorax. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred. Urgent spine magnetic resonance imaging showed a massive anterior spinal epidural hematoma from C2 to L1 level with different signal intensities, which was suspected to be staged hemorrhage. Hematoma evacuation with decompressive laminectomy was performed. The patient's neurologic deterioration was recovered immediately, and he was discharged without neurological deficits. A drug history of naftazone, which could induce a drug-induced platelet dysfunction, was revealed retrospectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of whole spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a young patient, with a history of hemorrhoid medication. PMID:24967052

  2. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Report.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a 12-year-old female, who presented with significant upper and lower extremities weakness preceded by pain around the neck and shoulder girdle. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed epidural hematoma extending from C6-T2 with characteristic heterogeneously hyperintensity on T2 and homogenously isointensity on T1. Emergent spinal decompression was performed. However, the patient remained substantially weak in her lower extremities and was wheelchair bound at 3 months postoperatively. We have discussed clinical features, predisposing events, pathogenesis and treatment guidelines described in the literature. We also aim to reinforce the notion of keeping a high degree of clinical suspicion to identify and intervene at the earliest stage to prevent the physically and socially challenging consequences of SSEH. PMID:27598898

  3. Dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in caudal analgesia in children

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Vigya; Kubre, Jyotsna; Radhakrishnan, Krishnaprabha

    2016-01-01

    Context: Postoperative pain management is becoming an integral part of anesthesia care. Various techniques of pediatric pain relief have been designed among which the most commonly practiced is caudal epidural block. Several adjuvants have been used to prolong the duration of caudal analgesia such as clonidine, neostigmine, ketamine, opioids, and ephedrine. We have designed the study using dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to assess analgesic efficacy, duration of postoperative analgesia, hemodynamic stability, postoperative sedation, and any adverse effects in children. Aims: The aim is to study the effects of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in caudal analgesia in pediatric patients posted for infraumbilical surgeries. Settings and Design: This is a randomized, double-blind study in which effect of dexmedetomidine is studied when added to bupivacaine in the caudal epidural block. The observations are made intraoperatively for hemodynamic stability and postoperatively for the duration of analgesia. Subjects and Methods: This study was conducted in 100 children of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II, aged 2–10 years, undergoing elective infraumbilical surgeries. They were divided into two groups as follows: Group A: (0.25%) bupivacaine 1 ml/kg + normal saline (NS) 1 ml. Group B: (0.25%) bupivacaine 1 ml/kg + 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine in 1 ml NS. As this study was double-blind, patients were randomly assigned to receive either (bupivacaine + saline) or (bupivacaine + dexmedetomidine) in each group. The patients were observed for hemodynamic stability, respiratory depression, and postoperative pain using face, legs, activity, cry, consolability (FLACC) pain scale for 24 h postoperatively. Statistical Analysis Used: Unpaired Student's t-test. Results: The mean duration of effective analgesia in Group A patients was 4.33 ± 0.98 h versus 9.88 ± 0.90 h in Group B patients. Likewise, the difference in mean FLACC score of both the

  4. Single-dose paravertebral blockade versus epidural blockade for pain relief after open renal surgery: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Moawad, Hazem Ebrahem; Mousa, Sherif Abdo; El-Hefnawy, Ahmed S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Paravertebral block (PVB) has been an established technique for providing analgesia to the chest and abdomen. We conducted the current study to compare single-dose PVB versus single-dose epidural blockade (EP) for pain relief after renal surgery. Methods: Eighty patients scheduled for renal surgery were randomly assigned into two groups according to the analgesic technique, PVB group or EP group. General anesthesia was induced for all patients. Postoperative pain was assessed over 24 h using 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Postoperative total pethidine consumption was recorded. Any postoperative events, such as nausea, vomiting, shivering, or respiratory complications, were recorded. Hemodynamics and blood gasometry were also recorded. Results: EP group showed significant decrease of both heart rate and mean blood pressure at most of the operative periods when compared with PVB group. There was no difference in total rescue analgesic consumption. Postoperative VAS showed no significant difference between the studied groups. Postoperative events were comparable in both the groups. Conclusion: Single injection PVB resulted in similar analgesia but greater hemodynamic stability than epidural analgesia in patients undergoing renal surgery, therefore this technique may be recommended for patients with coexisting circulatory disease. PMID:23717235

  5. Unusual cervical spine epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Liou, Jr-Han; Su, Yu-Jang

    2015-10-01

    A 48-year-old man presented to the emergency department with complain of severe neck pain and anterior chest pain. Intermittent fever in the recent 2 days was also noted. There is a track maker over his left side of neck. The laboratory examination showed leukocytosis and high C-reactive protein level. Urine drug screen was positive for opiate. Empirical antibiotic administration was given. Blood culture grew gram-positive cocci in chain, and there was no vegetation found by heart echocardiogram. However, progressive weakness of four limbs was noted, and patient even cannot stand up and walk. The patient also complained of numbness sensation over bilateral hands and legs, and lower abdomen. Acute urine retention occurred. We arranged magnetic resonance imaging survey, which showed evidence of inflammatory process involving the retropharyngeal spaces and epidural spaces from the skull base to the bony level of T5. Epidural inflammatory process resulted in compression of the spinal cord and bilateral neural foramen narrowing. Neurosurgeon was consulted. Operation with laminectomy and posterior fusion with bone graft and internal fixation was done. Culture of epidural abscess and 2 sets of blood culture all yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. For epidural abscess, the most common involved spine is lumbar followed by thoracic and cervical spine. Diagnosis and treatment in the drug abusers are still challenging because they lack typical presentation, drug compliance, and adequate follow-up and because it is hard to stop drug abuser habit. Significant improvement of neurological deficit can be expected in most spinal abscess in drug abusers after treatment. PMID:26298050

  6. A Comparison of Efficacy of Segmental Epidural Block versus Spinal Anaesthesia for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Nandanwar, Avinash S; Patil, Yogita; Baheti, Vidyasagar H.; Tanwar, Harshwardhan V.; Patwardhan, Sujata K.

    2015-01-01

    of haemodynamic stability, postoperative analgesia, patient satisfaction and reduced incidence of PONV. Epidural anaesthesia is difficult to execute and takes longer time to act as compared to spinal block which limits its use. PMID:26436021

  7. Computed tomographic staging of traumatic epidural bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-09-01

    The computed tomographic findings in 45 patients with post-traumatic epidural hemotomas are subdivided into three categories (acute, subacute, and chronic) and correlated with the severity of bleeding, clot formation, and clot resorption. Active epidural bleeding may be identified in acute cases.

  8. Paraplegia following lumbosacral steroid epidural injections.

    PubMed

    AbdeleRahman, Kader Tawfiq; Rakocevic, Goran

    2014-09-01

    Spinal cord ischemia is a rare but possible neurological complication following routine conservative treatment of lumbosacral radiculopathy. A case of a 46 year old woman with chronic L5 radiculopathy, who developed spinal cord ischemia following epidural steroid injection, is reported. Two months after the epidural injection, she required crutches for walking and had neurogenic bladder and bowel. PMID:25200706

  9. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Perineural Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Pusat, Serhat; Kural, Cahit; Aslanoglu, Atilla; Kurt, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices are rare and usually mimick lumbar disc herniations. Back pain and radiculopathy are the main symptoms of lumbar epidural varices. Perineural cysts are radiologically different lesions and should not be confused with epidural varix. A 36-year-old male patient presented to us with right leg pain. The magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion at S1 level that was compressing the right root, and was interpreted as a perineural cyst. The patient underwent surgery via right L5 and S1 hemilaminectomy, and the lesion was coagulated and removed. The histopathological diagnosis was epidural varix. The patient was clinically improved and the follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed the absence of the lesion. Lumbar epidural varix should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of the cystic lesions which compress the spinal roots. PMID:23741553

  10. [New opioids for general anaesthesia and in- and out-hospital analgesia].

    PubMed

    Dabrowska-Wójciak, Iwona; Piotrowski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, three new opioids of the piperidine family have been introduced to anaesthesia clinical practice: sufentanil, alfentanil and remifentanil. Alfentanil is a derivative of fentanyl, with quicker onset than that of fentanyl and with shorter duration and more intense vagomimetic properties than those of fentanyl and sufentanil. It may cause less intense respiratory depression than equianalgesic doses of fentanyl. Clinical trials indicate that alfentanil can be used effectively as an analgesic, as an analgesic supplement to anaesthesia, and as the major component of a general anaesthetic. Its short duration of effect makes it attractive as an analgesic supplement for short ambulatory surgical procedures. Sufentanil is a more potent and more lipophilic analgesic than fentanyl. It would appear to maintain haemodynamic stability during surgery better than other opioids. Epidural sufentanil produces a rapid onset and good quality of analgesia. In addition, low doses administered intravenously via a PCA pump seem to have a potential role for analgesia during labour. Remifentanil is an opioid analgesic that is rapidly metabolized by non-specific blood and tissue esterases. According to its unique pharmacokinetic profile, remifentanil-based anaesthesia combines high-dosage opioid analgesia intraoperatively with a rapid and predictable postoperative awakening, even after long procedures. Its vagomimetic properties are especially pronounced in small children, the elderly and hypovolaemic patients, and in these groups atropine should be always given before remifentanil administration. Remifentanil also minimises the adrenergic response to endotracheal intubation. Three mju agonist-antagonists have been used for pain treatment: nalbuphine, butorphanol and buprenorphine. They can be used in ambulatory settings. Nalbuphine can be used parenterally. It reverses morphine-induced respiratory depression while maintaining adequate analgesic effect. Buprenorphine

  11. Effects of continuous fascia iliaca compartment blocks for postoperative analgesia in patients with hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Hongling; Yang, Ya-Xiong; Wang, Yang; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Bin; Luan, Bo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Effective analgesia is essential for the postoperative care of orthopedic patients. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of continuous fascia iliaca compartment block (FIB) as postoperative analgesia after hip fracture surgery, and to compare FIB with patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) using fentanyl for 48 h postoperatively. METHODS: Patients with hip fractures who were scheduled for open reduction and internal fixation surgery using the antirotation proximal femoral nail technique were randomly assigned to the FIB or PCIA groups. Postoperative pain was assessed using a numeral rating scale at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h after analgesia was started. Delirium, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), and pruritus were also monitored. RESULTS: Patients in the FIB group reported less pain than those in the PCIA group (P=0.039, d=−0.3). The change in pain scores over time was similar between the two groups. There were six patients with PONV and five patients with pruritus in the PCIA group, while no PONV or pruritus was noticed in the FIB group (P=0.013). Ten (19.6%) patients in the FIB group and three (5.7%) patients in the PCIA group developed postoperative delirium (P=0.032, d=0.77). CONCLUSION: Continuous FIB is a safe and effective technique for postoperative analgesia after hip fracture surgery, making it an option for pain management in elderly patients with hip fractures. PMID:26125194

  12. Effect of Intravenous Patient Controlled Ketamine Analgesiaon Postoperative Pain in Opium Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Dahi-Taleghani, Mastane; Fazli, Benjamin; Ghasemi, Mahshid; Vosoughian, Maryam; Dabbagh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acutepostoperative pain is among the worst experience that patient scan undergo, and many analgesics have been used to suppress it; especially in chronic opium abusers. Ketamine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist analgesic, having both anesthetic and analgesic properties, which are not affected to the same extent in chronic opium abusers. Objectives: In this study, we assessed the analgesic effects of ketamine added to morphine as a patient-controlled analgesia method for acute pain management, compared with a placebo, inchronic maleopium abusers. Patients and Methods: After institutional review board approval for ethical considerations, a randomized double-blinded placebo controlled clinical trial was conducted. A total of 140 male patients aged 18-65 years, undergoing orthopedic surgery, were entered into the study after matching inclusion and exclusion criteria. All patients received the same anesthesia method; while the first group received ketamine (1mg/mL) and morphine (0.5 mg/mL) as a patient-controlled analgesia (70 patients), the second group received morphine (0.5 mg/mL) plus normal saline (70 patients). P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The ketamine and morphine group of patients experienced less postoperative pain and required less postoperative rescue analgesia. However, the unwanted postoperative side effects were nearly the same; although increased levels of postoperative nausea and vomiting were observed in the ketamine and morphine group Conclusions: This study demonstrated improved analgesic effects after using intravenous patient controlled analgesia with ketamine on postoperative pain in opium abusers. PMID:24701419

  13. Placebo analgesia: understanding the mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Medoff, Zev M; Colloca, Luana

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Expectations of pain relief drive placebo analgesia. Understanding how expectations of improvement trigger distinct biological systems to shape therapeutic analgesic outcomes has been the focus of recent pharmacologic and neuroimaging studies in the field of pain. Recent findings indicate that placebo effects can imitate the actions of real painkillers and promote the endogenous release of opioids and nonopioids in humans. Social support and observational learning also contribute to placebo analgesic effects. Distinct psychological traits can modulate expectations of analgesia, which facilitate brain pain control mechanisms involved in pain reduction. Many studies have highlighted the importance and clinical relevance of these responses. Gaining deeper understanding of these pain modulatory mechanisms has important implications for personalizing patient pain management. PMID:25806903

  14. A Randomized Double Blinded Comparison of Epidural Infusion of Bupivacaine, Ropivacaine, Bupivacaine-Fentanyl, Ropivacaine-Fentanyl for Postoperative Pain Relief in Lower Limb Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Krishan Yogesh; Grewal, Anju; Katyal, Sunil; Singh, Gurdeep; Kaur, Ananjit

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous epidural infusion of Bupivacaine and Ropivacaine with or without the addition of Fentanyl has been evaluated by various researchers for effective postoperative pain relief. Studies however, depict significant variability in their results with regard to analgesic efficacy and adverse effects like hypotension, motor blockade etc. Aim To comparatively evaluate postoperative analgesic efficacy, motor sparing effect, postoperative haemodynamic variations and total postoperative analgesic consumption in first 24 hours. Materials and Methods A randomised double blind study was conducted on 100 adult, ASA grade I and II patients, of either sex who had undergone elective lower limb surgery under spinal anaesthesia. According to the group allocated, patients were started on epidural infusion after completion of surgery. Group I (0.2% Ropivacaine), Group II (0.1% Ropivacaine + 2μg/ml Fentanyl), Group III (0.2% Bupivacaine), Group IV (0.1% Bupivacaine + 2μg/ml Fentanyl) at the rate of 6 ml/hour. VAS scores, epidural consumption, supplemental epidural boluses, rescue analgesics, haemodynamics, motor block, sensory block regression, sedation, nausea and pruritis were recorded by a blinded observer for 24 hours. Results The haemodynamic parameters were stable in all the groups. Side effects including the motor block were negligible and comparable in all groups. Group I patients had significantly lower VAS scores, mean total epidural consumption, supplemental epidural bolus requirement and rescue analgesic requirement among all groups. Conclusion It can be concluded that epidural analgesia using Ropivacaine 0.2% infusion is more effective than other study groups when used for postoperative pain relief in lower limb surgeries. PMID:26500984

  15. Epidural Co-Administration of Dexmedetomidine and Levobupivacaine Improves the Gastrointestinal Motility Function after Colonic Resection in Comparison to Co-Administration of Morphine and Levobupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xian-Zhang; Lu, Zhi-Fang; Lv, Xiang-Qi; Guo, Yue-Ping; Cui, Xiao-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal motility may be impaired after intestinal surgery. Epidural morphine is effective in controlling postoperative pain, but can further reduce gastrointestinal motility. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of epidural dexmedetomidine on gastrointestinal motility in patients undergoing colonic resection. Seventy-four patients undergoing colonic resection were enrolled in this clinical trial and allocated randomly to treatment with dexmedetomidine (D group) or morphine (M group). The D group received a loading dose epidural administration of 3 ml dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg kg-1) and then a continuous epidural administration of 80 μg dexmedetomidine in 150 ml levobupivacaine (0.125%) at 3 ml h-1 for two days. The M group received a loading dose epidural administration of 3 ml morphine (0.03 mg kg-1) and then a continuous epidural administration of 4.5 mg morphine in 150 ml levobupivacaine at 3 ml h-1 for two days. Verbal rating score (VRS), postoperative analgesic requirements, side effects related to analgesia, the time to postoperative first flatus (FFL) and first feces (FFE) were recorded. VRS and postoperative analgesic requirements were not significantly different between treatment groups. In contrast, the time to FFL and time to FFE were significant longer in M group in comparison to D group (P < 0.05). Moreover, patients in M group had a significantly higher incidence of nausea, vomiting, and pruritus (P < 0.05). No patients showed neurologic deficits in either group. In comparison to morphine, epidural dexmedetomidine is safe and beneficial for the recovery of gastrointestinal motility after colonic resection when used as an adjunct with levobupivacaine for postoperative pain control. Trial Registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-14004644 PMID:26751791

  16. Pharmacogenomic considerations in opioid analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vuilleumier, Pascal H; Stamer, Ulrike M; Landau, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Translating pharmacogenetics to clinical practice has been particularly challenging in the context of pain, due to the complexity of this multifaceted phenotype and the overall subjective nature of pain perception and response to analgesia. Overall, numerous genes involved with the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of opioids response are candidate genes in the context of opioid analgesia. The clinical relevance of CYP2D6 genotyping to predict analgesic outcomes is still relatively unknown; the two extremes in CYP2D6 genotype (ultrarapid and poor metabolism) seem to predict pain response and/or adverse effects. Overall, the level of evidence linking genetic variability (CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) to oxycodone response and phenotype (altered biotransformation of oxycodone into oxymorphone and overall clearance of oxycodone and oxymorphone) is strong; however, there has been no randomized clinical trial on the benefits of genetic testing prior to oxycodone therapy. On the other hand, predicting the analgesic response to morphine based on pharmacogenetic testing is more complex; though there was hope that simple genetic testing would allow tailoring morphine doses to provide optimal analgesia, this is unlikely to occur. A variety of polymorphisms clearly influence pain perception and behavior in response to pain. However, the response to analgesics also differs depending on the pain modality and the potential for repeated noxious stimuli, the opioid prescribed, and even its route of administration. PMID:23226064

  17. Evaluation of low-dose dexmedetomidine and neostigmine with bupivacaine for postoperative analgesia in orthopedic surgeries: A prospective randomized double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashima; Kumar, Naresh J; Azharuddin, Mohammad; Mohan, Lalith C; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Neuraxial adjuants to local anesthetics is an effective technique of improving the quality and duration of postoperative analgesia. The safety and efficacy of drugs like dexmedetomidine and neostigmine as epidural medications have been sparsely investigated. Material and Methods: Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia was performed in 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients who required lower limb surgeries of ≤3 h duration. The epidural drug was administered at the end of surgery with patients randomized into three groups. Group I, II and III received 6 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine alone, with 1 ug/kg of neostigmine and with 0.5 ug/kg of dexmedetomidine + 1 ug/kg of neostigmine, respectively. The patients were prescribed 50 mg tramadol intravenous as rescue analgesic. Patients were assessed for hemodynamic parameters, pain scores, duration of analgesia, rescue analgesic requirements and the incidence of side-effects over the next 10 h. Data was analyzed using SPSS® version 17.0 (Chicago, IL, USA). P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Patients in Group III had significantly longer mean duration of analgesia (273.5 min) compared to Group II (176.25 min) and Group I (144 min). There was increased requirement of fluids to maintain blood pressures in Group III. Neostigmine did not cause significant incidence of gastrointestinal side effects. Conclusions: Epidurally administered dexmedetomidine and neostigmine exhibit synergism in analgesic action. The incidence of drug-related side-effects was low in our study. PMID:27275047

  18. The effect of addition of low dose fentanyl to epidural bupivacaine (0.5%) in patients undergoing elective caesarean section: A randomized, parallel group, double blind, placebo controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Parate, LH; Manjrekar, SP; Anandaswamy, TC; Manjunath, B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Opioids have synergistic action with local anesthetics which may alter characteristics of epidural block. Giving opioids to mother before delivery of baby is still fully not accepted with some fearing risk of neonatal depression. Aims: Our primary aim was to evaluate the analgesic effect of addition of 50 μg fentanyl to epidural 0.5% bupivacaine in patients undergoing elective caesarean section using visual analog scale. The secondary aim was to assess onset of analgesia, volume of drug required to achieve T6 level, grade and duration of motor block and Apgar score. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study 64 patients scheduled for elective caesarean section under epidural anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups of 32 each. The fentanyl group received 1ml of 50 μg fentanyl and the saline group received 1ml of normal saline mixed with 10ml of 0.5% bupivacaine for epidural anesthesia. VAS score, time to achieve T6 level, dose of bupivacaine, intraoperative analgesic consumption and duration of analgesia, grade and duration of motor block and any adverse maternal and neonatal effects were noted. Statistical Analysis: Data was analyzed using Students t test, chi-square test and Mann-Whitney U-test. The values of P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Fentanyl improved the VAS score significantly (1.6 ± 1.32) compared to the saline group (3.77 ± 1.0, P < 0.0001). It also reduced the intraoperaitve analgesic supplementation compared to the saline group. (P = 0.031). The postoperative duration of analgesia was prolonged in the fentanyl group (275.80 ± 13.61 min) compared to the saline group (191.47 ± 12.16 min, P < 0.0001). The other characteristics of epidural block were unaltered. Conclusion: Addition of 50 μg fentanyl to epidural 0.5% bupivacaine significantly reduces the VAS score. It also reduces intra-operative analgesia supplementation and prolongs the duration

  19. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujin; Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-06-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  20. Epidural steroid warning controversy still dogging FDA.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Candido, Kenneth D; Singh, Vijay; Gharibo, Christopher G; Boswell, Mark V; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Falco, Frank J E; Grider, Jay S; Diwan, Sudhir; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    On April 23, 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a letter of warning that injection of corticosteroids into the epidural space of the spine may result in rare, but serious adverse events, including "loss of vision, stroke, paralysis, and death." The advisory also advocated that patients should discuss the benefits and risks of epidural corticosteroid injections with their health care professionals, along with the benefits and risks associated with other possible treatments. In addition, the FDA stated that the effectiveness and safety of the corticosteroids for epidural use have not been established, and the FDA has not approved corticosteroids for such use. To raise awareness of the risks of epidural corticosteroid injections in the medical community, the FDA's Safe Use Initiative convened a panel of experts including pain management experts to help define the techniques for such injections with the aim of reducing preventable harm. The panel was unable to reach an agreement on 20 proposed items related to technical aspects of performing epidural injections. Subsequently, the FDA issued the above referenced warning and a notice that a panel will be convened in November 2014. This review assesses the inaccuracies of the warning and critically analyzes the available literature. The literature has been assessed in reference to alternate techniques and an understanding of the risk factors when performing transforaminal epidural injections in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions, ultimately resulting in improved safety. The results of this review show the efficacy of epidural injections, with or without steroids, in a multitude of spinal ailments utilizing caudal, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar interlaminar approaches as well as lumbar transforaminal epidural injections . The evidence also shows the superiority of steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation utilizing caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches without any significant difference as

  1. Ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia for a parturient with severe malformations of the skeletal system undergoing cesarean delivery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Luo, LinLi; Ni, Juan; Wu, Lan; Luo, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients with preexisting diseases is challenging and individualized approaches need to be determined based on patients’ complications. We report here a case of ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia in combination with low-dose ketamine during cesarean delivery on a parturient with severe malformations of the skeletal system and airway problems. The ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia was performed in the L1–L2 space, followed by an intravenous administration of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) for sedation and analgesia. Satisfactory anesthesia was provided to the patient and spontaneous ventilation was maintained during the surgery. The mother and the baby were discharged 5 days after surgery, no complications were reported for either of them. Our work demonstrated that an ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia combined with low-dose ketamine can be used to successfully maintain spontaneous ventilation and provide effective analgesia during surgery and reduce the risk of postoperative anesthesia-related pulmonary infection. PMID:25999759

  2. An evaluation of obstetrical analgesia.

    PubMed

    FIST, H S

    1954-02-01

    Relief of pain and safety of mother and child are fundamentals in obstetrical analgesia. Elimination of those drugs which are ineffective or dangerous is the best guide to proper medication. Morphine, codeine, or similar opium derivatives should be avoided as they depress fetal respiration. Barbiturates have the same fault, despite their popularity. Demerol in small dosage is safe and effective. Scopolamine yields excellent results with safety. Magnesium sulfate potentiates and reinforces the action of scopolamine and involves no danger. This combination of drugs may be used by any competent general practitioner in the home or hospital. PMID:13126811

  3. Symptomatic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis After a Single Local Epidural Steroid Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, Chung Hong Kaur, Shaleen; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare disorder that can manifest with progressive neurological deficits. It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated epidural fat commonly associated with the administration of exogenous steroids associated with a variety of systemic diseases, endocrinopathies, and Cushing syndrome (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). Occasionally, spinal epidural lipomatosis may occur in patients not exposed to steroids or in patients with endocrinopathies, primarily in obese individuals (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). However, spinal lumbar epidural lipomatosis resulting from local steroid injection has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 45-year-old diabetic man with claudication that was probably due to symptomatic lumbar spinal lipomatosis resulting from a single local epidural steroid injection.

  4. Morphine Plus Bupivacaine Vs. Morphine Peridural Analgesia in Abdominal Surgery: The Effects on Postoperative Course in Major Hepatobiliary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Barzoi, G.; Carluccio, S.; Bianchi, B.; Vassia, S.; Colucci, G.

    2000-01-01

    Anaesthesia and surgical procedures lead to a reduction of intestinal motility, and opioids may produce a postoperative ileus, that might delay postoperative feeding. The aim of this prospective randomised study is to test whether or not different kinds of epidural analgesia (Group A: morphine 0.00 17 mg/kg/h and bupivacaine 0.125% – 0.058 mg/kg/h; Group B: morphine alone 0.035mg/kg/12h in the postoperative period) allow earlier postoperative enteral feeding, enhance intestinal motility a passage of flatus and help avoid complications, such as nausea, vomiting, ileus, diarrhoea, pneumonia or other infective diseases. We included in the study 60 patients (28 males and 32 females) with a mean age of 61.2 years (range 50–70) and with an ASA score of 2 or 3. All patients had hepato–biliary-pancreatic neoplasm and were candidates for major surgery. We compared two different pharmacological approaches, i.e., morphine plus bupivacaine (30 patients, Group A)versus morphine alone (30 patients, Group B). Each medication was administered by means of a thoracic epidural catheter for the control of postoperative pain. In the postoperative course we recorded every 6 hours peristaltic activity. We also noted morbidity (pneumonia, wound sepsis) and mortality. Effective peristalsis was present in all patients in Group A within the first six postoperative hours; in Group B, after 30 hours. Six patients in Group A had bowel motions in the first postoperative day, 11 in the second day, 10 in the third day and 3 in fourth day, while in Group B none in the first day, two in the second, 7 in the third, 15 in the fourth, and 6 in the fifth: the difference between the two groups was significant (P<0.05 in 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th days). Pneumonia occurred in 2 patients of Group A, and in 10 of Group B (P<0.05). We conclude that epidural analgesia with morphine plus bupivacaine allowed a move rapid return to normal gut activity and early enteral nutrition compared with epidural analgesia

  5. Etoricoxib - preemptive and postoperative analgesia (EPPA) in patients with laparotomy or thoracotomy - design and protocols

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective Our objective was to report on the design and essentials of the Etoricoxib protocol- Preemptive and Postoperative Analgesia (EPPA) Trial, investigating whether preemptive analgesia with cox-2 inhibitors is more efficacious than placebo in patients who receive either laparotomy or thoracotomy. Design and Methods The study is a 2 × 2 factorial armed, double blinded, bicentric, randomised placebo-controlled trial comparing (a) etoricoxib and (b) placebo in a pre- and postoperative setting. The total observation period is 6 months. According to a power analysis, 120 patients scheduled for abdominal or thoracic surgery will randomly be allocated to either the preemptive or the postoperative treatment group. These two groups are each divided into two arms. Preemptive group patients receive etoricoxib prior to surgery and either etoricoxib again or placebo postoperatively. Postoperative group patients receive placebo prior to surgery and either placebo again or etoricoxib after surgery (2 × 2 factorial study design). The Main Outcome Measure is the cumulative use of morphine within the first 48 hours after surgery (measured by patient controlled analgesia PCA). Secondary outcome parameters include a broad range of tests including sensoric perception and genetic polymorphisms. Discussion The results of this study will provide information on the analgesic effectiveness of etoricoxib in preemptive analgesia and will give hints on possible preventive effects of persistent pain. Trial registration NCT00716833 PMID:20504378

  6. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  7. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  8. Accidental epidural injection of thiopental in a dog.

    PubMed

    O'Kell, Allison L; Ambros, Barbara

    2010-03-01

    A 3-year-old Labrador retriever was presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine for a tibial plateau levelling osteotomy. While performing a pre-operative epidural, thiopental was inadvertently administered into the epidural space. Treatment included epidural saline flushing and intravenous methylprednisolone sodium succinate. No neurologic deficits were detected. PMID:20514256

  9. Accidental epidural injection of thiopental in a dog

    PubMed Central

    O’Kell, Allison L.; Ambros, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    A 3-year-old Labrador retriever was presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine for a tibial plateau levelling osteotomy. While performing a pre-operative epidural, thiopental was inadvertently administered into the epidural space. Treatment included epidural saline flushing and intravenous methylprednisolone sodium succinate. No neurologic deficits were detected. PMID:20514256

  10. [Pneumoencephalotomography under diaz-analgesia and narco-analgesia].

    PubMed

    Bergeron, J L; Renou, A M; Boulard, G; Vernhiet, J; Nicod, J

    1978-01-01

    The authors reported 92 observations of anesthesia for gaseous encephalotomography interest the adult. The contrast produce is air. 49 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. 25 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, succinylcholine, N2O to 60 p. 100. 18 under narco-analgesia and myoresolution. +Fentyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. The conditions of the study are described in the first part. The results and their analysis permit the appreciation of: - the patient confort, the quality of the examination; -the respect of the hemodynamics for this examination, reputed to be "difficult"; -the immediatly noticeable diminution of side effects; -the absence of side effects; -the justification and interesting of the control ventilation; -the quality of waking up. In the conclusion the authors underline the interest of their different techniques and the possibility of using them in operations in sitting position in neurosurgery, and all important chirurgical intervention. PMID:677506

  11. Epidural cortical stimulation and aphasia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cherney, Leora R.; Harvey, Richard L.; Babbitt, Edna M.; Hurwitz, Rosalind; Kaye, Rosalind C.; Lee, Jaime B.; Small, Steven. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several methods of delivering cortical brain stimulation to modulate cortical excitability and interest in their application as an adjuvant strategy in aphasia rehabilitation after stroke is growing. Epidural cortical stimulation, although more invasive than other methods, permits high frequency stimulation of high spatial specificity to targeted neuronal populations. Aims First, we review evidence supporting the use of epidural cortical stimulation for upper limb recovery after focal cortical injury in both animal models and human stroke survivors. These data provide the empirical and theoretical platform underlying the use of epidural cortical stimulation in aphasia. Second, we summarize evidence for the application of epidural cortical stimulation in aphasia. We describe the procedures and primary outcomes of a safety and feasibility study (Cherney, Erickson & Small, 2010), and provide previously unpublished data regarding secondary behavioral outcomes from that study. Main Contribution In a controlled study comparing epidural cortical stimulation plus language treatment (CS/LT) to language treatment alone (LT), eight stroke survivors with nonfluent aphasia received intensive language therapy for 6 weeks. Four of these participants also underwent surgical implantation of an epidural stimulation device which was activated only during therapy sessions. Behavioral data were collected before treatment, immediately after treatment, and at 6 and 12 weeks following the end of treatment. The effect size for the primary outcome measure, the Western Aphasia Battery Aphasia Quotient, was benchmarked as moderate from baseline to immediately post-treatment, and large from baseline to the 12-week follow-up. Similarly, effect sizes obtained at the 12-week follow-up for the Boston Naming Test, the Communicative Effectiveness Index, and for correct information units on a picture description task were greater than those obtained immediately post treatment

  12. Unusual Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis and Lumbosacral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Picazo, David; Ramírez Villaescusa, José

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural lipomatosis is most frequently observed in patients on chronic steroid treatment. Only a few idiopathic epidural lipomatosis cases have been described. Material and Methods. 64-year-old male patient presented with low back pain and left leg pain. Later, the patient experienced neurogenic claudication and radicular pain in the left leg without urinary dysfunction. Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an abnormal fat tissue overgrowth in the epidural space with compression of the dural sac, degenerative disc disease at L4-L5 level, and instability at L5-S1. Endocrinopathic diseases and chronic steroid therapy were excluded. If conservative treatment failed, surgical treatment can be indicated. Results. After surgery, there was a gradual improvement in symptoms and signs, and six months later the patient returned to daily activities and was neurologically normal. Conclusion. In the absence of common causes of neurogenic claudication, epidural lipomatosis should be considered. The standard test for the diagnosis of epidural lipomatosis is magnetic resonance (MR). At first, conservative treatment must be considered; weight loss and the suspension of prior corticosteroid therapy are indicated. In the presence of neurological impairment, the operative treatment of wide surgical decompression must be performed soon after diagnosis. PMID:27069704

  13. Antinociceptive effects of epidural buprenorphine or medetomidine, or the combination, in conscious cats.

    PubMed

    Steagall, P V M; Millette, V; Mantovani, F B; Gilbert, P; Luna, S P L; Duke-Novakovski, T

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the antinociceptive effects of epidural buprenorphine (EB), epidural medetomidine (EM) or epidural buprenorphine-medetomidine (EBM). Eight cats were studied. Thermal thresholds (TT) were measured by increasing the temperature of a probe placed on the thorax. Mechanical thresholds (MT) were measured through inflation of a modified blood pressure bladder to the cat's forelimb. After baseline measurements, EB (0.02 mg/kg), EM (0.01 mg/kg) or half of the doses of each drug (EBM) were administered. Data were analysed using anova (P < 0.05) and 95% confidence interval (CI). TT increased from 30 min to 1 h after EB and at 45 min after EM. MT increased from 45 min to 2 h after EB, from 15 min to 1 h after EM and at 30, 45 min and at 2 h after EBM. MT were significantly lower after EB than EM at 30 min. TT were above the upper 95%CI from 15 min to 24 h after EB, from 15 min to 4 h after EM and from 15 min to 8 h after EBM. MT were above the upper 95%CI from 15 min to 5 h, and at 8, 12 and 24 h after EB, from 15 min to 6 h after EM and from 15 min to 6 h and at 12 and 24 h after EBM. All treatments had similar onset. Overall, EB presented longer period of action than EBM and EM. The same magnitude of analgesia was achieved, but with fewer side effects when EBM was compared with EM. PMID:19754915

  14. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Atiba, Ayman; Ghazy, Alaa; Gomaa, Naglaa; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick test. Onset time, duration, and degree of analgesia and ataxia were recorded after each treatment. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature, and haematobiochemical parameters were recorded after all treatments. Time to onset and duration of analgesia, respectively, were as follows: tramadol 11 ± 2 min and 208 ± 15 min; tramadol-lidocaine 6 ± 2 min and 168 ± 9 min; lidocaine 4 ± 1 min and 67 ± 13 min. Onset time and duration were significantly longer with tramadol than the other treatments. Duration was significantly longer with tramadol-lidocaine than lidocaine. Ataxia was mildly observed in tramadol-lidocaine and was moderate in lidocaine. HR, RR, and rectal temperature did not differ significantly from baseline after any treatment. Haematobiochemical parameters returned to basal levels by 24 h after all treatments. This combination might be clinically useful to provide analgesia in buffalo for long-duration surgical procedures. PMID:26770870

  15. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Atiba, Ayman; Ghazy, Alaa; Gomaa, Naglaa; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick test. Onset time, duration, and degree of analgesia and ataxia were recorded after each treatment. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature, and haematobiochemical parameters were recorded after all treatments. Time to onset and duration of analgesia, respectively, were as follows: tramadol 11 ± 2 min and 208 ± 15 min; tramadol-lidocaine 6 ± 2 min and 168 ± 9 min; lidocaine 4 ± 1 min and 67 ± 13 min. Onset time and duration were significantly longer with tramadol than the other treatments. Duration was significantly longer with tramadol-lidocaine than lidocaine. Ataxia was mildly observed in tramadol-lidocaine and was moderate in lidocaine. HR, RR, and rectal temperature did not differ significantly from baseline after any treatment. Haematobiochemical parameters returned to basal levels by 24 h after all treatments. This combination might be clinically useful to provide analgesia in buffalo for long-duration surgical procedures. PMID:26770870

  16. A comparative study-efficacy and safety of combined spinal epidural anesthesia versus spinal anesthesia in high-risk geriatric patients for surgeries around the hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Tummala, Vengamamba; Rao, Lella Nageswara; Vallury, Manoj Kumar; Sanapala, Anitha

    2015-01-01

    Context: Combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) has a significant advantage by enabling the use of low dose intrathecal local anesthetic, with knowledge that the epidural catheter may be used to extend the block as necessary. CSEA is useful in high-risk geriatric patients by providing greater hemodynamic stability. Aim: This study is designed to compare the clinical effects of CSEA versus spinal anesthesia in high-risk geriatric patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients aged >65 years, American Society of Anaesthesiology III and IV were randomly allocated into two equal groups. Group A (n = 30) received CSEA with 1 ml (5 mg) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl through spinal route, and the expected incompleteness of spinal block was managed with small incremental dose of 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine through epidural catheter, 1–1.5 ml for every unblocked segment to achieve T10 sensory level. Group B (n = 30) received spinal anesthesia with 2.5 ml (12.5 mg) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine and 25 μg fentanyl. Result: Both the groups showed rapid onset, excellent analgesia and good quality motor block. Group A showed a significantly less incidence of hypotension (P < 0.01) along with the provision of prolonging analgesia as compared to Group B. Conclusion: CSEA is a safe, effective, reliable technique with better hemodynamic stability along with the provision of prolonging analgesia compared to spinal anesthesia for high-risk geriatric patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint. PMID:26417125

  17. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  18. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  19. Retrograde Epidural Catheter Relieves Intractable Sacral Pain.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ruchir; Shodhan, Shivam; Hosny, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT) drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a "band of anesthesia" which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique. PMID:27162431

  20. Retrograde Epidural Catheter Relieves Intractable Sacral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ruchir; Shodhan, Shivam; Hosny, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT) drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a “band of anesthesia” which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique. PMID:27162431

  1. Spinal dysraphisms in the parturient: implications for perioperative anaesthetic care and labour analgesia.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C J; Stanley, E; Kavanagh, E; Lenane, P E; McCaul, C L

    2015-08-01

    Anaesthetists may encounter parturients with a spectrum of anatomical and functional abnormalities secondary to spinal dysraphisms, which are among the most common neurodevelopmental anomalies. These range from surgically corrected open dysraphisms to previously undiagnosed closed dysraphisms. Both bony and neural structures may be abnormal. In true bony spina bifida, which occurs in up to 50% of the population, failure of fusion of the vertebral arch is seen and neural structures are normal. Ninety percent of such cases are confined to the sacrum. In open dysraphisms, sensory preservation is variable and may be present even in those with grossly impaired motor function. Both epidural and spinal blockade have been described for labour analgesia and operative anaesthesia in selected cases but higher failure and complication rates are reported. Clinical assessment should be performed on an outpatient basis to assess neurological function, evaluate central nervous system shunts and determine latex allergy status. Magnetic resonance imagining is recommended to clarify anatomical abnormalities and to identify levels at which neuraxial techniques can be performed. Of particular concern when performing neuraxial blockade is the possibility of a low-lying spinal cord or conus medullaris and spinal cord tethering. Previous corrective de-tethering surgery frequently does not result in ascent of the conus and re-tethering may be asymptomatic. Ultrasound is not sufficiently validated at the point of care to reliably detect low-lying cords. Epidurals should be performed at anatomically normal levels but spread of local anaesthetic may be impaired by previous surgery. PMID:26072279

  2. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery. PMID:26597606

  3. DIEP Flap for Breast Reconstruction Using Epidural Anesthesia with the Patient Awake

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Marco; de la Garza, Jonatan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many articles have been published about breast reconstruction using the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap; however, few articles have been published in plastic/reconstructive surgery journals describing the difference between anesthetic techniques and recovery in microsurgical patients. Methods: We analyzed 16 patients who underwent DIEP flap for breast reconstruction. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1: general anesthesia (n = 9); group 2: epidural block with the patient awake (n = 7). In group 2, the peridural block was done at 2 levels: thoracic (T2–T3) and lumbar (L2–L3). Results: The success rate was 100% with no partial or total loss of the flap. There was no difference between groups in regard to postoperative pain in the first 5 days (Visual Analog Scale). Analgesia used in group 1 was buprenorphine and ketorolac, and in group 2, only ketorolac without opioid derivatives. Immediate postoperative recovery was better in the peridural group than in the group administered general anesthesia (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: DIEP flap with peridural block and the patient awake during surgery is a feasible technique with better recovery in the immediate postoperative period, achieving good analgesia level with minimal intravenous medication.

  4. Guideline Implementation: Moderate Sedation/Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Fencl, Jennifer L

    2016-05-01

    Moderate sedation/analgesia is practiced in a variety of settings and delivered by a variety of health care providers, with a goal of reducing the patient's anxiety and discomfort during diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The updated AORN "Guideline for care of the patient receiving moderate sedation/analgesia" provides guidance on RN administration of moderate sedation/analgesia within the scope of nursing practice as defined by the state boards of nursing. The guideline addresses patient selection and assessment, staffing for the procedure, patient monitoring, medication administration, and criteria for postoperative discharge. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to promote safe care throughout the perioperative continuum for a patient receiving moderate sedation/analgesia. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:27129752

  5. [Epidural angiolipoma and multiple familial lipomatosis].

    PubMed

    Bordet, R; Ghawche, F; Destée, A

    1991-01-01

    In a 35-year old woman presenting familial multiple lipomatosis, spastic paraparesis developed and became worse under tetracosactide therapy. Signs of spinal cord compression at T3 were present. CT and MRI revealed a fat-containing epidural tumour (angiolipoma). The association of angiolipoma with familial multiple lipomatosis has not yet been reported. This association supports the theory that angiolipomas are hamartomatous lesions. The deterioration observed under tetracosactide suggests that iatrogenic epidural lipomatosis is due to the development of a pre-existing lipoma. PMID:1775830

  6. Effects of epidural lidocaine anesthesia on bulls during electroejaculation.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, A J; Waldner, C L; Cotter, B S; Gudmundson, J; Barth, A D

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether caudal epidural lidocaine anesthesia reduces a stress response to electroejaculation. In the 1st experiment, changes in cortisol and progesterone concentrations in serial blood samples were used to assess the stress response to restraint (control), transrectal massage, caudal epidural injection of saline, electroejaculation after caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, and electroejaculation without epidural lidocaine. In the 2nd experiment, behavioral responses were subjectively scored in bulls that were electroejaculated with or without caudal epidural lidocaine anesthesia. Cortisol and progesterone concentrations were significantly elevated after electroejaculation, whether or not bulls received caudal epidural anesthesia. Elevations in cortisol and progesterone were lower and fewer bulls vocalized during electroejaculation when given caudal epidural anesthesia; however, the differences were not significant. PMID:11272454

  7. Procedural sedation and analgesia in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Charu; Dash, Hari Hara

    2014-01-01

    A spectrum of conditions requires sedation and analgesia in pediatric population. Ineffective treatment of pain may result in physiological and behavioral responses that can adversely affect the developing nociceptive system. The recognition of pain in children can be facilitated by different pain scales. This article reviews the procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) practices in children along with pharmacology of the drugs used for this purpose. PMID:24891893

  8. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery. PMID:26294360

  9. Efficacy of intraoperative epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study is a descriptive review of the literature aimed at examining the efficacy of the use of intraoperative epidural steroids in lumbar disc surgery, a matter that remains controversial. Methods The relevant clinical trials were selected from databases and reviewed. The methodological quality of each included study was assessed and graded for perceived risk of bias. All the documented significant and non-significant findings were collected. Our outcome targets were reduction in postoperative pain scores, consumption of analgesia, duration of hospital stay and no increase in complication rates. The variation in the timing of postoperative pain assessments necessitated grouping the outcome into three postoperative stages; early: 0 to 2 weeks, intermediate: more than 2 weeks to 2 months and late: more than 2 months to 1 year. Results Sixteen trials that were published from1990 to 2012 were eligible. At least one significant reduction in pain score was reported in nine of the eleven trials that examined pain in the early stage, in four of the seven trials that examined pain in the intermediate stage and in two of the eight trials that examined pain in the late stage. Seven of the nine trials that looked at consumption of postoperative analgesia reported significant reduction while six of the ten trails that examined the duration of hospital stay reported significant reduction. None of the trials reported a significant increase of steroid-related complications. Conclusions There is relatively strong evidence that intraoperative epidural steroids are effective in reducing pain in the early stage and reducing consumption of analgesia. There is also relatively strong evidence that they are ineffective in reducing pain in the late stage and in reducing duration of hospital stay. The evidence for their effectiveness in reducing pain in the intermediate stage is considered relatively weak. The heterogeneity between the trials makes it difficult to make

  10. Continuous Femoral Nerve Analgesia after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: Stimulating versus Non-Stimulating Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim M.; Ritchey, R. Michael; Sessler, Daniel; Helfand, Robert; Samuel, Samuel; Xu, Meng; Beven, Michael; Bourdakos, Demetrios; Barsoum, Wael; Brooks, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Continuous femoral analgesia provides extended pain relief and improved functional recovery for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Successful continuous peripheral nerve analgesia depends on the catheter proximity to the target nerve. If the catheter is not close to the nerve, high infusion rates may be required to provide analgesia or analgesia may be sub-optimal. Stimulating catheters may allow more accurate placement of catheters in close proximity to the nerve. This randomized prospective study examined the use stimulating catheters versus non-stimulating catheters in 41 patients undergoing TKA. All patients had intravenous patient controlled anesthesia (IVPCA) for supplementary pain relief. The principal aim of the trial was to examine whether the use of a stimulating catheter allowed the use of lesser amounts of local anesthetics than a non-stimulating catheter. Additional parameters examined included post-operative pain scores, opioid use, side effects and acute functional orthopedic outcomes. Analgesia was good in both groups, but there were no statistically significant differences in the amount of ropivacaine administered; the median amount of ropivacaine given to patients in the stimulating catheter group was 8.2 ml/h vs. 8.8 ml/h for patients with non-stimulating catheters, P = 0.26 (median difference -0.6; 95% confidence interval, -2.3 to 0.6). No significant differences between the treatment groups were noted for the amount of fentanyl dispensed by the IVPCA, numeric pain rating scale scores, acute functional orthopedic outcomes, side effects or amounts of oral opioids consumed. Implications: For total knee arthroplasty, there seems to be no significant advantage for the use of stimulating catheters over traditional non-stimulating catheters in continuous femoral nerve blocks. PMID:17122240

  11. Ropivacaine 0.2% versus bupivacaine 0.1% with fentanyl: a double blind comparison for analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Dresner, M; Freeman, J; Calow, C; Quinn, A; Bamber, J

    2000-12-01

    We have performed a randomized, double-blind comparison of two epidural drug regimens for analgesia in labour. In the bupivacaine group (BUPIV), 101 healthy parturients received 0.1% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2 microg ml(-1). In the ropivacaine group (ROPIV), 102 women received 0.2% ropivacaine. Both groups received an initial loading dose of 15 ml, a continuous infusion of 8 ml h(-1), and top-ups of 10 ml. Breakthrough pain not responding to a routine top-up was treated with an 'escape' top-up of 10 ml 0.25% bupivacaine. The two groups were compared for complete analgesia at 30 min, routine and 'escape' top-up requirements, midwife assessment of analgesic efficacy, delivery mode, patient visual analogue scores (VAS) for first and second stage analgesia, overall satisfaction, and patient assessment of motor blockade. Patients receiving ropivacaine received fewer routine top-ups (median 1.0 vs. 2.0, P=0.001) and fewer escape top-ups (9.8% vs. 21.8%, P=0.02). The ropivacaine group was more likely to be pain free in the first stage (51% vs. 33.7%, P=0.01). There were no significant differences in patients' assessment of motor block or mode of delivery between the groups. Pain relief and satisfaction scores from midwives and patients were consistently better in the ropivacaine group, but did not reach statistical significance. PMID:11732513

  12. Fluoroscopic analysis of lumbar epidural contrast spread after retrograde interlaminar ventral epidural injection (RIVEI)

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji Seon; Woo, Jung Pil; Shim, Jae Hang

    2013-01-01

    Background Retrograde interlaminar ventral epidural injection (RIVEI) may hypothetically be more effective if the catheter is placed at the ventrocaudal aspect of the exiting nerve. We tested that hypothesis by measuring ventral and dorsal epidural contrast flow during RIVEI. Methods To perform RIVEI, a 17 G Tuohy needle was inserted to access the epidural space. A 19 G epidural catheter was inserted and advanced through the needle, passing in a caudal direction to the lower aspect of the contralateral pedicle. Fluoroscopic images were recorded at 1.5 ml increments of contrast. Based on the images of contrast dispersal, the extent of contrast spreading was assessed in 82 patients. Results All 82 patients (100%) injected with 3.0 ml contrast medium demonstrated ventral epidural spreading. Mean spreading level from the catheter tip was 2.21 ± 0.93 with 3.0 ml of contrast. Spreading to the superior aspect of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc was observed in 67/82 (81.7%) of RIVEIs with 3.0 ml of contrast injected into the ventral epidural space. We found that 3.0 ml of contrast reached the inferior aspect of the infra-adjacent intervertebral disc in 95.1% (78/82) of RIVEIs performed. Conclusions Our findings imply that a one-level RIVEI may be sufficient in situations where a two-level injection would currently be used. PMID:24363846

  13. Epidural infusions of sufentanil with and without bupivacaine: comparison with diamorphine-bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Black, A M; Wolf, A; McKenzie, I M; Tonkin, P A; Inglis, S T; Prys-Roberts, C

    1994-07-01

    The requirements for supplementary 3 ml epidural injections of bupivacaine 0.5% (top-ups) were used in a randomized double-blind study to compare the effects of five types of thoracic epidural infusions given at 2.5 ml h-1 for the first 24 h after major surgery to the upper abdomen in 99 patients and the lower abdomen in 72. The infusions were: bupivacaine 0.167% alone; diamorphine 0.167 mg ml-1 (0.417 mg h-1) in bupivacaine 0.167%; sufentanil 2 micrograms ml-1 (5 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; and sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in normal saline. The patients who had upper abdominal surgery were on average older than those having lower abdominal surgery and a larger proportion of them were female. They received on average fewer top-ups. After both upper and lower abdominal surgery, epidural infusions of bupivacaine alone required the most frequent supplementation (inter-quartile range 6-14 top-ups in 24 h) and the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures required the fewest (interquartile range 0-12 top-ups in 24 h). The infusions of sufentanil without bupivacaine were significantly less effective than the sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures after upper (but not lower) abdominal surgery. Although the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures were indistinguishable in analgesic effectiveness after either upper or lower abdominal surgery, the lower (5 micrograms h-1) dose rate of sufentanil gave a significantly higher average breathing rate and lower average PaCO2 for the first 24 h after lower (but not upper) abdominal surgery. Blood samples were taken (as an afterthought) from 11 patients receiving sufentanil 10 micrograms h-1, just before the epidural infusion was stopped. The concentrations were mostly above the range for systemic analgesia, but below the values that would have been expected if a steady state had been achieved. PMID:7925334

  14. Dexmedetomidine in Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chunguang; Chi, Meiying; Zhang, Yanwei; Zhang, Zongwang; Qi, Feng; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Both dexmedetomidine and sufentanil modulate spinal analgesia by different mechanisms, and yet no human studies are available on their combination for analgesia during the first 72 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. This CONSORT-prospective, randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of dexmedetomidine and sufentanil in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for 72 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. Ninety women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy were divided into 3 equal groups that received sufentanil (Group C; 0.02 μg/kg/h), sufentanil plus dexmedetomidine (Group D1; 0.02 μg/kg/h, each), or sufentanil (0.02 μg/kg/h) plus dexmedetomidine (0.05 μg/kg/h) (Group D2) for 72 hours after surgery in this double-blinded, randomized study. The primary outcome measure was the postoperative sufentanil consumption, whereas the secondary outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analogue scale), requirement of narcotic drugs during the operation, level of sedation, Bruggrmann comfort scale, and concerning adverse effects. The postoperative sufentanil consumption was significantly lower in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C during the observation period (P < 0.05), but lower in Group D2 than in Group D1 at 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery (P < 0.05). The heart rate after intubation and incision was lower in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C (P < 0.05). On arrival at the recovery room, Groups D1 and D2 had lower mean blood pressure than Group C (P < 0.05). The intraoperative requirement of sevoflurane was 30% lesser in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C. The sedation levels were greater in Groups D1 and D2 during the first hour (P < 0.05). Compared with Groups C and D1, Group D2 showed lower levels of the overall incidence of nausea and vomiting (P < 0.05). Among the tested PCA options, the addition of dexmedetomidine (0.05 μg/kg/h) and sufentanil (0

  15. Comparison of Two Doses of Ropivacaine Hydrochloride for Lumbosacral Epidural Anaesthesia in Goats Undergoing Laparoscopy Assisted Embryo Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fazili, Mujeeb ur Rehman; Shah, Riaz Ahmad; Khan, Firdous Ahmad; Bhat, Maajid Hassan; Yaqoob, Syed Hilal; Naykoo, Niyaz Ahmad; Ganai, Nazir Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Goats (n = 12) undergoing laparoscopy assisted embryo transfer were randomly allotted to two groups (I and II) and injected same volume of ropivacaine hydrochloride at 1.0 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg body weight, respectively, at the lumbosacral epidural space. The hind quarters of all the animals were lifted up for the first 3.0 minutes following injection. Immediately after induction the animals were restrained in dorsal recumbency in Trendelenburg position in a cradle. Laparoscopy was performed after achieving pneumoperitoneum using filtered room air. Regional analgesia and changes in physiological parameters were recorded. The mean induction time in animals of group I (n = 6) was 12.666 ± 1.994 minutes. In these animals the analgesia extended up to the umbilical region and lasted for 60 minutes. Only two animals in group II were satisfactorily induced in 11.333 ± 2.333 minutes. In animals of group I, the time taken for regaining the full motor power was significantly long (405 ± 46.314 min) when compared to group II goats (95 ± 9.219 min). From this study it was concluded that ropivacaine did not produce adequate analgesia in most of the goats at 0.5 mg/kg. When used at 1.0 mg/kg, it produced satisfactory regional analgesia lasting for one hour but the prolonged motor loss precludes its use. Additional studies using ropivacaine hydrochloride at doses in between the two extremes used here may be undertaken before recommending it for lumbosacral anaesthesia in goats undergoing laparoscopy.

  16. Pain analgesia among adolescent self-injurers.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jeffrey J; Michel, Bethany D; Franklin, Joseph C; Hooley, Jill M; Nock, Matthew K

    2014-12-30

    Although non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) involves self-inflicted physical harm, many self-injurers report feeling little or no pain during the act. Here we test: (1) whether the pain analgesia effects observed among adult self-injurers are also present among adolescents, and (2) three potential explanatory models proposing that habituation, dissociation, and/or self-criticism help explain the association between NSSI and pain analgesia among adolescents. Participants were 79 adolescents (12-19 years) recruited from the community who took part in a laboratory-based pain study. Results revealed that adolescent self-injurers have a higher pain threshold and greater pain endurance than non-injurers. Statistical mediation models revealed that the habituation and dissociation models were not supported; however, a self-critical style does mediate the association between NSSI and pain analgesia. The present findings extend earlier work by highlighting that a self-critical style may help to explain why self-injurers exhibit pain analgesia. Specifically, the tendency to experience self-critical thoughts in response to stressful events may represent a third variable that increases the likelihood of both NSSI and pain analgesia. Prospective experimental studies are needed to replicate and tease apart the direction of these associations, and may provide valuable leads in the development of effective treatments for this dangerous behavior problem. PMID:25172611

  17. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis after repeat epidural blood patch.

    PubMed

    Carlswärd, C; Darvish, B; Tunelli, J; Irestedt, L

    2015-08-01

    Epidural blood patching is an effective treatment for postdural puncture headache but has potential risks. Arachnoiditis is a very rare disabling condition and few cases have been described following an epidural blood patch. We present a case of chronic adhesive arachnoiditis in a parturient treated with a repeat epidural blood patch. A healthy 29-year-old woman had an accidental dural puncture following epidural insertion during labour. Initial treatment of postdural puncture headache with an epidural blood patch was ineffective and was therefore repeated. She gradually developed severe neurological symptoms consistent with arachnoiditis confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Despite intensive multimodal treatment with analgesics and physiotherapy, her neurological condition remains unresolved two years later. This serious but rare complication should encourage caution when treating parturients with postdural puncture headache with a repeat epidural blood patch. PMID:26119259

  18. Effect of caudal clonidine on emergence agitation and postoperative analgesia after sevoflurane anaesthesia in children: Randomised comparison of two doses

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Anudeep; Sethi, Ashish; Agarwal, Vikesh; Godwin, Rajan B

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Sevoflurane, a popular inhalational anaesthetic for children, has been associated with significant emergence agitation in the recovery phase. This study was intended to compare two doses of caudal clonidine added to ropivacaine 0.2% in order to decide on the optimal dose for prevention of sevoflurane induced emergence agitation (EA) and to get a meaningful prolongation of postoperative analgesia with minimal side effects. Methods: Sixty-one children aged 1–7 years (American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status I-II) received standardized general anaesthesia with inhaled sevoflurane and caudal epidural block with 0.2% ropivacaine 1 ml/kg for sub-umbilical surgeries. They were assigned randomly to two groups: (I) clonidine 1 μg/kg added to caudal ropivacaine; (II) clonidine 2 μg/kg added to caudal ropivacaine. EA and postoperative analgesia were assessed using pain/discomfort scale score and face, legs, activity, cry, consolability (FLACC) score respectively. Results: EA was observed in 8 children (26.6%) in group I when compared to only 2 children (6.4%) in group II after first 15 min postoperatively. Incidences of EA at 15 min, as well as total incidence of agitation, were both significantly lower in group II when compared to group I with P < 0.05. Duration of analgesia in group I (12 [8–20] h) and group II (16 [8–20] h) was statistically comparable (P > 0.05). There was no difference in the incidence of sedation or complications. Conclusion: Caudal clonidine 2 μg/kg added to 0.2% ropivacaine 1 ml/kg is suggested to be the optimal dose, for prevention of EA and meaningful prolongation of postoperative analgesia with minimal side-effects. PMID:25624536

  19. Lab in a needle for epidural space identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, B.; Micco, A.; Ricciardi, A.; Amorizzo, E.; Mercieri, M.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2016-05-01

    This work relies on the development of a sensorized medical needle with an all-optical guidance (Lab in a Needle) system for epidural space identification. The device is based on the judicious integration of a Fiber Bragg grating sensor inside the lumen of an epidural needle to discriminate between different types of tissue and thus providing continuous and real time measurements of the pressure experienced by the needle tip during its advancement. Experiments carried out on an epidural training phantom demonstrate the validity of our approach for the correct and effective identification of the epidural space.

  20. Key safety considerations when administering epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Benyamin, Ramsin M

    2015-01-01

    Neurological and other complications of epidural steroid injections have been widely discussed in recent years. Consequently, the US FDA issued a warning about serious neurological events, some resulting in death, and consequently is requiring label changes. Neurological adverse events numbering 131, including 41 cases of arachnoiditis, have been identified by the FDA, and 700 cases of fungal meningitis following injection of contaminated steroids. A review of the literature reveals an overwhelming proportion of the complications are related to transforaminal epidural injections, with the majority of them to cervical transforaminal epidural injections. This perspective describes the prevalence of administering epidural injections, complications, pathoanatomy, mechanism of injury and various preventive strategies. PMID:26059467

  1. Acupuncture for analgesia in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsey M; Neary, Susan M; Sharrock, Joseph; Rychel, Jessica K

    2014-06-01

    Acupuncture for analgesia is growing rapidly in popularity with veterinarians and pet owners. This article summarizes the mechanisms of analgesia derived from acupuncture and reviews current literature on the topic. Areas covered include the local effects at area of needle insertion, systemic effects secondary to circulating neurotransmitters and changes in cell signaling, central nervous system effects including the brain and spinal cord, and myofascial trigger point and pathology treatment. Clinical applications are discussed and suggested in each section. When used by appropriately trained professionals, acupuncture offers a compelling and safe method for pain management in our veterinary patients and should be strongly considered as a part of multimodal pain management plans. PMID:25454374

  2. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, A. L.; Pontani, R. B.; Vadlamani, N. L.

    1985-01-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  3. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1985-04-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  4. Epidural Abscess Masquerading as Lateral Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Brodner, David C.; Cutler, Jeff; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants, the evacuation of the sinus, or the use of medical treatment alone surrounds the treatment of lateral sinus thrombosis. Treatment of an epidural abscess associated with coalescent mastoiditis is much less controversial-drainage is usually recommended. The differing treatments of these complications mandate accurate diagnosis. The advent of more sophisticated radiological studies has facilitated diagnosis of these complications; however, tests are not infallible. We present three cases in which preoperative imaging demonstrates an epidural abscess mimicking lateral sinus thrombosis by compression of the vessel. A false-positive computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study may lead to the wrong diagnosis and, consequently, improper treatment. In light of this possibility, we recommend surgical exploration in all such cases. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171148

  5. Salmonella Typhi Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ying Ying; Chen, John L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of Salmonella infection. We report a case of a 57-year-old transgender male who presented with lower back pain for a period of one month following a fall. Physical examination only revealed tenderness over the lower back with no neurological deficits. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine revealed a spondylodiscitis at T10-T11 and T12-L1 and right posterior epidural collection at the T9-T10 level. He underwent decompression laminectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion of T8 to L3 vertebrae. Intraoperatively, he was found to have acute-on-chronic osteomyelitis in T10 and T11, epidural abscess, and discitis in T12-L1. Tissue and wound culture grew Salmonella Typhi and with antibiotics susceptibility guidance he was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for a period of six weeks. He recovered well with no neurological deficits. PMID:27034871

  6. Continous epidural butorphanol decreases the incidence of intrathecal morphine-related pruritus after cesarean section: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial: Epidural butorphanol decreases the incidence of intrathecal morphine-related pruritus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen; Kong, Mingjian; Chen, Jianqing; Wen, Laiyou; Wang, Jing; Tan, Jie

    2014-09-01

    This randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial investigated the effect of continuous epidural butorphanol on intrathecal morphine-related pruritus in patients undergoing cesarean section. Eighty-three patients undergoing elective cesarean section under spinal anesthesia (1.5 mL of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5 % and 0.1 mg of preservative-free morphine) were enrolled in this study. Subjects were randomized to receive epidural butorphanol (n = 43) or normal saline combined bupivacaine (n = 40). In the study group, after the umbilical cord was clamped, patients were administered an epidural loading dose of 1 mg followed by a 48-h infusion of 0.004 % butorphanol with 0.1 % bupivacaine at a rate of 2 mL/h. In the normal saline group, saline was used for the loading dose and the infusion 0.1 % bupivacaine at a same rate. Postoperatively, a blinded observer recorded the incidence/severity of pruritus, visual analog pain scores and sedation level at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 48 h. The 48-h consumption of breakthrough analgesic (tramadol) was also noted. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 48 h. At 48 h, the incidence of pruritus was significantly lower in the butorphanol group (16.3 vs. 52.5 %; P < 0.001). Furthermore, compared with the normal saline group, the intensity of pruritus was also decreased with epidural butorphanol at 3, 6 and 9 h (all P ≤ 0.008). The pain scores were significantly lower at 12, 24 and 48 h (all P < 0.05) in the butorphanol groups. Patients only receiving bupivacaine required a higher cumulative dose of tramadol (37.5 ± 62.8 vs. 9.3 ± 36.6; P = 0.014). In patients undergoing elective cesarean section, continuous epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine decreases the incidence and severity of intrathecal morphine-related pruritus without adversely affecting the quality of postoperative analgesia. PMID:24639106

  7. Long segment spinal epidural extramedullary hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Kanwaljeet; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Manmohan; Chandra, P. Sarat; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extramedullary hematopoiesis is defined as the formation of blood cells outside the bone marrow. It is a common manifestation of many chronic hemolytic anemias, and typically involves the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Only rarely is the spinal epidural space involved. Methods: We describe a 25-year-old male, known to have thalassemia intermedia, who presented with a 1-month history of stiffness and weakness in both lower extremities. On physical examination, he had palpable splenomegaly accompanied by spinal tenderness at the D5 level, weakness in both lower extremities, hyperactive bilateral Patellar and Achilles reflexes with bilateral Babinski responses, and a graded sensory loss to pin appreciation below D5. Results: The magnetic resonance (MR) study revealed a posterior, isointense and soft tissue epidural mass extending from D2 to D12 on both the T1- and T2-weighted images. These findings were consistent with the diagnosis of “red marrow,” and long-segment spinal epidural extramedullary hematopoiesis. Conclusions: Although extramedullary hematopoiesis is rarely encountered within the spinal canal, it should be considered among the differential diagnoses when a posterior compressive thoracic lesion contributes to myelopathy in a patient with a history of thalassemia intermedia and the accompanying chronic hemolytic anemia. PMID:24404404

  8. Liposome Bupivacaine for Postsurgical Analgesia in Adult Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Colectomy: Results from Prospective Phase IV Sequential Cohort Studies Assessing Health Economic Outcomes☆

    PubMed Central

    Candiotti, Keith A.; Sands, Laurence R.; Lee, Edward; Bergese, Sergio D.; Harzman, Alan E.; Marcet, Jorge; Kumar, Anjali S.; Haas, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Background Opioid-based postsurgical analgesia exposes patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy to elevated risk for gastrointestinal motility problems and other opioid-related adverse events (ORAEs). The purpose of our research was to investigate postsurgical outcomes, including opioid consumption, hospital length of stay, and ORAE risk associated with a multimodal analgesia regimen, employing a single administration of liposome bupivacaine as well as other analgesics that act by different mechanisms. Methods We analyzed combined results from 6 Phase IV, prospective, single-center studies in which patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy received opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or multimodal analgesia incorporating intraoperative administration of liposome bupivacaine. As-needed rescue therapy was available to all patients. Primary outcome measures were postsurgical opioid consumption, hospital length of stay, and hospitalization costs. Secondary measures included time to first rescue opioid use, patient satisfaction with analgesia (assessed using a 5-point Likert scale), and ORAEs. Results Eighty-two patients underwent laparoscopic colectomy and did not meet intraoperative exclusion criteria (PCA n = 56; multimodal analgesia n = 26). Compared with the PCA group, the multimodal analgesia group had significantly lower mean total postsurgical opioid consumption (96 vs 32 mg, respectively; P < 0.0001) and shorter median postsurgical hospital length of stay (3.0 vs 4.0 days; P = 0.0019). Geometric mean costs were $11,234 and $13,018 in the multimodal analgesia and PCA groups, respectively (P = 0.2612). Median time to first rescue opioid use was longer in the multimodal analgesia group versus PCA group (1.1 hours vs 0.6 hours, respectively; P=0.0003). ORAEs were experienced by 41% of patients receiving intravenous opioid PCA and 8% of patients receiving multimodal analgesia (P = 0.0019). Study limitations included use of an open

  9. Anesthetic management of nonintubated video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery using epidural anesthesia and dexmedetomidine in three patients with severe respiratory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yoshika; Hamai, Yusuke; Koyama, Tomohiro

    2016-04-01

    Nonintubated video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) has been reported to be safe and feasible for patients with various thoracic diseases, including those who have respiratory dysfunction. In nonintubated VATS, it is important to maintain spontaneous respiration and to obtain a satisfactory operating field through adequate collapse of the lung by surgical pneumothorax. Therefore, we need to minimize the patient's physical and psychological discomfort by using regional anesthesia and sedation. If analgesia and sedation are inadequate, conversion to intubated general anesthesia may be required. Dexmedetomidine (DEX) is a highly selective α2-adrenoceptor agonist that provides anxiolysis and cooperative sedation without respiratory depression. It seems to be a suitable sedative for nonintubated VATS, especially in high-risk patients for intubated general anesthesia, but there have been no report about its use combined with epidural anesthesia in nonintubated VATS for adult patients. Here, we report three patients with severe respiratory dysfunction who underwent nonintubated VATS for pneumothorax using epidural anesthesia and DEX. In all three patients, DEX infusion was started after placement of an epidural catheter and was titrated to achieve mild sedation, while maintaining communicability and cooperation. This seems to be a promising strategy for nonintubated VATS in patients with respiratory dysfunction, as well as patients with normal respiratory function. PMID:26758074

  10. Acoustic puncture assist device versus loss of resistance technique for epidural space identification

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Goel, Nitesh; Chowdhury, Itee; Shah, Shagun Bhatia; Singh, Brijesh Pratap; Jakhar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The conventional techniques of epidural space (EDS) identification based on loss of resistance (LOR) have a higher chance of complications, patchy analgesia and epidural failure, which can be minimised by objective confirmation of space before catheter placement. Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD) technique objectively confirms EDS, thus enhancing success, with lesser complications. This study was planned with the objective to evaluate the APAD technique and compare it to LOR technique for EDS identification and its correlation with ultrasound guided EDS depth. Methods: In this prospective study, the lumbar vertebral spaces were scanned by the ultrasound for measuring depth of the EDS and later correlated with procedural depth measured by either of the technique (APAD or LOR). The data were subjected to descriptive statistics; the concordance correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis with 95% confidence limits. Results: Acoustic dip in pitch and descent in pressure tracing on EDS localisation was observed among the patients of APAD group. Analysis of concordance correlation between the ultrasonography (USG) depth and APAD or LOR depth was significant (r ≥ 0.97 in both groups). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean difference of 0.171cm in group APAD and 0.154 cm in group LOR. The 95% limits of agreement for the difference between the two measurements were − 0.569 and 0.226 cm in APAD and − 0.530 to 0.222 cm in LOR group. Conclusion: We found APAD to be a precise tool for objective localisation of the EDS, co-relating well with the pre-procedural USG depth of EDS. PMID:27212720

  11. Prolonged Epidural Infusion Improves Functional Outcomes Following Knee Arthroscopy in Patients with Arthrofibrosis after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Retrospective Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Dave, Ankur; Young, Adam; Ahuja, Mukesh; Amin, Sandeep D; Bush-Joseph, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    A total of 20 consecutive patients with knee stiffness post total knee arthroplasty (TKA) underwent arthroscopic lysis of adhesions and manipulation plus indwelling epidural were evaluated retrospectively. Epidural catheters were placed preoperatively for an intended 6 weeks of postoperative analgesia to facilitate intensive physical therapy. The mean loss of knee extension immediately before incision was 13.5 ± 9.1 degrees (range, 0-35 degrees) and flexion was 77.65 ± 19.2 degrees (range, 45-125 degrees). At the 6-week and final (mean, 0.47 years) follow-up, the loss of extension was 1.5 ± 5.1 degrees (range, -10 to +7 degrees) and 5.4 ± 4.7 degrees (range, 0-15 degrees), respectively, and flexion was 99.7 ± 12.3 degrees (range, 75-120 degrees) and 98.5 ± 16.1 degrees (range, 75-130 degrees), respectively. Of the 20 patients, 2 missed their 6-week clinic visit. Improvements in motion immediately preoperative to 6-week and final follow-up were each significant (p < 0.01). At examination 6 weeks postoperatively, 94.4% of patients met the definition for clinical motion success and 70% maintained success at final follow-up. Visual analog scale improved significantly from 5.4 to 2.0 (p < 0.01) at 6 weeks postoperative in the 12 patients with this data recorded. On the basis of this data, use of tunneled epidurals with arthroscopic lysis of adhesions for arthrofibrosis after TKA is correlated with a high likelihood of functional success postoperatively as measured by range of motion improvement. PMID:25300008

  12. Idiopathic Lumbar Epidural Lipomatosis Mimicking Disc Herniation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Duran, Efe; Ilik, Kemal; Acar, Turker; Yıldız, Melda

    2016-05-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare condition which is described as the accumulation of fat in the extradural territory and often causes dural impingement. Spinal epidural lipomatosis has been implicated in causing a variety of neurologic impairments ranging from back pain, radiculopathy, claudication, myelopathy or even cauda equina syndrome. We report a 46-year-old female with obesity and a history of chronic back pain and radiculopathy who developed idiopathic Spinal epidural lipomatosis diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this report is to present a case of spinal epidural lipomatosis presenting with symptomatic cord compression and also remind this rare condition as a the differential diagnosis of epidural lesions in patients with risk factors. PMID:27309484

  13. Comparative evaluation of dexmedetomidine and clonidine with low dose ropivacaine in cervical epidural anesthesia for modified radical mastectomy: A prospective randomized, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Channabasappa, Shivakumar M.; Venkatarao, Gopinath H.; Girish, Shobha; Lahoti, Nandakishore K.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists clonidine and dexmedetomidine, are well known to produce analgesia through an opioid independent mechanism. Alpha-2 agonists are used as an adjuvant to local anesthetic agents to extend the duration of spinal, epidural and brachial plexus blocks. Aims: We compared clonidine and dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to Ropivacaine in cervical epidural anesthesia (CEA) with respect to onset and duration of sensory block, duration of analgesia and adverse effects. Subjects and Methods: A total 150 American Society of Anesthesiologists Class I or II adult female patients who were scheduled to undergo modified radical mastectomy were randomly allocated to the following two groups to receive CEA: Group D receive 15 mL of 0.375% ropivacaine combined with 1 μg/kg of dexmedetomidine; Group C received 15 mL of 0.375% ropivacaine combined with 1.5 μg/kg of clonidine. The onset of sensory block, duration of analgesia, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), sedation scores, and the incidences of adverse effects, such as hypotension, bradycardia, and oxygen desaturation were recorded. Results: The addition of dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine (Group D) resulted in faster onset of sensory block time compared with the addition of clonidine to ropivacaine (Group C) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 14.53 ± 2.96 vs. 16.72 ± 4.43 P = 0.032). The duration of analgesia block in Group D was significantly longer than that in Group C (95% CI: 234.65 ± 23.76 vs. 286.76 ± 34.65; P = 0.037). The Ramsay sedation score at in Group D were significantly higher between 20 and 60 min as compared to Group C (P < 0.022). MAP level and HR level in Group D and Group C were comparable. Conclusion: The addition of dexmedetomidine to low dose ropivacaine for CEA could shorten the onset of sensory block and extend the duration of analgesia with optimum sedation without episodes of hypoxemia as compared to addition of clonidine to ropivacaine. PMID:26957695

  14. Continuous epidural block versus continuous popliteal nerve block for postoperative pain relief after major podiatric surgery in children: a prospective, comparative randomized study.

    PubMed

    Dadure, Christophe; Bringuier, Sophie; Nicolas, Florence; Bromilow, Luke; Raux, Olivier; Rochette, Alain; Capdevila, Xavier

    2006-03-01

    Foot and ankle surgery in children is very painful postoperatively. Adverse effects from opioids and continuous epidural block (CEB) limit their use in children. Continuous popliteal nerve blocks (CPNB) have not been studied for this indication in children. In this prospective, randomized study we evaluated the effectiveness and adverse events of CPNB or CEB in children after podiatric surgery. Fifty-two children scheduled for foot surgery were separated into four groups by age and analgesia technique. After general anesthesia, 0.5 to 1 mL/kg of an equal-volume mixture of 0.25% bupivacaine and 1% lidocaine with 1:200000 epinephrine was injected via epidural or popliteal catheters. In the postoperative period, 0.1 mL x kg(-1) x h(-1) (group CPNB) or 0.2 mL x kg(-1) x h(-1) (group CEB) of 0.2% ropivacaine was administered for 48 h. Niflumic acid was routinely used. Adverse events were noted in each treatment group. Postoperative pain during motion was evaluated at 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, and 48 h. Requirement for rescue analgesia (first-line propacetamol 30 mg/kg 4 times daily or second-line 0.2 mg/kg IV nalbuphine), and motor blockade were recorded. Parental satisfaction was noted at 48 h. Twenty-seven patients were included in the CEB groups and 25 in CPNB groups. There were 32 children 1 to 6 yr of age (CPNB = 15; CEB = 17) and 20 children 7 to 12 yr of age (CPNB = 10; CEB = 10). The demographic data were comparable among groups. Postoperative analgesia was excellent for the two continuous block techniques and in the two age groups. Motor block intensity was equal between techniques. Adverse events (postoperative nausea or vomiting, urinary retention, and premature discontinuation of local anesthetic infusion in the 1- to 6-yr-old group) were significantly more frequent in the CEB group (P < 0.05). Eighty-six percent of the parents in the CEB groups and 100% in the CPNB groups were satisfied. We conclude that although both CEB and CPNB resulted in excellent

  15. Postoperative analgesia in pediatric herniotomy - Comparison of caudal bupivacaine to bupivacaine infiltration with diclofenac suppository

    PubMed Central

    Amminnikutty, C. M.; Karthik, Asish; Kodakkat, Abish K.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Perioperative analgesia in paediatric herniotomies demand safe, effective and less invasive strategies. Local infiltration with Bupivacaine, rectal Diclofenac and caudal Bupivacaine are widely used for pain relief. Aims: To compare the analgesic effects of caudal epidural using 1 mlkg-1 of 0.25% Bupivacaine against a combination of local infiltration 0.25% Bupivacaine 0.5 mlkg-1 with Diclofenac suppository 2 mgkg-1 in the management of post-operative pain following paediatric inguinal herniotomy. Settings and Design: This is an observational study from a tertiary care teaching hospital. Methods and Material: A total of 60 children for elective unilateral inguinal herniotomy were assigned to two groups of 30 each. Patients who received caudal block with 1 mlkg-1 of 0.25% Bupivacaine were allocated to Group A and who received Diclofenac suppository 2 mgkg-1 and infiltration with 0.25% Bupivacaine 0.5 mlkg-1 were allocated to Group B. Post operative Pain was assessed using Hannallah's modified objective pain scale. At score ≥3 rescue analgesic oral Paracetamol 15 mgkg-1 was given. Pain was assessed at 0,15,30,45,60 minutes and half hourly thereafter until 8 hours following surgery or until patient requires rescue analgesic whichever happens first. Statistical Analysis Used: Employed SPSS software. Data was analysed using sample t test and P-value was calculated. Results: The demographic profile was comparable between two groups. The mean analgesic duration in group A and group B was 228.5 and 331.0 minutes respectively and is found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Diclofenac suppository with local infiltration is a less invasive and effective alternative to caudal Bupivacaine for analgesia in paediatric herniotomy. PMID:27212756

  16. Management of infiltrating spinal epidural angiolipoma

    PubMed Central

    Nadi, Mustafa M.; Nadi, Arwa M.; Zabara, Mohammad Y.; Ahmad, Tahani M.

    2015-01-01

    Angiolipomas of the spine are rare benign tumors commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. The present report describes a case of spinal angiolipoma with thoracic mediastinal extension in a 50-year-old woman. She presented with a long-standing history of mid-back pain with progressive lower extremities weakness. An MRI showed a heterogeneously enhancing mass located in the posterior epidural space of the thoracic spine with mediastinal extension. Histopathological examination demonstrated features consistent with spinal angiolipoma. This report emphasizes the diagnosis and therapeutic management options of infiltrating spinal angiolipomas. PMID:25864069

  17. Analgesia for patients with advanced disease: 2

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E; Sykes, N

    2004-01-01

    The first article in this series explored epidemiology and patterns of pain in advanced disease, non-pharmacological treatments, and the use of opioids to manage pain. This second article examines the use of non-opioid drugs and anaesthetic interventions for pain relief in advanced disease. It also discusses an approach to managing analgesia in dying patients and finally looks at future developments. PMID:15082837

  18. General versus epidural anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Ulutas, Murat; Secer, Mehmet; Taskapilioglu, Ozgur; Karadas, Soner; Akyilmaz, Ahmet Aykut; Baydilek, Yunus; Kocamer, Betul; Ozboz, Ayse; Boyaci, Suat

    2015-08-01

    This study was a retrospective analysis of 850 lumbar microdiscectomy (LMD) under epidural anesthesia (EA; n=573) or general anesthesia (GA; n=277) performed by the same surgeon and paid by invoice to the Social Security Institution of the Turkish Republic between April 2003 and May 2013. Although GA is the most frequently used method of anesthesia during LMD, the choice of regional anesthetia (epidural, spinal or a combination of these) differs between surgeons and anesthetists. Studies have reported that EA in surgery for lumbar disc herniation may be more reliable than GA, as it enables the surgeon to communicate with the patient during surgery, but few studies have compared the costs of these two anesthetic methods in LMD. We found that EA patient costs were significantly lower than GA patient costs (p<0.01) and there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the time spent in the operating room (p<0.01). There was no difference in the duration of surgery (p>0.05). The anesthetic method used during LMD affected the complication rate, cost and efficiency of operating room use. We suggest that EA is an anesthetic method that can contribute to health care cost savings and enable LMD to be completed with less nerve root manipulation and more comfort, efficacy, reliability and cost efficiency without affecting the success rate of the surgical procedure. PMID:26067543

  19. Cervical Epidural Abscess Mimicking as Stroke - Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Velpula, Jagan Mohana Reddy; Gakhar, Harinder; Sigamoney, Kohilavani; Bommireddy, Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a common provisional diagnosis in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with unilateral neurological deficit. Cervical epidural abscess (CEA) may also present clinically with a unilateral neurological deficit. Objects: To highlight the inherent problems with diagnosing cervical epidural abscess and possible consequences of delay in diagnosis. Case Report: We would like to highlight two cases provisionally diagnosed as stroke. Both cases turned out to be cervical epidural abscesses. The delay in diagnosis and treatment led to suboptimal outcome in both cases. Summary: Cases with suspected stroke who deteriorate while under treatment or whose diagnosis is doubtful should have MRI whole spine in order to avoid potential complications. PMID:24551026

  20. Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in β-thalassaemia intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Hoi; Li, Allen; Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old man known to have β-thalassaemia intermedia since childhood presented with bilateral lower limb weakness after spinal anaesthesia for an elective minor operation of his left leg. MRI and CT scans were performed to rule out acute epidural haematoma; coincidental imaging features of marrow hyperplasia and spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis were found. This article will present and discuss the imaging features, differential diagnosis, management and literature review of the rare occurrence of extramedullary haematopoiesis in the spinal epidural space. PMID:24390965

  1. [Epidural extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Rafael; Bernal-García, Luis Miguel; Pineda-Palomo, Manuel; Botana-Fernández, Marcos; Gilete-Tejero, Ignacio Javier; Cabezudo-Artero, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a malignant tumour of the bone that sometimes presents extraskeletal involvement, with the epidural location being rare. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with paresthesia, paresis and urinary retention. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an epidural mass from C6 to D3. Laminectomy from C7 to D2 and partial resection of the lesion was performed. Pathological analysis was consistent with Ewing sarcoma. The patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy, without evidence of disease at 8 months follow-up. A review of the literature on all published cases of extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma with epidural involvement is presented. PMID:25497289

  2. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated. PMID:26678391

  3. An injectable extracellular matrix for the reconstruction of epidural fat and the prevention of epidural fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Yi; Liu, Tse-Ying; Chen, Mei-Hsiu; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Chen, Ming-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Extensive epidural fibrosis is a common complication following spinal surgery and can cause pain and limited mobility. In the present study, a novel biomimetic approach was developed to prevent postsurgical adhesion of the dura. We aimed to reconstruct epidural fat, which prevents scar-tissue adhesion, through the development of an injectable decellularized adipose matrix (DAM)-containing hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel loaded with adipose stromal cells (ASCs). Injectable DAM was prepared from porcine adipose tissue by four freeze-thaw cycles with subsequent pepsin digestion. Residual analyses confirmed the efficacy of detergent-free decellularization, while most sulfated glycosaminoglycans and collagen were preserved. The Transwell migration assay demonstrated the anti-infiltrative property of the DAM-containing HA hydrogel. After 14 d of 3D culture, the DAM-containing HA hydrogel showed inductive potential in the adipogenic differentiation of ASCs. For an in vivo study, the ASC-loaded DAM-containing HA hydrogel (DAM/ASC-incorporated HA hydrogel) was injected into adult laminectomized male rats, and the results were assessed by microscopic histological examination. The in vivo data indicated that HA hydrogel, DAM, and ASCs were all required for the ability of the engineered fat tissue to block the invasion of the fibrous tissue. Our results suggested that this injectable DAM/ASC-incorporated HA hydrogel has potential applications in minimally invasive surgery for soft-tissue reconstruction and epidural fibrosis prevention. PMID:27271471

  4. Rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry in four patients with abnormal routine coagulation studies before removal of epidural catheters after major surgery: a case series and research study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Routine coagulation tests have a low predictability for perioperative bleeding complications, and spinal hematoma after removal of epidural catheters is very infrequent. Thromboelastometry and point-of-care platelet aggregometry may improve hemostatic monitoring but have not been studied in the context of safety around epidural removal. Methods Twenty patients who received an epidural catheter for major thoracoabdominal and abdominal surgery were included prospectively. In addition to routine coagulation tests, rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry were carried out. Results A coagulation deficit was suggested by routine coagulation tests on the intended day of epidural catheter removal in four out of 20 patients. Prothrombin time-international normalized ratio was elevated to 1.5 in one patient (normal range: 0.9 to 1.2) while rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry parameters were within normal limits. Activated partial thromboplastin time was elevated to 47 to 50 seconds in the remaining three patients (normal range 28 to 45 seconds). Rotational thromboelastometry showed that one of the patients’ results was due to heparin effect: the clotting time with the HEPTEM® activator was 154 seconds as compared to 261 seconds with INTEM. The three remaining patients with prolonged routine coagulation test results had all received over 1L of hydroxyethyl starch (Venofundin®) and thrombosis prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaparin). Rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometrygave normal or hypercoagulative signals in most patients. Conclusions This case series is new in that it examines rotational thromboelastometry and multiple electrode platelet aggregometry postoperatively in the context of epidural analgesia and shows that they may be clinically useful. These methods should be validated before they can be used for standard patient care

  5. Epidural Blood Patch Using Manometry for Sinking Skin Flap Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turner, James D; Farmer, Justin L; Dobson, Sean W

    2016-06-01

    We describe here a 55-year-old male patient with a medical history significant for chronic back pain and substance abuse with cocaine who sustained a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage after a fall from a roof while acutely intoxicated on cocaine requiring decompressive hemicraniectomy and cranioplasty that was complicated by an epidural abscess requiring a repeat craniectomy. He was diagnosed with sinking skin flap syndrome consistent with altered mental status and a sunken skin flap with increased midline shift. Despite treatment with Trendelenburg positioning and appropriate fluid management, the patient continued to decline, and an epidural blood patch was requested for treatment. After placement of the epidural blood patch using manometry in the epidural space, the patient's neurologic status improved allowing him to ultimately receive a cranioplasty. The patient is now able to perform several of his activities of daily living and communicate effectively. PMID:27075425

  6. Imaging diagnosis--Spinal epidural hemangiosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Añor, Sònia

    2014-01-01

    An 8-year-old, male Boxer was examined for an acute onset of ambulatory paraparesis. Neurologic examination was consistent with a T3-L3 myelopathy. Myelography revealed an extradural spinal cord compression in the region of the T10-T13 vertebrae. On magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a well-defined epidural mass lesion was detected. The mass was mildly hyperintense on T1-weighted, hyperintense on T2-weighted and STIR images compared to normal spinal cord and enhanced strongly and homogenously. Postmortem examination confirmed a primary epidural hemangiosarcoma. Findings indicated that the MRI characteristics of spinal epidural hemangiosarcoma may mimic other lesions including meningioma and epidural hemorrhages/hematomas of non-neoplastic etiology. PMID:23815770

  7. Changes in total plasma and serum N-glycome composition and patient-controlled analgesia after major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gudelj, Ivan; Baciarello, Marco; Ugrina, Ivo; De Gregori, Manuela; Napolioni, Valerio; Ingelmo, Pablo M.; Bugada, Dario; De Gregori, Simona; Đerek, Lovorka; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Novokmet, Mislav; Gornik, Olga; Saccani Jotti, Gloria; Meschi, Tiziana; Lauc, Gordan; Allegri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation participates to the complex healing process occurring after major surgery, thus directly affecting the surgical outcome and patient recovery. Total plasma N-glycome might be an indicator of inflammation after major surgery, as well as an anti-inflammatory therapy response marker, since protein glycosylation plays an essential role in the inflammatory cascade. Therefore, we assessed the effects of surgery on the total plasma N-glycome and the association with self-administration of postoperative morphine in two cohorts of patients that underwent major abdominal surgery. We found that plasma N-glycome undergoes significant changes one day after surgery and intensifies one day later, thus indicating a systemic physiological response. In particular, we observed the increase of bisialylated biantennary glycan, A2G2S[3,6]2, 12 hours after surgery, which progressively increased until 48 postoperative hours. Most changes occurred 24 hours after surgery with the decrease of most core-fucosylated biantennary structures, as well as the increase in sialylated tetraantennary and FA3G3S[3,3,3]3 structures. Moreover, we observed a progressive increase of sialylated triantennary and tetraantennary structures two days after surgery, with a concomitant decrease of the structures containing bisecting N-acetylglucosamine along with bi- and trisialylated triantennary glycans. We did not find any statistically significant association between morphine consumption and plasma N-glycome. PMID:27501865

  8. Changes in total plasma and serum N-glycome composition and patient-controlled analgesia after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Gudelj, Ivan; Baciarello, Marco; Ugrina, Ivo; De Gregori, Manuela; Napolioni, Valerio; Ingelmo, Pablo M; Bugada, Dario; De Gregori, Simona; Đerek, Lovorka; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Novokmet, Mislav; Gornik, Olga; Saccani Jotti, Gloria; Meschi, Tiziana; Lauc, Gordan; Allegri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation participates to the complex healing process occurring after major surgery, thus directly affecting the surgical outcome and patient recovery. Total plasma N-glycome might be an indicator of inflammation after major surgery, as well as an anti-inflammatory therapy response marker, since protein glycosylation plays an essential role in the inflammatory cascade. Therefore, we assessed the effects of surgery on the total plasma N-glycome and the association with self-administration of postoperative morphine in two cohorts of patients that underwent major abdominal surgery. We found that plasma N-glycome undergoes significant changes one day after surgery and intensifies one day later, thus indicating a systemic physiological response. In particular, we observed the increase of bisialylated biantennary glycan, A2G2S[3,6]2, 12 hours after surgery, which progressively increased until 48 postoperative hours. Most changes occurred 24 hours after surgery with the decrease of most core-fucosylated biantennary structures, as well as the increase in sialylated tetraantennary and FA3G3S[3,3,3]3 structures. Moreover, we observed a progressive increase of sialylated triantennary and tetraantennary structures two days after surgery, with a concomitant decrease of the structures containing bisecting N-acetylglucosamine along with bi- and trisialylated triantennary glycans. We did not find any statistically significant association between morphine consumption and plasma N-glycome. PMID:27501865

  9. The Effect of Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate on Post-Operative Analgesia During Laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffaripour, Sina; Eghbal, Hossein; Rahimi, Ashkan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Post-operative pain control is an important concern for both patients and physicians. Magnesium is being used as an adjuvant for anesthesia and analgesia during and after various surgeries. We aimed to investigate the effects of intravenous magnesium sulfate on post-operative analgesia after laminectomy. Methods Materials: In this randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial, we enrolled 40 adult patients aged 18-60 with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)  Class I-II who were candidates for elective laminectomy. The patients were randomly assigned in two control groups and were similarly anesthetized. In the case group, after the induction of anesthesia, a loading dose of magnesium sulfate (30 mg/kg) was administered within five to 10 minutes followed by a maintenance dose of 10 mg/kg/hr up to the end of the surgery; while, the patients in the control group received the same volume of saline. After the surgery, all patients received a patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) pump containing morphine. The first time of using PCA, the amount of consumed morphine during the first 24 hours, and pain score were recorded at 6,12,18 and 24 hours in the post-operative period. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the amount of morphine consumed in 24 hours after the surgery (P value =0.23), the first time of using of PCA pump (P value =0.79) and pain intensity (P value=0.52). Conclusion: The infusion of Magnesium Sulfate during laminectomy had no effect on patients’ pain and opioid requirement during the first 24 hours after the surgery. PMID:27433405

  10. Delayed Onset of Subdural Hematoma following Epidural Catheter Breakage

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Gotoh, Momokazu; Nishiwaki, Kimitoshi; Nagao, Yoshimasa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objectives To describe a case of delayed-onset spinal hematoma following the breakage of a spinal epidural catheter. Methods The authors describe the clinical case review. Results A 64-year-old woman had undergone epidural anesthesia 18 years before she was referred to our hospital because of lower-back pain and lower neurologic deficit with leg pain. The clinical examination showed the presence of a fragment of an epidural catheter in the thoracolumbar canal, as assessed by computed tomography, and a spinal hematoma that compressed the spinal cord at the same spinal level, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical removal of the epidural catheter and decompression surgery were performed. The patient exhibited substantial clinical improvement 1 month after surgery; she achieved a steady gait without the need for a cane and had no leg pain. Conclusion This is the first report of delayed onset of spinal hematoma following the breakage of an epidural catheter. Generally, when the breakage of an epidural catheter occurs without symptoms, follow-up alone is recommended. However, because spinal hematoma might exhibit a late onset, the possibility of this complication should be considered when deciding whether to remove the catheter fragment. We believe that in our patient, there could be a relationship between the catheter fragment and subdural hematoma, and catheter breakage could have been a risk factor for the spinal hematoma. PMID:26835209

  11. [Update on prevention of epidural adhesion after lumbar laminectomy].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ming-xuan; Hong, Dun

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative epidural adhesion is one of the most common causes of failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), which can lead to back and leg pain or neurological deficit. Prevention of epidural adhesion after laminectomy is critical for improving the outcomes of lumbar surgery. The main origins of epidural fibrosis are raw surface of erector muscles and rupture fibers of intervertebral disc. The main current preventive methods for epidural adhesion include the usage of implants, chemicals and low dose radiation. However, most of them are still in experiment period. There are still controversies on the clinic usage of autograft free fat, ADCON-L, and Mitomycin C (MMC). The optimal implants are characteristics of better biocompatibility, degradable absorption and capability of existing for a certain period in body. The optimal medicine should have good effect on anti-desmoplasia, less side effects and long half-life. Besides, the combination of biodegradable medical film and drug and the mixture of two or more medical films are also the research frontlines of epidural adhesion. Further researches are required to explore new materials and drugs with stable and most favorable effect in preventing epidural adhesion. PMID:26757539

  12. Cervical epidural abscess caused by brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulos, Christos; Kamposos, Panagiotis; Papaioannou, Ioanna; Niarou, Vasiliki

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old Greek lady presented with fever, arthralgias of knees, cervical and lumbar pain during the last month. On clinical examination the patient was found to have tenderness of the cervical and the lumbar spine with great motion restriction. The blood tests revealed high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, abnormal liver function tests and a positive rheumatoid factor. Serological test for Brucella was positive while cervical MRI revealed epidural abscess and spondylodiscitis. Conservative treatment with streptomycin (it was substituted by rifampicin after the third week) and doxycyclin for 4 months significantly improved her symptoms. The frequency as well as the diagnosis and management of this manifestation are discussed. PMID:23188848

  13. A prospective, randomized comparison of interpleural and paravertebral analgesia in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Richardson, J; Sabanathan, S; Mearns, A J; Shah, R D; Goulden, C

    1995-10-01

    We have undertaken a prospective, randomized comparison of the superficially similar techniques of interpleural and paravertebral (extrapleural) analgesia in 53 patients undergoing posterolateral thoracotomy. Local anaesthetic placed anterior to the superior costotransverse ligament and posterior to the parietal pleura produces a paravertebral block and instilled between the parietal and visceral pleurae produces an interpleural block. Patients received preoperative and postoperative continuous bupivacaine paravertebral blocks in group 1 and interpleural blocks in group 2. Premedication comprised diclofenac and morphine, and after operation all patients had regular diclofenac and patient-controlled morphine (PCM). Analgesia was assessed by visual analogue pain scores (VAS), PCM requirements, ratio of preoperative to postoperative spirometric values (PFT), rates of postoperative respiratory morbidity (PORM) and hospital stay, all recorded by blinded observers. Eight patients were withdrawn and data from 45 patients were analysed. Patient characteristics, surgery, VAS scores and PCM use were similar in both groups. PFT were significantly better (P = 0.03-0.0001) in group 1, and PORM was lower and hospital stay approximately 1 day less in this group. Five patients in group 2 became temporarily confused, probably because of bupivacaine toxicity (P = 0.02). We conclude that bupivacaine deposited paravertebrally produced greater preservation of lung function and fewer side effects than bupivacaine administered interpleurally. PMID:7488477

  14. Abdominoplasty with procedural sedation and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, M H; Palaia, D A; Bonanno, P C

    2001-05-01

    The ability to perform abdominal cosmetic surgery in the ambulatory setting provides a more comfortable environment for the patient, ease of scheduling for the physician, and decreased costs. Avoiding the use of general anesthesia allows for quicker recovery, shorter length of hospital stay, and decreased rate of postoperative complications. The authors report 106 consecutive abdominoplasties, including fascial plication when indicated, using local anesthesia, with procedural sedation and analgesia. All procedures were performed with an anesthesiologist providing intraoperative monitoring of the patients. Their protocol uses procedural sedation and analgesia, which results in a depressed level of consciousness, but allows the patient to maintain airway control independently and continuously. The results of this approach were measured in terms of procedure time, length of hospital stay, rate of complications, total recovery time, and the level of patient satisfaction. Between January 1996 and January 1999, 106 patients underwent abdominoplasty (performed by one of the authors) under local anesthesia with procedural sedation and analgesia. All patients had an American Society of Anesthesiologists status of 1 to 3, and underwent a full abdominoplasty, including fascial plication. In 26% of the patients, allied procedures were also performed, most commonly liposuction or augmentation mammaplasty. The mean age in this series was 45 years, and all patients were available for follow-up at least 1 year after surgery. The mean operative time was 135 minutes, recovery room time was 68 minutes, and all patients were ambulatory. There were no surgical complications, including flap loss or wound dehiscence, and no complications related to anesthesia (cardiac, deep vein thrombosis, fat emboli, pulmonary embolism, etc.). Because paralytic agents were not used, none of the patients required catheterization postoperatively. Patients were generally pleased with the results of

  15. Local infiltration analgesia is not improved by postoperative intra-articular bolus injections for pain after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Karen V; Nikolajsen, Lone; Daugaard, Henrik; Andersen, Niels T; Haraldsted, Viggo; Søballe, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effect of postoperative intra-articular bolus injections after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that intra-articular bolus injections administered every 6 hours after surgery during the first 24 hours would significantly improve analgesia after THA. Patients and methods — 80 patients undergoing THA received high-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA; 200 mg ropivacaine and 30 mg ketorolac) followed by 4 intra-articular injections with either ropivacaine (100 mg) and ketorolac (15 mg) (the treatment group) or saline (the control group). The intra-articular injections were combined with 4 intravenous injections of either saline (treatment group) or 15 mg ketorolac (control group). All patients received morphine as patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The primary outcome was consumption of intravenous morphine PCA and secondary outcomes were consumption of oral morphine, pain intensity, side effects, readiness for hospital discharge, length of hospital stay, and postoperative consumption of analgesics at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Results — There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups regarding postoperative consumption of intravenous morphine PCA. Postoperative pain scores during walking were higher in the treatment group from 24–72 hours after surgery, but other pain scores were similar between groups. Time to readiness for hospital discharge was longer in the treatment group. Other secondary outcomes were similar between groups. Interpretation — Postoperative intra-articular bolus injections of ropivacaine and ketorolac cannot be recommended as analgesic method after THA. PMID:26312445

  16. Spinal analgesia for advanced cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Porzio, Giampiero; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2012-05-01

    In the nineties, spinal analgesia has been described as an useful means to control pain in advanced cancer patients. The aim of this review was to update this information with a systematic analysis of studies performed in the last 10 years. 27 papers pertinent with the topic selected for review were collected according to selection criteria. Few studies added further information on spinal analgesia in last decade. Despite a lack of a clinical evidence, spinal analgesia with a combination of opioids, principally morphine, and local anesthetics may allow to achieve analgesia in patients who had been intensively treated unsuccessfully with different trials of opioids. Some adjuvant drugs such as clonidine, ketamine, betamethasone, meperidine, and ziconotide may be promising agents, but several problems have to be solved before they can be used in the daily practice. In complex pain situations, spinal analgesia should not be negated to cancer patients, and oncologists should address this group of patients to other specialists. PMID:21684173

  17. Patterns of epidural progression following postoperative spine stereotactic body radiotherapy: implications for clinical target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Michael W; Thibault, Isabelle; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Yu, Eugene; John Cho, B C; Letourneau, Daniel; Lee, Young; Yee, Albert; Fehlings, Michael G; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT The authors performed a pattern-of-failure analysis, with a focus on epidural disease progression, in patients treated with postoperative spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). METHODS Of the 70 patients with 75 spinal metastases (cases) treated with postoperative spine SBRT, there were 26 cases of local disease recurrence and 25 cases with a component of epidural disease progression. Twenty-four of the 25 cases had preoperative epidural disease with subsequent epidural disease progression, and this cohort was the focus of this epidural-specific pattern-of-failure investigation. Preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up MRI scans were reviewed, and epidural disease was characterized based on location according to a system in which the vertebral anatomy is divided into 6 sectors, with the anterior compartment comprising Sectors 1, 2, and 6, and the posterior compartment comprising Sectors 3, 4, and 5. RESULTS Patterns of epidural progression are reported specifically for the 24 cases with preoperative epidural disease and subsequent epidural progression. Epidural disease progression within the posterior compartment was observed to be significantly lower in those with preoperative epidural disease confined to the anterior compartment than in those with preoperative epidural disease involving both anterior and posterior compartments (56% vs 93%, respectively; p = 0.047). In a high proportion of patients with epidural disease progression, treatment failure was found in the anterior compartment, including both those with preoperative epidural disease confined to the anterior compartment and those with preoperative epidural disease involving both anterior and posterior compartments (100% vs. 73%, respectively). When epidural disease was confined to the anterior compartment on the preoperative and postoperative MRIs, no epidural disease progression was observed in Sector 4, which is the most posterior sector. Postoperative epidural disease characteristics

  18. Microscopic epidural lesions in goats given repeated epidural injections of morphine: use of a modified autopsy procedure.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J J; Svendsen, O; Andersen, H B

    1986-01-01

    Epidural catheterization was performed in six goats. Five days later either saline or 20 mg (5 mg/ml) preservative free morphine was injected epidurally once daily for 8 days. The goats were sacrificed 4, 24 or 48 hours after the last injection. The lumbar part of columna was removed in toto for microscopic examination of the spinal cord and the entire epidural space after decalcification and transverse sectioning. After saline, minimal changes including a fibrous membrane surrounding the catheter, scattered fat cell necrosis, scattered small focal cell infiltrations and occasionally focal haemorrhages were seen. After morphine the changes were considerably more severe including diffuse cellular inflammatory reaction in the epidural space, fat cell necrosis, occasionally focal exudative inflammation and chronic inflammatory reaction in the vicinity of the fibrous membrane demarcating position of the catheter. It is concluded that the present modified autopsy procedure permits microscopic examination of the epidural space. It has been shown that repeated administration of morphine caused tissue damage in the epidural space of goats. The human predictability of the results obtained is unknown. However, the results are encouraging for investigations with similar procedure in humans. PMID:3953294

  19. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in multimodal analgesia after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Çiğdem; Çakan, Türkay; Baltaci, Bülent; Başar, Hülya

    2013-01-01

    Backround: We aimed to evaluate analgesic efficacy, opioid-sparing, and opioid-related adverse effects of intravenous paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in combination with iv morphine after total abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologist Physical Status Classification I-II patients scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy were enrolled to this double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled, and prospective study. Patients were divided into three groups as paracetamol, dexketoprofen trometamol, and placebo (0.9% NaCl) due to their post-operative analgesic usage. Intravenous patient controlled analgesia morphine was used as a rescue analgesic in all groups. Pain scores, hemodynamic parameters, morphine consumption, patient satisfaction, and side-effects were evaluated. Results: Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores were not statistically significantly different among the groups in all evaluation times, but decrease in VAS scores was statistically significant after the evaluation at 12th h in all groups. Total morphine consumption (morphine concentration = 0.2 mg/ml) in group paracetamol (72.3 ± 38.0 ml) and dexketoprofen trometamol (69.3 ± 24.1 ml) was significantly lower than group placebo (129.3 ± 22.6 ml) (P < 0.001). Global satisfaction scores of the patients in group placebo was significantly lower than group dexketoprofen trometamol after surgery and the increase in global satisfaction score was significant only in group placebo. Conclusion: Dexketoprofen trometamol and Paracetamol didn’t cause significant change on pain scores, but increased patients’ comfort. Although total morphine consumption was significantly decreased by both drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting were similar among the groups. According to results of the present study routine addition of dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol to patient controlled analgesia morphine after hysterectomies is not recommended. PMID

  20. Severe Scapular Pain Following Unintentional Cervical Epidural Air Injection.

    PubMed

    Henthorn, Randall W; Murray, Kerra

    2016-03-01

    This a unique case of severe scapular pain following unintentional epidural space air injection during epidural steroid injection.A 70-year-old woman presented for a fluoroscopically guided C7-T1 interlaminar epidural steroid injection. Three injection attempts were made using the loss of resistance with air technique. On the first attempt the epidural space was entered, but contrast injection showed that the needle was intravenous. On the second attempt an equivocal loss of resistance with air was perceived and 5 mL of air was lost from the syringe. The needle was withdrawn and redirected, and upon the third needle passage the contrast injection showed appropriate epidural space filling up to the C4-5 level. Injection of betamethasone mixed in lidocaine was initially uneventful.However, 20 minutes post-injection the patient experienced sudden sharp and continuous pain along the medial edge of the scapula. After failing to respond to multiple intravascular analgesics, the patient was transferred to the emergency room. Her pain subsided completely following an intravenous diazepam injection. Cervical spine computerized tomography showed obvious air in the posterior epidural space from C4-5 to C6-7 as well as outside the spinal canal from (C4-T2). Having recovered fully, she was discharged the following morning. In reviewing the procedure, the equivocal loss of resistance on the second passage was actually a true loss of resistance to epidural space and air was unintentionally injected. Surprisingly, severe scapular pain resulted in a delayed manner after the steroid solution was injected. The authors theorize that unintentional prefilling of the epidural space with air prior to the injection of the subsequent steroid mixture added sufficient pressure to the epidural space to cause right-sided C4 nerve root stretching/entrapment and ensuing radicular pain to the right scapular border. The subsequent intravenous diazepam provided cervical muscle relaxation and

  1. [Ketorolac vs metamizol preemptive analgesia in children].

    PubMed

    Peñuelas-Acuña, Juana; Oriol-López, S Alejandra; Hernández-Bernal, Clara E; Castelazo Arredondo, J Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Preventive analgesia produced by ketorolac and metamizol was evaluated during a prospective study randomized in two groups. One hundred twenty children were included aged from 3 to 6 years who underwent surgery by different procedures. Analgesic dose was applied 15 min prior to surgery by intravenous (i.v.) via. Technique used was inhaled general anesthesia; use of opioids was avoided. Pain evaluation at the end of surgery (and during the following 48 to 72 h) as well as bleeding time, platelet count, and alterations in white blood cell count were dependent variables. As soon as patients arrived in the recovery room, pain was measured by modified McGrath scales and the chromatic EVA. In ketorolac group, 40% of children showed no pain and 55% presented mild to moderate pain (1-6). In metamizol group, 40% of children referred no pain, while 55% evaluated pain as minimal to moderate. Analgesia produced by both drugs presented no significant statistical diference (p > 0.5). Troughout followup, maximum pain referred had a values of 6 and 7, respectively, for ketorolac and metamizol. Fifteen min after analgesic dose, pain was referred as 3 and 4. No alterations were observed in bleeding time, platelet count, and white blood cell count. We conclude that both analgesics prevent hyperalgesia during post-surgical period. PMID:19753721

  2. Combination of dexmedetomidine and remifentanil for labor analgesia: A double-blinded, randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Waleed; Ammar, Mona Ahmed; Tharwat, Ayman Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Satisfactory analgesia is of great importance in the labor. The clinical efficacy and side effects of remifentanil in the management of labor pain had been evaluated. Dexmedetomidine (DMET) demonstrates an antinociceptive effect in visceral pain conditions. Aims of the study were to assess whether the combination of DMET with remifentanil would produce a synergistic effect that results in lower analgesic requirements. Furthermore, whether this combination would have less maternal and neonatal adverse effects. Patients and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II pregnant women had been enrolled into this study. All were full term (37-40 weeks’ gestation), singleton fetus with cephalic presentation in the first stage of spontaneous labor. They were divided into two groups group (I) Patient-controlled IV remifentanil analgesia (bolus dose 0.25 μg/kg, lockout interval 2 min) increased by 0.25 μg/kg to a maximum bolus dose 1 μg/kg in addition to a loading dose of DMET 1 μg/kg over 20 min, followed by infusion at 0.5 μg/kg/h group (II) Patient-controlled IV remifentanil analgesia (PCA) (bolus dose 0.25 μg/kg, lockout interval 2 min) increased by 0.25 μg/kg to a maximum bolus dose 1 μg/kg in addition to a the same volume of normal saline as a loading dose, followed by a continuous saline infusion. Visual analog scale score, maternal, and fetal complications and patients’ satisfaction were recorded. Results: Patients receiving a combination of PCA remifentanil and DMET had a lower pain score compared with remifentanil alone in the second stage of labor (P = 0.001). The Total consumption of remifentanil was reduced by 53.3% in group I. There was an increased incidence of maternal complications and a lower patient satisfaction score in group II. Conclusion: DMET has an opioid sparing effect; a combination of DMET and remifentanil produces a synergistic effect that results in lower analgesic requirements and less

  3. Efficacy of caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, xylazine and xylazine plus hyaluronidase in reducing discomfort produced by electroejaculation in bulls.

    PubMed

    Pagliosa, Ronaldo C; Derossi, Rafael; Costa, Deiler S; Faria, Fabio J C

    2015-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that epidural administration of lidocaine, xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase provides reduced pain and stress during electroejaculation in bulls, eight 30-month-old Nellore bulls received saline solution (control), 2% lidocaine, 2% xylazine or 2% xylazine plus hyaluronidase injected into the first intercoccygeal (Co1-Co2) epidural space in randomized order. Heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, analgesia, animal behavior and motor blockade were evaluated before treatment and at predetermined intervals during and after treatment. Pain and stress were scored subjectively, and semen quality was evaluated. The onset of anesthetic action was significantly faster with lidocaine (3.0 ± 1.2 min) than with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase (8.9 ± 1.5 and 5.5 ± 2.6 min, P=0.021 and P=0.012, respectively), and the onset of anesthesia with xylazine plus hyaluronidase was significantly faster than that with xylazine alone (P=0.032). Treatment with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase resulted in less discomfort than treatment with lidocaine, as indicated by animal behavior. Changes in heart rate, respiratory rate and arterial pressure were within acceptable limits. Penile protrusion and semen emission occurred in all animals during all four treatments. Our results suggest that xylazine plus hyaluronidase reduced discomfort during electroejaculation more effectively than xylazine or lidocaine alone. Further experiments are necessary to determine whether electroejaculation with xylazine plus hyaluronidase is feasible for obtaining semen from Nellore bulls unaccustomed to being handled or restrained. PMID:26097016

  4. Efficacy of caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, xylazine and xylazine plus hyaluronidase in reducing discomfort produced by electroejaculation in bulls

    PubMed Central

    PAGLIOSA, Ronaldo C.; DEROSSI, Rafael; COSTA, Deiler S.; FARIA, Fabio J.C.

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that epidural administration of lidocaine, xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase provides reduced pain and stress during electroejaculation in bulls, eight 30-month-old Nellore bulls received saline solution (control), 2% lidocaine, 2% xylazine or 2% xylazine plus hyaluronidase injected into the first intercoccygeal (Co1–Co2) epidural space in randomized order. Heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, analgesia, animal behavior and motor blockade were evaluated before treatment and at predetermined intervals during and after treatment. Pain and stress were scored subjectively, and semen quality was evaluated. The onset of anesthetic action was significantly faster with lidocaine (3.0 ± 1.2 min) than with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase (8.9 ± 1.5 and 5.5 ± 2.6 min, P=0.021 and P=0.012, respectively), and the onset of anesthesia with xylazine plus hyaluronidase was significantly faster than that with xylazine alone (P=0.032). Treatment with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase resulted in less discomfort than treatment with lidocaine, as indicated by animal behavior. Changes in heart rate, respiratory rate and arterial pressure were within acceptable limits. Penile protrusion and semen emission occurred in all animals during all four treatments. Our results suggest that xylazine plus hyaluronidase reduced discomfort during electroejaculation more effectively than xylazine or lidocaine alone. Further experiments are necessary to determine whether electroejaculation with xylazine plus hyaluronidase is feasible for obtaining semen from Nellore bulls unaccustomed to being handled or restrained. PMID:26097016

  5. Pentoxifylline Inhibits Epidural Fibrosis in Post-Laminectomy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelten, Bilal; Erdogan, Hakan; Antar, Veysel; Sanel, Selim; Tuncdemir, Matem; Kutnu, Muge; Karaoglan, Alper; Orki, Tulay

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effectiveness of intramuscular pentoxifylline in the prevention of postoperative fibrosis. Material/Methods We divided 16 adult Wistar albino rats into 2 equal groups: treatment and control. Both groups underwent L1 vertebral total laminectomy to expose the dura. The intramuscular treatment group received pentoxifylline. Four weeks later, epidural fibrosis was studied in both groups using electron microscopy, light microscopy, histology, biochemistry, and macroscopy. Results The evaluation of epidural fibrosis in the 2 groups according to macroscopic (p<0.01) assessment and light microscopy revealed that epidural scar tissue formation was lower in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.001) and the number of fibroblasts was also decreased significantly in the pentoxifylline-treated group (p<0.05). More immature fibers were demonstrated in the treatment group by electron microscopy in comparison with the control group. In biochemical analysis, a statistically significant decrease was detected in hydroxyproline, which indicates fibrosis and myeloperoxidase activity, and shows an inflammatory response (P<0.001). Conclusions Systemic pentoxifylline application prevents postoperative epidural fibrosis and adhesions with various mechanisms. Our study is the first to present evidence of experimental epidural fibrosis prevention with pentoxifylline. PMID:26974057

  6. Spontaneous thoracic epidural hematoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Rasim; Ekşi, Murat Şakir

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma is a rare neurosurgical emergency in respect of motor and sensory loss. Identifiable reasons for spontaneous hemorrhage are vascular malformations and hemophilias. We presented a case of spontaneous epidural hematoma in an 18-year-old female patient who had motor and sensory deficits that had been present for 1 day. On MRI, there was spinal epidural hematoma posterior to the T2-T3 spinal cord. The hematoma was evacuated with T2 hemilaminectomy and T3 laminectomy. Patient recovered immediately after the surgery. Literature review depicted 112 pediatric cases (including the presented one) of spinal epidural hematoma. The female/male ratio is 1.1:2. Average age at presentation is 7.09 years. Clinical presentations include loss of strength, sensory disturbance, bowel and bladder disturbances, neck pain, back pain, leg pain, abdominal pain, meningismus, respiratory difficulty, irritability, gait instability, and torticollis. Most common spinal level was cervicothoracic spine. Time interval from symptom onset to clinical diagnosis varied from immediate to 18 months. Spinal epidural hematoma happened spontaneously in 71.8 % of the cases, and hemophilia was the leading disorder (58 %) in the cases with a definable disorder. Partial or complete recovery is possible after surgical interventions and factor supplementations. PMID:26033378

  7. Epidural catheter with integrated light guides for spectroscopic tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Astorga, R. P.; West, S.; Putnis, S.; Hebden, J. C.; Desjardins, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Epidural catheters are used to deliver anesthetics and opioids for managing pain in many clinical scenarios. Currently, epidural catheter insertion is performed without information about the tissues that are directly ahead of the catheter. As a result, the catheter can be incorrectly positioned within a blood vessel, which can cause toxicity. Recent studies have shown that optical reflectance spectroscopy could be beneficial for guiding needles that are used to insert catheters. In this study, we investigate the whether this technique could benefit the placement of catheters within the epidural space. We present a novel optical epidural catheter with integrated polymer light guides that allows for optical spectra to be acquired from tissues at the distal tip. To obtain an initial indication of the information that could be obtained, reflectance values and photon penetration depth were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations, and optical reflectance spectra were acquired during a laminectomy of a swine ex vivo. Large differences between the spectra acquired from epidural adipose tissue and from venous blood were observed. The optical catheter has the potential to provide real-time detection of intravascular catheter placement that could reduce the risk of complications. PMID:24298420

  8. Posterior epidural fibrotic mass associated with Baastrup’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eui-Chan; Lee, Han-Jun; Kim, Jae Yoon; Yang, Jae Jun

    2010-01-01

    A few reports have demonstrated rare cases of Baastrup’s disease that involve epidural cysts that cause dural compression. However, there have been no reports of a midline epidural fibrotic mass being associated with Baastrup’s disease. A 60-year-old man presented with neurogenic claudication that had lasted for 5 years. Radiography showed anterolisthesis at the L4–L5 level, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated severe stenosis due to a posterior noncystic mass, and the linear fluid signal tracked into the posterior epidural space at the L4–L5 level. A cleft in the ligamentum flavum was identified by probe at surgery, and this enabled the probe to be inserted into the epidural space without excising ligamentum flavum. Histological analysis showed that the fibrotic mass consisted of a collagen matrix that had a cystic component and exhibited a peripheral inflammatory reaction. This report shows that it is possible for an extended epidural cystic mass that occurs in Baastrup’s disease to change over time through peripheral inflammation into a cyst-containing fibrotic mass. PMID:20063020

  9. Analgesia for people with acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Carter, David; Amblum-Almer, Jeshni

    2015-04-01

    Around 302,000 people with soft-tissue ankle injuries present to UK emergency departments every year (Ferran and Maffulli 2006). These patients are generally treated conservatively with analgesia, ice, compression and elevation, and rest. There is some discussion in the literature about whether or not people with these injuries should be treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with some authors claiming that the inflammatory response following injury is part of the healing process and should not be halted. This article examines the literature on the efficacy of administering NSAIDs as the first-line drug management for ankle sprain. It also considers cost of treatment, prescribing practice and contraindications of NSAIDs. PMID:25854742

  10. Epidural haematoma and stroller-associated injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, A C; Fong, D

    1997-10-01

    We present a severe case of head injury in an infant associated with stroller use and review similar reports from the literature. A case report and a literature search of the Medline database from 1966 to 6/1996 using the terms 'perambulator', 'parm', 'stroller', or 'baby carriage'. Reports in English describing injuries associated with their use are reviewed. We report a case of epidural haematoma in a 10 months old girl who sustained the injury after falling from a stroller. Safety harnesses were not worn during the incident. There was no skull fracture. Complete recovery followed surgical evacuation of the blood clot. Five reports describing stroller-related injuries were found in the English literature. Most injuries were mild. Three cases of death were reported of which two were classified as child abuse. The prevalence of unintentional stroller-associated injury is not clear. Mild injury, mostly to the head region, is probably common. Life-threatening injuries are rare but these are potentially preventable if strollers are properly designed and safety recommendations are followed. PMID:9401893

  11. Epidural infection: Is it really an abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We reviewed the literature regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Methods: Utilizing PubMed, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature on SEAs. Results: SEA remains a difficult infectious process to diagnose. This is particularly true in the early stages, when patients remain neurologically intact, and before the classic triad of fever, back pain, and neurologic deficit develop. However, knowledge of risk factors, obtaining serologic markers, and employing magnetic resonance scans facilitate obtaining a prompt and accurate diagnosis. In patients without neurologic deficits, lone medical therapy may prove effective. Conclusions: More prevalent over the previous three decades, SEA remains a rare but deleterious infectious process requiring prompt identification and treatment. Historically, identification of SEA is often elusive, diagnosis is delayed, and clinicians contend that surgical debridement is the cornerstone of treatment. Early surgery leads to more favorable outcomes and preserves neurologic function, particularly in the early stages of disease when minimal or no neurologic deficits are present. The advent of improved imaging modalities, diagnostic techniques, and multidrug antimicrobial agents has enabled medical/spinal surgical consultants to more rapidly diagnose SEA and institute more effective early medical treatment (e.g., data suggest that lone medical therapy may prove effective in the early management of SEA). PMID:23248757

  12. Computational modeling of epidural cortical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-12-01

    Epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) is a developing therapy to treat neurological disorders. However, it is not clear how the cortical anatomy or the polarity and position of the electrode affects current flow and neural activation in the cortex. We developed a 3D computational model simulating ECS over the precentral gyrus. With the electrode placed directly above the gyrus, about half of the stimulus current flowed through the crown of the gyrus while current density was low along the banks deep in the sulci. Beneath the electrode, neurons oriented perpendicular to the cortical surface were depolarized by anodic stimulation, and neurons oriented parallel to the boundary were depolarized by cathodic stimulation. Activation was localized to the crown of the gyrus, and neurons on the banks deep in the sulci were not polarized. During regulated voltage stimulation, the magnitude of the activating function was inversely proportional to the thickness of the CSF and dura. During regulated current stimulation, the activating function was not sensitive to the thickness of the dura but was slightly more sensitive than during regulated voltage stimulation to the thickness of the CSF. Varying the width of the gyrus and the position of the electrode altered the distribution of the activating function due to changes in the orientation of the neurons beneath the electrode. Bipolar stimulation, although often used in clinical practice, reduced spatial selectivity as well as selectivity for neuron orientation.

  13. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  14. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  15. Intravenous analgesia with opioids versus femoral nerve block with 0.2% ropivacaine as preemptive analgesic for fracture femur: A randomized comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvinder Pal; Kohli, Vaneet; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Femoral fractures are extremely painful and pain invariably worsens on any movement. Anesthesia for fracture femur surgery is usually provided by spinal block. This study was undertaken to compare the analgesic effects of femoral nerve block (FNB) using nerve stimulator with 0.2% ropivacaine (15 ml) and intravenous (I.V.) fentanyl before patient positioning for fracture femur surgery under spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, comparative study was conducted on 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients (18–60 years) scheduled for femur surgery under combined spinal epidural anesthesia. Patients in Group I (n = 30), were administered FNB using nerve stimulator with 0.2% ropivacaine (15 ml) and in Group II patients (n = 30), I.V. fentanyl 0.5 μg/kg was given as preemptive analgesia. Parameters observed included time to spinal anesthesia, intra-operative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) for any pain and postoperative epidural top-ups dosages. Results: Demographic profile was comparable in both the groups. VAS at 2 min in Group I was 5.63 and in Group II it was 8.00. Satisfaction score was better in Group I as compared to Group II patients. Time to administer subarachnoid block was 17.80 min in patients of Group I as compared to 25.03 min in Group II patients. Postoperatively, VAS scores were lower in Group I than Group II patients. The frequency of epidural top-ups was higher in Group II than in Group I patients. Conclusions: FNB is comparatively better in comparison to I.V. fentanyl when used as preemptive and postoperative analgesic in patients being operated for fracture femur. PMID:27212771

  16. Innovative approaches to neuraxial blockade in children: The introduction of epidural nerve root stimulation and ultrasound guidance for epidural catheter placement

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Ban CH

    2006-01-01

    Continuous epidural blockade remains the cornerstone of pediatric regional anesthesia. However, the risk of catastrophic trauma to the spinal cord when inserting direct thoracic and high lumbar epidural needles in anesthetized or heavily sedated pediatric patients is a concern. To reduce this risk, research has focused on low lumbar or caudal blocks (ie, avoiding the spinal cord) and threading catheters from distal puncture sites in a cephalad direction. However, with conventional epidural techniques, including loss-of-resistance for localization of the needle, optimal catheter tip placement is difficult to assess because considerable distances are required during threading. Novel approaches include electrical epidural stimulation for physiological confirmation and segmental localization of epidural catheters, and ultrasound guidance for assessing related neuroanatomy and real-time observation of the needle puncture and, potentially, catheter advancement. The present article provides a brief and focused review of these two advances, and outlines recent clinical experiences relevant to pediatric epidural anesthesia. PMID:16960634

  17. Does labour epidural slow the progress of labour and lead to complications? Obstetricians’ perception working in private and public sector teaching hospitals in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Sohaib, Muhammad; Ismail, Samina

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Obstetricians play a major role in the decision making for provision of analgesia for the woman in labour. As epidural analgesia (EA) is the most preferred technique, it is important to know obstetricians' perception regarding its effect on progress of labour and associated complications. Methods: The 6 months cross-sectional study included 114 obstetricians from teaching hospitals. After informed consent, obstetricians were asked to fill a predesigned questionnaire containing 13 close ended questions regarding their perception on the effect of EA on progress of labour, EA complications and whether they would recommend EA to their patients or not. Other variables included age, gender, training in EA, practice type and hospital settings (private or public sector). Results: Majority of the obstetricians had the perception of EA prolonging the first stage (89.5%) and second stage (98.2%) of labour, increasing the rate of caesarean section (87.7%), instrumental delivery (58.8%) and increasing the incidence of backache (85.5%). None of the obstetricians received any formal training in EA. Majority (84.2%) were not sure if they would recommend EA to their patients. When these responses were compared between public and private sector, a statistically higher percentage (P < 0.001) of public sector obstetricians had negative perception of EA. Conclusion: Perception of obstetrician regarding EA is contrary to the current evidence. There is a need to introduce formal curriculum on EA in obstetric training program and conduct regular refresher courses. PMID:26903670

  18. Behavioral evidence for an opiate pituitary mechanism subserving conditioned analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gaiardi, M; Bartoletti, M; Gubellini, C; Bacchi, A; Babbini, M

    1983-09-01

    The effect of a naloxone or a dexamethasone pretreatment on the conditioned analgesia resulting from the exposure of rats to an experimental chamber repeatedly paired with a grid shock was investigated. Shock induced disruption of bar pressing activity was taken as a behavioral measure of pain responsiveness. It was found that a 6, but not a 3, mg/kg dose of naloxone i.p. is hyperalgesic in unconditioned rats and effectively antagonizes conditioned analgesia. Dexamethasone (up to a dose of 2 + 1 mg/kg i.p. 23 and 1 h prior) did not alter the pain responsiveness of unconditioned rats, but caused a dose dependent suppression of conditioned analgesia. These results are discussed in terms of an opiate pituitary mechanism subserving conditioned analgesia. PMID:6314229

  19. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension following epidural anesthesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    An, X; Wu, S; He, F; Li, C; Fang, X

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of refractory spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) following epidural anesthesia. In this case, typical clinical symptoms and concomitant use of regional anesthesia led to the misdiagnosis of SIH as post-dural puncture headache (PDPH). A 56-year-old man received a successful appendectomy under epidural anesthesia performed at a T11-T12 intravertebral space. About 20 h later, the patient started complaining about orthostatic headache when getting up from his lying position, then a PDPH was diagnosed. However, the patient did not respond well to conservative treatment. Three months later, the first epidural blood patch was performed at the L3-L4 level, however, the patient still had an orthostatic headache. Five days later, spine magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple meningeal diverticulum in the cervicothoracic junction, and computerized tomography myelography demonstrated a C5-C6 spinal dural tear suggesting cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Finally, the patient was diagnosed as SIH and received a second epidural blood patch at the T2-T3 level and responded with improvements in symptomatology. The patient was then discharged, and at a 2-year follow-up, he had fully recovered except for some remaining neck stiffness. This case illustrates that SIH was misdiagnosed as PDPH because of the common clinical symptoms and potentially confounding events (epidural/spinal anesthesia and assumption that it was a case of PDPH). It is important to carefully observe patients in such conditions and promptly conduct suitable diagnostic tests. For a successful treatment of SIH, a timely epidural blood patch should be considered as soon as the diagnosis is established. PMID:26939569

  20. [PERIOPERATIVE ANALGESIA INFLUENCE ON MOTHER REHABILITATION PERIOD AFTER CESAREAN SECTION].

    PubMed

    Sedykh, S V

    2015-01-01

    Early breast-feeding is a standard of perinatal care currently. After cesarean section it can be possible in case of early mother activation (verticalization). Assessment of perioperative analgesia influence on activation timing was the aim of our research. We included 120 parturient women. It was proved, that local analgesia using in postoperative period promotes early mother verticaliration, and optimal breast-feeding starting. PMID:26596028

  1. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Zizka, J; Eliás, P; Michl, A; Harrer, J; Cesák, T; Herman, A

    2001-01-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. PMID:11471620

  2. Geographic Variation in Epidural Steroid Injection Use in Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Friedly, Janna; Chan, Leighton; Deyo, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background: The rates of epidural steroid injections have increased dramatically over time, with conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of epidural steroid injections for the treatment of various low-back pain disorders. Given the uncertainty about their role, we sought to evaluate the geographic variation in the use of epidural steroid injections for low back pain within the United States. We also sought to determine whether greater rates of epidural steroid injections are associated with lower rates of lumbar surgery. Methods: We used the 2001 Medicare Physician Part-B claims to examine the geographic variation in the use of epidural steroid injections. Current Procedural Technology codes were used to identify the number of procedures performed as well as the percentage of injections that were fluoroscopically guided. Procedure rates were analyzed with use of several geographic indicators, including state, United States Census Bureau regions (Northeast, South, Midwest, and West), and health referral regions as defined by the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care. Results: In 2001, there was a 7.7-fold difference between the state with the lowest rate (Hawaii at 5.2 per 1000) and the state with the highest rate (Alabama at 39.9 per 1000). The variation among health referral regions, which are smaller in size, was even greater, with an 18.4-fold difference from 5.6 per 1000 in Honolulu, Hawaii, to 103.6 per 1000 in Palm Springs, California. Higher statewide rates of epidural steroid injections were associated with significantly higher rates of lumbar surgery (p = 0.001). In areas with high injection rates, a significantly higher percentage of patients who sought care for low back pain received injections (p < 0.001). In addition, in areas with high injection rates, a significantly higher percentage of patients who presented with low back pain received both injections and lumbar surgery within the same year (p < 0.001). Conclusions: There is substantial geographic

  3. Translaminar lumbar epidural endoscopy: anatomy, technique, and indications.

    PubMed

    De Antoni, D J; Claro, M L; Poehling, G G; Hughes, S S

    1996-06-01

    This article describes a new technique to achieve access to the epidural space via a direct posterior portal. This minimally invasive technique allows treatment of disc protrusions and extrusions with full visualization and minimal dissection of the paraspinal musculature. Hemostasis, visualization, and triangulation is performed with standard arthroscopic instrumentation. The anatomy of, indications for, and advantages of this techniques are described. PMID:8783828

  4. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords "Upper cervical epidural abscess," "C1 osteomyelitis," "C2 osteomyelitis," "C1 epidural abscess," "C2 epidural abscess." We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  5. Fluoroscopically-guided epidural blood patch for spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manish; Giampetro, David M; Kalapos, Paul; Caldwell, Julia C

    2015-01-01

    We present three patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension who failed conservative treatment and were treated with image-guided epidural blood patch close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak site. Each patient achieved significant long-term improvement of clinical symptoms and CSF leak related image findings. PMID:26702220

  6. Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment of Acute Epidural Hematoma: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. Although minimally invasive surgical treatment of acute epidural hematoma attracts increasing attention, no generalized indications for the surgery have been adopted. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of minimally invasive surgery in acute epidural hematoma with various hematoma volumes. Methods. Minimally invasive puncture and aspiration surgery were performed in 59 cases of acute epidural hematoma with various hematoma volumes (13–145 mL); postoperative follow-up was 3 months. Clinical data, including surgical trauma, surgery time, complications, and outcome of hematoma drainage, recovery, and Barthel index scores, were assessed, as well as treatment outcome. Results. Surgical trauma was minimal and surgery time was short (10–20 minutes); no anesthesia accidents or surgical complications occurred. Two patients died. Drainage was completed within 7 days in the remaining 57 cases. Barthel index scores of ADL were ≤40 (n = 1), 41–60 (n = 1), and >60 (n = 55); scores of 100 were obtained in 48 cases, with no dysfunctions. Conclusion. Satisfactory results can be achieved with minimally invasive surgery in treating acute epidural hematoma with hematoma volumes ranging from 13 to 145 mL. For patients with hematoma volume >50 mL and even cerebral herniation, flexible application of minimally invasive surgery would help improve treatment efficacy. PMID:27144170

  7. Epidural abscess with associated spondylodiscitis following prostatic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Dobson, G; Cowie, C J A; Holliman, D

    2015-07-01

    Spondylodiscitis is often iatrogenic in nature. We report the case of a 69-year-old man presenting with spondylodiscitis and associated epidural abscess following transrectal ultrasonography guided prostate biopsy despite ciprofloxacin cover. To our knowledge, this is the first case of spondylodiscitis secondary to fluoroquinolone resistant Escherichia coli. PMID:26264110

  8. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords “Upper cervical epidural abscess,” “C1 osteomyelitis,” “C2 osteomyelitis,” “C1 epidural abscess,” “C2 epidural abscess.” We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  9. Symptomatic lumbar epidural varices. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, G A; Weingarten, K; Lavyne, M H

    1994-05-01

    Lumbar epidural varices have been infrequently described in the literature and rarely accepted as a primary pathophysiological entity. The authors' total experience with symptomatic lumbar epidural varices over the last 15 years includes four cases (incidence 0.067% of all lumbar spine operations), two of which are described in detail in this paper. The mechanism for their formation is proposed: central disc herniations obstruct the anterior epidural venous flow leading to anterolateral caudal venous distention. Subsequent venous endothelial injury predisposes to varying degrees of phlebothrombosis. Decompression of partially thrombosed varices may occur during operative discectomy or spontaneously during regression of the nonoperated disc prolapse. Regression of the central disc herniation may also explain the "disappearing disc" phenomenon, in which patients with clinical and radiographic evidence of apparently large caudal disc herniations exhibit clinical and radiographic resolution. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the epidural varix depend upon the degree of thrombosis within this anomaly. A thrombosed varix is hyperintense on T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted images, whereas flowing blood is hypointense. The variable hypo- and hyperintensity on the T2-weighted MR imaging sequences correlate with a partially patent lumen within the varix. PMID:8169634

  10. Incidence of intravascular penetration in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Furman, Michael B; Giovanniello, Michael T; O'Brien, Erin M

    2003-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN A prospective, observational, human, study was conducted. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the incidence of vascular penetration during fluoroscopically guided, contrast-enhanced transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, and to determine whether the observation of blood in the needle hub can be used to predict a vascular injection. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA Incorrectly placed intravascular cervical spinal injections result in medication flow systemically and not to the desired target. A recently published study demonstrates a high incidence of intravascular injections in transforaminal lumbosacral epidural injections. No studies so far have evaluated the incidence of vascular injections in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, nor have they calculated the ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict a vascular injection in the cervical spine.METHODS The incidence of fluoroscopically confirmed intravascular uptake of contrast was prospectively observed in 337 patients treated with cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections. The ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict intravascular injection was also investigated. For each subject, the injection level was chosen on the basis of the clinical scenario including history, physical examination, and review of imaging studies. Some patients had multilevel injections. Using fluoroscopic guidance, the authors placed a 25-gauge needle into the epidural space using a transforaminal approach according to accepted standard technique. Needle tip location was confirmed with biplanar imaging. The presence or absence of blood in the needle hub spontaneously ("flash") and after attempted aspiration by pulling back on the syringe's plunger was documented. Contrast then was injected under real-time fluoroscopy to determine whether the location of the needle tip was intravascular. The results were recorded in a prospective manner indicating the presence or absence of blood

  11. Acoustic puncture assist device: A novel technique to identify the epidural space

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mokaddam, MA; Al-Harbi, MK; El-Jandali, ST; Al-Zahrani, TA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD) is designed to detect and signal the loss of resistance during the epidural procedure. We aimed to evaluate this device in terms of successful identification of the epidural space and the incidence of accidental dural puncture. Patients and Methods: Following Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent obtained from all patients, 200 adult patients (107 males) American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III who underwent lower limb orthopedic surgery under lumbar epidural anesthesia using APAD were enrolled in the study. APAD system was connected to the epidural needle using normal saline prefilled extension tube. Numbers of successful epidural attempts and accidental dural tap were documented. Results: The mean values of the depth of epidural space and the time to perform epidural puncture were 5.8 ± 1.0 cm and 3.3 ± 1.4 min, respectively. In 63% of patients, epidural puncture was successful from the first attempt and in 1% it was successful from the fourth attempt. Epidural anesthesia by APAD was successful in 198 cases (99 %). Dural tap occurred in 2 cases (1%). Conclusions: Using APAD, the success of identifying the epidural space was high and reliable. PMID:27051369

  12. Comparison of the analgesic effect of patient-controlled oxycodone and fentanyl for pain management in patients undergoing colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyeo-Woon; Kang, Hyeon-Wook; Park, Chan-Hye; Choi, Byung-Hyun; Bang, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Soo-Han; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Byung-Moon; Noh, Gyu-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist and is generally indicated for the relief of moderate to severe pain. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of patient-controlled oxycodone and fentanyl for postoperative pain in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. Patients scheduled to undergo elective colorectal surgery (n=82) were allocated to receive oxycodone (n=41, concentration of 1 mg/mL) or fentanyl (n=41, concentration of 15 μg/mL) for postoperative pain management. After the operation, pain using a numerical rating scale (NRS), delivery to demand ratio, infused dose of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), side effects, and sedation levels were evaluated. Median (25%-75%) cumulative PCA dose of oxycodone group at 48 hours (66.9, 58.4-83.7 mL) was significantly less than that of fentanyl group (80.0, 63.4-103.3 mL, P=.037). Six hours after surgery, the mean (SD) NRS scores of the oxycodone and fentanyl groups were 6.2 (2.4) and 6.8 (1.9), respectively (P=.216). The mean equianalgesic potency ratio of oxycodone to fentanyl was 55:1. The groups did not differ in postoperative nausea, vomiting, and level of sedation. Patient-controlled oxycodone provides similar effects for pain relief compared to patient-controlled fentanyl in spite of less cumulative PCA dose. Based on these results, oxycodone can be a useful alternative to fentanyl for PCA in patients after colorectal surgery. PMID:27128496

  13. Dose response study of subarachnoid diamorphine for analgesia after elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Skilton, R W; Kinsella, S M; Smith, A; Thomas, T A

    1999-10-01

    Subarachnoid diamorphine provides excellent analgesia after elective caesarean section but the optimum dose is still uncertain. We therefore investigated the effects of three regimens of subarachnoid diamorphine. Forty parturients were assigned to one of four groups. A control group received no diamorphine in their subarachnoid bupivacaine and three study groups received 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg or 0.3 mg diamorphine added to 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% in a semi-blind randomised design study. All women received a 100 mg diclofenac suppository at the end of the caesarean section and were provided with morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively. The patients were assessed for pain, morphine usage and side-effects at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h after the subarachnoid injection. Postoperative visual analogue scores for pain and PCA morphine consumption were significantly lower, and mean time to first use of morphine was significantly longer in the 0.3 mg diamorphine group. The mean (SD) dose of PCA morphine used over 24 h was 39.4 (14.7), 25.6 (16.5), 21.6 (15.9) and 3.1 (3.6) mg, and mean time to first use of morphine was 1.6 (0.5), 3.0 (1.4), 3.4 (2.4) and 14.1 (9.4) h, in the 0, 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg and 0.3 mg groups respectively. Side-effects of pruritus, nausea and vomiting were dependent on the dose of spinal diamorphine but did not require treatment in any patients. We conclude that 0.3 mg subarachnoid diamorphine provides significantly better postoperative pain relief than the smaller doses with an acceptable increase in side-effects. PMID:15321116

  14. Analgesic and motor effects of a high-volume intercoccygeal epidural injection of 0.125% or 0.0625% bupivacaine in adult cows

    PubMed Central

    Rioja, Eva; Rubio-Martínez, Luis M.; Monteith, Gabrielle; Kerr, Carolyn L.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the analgesic and motor effects of a high-volume intercoccygeal epidural injection of bupivacaine at 2 concentrations in cows. A prospective, randomized, blinded, crossover trial was conducted on 6 adult cows. An indwelling epidural catheter was placed in the first intercoccygeal space and advanced 10 cm cranially. All the cows received 3 treatments with a washout period of 48 h: saline (control), 0.125% bupivacaine (high dose), or 0.0625% bupivacaine (low dose), at a final volume of 0.15 mL per kilogram of body weight, infused manually into the epidural space over a period of 15 min. The anal and tail tone and motor deficits of the pelvic limbs were evaluated in 5 of the cows with use of a numerical rating scale and a visual analogue scale (VAS). Sensory block was assessed in 4 of the cows by the response to needle pricks in different regions with the use of a VAS. Measurements were obtained before and at different time points after injection, up to 360 min. Analysis of variance for repeated measures and post-hoc Tukey’s and Dunnett’s tests were used. Differences were considered significant when the P-value was ≤ 0.05. One cow became recumbent 6 h after injection. Anal and tail tones were significantly decreased and motor deficits of the pelvic limbs were significantly increased after bupivacaine treatment compared with control treatment. The overall mean VASpain scores ± standard deviation were 66 ± 8 after control treatment, 52 ± 5 after low-dose bupivacaine treatment, and 43 ± 5 after high-dose bupivacaine treatment. The pain scores were significantly lower in caudal regions up to the saphenous nerve after high-dose bupivacaine treatment compared with control treatment and significantly lower in the anus, vulva, and tail after low-dose bupivacaine treatment compared with control treatment. Thus, analgesia with moderate motor deficits of the pelvic limbs may be obtained with 0.125% bupivacaine administered

  15. Caudal epidural steroid injection: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Murakibhavi, V. G.; Khemka, Aditya G.

    2011-01-01

    Study design: Prospective study. Study rationale: A recurrent phenomenon, the lifetime prevalence of low back pain has been reported as 54%–80%, while annual prevalence ranges from 15%–45%.1 It is also associated with enormous economic, societal, and health impact.2 India, being a developing country, has its problem compounded by the occupational compulsions in parts of the rural areas.3 For some interventional therapies, like epidural steroid injections, utilization rates have increased dramatically.4,5,6,7,8,9 They have become one of the most commonly performed interventions in the United States for low back pain with radiculopathy.10 Clinical question: Multiple systematic reviews,11 a meta-analysis,12 several guidelines,13 health technology assessments by insurers, and local medical review policies and coverage decisions have been published. However, controversy continues regarding the effectiveness of epidural steroid injections. In addition three types of epidurals, namely interlaminar, transforaminal, and caudal, with variable results complicate the picture for practice of interventional pain management. The underlying mechanism of action of epidurally administered steroid and local anesthetic injections is still not well understood and compounds the problem.14 Objective: To evaluate and update the effects of caudal epidural injection in the management of chronic low back pain and sciatica. Final Class of evidence-treatment Yes Study design:  RCT •  Cohort  Case control  Case series Methods  Concealed allocation (RCT) •  Intention to treat (RCT) •  Blinded/independent evaluation of primary outcome •  F/U ≥ 85% •  Adequate sample size • Control for confounding Overall class of evidence II The definiton of the different classes of evidence is available here. PMID:23230402

  16. Microbiological and physicochemical stability of fentanyl and sufentanil solutions for patient-controlled delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Chapalain-Pargade, Sophie; Laville, Isabelle; Paci, Angelo; Chachaty, Elisabeth; Mercier, Lionel; Bourget, Philippe

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the microbiological and physicochemical stability of opioid solutions containing fentanyl or sufentanil and thereby determine the feasibility of extending the expiration dates after mixing. Five systems containing fentanyl or sufentanil solutions at 50 microg/mL in portable patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) systems were filled and stored at room temperature for 14 days. They were sampled immediately after preparation, at day 3, and each day of the following weeks. Microbiological stability was assessed by performing sterility tests. The physicochemical study was performed by determining aspect, pH, and osmolality evolution. All samples were tested for appearance, change in color, and loss of concentration using an analytical method. There was no significant change in pH and osmolality values of any solutions. No precipitation or change in color was observed in any of the sample solutions. There was no significant loss of fentanyl or sufentanil over 14 days (4.3% and 4.1%, respectively). This study indicates that both drug solutions in the PCA systems are stable for a minimum of 14 days at room temperature. PMID:16824989

  17. NOP receptor mediates anti-analgesia induced by agonist-antagonist opioids.

    PubMed

    Gear, R W; Bogen, O; Ferrari, L F; Green, P G; Levine, J D

    2014-01-17

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ∼90min after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J-113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  18. Multimodal Analgesia in the Hip Fracture Patient.

    PubMed

    Fabi, David W

    2016-05-01

    Hip fracture is one of the most common injuries among the elderly and, because the population is aging, it is expected to remain a major clinical challenge and public health problem for the foreseeable future. The clinical importance of early mobilization and prompt participation in physical therapy after hip fracture surgery is now widely recognized. Because postoperative pain can impair mobility and delay physical therapy, much attention is now being paid to finding more effective ways of controlling pain after hip fracture. Oversedation with opioid drugs inhibits communication between the patient and the health care team, can delay ambulation and rehabilitation therapy, and may increase the probability of the patient requiring a skilled nursing facility, which adds further cost to the overall health care system. Multiple pain pathways contribute to the perception of postoperative pain, and although opioids are highly effective in blocking nociceptive pain through inhibition of the mu receptors, they do not block other pain pathways. Multimodal analgesia involves the use of several anesthetic and analgesic modalities that are strategically combined to block pain perception at different sites in the peripheral and central nervous systems. This balanced, multifaceted approach provides more effective control of postoperative pain than opioid drugs alone, allows lower doses of opioids to be used as part of the multimodal regimen (thereby reducing the risk of opioid-related adverse events and complications), and may facilitate more rapid recovery and improve certain outcome measures related to recovery time. One prospective randomized study evaluating the clinical value of multimodal pain management in elderly patients undergoing bipolar hip hemiarthroplasty found that a multimodal regimen, including preemptive pain medication and intraoperative periarticular injections, reduced pain on postoperative days 1 and 4, and reduced overall opioid use. This article describes

  19. The neuroanatomy of sexual dimorphism in opioid analgesia.

    PubMed

    Loyd, Dayna R; Murphy, Anne Z

    2014-09-01

    The influence of sex has been neglected in clinical studies on pain and analgesia, with the vast majority of research conducted exclusively in males. However, both preclinical and clinical studies indicate that males and females differ in both the anatomical and physiological composition of central nervous system circuits that are involved in pain processing and analgesia. These differences influence not only the response to noxious stimuli, but also the ability of pharmacological agents to modify this response. Morphine is the most widely prescribed opiate for the alleviation of persistent pain in the clinic; however, it is becoming increasingly clear that morphine is less potent in women compared to men. This review highlights recent research identifying neuroanatomical and physiological dimorphisms underlying sex differences in pain and opioid analgesia, focusing on the endogenous descending pain modulatory circuit. PMID:24731947

  20. The Neuroanatomy of Sexual Dimorphism in Opioid Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Loyd, Dayna R.; Murphy, Anne Z.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of sex has been neglected in clinical studies on pain and analgesia, with the vast majority of research conducted exclusively in males. However, both preclinical and clinical studies indicate that males and females differ in both the anatomical and physiological composition of central nervous system circuits that are involved in pain processing and analgesia. These differences influence not only the response to noxious stimuli, but also the ability of pharmacological agents to modify this response. Morphine is the most widely prescribed opiate for the alleviation of persistent pain in the clinic; however, it is becoming increasingly clear that morphine is less potent in women compared to men. This review highlights recent research identifying neuroanatomical and physiological dimorphisms underlying sex differences in pain and opioid analgesia, focusing on the endogenous descending pain modulatory circuit. PMID:24731947

  1. Liposomal extended-release bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Mark; O’Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    When physicians consider which analgesia to use postsurgery, the primary goal is to relieve pain with minimal adverse side effects. Bupivacaine, a commonly used analgesic, has been formulated into an aqueous suspension of multivesicular liposomes that provide long-lasting analgesia for up to 72 hours, while avoiding the adverse side effects of opioids. The increased efficacy of liposomal extended-release bupivacaine, compared to bupivacaine hydrochloride, has promoted its usage in a variety of surgeries including hemorrhoidectomy, bunionectomy, inguinal hernia repair, total knee arthroplasty, and augmentation mammoplasty. However, like other bupivacaine formulations, the liposomal extended-release bupivacaine does have some side effects. In this brief review, we provide an update of the current knowledge in the use of bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia. PMID:24043932

  2. CLASSICAL CONDITIONING AND PAIN: CONDITIONED ANALGESIA AND HYPERALGESIA

    PubMed Central

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity. PMID:24269884

  3. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by subanesthetic doses of pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L; Misra, A L

    1985-03-01

    Pentobarbital pretreatment reportedly either inhibits, enhances or has no effect on morphine analgesia. The effect of subanesthetic doses of sodium pentobarbital (8-12 mg kg-1, SC) delivered via a delivery system on analgesia of morphine (5 mg kg-1, SC or 1 mg kg-1, IV) acutely administered 45 min after the sodium pentobarbital pellet implantation was assessed using the warm water (55 degrees C)-induced tail-withdrawal reflex in male Wistar rats. Significant potentiation of morphine analgesia was observed in sodium pentobarbital as compared to the placebo-pelleted animals. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors were not involved in this potentiation, which was possibly due to the activation of the descending inhibitory control pathways of nociceptive spinal tail-withdrawal reflex by a combined interaction of two drugs at spinal and supraspinal sites of action, that mediate opiate antinociception. PMID:3991755

  4. Epidural buprenorphine or morphine for the relief of head and neck cancer pain.

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Y.; Utsumi, T.; Tanioka, H.; Rigor, B. M.

    1991-01-01

    We present three cases in which epidural buprenorphine or morphine was used for intractable cancer pain of the head and neck. Excellent pain relief and minimal side effects offered by epidural opioids were of significant benefit. The use of epidural opioids prior to the administration of high doses of oral morphine may be the treatment of choice for pain from malignancy of the head and neck, especially when there is tumor extension or distant metastasis. PMID:1811431

  5. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia and Recovery in Patients after Abdominal Hysterectomy: a Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain and stress response can lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia and recovery following abdominal hysterectomy surgeries. Sixty-four patients scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia were divided into two groups that were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score immediately after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post-surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine with patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had lower scores on a visual analogue scale (VAS) than their controls from the PRS group. The global 40-item quality of recovery questionnaire and 9-question fatigue severity score both showed higher recovery scores from day 3 after surgery in the PRD group. with the data are considered together, intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appeared to promote the analgesic properties of morphine-based PCA and to expedite recovery following surgery in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:26903197

  6. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia and Recovery in Patients after Abdominal Hysterectomy: a Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain and stress response can lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia and recovery following abdominal hysterectomy surgeries. Sixty-four patients scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia were divided into two groups that were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score immediately after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post-surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine with patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had lower scores on a visual analogue scale (VAS) than their controls from the PRS group. The global 40-item quality of recovery questionnaire and 9-question fatigue severity score both showed higher recovery scores from day 3 after surgery in the PRD group. with the data are considered together, intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appeared to promote the analgesic properties of morphine-based PCA and to expedite recovery following surgery in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:26903197

  7. Spinal osteotomy in the presence of massive lumbar epidural scarring.

    PubMed

    Arlet, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The combination of Massive epidural scarring and spinal deformity represents the ultimate challenge for the spinal deformity surgeon. This is observed more and more as the population is aging and the number of spine surgery is increasing. In assessing the patient with spinal deformity and epidural scarring, one should carry out a thorough medical work up including Dexa scan, comorbidities, and in most cases a Myelo-CT scan that will identify the extent of the previous fusion, the fixed or semi-rigid nature of the deformity with complete anterior fusion or only bone bridges, the evaluation of the previous instrumentation (if present) with possible screw misplacement, or halo around the screws, the extent of the previous laminectomy, the spinal stenosis and possible arachnoiditis and or meningocele. Once the requirement of deformity correction has been established with specific attention to the pelvic incidence and amount of lordosis required two basic choices can be made. The first one is to perform the spine realignment outside the massive epidural scarring whether this will be performed through simple posterior osteotomies, TLIF combined with Smith-Petersen osteotomies or Pedicle subtraction osteotomies. One should not forget about all the possibilities of an anterior or lateral approach to the spine that can also judiciously realign the spine at the level or at distance of the massive epidural scarring. These anterior realignments have to be supplemented with posterior fixation and or osteotomies. The other alternative is to perform the spine osteotomy at the level of the massive epidural scarring preferably at the junction of normal dura and epidural scar. Working around the dura that will require to be thinned down before the osteotomy is performed represents another challenge where incidental durotomies are not infrequent. During the closing of the osteotomy the dura may not be as giving as a normal dura and too aggressive closure of the osteotomy may not be

  8. DHEA administration modulates stress-induced analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Cecconello, Ana Lúcia; Torres, Iraci L S; Oliveira, Carla; Zanini, Priscila; Niches, Gabriela; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques

    2016-04-01

    An important aspect of adaptive stress response is the pain response suppression that occurs during or following stress exposure, which is often referred to as acute stress-induced analgesia. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) participates in the modulation of adaptive stress response, changing the HPA axis activity. The effect of DHEA on the HPA axis activity is dependent on the state and uses the same systems that participate in the regulation of acute stress-induced analgesia. The impact of DHEA on nociception has been studied; however, the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia is not known. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia and determine the best time for hormone administration in relation to exposure to stressor stimulus. The animals were stressed by restraint for 1h in a single exposure and received treatment with DHEA by a single injection before the stress or a single injection after the stress. Nociception was assessed with a tail-flick apparatus. Serum corticosterone levels were measured. DHEA administered before exposure to stress prolonged the acute stress-induced analgesia. This effect was not observed when the DHEA was administered after the stress. DHEA treatment in non-stressed rats did not alter the nociceptive threshold, suggesting that the DHEA effect on nociception is state-dependent. The injection of DHEA had the same effect as exposure to acute stress, with both increasing the levels of corticosterone. In conclusion, acute treatment with DHEA mimics the response to acute stress indexed by an increase in activity of the HPA axis. The treatment with DHEA before stress exposure may facilitate adaptive stress response, prolonging acute stress-induced analgesia, which may be a therapeutic strategy of interest to clinics. PMID:26852948

  9. Histopathological Alterations after Single Epidural Injection of Ropivacaine, Methylprednizolone Acetate, or Contrast Material in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsou, Maria-Chrysanthi; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Demetrios; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Kelekis, Alexis

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The consequences from the injection of different types of drugs in the epidural space remains unknown. Increasing evidence suggests that localized inflammation, fibrosis, and arachnoiditis can complicate sequential epidural blockades, or even epidural contrast injection. We investigate the in vivo effect of epidural injections in the epidural space in an animal model. Materials and Methods: A group of ten male adult pigs, five punctures to each at distinct vertebral interspaces under general anesthesia, were examined, testing different drugs, used regularly in the epidural space (iopamidol, methylprednisolone acetate, ropivacaine). Each site was marked with a percutaneous hook wire marker. Histological analysis of the epidural space, the meninges, and the underlying spinal cord of the punctured sites along with staining for caspase-3 followed 20 days later. Results: The epidural space did not manifest adhesions or any other pathology, and the outer surface of the dura was not impaired in any specimen. The group that had the contrast media injection showed a higher inflammation response compared to the other groups (P = 0.001). Positive staining for caspase-3 was limited to <5% of neurons with all substances used. Conclusion: No proof of arachnoiditis and/or fibrosis was noted in the epidural space with the use of the above-described drugs. A higher inflammation rate was noted with the use of contrast media.

  10. Accuracy of pulse oximeter perfusion index in thoracic epidural anesthesia under basal general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zifeng; Zhang, Jianhai; Xia, Yunfei; Deng, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the change of PVI after thoracic epidural block on the basis of general anesthesia. Methods: In 26 patients undergoing elective upper abdominal operations, changes of SVI, PVI, SVV, PPV and CVP were monitored immediately before and 10 minutes after T8-9 thoracic epidural anesthesia on the basis of general anesthesia. The definition was that patients with ΔSVI greater than 10% belonged to response group to epidural block. Results: Before epidural block, the PVI, SVV and PPV baseline values in patients of response group were significantly higher than those in patients of non-response group. PVI, SVV and PPV after epidural block were significantly higher than immediately before epidural block (P < 0.001). PVI, SVV and PPV baseline values immediately before epidural block were positively correlated with ΔSVI; the correlation coefficients were 0.70, 0.71 and 0.63, respectively, P ≤ 0.001. The optimal critical values for PVI, SVV and PPV to predict response to T8-9 gap epidural block under general anesthesia were 16% (sensitivity 80%, specificity 92%), 13% (sensitivity 90%, specificity 62%) and 12% (sensitivity 90%, specificity 77%), respectively. Conclusion: PVI can be used as a noninvasive indictor to monitor volume change after thoracic epidural block on the basis of general anesthesia. PMID:25126171

  11. [Involuntary Movement of Bilateral Lower Limbs Caused by Epidural Anesthesia: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Toki, Keiko; Yokose, Masashi; Miyashita, Tetsuya; Sato, Hitoshi; Fujimoto, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Sayoko; Goto, Takahisa

    2016-06-01

    Regional anesthesia, especially epidural anesthesia, rarely causes involuntary movement Here we present a case of a patient who demonstrated myoclonus-like involuntary movement of the lower limbs during continuous infusion of ropivacaine, fentanyl, and droperidol through the thoracic epidural catheter. This movement disappeared when the epidural infusion was stopped, but reappeared when the epidural infusion was restarted. Naloxone did not eliminate the movement The patient was thereafter discharged uneventfully. This case and other reports in the literature suggest that involuntary movement associated with regional anesthesia is rare and self-limiting. However, careful consideration should be given to exclude other, potentially dangerous complications. PMID:27483662

  12. Nitrous oxide/oxygen analgesia in emergency care.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, K D; Culver, D; Prno, J M

    1980-01-01

    A method of analgesia relatively new to North American emergency care involves the use of a homogeneous gas composed of 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen (Entonox). The gas is administered by the patient, who holds the Entonox apparatus mask to his face and triggers gas flow by exerting negative inspiratory pressure (-1 cm. H(2)O). Worthwhile analgesia (i.e. marked or partial pain relief) was achieved in 95% of 110 emergency department patients experiencing significant pain from various sources. PMID:21297843

  13. Nitrous Oxide/Oxygen Analgesia In Emergency Care

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Kent D. L.; Culver, Denis; Prno, John M.

    1980-01-01

    A method of analgesia relatively new to North American emergency care involves the use of a homogeneous gas composed of 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen (Entonox). The gas is administered by the patient, who holds the Entonox apparatus mask to his face and triggers gas flow by exerting negative inspiratory pressure (−1 cm. H2O). Worthwhile analgesia (i.e. marked or partial pain relief) was achieved in 95% of 110 emergency department patients experiencing significant pain from various sources. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:21297843

  14. [Spinal epidural abscess as a complication of a finger infection].

    PubMed

    Ridderikhof, M L; van den Brink, W A; van Dalsen, A D; Kieft, H

    2008-06-21

    An 81-year-old man was treated with intravenous antibiotics for a soft tissue infection in a finger. Despite adequate antibiotic treatment, he developed signs of spinal cord injury caused by a cervical spinal epidural abscess. An emergency laminectomy was performed. The neurological impairment appeared to be irreversible, and the patient died. Spinal epidural abscess is a rare and serious complication ofa bacteraemia. It is often caused by an infection of the skin or soft tissue with Staphylococcus aureus. Given the risk of rapidly progressive and irreversible neurological damage, this complication must be treated as soon as possible. The treatment of choice is surgery. Conservative management with intravenous antibiotics is an option only under strict conditions. PMID:18624007

  15. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Isolated to the Thoracic Epidural Spine.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Benjamin; Talbott, Jason; Uzelac, Alina; Rehani, Bhavya

    2015-11-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare benign histiocytic disease that infrequently presents in the spine. We report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease isolated to the epidural thoracic spine in a 26-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the 15th reported case of isolated spinal disease and only the fourth case of isolated thoracic epidural disease. Given its rarity as well as non-specific symptoms and imaging findings, Rosai-Dorfman disease is often not considered and misdiagnosed on imaging studies. To help improve awareness of Rosai-Dorfman spinal disease, we review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. PMID:27252790

  16. Spontaneous spinal epidural hemorrhage from intense piano playing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Ju; Su, Fang Jy; Huang, Ying C; Chen, Shih-Han

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare but real neurosurgical emergency. It is caused by atraumatic rupture of the vertebral epidural vein that results in nerve root or spinal cord compression. Most cases of SSEH have a multifactorial etiology, including congenital and acquired coagulopathies; platelet dysfunction; vascular malformation; tumors; uncontrolled hypertension; pregnancy; and, very rarely, activities requiring Valsalva. Herein we reported the case of a young pianist who was attacked by SSEH during piano practice. Playing the piano is a joyful, relaxing entertainment; however, this musical activity can be a highly demanding physical and mental exercise for pianists. Emotional and expressive performance, especially in professional performing, has been reported to result in significant increase of sympathetic and decrease of parasympathetic activities and thus influence the cardiorespiratory variables. The increased biomechanical stress from fluctuating hemodynamics was thought to trigger the rupture of her spinal arteriovenous malformation. PMID:24418452

  17. The topographical anatomy of the lumbar epidural space.

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, I G; Harrison, G R

    1985-01-01

    Although clinically important, the lumbar epidural space is inconsistently described in textbooks of both anatomy and anaesthetics. This anatomical study of twelve cadavers was performed in an attempt to clarify the description of this region. The dura mater, which possesses a midline fold in a very few cases, is apposed to the walls of the vertebral canal, and attached to them by connective tissue, which is sufficient to allow for displacement of the dural sac during movement of the spine and venous engorgement. Between the dura mater and the vertebral canal is a thin layer of areolar tissue. This contains the internal vertebral venous plexus and a posterior deposit of fat which lies in a recess between the ligamenta flava. These findings are discussed in relation to previous studies in an attempt to arrive at a cohesive description of the epidural region. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:4077717

  18. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Isolated to the Thoracic Epidural Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Benjamin; Talbott, Jason; Uzelac, Alina; Rehani, Bhavya

    2015-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare benign histiocytic disease that infrequently presents in the spine. We report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease isolated to the epidural thoracic spine in a 26-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the 15th reported case of isolated spinal disease and only the fourth case of isolated thoracic epidural disease. Given its rarity as well as non-specific symptoms and imaging findings, Rosai-Dorfman disease is often not considered and misdiagnosed on imaging studies. To help improve awareness of Rosai-Dorfman spinal disease, we review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. PMID:27252790

  19. Complete nonsurgical resolution of a spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Silber, S H

    1996-07-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas (SSEH) are heralded by spinal pain and progressive cord compression syndromes which may lead to permanent neurological disability or death if emergent neurosurgical intervention is delayed. It therefore must be considered early in the differential diagnosis of acute spinal cord compression syndrome. A case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma presenting as an acute myelopathy in a clarinet player who chronically used a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication is presented. The case was remarkable for the rare complete spontaneous resolution of neurological function. Approximately 250 cases of SSEH have been reported in the medical literature, although only a handful of these patients have recovered spontaneously. This is the sixth report of such an event. The etiologies, contributing factors, disease progression, and treatment recommendations are discussed. PMID:8768163

  20. Lumbar spine osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Godhania, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with no previous medical history presented with abdominal and low back pain. Based on clinical and radiological findings he was diagnosed with L1/L2 osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Further history taking revealed recent use of acupuncture for treatment of mechanical back pain. The patient was treated conservatively with an extended course of antibiotics, monitored with repeat MRI scans and had a full recovery with no neurological deficit. This is the first reported case of epidural abscess formation and osteomyelitis after acupuncture in the UK. As acupuncture becomes more commonly used in western countries, it is important to be aware of this rare but serious complication. PMID:26976275

  1. Transient bladder and fecal incontinence following epidural blood patch

    PubMed Central

    Palomero-Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; Palacio-Abinzada, Francisco J.; Campollo, Sara Chacón; Laporta-Báez, Yolanda; Mendez Cendón, Jose Carlos; López-García, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Epidural blood patch (EBP) is the currently accepted treatment of choice for postdural puncture headache because of its high initial success rates and infrequent complications. Many authors recommended a small volume (10-20 mL) of blood to be delivered for an effective EBP. Here, we report an obstetric patient who developed a transient bladder and fecal incontinence after 19 mL of blood EBP at L1 -L2 level. Since the magnetic resonance image did not demonstrate any definitive spinal cord lesion, the exact mechanism remains unclear. We suggest that accumulation of blood performed at L1 to L2 level in a closed relationship with the sacral cord, may have trigger a significant pressure elevation of the epidural space at this level, resulting in a temporal spinal cord-related injury in the sacral cord. PMID:26543470

  2. Comparison of relative oxycodone consumption in surgical pleth index-guided analgesia versus conventional analgesia during sevoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Ju; Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, So Hyun; Park, Sangwoo; Kim, Heezoo; Lee, Il Ok; Kong, Myoung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The surgical pleth index (SPI) is proposed for titration of analgesic drugs during general anesthesia. Several reports have investigated the effect of SPI on the consumption of opioids including remifentanil, fentanyl, and sufentanil during anesthesia, but there are no reports about oxycodone. We aimed to investigate intravenous oxycodone consumption between SPI-guided analgesia and conventional analgesia practices during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Methods: Forty-five patients undergoing elective thyroidectomy were randomly assigned to an SPI group (SPI-guided analgesia group, n = 23) or a control group (conventional analgesia group, n = 22). Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane to achieve bispectral index values between 40 and 60. In the SPI group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at SPI values over 50; in the control group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at the occurrence of tachycardia or hypertension event. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption and extubation time were recorded. The number of hemodynamic and somatic movement events was recorded, as were postoperative pain and recovery scores. Results: Patients’ characteristics were comparable between the groups. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption in the SPI group was significantly lower than the control group (3.5 ± 2.4 vs 5.1 ± 2.4 mg; P = 0.012). Extubation time was significantly shorter in the SPI group (10.6 ± 3.5 vs 13.4 ± 4.6 min; P = 0.026). Hemodynamic and somatic movement events during anesthesia were comparable between the groups, as were numeric rating scales for pain and modified Aldrete scores at postanesthesia care unit. Conclusions: SPI-guided analgesia reduces intravenous oxycodone consumption and extubation time compared with conventional analgesia based on clinical parameters during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. PMID:27583920

  3. Salmonella typhimurium epidural empyema in an HIV-infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Hachfi, Wissem; Bellazreg, Foued; Ladib, Mohamed; Kaabia, Naoufel; Khalifa, Mabrouk; Krifa, Hedi; Letaief, Amel

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella focal intracranial infections are reported rarely. They tend to occur in immunocompromised patients. We present here a case of Salmonella typhimurium epidural empyema, with osteomyelitis of the adjacent frontal bone, in a 37-year-old human immunodeficiency virus positive man who presented with a three-day history of headache, fever, and sweats. He was treated successfully with antibiotics and surgical drainage. PMID:24470883

  4. Subdural Hematoma as a Consequence of Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tracy M.; Elsayed, Kareem S.; Kane, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Regional spinal and epidural anesthesia are used commonly in operative procedures. While the most frequent complication, postdural puncture headache (PDPH), is a clinically diagnosed positional headache that is usually self-limited, subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a potentially fatal complication that cannot be missed. We report a case of an otherwise healthy female who presented with persistent positional headache and was ultimately found to have a large subdural hematoma with midline shift requiring surgical evacuation. PMID:26697237

  5. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Prostatic Small Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Solitary, spinal epidural metastasis (SEM) that is not related to vertebral metastasis is very rare. And solitary SEM from prostatic cancer is rarely found in previously published reports. However, it is clinically significant due to the possibility of neurologic dysfunction, and it can be assessed by MRI. In this report, we show a case of solitary SEM arising from prostatic small cell carcinoma detected by MRI. PMID:27413569

  6. Evaluation of the Neurological Safety of Epidural Milnacipran in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung Mo; Shin, Mee Ran; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kang, Hyun; Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Kim, Baek Hui; Lim, Young Jin; Lee, Sang Chul

    2012-01-01

    Background Milnacipran is a balanced serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor with minimal side effects and broad safety margin. It acts primarily on the descending inhibitory pain pathway in brain and spinal cord. In many animal studies, intrathecal administration of milnacipran is effective in neuropathic pain management. However, there is no study for the neurological safety of milnacipran when it is administered neuraxially. This study examined the neurotoxicity of epidural milnacipran by observing behavioral and sensory-motor changes with histopathological examinations of spinal cords in rats. Methods Sixty rats were divided into 3 groups, with each group receiving epidural administration of either 0.3 ml (3 mg) of milnacipran (group M, n = 20), 0.3 ml of 40% alcohol (group A, n = 20), or 0.3 ml of normal saline (group S, n = 20). Results There were no abnormal changes in the behavioral, sensory-motor, or histopathological findings in all rats of groups M and S over a 3-week observation period, whereas all rats in group A had abnormal changes. Conclusions Based on these findings, the direct epidural administration of milnacipran in rats did not present any evidence of neurotoxicity in behavioral, sensory-motor and histopathological evaluations. PMID:23091683

  7. Efficacy of continuous epidural block in acute herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo Na; Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Eung Don

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate efficacy of continuous epidural block for prevent postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) progression in cases of acute herpes zoster with severe pain and also to identify predictive factors for PHN in such conditions. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of patients with herpes zoster who underwent continuous epidural block between March 2013 and October 2015. Time points were set as 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after zoster onset. PHN was defined as the presence of pain with NRS ≥3 at certain time points. The incidence of developing PHN was 38.1%, 27.0%, and 19.0% 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after zoster onset, respectively. Age and duration of catheterization were predictive factors for PHN at 1 month. Age, duration of catheterization, and NRS at first visit were identified as predictive factors for PHN at 3 months. Presence of diabetes, duration of catheterization, and NRS during catheterization were significant predictive factors for PHN at 6 months. The incidence of PHN is higher in zoster patients with severe pain that requires continuous epidural block compared to incidence in the general population. Advanced age and severe initial pain intensity were predictive factors of PHN development. Prolonged catheterization resulting from weak response to treatment strongly suggested progression to PHN. PMID:27512887

  8. The use of combined spinal-epidural technique to compare intrathecal ziconotide and epidural opioids for trialing intrathecal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Amitabh; Loh, Jeffrey; Puttanniah, Vinay; Malhotra, Vivek

    2013-03-01

    SUMMARY Choosing the initial medications for intrathecal delivery is often confusing and not standardized. We describe a novel way for using a combined spinal-epidural technique to compare two first-line medications for intrathecal delivery; ziconotide and morphine (or hydromorphone). Five patients with intractable chronic or cancer pain were elected to have an intrathecal drug delivery system implanted for pain management. Each patient was given a 3-day inpatient trial with the combined spinal-epidural technique. The Visual Analog Scale, Numerical Rating Scale, short-term McGill questionnaire and opioid consumption were monitored daily. The results were used to develop a paradigm to describe how ziconotide can be used in practice. PMID:24645996

  9. [Ropivacaine 1% versus bupivacaine 0.75% without a vasoconstrictor. A comparative study of epidural anesthesia in orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Niesel, H C; Eilingsfeld, T; Hornung, M; Kaiser, H

    1993-09-01

    The long-acting local anaesthetic agent ropivacaine, S(-)-1-propyl-2',6'-pipecoloxylidid, is characterised by lower lipid solubility and lower cardiotoxicity compared with bupivacaine. This study was designed to evaluate its clinical efficacy and motor blocking properties when using lower volumes and higher concentrations of both plain substances. METHODS. In a randomised, double-blind study plain ropivacaine (ro) 1% (150 mg) and bupivacaine (bu) 0.75% (112.5 mg) were compared in 44 patients. In the lateral position, epidural anaesthesia was performed at L2/3 or L3/4 using the loss-of-resistance technique. A test dose of 3 ml was given followed by 12 ml (total volume 15 ml). Sensory blockade was registered by the pin-prick method after 2 min at 5-min intervals up to maximal levels and after the operation at 30-min intervals. Simultaneously, the motor block was determined by means of the Bromage scale. Results are given as median values. RESULTS. The onset of analgesia was 6.0 min for both substances (L2), the time to level L5 16.0 and 17.0 min, respectively. The median maximum upper level of sensory analgesia was achieved after 24.5 min with ro (Th 5) and after 21.0 min (Th 7) with bu. The maximum durations (regression to L2) were 321.5 (ro) and 266.0 min (bu) (P < 0.05). Times for 2-segment regression were comparable at 177.5 and 176.0 min, respectively, and for 4-segment regression at 201.3 and 222.0 min. Twenty-one of the 22 patients developed a first-degree motor block (latency 15 and 12 min); 16 patients in the ro group developed a second-degree block, as did 14 in the bu group (latency 24 and 22 min). Third-degree motor block was recorded in 3 patients (latency 45 and 38 min). The duration of first-degree motor block was 233 min and 207 min, of second-degree block 150 and 155 min, and third-degree block 135 min in both groups. The mean arterial pressures and heart rates did not differ. The diastolic pressures were lower after bu (-8.3%) than after ro (-0

  10. Mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia for clinical and experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland; Price, Donald D

    2006-05-01

    There is convincing evidence that acupuncture (AP) is effective for the treatment of postoperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, as well as postoperative dental pain. Less convincing data support AP's efficacy for chronic pain conditions, including headache, fibromyalgia and low back pain. There is no evidence that AP is effective in treating addiction, insomnia, obesity, asthma or stroke deficits. AP seems to be efficacious for alleviating experimental pain by increasing pain thresholds in human subjects and it appears to activate analgesic brain mechanisms through the release of neurohumoral factors, some of which can be inhibited by the opioid antagonist naloxone. In contrast to placebo analgesia, AP-related pain relief takes some time to develop and to resolve. Furthermore, repetitive use of AP analgesia can result in tolerance that demonstrates cross-tolerance with morphine. However, it appears that not all forms of AP are equally effective for providing analgesia. In particular, electro-AP seems to best deliver stimuli that activate powerful opioid and nonopioid analgesic mechanisms. Thus, future carefully controlled clinical trials using adequate electro-AP may be able to provide the necessary evidence for relevant analgesia in chronic pain conditions, such as headache, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and low back pain. PMID:16734514

  11. Analgesia and sedation for children undergoing burn wound care.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Ahmad; Ramaiah, Ramesh; Bhananker, Sanjay M

    2010-11-01

    Standard care of burn wounds consists of cleaning and debridement (removing devitalized tissue), followed by daily dressing changes. Children with burns undergo multiple, painful and anxiety-provoking procedures during wound care and rehabilitation. The goal of procedural sedation is safe and efficacious management of pain and emotional distress, requiring a careful and systematic approach. Achieving the best results needs understanding of the mechanisms of pain and the physiologic changes in burn patients, frequent evaluation and assessment of pain and anxiety, and administration of suitable pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies. Pharmacological therapies provide the backbone of analgesia and sedation for procedural pain management. Opioids provide excellent pain control, but they must be administered judiciously due to their side effects. Sedative drugs, such as benzodiazepines and propofol, provide excellent sedation, but they must not be used as a substitute for analgesic drugs. Ketamine is increasingly used for analgesia and sedation in children as a single agent or an adjuvant. Nonpharmacological therapies such as virtual reality, relaxation, cartoon viewing, music, massage and hypnosis are necessary components of procedural sedation and analgesia for children. These can be combined with pharmacological techniques and are used to limit the use of drugs (and hence side effects), as well as to improve patient participation and satisfaction. In this article, we review the pathophysiologic changes associated with major thermal injury in children, the options available for sedation and analgesia for wound care procedures in these children and our institutional guidelines for procedural sedation. PMID:20977331

  12. Multimodal analgesia for perioperative pain in three cats.

    PubMed

    Steagall, Paulo V M; Monteiro-Steagall, Beatriz P

    2013-08-01

    Adequate pain relief is usually achieved with the simultaneous use of two or more different classes of analgesics, often called multimodal analgesia. The purpose of this article is to highlight the use of perioperative multimodal analgesia and the need to individualize the treatment plan based on the presenting condition, and to adjust it based on the response to analgesia for a given patient. This case series presents the alleviation of acute pain in three cats undergoing different major surgical procedures. These cases involved the administration of different classes of analgesic drugs, including opioids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tramadol, ketamine, gabapentin and local anesthetics. The rationale for the administration of analgesic drugs is discussed herein. Each case presented a particular challenge owing to the different cause, severity, duration and location of pain. Pain management is a challenging, but essential, component of feline practice: multimodal analgesia may minimize stress while controlling acute perioperative pain. Individual response to therapy is a key component of pain relief in cats. PMID:23382595

  13. Safety and efficacy of nurse-controlled analgesia in patients less than 1 year of age

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Hina; Tumin, Dmitry; Wrona, Sharon; Martin, David; Bhalla, Tarun; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of acute pain presents unique challenges in the younger pediatric population. Although patient-controlled devices are frequently used in patients ≥6 years of age, alternative modes of analgesic delivery are needed in infants. Objective To examine the safety and efficacy of nurse-controlled analgesia (NCA) in neonates less than 1 year of age. Methods Data from patients <1 year of age receiving NCA as ordered by the Acute Pain Service at our institution were collected over a 5-year period and reviewed retrospectively. The primary outcomes were activation of the institution’s Rapid Response Team (RRT) or Code Blue, signifying severe adverse events. Pain score after NCA initiation was a secondary outcome. Results Among 338 girls and 431 boys, the most common opioid used for NCA was fentanyl, followed by morphine and hydromorphone. There were 39 (5%) cases involving RRT or Code Blue activation, of which only one (Code Blue) was activated due to a complication of NCA (apnea). Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated morphine NCA to be associated with greater odds of RRT activation (OR=3.29, 95% CI=1.35, 8.03, P=0.009) compared to fentanyl NCA. There were no statistically significant differences in pain scores after NCA initiation across NCA agents. Conclusion NCA is safe in neonates and infants, with comparable efficacy demonstrated for the three agents used. The elevated incidence of RRT activation in patients receiving morphine suggests caution in its use and consideration of alternative agents in this population.

  14. Hydromyelia secondary to spinal epidural abscess. A case report.

    PubMed

    Saponiero, R; Toriello, A; Locatelli, G; Narciso, N; Posteraro, L; Panza, M P; Napoli, A N; Romano, F; Pugliese, N D

    2010-06-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare condition that can be fatal if untreated. Risk factors are immunocompromised states as well as spinal procedures including epidural anesthesia and spinal surgery. The signs and symptoms of SEA are nonspecific and can range from low back pain to sepsis. The treatment of choice is surgical decompression followed by four to six weeks of antibiotic therapy. The most common causative organism in SEA is staphylococcus aureus and spread is usually haematogenous or contiguous from psoas, paraspinal or retropharyngeal abscesses. The exact mechanism by which an epidural abscess causes spinal cord damage is unclear. In fact, the damage is often out of proportion to the degree of compression demonstrated radiologically. There is only a report of a patient with syrinx formation secondary to epidural abscess. We describe the case of a 48-year-old woman with a two-week history of thoracic back pain and evidence of dorsal SEA probably from contiguous psoas abscess. Neurological examination revealed flaccid paraplegia and loss of sphincter control. A spinal MRI scan with Gd-enhancement revealed focal high intensity signal in the T2-weighted and FLAIR images at the level of the vertebral bodies in segments D3-D11. The patient was treated with posterior decompression and drainage of the SEA, but with a poor outcome. Six weeks after the onset of symptoms, an MRI scan showed a newly-formed hydromyelia formation from D4 to D8. The case reported is the second to describe hydromyelia formation secondary to epidural abscess and a poor outcome, experiencing partial improvement without recovery. For this reason, we confirmed that the essential problem of SEA lies in the need for early diagnosis, because the early signs and symptoms may be vague and the "classic" triad of back pain, fever and variable neurological deficits occur in only 13% of patients by the time of diagnosis. Only timely treatment will avoid or reduce permanent neurological deficits

  15. Sensitivity of quantitative sensory models to morphine analgesia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brock, Christina; Sverrisdóttir, Eva; Larsen, Isabelle Myriam; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Opioid analgesia can be explored with quantitative sensory testing, but most investigations have used models of phasic pain, and such brief stimuli may be limited in the ability to faithfully simulate natural and clinical painful experiences. Therefore, identification of appropriate experimental pain models is critical for our understanding of opioid effects with the potential to improve treatment. Objectives The aim was to explore and compare various pain models to morphine analgesia in healthy volunteers. Methods The study was a double-blind, randomized, two-way crossover study. Thirty-nine healthy participants were included and received morphine 30 mg (2 mg/mL) as oral solution or placebo. To cover both tonic and phasic stimulations, a comprehensive multi-modal, multi-tissue pain-testing program was performed. Results Tonic experimental pain models were sensitive to morphine analgesia compared to placebo: muscle pressure (F=4.87, P=0.03), bone pressure (F=3.98, P=0.05), rectal pressure (F=4.25, P=0.04), and the cold pressor test (F=25.3, P<0.001). Compared to placebo, morphine increased tolerance to muscle stimulation by 14.07%; bone stimulation by 9.72%; rectal mechanical stimulation by 20.40%, and reduced pain reported during the cold pressor test by 9.14%. In contrast, the more phasic experimental pain models were not sensitive to morphine analgesia: skin heat, rectal electrical stimulation, or rectal heat stimulation (all P>0.05). Conclusion Pain models with deep tonic stimulation including C fiber activation and and/or endogenous pain modulation were more sensitive to morphine analgesia. To avoid false negative results in future studies, we recommend inclusion of reproducible tonic pain models in deep tissues, mimicking clinical pain to a higher degree. PMID:25525384

  16. A Case of Extensive Sacral Decubitus Ulcer Complicated by an Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Mai; Hiratsuka, Munehisa; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We herein report a 62-year-old man with an extensive sacral decubitus ulcer complicated by an epidural abscess. An epidural abscess is a rare disease, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a deep infection with decubitus. Moreover, the diagnosis may be late in such instances and should be carefully considered when a patient has paralysis.

  17. Epidural bleeding after ACL reconstruction under regional anaesthesia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Poultsides, Lazaros A; Gougoulias, Nikolaos E; Liakou, Paraskevi D; Karachalios, Theofilos S; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Epidural bleeding as a complication of catheterization or epidural catheter removal is often associated with perioperative thromboprophylaxis especially in adult reconstructive surgery. Case presentation We report on a case of a 19 years old male athlete that underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, receiving low molecular weight heparin for thromboprophylaxis and developed an epidural hematoma and subsequent cauda equina syndrome two days after removal of the epidural catheter. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed an epidural hematoma from the level of L3 to L4. Emergent decompression and hematoma evacuation resulted in patient's significant neurological improvement immediately postoperatively. Conclusion A high index of clinical suspicion and surgical intervention are necessary to prevent such potentially disabling complications especially after procedures on a day-case basis and early patient's discharge. PMID:19829853

  18. The C2 ganglion sectioning epidural approach to craniocervical junction chordoma: a technical case report.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Naoshi; Matsushima, Toshio; Kawashima, Masatou; Hikita, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In chordoma, complete surgical removal of the epidural tumor should be the first choice of treatment. Numerous surgical approaches to clival chordoma have been described: anterior approaches, lateral approaches, and posterolateral approaches. A multistaged operation with a combination of these approaches is generally performed. We used three approaches to remove a clival chordoma extending from the lower clivus anteriorly to the anterior perivertebral space and inferiorly to the C2 level. The epidural posterolateral approach through the vertebral artery (VA)-C2 interval space after resection of the C2 dorsal ganglion was the most effective. To our knowledge, the epidural posterolateral approach below VA, referred to as C2 ganglion sectioning epidural approach has not been reported as an independent approach in detail. We report a two-year-old girl with a lower clival chordoma which has been excised using C2 ganglion sectioning epidural approach. PMID:23287329

  19. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air. PMID:26885305

  20. An in vitro comparison of the electrical conducting properties of multiport versus single-port epidural catheters for the epidural stimulation test.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ban C H; Sze, Corey K C

    2005-11-01

    Effective conduction of electricity through a catheter is essential for the success of the epidural stimulation test. In this in vitro study we examined the electrical conductivity of single and multiport epidural catheters (with and without embedded metal elements) after being primed with normal saline. Seven different types of 19-gauge catheters (n = 5), either single-port or multiport catheters, with or without embedded metal elements, were studied. The proximal end of each epidural catheter was connected to the cathode of a nerve stimulator via an electrode adapter. The catheter, primed with normal saline, was placed at the bottom of a syringe filled with 5 different volumes of saline (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 mL) and attached to an electrode adapter. The voltage of the peripheral nerve stimulator was measured using an oscilloscope. The electrical resistance between the proximal and distal end of the catheter was calculated using Ohm's Law. In catheters without metal elements the electrical resistances were too high to be measured. In catheters that had metal elements, the mean electrical resistances of the same catheter design (single-port or multiport) were similar. However, the electrical resistances of the multiport metal reinforced epidural catheters were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than the single-port metal coil reinforced epidural catheters. The volume of saline in the syringe had no impact on the measured electrical resistances. This study suggests that multiport metal reinforced epidural catheters have low electrical resistances and, thus, are a reasonable alternative to single-port catheters for transmitting sufficient current for performing the epidural stimulation test. On the other hand, epidural catheters without metal elements (single-port or multiport) are not suitable for performing the stimulation test. PMID:16244025

  1. Patient-Controlled Transdermal Fentanyl Versus Intravenous Morphine Pump After Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Emily M; Milligan, Kenneth; Farmer, Ryan; Burger, Evalina L; Patel, Vikas V

    2015-09-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is regularly used to manage pain following major surgery. The fentanyl hydrochloride iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) was developed to overcome some of the limitations of intravenous (IV) PCA. The small, self-adhesive, needle-free disposable system is applied to the skin on the upper arm or chest and is controlled by patients clicking a button on the device. The authors identified patients who were underwent spinal surgery from 2 prior multicenter, randomized studies and analyzed their data. Of the 1296 patients in the original trials, 170 underwent spine surgery procedures: 90 were randomized to the fentanyl ITS (40 mcg/activation) and 80 to IV PCA morphine (1 mg/dose). More patients treated with the fentanyl ITS rated their method of pain control as "excellent" across all time points, but differences did not reach statistical significance. However, investigators' ratings of "excellent" satisfaction with study treatment were significantly higher for the fentanyl ITS. Discontinuation rates and overall adverse event rates were similar between groups. The only significant difference was that patients treated with the fentanyl ITS had a higher rate of application site reactions than infusion site reactions in the IV PCA morphine group; the reactions were typically mild-to-moderate erythema that resolved shortly after removal of the fentanyl ITS device and did not require further treatment. Ratings of satisfaction with pain control method were consistently higher for the fentanyl ITS than the IV PCA morphine. The 2 groups had a similar safety profile. These results suggest that the fentanyl ITS appears to be a safe, efficacious alternative to IV PCA in spine surgery patients. PMID:26375541

  2. Effects of high thoracic epidural anesthesia on mixed venous oxygen saturation in coronary artery bypass grafting surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gurses, Ercan; Berk, Derviş; Sungurtekin, Hülya; Mete, Asli; Serin, Simay

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate possible effects of high thoracic epidural anesthesia (HTEA) on mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) in coronary artery bypass grafting surgery (CABGS). Material/Methods Sixty-four patients scheduled for CABGS were randomly assigned to either test (HTEA) or control group. Standard balanced general anesthesia was applied in both groups. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), oxygen saturation (SpO2), central venous pressure (CVP), cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), pulmonary compliance (C), bispectral index (BIS), body temperature, SvO2, hematocrit values were recorded before induction. Postoperative hemodynamic changes, inotropic agent, need for vasodilatation, transfusion and additional analgesics, recovery score, extubation time, visual analogue scale (VAS) values, duration of stay in intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital were recorded. Results Study groups were similar in SpO2, CVP, PCWP, PAP, C, body temperature, BIS values, development of intraoperative bradycardia. In HTEA group, intraoperative MAP, SVR, PVR, need for transfusion were lower, whereas CO, CI, SvO2, hematocrit values were higher (p<0.05). Postoperative MAP, HR, hypertension development, need for vasodilatator, transfusion, analgesics, extubation time, recovery data, duration of stay in ICU, hospital were lower in HTEA group (p<0.05). VAS score decreased in 30 minutes and 12 hours following extubation in HTEA and control group, respectively. Conclusions HTEA may improve balance between oxygen presentation and usage by suppressing neuroendocrin stress response; provide efficient postoperative analgesia, more stabile hemodynamic, respiratory conditions, lower duration of stay in ICU, hospital. PMID:23531633

  3. Oesophageal Doppler monitoring overestimates cardiac output during lumbar epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Leather, H A; Wouters, P F

    2001-06-01

    Oesophageal Doppler monitoring (ODM) has been advocated as a non-invasive means of measuring cardiac output (CO). However, its reliance upon blood flow measurement in the descending aorta to estimate CO is susceptible to error if blood flow is redistributed between the upper and lower body. We hypothesize that lumbar epidural anesthesia (LEA), which causes blood flow redistribution, causes errors in CO estimates. We compared ODM with thermodilution (TD) measurements in fourteen patients under general anaesthesia for radical prostatectomy, who had received an epidural catheter at the intervertebral level L2-L3. Coupled measurements of CO by means of the TD and ODM techniques were performed at baseline (general anaesthetic only) and after epidural administration of 10 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine. The two methods were compared using Bland-Altman analysis: before LEA there was a bias of -0.89 litre min(-1) with limits of agreement ranging between -2.67 and +0.88 litre min(-1). Following lumbar sympathetic block, bias became positive (+0.55 litre min(-1)) and limits of agreement increased to -3.21 and +4.30 litre min(-1). ODM measured a greater increase in CO after LEA (delta=+1.71 (1.19) litre min(-1) (mean (SD)) compared with TD (delta=+0.51 (0.70) litre min(-1)). We conclude that following LEA, measurements with the Oesophageal Doppler Monitor II overestimate CO and show unacceptably high variability. Blood flow redistribution may limit the value of ODM. PMID:11573585

  4. Idiopathic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis in the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Al-Omari, Ali A; Phukan, Rishabh D; Leonard, Dana A; Herzog, Tyler L; Wood, Kirkham B; Bono, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Overgrowth of epidural fat, known as spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL), can cause symptomatic compression of the spinal cord, conus medullaris, or cauda equina. Suggested predisposing factors such as obesity, steroid use, and diabetes mellitus have been based on a few reported cases, many of which were not surgically confirmed. There is a paucity of epidemiological data in surgically confirmed cases for this disorder. The purpose of this independently reviewed, retrospective, matched cohort analysis was to compare the demographics and incidence of comorbidities of patients who underwent lumbar decompression for SEL vs degenerative stenosis without SEL. Two surgeons' databases were reviewed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent decompression surgery for magnetic resonance imaging-verified, symptomatic lumbar SEL. A matched control group comprised an equal number of patients with degenerative stenosis (n=14). Demographic data, body mass index, symptom type/duration, comorbidities, complications, treatment history, and associated pathology were collected from medical records. Previously suggested risk factors, such as obesity, endocrinopathy, and epidural steroid injections, were not significantly different between the SEL and control groups. Furthermore, there were no differences in operative times, complications, or blood loss. The only noted difference between the 2 groups was the preoperative duration of symptoms, on average double in patients with SEL. This series represents the largest of its kind reported to date. Because symptom duration was the only difference noted, it is postulated to be the result of lack of awareness of SEL. Future prospective study in a larger group of patients is warranted. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):163-168.]. PMID:27018608

  5. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  6. Inflammation and Epidural-Related Maternal Fever: Proposed Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Pervez; David, Anna L; Fernando, Roshan; Ackland, Gareth L

    2016-05-01

    Intrapartum fever is associated with excessive maternal interventions as well as higher neonatal morbidity. Epidural-related maternal fever (ERMF) contributes to the development of intrapartum fever. The mechanism(s) for ERMF has remained elusive. Here, we consider how inflammatory mechanisms may be modulated by local anesthetic agents and their relevance to ERMF. We also critically reappraise the clinical data with regard to emerging concepts that explain how anesthetic drug-induced metabolic dysfunction, with or without activation of the inflammasome, might trigger the release of nonpathogenic, inflammatory molecules (danger-associated molecular patterns) likely to underlie ERMF. PMID:27101499

  7. CNS Animal fMRI imaging in Pain and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2010-01-01

    Animal imaging of brain systems offers exciting opportunities to better understand the neurobiology of pain and analgesia. Overall functional studies have lagged behind human studies as a result of technical issues including the use of anesthesia. Now that many of these issues have been overcome including the possibility of imaging awake animals, there are new opportunities to study whole brain systems neurobiology of acute and chronic pain as well as analgesic effects on brain systems de novo (using pharmacological MRI) or testing in animal models of pain. Understanding brain networks in these areas may provide new insights into translational science, and use neural networks as a “language of translation” between preclinical to clinical models. In this review we evaluate the role of functional and anatomical imaging in furthering our understanding in pain and analgesia. PMID:21126534

  8. Pleasure-related analgesia activates opioid-insensitive circuits.

    PubMed

    Kut, Elvan; Candia, Victor; von Overbeck, Jan; Pok, Judit; Fink, Daniel; Folkers, Gerd

    2011-03-16

    Recent findings suggest that pain and pleasure share common neurochemical circuits, and studies in animals and humans show that opioid-mediated descending pathways can inhibit or facilitate pain. We explored the role of endogenous opioid neurotransmission in pleasure-related analgesia. μ-Opioidergic activity was blocked with 0.2 mg/kg naloxone to assess its effects on hedonic responses to pleasant emotional pictures (International Affective Picture System) and its modulating effects on heat pain tolerance. Naloxone did not alter subjective and autonomous reactions to pleasure induction or overall mood of participants. In addition, pleasure-related increases in pain tolerance persisted after reversal of endogenous μ-opioidergic neurotransmission. Subjective pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings increased after naloxone administration. These findings suggest that, in addition to opioid-sensitive circuits, mainly opioid-insensitive pain-modulating circuits are activated during pleasure-related analgesia. PMID:21411655

  9. Suckling- and sucrose-induced analgesia in human newborns.

    PubMed

    Blass, E M; Watt, L B

    1999-12-01

    This experiment had three goals: 1. To identify the basis of sucking-induced analgesia in healthy, term, newborn humans undergoing the painful, routine, procedure of heel lance and blood collection. 2. To evaluate how taste-induced and sucking-induced analgesias combine to combat pain. 3. To determine whether facial grimacing was an accurate index of diminished pain, or whether it was linked to tissue trauma. We report that: 1. Sucking an unflavored pacifier was analgesic when and only when suck rate exceeded 30 sucks/min. 2. The combination of sucrose and nonnutritive sucking was remarkably analgesic; we saw no behavioral indication in nine of the ten infants that the heel lance had even occurred. 3. Grimacing was reduced to almost naught by procedures that essentially eliminated crying and markedly reduced heart rate during the blood harvesting procedure. PMID:10568870

  10. Acupuncture Anesthesia and Analgesia for Clinical Acute Pain in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Acupuncture anesthesia has been practiced in China since about 1960. In Japan, Hyodo reported 30 cases of acupuncture anesthesia in 1972. However, from around 1980, the direction of acupuncture investigations turned from anesthesia to analgesia. Acupuncture analgesia is presently considered a way to activate the body's endogenous analgesic system. Recently, with the rise of acupuncture as one of the most well known CAM therapies, acupuncture or moxibustion treatment has been reported for both acute and chronic pain. Even so, few clinical reports and original articles have been reported in Japan. This review illustrates how acupuncture is being used in Japan for acute pain such as surgical operations, post- operative pain (POP), neuropathic pain, pain associated with teeth extractions and after the extraction of impacted wisdom teeth. PMID:18604250

  11. CNS animal fMRI in pain and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2011-04-01

    Animal imaging of brain systems offers exciting opportunities to better understand the neurobiology of pain and analgesia. Overall functional studies have lagged behind human studies as a result of technical issues including the use of anesthesia. Now that many of these issues have been overcome including the possibility of imaging awake animals, there are new opportunities to study whole brain systems neurobiology of acute and chronic pain as well as analgesic effects on brain systems de novo (using pharmacological MRI) or testing in animal models of pain. Understanding brain networks in these areas may provide new insights into translational science, and use neural networks as a "language of translation" between preclinical to clinical models. In this review we evaluate the role of functional and anatomical imaging in furthering our understanding in pain and analgesia. PMID:21126534

  12. Two opioid forms of stress analgesia: studies of tolerance and cross-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Terman, G W; Lewis, J W; Liebeskind, J C

    1986-03-12

    We have previously reported that stress analgesia sensitive to and insensitive to opiate antagonists can be differentially produced in rats by varying the severity or temporal pattern of inescapable footshock. In these studies, we give further evidence for the opioid and non-opioid bases of these paradigms of stress analgesia. We find that naloxone-sensitive analgesia demonstrates tolerance with repeated stress and cross-tolerance with morphine, whereas naloxone-insensitive analgesia demonstrates neither of these characteristics. Moreover, different forms of opioid, but not non-opioid, stress analgesia manifest cross-tolerance with each other. These data are discussed in terms of the similarities and differences between two forms of opioid stress analgesia. PMID:3955348

  13. Stereospecific potentiation of opiate analgesia by cocaine: predominant role of noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1987-01-01

    Cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellets implanted subcutaneously in male Wistar rats potentiated the analgesia of morphine, levorphanol, methadone and buprenorphine as measured by the tail-withdrawal test. Potentiated opiate analgesia was abolished by naloxone and further enhanced by desipramine and phenoxybenzamine. Yohimbine, alpha-methyl p-tyrosine, haloperidol, zimelidine, methysergide, p-chlorophenylalanine produced no significant effect on potentiated opiate analgesia. Pseudo-cocaine (dextro-cocaine), which is several-fold less potent than cocaine as an inhibitor of noradrenaline and dopamine reuptake in the CNS, had no significant effect on opiate analgesia. Analgesia produced by low doses of baclofen, a GABA agonist, was also not potentiated by cocaine. This study suggests a predominant role for noradrenaline in the stereospecific potentiation of opiate analgesia by cocaine. PMID:3822492

  14. Preemptive analgesia: the prevention of neurogenous orofacial pain.

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic neurogenous pain is often an extremely difficult condition to manage. In the orofacial region, trauma from injury or dental procedures may lead to the development of severe neuralgic pains and major distress to the patient. Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the use of adequate preemptive regional anesthesia, systemic analgesia, and the avoidance of repeated, painful stimuli may reduce the incidence of this problem. PMID:8934952

  15. Multimodal analgesia versus traditional opiate based analgesia after cardiac surgery, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate if an opiate sparing multimodal regimen of dexamethasone, gabapentin, ibuprofen and paracetamol had better analgesic effect, less side effects and was safe compared to a traditional morphine and paracetamol regimen after cardiac surgery. Methods Open-label, prospective randomized controlled trial. 180 patients undergoing cardiac procedures through median sternotomy, were included in the period march 2007- August 2009. 151 patients were available for analysis. Pain was assessed with the 11-numeric rating scale (11-NRS). Results Patients in the multimodal group demonstrated significantly lower average pain scores from the day of surgery throughout the third postoperative day. Extensive nausea and vomiting, was found in no patient in the multimodal group but in 13 patients in the morphine group, p < 0.001. Postoperative rise in individual creatinine levels demonstrated a non-significant rise in the multimodal group, 33.0±53.4 vs. 19.9±48.5, p = 0.133. Patients in the multimodal group suffered less major in-hospital events in crude numbers: myocardial infarction (MI) (1 vs. 2, p = 0.54), stroke (0 vs. 3, p = 0.075), dialysis (1 vs. 2, p = 0.54), and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (0 vs. 1, p = 0.31). 30-day mortality was 1 vs. 2, p = 0.54. Conclusions In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, a multimodal regimen offered significantly better analgesia than a traditional opiate regimen. Nausea and vomiting complaints were significantly reduced. No safety issues were observed with the multimodal regimen. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01966172 PMID:24650125

  16. Mediation of opioid analgesia by a truncated 6-transmembrane GPCR

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhigang; Xu, Jin; Rossi, Grace C.; Majumdar, Susruta; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2015-01-01

    The generation of potent opioid analgesics that lack the side effects of traditional opioids may be possible by targeting truncated splice variants of the μ-opioid receptor. μ-Opioids act through GPCRs that are generated from the Oprm1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. The most abundant set of Oprm1 variants encode classical full-length 7 transmembrane domain (7TM) μ-opioid receptors that mediate the actions of the traditional μ-opioid drugs morphine and methadone. In contrast, 3-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic against thermal, inflammatory, and neuropathic pain that acts independently of 7TM μ-opioid receptors but has no activity in mice lacking a set of 6TM truncated μ-opioid receptor splice variants. Unlike traditional opioids, IBNtxA does not depress respiration or result in physical dependence or reward behavior, suggesting it acts through an alternative μ-opioid receptor target. Here we demonstrated that a truncated 6TM splice variant, mMOR-1G, can rescue IBNtxA analgesia in a μ-opioid receptor–deficient mouse that lacks all Oprm1 splice variants, ablating μ-opioid activity in these animals. Intrathecal administration of lentivirus containing the 6TM variant mMOR-1G restored IBNtxA, but not morphine, analgesia in Oprm1-deficient animals. Together, these results confirm that a truncated 6TM GPCR is both necessary and sufficient for IBNtxA analgesia. PMID:26011641

  17. Depressed mood, anxiety, and the use of labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Fatimah Dabo; Hellgren, Charlotte; Nyberg, Fred; Åkerud, Helena; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2016-02-01

    Relatively little is known about mental health and labor pain. The aim of this study was to assess if self-rated antenatal depressed mood and anxiety are associated with pain-related behaviors and self-reported labor pain. We also wanted to replicate our previous finding of altered labor pain behavior in carriers of a specific guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 gene (GCH1) haplotype. Ninety-nine women in gestational weeks 37 to 40 filled out questionnaires on depression and anxiety symptoms and later rated their labor pain by use of visual analog scales. Each subject was also genotyped for GCH1. Following adjustment for relevant confounders, women who arrived early to the delivery unit (cervical dilation <5 cm) had a significantly higher antenatal Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S) score, p < 0.05, than late arrivers (cervical dilation >5 cm). Women with increased Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T) scores reported higher self-rated pain prior to labor analgesia, p < 0.05, than women with low STAI-T scores. No association between the GCH1 pain-protective haplotype and cervical dilation was found, but a previously demonstrated association with increased use of second-line analgesia was confirmed. Depressed mood during pregnancy is associated with early arrival to the delivery department, whereas antenatal anxiety is associated with increased self-rated pain prior to labor analgesia. PMID:26392364

  18. Phorbol ester suppression of opioid analgesia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.J.; Wang, X.J.; Han, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) has been shown to be an important substrate in intracellular signal transduction. Very little is known concerning its possible role in mediating opiate-induced analgesia. In the present study, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a selective activator of PKC, was injected intrathecally (ith) to assess its influence on the analgesia induced by intrathecal injection of the mu opioid agonist PL017, the delta agonist DPDPE and the kappa agonist 66A-078. Radiant heat-induced tail flick latency (TFL) was taken as an index of nociception. TPA in the dose of 25-50 ng, which did not affect the baseline TFL, produced a marked suppression of opioid antinociception, with a higher potency in blocking mu and delta than the kappa effect. In addition, mu and delta agonists induced remarkable decreases in spinal cyclic AMP (cAMP) content whereas the kappa effect was weak. The results suggest a cross-talk between the PKC system and the signal transduction pathway subserving opioid analgesia.

  19. Computer-Assisted and Patient-Controlled Sedation Platforms.

    PubMed

    Pambianco, Daniel; Niklewski, Paul

    2016-07-01

    As the number and complexity of endoscopic procedures increase, the role of sedation has been integral in patient and physician satisfaction. This article discusses the advances of computer-assisted and patient-controlled platforms. These computer-assisted and patient-controlled platforms use different anesthetics and analgesics, all with the intent of achieving improved consistency in the level of sedation, appropriate to the needs of patients, while also improving patient safety. These systems have been around for decades; however, few are approved for use in the United States, and several still require further study before broad clinical application. PMID:27372778

  20. Comparing analgesia and μ-opioid receptor internalization produced by intrathecal enkephalin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Song, Bingbing; Lao, Lijun; Pérez, Orlando A.; Kim, Woojae; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Opioid receptors in the spinal cord produce strong analgesia, but the mechanisms controlling their activation by endogenous opioids remain unclear. We have previously shown in spinal cord slices that peptidases preclude μ-opioid receptor (MOR) internalization by opioids. Our present goals were to investigate whether enkephalin-induced analgesia is also precluded by peptidases, and whether it is mediated by MORs or δ-opioid receptors (DORs). Tail-flick analgesia and MOR internalization were measured in rats injected intrathecally with Leu-enkephalin and peptidase inhibitors. Without peptidase inhibitors, Leu-enkephalin produced neither analgesia nor MOR internalization at doses up to 100 nmol, whereas with peptidase inhibitors it produced analgesia at 0.3 nmol and MOR internalization at 1 nmol. Leu-enkephalin was ten times more potent to produce analgesia than to produce MOR internalization, suggesting that DORs were involved. Selective MOR or DOR antagonists completely blocked the analgesia elicited by 0.3 nmol Leu-enkephalin (a dose that produced little MOR internalization), indicating that it involved these two receptors, possibly by an additive or synergistic interaction. The selective MOR agonist endomorphin-2 produced analgesia even in the presence of a DOR antagonist, but at doses substantially higher than Leu-enkephalin. Unlike Leu-enkephalin, endomorphin-2 had the same potencies to induce analgesia and MOR internalization. We concluded that low doses of enkephalins produce analgesia by activating both MORs and DORs. Analgesia can also be produced exclusively by MORs at higher agonist doses. Since peptidases prevent the activation of spinal opioid receptors by enkephalins, the coincident release of opioids and endogenous peptidase inhibitors may be required for analgesia. PMID:17845806

  1. Interrater Reliability of the Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis Classification: A Histopathologic Study in the Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Jirarattanaphochai, Kitti; Sumananont, Chat; Wittayapairoj, Kriangkrai; Sukhonthamarn, Kamolsak

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Agreement study. Purpose To validate the interrater reliability of the histopathological classification of the post-laminectomy epidural fibrosis in an animal model. Overview of Literature Epidural fibrosis is a common cause of failed back surgery syndrome. Many animal experiments have been developed to investigate the prevention of epidural fibrosis. One of the common outcome measurements is the epidural fibrous adherence grading, but the classification has not yet been validated. Methods Five identical sets of histopathological digital files of L5-L6 laminectomized adult Sprague-Dawley rats, representing various degrees of postoperative epidural fibrous adherence were randomized and evaluated by five independent assessors masked to the study processes. Epidural fibrosis was rated as grade 0 (no fibrosis), grade 1 (thin fibrous band), grade 2 (continuous fibrous adherence for less than two-thirds of the laminectomy area), or grade 3 (large fibrotic tissue for more than two-thirds of the laminectomy area). A statistical analysis was performed. Results Four hundred slides were independently evaluated by each assessor. The percent agreement and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between each pair of assessors varied from 73.5% to 81.3% and from 0.81 to 0.86, respectively. The overall ICC was 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.86). Conclusions The postoperative epidural fibrosis classification showed almost perfect agreement among the assessors. This classification can be used in research involving the histopathology of postoperative epidural fibrosis; for example, for the development of preventions of postoperative epidural fibrosis or treatment in an animal model. PMID:26240719

  2. Efficacy of Epidural Injections in the Treatment of Lumbar Central Spinal Stenosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan David; Manchikanti, Kavita; Boswell, Mark; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Hirsch, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lumbar central spinal stenosis is common and often results in chronic persistent pain and disability, which can lead to multiple interventions. After the failure of conservative treatment, either surgical or nonsurgical modalities such as epidural injections are contemplated in the management of lumbar spinal stenosis. Evidence Acquisition: Recent randomized trials, systematic reviews and guidelines have reached varying conclusions about the efficacy of epidural injections in the management of central lumbar spinal stenosis. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of all three anatomical epidural injection approaches (caudal, interlaminar, and transforaminal) in the treatment of lumbar central spinal stenosis. A systematic review was performed on randomized trials published from 1966 to July 2014 of all types of epidural injections used in the management of lumbar central spinal stenosis. Methodological quality assessment and grading of the evidence was performed. Results: The evidence in managing lumbar spinal stenosis is Level II for long-term improvement for caudal and lumbar interlaminar epidural injections. For transforaminal epidural injections, the evidence is Level III for short-term improvement only. The interlaminar approach appears to be superior to the caudal approach and the caudal approach appears to be superior to the transforaminal one. Conclusions: The available evidence suggests that epidural injections with local anesthetic alone or with local anesthetic with steroids offer short- and long-term relief of low back and lower extremity pain for patients with lumbar central spinal stenosis. However, the evidence is Level II for the long-term efficacy of caudal and interlaminar epidural injections, whereas it is Level III for short-term improvement only with transforaminal epidural injections. PMID:25789241

  3. An Active Learning Algorithm for Control of Epidural Electrostimulation.

    PubMed

    Desautels, Thomas A; Choe, Jaehoon; Gad, Parag; Nandra, Mandheerej S; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Tai, Yu-Chong; Edgerton, V Reggie; Burdick, Joel W

    2015-10-01

    Epidural electrostimulation has shown promise for spinal cord injury therapy. However, finding effective stimuli on the multi-electrode stimulating arrays employed requires a laborious manual search of a vast space for each patient. Widespread clinical application of these techniques would be greatly facilitated by an autonomous, algorithmic system which choses stimuli to simultaneously deliver effective therapy and explore this space. We propose a method based on GP-BUCB, a Gaussian process bandit algorithm. In n = 4 spinally transected rats, we implant epidural electrode arrays and examine the algorithm's performance in selecting bipolar stimuli to elicit specified muscle responses. These responses are compared with temporally interleaved intra-animal stimulus selections by a human expert. GP-BUCB successfully controlled the spinal electrostimulation preparation in 37 testing sessions, selecting 670 stimuli. These sessions included sustained autonomous operations (ten-session duration). Delivered performance with respect to the specified metric was as good as or better than that of the human expert. Despite receiving no information as to anatomically likely locations of effective stimuli, GP-BUCB also consistently discovered such a pattern. Further, GP-BUCB was able to extrapolate from previous sessions' results to make predictions about performance in new testing sessions, while remaining sufficiently flexible to capture temporal variability. These results provide validation for applying automated stimulus selection methods to the problem of spinal cord injury therapy. PMID:25974925

  4. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease. PMID:26275629

  5. Cervical Epidural Abscess: Rare Complication of Bacterial Endocarditis with Streptococcus Viridans: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Although many patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complain of joint, muscle, and back pain, infections at these sights are rare. The incidence of spinal abscess in cervical spine complicating endocarditis is very rare. Although the surgical management is the mainstay of treatment, conservative treatment can get success in selected patients. We report a patient with cervical epidural abscess due to Streptococcus viridans endocarditis. Both epidural abscess and IE were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics for 8 weeks, with recovery. It is important to remind spinal epidural abscess can occur in those patients with bacterial endocarditis. PMID:25883665

  6. Cervical epidural abscess: rare complication of bacterial endocarditis with streptococcus viridans: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Doh, Jae-Won

    2015-03-01

    Although many patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complain of joint, muscle, and back pain, infections at these sights are rare. The incidence of spinal abscess in cervical spine complicating endocarditis is very rare. Although the surgical management is the mainstay of treatment, conservative treatment can get success in selected patients. We report a patient with cervical epidural abscess due to Streptococcus viridans endocarditis. Both epidural abscess and IE were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics for 8 weeks, with recovery. It is important to remind spinal epidural abscess can occur in those patients with bacterial endocarditis. PMID:25883665

  7. Epidural pneumatosis associated with spontaneous pneumomediastinum: a rare complication of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Healy, Mary-Louise; O'Shea, Donal; Crowley, Rachel K

    2016-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum and epidural pneumatosis are rare complications of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). These result from the emesis and hyperventilation associated with DKA which lead to alveolar rupture and air escape into the mediastinal and epidural spaces. These complications are often asymptomatic and resolve with the correction of the underlying metabolic abnormality. Oesophageal contrast studies are only required if oesophageal perforation is suspected in patients presenting with persistent vomiting and chest pain. We report the rare association of pneumomediastinum and epidural pneumatosis complicating DKA in a 19-year-old female patient. PMID:27451054

  8. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Suppression and Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome as a Complication of Epidural Steroid Injections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections are well accepted as a treatment for radicular back pain in appropriate candidates. While overall incidence of systemic side effects has not been well established, at least five biochemically proven cases of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome have been reported as complications of epidural steroid treatment. We present an additional case of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome and adrenal suppression in a middle-aged woman who received three epidural steroid injections over a four-month period. We review this case in the context of previous cases and discuss diagnostic and management issues. PMID:23991341

  9. Addition of fentanyl to the ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block does not improve analgesia following cesarean delivery

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LI-ZHONG; LIU, XIA; ZHANG, YING-FA; HU, XIAO-XIA; ZHANG, XIAO-MING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether the addition of fentanyl to the transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block procedure may improve analgesic duration following cesarean delivery. A total of 147 nulliparous women with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I–II, scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia, were enrolled in the present study. All patients underwent cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia with 10 mg bupivacaine and 10 µg fentanyl, after which the patients underwent an ultrasound-guided bilateral TAP block with either 0.375% ropivacaine (group TR; n=48), 0.375% ropivacaine and 50 µg subcutaneous fentanyl (group TRSF; n=49), or a mixture of 0.375% ropivacaine and 50 µg fentanyl (2.5 µg/ml; group TRF; n=50) per side. The TAP block formed part of a multimodal analgesic regimen comprising patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with intravenous fentanyl, and regular treatment with diclofenac and paracetamol. The TAP block was performed in the midaxillary line using an in-plane technique. The primary outcome was the time to the first PCA, whereas secondary outcomes were the cumulative and interval PCA consumptions, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores at rest and during movement, side effects assessed at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h postoperatively, and patient satisfaction with postoperative analgesia. No significant differences were observed in the median time to the first PCA among the three groups (P=0.640), which were 150 min (70–720 min) in group TR, 165 min (90–670 min) in group TRSF, and 190 min (70–680 min) in group TRF. Fentanyl consumption, VAS pain scores, side effects and patient satisfaction were similar among the three groups; however, the demand for fentanyl was significantly decreased in the TRSF and TRF groups at 2 h postoperatively (P=0.001 and 0.002, respectively), as compared with group TR. No complications attributed to the TAP block were detected. In conclusion, the results of the

  10. Needle Tip Position and Bevel Direction Have No Effect in the Fluoroscopic Epidural Spreading Pattern in Caudal Epidural Injections: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Won Kyoung; Kim, Ah Na; Lee, Pil Moo; Park, Cheol Hwan; Kim, Jae Hun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Caudal epidural steroid injections (CESIs) are an effective treatment for pain. If the injection spreads in a specific pattern depending on the needle position or bevel direction, it would be possible to inject the agent into a specific and desired area. Objectives. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to determine if the needle position and bevel direction have any effect on the epidural spreading pattern in CESI. Methods. Demographic data of the patient were collected. During CESI, the needle position (middle or lateral) and direction (ventral or dorsal) were randomly allocated. Following fluoroscope-guided injection of 4 mL contrast media and 10 mL of injectates, the epidural spreading patterns (ventral or dorsal, bilateral or lateral) were imaged. Results. In the 210 CESIs performed, the needle tip position and bevel direction did not influence the epidural spreading patterns at L4-5 and L5-S1 disc levels. A history of Lumbar spine surgery was associated with a significantly limited spread to each disc level. A midline needle tip position was more effective than the lateral position in spreading to the distant disc levels. Conclusions. Neither the needle tip position nor the bevel direction affected the epidural drug spreading pattern during CESI. PMID:27445609

  11. Dexmedetomidine infusion for analgesia up to 48 hours after lung surgery performed by lateral thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Kate B.; Leeper, Barbara; Hamman, Baron L.; Hebeler, Robert F.; Henry, A. Carl; Kourlis, Harry; Wood, Richard E.; Stecher, Jack A.; Hein, H. A. Tillmann

    2014-01-01

    Patients undergoing a lateral thoracotomy for pulmonary resection have moderate to severe pain postoperatively that is often treated with opioids. Opioid side effects such as respiratory depression can be devastating in patients with already compromised respiratory function. This prospective double-blinded clinical trial examined the analgesic effects and safety of a dexmedetomidine infusion for postthoracotomy patients when administered on a telemetry nursing floor, 24 to 48 hours after surgery, to determine if the drug's known early opioid-sparing properties were maintained. Thirty-eight thoracotomy patients were administered dexmedetomidine intraoperatively and overnight postoperatively and then randomized to receive placebo or dexmedetomidine titrated from 0.1 to 0.5 μg·kg·h−1 the day following surgery for up to 24 hours on a telemetry floor. Opioids via a patient-controlled analgesia pump were available for both groups, and vital signs including transcutaneous carbon dioxide, pulse oximetry, respiratory rate, and pain and sedation scores were monitored. The dexmedetomidine group used 41% less opioids but achieved pain scores equal to those of the placebo group. The mean heart rate and systolic blood pressure were lower in the dexmedetomidine group but sedation scores were better. The mean respiratory rate and oxygen saturation were similar in the two groups. Mild hypercarbia occurred in both groups, but periods of significant respiratory depression were noted only in the placebo group. Significant hypotension was noted in one patient in the dexmedetomidine group in conjunction with concomitant administration of a beta-blocker agent. The placebo group reported a higher number of opioid-related adverse events. In conclusion, the known opioid-sparing properties of dexmedetomidine in the immediate postoperative period are maintained over 48 hours. PMID:24381392

  12. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder of the cervical spine mimicking an epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Wewel, Joshua T; Harbhajanka, Aparna; Kasliwal, Manish K; Ahuja, Sumeet K; Loew, Jerome M; Fontes, Ricardo B

    2016-07-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a recognized complication following solid organ and stem cell transplants with subsequent immunosuppression and is the most common malignancy complicating solid organ transplantation. Improved survival and use of aggressive immunosuppression following solid organ transplants have led to increased diagnosis of PTLD. Nevertheless, spinal involvement in PTLD is extremely rare. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PTLD causing epidural spinal cord compression of the cervical spine, mimicking the imaging and pathology of an epidural abscess. The patient underwent posterior and subsequent anterior decompression and stabilization. Rarity of occurrence of PTLD in the spine with absence of diagnostic imaging features may preclude differentiating it from the more commonly occurring lesions such as epidural abscess which occurs in a similar clinical setting. As the management strategy and overall prognosis are dramatically different, the importance of considering PTLD in the differential diagnosis for epidural spinal cord compression in a transplant recipient patient cannot be overemphasized. PMID:26916907

  13. Spontaneous ventral spinal epidural hematoma in a child: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ratre, Shailendra; Yadav, Yadram; Choudhary, Sushma; Parihar, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is very uncommon cause of spinal cord compression. It is extremely rare in children and is mostly located in dorsal epidural space. Ventral spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is even rarer, with only four previous reports in childrens. We are reporting fifth such case in a 14 year old male child. He presented with history of sudden onset weakness and sensory loss in both lower limbs with bladder bowel involvment since 15 days. There was no history of trauma or bleeding diasthesis. On clinical examination he had spastic paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of dorsal spine was suggestive of ventral spinal epidural hematoma extending from first to sixth dorsal vertebrae. Laminectomy of fourth and fifth dorsal vertebrae and complete evacuation of hematoma was done on the same day of admission. Postoperatively the neurological status was same. PMID:27114667

  14. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bustoros, Mark; Thomas, Cheddhi; Frenster, Joshua; Modrek, Aram S; Bayin, N Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Rosen, Gerald; Schiff, Peter B; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  15. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  16. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath and transversus abdominis plane blocks for perioperative analgesia in upper abdominal surgery: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Khaled; Mohamdin, OW

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regional anesthetic techniques can be used to alleviate postoperative pain in patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of bilateral ultrasound (US)-guided rectus sheath (RS) and transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks for better perioperative analgesia. Patients and Methods: It is a prospective, observer-blinded, randomized clinical study. 40 eligible patients undergoing elective liver resection or Whipple procedure were included. All patients received a standardized anesthetic technique. Group 1 (n = 20) received preincisional US-guided bilateral RS and TAP blocks using 20 ml volume of bupivacaine 0.25% for each, and group 2 (n = 20) received local wound infiltration at end of surgery with 40 ml of bupivacaine 0.25%. A standardized postoperative analgesic regimen composed of intravenous paracetamol and a morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The use of intraoperative fentanyl and recovery room morphine boluses, PCA-administered morphine, pain scores as well as number of patients’ experienced postoperative nausea and vomiting in the ward at 6 and 24 h were recorded. Results: Group 1 patients received a significantly lower cumulative intraoperative fentanyl, significantly lesser boluses of morphine in postanesthesia care unit, as well, significantly lower cumulative 24 h postoperative morphine dosage than the group 2 patients. Pain visual analog scale scores were significantly lower at both 6 and 24 h postoperatively in TAP group when compared with the no-TAP group. There were no complications related to the TAP block procedures. No signs or symptoms of local anesthetic systemic toxicity were detected. Conclusion: The combination of bilateral US-guided RS and TAP blocks provides excellent perioperative analgesia for major upper abdominal surgery. PMID:26955306

  17. Postpartum spinal subdural hematoma: irrelevant epidural blood patch: a case report.

    PubMed

    Choe, Won Joo; Kim, Ji Yeon; Yeo, Hyeok Jae; Kim, Jun Hyun; Lee, Sang-Il; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jang Su; Kim, Jung Won

    2016-04-01

    We report a healthy patient with postpartum headache and neck stiffness which were diagnosed as symptoms of pseudoaneurysm of vertebral artery. She had received a Cesarean section under the spinal anesthesia, and complaint of headache and neck stiffness. Epidural blood patches were done twice, but symptoms persisted. Eight days later, she experienced sensory disturbance and emergent laminectomy was done. When persistent postpartum headache occurs after epidural blood patch, more precise differential diagnosis should be made and considering other possible pathologies. PMID:27066211

  18. Computed tomographic epidurography: an aid to understanding deformation of the lumbar dural sac by epidural injections.

    PubMed

    Fukushige, T; Kano, T; Sano, T; Irie, M

    1999-09-01

    Local anaesthetics injected into the epidural space may deform the dural sac to a variable degree, thereby contributing to variability in the extent of the block. We investigated deformation of the lumbar dural sac after injection into the lumbar epidural space. The subjects were 26 patients with low-back pain who underwent lumbar epidurography and computed tomographic (CT) epidurography, of whom seven also underwent myelography and computed tomographic myelography. The epidural space was entered via the sacral hiatus in 24 patients and through the L5/S1 interspace in two patients. Ten millilitres of local anaesthetic was then injected into the epidural space followed by 20 mL of contrast medium. Computed tomographic epidurography was undertaken approximately 30-min after the epidural injection at the mid-vertebral and mid-discal levels from the first lumbar through to the first sacral vertebrae. The dural sac usually showed an oval or hexagonal shape on the transverse views at the first and second lumbar vertebral levels, and the shape of an inverted triangle below the level of the third lumbar vertebra. A median line of translucency was also observed on the posteroanterior epidurographic view in 25 of the 26 patients. This line was though to be a manifestation of the dural deformation to the inverted triangle. Dural sac deformation usually shows a specific pattern, although there are individual variations. Dural deformability is an important consideration in any analysis of the spread of epidural block or of the changes of epidural pressure after epidural injection of local anaesthetics. PMID:10549463

  19. Postpartum spinal subdural hematoma: irrelevant epidural blood patch: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Hyeok Jae; Lee, Sang-Il; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jang Su; Kim, Jung Won

    2016-01-01

    We report a healthy patient with postpartum headache and neck stiffness which were diagnosed as symptoms of pseudoaneurysm of vertebral artery. She had received a Cesarean section under the spinal anesthesia, and complaint of headache and neck stiffness. Epidural blood patches were done twice, but symptoms persisted. Eight days later, she experienced sensory disturbance and emergent laminectomy was done. When persistent postpartum headache occurs after epidural blood patch, more precise differential diagnosis should be made and considering other possible pathologies. PMID:27066211

  20. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is...

  5. Subcutaneous L-tyrosine elicits cutaneous analgesia in response to local skin pinprick in rats.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Wen; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of the study was to estimate the ability of L-tyrosine to induce cutaneous analgesia and to investigate the interaction between L-tyrosine and the local anesthetic lidocaine. After subcutaneously injecting the rats with L-tyrosine and lidocaine in a dose-dependent manner, cutaneous analgesia (by blocking the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex-CTMR) was evaluated in response to the local pinprick. The drug-drug interaction was analyzed by using an isobolographic method. We showed that both L-tyrosine and lidocaine produced dose-dependent cutaneous analgesia. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the rank of drug potency was lidocaine (5.09 [4.88-5.38] μmol)>L-tyrosine (39.1 [36.5-41.8] μmol) (P<0.05). At the equipotent doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the duration of cutaneous analgesia caused by L-tyrosine lasted longer than that caused by lidocaine (P<0.01). Lidocaine co-administered with L-tyrosine exhibited an additive effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Our pre-clinical study demonstrated that L-tyrosine elicits the local/cutaneous analgesia, and the interaction between L-tyrosine and lidocaine is additive. L-tyrosine has a lower potency but much greater duration of cutaneous analgesia than lidocaine. Adding L-tyrosine to lidocaine preparations showed greater duration of cutaneous analgesia compared with lidocaine alone. PMID:26376025

  6. Doubtful effect of continuous intraarticular analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdulemir; Sundberg, Martin; Hansson, Ulrik; Malmvik, Johan; Flivik, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Local infiltration analgesia (LIA) is well established for effective postoperative pain relief in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). To prolong the effect of LIA, infusion pumps with local intraarticular analgesia can be used. We evaluated the effect of such an infusion pump for the first 48 h postoperatively regarding pain, knee function, length of stay (LOS) in hospital, and complications. Patients and methods 200 patients received peroperative LIA and a continuous intraarticular elastomeric infusion pump set at 2 mL/h. The patients were randomized either to ropivacaine (7.5 mg/mL) or to NaCl (9 mg/mL) in the pump. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain (0–100 mm), analgesic consumption, side effects of medicine, range of motion (ROM), leg-raising ability, LOS, and complications during the first 3 months were recorded. Results On the first postoperative day, the ropivacaine group had lower VAS pain (33 vs. 40 at 12 noon and 36 vs. 43 at 8 p.m.; p = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively), but after that all recorded variables were similar between the groups. During the first 3 months, the ropivacaine group had a greater number of superficial and deep surgical wound infections (11 patients vs. 2 patients, p = 0.02). There were no other statistically significant differences between the groups. Interpretation Continuous intraarticular analgesia (CIAA) with ropivacaine after TKA has no relevant clinical effect on VAS pain and does not affect LOS, analgesic consumption, ROM, or leg-raising ability. There may, however, be a higher risk of wound-healing complications including deep infections. PMID:25428755

  7. Gender specificity of sucrose induced analgesia in human adults.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Manasi; Bhatia, Renu; Mathur, Rashmi

    2007-01-01

    Sweet, palatable substances such as sucrose are reported to calm infants undergoing routine investigative procedures. The analgesic effect persists in pre pubertal children and adults with a hint of gender dependent variation in the analgesic response. The present study was therefore designed to explore gender specificity of sucrose induced analgesia in adult volunteers utilizing the nociceptive flexion reflex, an objective tool for pain assessment. Nociceptive flexion reflex was recorded, both before and after (up to 15 min) ingestion of 100 ml of 25% sucrose solution in 6 male and 6 female volunteers. In the male volunteers the maximum amplitude of the response was 20.8 +/- 7.7 microV before sucrose ingestion and 22.6 +/- 9.1 microV, 6.6 +/- 0.7 microV, 6.2 +/- 1.1 microV, 7.5 +/- 0.9 microV at 0, 5, 10 and 15 minutes post sucrose ingestion respectively. In female volunteers, the maximum amplitude of the response was 33.7 +/- 17.7 microV before sucrose ingestion and 43.6 +/- 17.2 microV, 7.1 +/- 1.2 microV, 25.9 +/- 16.1 microV, 50.6 +/- 16.3 microV at the same time intervals post sucrose ingestion. The maximum amplitude values were significantly lower in the males at 10 and 15 minutes after sucrose ingestion (P < 0.05). This is the first objective report of gender specificity in sucrose induced analgesia in adult humans. The gender dependent variation in sucrose induced analgesia is prolonged in male (15 min) and short lived in female (5 min) volunteers. This knowledge may have important implications in pain management. PMID:18476396

  8. The elusive rat model of conditioned placebo analgesia.

    PubMed

    McNabb, Christopher T; White, Michelle M; Harris, Amber L; Fuchs, Perry N

    2014-10-01

    Recent research on human placebo analgesia has suggested the need for rodent models to further elucidate the neural substrates of the placebo effect. This series of 3 experiments therefore was performed in an attempt to develop a model of placebo analgesia in rats. In each study, female Sprague-Dawley rats received an L5 spinal nerve ligation to induce a neuropathic pain condition. Each rat then underwent a 4-day conditioning procedure in which an active analgesic drug or its vehicle (unconditioned stimulus) was associated with the following cues (conditioned stimuli): novel testing room (environmental), vanilla scent cue (olfactory), dim incandescent lighting (visual), restraint procedure/injection (tactile), and time of day and injection-test latency (temporal). The analgesics for each experiment were as follows: Experiment 1 used 90 mg/kg gabapentin, experiment 2 used 3mg/kg loperamide hydrochloride, and experiment 3 used 6 mg/kg morphine sulfate. On the following test day, half of the animals received the opposite treatment, resulting in 4 conditioning manipulations: drug/drug, drug/vehicle, vehicle/drug, and vehicle/vehicle. Nociceptive thresholds were assessed with the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold test each day after the conditioning procedure. In all 3 experiments, no significant differences were detected on test day between control and placebo groups, indicating a lack of a conditioned placebo analgesic response. Our results contrast with prior research that implies the existence of a reliable and robust response to placebo treatment. We conclude that placebo analgesia in rats is not particularly robust and that it is difficult to achieve using conventional procedures and proper experimental design. PMID:25026214

  9. Butorphanol in labour analgesia: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Ajay; Agarwal, Rachana

    2013-01-01

    Objective Parenteral opioids can be administered with ease at a very low cost with high efficacy as labour analgesia. However, there are insufficient data available to accept the benefits of parenteral opioids over other proven methods of labour analgesia. Butorphanol, a new synthetic opioid, has emerged as a promising agent in terms of efficacy and a better safety profile. This study investigates the effect of butorphanol as a labour analgesia to gather further evidence of its safety and efficacy to pave the way for its widespread use in low resource settings. Material and Methods One hundred low risk term consenting pregnant women were recruited to take part in a prospective cohort study. Intramuscular injections of butorphanol tartrate 1 mg (Butrum 1/2mg, Aristo, Mumbai, India) were given in the active phase of labour and repeated two hourly. Pain relief was noted on a 10-point visual pain analogue scale (VPAS). Obstetric and neonatal outcome measures were mode of delivery, duration of labour, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit admissions. Collected data were analysed for statistically significant pain relief between pre- and post-administration VPAS scores and also for the incidence of adverse outcomes. Results Pain started to decrease significantly within 15 minutes of administration and reached the nadir (3.08 SD0.51) at the end of two hours. The pain remained below four on the VPAS until the end of six hours and was still significantly low after eight hours. The incidence of adverse outcomes was low in the present study. Conclusion Butorphanol is an effective parenteral opioid analgesic which can be administered with reasonable safety for the mother and the neonate. The study has the drawback of lack of control and small sample size. PMID:24592110

  10. Lumbar spinal epidural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary venous drainage after endoscopic lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Toshiharu; Wada, Takeshi; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) with perimedullary venous drainage are rare. This report describes a case of lumbar epidural AVF in a patient with a history of endoscopic lumbar discectomy at the same level 8 years prior to presenting with progressive myelopathy secondary to retrograde venous reflux into the perimedullary vein. A 69-year-old man presented with progressive lower extremity weakness and sensory disturbance and loss of sphincter control 8 years after endoscopic lumbar discectomy for a disc herniation at L4–5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal cord edema and dilated intradural perimedullary vessels. Spinal angiography revealed an epidural AVF at the site of the previous endoscopic lumbar surgery with intradural perimedullary venous drainage. The fistula was successfully occluded via endovascular transarterial embolization, and the patient had stabilization of his neurological deficits. Lumbar spinal epidural AVFs, especially those associated with iatrogenic trauma, are rare. Endoscopic surgical procedure can occlude the epidural venous plexus and disturb venous drainage, thereby inducing local venous hypertension and leading to epidural AVF with perimedullary venous drainage. This type of pathology should be considered within the differential diagnosis of delayed neurological deterioration after spinal surgery. PMID:25948114

  11. Optical fiber guided needle insertion to localize epidural space in porcine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yin; Ting, Chien Kun; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Chen, Pin-Tarng; Chan, Kwok-Hon

    2010-02-01

    A novel optical method of guiding epidural catheter insertion is introduced due to high failure rate of traditional technique for epidural blocks. Experiments of ex-vivo and in-vivo in porcine were performed. In the ex-vivo study the optically reflective spectra of identified porcine tissues were obtained. By which wavelengths of 650 nm and 532 nm were selected to differentiate epidural space and ligamentum flavum. Then the typical stylet of an insertion needle set was replaced by a specially designed hollow stylet which contained optical fibers served for tissue illumination and receiving reflected light from tissue in the in-vivo experiment in pigs. The data was promising with mean magnitudes for 650 nm and 532 nm and their ratio at epidural space and ligamentum flavum were 3.565+/-0.194, 2.542+/-0.145, 0.958+/-0.172 and 3.842+/-0.191, 2.563+/-0.131, 1.228+/-0.244 respectively. Paired t test showed that significant differences occurred between epidural spaces and ligamentum flavum in both 650nm (p<0.001), 532nm (p=0.014) and their ratio (p <0.001). Two-way ANOVA for reflective lights of 650 and 532 nm indicates no significant difference at the different puncture sites for ligamentum flavum and epidural space (all p>0.05).

  12. Microbial examination of kidney lithotripter tub water and epidural anesthesia catheters.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G L; Roberts, J T; O'Brien, A; Kelleher, M; Dretler, S P; Battit, G E; Hopkins, C C

    1986-04-01

    Kidney lithotripsy patients frequently receive epidural anesthesia via indwelling epidural catheters. In our hospital, patients are immersed in a tub of warm, continuously-flowing tap water. The epidural catheter-entry site is covered by a transparent occlusive dressing. To determine the risk of microbial colonization of the epidural catheter during lithotripsy, we performed quantitative cultures of tub water and semiquantitative cultures of catheters in 63 lithotripsy procedures. Most of the tub water organisms were typical tap water and skin flora isolates. Total colony counts were generally low with no significant progression during the course of serial procedures. Forty-two epidural catheters were cultured; 34 (81%) were sterile, 8 (19%) were colonized with small numbers of flavobacteria or coagulase-negative staphylococci. Only four catheters had organisms present on catheter segments covered by the transparent occlusive dressing (in each case there was a single colony forming unit per semiquantitative plate) and these organisms were probable contaminants. We conclude that with our current lithotripsy procedures, the risk for the development of epidural catheter-associated infection seems to be low. PMID:3634759

  13. Antinociceptive effects of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine in healthy ponies.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Johannes P A M; Menke, Eveline S; Doornenbal, Arie; Back, Willem; Hellebrekers, Ludo J

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine in ponies. Antinociceptive effects of epidural ropivacaine were evaluated by means of mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNTs) at several spinal levels in conscious ponies. The effects of ropivacaine on nociceptive afferent transmission to the spinal cord were also assessed by measuring spinal cord somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in anaesthetised ponies. Ataxia scores were determined in conscious ponies to assess the effects on motor function. A randomised, placebo controlled, double blind cross-over design was used. Low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine led to increases in MNTs at various anatomical locations with a maximum effect at the lumbosacral and sacrococcygeal regions, both with respect to increase in threshold and duration of effect. Analysis of SSEPs showed that epidural ropivacaine influenced both Aβ- and Aδ-mediated afferent transmission to the spinal cord at the level of the lumbosacral junction. Ponies showed mild ataxia after low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine, but all ponies remained standing. Application of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine provided safe and efficacious antinociceptive effects in conscious and anaesthetised ponies, and could therefore be a valuable addition to multimodal analgesic protocols in Equidae. PMID:22398129

  14. The pathogenesis of spinal epidural abscess: microangiographic studies in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Feldenzer, J A; McKeever, P E; Schaberg, D R; Campbell, J A; Hoff, J T

    1988-07-01

    An experimental model of spinal epidural abscess was developed in rabbits by injecting Staphylococcus aureus into the posterior thoracolumbar epidural space. This model has been shown to reproduce the neurological, bacteriological, and radiological aspects of the human disease. In this study, the effect of the infectious epidural mass on the vasculature of the spinal cord in paraplegic rabbits was studied using microangiographic techniques. The normal vascular anatomy of the rabbit spinal cord was defined in control experiments. Vascular proliferation was demonstrated in the epidural space surrounding the abscesses. Anterior and paired posterior spinal arteries remained patent in paraplegic rabbits with mild or moderate spinal cord compression and in some cases of severe compression. In animals with severe compression, the anterior epidural venous plexus remained patent, but the dorsal spinal vein was occluded. Occlusion of perforating arteries occurred only with extreme spinal cord compression. These data indicate that the initial neurological deficit associated with experimental spinal epidural abscess is not due to vascular thrombosis. PMID:2454302

  15. Intravenous Dexmedetomidine Promotes Spinal Bupivacaine Anesthesia and Postoperative Analgesia in Lower Limb Surgery: A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical CONSORT Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Ming; Zhang, Sai-Yu; Fu, Min; Zhang, Si-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dexmedetomidine (DEX) has been reported to have synergistic action with local anesthetics. This prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical study was designed to observe the efficacy of intravenous DEX without loading dose on spinal blockade duration, postoperative sedation, patient-controlled analgesia and its morphine-sparing effect in lower limb surgeries. Seventy-five patients, scheduled for lower limb surgery under spinal anesthesia, were randomly allocated into 2 groups: group BS (received 15 mg of 0.5% of bupivacaine for subarachnoid anesthesia and continuous intravenous infusion of saline in Ringer solution) and BD group (received 15 mg of 0.5% of bupivacaine for subarachnoid anesthesia and continuous intravenous infusion of DEX in Ringer solution at a rate of 0.25 μg/kg/h). Intravenous infusion started 15 minutes before spinal anesthesia. The onset time of sensory and motor blockade was shorten, the duration of sensory and motor blockade was significantly prolonged in BD patients when compared to BS patients. The Ramsay sedation score measured immediately after surgery was greater in BD group than BS group. BD patients also shown increased time to the first request of postoperative morphine and decreased total morphine consumption as compared with BS patients. Collectively, intravenous administration of DEX without loading dose promoted the efficacy of spinal bupivacaine anesthesia and postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing lower limb surgery. PMID:26937924

  16. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Schwartz, Kobi

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs) in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers) and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. "Hyperstimulation analgesia" with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study. PMID:23847430

  17. Regional anaesthesia and analgesia on the front line.

    PubMed

    Scott, D M

    2009-11-01

    Deployment to a combat zone with the military poses many challenges to the anaesthetist. One of these challenges is the safe, rapid and comfortable initial wound management and repatriation of wounded combat soldiers to their home country or tertiary treatment facility for definitive care and rehabilitation. The current conflict in Afghanistan is associated with injury patterns that differ from wars such as Vietnam or Korea. This report describes the experience of an Australian military anaesthetist and the value of regional anaesthesia and analgesia for the care of the wounded combat soldier PMID:20014611

  18. Stress antagonizes morphine-induced analgesia in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Shannon, L.; Heybach, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to restraint stress resulted in antagonism of the analgesic effect of administered morphine in adult male rats. This antagonism of morphine-induced analgesia by restraint stress was not affected by adrenalectomy one day prior to testing, suggesting that stress-induced secretion of corticosteroids is not critical to this antagonism. In addition, parenteral administration of exogenous adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) mimicked the effect of stress in antagonizing morphine's analgesic efficacy. The hypothesis that ACTH is an endogenous opiate antagonist involved in modulating pain sensitivity is supported.

  19. Spinal subdural haematoma in a parturient after attempted epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lao, T T; Halpern, S H; MacDonald, D; Huh, C

    1993-04-01

    We report a case of spinal subdural haematoma with neurological deficit in a 36-yr-old woman following Caesarean section for severe preeclampsia and placental abruption. She had been taking chronic trifluoperazine treatment for depression. Her activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) was 49 sec (normal = 26-36) but all other tests of coagulation were normal. Epidural anaesthesia was attempted but, despite a negative test dose, injection of local anaesthetic resulted in a generalized seizure and general anaesthesia was induced. Seventy-two hours after delivery, she was found to have bilateral leg weakness, urinary incontinence, absent rectal sphincter tone and asymmetrical leg reflexes. The diagnosis of spinal haematoma was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. She underwent emergency laminectomy and made a full neurological recovery. PMID:8485794

  20. Catheter-Based Transepidural Approach to Cervical and Thoracic Posterior and Perineural Epidural Spaces: A Cadaveric Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Khan, Asif A.; Sohail, Amna; Saed, Aveen; Jadhav, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Approaching the cervical and high thoracic level epidural space through transepidural route from lumbar region represents a method to lower the occurrence of complications associated with direct approach. The authors performed a cadaveric pilot project to determine the feasibility of various catheter-based manipulation and cephalad advancement using the transepidural route. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Two cadavers were used to determine the following: 1. Ability to place a guide sheath over a guidewire using a percutaneous approach within the posterior lumbar epidural space; 2. The highest vertebral level catheter can be advanced within the posterior epidural space; 3. Ability to cross midline within the posterior epidural space; and 4. Ability to catheterize the perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. RESULTS We were able to advance the catheters up to the level of cervical vertebral level of C2 within the posterior epidural space under fluoroscopic guidance from a sheath inserted via oblique parasagittal approach at the lumbar L4–L5 intervertebral space. We were able to cross midline within the posterior epidural space and catheterize multiple perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical vertebral level of C2, C3, and C4 on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. We also catheterized multiple epidural sheaths that surround the nerve roots exiting at the thoracic vertebral level on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. CONCLUSIONS We were able to advance a catheter or microcatheter up to the cervical vertebral level within the posterior epidural space and catheterize the perineural epidural sheath of the nerve root exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. Such observations support further exploration of percutaneous catheter based transepidural approach to cervical and thoracic dorsal epidural spaces for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26060530

  1. The potential contributing effect of ketorolac and fluoxetine to a spinal epidural hematoma following a cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection: a case report and narrative review.

    PubMed

    Chien, George C Chang; McCormick, Zack; Araujo, Marco; Candido, Kenneth D

    2014-01-01

    Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections (ESIs) are commonly performed as one part of a multi-modal analgesic regimen in the management of upper extremity radicular pain. Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare complication with a reported incidence ranging from 1.38 in 10,000 to 1 in 190,000 epidurals. Current American Society of Regional Anesthesia (ASRA), American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP), and the International Spine Intervention Society (ISIS) recommendations are that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) do not need to be withheld prior to epidural anesthesia. We report a case wherein intramuscular ketorolac and oral fluoxetine contributed to a SEH and tetraplegia following a cervical interlaminar (ESI). A 66 year-old woman with chronic renal insufficiency and neck pain radiating into her right upper extremity presented for evaluation and was deemed an appropriate CESI candidate. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multi-level neuroforaminal stenosis and degenerative intervertebral discs. Utilizing a loss of resistance to saline technique, an 18-gauge Tuohy-type needle entered the epidural space at C6-7. After negative aspiration, 4 mL of saline with 80 mg of methyl-prednisolone was injected. Immediately thereafter, the patient reported significant spasmodic-type localized neck pain with no neurologic status changes. A decision was made to administer 30 mg intramuscular ketorolac as treatment for the spasmodic-type pain. En route home, she developed a sudden onset of acute tetraplegia. She was brought to the emergency department for evaluation including platelet and coagulation studies which were normal. MRI demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from C5 to T7. She underwent a bilateral C5-T6 laminectomy with epidural hematoma evacuation and was discharged to an acute inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Chronic renal insufficiency, spinal stenosis, female gender, and increasing age have been

  2. Delayed Presentation of a Cervic