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Sample records for episodic ataxia type

  1. The first knockin mouse model of episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Rose, Samuel J; Kriener, Lisa H; Heinzer, Ann K; Fan, Xueliang; Raike, Robert S; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Hess, Ellen J

    2014-11-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with attacks of ataxia that are typically precipitated by stress, ethanol, caffeine or exercise. EA2 is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes the α1A subunit of the CaV2.1 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel. To better understand the pathomechanisms of this disorder in vivo, we created the first genetic animal model of EA2 by engineering a mouse line carrying the EA2-causing c.4486T>G (p.F1406C) missense mutation in the orthologous mouse Cacna1a gene. Mice homozygous for the mutated allele exhibit a ~70% reduction in CaV2.1 current density in Purkinje cells, though surprisingly do not exhibit an overt motor phenotype. Mice hemizygous for the knockin allele (EA2/- mice) did exhibit motor dysfunction measurable by rotarod and pole test. Studies using Cre-flox conditional genetics explored the role of cerebellar Purkinje cells or cerebellar granule cells in the poor motor performance of EA2/- mice and demonstrate that manipulation of either cell type alone did not cause poor motor performance. Thus, it is possible that subtle dysfunction arising from multiple cell types is necessary for the expression of certain ataxia syndromes. PMID:25109669

  2. Episodic ataxia type 1: clinical characterization, quality of life and genotype–phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Tracey D.; Cha, Yoon-Hee; Hahn, Angelika F.; Barohn, Richard; Salajegheh, Mohammed K.; Griggs, Robert C.; Bundy, Brian N.; Jen, Joanna C.; Baloh, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 is considered a rare neuronal ion channel disorder characterized by brief attacks of unsteadiness and dizziness with persistent myokymia. To characterize the natural history, develop outcome measures for future clinical trials, and correlate genotype with phenotype, we undertook an international, prospective, cross-sectional study. Thirty-nine individuals (51% male) were enrolled: median age 37 years (range 15–65 years). We identified 10 different pathogenic point mutations in KCNA1 that accounted for the genetic basis of 85% of the cohort. Participants with KCNA1 mutations were more likely to have a positive family history. Analysis of the total cohort showed that the first episode of ataxia occurred before age 20 in all but one patient, with an average age of onset of 7.9 years. Physical exertion, emotional stress and environmental temperature were the most common triggers for attacks. Attack frequency ranged from daily to monthly, even with the same KCNA1 genotype. Average attack duration was in the order of minutes. Ten participants (26%) developed permanent cerebellar signs, which were related to disease duration. The average Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia score (SARA, a standardized measure of cerebellar dysfunction on clinical examination, scores range from 0–40) was an average of 3.15 for all participants (range 0–14), but was only 2 in those with isolated episodic ataxia compared with 7.7 in those with progressive cerebellar ataxia in addition to episodic ataxia. Thirty-seven participants completed the SF-36, a quality of life survey; all eight domain norm-based average scores (mean = 50) were below normal with mental health being the lowest (41.3) in those with mutation positive episodic ataxia type 1. Scores on SF-36 correlated negatively with attack frequency. Of the 39 participants in the study, 33 harboured mutations in KCNA1 whereas the remaining six had no mutation identified. Episodic ataxia type 1

  3. Genetics Home Reference: episodic ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ebers GC. A genome-wide screen and linkage mapping for a large pedigree with episodic ataxia. Neurology. ... investigators. Primary episodic ataxias: diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment. Brain. 2007 Oct;130(Pt 10):2484-93. Epub ...

  4. Next-generation sequencing identifies novel CACNA1A gene mutations in episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Maksemous, Neven; Roy, Bishakha; Smith, Robert A; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2016-03-01

    Episodic Ataxia type 2 (EA2) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited neurological disorder characterized by recurrent disabling imbalance, vertigo, and episodes of ataxia lasting minutes to hours. EA2 is caused most often by loss of function mutations of the calcium channel gene CACNA1A. In addition to EA2, mutations in CACNA1A are responsible for two other allelic disorders: familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Herein, we have utilized next-generation sequencing (NGS) to screen the coding sequence, exon-intron boundaries, and Untranslated Regions (UTRs) of five genes where mutation is known to produce symptoms related to EA2, including CACNA1A. We performed this screening in a group of 31 unrelated patients with EA2 symptoms. Both novel and known mutations were detected through NGS technology, and confirmed through Sanger sequencing. Genetic testing showed in total 15 mutation bearing patients (48%), of which nine were novel mutations (6 missense and 3 small frameshift deletion mutations) and six known mutations (4 missense and 2 nonsense).These results demonstrate the efficiency of our NGS-panel for detecting known and novel mutations for EA2 in the CACNA1A gene, also identifying a novel missense mutation in ATP1A2 which is not a normal target for EA2 screening. PMID:27066515

  5. In vivo impact of presynaptic calcium channel dysfunction on motor axons in episodic ataxia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Tan, S. Veronica; Burke, David; Labrum, Robyn W.; Haworth, Andrea; Gibbons, Vaneesha S.; Sweeney, Mary G.; Griggs, Robert C.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Bostock, Hugh; Hanna, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel dysfunction causes a range of neurological disorders by altering transmembrane ion fluxes, neuronal or muscle excitability, and neurotransmitter release. Genetic neuronal channelopathies affecting peripheral axons provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of dysfunction of a single channel subtype in detail in vivo. Episodic ataxia type 2 is caused by mutations in CACNA1A, which encodes the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated calcium channel Cav2.1. In peripheral motor axons, this channel is highly expressed at the presynaptic neuromuscular junction where it contributes to action potential-evoked neurotransmitter release, but it is not expressed mid-axon or thought to contribute to action potential generation. Eight patients from five families with genetically confirmed episodic ataxia type 2 underwent neurophysiological assessment to determine whether axonal excitability was normal and, if not, whether changes could be explained by Cav2.1 dysfunction. New mutations in the CACNA1A gene were identified in two families. Nerve conduction studies were normal, but increased jitter in single-fibre EMG studies indicated unstable neuromuscular transmission in two patients. Excitability properties of median motor axons were compared with those in 30 age-matched healthy control subjects. All patients had similar excitability abnormalities, including a high electrical threshold and increased responses to hyperpolarizing (P < 0.00007) and depolarizing currents (P < 0.001) in threshold electrotonus. In the recovery cycle, refractoriness (P < 0.0002) and superexcitability (P < 0.006) were increased. Cav2.1 dysfunction in episodic ataxia type 2 thus has unexpected effects on axon excitability, which may reflect an indirect effect of abnormal calcium current fluxes during development. PMID:26912519

  6. In vivo impact of presynaptic calcium channel dysfunction on motor axons in episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Susan E; Tan, S Veronica; Burke, David; Labrum, Robyn W; Haworth, Andrea; Gibbons, Vaneesha S; Sweeney, Mary G; Griggs, Robert C; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Bostock, Hugh; Hanna, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    Ion channel dysfunction causes a range of neurological disorders by altering transmembrane ion fluxes, neuronal or muscle excitability, and neurotransmitter release. Genetic neuronal channelopathies affecting peripheral axons provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of dysfunction of a single channel subtype in detail in vivo. Episodic ataxia type 2 is caused by mutations in CACNA1A, which encodes the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated calcium channel Cav2.1. In peripheral motor axons, this channel is highly expressed at the presynaptic neuromuscular junction where it contributes to action potential-evoked neurotransmitter release, but it is not expressed mid-axon or thought to contribute to action potential generation. Eight patients from five families with genetically confirmed episodic ataxia type 2 underwent neurophysiological assessment to determine whether axonal excitability was normal and, if not, whether changes could be explained by Cav2.1 dysfunction. New mutations in the CACNA1A gene were identified in two families. Nerve conduction studies were normal, but increased jitter in single-fibre EMG studies indicated unstable neuromuscular transmission in two patients. Excitability properties of median motor axons were compared with those in 30 age-matched healthy control subjects. All patients had similar excitability abnormalities, including a high electrical threshold and increased responses to hyperpolarizing (P < 0.00007) and depolarizing currents (P < 0.001) in threshold electrotonus. In the recovery cycle, refractoriness (P < 0.0002) and superexcitability (P < 0.006) were increased. Cav2.1 dysfunction in episodic ataxia type 2 thus has unexpected effects on axon excitability, which may reflect an indirect effect of abnormal calcium current fluxes during development. PMID:26912519

  7. New insights into the pathogenesis and therapeutics of episodic ataxia type 1

    PubMed Central

    D’Adamo, Maria Cristina; Hasan, Sonia; Guglielmi, Luca; Servettini, Ilenio; Cenciarini, Marta; Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Franciolini, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) is a K+ channelopathy characterized by a broad spectrum of symptoms. Generally, patients may experience constant myokymia and dramatic episodes of spastic contractions of the skeletal muscles of the head, arms, and legs with loss of both motor coordination and balance. During attacks additional symptoms may be reported such as vertigo, blurred vision, diplopia, nausea, headache, diaphoresis, clumsiness, stiffening of the body, dysarthric speech, and difficulty in breathing. These episodes may be precipitated by anxiety, emotional stress, fatigue, startle response or sudden postural changes. Epilepsy is overrepresented in EA1. The disease is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, and genetic analysis of several families has led to the discovery of a number of point mutations in the voltage-dependent K+ channel gene KCNA1 (Kv1.1), on chromosome 12p13. To date KCNA1 is the only gene known to be associated with EA1. Functional studies have shown that these mutations impair Kv1.1 channel function with variable effects on channel assembly, trafficking and biophysics. Despite the solid evidence obtained on the molecular mechanisms underlying EA1, how these cause dysfunctions within the central and peripheral nervous systems circuitries remains elusive. This review summarizes the main breakthrough findings in EA1, discusses the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease, current therapies, future challenges and opens a window onto the role of Kv1.1 channels in central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) functions. PMID:26347608

  8. Episodic ataxia type 2 manifests as epileptiform electroencephalographic activity with no epileptic attacks in two family members.

    PubMed

    Kaido, Misako; Furuta, Mitsuru; Nakamori, Masayuki; Yuasa, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Masanori P

    2016-04-28

    Here, we report two cases of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) in a 63-year-old woman and her 36-year-old daughter. The mother experienced recurrent attacks of cerebellar dysfunction lasting 4 to 5 hours since the age of 41 years. On several occasions, she was admitted to the emergency room, where she was diagnosed with epilepsy or stroke. Based on these diagnoses, she was treated with antiepileptic or anticoagulant drugs, but both treatments were eventually discontinued. The frequency of the attacks increased after the patient reached the age of 62. Interictal neurological examination demonstrated signs of slight cerebellar ataxia, i.e. saccadic eye movements, gaze-directed nystagmus, and mild truncal ataxia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebellar vermis atrophy. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed various spike and wave patterns: solitary spikes, spike-and-slow wave complexes, and slow wave bursts. Photoparoxysmal response (PPR) type 3 was also observed. Treatment with acetazolamide abolished the patient's attacks almost completely. The daughter started experiencing 5- to 10-minute ataxic episodes at the age of 16 years. Based on her epileptiform EEG activities with PPR (type 2), antiepileptic drugs (valproate and zonisamide) were prescribed. Despite pharmacological treatment, the attacks recurred; however, their frequency gradually decreased with time, until they almost entirely disappeared when the patient was 33. Unfortunately, migraine-like headaches arose instead. Subtle truncal ataxia was observed during interictal periods. Sanger sequencing of the exons of the CACNA1A gene revealed a novel single base deletion (c.3575delA) in both patients. Despite the difference in age of onset and clinical course, both patients showed clearly epileptiform EEG activities without experiencing the concurrent epileptic episodes. Thus, EA2 is a disease that may be misdiagnosed as epilepsy or stroke in the field of emergency medicine. PMID:27025991

  9. Episodic ataxia type 2: phenotype characteristics of a novel CACNA1A mutation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nachbauer, Wolfgang; Nocker, Michael; Karner, Elfriede; Stankovic, Iva; Unterberger, Iris; Eigentler, Andreas; Schneider, Rainer; Poewe, Werner; Delazer, Margarete; Boesch, Sylvia

    2014-05-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurological disorder that is characterized by paroxysmal episodes of ataxia. The causative gene for EA2 is CACNA1A which codes for the alpha 1A subunit of the voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel (Cav2.1). We detected a novel point mutation in the CACNA1A gene in a large Austrian family. All ten affected family members harbored a heterozygous c.3089+2T>C nucleotide exchange in intron 19. In silico modeling demonstrated a loss of the splice site of exon 19 by the mutation, which most likely results in exon skipping without frameshifting or use of an alternative splice site.Clinically, the family exhibited frequent ataxic episodes accompanied by headache in some individuals, which showed a good treatment response to acetazolamide or aminopyridine. Interictal phenotype variability was high ranging from an unremarkable clinical examination to a progressive cerebellar syndrome. Detailed cognitive testing with standardized neuropsychological tests revealed specific deficits in various domains including memory,executive functions and visual abilities. Moreover, a striking coincidence of socio-phobic behavior and anxiety disorders was detected within this family, which interfered with activities of daily living and has to be taken in consideration in EA2 patient management. We here characterize the phenotype of this novel CACNA1A mutation,review the respective literature and discuss implications on diagnosis and patient management. PMID:24658662

  10. RNAi silencing of P/Q-type calcium channels in Purkinje neurons of adult mouse leads to episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Julie; Bertaso, Federica; Mausset-Bonnefont, Anne-Laure; Metz, Alexandra; Lemmers, Céline; Ango, Fabrice; Fagni, Laurent; Lory, Philippe; Mezghrani, Alexandre

    2014-08-01

    Episodic ataxia type-2 (EA2) is a dominantly inherited human neurological disorder caused by loss of function mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes the CaV2.1 subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels. It remains however unknown whether the deficit of cerebellar CaV2.1 in adult is in direct link with the disease. To address this issue, we have used lentiviral based-vector RNA interference (RNAi) to knock-down CaV2.1 expression in the cerebellum of adult mice. We show that suppression of the P/Q-type channels in Purkinje neurons induced motor abnormalities, such as imbalance and ataxic gait. Interestingly, moderate channel suppression caused no basal ataxia, while β-adrenergic activation and exercise mimicked stress induced motor disorders. Moreover, stress-induced ataxia was stable, non-progressive and totally abolished by acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor used to treat EA2. Altogether, these data reveal that P/Q-type channel suppression in adult mice supports the episodic status of EA2 disease. PMID:24768804

  11. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 20.

    PubMed

    Storey, Elsdon; Gardner, R J McKinlay

    2012-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 20 (SCA20), first reported in 2004, is a slowly progressive dominantly inherited disorder so far reported in a single Anglo-Celtic family from Australia. It is characterized by dentate calcification from an early stage of the illness. Dysarthria without ataxia is the first symptom in the majority - an unusual feature amongst the SCAs. In addition to ataxia, examination often reveals spasmodic dysphonia and palatal tremor, but the syndrome is otherwise fairly pure. The responsible genetic abnormality has been tentatively identified as a 260-kb duplication in the pericentric region of chromosome 11, but confirmation will necessarily await description of further families. PMID:21827916

  12. Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Winchester, Sara; Singh, Piyush K; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2013-01-01

    The approach to the child with ataxia requires a detailed history and careful general and neurological examination as well as selected blood work and brain imaging and increasingly available genetic testing for inherited ataxias that usually have an episodic or progressive presentation. The differential of acute and recurring ataxia covered in this chapter includes intoxication (e.g., antiepileptics, lead, alcohol), postinfectious cerebellitis, hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, tumor (posterior fossa or cerebellum), brainstem encephalitis, occult neuroblastoma, Miller Fisher syndrome, conversion reaction, multiple sclerosis, epileptic pseudoataxia, vasculitis (e.g., Kawasaki), metabolic etiologies (e.g., maple syrup urine disease, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, biotinidase deficiency, Hartnup disease, and argininosuccinic aciduria), migraine, migraine equivalents (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo), autosomal dominant episodic ataxias (with seven types currently identified), and hypothyroidism. Cooperation with therapists and providers from other specialties including ophthalmology and genetics and metabolism is essential to caring for these children and their families. PMID:23622331

  13. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 15.

    PubMed

    Storey, Elsdon; Gardner, R J McKinlay

    2012-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 15 (SCA15), first described in 2001, is a slowly progressive, relatively pure dominantly inherited ataxia. Six pedigrees have been reported to date, in Anglo-Celtic and Japanese populations. Other than notably slow progression, its main distinguishing characteristic is tremor, often affecting the head, which is seen in about half of affecteds and which may be the presenting feature. Neuroradiology shows cerebellar atrophy, particularly affecting the anterior and dorsal vermis. SCA15 is due to various deletions of the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 1 gene (ITPR1) on the distal short arm of chromosome 3. The potential of point mutations in ITPR1 to cause SCA15 is not yet confirmed. "SCA16" has now been shown to be due to an ITPR1 mutation, and has now been subsumed into SCA15. PMID:21827915

  14. A novel frameshift mutation in FGF14 causes an autosomal dominant episodic ataxia.

    PubMed

    Choquet, Karine; La Piana, Roberta; Brais, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    Episodic ataxias (EAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders characterized by recurrent attacks of ataxia. Mutations in KCNA1 and CACNA1A account for the majority of EA cases worldwide. We recruited a two-generation family affected with EA of unknown subtype and performed whole-exome sequencing on two affected members. This revealed a novel heterozygous mutation c.211_212insA (p.I71NfsX27) leading to a premature stop codon in FGF14. Mutations in FGF14 are known to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 27 (SCA27). Sanger sequencing confirmed segregation within the family. Our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of SCA27 by underlining the possible episodic nature of this ataxia. PMID:25566820

  15. The episodic ataxia type 1 mutation I262T alters voltage-dependent gating and disrupts protein biosynthesis of human Kv1.1 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Han; Fu, Ssu-Ju; Huang, Jing-Jia; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are essential for setting neuronal membrane excitability. Mutations in human Kv1.1 channels are linked to episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1). The EA1-associated mutation I262T was identified from a patient with atypical phenotypes. Although a previous report has characterized its suppression effect, several key questions regarding the impact of the I262T mutation on Kv1.1 as well as other members of the Kv1 subfamily remain unanswered. Herein we show that the dominant-negative effect of I262T on Kv1.1 current expression is not reversed by co-expression with Kvβ1.1 or Kvβ2 subunits. Biochemical examinations indicate that I262T displays enhanced protein degradation and impedes membrane trafficking of Kv1.1 wild-type subunits. I262T appears to be the first EA1 mutation directly associated with impaired protein stability. Further functional analyses demonstrate that I262T changes the voltage-dependent activation and Kvβ1.1-mediated inactivation, uncouples inactivation from activation gating, and decelerates the kinetics of cumulative inactivation of Kv1.1 channels. I262T also exerts similar dominant effects on the gating of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 channels. Together our data suggest that I262T confers altered channel gating and reduced functional expression of Kv1 channels, which may account for some of the phenotypes of the EA1 patient. PMID:26778656

  16. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by progressive problems ...

  17. A gene for nystagmus-associated episodic ataxia maps to chromosome 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.L.; Root, D.; Gancher, S.

    1994-09-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by attacks of generalized ataxia and relatively normal neurological function between attacks. Onset occurs in childhood or adolescence and persists through adulthood. Penetrance is nearly complete. EA is clinically heterogeneous, including at least two distinct entities: (1) episodes of ataxia and dysarthria lasting hours to days, generally with interictal nystagmus (MIM 108500); (2) episodes of ataxia and dysarthria lasting only minutes, with interictal myokymia (MMM 160120). The EA/nystagmus patients sometimes develop persistent ataxia and cerebellar atrophy. Previously we reported linkage in four EA/myokymia families to a K{sup +} channel gene on chromosome 12p. We excluded this region in a large family with EA/nystagmus. We now report evidence for linkage to chromosome 19p in this and in one other EA/nystagmus family, based on eight microsatellite markers which span approximately 30 cM. The region is flanked distally by D19S209 and proximally by D19S226. All six markers within this region gave positive evidence for linkage; the highest total two-point lod scores occurred wtih D19S221 (3.98 at theta = 0.10) and D19S413 (3.37 at theta = 0.05). Interestingly, Joutel et al. (1993) mapped a gene for familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) to the region around D19S221. Some individuals in these families have ataxia, cerebellar atrophy and interictal nystagmus, but no episodic ataxia. These results demonstrate that the clinical heterogeneity in EA reflects underlying genetic hetreogeneity. In addition, they suggest that EA/nystagmus and some FHM may represent different mutations in the same gene locus on chromosome 19p.

  18. Thiamine and spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Antonio; Pala, Maria Immacolata; Colangeli, Marco; Savelli, Serena

    2013-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 is a genetic disorder characterised by the degeneration of the cerebellum, its connections and degeneration in brainstem areas. Some observations indicate that high doses of thiamine may lead to the partial regression of the symptoms. One patient was under rehabilitative treatment from June 2011 to July 2012. We assessed the level of fatigue using the Fatigue Severity Scale. We performed the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia and Robertson Profile for Dysarthria (Italian version). Thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate levels in the blood were within the healthy reference range. We started a parenteral therapy with 100 mg intramuscular every 7 days. The therapy led to a partial regression of fatigue within a few days. After about 3 months, a discreet improvement of motor symptoms especially in speech was observed. The symptoms could derive from a focal thiamine deficiency that could determine a selective neuronal loss. PMID:23314445

  19. Novel frameshift mutation in the CACNA1A gene causing a mixed phenotype of episodic ataxia and familiar hemiplegic migraine.

    PubMed

    Kinder, S; Ossig, C; Wienecke, M; Beyer, A; von der Hagen, M; Storch, A; Smitka, M

    2015-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, MIM#108500) is the most common form of EA and an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder characterized by paroxysmal episodes of ataxia. The disease causative gene CACNA1A encodes for the alpha 1A subunit of the voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel. We report on a family with a novel mutation in the CACNA1A gene. The clinical symptoms within the family varied from the typical clinical presentation of EA2 with dysarthria, gait ataxia and oculomotor symptoms to migraine and dystonia. A novel nonsense mutation of the CACNA1A gene was identified in all affected family members and is most likely the disease causing molecular defect. The pharmacological treatment with acetazolamide (AAA) was successful in three family members so far. Treatment with AAA led to a reduction of migraine attacks and an improvement of the dystonia. This relationship confirmed the hypothesis that this novel mutation results in a heterogeneous phenotype and confutes the coincidence with common migraine. Dystonia is potentially included as a further part of the phenotype spectrum of CACNA1A gene mutations. PMID:25468264

  20. Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Umar; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Balance and coordination are products of complex circuitry involving the basal ganglia, cerebellum and cerebral cortex, as well as peripheral motor and sensory pathways. Malfunction of any part of this intricate circuitry can lead to imbalance and incoordination, or ataxia, of gait, the limbs or eyes, or a combination thereof. Ataxia can be a symptom of a multisystemic disorder, or it can manifest as the major component of a disease process. Ongoing discoveries of genetic abnormalities suggest the role ofmitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, abnormal mechanisms of DNA repair, possible protein misfolding, and abnormalities in cytoskeletal proteins. Few ataxias are fully treatable, and most are symptomatically managed. A discussion of the ataxias is presented here with brief mention of acquired ataxias, and a greater focus on inherited ataxias. PMID:25432731

  1. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 5 (SCA5)

    MedlinePlus

    ... areas of the brain. It is considered a “pure cerebellar ataxia.” What is the prognosis for SCA5? ... SCA5 have, on rare occasions, been reported in individuals under age 20. Those individuals with early onset ...

  2. Episodic Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene and thus being afflicted with the disease. Males and females are equally likely to be affiicted. ........................................................... . ............... . ............... .. ................ . ........ . ............ .. .. .. ................ . .. ...................... ...................... ........................ ................ ...................... ................. .................... 2 NAF– ...

  3. A novel missense mutation in CACNA1A evaluated by in silico protein modeling is associated with non-episodic spinocerebellar ataxia with slow progression.

    PubMed

    Bürk, Katrin; Kaiser, Frank J; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Schöls, Ludger; Kreuz, Friedmar R; Wieland, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Büttner, Thomas; Hollstein, Ronja; Braunholz, Diana; Plaschke, Jens; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Zühlke, Christine

    2014-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1) are allelic disorders of the gene CACNA1A encoding the P/Q subunit of a voltage gated calcium channel. While SCA6 is related to repeat expansions affecting the C-terminal part of the protein, EA2 and FHM phenotypes are usually associated with nonsense and missense mutations leading to impaired channel properties. In three unrelated families with dominant cerebellar ataxia, symptoms cosegregated with CACNA1A missense mutations of evolutionary highly conserved amino acids (exchanges p.E668K, p.R583Q and p.D302N). To evaluate pathogenic effects, in silico, protein modeling analyses were performed which indicate structural alterations of the novel mutation p.E668K within the homologous domain 2 affecting CACNA1A protein function. The phenotype is characterised by a very slowly progressive ataxia, while ataxic episodes or migraine are uncommon. These findings enlarge the phenotypic spectrum of CACNA1A mutations. PMID:24486772

  4. Clinical and MRI findings in spinocerebellar ataxia type 5.

    PubMed

    Stevanin, G; Herman, A; Brice, A; Dürr, A

    1999-10-12

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5), one of the genetically heterogeneous autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias, was assigned to chromosome 11 in a single family descending from the grandparents of President Abraham Lincoln. We report a second, apparently unrelated, SCA5 family of French origin. The overall clinical picture was a slowly progressive cerebellar syndrome beginning mostly in the third decade (27+/-10 years, range 14 to 40). MRI showed a marked global cerebellar atrophy similar to SCA6. PMID:10522902

  5. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 36 in the Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Chung; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Liu, Guan-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the genetic and clinical characteristics of the GGCCTG hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the nucleolar protein 56 gene (NOP56) in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), sporadic ataxia, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in Taiwan. Methods: We conducted clinical and molecular genetic studies of 109 probands with molecularly unassigned SCA from 512 SCA pedigrees, 323 healthy controls, 502 patients with sporadic ataxia syndromes, and 144 patients with ALS. Repeat-primed PCR assays and PCR-fragment analysis for the number of short hexanucleotide repeats (<40 units) were performed to ascertain NOP56 hexanucleotide repeat expansion. Genotyping included 8 microsatellite markers and 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms flanking NOP56 and covering a region of 1.8 Mb to assess a possible founder effect. Results: Eleven individuals from 3 SCA pedigrees have the NOP56 repeat expansions. The 3 pedigrees share a common haplotype spanning 5.3 kb flanking the NOP56 repeat expansions, suggesting a founder effect of spinocerebellar ataxia type 36 (SCA36) in the Han Chinese. The average age at symptom onset was 44.8 ± 3.8 years with truncal ataxia as the initial manifestation. Common features included slowly progressive truncal/limb ataxia, dysarthria, generalized hyperreflexia, and hearing impairment. Evidence of lower motor neuron involvement, including atrophy and fasciculation in the limb muscles and tongue, was mostly found in patients with prolonged disease duration. NOP56 repeat expansion was not detected in controls or patients with sporadic ataxic syndromes or ALS. Conclusions: SCA36 is an uncommon subtype, which accounted for 0.6% (3/512) of SCA cases in the Han Chinese population. PMID:27123487

  6. A novel locus for episodic ataxia:UBR4 the likely candidate

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Judith; McGettigan, Paul; Murphy, Raymond; Webb, David; Murphy, Sinéad M; McCoy, Blathnaid; Albertyn, Christine; McCreary, Dara; McDonagh, Cara; Walsh, Orla; Lynch, SallyAnn; Ennis, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Episodic ataxias (EAs) are rare neurological channelopathies that are characterized by spells of imbalance and a lack of co-ordination. There are seven clinically recognized EAs and multiple isolated cases. Five disease-causing genes have been identified to date. We describe a novel form of autosomal dominant EA in a large three-generation Irish family. This form of EA presents in early childhood with periods of unsteadiness generalized weakness and slurred speech during an attack, which may be triggered by physical tiredness or stress. Linkage analysis undertaken in 13 related individuals identified a single disease locus (1p36.13-p34.3) with a LOD score of 3.29. Exome sequencing was performed. Following data analysis, which included presence/absence within the linkage peak, two candidate variants were identified. These are located in the HSPG2 and UBR4 genes. UBR4 is an ubiquitin ligase protein that is known to interact with calmodulin, a Ca2+ protein, in the cytoplasm. It also co-localizes with ITPR1 a calcium release channel that is a major determinant of mammal co-ordination. Although UBR4 is not an ion channel gene, the potential for disrupted Ca2+ control within neuronal cells highlights its potential for a role in this form of EA. PMID:23982692

  7. Mutations in the sodium channel gene SCN2A cause neonatal epilepsy with late-onset episodic ataxia.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, N; Hahn, A; Bast, T; Müller, S; Löffler, H; Maljevic, S; Gaily, E; Prehl, I; Biskup, S; Joensuu, T; Lehesjoki, A-E; Neubauer, B A; Lerche, H; Hedrich, U B S

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in SCN2A cause epilepsy syndromes of variable severity including neonatal-infantile seizures. In one case, we previously described additional childhood-onset episodic ataxia. Here, we corroborate and detail the latter phenotype in three further cases. We describe the clinical characteristics, identify the causative SCN2A mutations and determine their functional consequences using whole-cell patch-clamping in mammalian cells. In total, four probands presented with neonatal-onset seizures remitting after five to 13 months. In early childhood, they started to experience repeated episodes of ataxia, accompanied in part by headache or back pain lasting minutes to several hours. In two of the new cases, we detected the novel mutation p.Arg1882Gly. While this mutation occurred de novo in both patients, one of them carries an additional known variant on the same SCN2A allele, inherited from the unaffected father (p.Gly1522Ala). Whereas p.Arg1882Gly alone shifted the activation curve by -4 mV, the combination of both variants did not affect activation, but caused a depolarizing shift of voltage-dependent inactivation, and a significant increase in Na(+) current density and protein production. p.Gly1522Ala alone did not change channel gating. The third new proband carries the same de novo SCN2A gain-of-function mutation as our first published case (p.Ala263Val). Our findings broaden the clinical spectrum observed with SCN2A gain-of-function mutations, showing that fairly different biophysical mechanisms can cause a convergent clinical phenotype of neonatal seizures and later onset episodic ataxia. PMID:26645390

  8. Aerosol characteristics of different types of episode.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Yih; Lin, Yan-Ruei; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Chou, Chun-Hung

    2013-12-01

    Daily and hourly average data from nine air-quality monitoring stations distributed across central Taiwan, which include ten items (i.e., PM₁₀, PM₂.₅, wind direction, wind speed, temperature, relative humidity, SO₂, NO₂, NO, and CO), were collected from 2005 to 2009. Four episode types: long-range transport with dust storms (DS), long-range transport with frontal pollution (FP), river dust (RD), and stagnant weather (SW), and one mixed type of episode were identified. Of these four episode types, the SW was the dominant type, averaging about 70%. The mean ratio of PM₂.₅/PM₁₀ was the lowest during the RD episodes (0.42), while the mean ratio of PM₂.₅/PM₁₀ was the highest during the SW episodes (0.64). Fine aerosol (PM₂.₅) and coarse aerosol (PM₁₀-₂.₅) samples were collected by high-volume samplers for chemical composition analysis, from only three stations (Douliou, Lunbei, and Siansi) during the days of SW, RD, DS, and FP. The concentrations of PM₂.₅ and three ionic species (NH₄⁺, NO₃⁻, and SO₄²⁻) all showed significant differences among the four episode types. The highest levels of NO₃⁻ (12.1 μg/m(3)) and SO₄²⁻ (20.5 μg/m(3)) were found during the SW and FP episodes, respectively. A comparison on the spatial similarity of aerosol compositions among the episodes and/or non-episodes (control) was characterized by the coefficient of divergence (CD). The results showed higher CD values in PM₁₀-₂.₅ than in PM₂.₅, and the CD values between RD episodes and the other three episodes were higher than those between two types of episode for the other three episodes. The ratios of SOR (sulfur oxidation ratio), SO₄²⁻/EC (elemental carbon), NOR (nitrogen oxidation ratio), and NO₃⁻/EC showed that sulfate formation was most rapid during the FP, while nitrate formation was most rapid during the SW. PMID:23761164

  9. Disruptive SCYL1 Mutations Underlie a Syndrome Characterized by Recurrent Episodes of Liver Failure, Peripheral Neuropathy, Cerebellar Atrophy, and Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M.; Rutledge, S. Lane; Schüle, Rebecca; Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Züchner, Stephan; Boltshauser, Eugen; Bittner, Reginald E.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias comprise a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by clinically variable cerebellar dysfunction and accompanied by involvement of other organ systems. The molecular underpinnings for many of these diseases are widely unknown. Previously, we discovered the disruption of Scyl1 as the molecular basis of the mouse mutant mdf, which is affected by neurogenic muscular atrophy, progressive gait ataxia with tremor, cerebellar vermis atrophy, and optic-nerve thinning. Here, we report on three human individuals, from two unrelated families, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute liver failure in early infancy and are affected by cerebellar vermis atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. By whole-exome sequencing, compound-heterozygous mutations within SCYL1 were identified in all affected individuals. We further show that in SCYL1-deficient human fibroblasts, the Golgi apparatus is massively enlarged, which is in line with the concept that SCYL1 regulates Golgi integrity. Thus, our findings define SCYL1 mutations as the genetic cause of a human hepatocerebellar neuropathy syndrome. PMID:26581903

  10. Disruptive SCYL1 Mutations Underlie a Syndrome Characterized by Recurrent Episodes of Liver Failure, Peripheral Neuropathy, Cerebellar Atrophy, and Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M; Rutledge, S Lane; Schüle, Rebecca; Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Züchner, Stephan; Boltshauser, Eugen; Bittner, Reginald E

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary ataxias comprise a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by clinically variable cerebellar dysfunction and accompanied by involvement of other organ systems. The molecular underpinnings for many of these diseases are widely unknown. Previously, we discovered the disruption of Scyl1 as the molecular basis of the mouse mutant mdf, which is affected by neurogenic muscular atrophy, progressive gait ataxia with tremor, cerebellar vermis atrophy, and optic-nerve thinning. Here, we report on three human individuals, from two unrelated families, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute liver failure in early infancy and are affected by cerebellar vermis atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. By whole-exome sequencing, compound-heterozygous mutations within SCYL1 were identified in all affected individuals. We further show that in SCYL1-deficient human fibroblasts, the Golgi apparatus is massively enlarged, which is in line with the concept that SCYL1 regulates Golgi integrity. Thus, our findings define SCYL1 mutations as the genetic cause of a human hepatocerebellar neuropathy syndrome. PMID:26581903

  11. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 12 identified in two Italian families may mimic sporadic ataxia.

    PubMed

    Brussino, Alessandro; Graziano, Claudio; Giobbe, Dario; Ferrone, Marina; Dragone, Elisa; Arduino, Carlo; Lodi, Raffaele; Tonon, Caterina; Gabellini, Anna; Rinaldi, Rita; Miccoli, Sara; Grosso, Enrico; Bellati, Maria Cristina; Orsi, Laura; Migone, Nicola; Brusco, Alfredo

    2010-07-15

    SCA12 is an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia characterized by onset in the fourth decade of life with action tremor of arms and head, mild ataxia, dysmetria, and hyperreflexia. The disease is caused by an expansion of >or=51 CAGs in the 5' region of the brain- specific phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B-beta isoform (PPP2R2B) gene. SCA12 is very rare, except for a single ethnic group in India. We screened 159 Italian ataxic patients for SCA12 and identified two families that segregated an expanded allele of 57 to 58 CAGs, sharing a common haplotype. The age at onset, phenotype, and variability of symptoms were compatible with known cases. In one family, the disease was apparently sporadic due to possible incomplete penetrance and/or late age at onset. Our data indicate that SCA12 is also present in Italian patients, and its genetic testing should be applied to both sporadic and familial ataxias. PMID:20629122

  12. Abraham Lincoln did not have type 5 spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Sotos, John G

    2009-10-20

    An autosomal dominant genetic disorder, type 5 spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA5), occurs in multiple descendants of one paternal uncle and one paternal aunt of President Abraham Lincoln. It has been suggested that Lincoln himself had the disease and that his DNA should be tested for an SCA5-conferring gene. Herein, I review the pertinent phenotypes of Lincoln, his father, and his paternal grandmother, and conclude that 1) Lincoln's father did not have SCA5, and, therefore, that Lincoln was not at special risk of the disease; 2) Lincoln had neither subclinical nor visible manifestations of SCA5; 3) little evidence suggests SCA5 is a "Lincolnian" disorder; and 4) without additional evidence, Lincoln's DNA should not be tested for SCA5. PMID:19841386

  13. Sensorimotor processing for balance in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    PubMed Central

    Bunn, Lisa M.; Marsden, Jonathan F.; Voyce, Daniel C.; Giunti, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background We investigated whether balance impairments caused by cerebellar disease are associated with specific sensorimotor processing deficits that generalize across all sensory modalities. Experiments focused on the putative cerebellar functions of scaling and coordinate transformation of balance responses evoked by stimulation of single sensory channels. Methods Vestibular, visual, and proprioceptive sensory channels were stimulated in isolation using galvanic vestibular stimulation, moving visual scenery, and muscle vibration, respectively, in 16 subjects with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and 16 matched healthy controls. Two polarities of each stimulus type evoked postural responses of similar form in the forward and backward directions. Disease severity was assessed using the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia. Results Impaired balance of SCA6 subjects during unperturbed stance was reflected in faster than normal body sway (P = 0.009), which correlated with disease severity (r = 0.705, P < 0.001). Sensory perturbations revealed a sensorimotor processing abnormality that was specific to response scaling for the visual channel. This manifested as visually evoked postural responses that were approximately three times larger than normal (backward, P < 0.001; forward P = 0.005) and correlated with disease severity (r = 0.543, P = 0.03). Response direction and habituation properties were no different from controls for all three sensory modalities. Conclusion Cerebellar degeneration disturbs the scaling of postural responses evoked by visual motion, possibly through disinhibition of extracerebellar visuomotor centers. The excessively high gain of the visuomotor channel without compensatory decreases in gains of other sensorimotor channels provides a potential mechanism for instability of the balance control system in cerebellar disease. © 2015 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  14. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 in the south of Brazil – The Amerindian-Belgian connection

    PubMed Central

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Moro, Adriana; Moscovich, Mariana; Arruda, Walter Oleskho; Munhoz, Renato Puppi; Raskin, Salmo; Teive, Gladys Mary Ghizoni; Dallabrida, Norberto; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is a rare form of autosomal dominant ataxia found predominantly in patients from Latin America with Amerindian ancestry. The authors report the history of SCA10 families from the south of Brazil (the states of Paraná and Santa Catarina), emphasizing the Belgian-Amerindian connection. PMID:26222367

  15. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 in eastern India: Some new observations

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B; Pulai, Debabrata; Guin, Deb Shankar; Ganguly, Goutam; Joardar, Anindita; Roy, Sarnava; Rai, Saurabh; Biswas, Atanu; Pandit, Alok; Roy, Arijit; Senapati, Asit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are hereditary, autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorders showing clinical and genetic heterogeneity. They are usually manifested clinically in the third to fifth decade of life although there is a wide variability in the age of onset. More than 36 different types of SCAs have been reported so far and about half of them are caused by pathological expansion of the trinucleotide, Cytosine Alanine Guanine (CAG) repeat. The global prevalence of SCA is 0.3-2 per 100,000 population, SCA3 being the commonest variety worldwide, accounting for 20-50 per cent of all cases, though SCA 2 is generally considered as the commonest one in India. However, SCA6 has not been addressed adequately from India though it is common in the eastern Asian countries like, Japan, Korea and Thailand. Objective: The present study was undertaken to identify the prevalence of SCA6 in the city of Kolkata and the eastern part of India. Materials and Methods: 83 consecutive patients were recruited for the study of possible SCAs and their clinical features and genotype were investigated. Results: 6 of the 83 subjects turned out positive for SCA6, constituting therefore, 13.33% of the patient pool. Discussion: SCA6 is prevalent in the eastern part of India, though not as frequent as the other common varieties. Conclusions: Further community based studies are required in order to understand the magnitude of SCA6 in the eastern part, as well as in other regions of India. PMID:27570389

  16. Elevated mutant dynorphin A causes Purkinje cell loss and motor dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxia type 23.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Cleo J L M; Jezierska, Justyna; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Duarri, Anna; Fokkens, Michiel R; Meijer, Michel; Zhou, Qin; Yakovleva, Tania; Boddeke, Erik; den Dunnen, Wilfred; van Deursen, Jan; Bakalkin, Georgy; Kampinga, Harm H; van de Sluis, Bart; Verbeek, Dineke S

    2015-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 is caused by mutations in PDYN, which encodes the opioid neuropeptide precursor protein, prodynorphin. Prodynorphin is processed into the opioid peptides, α-neoendorphin, and dynorphins A and B, that normally exhibit opioid-receptor mediated actions in pain signalling and addiction. Dynorphin A is likely a mutational hotspot for spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 mutations, and in vitro data suggested that dynorphin A mutations lead to persistently elevated mutant peptide levels that are cytotoxic and may thus play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23. To further test this and study spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 in more detail, we generated a mouse carrying the spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 mutation R212W in PDYN. Analysis of peptide levels using a radioimmunoassay shows that these PDYN(R212W) mice display markedly elevated levels of mutant dynorphin A, which are associated with climber fibre retraction and Purkinje cell loss, visualized with immunohistochemical stainings. The PDYN(R212W) mice reproduced many of the clinical features of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23, with gait deficits starting at 3 months of age revealed by footprint pattern analysis, and progressive loss of motor coordination and balance at the age of 12 months demonstrated by declining performances on the accelerating Rotarod. The pathologically elevated mutant dynorphin A levels in the cerebellum coincided with transcriptionally dysregulated ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters, and altered neuronal excitability. In conclusion, the PDYN(R212W) mouse is the first animal model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 and our work indicates that the elevated mutant dynorphin A peptide levels are likely responsible for the initiation and progression of the disease, affecting glutamatergic signalling, neuronal excitability, and motor performance. Our novel mouse model defines a critical role for opioid

  17. Widespread neuronal damage and cognitive dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Tátila Martins; D'Abreu, Anelyssa; França, Marcondes Cavalcante; Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Betting, Luiz Eduardo; Samara, Adriana Bastos; Castellano, Gabriela; Somazz, Júlio César; Balthazar, Marcio Luiz Figueredo; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Cendes, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated cognitive impairments in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3/MJD); however, there is no consensus about the cognitive domains affected and the correlation with structural brain abnormalities. We investigated the neuropsychological profile and 3T-MRI findings, including high-resolution T1-images, diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 32 patients with SCA3/MJD and 32 age-, gender- and educational level-matched healthy controls. We reviewed patients' clinical history and CAG repeat length, and performed assessment and rating of ataxia (SARA)-Brazilian version and the neuropsychiatric inventory. Patients presented worse performance in episodic and working memory and Beck inventories (depression and anxiety). SCA3/MJD patients had a reduction of gray matter volume (GM) in the cerebellum, putamen, cingulum, precentral and parietal lobe. A positive correlation was identified between the cognitive findings and GM of temporal, frontal, parietal, culmen and insula. We observed positive correlation between the brainstem's fractional anisotropy and digit span-forward. The following cerebellar metabolite groups (measured relative to creatine) were reduced in patients: N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), NAA + N-acetyl-aspartate-glutamate and glutamate + glutamine (Glx). We found a positive correlation between Corsi's block-tapping task forward with Glx; semantic verbal fluency with phosphorylcholine and glycerophosphorylcholine; digits span-forward with NAA. The cognitive impairments in SCA3/MJD are associated not only with cerebellar and brainstem abnormalities, but also with neuroimaging evidence of diffuse neuronal and axonal dysfunction, particularly in temporal, frontal, parietal and insular areas. PMID:23775343

  18. A CaV2.1 N-terminal fragment relieves the dominant-negative inhibition by an Episodic ataxia 2 mutant.

    PubMed

    Dahimene, Shehrazade; Page, Karen M; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Pratt, Wendy S; D'Arco, Marianna; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-09-01

    Episodic ataxia 2 (EA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the gene CACNA1A that encodes the pore-forming CaV2.1 calcium channel subunit. The majority of EA2 mutations reported so far are nonsense or deletion/insertion mutations predicted to form truncated proteins. Heterologous expression of wild-type CaV2.1, together with truncated constructs that mimic EA2 mutants, significantly suppressed wild-type calcium channel function, indicating that the truncated protein produces a dominant-negative effect (Jouvenceau et al., 2001; Page et al., 2004). A similar finding has been shown for CaV2.2 (Raghib et al., 2001). We show here that a highly conserved sequence in the cytoplasmic N-terminus is involved in this process, for both CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 channels. Additionally, we were able to interfere with the suppressive effect of an EA2 construct by mutating key N-terminal residues within it. We postulate that the N-terminus of the truncated channel plays an essential part in its interaction with the full-length CaV2.1, which prevents the correct folding of the wild-type channel. In agreement with this, we were able to disrupt the interaction between EA2 and the full length channel by co-expressing a free N-terminal peptide. PMID:27260834

  19. 4-aminopyridine reverses ataxia and cerebellar firing deficiency in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    PubMed Central

    Jayabal, Sriram; Chang, Hui Ho Vanessa; Cullen, Kathleen E.; Watt, Alanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is a devastating midlife-onset autosomal dominant motor control disease with no known treatment. Using a hyper-expanded polyglutamine (84Q) knock-in mouse, we found that cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision was degraded in heterozygous (SCA684Q/+) mice at 19 months when motor deficits are observed. Similar alterations in firing precision and motor control were observed at disease onset at 7 months in homozygous (SCA684Q/84Q) mice, as well as a reduction in firing rate. We further found that chronic administration of the FDA-approved drug 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which targets potassium channels, alleviated motor coordination deficits and restored cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision to wildtype (WT) levels in SCA684Q/84Q mice both in acute slices and in vivo. These results provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating ataxic symptoms associated with SCA6. PMID:27381005

  20. 4-aminopyridine reverses ataxia and cerebellar firing deficiency in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6.

    PubMed

    Jayabal, Sriram; Chang, Hui Ho Vanessa; Cullen, Kathleen E; Watt, Alanna J

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is a devastating midlife-onset autosomal dominant motor control disease with no known treatment. Using a hyper-expanded polyglutamine (84Q) knock-in mouse, we found that cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision was degraded in heterozygous (SCA6(84Q/+)) mice at 19 months when motor deficits are observed. Similar alterations in firing precision and motor control were observed at disease onset at 7 months in homozygous (SCA6(84Q/84Q)) mice, as well as a reduction in firing rate. We further found that chronic administration of the FDA-approved drug 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which targets potassium channels, alleviated motor coordination deficits and restored cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision to wildtype (WT) levels in SCA6(84Q/84Q) mice both in acute slices and in vivo. These results provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating ataxic symptoms associated with SCA6. PMID:27381005

  1. Early Cerebellar Network Shifting in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Falcon, M I; Gomez, C M; Chen, E E; Shereen, A; Solodkin, A

    2016-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant degenerative disease, is characterized by diplopia, gait ataxia, and incoordination due to severe progressive degeneration of Purkinje cells in the vestibulo- and spinocerebellum. Ocular motor deficits are common, including difficulty fixating on moving objects, nystagmus and disruption of smooth pursuit movements. In presymptomatic SCA6, there are alterations in saccades and smooth-pursuit movements. We sought to assess functional and structural changes in cerebellar connectivity associated with a visual task, hypothesizing that gradual changes would parallel disease progression. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data during a passive smooth-pursuit task in 14 SCA6 patients, representing a range of disease duration and severity, and performed a cross-sectional comparison of cerebellar networks compared with healthy controls. We identified a shift in activation from vermis in presymptomatic individuals to lateral cerebellum in moderate-to-severe cases. Concomitantly, effective connectivity between regions of cerebral cortex and cerebellum was at its highest in moderate cases, and disappeared in severe cases. Finally, we noted structural differences in the cerebral and cerebellar peduncles. These unique results, spanning both functional and structural domains, highlight widespread changes in SCA6 and compensatory mechanisms associated with cerebellar physiology that could be utilized in developing new therapies. PMID:26209844

  2. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 olfactory impairment shows a pattern similar to other major neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Díaz, Rosalinda; González, Ruth Pérez; Ochoa, Nalia Canales; Cruz, Gilberto Sánchez; Mederos, Luis Enrique Almaguer; Góngora, Edilberto Martínez; Hudson, Robyn; Drucker-Colin, René

    2006-09-01

    Olfactory function is affected in different neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, it has been found that some hereditary ataxias are also associated with significant olfactory impairment. However, the initial findings did not examine the nature of the olfactory impairment associated with these ataxias. In the present article the effect of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) on olfactory function was studied in 53 SCA2 patients and 53 healthy control subjects from Holguín, Cuba. Several tests were applied to evaluate olfactory threshold, description, identification and discrimination. The results show significant impairment in SCA2 patients on all olfactory measurements, and the pattern of olfactory deficits found suggests that they have much in common with those reported for other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. PMID:16609806

  3. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7: Clinical Course, Phenotype-Genotype Correlations, and Neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Laura C.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Vangel, Mark G.; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Berson, Eliot L.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 is a neurodegenerative polyglutamine disease characterized by ataxia and retinal degeneration. The longitudinal course is unknown, and relationships between repeat expansion, clinical manifestations, and neuropathology remain uncertain. METHODS We followed 16 affected individuals of a 61-member kindred over 27 years with electroretinograms, neurological examinations including the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale, neuroimaging in 5, and autopsy in 4 cases. RESULTS We identified 4 stages of the illness. Stage 0; gene positive but phenotypically silent. Stage 1; no symptoms, but hyperreflexia and/or abnormal electroretinograms. Stage 2; symptoms and signs progress modestly. Stage 3; rapid clinical progression. CAG repeat length correlated inversely with age of onset of visual or motor signs (r=-0.74, p=0.002). Stage 3 rate of progression did not differ between cases (p=0.18). Electroretinograms correlated with Brief Ataxia Rating Scale score and were a biomarker of disease onset and progression. All symptomatic patients developed gait ataxia, extremity dysmetria, dysarthria, dysrhythmia, and oculomotor abnormalities. Funduscopy revealed pale optic discs and pigmentary disturbances. Visual acuity declined to blindness in those with longer CAG expansions. Hyperreflexia was present from Stage 1 onwards. Restless legs syndrome and sensory impairment were common. Neuropathological hallmarks were neuronal loss in cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, inferior olive, and anterior horns of the spinal cord, and axonal loss in spinocerebellar tracts, dorsal nerve roots and posterior columns. Retinal pathology included photoreceptor degeneration and disruption of retinal pigment epithelium. DISCUSSION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 evolves through 4 clinical stages; neuropathological findings underlie the clinical presentation; electroretinograms are a potential biomarker of disease progression. PMID:22915085

  4. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Sundal, Christina; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments. PMID:23331413

  5. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: A review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) characterized by ataxia with other neurological signs, including oculomotor disturbances, cognitive deficits, pyramidal and extrapyramidal dysfunction, bulbar, spinal and peripheral nervous system involvement. The global prevalence of this disease is not known. The most common type I ADCA is SCA3 followed by SCA2, SCA1, and SCA8, in descending order. Founder effects no doubt contribute to the variable prevalence between populations. Onset is usually in adulthood but cases of presentation in childhood have been reported. Clinical features vary depending on the SCA subtype but by definition include ataxia associated with other neurological manifestations. The clinical spectrum ranges from pure cerebellar signs to constellations including spinal cord and peripheral nerve disease, cognitive impairment, cerebellar or supranuclear ophthalmologic signs, psychiatric problems, and seizures. Cerebellar ataxia can affect virtually any body part causing movement abnormalities. Gait, truncal, and limb ataxia are often the most obvious cerebellar findings though nystagmus, saccadic abnormalities, and dysarthria are usually associated. To date, 21 subtypes have been identified: SCA1-SCA4, SCA8, SCA10, SCA12-SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA17-SCA23, SCA25, SCA27, SCA28 and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). Type I ADCA can be further divided based on the proposed pathogenetic mechanism into 3 subclasses: subclass 1 includes type I ADCA caused by CAG repeat expansions such as SCA1-SCA3, SCA17, and DRPLA, subclass 2 includes trinucleotide repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding regions of the disease gene including SCA8, SCA10 and SCA12. Subclass 3 contains disorders caused by specific gene deletions, missense mutation, and nonsense mutation and includes SCA13, SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA27 and SCA28. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, physical examination, genetic molecular

  6. Molecular mechanism of Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6: glutamine repeat disorder, channelopathy and transcriptional dysregulation. The multifaceted aspects of a single mutation.

    PubMed

    Giunti, Paola; Mantuano, Elide; Frontali, Marina; Veneziano, Liana

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by late onset, slowly progressive, mostly pure cerebellar ataxia. It is one of three allelic disorders associated to CACNA1A gene, coding for the Alpha1 A subunit of P/Q type calcium channel Cav2.1 expressed in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum. The other two disorders are Episodic Ataxia type 2 (EA2), and Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 1 (FHM1). These disorders show distinct phenotypes that often overlap but have different pathogenic mechanisms. EA2 and FHM1 are due to mutations causing, respectively, a loss and a gain of channel function. SCA6, instead, is associated with short expansions of a polyglutamine stretch located in the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail of the protein. This domain has a relevant role in channel regulation, as well as in transcription regulation of other neuronal genes; thus the SCA6 CAG repeat expansion results in complex pathogenic molecular mechanisms reflecting the complex Cav2.1 C-terminus activity. We will provide a short review for an update on the SCA6 molecular mechanism. PMID:25762895

  7. Molecular mechanism of Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6: glutamine repeat disorder, channelopathy and transcriptional dysregulation. The multifaceted aspects of a single mutation

    PubMed Central

    Giunti, Paola; Mantuano, Elide; Frontali, Marina; Veneziano, Liana

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by late onset, slowly progressive, mostly pure cerebellar ataxia. It is one of three allelic disorders associated to CACNA1A gene, coding for the Alpha1 A subunit of P/Q type calcium channel Cav2.1 expressed in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum. The other two disorders are Episodic Ataxia type 2 (EA2), and Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 1 (FHM1). These disorders show distinct phenotypes that often overlap but have different pathogenic mechanisms. EA2 and FHM1 are due to mutations causing, respectively, a loss and a gain of channel function. SCA6, instead, is associated with short expansions of a polyglutamine stretch located in the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail of the protein. This domain has a relevant role in channel regulation, as well as in transcription regulation of other neuronal genes; thus the SCA6 CAG repeat expansion results in complex pathogenic molecular mechanisms reflecting the complex Cav2.1 C-terminus activity. We will provide a short review for an update on the SCA6 molecular mechanism. PMID:25762895

  8. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 in a family descended from the grandparents of President Lincoln maps to chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Ranum, L P; Schut, L J; Lundgren, J K; Orr, H T; Livingston, D M

    1994-11-01

    Autosomal dominant ataxias are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders for which spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) loci on chromosomes 6p, 12q, 14q and 16q have been reported. We have examined 170 individuals (56 of whom were affected) from a previously unreported ten-generation kindred with a dominant ataxia that is clinically and genetically distinct from those previously mapped. The family has two major branches which both descend from the paternal grandparents of President Abraham Lincoln. Among those examined, 56 individuals have a generally non-life threatening cerebellar ataxia. Disease onset varies from 10-68 years and anticipation is evident. We have mapped this gene, spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5), to the centromeric region of chromosome 11. PMID:7874171

  9. Friedreich's Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Friedreich's Ataxia Information Page Condensed from Friedreich's Ataxia Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Friedreich's Ataxia? Friedreich's ataxia is a rare inherited disease that ...

  10. Analysis of spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, 3, and 6, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, and Friedreich's ataxia genes in spinocerebellar ataxia patients in the UK.

    PubMed Central

    Leggo, J; Dalton, A; Morrison, P J; Dodge, A; Connarty, M; Kotze, M J; Rubinsztein, D C

    1997-01-01

    Accurate clinical diagnosis of the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) can be difficult because of overlap in phenotype with other disorders and variation in clinical manifestations. Six SCA loci have been mapped and four disease causing genes identified, in addition to the causative gene for Friedreich's ataxia (FA). All of the identified mutations are expansions of trinucleotide repeat tracts. The SCA2 and SCA6 genes were published recently. The extent of the normal CAG size ranges at these loci and the relative frequencies of the known causes of SCA in the UK are not known. This study first investigated the normal size ranges of the SCA2 and SCA6 loci by genotyping control populations of West African and South African subjects, since African populations generally show the greatest allelic diversity. We found one allele larger than the previously determined normal range for SCA2, and our results at the SCA6 locus agreed with the previously reported normal range. The second component of the study assessed the relative frequencies of the SCA1, 2, 3, and 6, DRPLA, and FA trinucleotide repeat mutations in 146 patients presenting with SCA-like symptoms referred to genetic diagnostic laboratories in the UK. We detected mutations in 14% of patients referred with a diagnosis of autosomal dominant SCA, and in 15% of patients referred with spinocerebellar ataxia where we did not have sufficient family history data available to allow categorisation as familial or sporadic cases. Friedreich's ataxia accounted for 3% of the latter category of cases in our sample, but the most common causes of SCA were SCA2 and SCA6. PMID:9429138

  11. Motor Decline in Clinically Presymptomatic Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 Gene Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Perez, Luis; Díaz, Rosalinda; Pérez-González, Ruth; Canales, Nalia; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Medrano, Jacquelín; Sánchez, Gilberto; Almaguer-Mederos, Luis; Torres, Cira; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Background Motor deficits are a critical component of the clinical characteristics of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. However, there is no current information on the preclinical manifestation of those motor deficits in presymptomatic gene carriers. To further understand and characterize the onset of the clinical manifestation in this disease, we tested presymptomatic spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene carriers, and volunteers, in a task that evaluates their motor performance and their motor learning capabilities. Methods and Findings 28 presymptomatic spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene carriers and an equal number of control volunteers matched for age and gender participated in the study. Both groups were tested in a prism adaptation task known to be sensible to both motor performance and visuomotor learning deficits. Our results clearly show that although motor learning capabilities are intact, motor performance deficits are present even years before the clinical manifestation of the disease start. Conclusions The results show a clear deficit in motor performance that can be detected years before the clinical onset of the disease. This motor performance deficit appears before any motor learning or clinical manifestations of the disease. These observations identify the performance coefficient as an objective and quantitative physiological biomarker that could be useful to assess the efficiency of different therapeutic agents. PMID:19401771

  12. Origin of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 gene mutation in Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Magaña, J J; Gómez, R; Maldonado-Rodríguez, M; Velázquez-Pérez, L; Tapia-Guerrero, Y S; Cortés, H; Leyva-García, N; Hernández-Hernández, O; Cisneros, B

    2013-12-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia associated with macular degeneration that leads, in the majority of patients, to loss of autonomy and blindness. The cause of the disease has been identified as (CAG) n repeat expansion in the coding sequence of the ATXN7 gene on chromosome 3p21.1. SCA7 is one of the least common genetically verified autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias found worldwide; however, we previously identified the Mexican population showing high prevalence of SCA7, suggesting the occurrence of a common founder effect. In this study, haplotype analysis using four SCA7 gene-linked markers revealed that all 72 SCA7 carriers studied share a common haplotype, A-254-82-98, for the intragenic marker 3145G/A and centromeric markers D3S1287, D3S1228, and D3S3635, respectively. This multiloci combination is uncommon in healthy relatives and Mexican general population, suggesting that a single ancestral mutation is responsible for all SCA7 cases in this population. Furthermore, genotyping using 17 short tandem repeat markers from the non-recombining region of the Y chromosome and further phylogenetic relationship analysis revealed that Mexican patients possess the Western European ancestry, which might trace the SCA7 ancestral mutation to that world region. PMID:23828024

  13. Progression of Brain Atrophy in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2: A Longitudinal Tensor-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Mascalchi, Mario; Diciotti, Stefano; Giannelli, Marco; Ginestroni, Andrea; Soricelli, Andrea; Nicolai, Emanuele; Aiello, Marco; Tessa, Carlo; Galli, Lucia; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Piacentini, Silvia; Salvatore, Elena; Toschi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years) and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years) on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM) and cortical gray matter (GM) in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials. PMID:24586758

  14. Broad distribution of ataxin 1 silencing in rhesus cerebella for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Megan S; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro; Davidson, Beverly L

    2015-12-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is one of nine polyglutamine expansion diseases and is characterized by cerebellar ataxia and neuronal degeneration in the cerebellum and brainstem. Currently, there are no effective therapies for this disease. Previously, we have shown that RNA interference mediated silencing of ATXN1 mRNA provides therapeutic benefit in mouse models of the disease. Adeno-associated viral delivery of an engineered microRNA targeting ATXN1 to the cerebella of well-established mouse models improved motor phenotypes, neuropathy, and transcriptional changes. Here, we test the translatability of this approach in adult rhesus cerebella. Nine adult male and three adult female rhesus macaque were unilaterally injected with our therapeutic vector, a recombinant adeno-associated virus type 1 (rAAV1) expressing our RNAi trigger (miS1) and co-expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (rAAV1.miS1eGFP) into the deep cerebellar nuclei using magnetic resonance imaging guided techniques combined with a Stealth Navigation system (Medtronics Inc.). Transduction was evident in the deep cerebellar nuclei, cerebellar Purkinje cells, the brainstem and the ventral lateral thalamus. Reduction of endogenous ATXN1 messenger RNA levels were ≥30% in the deep cerebellar nuclei, the cerebellar cortex, inferior olive, and thalamus relative to the uninjected hemisphere. There were no clinical complications, and quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest that this therapeutic intervention strategy and subsequent reduction of ATXN1 is well tolerated. Collectively the data illustrate the biodistribution and tolerability of rAAV1.miS1eGFP administration to the adult rhesus cerebellum and are supportive of clinical application for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. PMID:26490326

  15. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H266.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Adele G; Schmid, Benjamin; Tubsuwan, Alisa; Poulsen, Ulla B; Hyttel, Poul; Nielsen, Troels T; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Holst, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting the cerebellum. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and, to date, no cure or treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate the generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line of a SCA2 patient. The selected clone has been proven to be a bona fide iPSC line, which retains a normal karyotype. Due to its differentiation potential into neurons, this iPSC line will be a valuable tool in studying a disease-specific phenotype of SCA2. PMID:27345805

  16. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H196.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Adele G; Schmid, Benjamin; Tubsuwan, Alisa; Poulsen, Ulla B; Hyttel, Poul; Nielsen, Troels T; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Holst, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting the cerebellum. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and, to date, no cure or treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate the generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line of a SCA2 patient. The selected clone has been proven to be a bona fide iPSC line, which retains a normal karyotype. Due to its differentiation potential into neurons, this iPSC line will be a valuable tool in studying a disease-specific phenotype of SCA2. PMID:27345814

  17. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H271.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Adele G; Tubsuwan, Alisa; Schmid, Benjamin; Poulsen, Ulla B; Hyttel, Poul; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Nielsen, Troels T; Holst, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting the cerebellum. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and, to date, no cure or treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate the generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line of a SCA2 patient. The selected clone has been proven to be a bona fide iPSC line, which retains a normal karyotype. Due to its differentiation potential into neurons, this iPSC line will be a valuable tool in studying a disease-specific phenotype of SCA2. PMID:27345803

  18. Brain Metabolic Changes of Cervical Dystonia with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 after Botulinum Toxin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Akio; Takeda, Atsushi; Sugeno, Naoto; Miura, Emiko; Kato, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Baba, Toru; Konno, Masatoshi; Oshima, Ryuji; Watanuki, Shoichi; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Tashiro, Manabu; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We occasionally observe long-term remission of cervical dystonia after several botulinum toxin treatments. However, botulinum toxin transiently acts on neuromuscular junctions. We herein report that a cervical dystonia patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 could have long-term remission as a result of the depression of hypermetabolism in the bilateral putamen and primary sensorimotor cortex after botulinum toxin therapy. We suggest that botulinum toxin impacts the central nervous system, causing prolonged improvement through the normalization of basal ganglia circuits in addition to its effects at neuromuscular junctions. PMID:27432104

  19. Delayed postnatal loss of P/Q type calcium channels recapitulates the absence epilepsy, dyskinesia, and ataxia phenotypes of genomic Cacna1A mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Melanie D.; Maejima, Takashi; Kuckelsberg, Denise; Yoo, Jong W.; Hyde, Robert A.; Shah, Viral; Gutierrez, Davina; Moreno, Rosa L.; Kruse, Wolfgang; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Herlitze, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Inherited loss of P/Q-type calcium channel function causes human absence epilepsy, episodic dyskinesia, and ataxia, but the molecular ‘birthdate’ of the neurological syndrome and its dependence on prenatal pathophysiology is unknown. Since these channels mediate transmitter release at synapses throughout the brain and are expressed early in embryonic development, delineating the critical circuitry and onset underlying each of the emergent phenotypes requires targeted control of gene expression. To visualize P/Q-type Ca2+ channels and dissect their role in neuronal networks at distinct developmental stages, we created a novel conditional Cacna1a knock-in mouse by inserting the floxed GFP derivative Citrine into the first exon of Cacna1a, then crossing it with a postnatally expressing PCP2-Cre line for delayed Purkinje cell (PC) gene deletion within the cerebellum and sparsely in forebrain (purky). PCs in purky mice lacked P/Q-type calcium channel protein and currents within the first month after birth, displayed altered spontaneous firing, and showed impaired neurotransmission. Unexpectedly, adult purky mice exhibited the full spectrum of neurological deficits seen in mice with genomic Cacna1a ablation. Our results show that the ataxia, dyskinesia and absence epilepsy due to inherited disorders of the P/Q-type channel arise from signaling defects beginning in late infancy, revealing an early window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21411672

  20. Genetic and clinical analysis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 36 in Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, S; Zeng, J; He, M; Zeng, X; Zhou, Y; Liu, Z; Xia, K; Pan, Q; Jiang, H; Shen, L; Yan, X; Tang, B; Wang, J

    2016-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 36 (SCA36) is a new SCA subtype recently reported in Japanese and Spanish pedigrees. To assess the frequency and clinical characteristics of SCA36 in patients from Mainland China, we combined the repeat-primed polymerase chain reaction method and Southern blot analysis to detect the GGCCTG hexanucleotide repeats of NOP56 in 364 probands with SCA, 126 probands with hereditary spastic paraplegia and 99 probands with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Systematic and targeted clinical evaluations and investigations were conducted in the SCA36 patients. As a result, eight autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (ADCA) pedigrees (a total of 13 patients) and one sporadic SCA (S-SCA) patient were identified as SCA36 in the SCA cohort, accounting for approximately 1.60% of the cases in the ADCA group and 0.32% of those in the S-SCA group in Mainland China. The characteristics include late onset and slow progression accompanied by acoustic impairments and 'possible' ALS phenotype in patients from Mainland China. PMID:26661328

  1. Abnormalities in synaptic dynamics during development in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Watase, Kei; Wada, Keiji; Nagai, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by neurological symptoms and progressive neuronal death. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal dysfunction, rather than neuronal death, causes the symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying the dysfunction that occurs prior to cell death remain unclear. To investigate the synaptic basis of this dysfunction, we employed in vivo two-photon imaging to analyse excitatory postsynaptic dendritic protrusions. We used Sca1154Q/2Q mice, an established knock-in mouse model of the polyglutamine disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), which replicates human SCA1 features including ataxia, cognitive impairment, and neuronal death. We found that Sca1154Q/2Q mice exhibited greater synaptic instability than controls, without synaptic loss, in the cerebral cortex, where obvious neuronal death is not observed, even before the onset of distinct symptoms. Interestingly, this abnormal synaptic instability was evident in Sca1154Q/2Q mice from the synaptic developmental stage, and persisted into adulthood. Expression of synaptic scaffolding proteins was also lower in Sca1154Q/2Q mice than controls before synaptic maturation. As symptoms progressed, synaptic loss became evident. These results indicate that aberrant synaptic instability, accompanied by decreased expression of scaffolding proteins during synaptic development, is a very early pathology that precedes distinct neurological symptoms and neuronal cell death in SCA1. PMID:26531852

  2. Change in the Cortical Complexity of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 Appears Earlier than Clinical Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Bing-Wen; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Shyu, Kuo-Kai; Wang, Po-Shan; Wu, Yu-Te

    2015-01-01

    Patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) have exhibited cerebral cortical involvement and various mental deficits in previous studies. Clinically, conventional measurements, such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and electroencephalography (EEG), are insensitive to cerebral cortical involvement and mental deficits associated with SCA3, particularly at the early stage of the disease. We applied a three-dimensional fractal dimension (3D-FD) method, which can be used to quantify the shape complexity of cortical folding, in assessing cortical degeneration. We evaluated 48 genetically confirmed SCA3 patients by employing clinical scales and magnetic resonance imaging and using 50 healthy participants as a control group. According to the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), the SCA3 patients were diagnosed with cortical dysfunction in the cerebellar cortex; however, no significant difference in the cerebral cortex was observed according to the patients’ MMSE ratings. Using the 3D-FD method, we determined that cortical involvement was more extensive than involvement of traditional olivopontocerebellar regions and the corticocerebellar system. Moreover, the significant correlation between decreased 3D-FD values and disease duration may indicate atrophy of the cerebellar cortex and cerebral cortex in SCA3 patients. The change of the cerebral complexity in the SCA3 patients can be detected throughout the disease duration, especially it becomes substantial at the late stage of the disease. Furthermore, we determined that atrophy of the cerebral cortex may occur earlier than changes in MMSE scores and EEG signals. PMID:25897782

  3. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  4. CAOS-Episodic Cerebellar Ataxia, Areflexia, Optic Atrophy, and Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Third Allelic Disorder of the ATP1A3 Gene.

    PubMed

    Heimer, Gali; Sadaka, Yair; Israelian, Lori; Feiglin, Ariel; Ruggieri, Alessandra; Marshall, Christian R; Scherer, Stephen W; Ganelin-Cohen, Esther; Marek-Yagel, Dina; Tzadok, Michal; Nissenkorn, Andreea; Anikster, Yair; Minassian, Berge A; Zeev, Bruria Ben

    2015-11-01

    We describe the molecular basis of a distinctive syndrome characterized by infantile stress-induced episodic weakness, ataxia, and sensorineural hearing loss, with permanent areflexia and optic nerve pallor. Whole exome sequencing identified a deleterious heterozygous c.2452 G>A, p.(E818K) variant in the ATP1A3 gene and structural analysis predicted its protein-destabilizing effect. This variant has not been reported in context with rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood, the 2 main diseases associated with ATP1A3. The clinical presentation in the family described here differs categorically from these diseases in age of onset, clinical course, cerebellar over extrapyramidal movement disorder predominance, and peripheral nervous system involvement. While this paper was in review, a highly resembling phenotype was reported in additional patients carrying the same c.2452 G>A variant. Our findings substantiate this variant as the cause of a unique inherited autosomal dominant neurologic syndrome that constitutes a third allelic disease of the ATP1A3 gene. PMID:25895915

  5. In vivo assessment of riluzole as a potential therapeutic drug for spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jana; Schmidt, Thorsten; Golla, Matthias; Lehmann, Lisa; Weber, Jonasz Jeremiasz; Hübener-Schmid, Jeannette; Riess, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder for which no curative therapy is available. The cause of this disease is the expansion of a CAG repeat in the so-called ATXN3 gene leading to an expanded polyglutamine stretch in the ataxin-3 protein. Although the function of ataxin-3 has been defined as a deubiquitinating enzyme, the pathogenic pathway underlying SCA3 remains to be deciphered. Besides others, also the glutamatergic system seems to be altered in SCA3. The antiglutamatergic substance riluzole has thus been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent for SCA3. To assess whether riluzole is effective in the treatment of SCA3 in vivo, we used a phenotypically well-characterized conditional mouse model previously generated by us. Treatment with 10 mg/kg riluzole in the drinking water was started when mice showed impairment in rotarod performance. Post-symptomatic treatment with riluzole carried out for a period of 10 months led to reduction of the soluble ataxin-3 level and an increase in ataxin-3 positive accumulations, but did not improve motor deficits measured by rotarod. There was also no positive effect on home cage behavior or body weight. We even observed a pronounced reduction of calbindin expression in Purkinje cells in riluzole-treated mice. Thus, long-term treatment with riluzole was not able to alleviate disease symptoms observed in transgenic SCA3 mice and should be considered with caution in the treatment of human patients. Assessing riluzole as a potential treatment for spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) had no beneficial, but rather a worsening effect on our transgenic SCA3 mouse model. We hypothesize that: Riluzole treatment enhanced glutamate release in ATXN3-expressing cells leading to an increased Ca(2+) influx resulting in Purkinje cell damage shown by loss of calbindin expression. PMID:26990650

  6. Cerebellar Soluble Mutant Ataxin-3 Level Decreases during Disease Progression in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jonasz Jeremiasz; Grueninger, Stephan; Riess, Olaf; Weiss, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease, is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded polyglutamine stretch in the ataxin-3 protein. A pathological hallmark of the disease is cerebellar and brainstem atrophy, which correlates with the formation of intranuclear aggregates in a specific subset of neurons. Several studies have demonstrated that the formation of aggregates depends on the generation of aggregation-prone and toxic intracellular ataxin-3 fragments after proteolytic cleavage of the full-length protein. Despite this observed increase in aggregated mutant ataxin-3, information on soluble mutant ataxin-3 levels in brain tissue is lacking. A quantitative method to analyze soluble levels will be a useful tool to characterize disease progression or to screen and identify therapeutic compounds modulating the level of toxic soluble ataxin-3. In the present study we describe the development and application of a quantitative and easily applicable immunoassay for quantification of soluble mutant ataxin-3 in human cell lines and brain samples of transgenic SCA3 mice. Consistent with observations in Huntington disease, transgenic SCA3 mice reveal a tendency for decrease of soluble mutant ataxin-3 during disease progression in fractions of the cerebellum, which is inversely correlated with aggregate formation and phenotypic aggravation. Our analyses demonstrate that the time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer immunoassay is a highly sensitive and easy method to measure the level of soluble mutant ataxin-3 in biological samples. Of interest, we observed a tendency for decrease of soluble mutant ataxin-3 only in the cerebellum of transgenic SCA3 mice, one of the most affected brain regions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 but not in whole brain tissue, indicative of a brain region selective change in mutant ataxin-3 protein homeostasis. PMID:23626768

  7. Cerebellar soluble mutant ataxin-3 level decreases during disease progression in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 mice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Hübener, Jeannette; Weber, Jonasz Jeremiasz; Grueninger, Stephan; Riess, Olaf; Weiss, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease, is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded polyglutamine stretch in the ataxin-3 protein. A pathological hallmark of the disease is cerebellar and brainstem atrophy, which correlates with the formation of intranuclear aggregates in a specific subset of neurons. Several studies have demonstrated that the formation of aggregates depends on the generation of aggregation-prone and toxic intracellular ataxin-3 fragments after proteolytic cleavage of the full-length protein. Despite this observed increase in aggregated mutant ataxin-3, information on soluble mutant ataxin-3 levels in brain tissue is lacking. A quantitative method to analyze soluble levels will be a useful tool to characterize disease progression or to screen and identify therapeutic compounds modulating the level of toxic soluble ataxin-3. In the present study we describe the development and application of a quantitative and easily applicable immunoassay for quantification of soluble mutant ataxin-3 in human cell lines and brain samples of transgenic SCA3 mice. Consistent with observations in Huntington disease, transgenic SCA3 mice reveal a tendency for decrease of soluble mutant ataxin-3 during disease progression in fractions of the cerebellum, which is inversely correlated with aggregate formation and phenotypic aggravation. Our analyses demonstrate that the time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer immunoassay is a highly sensitive and easy method to measure the level of soluble mutant ataxin-3 in biological samples. Of interest, we observed a tendency for decrease of soluble mutant ataxin-3 only in the cerebellum of transgenic SCA3 mice, one of the most affected brain regions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 but not in whole brain tissue, indicative of a brain region selective change in mutant ataxin-3 protein homeostasis. PMID:23626768

  8. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias.

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya; Yoneda, Makoto; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto's encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Miller Fisher syndrome, ataxia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Humoral mechanisms, cell-mediated immunity, inflammation, and vascular injuries contribute to the cerebellar deficits in immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias. PMID:25823827

  9. Friedreich's Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes. The disorder does not affect thinking and reasoning abilities (cognitive functions). Friedreich’s ataxia is caused by ... A diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia requires a careful clinical examination, which includes a medical history and a ...

  10. Friedreich's Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited disease that damages your nervous system. The damage affects your spinal cord and the ... of 5 and 15. The main symptom is ataxia, which means trouble coordinating movements. Specific symptoms include ...

  11. Impaired Spatio-Temporal Predictive Motor Timing Associated with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Broersen, Robin; Onuki, Yoshiyuki; Abdelgabar, Abdel R; Owens, Cullen B; Picard, Samuel; Willems, Jessica; Boele, Henk-Jan; Gazzola, Valeria; Van der Werf, Ysbrand D; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    Many daily life activities demand precise integration of spatial and temporal information of sensory inputs followed by appropriate motor actions. This type of integration is carried out in part by the cerebellum, which has been postulated to play a central role in learning and timing of movements. Cerebellar damage due to atrophy or lesions may compromise forward-model processing, in which both spatial and temporal cues are used to achieve prediction for future motor states. In the present study we sought to further investigate the cerebellar contribution to predictive and reactive motor timing, as well as to learning of sequential order and temporal intervals in these tasks. We tested patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and healthy controls for two related motor tasks; one requiring spatio-temporal prediction of dynamic visual stimuli and another one requiring reactive timing only. We found that healthy controls established spatio-temporal prediction in their responses with high temporal precision, which was absent in the cerebellar patients. SCA6 patients showed lower predictive motor timing, coinciding with a reduced number of correct responses during the 'anticipatory' period on the task. Moreover, on the task utilizing reactive motor timing functions, control participants showed both sequence order and temporal interval learning, whereas patients only showed sequence order learning. These results suggest that SCA6 affects predictive motor timing and temporal interval learning. Our results support and highlight cerebellar contribution to timing and argue for cerebellar engagement during spatio-temporal prediction of upcoming events. PMID:27571363

  12. Impaired Spatio-Temporal Predictive Motor Timing Associated with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

    PubMed Central

    Onuki, Yoshiyuki; Abdelgabar, Abdel R.; Owens, Cullen B.; Picard, Samuel; Willems, Jessica; Boele, Henk-Jan; Gazzola, Valeria; Van der Werf, Ysbrand D.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Many daily life activities demand precise integration of spatial and temporal information of sensory inputs followed by appropriate motor actions. This type of integration is carried out in part by the cerebellum, which has been postulated to play a central role in learning and timing of movements. Cerebellar damage due to atrophy or lesions may compromise forward-model processing, in which both spatial and temporal cues are used to achieve prediction for future motor states. In the present study we sought to further investigate the cerebellar contribution to predictive and reactive motor timing, as well as to learning of sequential order and temporal intervals in these tasks. We tested patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and healthy controls for two related motor tasks; one requiring spatio-temporal prediction of dynamic visual stimuli and another one requiring reactive timing only. We found that healthy controls established spatio-temporal prediction in their responses with high temporal precision, which was absent in the cerebellar patients. SCA6 patients showed lower predictive motor timing, coinciding with a reduced number of correct responses during the ‘anticipatory’ period on the task. Moreover, on the task utilizing reactive motor timing functions, control participants showed both sequence order and temporal interval learning, whereas patients only showed sequence order learning. These results suggest that SCA6 affects predictive motor timing and temporal interval learning. Our results support and highlight cerebellar contribution to timing and argue for cerebellar engagement during spatio-temporal prediction of upcoming events. PMID:27571363

  13. Molecular Pathogenesis and Cellular Pathology of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Garden, Gwenn A.; La Spada, Albert R.

    2013-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is unique among CAG / polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat diseases due to dramatic intergenerational instability in repeat length and an associated cone-rod dystrophy retinal degeneration phenotype. SCA7 is caused by a polyQ expansion in the protein ataxin-7. Like other neurodegenerative diseases caused by polyQ expansion mutations, the spectrum of clinical severity and disease progression worsens with increasing polyQ length. Several potential mechanisms for the molecular pathogenesis of polyQ-expanded ataxin-7 have been suggested. These include, but are not limited to, alteration of endogenous ataxin-7 function, abnormal processing and stability of polyQ ataxin-7, and alteration of transcriptional regulation via interaction of polyQ-expanded ataxin-7 with other transcriptional regulators. Ataxin-7's normal function as a transcription factor may contribute to the selective vulnerability of specific cellular populations in SCA7, and the resolution of the mechanistic basis of this pathogenic cascade is a major focus of SCA7 disease research. PolyQ-expanded ataxin-7 can cause non-cell autonomous neurodegeneration in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Advances in understanding SCA7's molecular basis have led to important insights into cell-type specific neurodegeneration. We expect that further study of ataxin-7 normal function, insights into the molecular basis of SCA7 neurodegeneration, and the development of therapeutic interventions for SCA7 will greatly influence related endeavors directed at other CAG / polyQ repeat diseases. PMID:18418675

  14. Cancer risk according to type and location of ATM mutation in ataxia-telangiectasia families.

    PubMed

    Cavaciuti, E; Laugé, A; Janin, N; Ossian, K; Hall, J; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Andrieu, N

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) heterozygotes in AT families have an increased risk of cancer, particularly of breast cancer (BC). However, in BC case-control studies, no significant differences were found in the frequency of ATM mutations between patients and controls. In such studies missense mutations were found more frequently than truncating mutations, suggesting that the cancer risk depends on mutation type. To investigate this possibility, we assessed the risk of BC according to the type and position of the ATM truncating mutation in extended AT families. DNA or RNA that had been isolated from blood or buccal cells of AT children and their relatives was screened for ATM germ-line mutations using restriction endonuclease fingerprinting, the protein truncation test, fluorescence-assisted mismatch analysis, and direct sequencing. The standardized incidence ratio of cancer associated with ATM heterozygosity status and type of mutation was estimated. We tested for genotype-phenotype correlations by simulations, permuting mutations among parental branches. No significant difference was found in the relative risk of breast cancer or any other type of cancer based on mutation type. However, the occurrence of BC may be associated with truncating mutations in certain binding domains of the ATM protein (e.g., P53/BRCA1, beta-adaptin, and FAT domains; P = 0.006). In this limited sample set, the presence of missense or truncating ATM mutations was not associated with different cancer risks. The risk of BC appeared to be associated with the alteration of binding domains rather than with the length of the predicted ATM protein. PMID:15390180

  15. Crystallographic and Computational Analyses of AUUCU Repeating RNA That Causes Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 10 (SCA10).

    PubMed

    Park, HaJeung; González, Àlex L; Yildirim, Ilyas; Tran, Tuan; Lohman, Jeremy R; Fang, Pengfei; Guo, Min; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-06-23

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is caused by a pentanucleotide repeat expansion of r(AUUCU) within intron 9 of the ATXN10 pre-mRNA. The RNA causes disease by a gain-of-function mechanism in which it inactivates proteins involved in RNA biogenesis. Spectroscopic studies showed that r(AUUCU) repeats form a hairpin structure; however, there were no high-resolution structural models prior to this work. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of model r(AUUCU) repeats refined to 2.8 Å and analysis of the structure via molecular dynamics simulations. The r(AUUCU) tracts adopt an overall A-form geometry in which 3 × 3 nucleotide (5')UCU(3')/(3')UCU(5') internal loops are closed by AU pairs. Helical parameters of the refined structure as well as the corresponding electron density map on the crystallographic model reflect dynamic features of the internal loop. The computational analyses captured dynamic motion of the loop closing pairs, which can form single-stranded conformations with relatively low energies. Overall, the results presented here suggest the possibility for r(AUUCU) repeats to form metastable A-from structures, which can rearrange into single-stranded conformations and attract proteins such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K). The information presented here may aid in the rational design of therapeutics targeting this RNA. PMID:26039897

  16. A randomized controlled pilot trial of lithium in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Saccà, Francesco; Puorro, Giorgia; Brunetti, Arturo; Capasso, Giovambattista; Cervo, Amedeo; Cocozza, Sirio; de Leva, Mariafulvia; Marsili, Angela; Pane, Chiara; Quarantelli, Mario; Russo, Cinzia Valeria; Trepiccione, Francesco; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Morra, Vincenzo Brescia

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder. Lithium is able to stimulate autophagy, and to reduce Ca(2+) efflux from the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor. We designed a phase II, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, 48-week trial with lithium carbonate in 20 patients with SCA2. The primary objective was to determine safety and tolerability of lithium. The secondary objectives were to determine disease progression, quality of life, mood, and brain volume change. Sixteen patients completed the trial, 8 randomized to lithium, 8 to placebo. Forty adverse events (AEs) were reported during the trial, twenty-eight in the lithium and 12 in the placebo group (p = 0.11). Mean AE duration was 57.4 ± 60.8 and 77.4 ± 68.5 days (p = 0.37). Non-significant differences were observed for the SARA and for brain volume change, whereas a significant reduction in the BDI-II was observed for lithium group (p < 0.05). Lithium was well tolerated and reported AEs were similar to those previously described for bipolar disorder patients. A correctly powered phase III trial is needed to assess if lithium may slow disease progression in SCA2. PMID:25346067

  17. The contribution of the cerebellum to cognition in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Freya E; Grube, Manon; Elsegood, Kelly J; Welch, John L; Kelly, Thomas P; Chinnery, Patrick F; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2010-01-01

    This study sought evidence for a specific cerebellar contribution to cognition by characterising the cognitive phenotype of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 (SCA-6); an autosomal dominant genetic disease which causes a highly specific late-onset cerebellar degeneration. A comprehensive neuropsychological assessment was administered to 27 patients with genetically confirmed SCA-6. General intellectual ability, memory and executive function were examined using internationally standardised tests (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III, Wechsler Memory Scale-III, Delis and Kaplan Executive Function System, Brixton Spatial Anticipation test). The patient group showed no evidence of intellectual or memory decline. However, tests of executive function involving skills of cognitive flexibility, inhibition of response and verbal reasoning and abstraction demonstrated significant impairment at the group level with large effect sizes. The results demonstrate an executive deficit due to SCA-6 that can be conceptualised as parallel to the motor difficulties suffered by these patients: the data support a role for the cerebellum in the regulation and coordination of cognitive, as well as motor processes that is relevant to individual performance. PMID:20714057

  18. Ataxin-3 phosphorylation decreases neuronal defects in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 models.

    PubMed

    Matos, Carlos A; Nóbrega, Clévio; Louros, Susana R; Almeida, Bruno; Ferreiro, Elisabete; Valero, Jorge; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Carvalho, Ana Luísa

    2016-02-15

    Different neurodegenerative diseases are caused by aberrant elongation of repeated glutamine sequences normally found in particular human proteins. Although the proteins involved are ubiquitously distributed in human tissues, toxicity targets only defined neuronal populations. Changes caused by an expanded polyglutamine protein are possibly influenced by endogenous cellular mechanisms, which may be harnessed to produce neuroprotection. Here, we show that ataxin-3, the protein involved in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, also known as Machado-Joseph disease, causes dendritic and synapse loss in cultured neurons when expanded. We report that S12 of ataxin-3 is phosphorylated in neurons and that mutating this residue so as to mimic a constitutive phosphorylated state counters the neuromorphologic defects observed. In rats stereotaxically injected with expanded ataxin-3-encoding lentiviral vectors, mutation of serine 12 reduces aggregation, neuronal loss, and synapse loss. Our results suggest that S12 plays a role in the pathogenic pathways mediated by polyglutamine-expanded ataxin-3 and that phosphorylation of this residue protects against toxicity. PMID:26880203

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells attenuate peripheral neuronal degeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 knockin mice.

    PubMed

    Mieda, Tokue; Suto, Nana; Iizuka, Akira; Matsuura, Serina; Iizuka, Haku; Takagishi, Kenji; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2016-03-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder in which an abnormally expanded polyglutamine tract is inserted into causative ataxin-1 proteins. We have previously shown that SCA1 knockin (SCA1-KI) mice over 6 months of age exhibit a degeneration of motor neuron axons and their encasing myelin sheaths, as reported in SCA1 patients. We examined whether axon degeneration precedes myelin degeneration or vice versa in SCA1-KI mice and then attempted to mitigate motor neuron degeneration by intrathecally administering mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Temporal examination of the diameters of motor neuron axons and their myelin sheaths revealed a decrease in diameter of the axon but not of the myelin sheaths in SCA1-KI mice as early as 1 month of age, which suggests secondary degeneration of the myelin sheaths. We injected MSCs into the intrathecal space of SCA1-KI mice at 1 month of age, which resulted in a significant suppression of degeneration of both motor neuron axons and myelin sheaths, even 6 months after the MSC injection. Thus, MSCs effectively suppressed peripheral nervous system degeneration in SCA1-KI mice. It has not yet been clarified how clinically administered MSCs exhibit significant therapeutic effects in patients with SCA1. The morphological evidence presented in this current mouse study might explain the mechanisms that underlie the therapeutic effects of MSCs that are observed in patients with SCA1. PMID:26707550

  20. Parahippocampal gray matter alterations in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 identified by voxel based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Mercadillo, Roberto E; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Hernández-Castillo, Carlos Roberto; Campos-Romo, Aurelio; Boll, Marie-Catherine; Pasaye, Erick H; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2014-12-15

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a genetic disorder causing cerebellar degeneration that result in motor and cognitive alterations. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses have found neurodegenerative patterns associated to SCA2, but they show some discrepancies. Moreover, behavioral deficits related to non-cerebellar functions are scarcely discussed in those reports. In this work we use behavioral and cognitive tests and VBM to identify and confirm cognitive and gray matter alterations in SCA2 patients compared with control subjects. Also, we discuss the cerebellar and non-cerebellar functions affected by this disease. Our results confirmed gray matter reduction in the cerebellar vermis, pons, and insular, frontal, parietal and temporal cortices. However, our analysis also found unreported loss of gray matter in the parahippocampal gyrus bilaterally. Motor performance test ratings correlated with total gray and white matter reductions, but executive performance and clinical features such as CAG repetitions and disease progression did not show any correlation. This pattern of cerebellar and non-cerebellar morphological alterations associated with SCA2 has to be considered to fully understand the motor and non-motor deficits that include language production and comprehension and some social skill changes that occur in these patients. PMID:25263602

  1. Reversibility of symptoms in a conditional mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    PubMed

    Boy, Jana; Schmidt, Thorsten; Wolburg, Hartwig; Mack, Andreas; Nuber, Silke; Böttcher, Martin; Schmitt, Ina; Holzmann, Carsten; Zimmermann, Frank; Servadio, Antonio; Riess, Olaf

    2009-11-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat tract that affects the MJD1 gene which encodes the ataxin-3 protein. In order to analyze whether symptoms caused by ataxin-3 with an expanded repeat are reversible in vivo, we generated a conditional mouse model of SCA3 using the Tet-Off system. We used a full-length human ataxin-3 cDNA with 77 repeats in order to generate the responder mouse line. After crossbreeding with a PrP promoter mouse line, double transgenic mice developed a progressive neurological phenotype characterized by neuronal dysfunction in the cerebellum, reduced anxiety, hyperactivity, impaired Rotarod performance and lower body weight gain. When ataxin-3 expression was turned off in symptomatic mice in an early disease state, the transgenic mice were indistinguishable from negative controls after 5 months of treatment. These results show that reducing the production of pathogenic ataxin-3 indeed may be a promising approach to treat SCA3, provided that such treatment is applied before irreversible damage has taken place and that it is continued for a sufficiently long time. PMID:19666958

  2. Crystallographic and Computational Analyses of AUUCU Repeating RNA That Causes Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 10 (SCA10)

    PubMed Central

    Park, HaJeung; González, Àlex L.; Yildirim, Ilyas; Tran, Tuan; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Fang, Pengfei; Guo, Min; Disney, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is caused by a pentanucleotide repeat expansion of r(AUUCU) within intron 9 of the ATXN10 pre-mRNA. The RNA causes disease by a gain-of-function mechanism in which it inactivates proteins involved in RNA biogenesis. Spectroscopic studies showed that r(AUUCU) repeats form a hairpin structure; however, there were no high-resolution structural models prior to this work. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of model r(AUUCU) repeats refined to 2.8 Å and analysis of the structure via molecular dynamics simulations. The r(AUUCU) tracts adopt an overall A-form geometry in which 3 × 3 nucleotide 5′UCU3′/3′UCU5′ internal loops are closed by AU pairs. Helical parameters of the refined structure as well as the corresponding electron density map on the crystallographic model reflect dynamic features of the internal loop. The computational analyses captured dynamic motion of the loop closing pairs, which can form single-stranded conformations with relatively low energies. Overall, the results presented here suggest the possibility for r(AUUCU) repeats to form metastable A-from structures, which can rearrange into single-stranded conformations and attract proteins such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K). The information presented here may aid in the rational design of therapeutics targeting this RNA. PMID:26039897

  3. Overexpression of Cystathionine γ-Lyase Suppresses Detrimental Effects of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3

    PubMed Central

    Snijder, Pauline M; Baratashvili, Madina; Grzeschik, Nicola A; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Kuijpers, Lucas; Huitema, Sippie; Schaap, Onno; Giepmans, Ben N G; Kuipers, Jeroen; Miljkovic, Jan Lj; Mitrovic, Aleksandra; Bos, Eelke M; Szabó, Csaba; Kampinga, Harm H; Dijkers, Pascale F; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Filipovic, Milos R; van Goor, Harry; Sibon, Ody C M

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a polyglutamine (polyQ) disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 (ATXN3) gene resulting in toxic protein aggregation. Inflammation and oxidative stress are considered secondary factors contributing to the progression of this neurodegenerative disease. There is no cure that halts or reverses the progressive neurodegeneration of SCA3. Here we show that overexpression of cystathionine γ-lyase, a central enzyme in cysteine metabolism, is protective in a Drosophila model for SCA3. SCA3 flies show eye degeneration, increased oxidative stress, insoluble protein aggregates, reduced levels of protein persulfidation and increased activation of the innate immune response. Overexpression of Drosophila cystathionine γ-lyase restores protein persulfidation, decreases oxidative stress, dampens the immune response and improves SCA3-associated tissue degeneration. Levels of insoluble protein aggregates are not altered; therefore, the data implicate a modifying role of cystathionine γ-lyase in ameliorating the downstream consequence of protein aggregation leading to protection against SCA3-induced tissue degeneration. The cystathionine γ-lyase expression is decreased in affected brain tissue of SCA3 patients, suggesting that enhancers of cystathionine γ-lyase expression or activity are attractive candidates for future therapies. PMID:26467707

  4. Chinese patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 presenting with rare clinical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yi; Sun, Yi-Min; Ni, Wang; Gan, Shi-Rui; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2013-01-15

    Clinical heterogeneity is the prominent feature of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) which is sometimes neglected and often impedes the timely diagnosis of patients. In this study, the clinical data of 201 unrelated Chinese SCA3 patients were retrospectively studied. The rare clinical features were summarized and the underlying genetic mutations were screened by direct DNA sequencing. Three patients were found primarily presenting with the rare clinical features, including dystonic phenotype without response to levodopa, chorea and memory decline, and hearing impairment, respectively. We firstly reported three diverse heterogeneities of SCA3 patients, which are quite uncommon in the Chinese SCA3 patients. Our results expanded the variable phenotypes of SCA3 and provided the explicit information for the rare and special SCA3 manifestations. Based on this new knowledge, we suggested that when the presentation was consistent with HD or DRD while negative in the corresponding genetic testing, SCA3 should be considered, and clinicians should divert partial attention to the examinations on the auditory system of SCA3 patients. PMID:23174085

  5. Role of glutathione S-transferases in the spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Almaguer-Gotay, D; Almaguer-Mederos, L E; Aguilera-Rodríguez, R; Estupiñán-Rodríguez, A; González-Zaldivar, Y; Cuello-Almarales, D; Laffita-Mesa, J M; Vázquez-Mojena, Y

    2014-06-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative and incurable hereditary disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion mutation on ATXN2 gene. The identification of reliable biochemical markers of disease severity is of paramount significance for the development and assessment of clinical trials. In order to evaluate the potential use of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity as a biomarker for SCA2, a case-control study in 38 affected, presymptomatic individuals or healthy controls was conducted. An enlarged sample of 121 affected individuals was set to assess the impact of GST activity on SCA2 clinical expression. There was a significant increase in GST activity in affected individuals relative to controls, although sensibility and specificity were not high. GST activity was not significantly influenced by sex, age, disease duration or CAG repeat size and did not significantly influence disease severity markers. These findings show a disruption of in vivo GST activity in SCA2, suggesting a role for oxidative stress in the neurodegenerative process. PMID:24780439

  6. Subtle rapid eye movement sleep abnormalities in presymptomatic spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene carriers.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Velázquez-Perez, Luis; Ochoa, Nalia Canales; Polo, Lourdes Galicia; Valencia, Reyes Haro; Cruz, Gilberto Sánchez; Montero, Jacqueline Medrano; Laffita-Mesa, José M; Mederos, Luis E Almaguer; Zaldívar, Yanetza González; Parra, Cira Torres; Acosta, Arnoy Peña; Mariño, Tania Cruz

    2011-02-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep disorders are commonly associated to patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2); however, these abnormalities have not been studied in presymptomatic gene carriers. To determine whether the REM sleep pathology is detectable before clinical manifestation of SCA2 and evaluate it as a preclinical biomarker, we studied 36 presymptomatic SCA2 individuals and 36 controls by video-polysomnography (VPSG) and sleep questionnaires. Presymptomatic subjects showed significant decrease of REM sleep percentage, REMs density, total sleep time, and sleep efficiency. Aging effect on REM sleep percentage was significant in both groups. There was no correlation between cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeat length and REM sleep. Our findings identified the REM sleep pathology as a prominent herald sign of SCA2, conferring a special importance to VPSG as a sensitive neurophysiological tool to detect early changes associated with SCA2, which contributes to the understanding of disease pathophysiology and the development of therapeutic trials focused on the preclinical disease stage. PMID:20960485

  7. Parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synaptic impairment in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 27

    PubMed Central

    Tempia, Filippo; Hoxha, Eriola; Negro, Giulia; Alshammari, Musaad A.; Alshammari, Tahani K.; Panova-Elektronova, Neli; Laezza, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Genetically inherited mutations in the fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14) gene lead to spinocerebellar ataxia type 27 (SCA27), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by heterogeneous motor and cognitive impairments. Consistently, genetic deletion of Fgf14 in Fgf14−/− mice recapitulates salient features of the SCA27 human disease. In vitro molecular studies in cultured neurons indicate that the FGF14F145S SCA27 allele acts as a dominant negative mutant suppressing the FGF14 wild type function and resulting in inhibition of voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels. To gain insights in the cerebellar deficits in the animal model of the human disease, we applied whole-cell voltage-clamp in the acute cerebellar slice preparation to examine the properties of parallel fibers (PF) to Purkinje neuron synapses in Fgf14−/− mice and wild type littermates. We found that the AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents evoked by PF stimulation (PF-EPSCs) were significantly reduced in Fgf14−/− animals, while short-term plasticity, measured as paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), was enhanced. Measuring Sr2+-induced release of quanta from stimulated synapses, we found that the size of the PF-EPSCs was unchanged, ruling out a postsynaptic deficit. This phenotype was corroborated by decreased expression of VGLUT1, a specific presynaptic marker at PF-Purkinje neuron synapses. We next examined the mGluR1 receptor-induced response (mGluR1-EPSC) that under normal conditions requires a gradual build-up of glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft, and found no changes in these responses in Fgf14−/− mice. These results provide evidence of a critical role of FGF14 in maintaining presynaptic function at PF-Purkinje neuron synapses highlighting critical target mechanisms to recapitulate the complexity of the SCA27 disease. PMID:26089778

  8. Causes of Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donate to the National Ataxia Foundation Causes of Ataxia The hereditary ataxias are genetic, which means they ... the disease is inherited as a recessive gene. Ataxia Gene Identified in 1993 The first ataxia gene ...

  9. Social and Cultural Elements Associated with Neurocognitive Dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mercadillo, Roberto Emmanuele; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Paredes, Lorena; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R.; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience, it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain-related alterations. Here, we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant’s routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients’ medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients’ testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives’ testimonies indicate patients’ lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal, and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients’ alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the medical approach to

  10. Social and Cultural Elements Associated with Neurocognitive Dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 Patients.

    PubMed

    Mercadillo, Roberto Emmanuele; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Paredes, Lorena; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience, it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain-related alterations. Here, we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant's routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients' medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients' testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives' testimonies indicate patients' lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal, and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients' alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the medical approach to the disease

  11. Spinocerebellar ataxias type 8, 12, and 17 and dentatorubro-pallidoluysian atrophy in Czech ataxic patients.

    PubMed

    Musova, Zuzana; Sedlacek, Zdenek; Mazanec, Radim; Klempir, Jiri; Roth, Jan; Plevova, Pavlina; Vyhnalek, Martin; Kopeckova, Marta; Apltova, Ludmila; Krepelova, Anna; Zumrova, Alena

    2013-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders currently associated with 27 genes. The most frequent types are caused by expansions in coding CAG repeats. The frequency of SCA subtypes varies among populations. We examined the occurrence of rare SCAs, SCA8, SCA12, SCA17 and dentatorubro-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA), in the Czech population from where the data were missing. We analyzed causal gene expansions in 515 familial and sporadic ataxic patients negatively tested for SCA1-3 and SCA6-7. Pathogenic SCA8 and SCA17 expansions were identified in eight and five patients, respectively. Tay-Sachs disease was later diagnosed in one patient with an SCA8 expansion and the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) was suspected in two other patients with SCA8 expansions. These findings are probably coincidental, although the participation of SCA8 expansions in the susceptibility to MS and disease progression cannot be fully excluded. None of the patients had pathogenic SCA12 or DRPLA expansions. However, three patients had intermediate SCA12 alleles out of the normal range with 36 and 43 CAGs. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was probable in the patient with 43 CAGs. This coincidence is remarkable, especially in the context with the recently identified predisposing role of longer SCA2 alleles in ALS. Five families with SCA17 represent a significant portion of ataxic patients and this should be reflected in the diagnostics of SCAs in the Czech population. SCA8 expansions must be considered after careful clinical evaluation. PMID:22872568

  12. Mutations in PNKP cause recessive ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 4.

    PubMed

    Bras, Jose; Alonso, Isabel; Barbot, Clara; Costa, Maria Manuela; Darwent, Lee; Orme, Tatiana; Sequeiros, Jorge; Hardy, John; Coutinho, Paula; Guerreiro, Rita

    2015-03-01

    Hereditary autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. We used homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to study a cohort of nine Portuguese families who were identified during a nationwide, population-based, systematic survey as displaying a consistent phenotype of recessive ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA). The integration of data from these analyses led to the identification of the same homozygous PNKP (polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase) mutation, c.1123G>T (p.Gly375Trp), in three of the studied families. When analyzing this particular gene in the exome sequencing data from the remaining cohort, we identified homozygous or compound-heterozygous mutations in five other families. PNKP is a dual-function enzyme with a key role in different pathways of DNA-damage repair. Mutations in this gene have previously been associated with an autosomal-recessive syndrome characterized by microcephaly; early-onset, intractable seizures; and developmental delay (MCSZ). The finding of PNKP mutations associated with recessive AOA extends the phenotype associated with this gene and identifies a fourth locus that causes AOA. These data confirm that MCSZ and some forms of ataxia share etiological features, most likely reflecting the role of PNKP in DNA-repair mechanisms. PMID:25728773

  13. Friedreich ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Friedreich ataxia includes: Counseling Speech therapy Physical therapy Walking aids or wheelchairs Orthopedic devices (braces) may be needed for scoliosis and foot problems. Treating heart disease and diabetes help people live longer and improve their quality ...

  14. Ataxia - telangiectasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... results from defects in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene. Defects in this gene can lead to ... Genetic testing to look for mutations in the ATM gene Glucose tolerance test Serum immunoglobulin levels (IgE, ...

  15. Ataxia Telangiectasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Ataxia Telangiectasia Information ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  16. Ataxin-3 protein modification as a treatment strategy for spinocerebellar ataxia type 3: removal of the CAG containing exon.

    PubMed

    Evers, Melvin M; Tran, Hoang-Dai; Zalachoras, Ioannis; Pepers, Barry A; Meijer, Onno C; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2013-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 is caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the ataxin-3 protein, resulting in gain of toxic function of the mutant protein. The expanded glutamine stretch in the protein is the result of a CAG triplet repeat expansion in the penultimate exon of the ATXN3 gene. Several gene silencing approaches to reduce mutant ataxin-3 toxicity in this disease aim to lower ataxin-3 protein levels, but since this protein is involved in deubiquitination and proteasomal protein degradation, its long-term silencing might not be desirable. Here, we propose a novel protein modification approach to reduce mutant ataxin-3 toxicity by removing the toxic polyglutamine repeat from the ataxin-3 protein through antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping while maintaining important wild type functions of the protein. In vitro studies showed that exon skipping did not negatively impact the ubiquitin binding capacity of ataxin-3. Our in vivo studies showed no toxic properties of the novel truncated ataxin-3 protein. These results suggest that exon skipping may be a novel therapeutic approach to reduce polyglutamine-induced toxicity in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. PMID:23659897

  17. Genetic fitness and selection intensity in a population affected with high-incidence spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    PubMed

    Platonov, Fedor A; Tyryshkin, Kathrin; Tikhonov, Dmitriy G; Neustroyeva, Tatyana S; Sivtseva, Tatyana M; Yakovleva, Natalya V; Nikolaev, Valerian P; Sidorova, Oksana G; Kononova, Sardana K; Goldfarb, Lev G; Renwick, Neil M

    2016-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is the major and likely the only type of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia in the Sakha (Yakut) people of Eastern Siberia. The prevalence rate of SCA1 has doubled over the past 21 years peaking at 46 cases per 100,000 rural population. The age at death correlates closely with the number of CAG triplet repeats in the mutant ATXN1 gene (r = -0.81); most patients with low-medium (39-55) repeat numbers survived until the end of reproductive age. The number of CAG repeats expands in meiosis, particularly in paternal transmissions; the average total increase in intergenerational transmissions in our cohort was estimated at 1.6 CAG repeats. The fertility rates of heterozygous carriers of 39-55 CAG repeats in women were no different from those of the general Sakha population. Overall, the survival of mutation carriers through reproductive age, unaltered fertility rates, low childhood mortality in SCA1-affected families, and intergenerational transmission of increasing numbers of CAG repeats in the ATXN1 gene indicate that SCA1 in the Sakha population will be maintained at high prevalence levels. The low (0.19) Crow's index of total selection intensity in our SCA1 cohort implies that this mutation is unlikely to be eliminated through natural selection alone. PMID:27106293

  18. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  19. More Than Ataxia: Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders in Childhood Autosomal Recessive Ataxia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Toni S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The autosomal recessive ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by complex neurological features in addition to progressive ataxia. Hyperkinetic movement disorders occur in a significant proportion of patients, and may sometimes be the presenting motor symptom. Presentations with involuntary movements rather than ataxia are diagnostically challenging, and are likely under-recognized. Methods A PubMed literature search was performed in October 2015 utilizing pairwise combinations of disease-related terms (autosomal recessive ataxia, ataxia–telangiectasia, ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1), ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2), Friedreich ataxia, ataxia with vitamin E deficiency), and symptom-related terms (movement disorder, dystonia, chorea, choreoathetosis, myoclonus). Results Involuntary movements occur in the majority of patients with ataxia–telangiectasia and AOA1, and less frequently in patients with AOA2, Friedreich ataxia, and ataxia with vitamin E deficiency. Clinical presentations with an isolated hyperkinetic movement disorder in the absence of ataxia include dystonia or dystonia with myoclonus with predominant upper limb and cervical involvement (ataxia–telangiectasia, ataxia with vitamin E deficiency), and generalized chorea (ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1, ataxia-telangiectasia). Discussion An awareness of atypical presentations facilitates early and accurate diagnosis in these challenging cases. Recognition of involuntary movements is important not only for diagnosis, but also because of the potential for effective targeted symptomatic treatment. PMID:27536460

  20. Expansion of the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) repeat in a patient with Sioux Native American ancestry.

    PubMed

    Bushara, Khalaf; Bower, Matthew; Liu, Jilin; McFarland, Karen N; Landrian, Ivette; Hutter, Diane; Teive, Hélio A G; Rasmussen, Astrid; Mulligan, Connie J; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, is caused by the expansion of the non-coding ATTCT pentanucleotide repeat in the ATAXIN 10 gene. To date, all cases of SCA10 are restricted to patients with ancestral ties to Latin American countries. Here, we report on a SCA10 patient with Sioux Native American ancestry and no reported Hispanic or Latino heritage. Neurological exam findings revealed impaired gait with mild, age-consistent cerebellar atrophy and no evidence of epileptic seizures. The age at onset for this patient, at 83 years of age, is the latest documented for SCA10 patients and is suggestive of a reduced penetrance allele in his family. Southern blot analysis showed an SCA10 expanded allele of 1400 repeats. Established SNPs surrounding the SCA10 locus showed a disease haplotype consistent with the previously described "SCA10 haplotype". This case suggests that the SCA10 expansion represents an early mutation event that possibly occurred during the initial peopling of the Americas. PMID:24278426

  1. Rapid Onset of Motor Deficits in a Mouse Model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 Precedes Late Cerebellar Degeneration123

    PubMed Central

    Ljungberg, Lovisa; Cormier, Alexander; Quilez, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal-dominant cerebellar ataxia that has been associated with loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Disease onset is typically at midlife, although it can vary widely from late teens to old age in SCA6 patients. Our study focused on an SCA6 knock-in mouse model with a hyper-expanded (84X) CAG repeat expansion that displays midlife-onset motor deficits at ∼7 months old, reminiscent of midlife-onset symptoms in SCA6 patients, although a detailed phenotypic analysis of these mice has not yet been reported. Here, we characterize the onset of motor deficits in SCA684Q mice using a battery of behavioral assays to test for impairments in motor coordination, balance, and gait. We found that these mice performed normally on these assays up to and including at 6 months, but motor impairment was detected at 7 months with all motor coordination assays used, suggesting that motor deficits emerge rapidly during a narrow age window in SCA684Q mice. In contrast to what is seen in SCA6 patients, the decrease in motor coordination was observed without alterations in gait. No loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells or striatal neurons were observed at 7 months, the age at which motor deficits were first detected, but significant Purkinje cell loss was observed in 2-year-old SCA684Q mice, arguing that Purkinje cell death does not significantly contribute to the early stages of SCA6. PMID:26730403

  2. Impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3): bedside and search coil evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Carlos R; Zivotofsky, Ari Z; Caspi, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) abnormalities in cerebellar ataxias are a matter of renewed interest. We have previously reported vestibular areflexia in a group of Yemenite-Jews with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 (SCA3) who had clear bilateral pathological horizontal Head Impulse Test (HIT). The objective of this study was to evaluate the VOR of ten SCA3 patients who have variable bedside HIT responses by recording their eye movements using magnetic search coils and to correlate these results with their clinical and genetic data. Eight out of the ten patients have abnormal horizontal HIT detected by both clinical bedside examination and laboratory tests. Results of bedside HIT testing were significantly correlated with the VOR gain recorded using magnetic search coils. No significant correlations were found between VOR gain and other clinical or genetic data. Our study confirms the presence of defective VOR in SCA3 patients and corroborates the useful of the HIT as a reliable bedside test for diagnosis of VOR deficits. PMID:25564077

  3. In vivo neurometabolic profiling in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, 3, and 7.

    PubMed

    Adanyeguh, Isaac M; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Nguyen, Tra M; Rinaldi, Daisy; Jauffret, Celine; Valabregue, Romain; Emir, Uzay E; Deelchand, Dinesh K; Brice, Alexis; Eberly, Lynn E; Öz, Gülin; Durr, Alexandra; Mochel, Fanny

    2015-04-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) belong to polyglutamine repeat disorders and are characterized by a predominant atrophy of the cerebellum and the pons. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H MRS) using an optimized semiadiabatic localization by adiabatic selective refocusing (semi-LASER) protocol was performed at 3 T to determine metabolite concentrations in the cerebellar vermis and pons of a cohort of patients with SCA1 (n=16), SCA2 (n=12), SCA3 (n=21), and SCA7 (n=12) and healthy controls (n=33). Compared with controls, patients displayed lower total N-acetylaspartate and, to a lesser extent, lower glutamate, reflecting neuronal loss/dysfunction, whereas the glial marker, myoinositol (myo-Ins), was elevated. Patients also showed higher total creatine as reported in Huntington's disease, another polyglutamine repeat disorder. A strong correlation was found between the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia and the neurometabolites in both affected regions of patients. Principal component analyses confirmed that neuronal metabolites (total N-acetylaspartate and glutamate) were inversely correlated in the vermis and the pons to glial (myo-Ins) and energetic (total creatine) metabolites, as well as to disease severity (motor scales). Neurochemical plots with selected metabolites also allowed the separation of SCA2 and SCA3 from controls. The neurometabolic profiles detected in patients underlie cell-specific changes in neuronal and astrocytic compartments that cannot be assessed by other neuroimaging modalities. The inverse correlation between metabolites from these two compartments suggests a metabolic attempt to compensate for neuronal damage in SCAs. Because these biomarkers reflect dynamic aspects of cellular metabolism, they are good candidates for proof-of-concept therapeutic trials. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:25773989

  4. In vivo neurometabolic profiling in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, 2, 3 and 7

    PubMed Central

    Adanyeguh, Isaac M.; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Nguyen, Tra M.; Rinaldi, Daisy; Jauffret, Celine; Valabregue, Romain; Emir, Uzay E.; Deelchand, Dinesh K.; Brice, Alexis; Eberly, Lynn E.; Öz, Gülin; Durr, Alexandra; Mochel, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar Ataxias (SCAs) belong to polyglutamine repeat disorders and are characterized by a predominant atrophy of the cerebellum and the pons. Methods Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) using an optimised semiadiabatic localization by adiabatic selective refocusing (semi-LASER) protocol was performed at 3 T to determine metabolite concentrations in the cerebellar vermis and pons of a cohort of patients with SCA1 (n = 16), SCA2 (n = 12), SCA3 (n = 21), SCA7 (n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 33). Results Compared to controls, patients displayed lower total N-acetylaspartate and, to a lesser extent, lower glutamate, reflecting neuronal loss/dysfunction, while the glial marker, myo-inositol, was elevated. Patients also showed higher total creatine as reported in Huntington disease, another polyglutamine repeat disorder. There was a strong correlation between the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia and the neurometabolites in both affected regions of patients. Principal component analyses confirmed that neuronal metabolites (total N-acetylaspartate and glutamate) were inversely correlated in the vermis and the pons to glial (myo-inositol) and energetic (total creatine) metabolites, as well as to disease severity (motor scales). Neurochemical plots with selected metabolites also allowed the separation of SCA2 and SCA3 from controls. Conclusion The neurometabolic profiles detected in patients underlie cell-specific changes in neuronal and astrocytic compartments that cannot be assessed by other neuroimaging modalities. The inverse correlation between metabolites from these two compartments suggests a metabolic attempt to compensate for neuronal damage in SCAs. Because these biomarkers reflect dynamic aspects of cellular metabolism, they are good candidates for proof-of-concept therapeutic trials. PMID:25773989

  5. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease starting before adolescence.

    PubMed

    Donis, Karina Carvalho; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Krum-Santos, Ana Carolina; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Mattos, Eduardo Preusser; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Torman, Vanessa Leotti; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2016-04-01

    Onset of Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) before adolescence has been rarely reported. This study aims to describe a cohort of SCA3/MJD with onset before 12 years of age, comparing their disease progression with the progression observed in patients with usual disease onset. We identified all cases from our cohort whose onset was before adolescence. After consent, patients were examined with clinical scales Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) and Neurological Examination Score for Spinocerebellar Ataxia (NESSCA). Gender, age, age at onset, disease duration, CAG expanded repeats, transmitting parent, and anticipation of cases with infantile and adult onset were studied. Progression of NESSCA and SARA scores was estimated through a mixed model, and was compared with a historical group with onset after adolescence. Between 2000 and 2014, 461 symptomatic individuals from our region were diagnosed as SCA3/MJD. Onset of eight cases (2.2 %), all heterozygotes, was before adolescence: seven were females (p = 0.054). CAG expanded repeats-75 ± 3 versus 84 ± 4-and anticipations-7 ± 9.7 versus 14.4 ± 7.2 years-were different between early childhood and adult onset groups (p < 0.03). The median survival of early childhood onset group was 23 years of age. The annual progression of SARA-2.3 and 0.6 points/year (p = 0.001)-and NESSCA-2.04 and 0.88 points/year (p = 0.043)-was faster in childhood than in adult onset group. Onset of SCA3/MJD before adolescence was related to larger expanded CAG repeats in heterozygosis; females seemed to be at higher risk. Disease progression was faster than in SCA3/MJD starting after 12 years. PMID:26780339

  6. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell line SCA3.A11.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Susanne K; Borland, Helena; Hasholt, Lis F; Tümer, Zeynep; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Rasmussen, Mikkel A; Nielsen, Troels T; Stummann, Tina C; Fog, Karina; Hyttel, Poul

    2016-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG-repeat expanding mutation in ATXN3. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a SCA3 patient by electroporation of dermal fibroblasts with episomal plasmids encoding L-MYC, LIN28, SOX2, KLF4, OCT4 and short hairpin RNA targeting P53. The resulting iPSCs had normal karyotype, were free of genomically integrated episomal plasmids, expressed pluripotency markers, could differentiate into the three germ layers in vitro and retained the disease-causing ATXN3 mutation. This iPSC line could be useful for the investigation of SCA3 disease mechanisms. PMID:27346190

  7. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell line SCA3.B11.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Susanne K; Borland, Helena; Hasholt, Lis F; Tümer, Zeynep; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Rasmussen, Mikkel A; Nielsen, Troels T; Stummann, Tina C; Fog, Karina; Hyttel, Poul

    2016-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion of the CAG-repeat in ATXN3. In this study, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from SCA3 patient dermal fibroblasts by electroporation with episomal plasmids encoding L-MYC, LIN28, SOX2, KLF4, OCT4 and short hairpin RNA targeting P53. The resulting iPSCs had normal karyotype, were free of integrated episomal plasmids, expressed pluripotency markers, could differentiate into the three germ layers in vitro and retained the disease-causing ATXN3 mutation. Potentially, this iPSC line could be a useful tool for the investigation of SCA3 disease mechanisms. PMID:27346191

  8. DnaJ-1 and karyopherin α3 suppress degeneration in a new Drosophila model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Wei-Ling; Hosking, Ryan R; Burr, Aaron A; Sutton, Joanna R; Ouyang, Michelle; Du, Xiaofei; Gomez, Christopher M; Todi, Sokol V

    2015-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) belongs to the family of CAG/polyglutamine (polyQ)-dependent neurodegenerative disorders. SCA6 is caused by abnormal expansion in a CAG trinucleotide repeat within exon 47 of CACNA1A, a bicistronic gene that encodes α1A, a P/Q-type calcium channel subunit and a C-terminal protein, termed α1ACT. Expansion of the CAG/polyQ region of CACNA1A occurs within α1ACT and leads to ataxia. There are few animal models of SCA6. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of the first Drosophila melanogaster models of SCA6, which express the entire human α1ACT protein with a normal or expanded polyQ. The polyQ-expanded version of α1ACT recapitulates the progressively degenerative nature of SCA6 when expressed in various fly tissues and the presence of densely staining aggregates. Additional studies identify the co-chaperone DnaJ-1 as a potential therapeutic target for SCA6. Expression of DnaJ-1 potently suppresses α1ACT-dependent degeneration and lethality, concomitant with decreased aggregation and reduced nuclear localization of the pathogenic protein. Mutating the nuclear importer karyopherin α3 also leads to reduced toxicity from pathogenic α1ACT. Little is known about the steps leading to degeneration in SCA6 and the means to protect neurons in this disease are lacking. Invertebrate animal models of SCA6 can expand our understanding of molecular sequelae related to degeneration in this disorder and lead to the rapid identification of cellular components that can be targeted to treat it. PMID:25954029

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 in South Africa: Epidemiology, pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Watson, L; Smith, D C; Scholefield, J; Ballo, R; Kidson, S; Greenberg, L J; Wood, M J A

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of the nervous system represent a significant proportion of the global burden of non-communicable diseases, due to the trend towards ageing populations. The Department (now Division) of Human Genetics at the University of Cape Town (UCT) has been involved in pioneering research into these diseases since the appointment of Prof. Peter Beighton as Head of Department in 1972. Beighton's emphasis on understanding the genetic basis of disease laid the groundwork for investigations into several monogenic neurodegenerative conditions, including Huntington's disease and the polyglutamine spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs). In particular, SCA7, which occurs at an unusually high frequency in the South African (SA) population, was identified as a target for further research and therapeutic development. Beginning with early epidemiological surveys, the SCA7 project progressed to molecular genetics-based investigations, leading to the identification of a founder effect in the SA SCA7 patient population in the mid-2000s. Capitalising on the founder haplotype shared by many SCA7 patients, UCT researchers went on to develop the first population-specific gene-silencing approach for the disease. More recently, efforts have shifted to the development of a more accurate model to decipher the precise mechanisms of neurodegeneration, using induced pluripotent stem cells derived from SA SCA7 patients. In many ways, the SA SCA7 journey reflects the legacy and vision of Prof. Peter Beighton, and his efforts to establish world-class, collaborative research into diseases affecting the African continent. PMID:27245542

  10. Parametric fMRI of paced motor responses uncovers novel whole-brain imaging biomarkers in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    PubMed

    Duarte, João Valente; Faustino, Ricardo; Lobo, Mercês; Cunha, Gil; Nunes, César; Ferreira, Carlos; Januário, Cristina; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    Machado-Joseph Disease, inherited type 3 spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA3), is the most common form worldwide. Neuroimaging and neuropathology have consistently demonstrated cerebellar alterations. Here we aimed to discover whole-brain functional biomarkers, based on parametric performance-level-dependent signals. We assessed 13 patients with early SCA3 and 14 healthy participants. We used a combined parametric behavioral/functional neuroimaging design to investigate disease fingerprints, as a function of performance levels, coupled with structural MRI and voxel-based morphometry. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was designed to parametrically analyze behavior and neural responses to audio-paced bilateral thumb movements at temporal frequencies of 1, 3, and 5 Hz. Our performance-level-based design probing neuronal correlates of motor coordination enabled the discovery that neural activation and behavior show critical loss of parametric modulation specifically in SCA3, associated with frequency-dependent cortico/subcortical activation/deactivation patterns. Cerebellar/cortical rate-dependent dissociation patterns could clearly differentiate between groups irrespective of grey matter loss. Our findings suggest functional reorganization of the motor network and indicate a possible role of fMRI as a tool to monitor disease progression in SCA3. Accordingly, fMRI patterns proved to be potential biomarkers in early SCA3, as tested by receiver operating characteristic analysis of both behavior and neural activation at different frequencies. Discrimination analysis based on BOLD signal in response to the applied parametric finger-tapping task significantly often reached >80% sensitivity and specificity in single regions-of-interest.Functional fingerprints based on cerebellar and cortical BOLD performance dependent signal modulation can thus be combined as diagnostic and/or therapeutic targets in hereditary ataxia. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3656-3668, 2016. © 2016 Wiley

  11. Prediction of the age at onset in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, 2, 3 and 6

    PubMed Central

    Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Durr, Alexandra; Rakowicz, Maria; Nanetti, Lorenzo; Charles, Perrine; Sulek, Anna; Mariotti, Caterina; Rola, Rafal; Schols, Ludger; Bauer, Peter; Dufaure-Garé, Isabelle; Jacobi, Heike; Forlani, Sylvie; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Filla, Alessandro; Timmann, Dagmar; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Marelli, Cecila; Kang, Jun-Suk; Giunti, Paola; Cook, Arron; Baliko, Laszlo; Bela, Melegh; Boesch, Sylvia; Szymanski, Sandra; Berciano, José; Infante, Jon; Buerk, Katrin; Masciullo, Marcella; Di Fabio, Roberto; Depondt, Chantal; Ratka, Susanne; Stevanin, Giovanni; Klockgether, Thomas; Brice, Alexis; Golmard, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA)—SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, and SCA6—are caused by (CAG)n repeat expansion. While the number of repeats of the coding (CAG)n expansions is correlated with the age at onset, there are no appropriate models that include both affected and preclinical carriers allowing for the prediction of age at onset. Methods We combined data from two major European cohorts of SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, and SCA6 mutation carriers: 1187 affected individuals from the EUROSCA registry and 123 preclinical individuals from the RISCA cohort. For each SCA genotype, a regression model was fitted using a log-normal distribution for age at onset with the repeat length of the alleles as covariates. From these models, we calculated expected age at onset from birth and conditionally that this age is greater than the current age. Results For SCA2 and SCA3 genotypes, the expanded allele was a significant predictor of age at onset (−0.105±0.005 and −0.056±0.003) while for SCA1 and SCA6 genotypes both the size of the expanded and normal alleles were significant (expanded: −0.049±0.002 and −0.090±0.009, respectively; normal: +0.013±0.005 and −0.029±0.010, respectively). According to the model, we indicated the median values (90% critical region) and the expectancy (SD) of the predicted age at onset for each SCA genotype according to the CAG repeat size and current age. Conclusions These estimations can be valuable in clinical and research. However, results need to be confirmed in other independent cohorts and in future longitudinal studies. ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01037777 and NCT00136630 for the French patients. PMID:24780882

  12. Episodic Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    An account of episodic memories is developed that focuses on the types of knowledge they represent, their properties, and the functions they might serve. It is proposed that episodic memories consist of "episodic elements," summary records of experience often in the form of visual images, associated to a "conceptual frame" that provides a…

  13. Treatment with a Ginkgo biloba extract, EGb 761, inhibits excitotoxicity in an animal model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 17.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ding-Siang; Lin, Hsuan-Yuan; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu-Mei; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Lin, Jung-Yaw

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA 17) is a polyglutamine disease caused by the expansion of CAG/CAA repeats in the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) gene. The Ginkgo biloba extract, EGb 761, contains flavonoids and terpenoids with a potential use for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The neuroprotective effects of EGb 761 are obvious, but whether the EGb 761 has therapeutic effects in SCA 17 is still unclear. To manage our issues, we have generated TBP/79Q-expressing SH-SY5Y cells and SCA 17 transgenic mice with the mutant hTBP gene. In in vitro experiment, we observed that the EGb 761 treatment decreased the amount of sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble proteins in the TBP/79Q-expressing SH-SY5Y cells. We further found that the EGb 761 treatment could inhibit excitotoxicity and calcium influx and reduce the expression of apoptotic markers in glutamate-treated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. In in vivo experiment, we observed that the EGb 761 treatment (100 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection per day) could relieve the motor deficiencies of the SCA 17 transgenic mice. Our findings provide evidence that the EGb 761 treatment can be a remedy for SCA 17 via suppressing excitotoxicity and apoptosis in SCA 17 cell and animal models. Therefore, we suggest that EGb 761 may be a potential therapeutic agent for treating SCA 17. PMID:26937174

  14. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease: segregation patterns and factors influencing instability of expanded CAG transmissions.

    PubMed

    Souza, G N; Kersting, N; Krum-Santos, A C; Santos, A S P; Furtado, G V; Pacheco, D; Gonçalves, T A; Saute, J A; Schuler-Faccini, L; Mattos, E P; Saraiva-Pereira, M L; Jardim, L B

    2016-08-01

    Controversies about Mendelian segregation and CAG expansion (CAGexp) instabilities during meiosis in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) need clarification. Additional evidence about these issues was obtained from the cohort of all SCA3/MJD individuals living in South Brazil. A survey was carried out to update information registered since 2001. Deaths were checked with the Public Information System, and data was made anonymous. Anticipation and delta-CAGexp from parent-offspring pairs, and delta-CAGexp between siblings were obtained. One hundred and fifty-nine families (94% of the entire registry) were retrieved, comprising 3725 living individuals as of 2015, 625 of these being symptomatic. Minimal prevalence was 6:100,000. Carriers of a CAGexp represented 65.6% of sibs in the genotyped offspring (p < 0.001). Median instability was larger among paternal than maternal transmissions, and instabilities correlated with anticipation (r = 0.38; p = 0.001). Age of the parent correlated to delta-CAGexp among 115 direct parent-offspring CAGexp transmissions (ρ = 0.23, p = 0.014). In 98 additional kindreds, the delta-CAGexp between 269 siblings correlated with their delta-of-age (ρ = 0.27, p < 0.0001). SCA3/MJD was associated with a segregation distortion favoring the expanded allele in our cohort. Instability of expansion during meiosis was weakly influenced by the age of the transmitting parent at the time of conception. PMID:26693702

  15. Treatment with a Ginkgo biloba extract, EGb 761, inhibits excitotoxicity in an animal model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 17

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ding-Siang; Lin, Hsuan-Yuan; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu-Mei; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Lin, Jung-Yaw

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA 17) is a polyglutamine disease caused by the expansion of CAG/CAA repeats in the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) gene. The Ginkgo biloba extract, EGb 761, contains flavonoids and terpenoids with a potential use for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. The neuroprotective effects of EGb 761 are obvious, but whether the EGb 761 has therapeutic effects in SCA 17 is still unclear. To manage our issues, we have generated TBP/79Q-expressing SH-SY5Y cells and SCA 17 transgenic mice with the mutant hTBP gene. In in vitro experiment, we observed that the EGb 761 treatment decreased the amount of sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble proteins in the TBP/79Q-expressing SH-SY5Y cells. We further found that the EGb 761 treatment could inhibit excitotoxicity and calcium influx and reduce the expression of apoptotic markers in glutamate-treated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. In in vivo experiment, we observed that the EGb 761 treatment (100 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection per day) could relieve the motor deficiencies of the SCA 17 transgenic mice. Our findings provide evidence that the EGb 761 treatment can be a remedy for SCA 17 via suppressing excitotoxicity and apoptosis in SCA 17 cell and animal models. Therefore, we suggest that EGb 761 may be a potential therapeutic agent for treating SCA 17. PMID:26937174

  16. A human β-III-spectrin spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 mutation causes high-affinity F-actin binding

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Adam W.; Crain, Jonathan; Thomas, David D.; Hays, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) is a human neurodegenerative disease that stems from mutations in the SPTBN2 gene encoding the protein β-III-spectrin. Here we investigated the molecular consequence of a SCA5 missense mutation that results in a L253P substitution in the actin-binding domain (ABD) of β-III-spectrin. We report that the L253P substitution in the isolated β-III-spectrin ABD causes strikingly high F-actin binding affinity (Kd = 75.5 nM) compared to the weak F-actin binding affinity of the wild-type ABD (Kd = 75.8 μM). The mutation also causes decreased thermal stability (Tm = 44.6 °C vs 59.5 °C). Structural analyses indicate that leucine 253 is in a loop at the interface of the tandem calponin homology (CH) domains comprising the ABD. Leucine 253 is predicted to form hydrophobic contacts that bridge the CH domains. The decreased stability of the mutant indicates that these bridging interactions are probably disrupted, suggesting that the high F-actin binding affinity of the mutant is due to opening of the CH domain interface. These results support a fundamental role for leucine 253 in regulating opening of the CH domain interface and binding of the ABD to F-actin. This study indicates that high-affinity actin binding of L253P β-III-spectrin is a likely driver of neurodegeneration. PMID:26883385

  17. Mutation of senataxin alters disease-specific transcriptional networks in patients with ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Brent L; Cho, Ellen; Wahnich, Amanda; Gao, Fuying; Becherel, Olivier J; Wang, Xizhe; Fike, Francesca; Chen, Leslie; Criscuolo, Chiara; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Collins, Abigail; Hahn, Angelika F; Gatti, Richard A; Konopka, Genevieve; Perlman, Susan; Lavin, Martin F; Geschwind, Daniel H; Coppola, Giovanni

    2014-09-15

    Senataxin, encoded by the SETX gene, contributes to multiple aspects of gene expression, including transcription and RNA processing. Mutations in SETX cause the recessive disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) and a dominant juvenile form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4). To assess the functional role of senataxin in disease, we examined differential gene expression in AOA2 patient fibroblasts, identifying a core set of genes showing altered expression by microarray and RNA-sequencing. To determine whether AOA2 and ALS4 mutations differentially affect gene expression, we overexpressed disease-specific SETX mutations in senataxin-haploinsufficient fibroblasts and observed changes in distinct sets of genes. This implicates mutation-specific alterations of senataxin function in disease pathogenesis and provides a novel example of allelic neurogenetic disorders with differing gene expression profiles. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) demonstrated these senataxin-associated genes to be involved in both mutation-specific and shared functional gene networks. To assess this in vivo, we performed gene expression analysis on peripheral blood from members of 12 different AOA2 families and identified an AOA2-specific transcriptional signature. WGCNA identified two gene modules highly enriched for this transcriptional signature in the peripheral blood of all AOA2 patients studied. These modules were disease-specific and preserved in patient fibroblasts and in the cerebellum of Setx knockout mice demonstrating conservation across species and cell types, including neurons. These results identify novel genes and cellular pathways related to senataxin function in normal and disease states, and implicate alterations in gene expression as underlying the phenotypic differences between AOA2 and ALS4. PMID:24760770

  18. A human β-III-spectrin spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 mutation causes high-affinity F-actin binding.

    PubMed

    Avery, Adam W; Crain, Jonathan; Thomas, David D; Hays, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) is a human neurodegenerative disease that stems from mutations in the SPTBN2 gene encoding the protein β-III-spectrin. Here we investigated the molecular consequence of a SCA5 missense mutation that results in a L253P substitution in the actin-binding domain (ABD) of β-III-spectrin. We report that the L253P substitution in the isolated β-III-spectrin ABD causes strikingly high F-actin binding affinity (Kd = 75.5 nM) compared to the weak F-actin binding affinity of the wild-type ABD (Kd = 75.8 μM). The mutation also causes decreased thermal stability (Tm = 44.6 °C vs 59.5 °C). Structural analyses indicate that leucine 253 is in a loop at the interface of the tandem calponin homology (CH) domains comprising the ABD. Leucine 253 is predicted to form hydrophobic contacts that bridge the CH domains. The decreased stability of the mutant indicates that these bridging interactions are probably disrupted, suggesting that the high F-actin binding affinity of the mutant is due to opening of the CH domain interface. These results support a fundamental role for leucine 253 in regulating opening of the CH domain interface and binding of the ABD to F-actin. This study indicates that high-affinity actin binding of L253P β-III-spectrin is a likely driver of neurodegeneration. PMID:26883385

  19. Diagnosis of Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fingers, hands, arms, legs, body, speech, and eye movements. The word ataxia is often used to describe ... motor control such as writing and eating. Slow eye movements can be seen in some form of ataxia. ...

  20. National Ataxia Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... naf@ataxia.org . Charity Navigator Awards NAF Four-Star Rating Charity Navigator, America’s premier charity evaluator, has ... Ataxia Foundation received a four out of four star rating. This is the fourth consecutive year NAF ...

  1. Ataxias with autosomal, X-chromosomal or maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2009-07-01

    Heredoataxias are a group of genetic disorders with a cerebellar syndrome as the leading clinical manifestation. The current classification distinguishes heredoataxias according to the trait of inheritance into autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and maternally inherited heredoataxias. The autosomal dominant heredoataxias are separated into spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA1-8, 10-15, 17-23, 25-30, and dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy), episodic ataxias (EA1-7), and autosomal dominant mitochondrial heredoataxias (Leigh syndrome, MIRAS, ADOAD, and AD-CPEO). The autosomal recessive ataxias are separated into Friedreich ataxia, ataxia due to vitamin E deficiency, ataxia due to Abeta-lipoproteinemia, Refsum disease, late-onset Tay-Sachs disease, cerebrotendineous xanthomatosis, spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy, ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia telangiectasia-like disorder, ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1 and 2, spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay, Cayman ataxia, Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, and autosomal recessive mitochondrial ataxias (AR-CPEO, SANDO, SCAE, AHS, IOSCA, MEMSA, LBSL CoQ-deficiency, PDC-deficiency). Only two of the heredoataxias, fragile X/tremor/ataxia syndrome, and XLSA/A are transmitted via an X-linked trait. Maternally inherited heredoataxias are due to point mutations in genes encoding for tRNAs, rRNAs, respiratory chain subunits or single large scale deletions/duplications of the mitochondrial DNA and include MELAS, MERRF, KSS, PS, MILS, NARP, and non-syndromic mitochondrial disorders. Treatment of heredoataxias is symptomatic and supportive and may have a beneficial effect in single patients. **Please see page 424 for abbreviation list. PMID:19650351

  2. Prevention of repeated episodes of type 2 reaction of leprosy with the use of thalidomide 100 mg/day*

    PubMed Central

    Putinatti, Maria Stella de Mello Ayres; Lastória, Joel Carlos; Padovani, Carlos Roberto

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy can have its course interrupted by type 1 and 2 reactional episodes, the last named of erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL). Thalidomide has been the medication of choice for the control of ENL episodes since 1965. OBJECTIVES These episodes can repeat and cause damages to the patient. In order to prevent these episodes, an extra dose of 100 mg/day thalidomide was used during six months, followed by a follow-up period of six more months after thalidomide discontinuation. METHODS We included 42 patients with multibacillary (MB) leprosy who had episodes of ENL. They were male and female patients aged between 18 and 84 years. RESULTS Of the 42 patients, 39 (92.85%) had the lepromatous form and three (7.15%) had the borderline form. We found that 100% of patients had no reactional episode during the use of the drug. During the follow-up period after thalidomide discontinuation, 33 (78.57%) patients had no reactional episode and nine (21.43%), all of them with the lepromatous form, had mild episodes, which were controlled using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory. There were no thalidomide-related side effects. CONCLUSION A maintenance dose of 100 mg/day of thalidomide showed to be effective to prevent repeated type 2 reactional episodes of ENL. PMID:24770503

  3. Beyond the glutamine expansion: Influence of post-translational modifications of Ataxin-1 in the pathogenesis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Janghoo

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications are crucial mechanisms that modulate various cellular signaling pathways, and their dysregulation is associated with many human diseases. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive ataxia, mild cognitive impairments, difficulty with speaking and swallowing, and respiratory failure. It is caused by the expansion of an unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat encoding a glutamine tract in ATAXIN-1 (ATXN1). Although the expansion of the polyglutamine tract is the key determinant of the disease, protein domains outside of the polyglutamine tract and post-translational modifications of ATXN1 significantly alter the neurotoxicity of SCA1. ATXN1 undergoes several post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, and transglutamination. Such modifications can alter the stability of ATXN1 or its activity in the regulation of target gene expression, and therefore contribute to SCA1 toxicity. This review outlines different types of post-translational modifications in ATXN1 and discusses their potential regulatory mechanisms and effects on SCA1 pathogenesis. Finally, the manipulation of post-translational modifications as a potential therapeutic approach will be discussed. PMID:24752589

  4. Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type1 (AOA1): novel and recurrent aprataxin mutations, coenzyme Q10 analyses, and clinical findings in Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Castellotti, Barbara; Mariotti, Caterina; Rimoldi, Marco; Fancellu, Roberto; Plumari, Massimo; Caimi, Sara; Uziel, Graziella; Nardocci, Nardo; Moroni, Isabella; Zorzi, Giovanna; Pareyson, Davide; Di Bella, Daniela; Di Donato, Stefano; Taroni, Franco; Gellera, Cinzia

    2011-08-01

    Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type1 (AOA1, MIM 208920) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the APTX gene. We screened a cohort of 204 patients with cerebellar ataxia and 52 patients with early-onset isolated chorea. APTX gene mutations were found in 13 ataxic patients (6%). Eleven patients were homozygous for the known p.W279X, p.W279R, and p.P206L mutations. Three novel APTX mutations were identified: c.477delC (p.I159fsX171), c.C541T (p.Q181X), and c.C916T (p.R306X). Expression of mutated proteins in lymphocytes from these patients was greatly decreased. No mutations were identified in subjects with isolated chorea. Two heterozygous APTX sequence variants (p.L248M and p.D185E) were found in six families with ataxic phenotype. Analyses of coenzyme Q10 in muscle, fibroblasts, and plasma demonstrated normal levels of coenzyme in five of six mutated subjects. The clinical phenotype was homogeneous, irrespectively of the type and location of the APTX mutation, and it was mainly characterized by early-onset cerebellar signs, sensory neuropathy, cognitive decline, and oculomotor deficits. Three cases had slightly raised alpha-fetoprotein. Our survey describes one of the largest series of AOA1 patients and contributes in defining clinical, molecular, and biochemical characteristics of this rare hereditary neurological condition. PMID:21465257

  5. Milestones in ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Klockgether, Thomas; Paulson, Henry

    2010-01-01

    The past 25 years have seen enormous progress in the deciphering of the genetic and molecular basis of ataxias resulting in an improved understanding of their pathogenesis. The most significant milestones during this period were the cloning of the genes associated with the common spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and Friedreich ataxia (FRDA). To date, the causative mutations of more than 30 SCAs and 20 recessive ataxias have been identified. In addition, there are numerous acquired ataxias with defined molecular causes so that the entire number of distinct ataxia disorders exceeds 50 and possibly approaches 100. Despite this enormous heterogeneity, a few recurrent pathopyhsiological themes stand out. These include protein aggregation, failure of protein homoestasis, perturbations in ion channel function, defects in DNA repair and mitochondrial dysfunction. The clinical phenotypes of the most common ataxia disorders have been firmly established, and their natural history is being studied in ongoing large observational trials. Effective therapies for ataxias are still lacking. However, novel drug targets are under investigation, and it is expected that there will be an increasing number of therapeutic trials in ataxia. PMID:21626557

  6. Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes complicated by an episode of severe hypertriglyceridaemia-induced pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Denecker, Nathalie; Decochez, Katelijn

    2013-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman with a history of type 2 diabetes and non-compliance presented to the emergency department with abdominal epigastric pain and nausea. Laboratory examination revealed a mild ketoacidosis while an abdominal CT scan performed the following day demonstrated a severe acute pancreatitis of the body and tail (Balthazar grade E) despite normal amylase serum levels on admission. The presence of a lactescent serum was the clue to an extremely high triglyceride level (>10 000 mg/dl) causing the pancreatitis. The hypertriglyceridaemia itself was attributed mainly to the diabetic ketoacidosis. There was no family history of hypertriglyceridaemia. The triad consisting of diabetic ketoacidosis, hypertriglyceridaemia and acute pancreatitis is an unusual presentation of poorly controlled diabetes which can occur in type 1 as well as type 2 diabetic adults and children. Treatment with intravenous insulin and hydration successfully resolved the ketoacidosis and hypertriglyceridaemia and reversed the episode of acute pancreatitis. PMID:23632173

  7. Acute Ataxia in Childhood: 11-Year Experience at a Major Pediatric Neurology Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Kavita; Maricich, Stephen M; Alper, Gulay

    2016-08-01

    We categorized the causes of acute ataxia in the pediatric population-referred to the Division of Neurology-at a large, urban pediatric medical center. Of the 120 cases identified over the past 11 years, post-infectious cerebellar ataxia was the most commonly diagnosed (59%), followed by drug intoxication, opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia syndrome, episodic ataxia, acute cerebellitis, cerebellar stroke, ADEM, meningitis, cerebral vein thrombosis, Leigh's disease, Miller-Fisher syndrome, and concussion. Among the patients with post-infectious cerebellar ataxia, 85% were 1-6 years old and all had a history of antecedent viral illness. CSF pleocytosis was present in 40% of patients; all had normal brain MRIs. The majority (91%) recovered within 30 days. We conclude that post-infectious cerebellar ataxia remains the most common cause of acute ataxia in childhood and that it carries a good prognosis. We also differentiate acute post-infectious cerebellar ataxia from other causes with similar presentations. PMID:27071467

  8. Multimodal electrophysiologic follow-up study in 3 mutated but presymptomatic members of a spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) family.

    PubMed

    Ragno, M; Perretti, A C; Castaldo, I; Scarcella, M; Acciarri, S; Manganelli, F; Santoro, L

    2005-06-01

    The objective was to determine the progression of nervous system involvement in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1). Three presymptomatic members of an Italian SCA1 family underwent molecular analysis and showed the SCA1 mutation. They were defined as "at risk/mutated" individuals. A clinical and electrophysiologic 7-9 year follow-up was performed. The Inherited Ataxia Progression Scale was used for clinical staging. Sensory and motor conduction velocities, somatosensory evoked potentials and transcranial magnetic stimulation were performed at least three times in each subject. Clinical examination showed the early corticospinal pathway involvement. Electrophysiologic investigations confirmed that at the asymptomatic stage only magnetic motor cortex stimulation was abnormal and rapidly worsened with time. Somatosensory pathway studies showed a later involvement and a light sensory-motor neuropathy was the last electrophysiologic abnormality to be recognised. These data confirm that SCA1 phenotype is characterised by early and prevalent pyramidal tract involvement and that peripheral neuropathy is a late and moderate complication. PMID:15995822

  9. Targeting the prodromal stage of spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 mice: G-CSF in the prevention of motor deficits via upregulating chaperone and autophagy levels.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya-Chin; Lin, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Chen-Ming; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Su, Ming-Tsan; Ro, Long-Sun; Chen, Chiung-Mei; Huang, Hei-Jen; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei

    2016-05-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17), an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, is a devastating, incurable disease caused by the polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion of transcription factor TATA binding protein (TBP). The polyQ expansion causes misfolding and aggregation of the mutant TBP, further leading to cytotoxicity and cell death. The well-recognized prodromal phase in many forms of neurodegeneration suggests a prolonged period of partial neuronal dysfunction prior to cell loss that may be amenable to therapeutic intervention. The objective of this study was to assess the effects and molecular mechanisms of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy during the pre-symptomatic stage in SCA17 mice. Treatment with G-CSF at the pre-symptomatic stage improved the motor coordination of SCA17 mice and reduced the cell loss, insoluble mutant TBP protein, and vacuole formation in the Purkinje neurons of these mice. The neuroprotective effects of G-CSF may be produced by increases in Hsp70, Beclin-1, LC3-II and the p-ERK survival pathway. Upregulation of chaperone and autophagy levels further enhances the clearance of mutant protein aggregation, slowing the progression of pathology in SCA17 mice. Therefore, we showed that the early intervention of G-CSF has a neuroprotective effect, delaying the progression of SCA17 in mutant mice via increases in the levels of chaperone expression and autophagy. PMID:26972528

  10. Ataxia is the major neuropathological finding in arylsulfatase G-deficient mice: similarities and dissimilarities to Sanfilippo disease (mucopolysaccharidosis type III)

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewski, Björn; Heimann, Peter; Ortkras, Theresa; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Sawada, Tomo; Walkley, Steven U.; Dierks, Thomas; Damme, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency of arylsulfatase G (ARSG) leads to a lysosomal storage disease in mice resembling biochemical and pathological features of the mucopolysaccharidoses and particularly features of mucopolysaccharidosis type III (Sanfilippo syndrome). Here we show that Arsg KO mice share common neuropathological findings with other Sanfilippo syndrome models and patients, but they can be clearly distinguished by the limitation of most phenotypic alterations to the cerebellum, presenting with ataxia as the major neurological finding. We determined in detail the expression of ARSG in the central nervous system and observed highest expression in perivascular macrophages (which are characterized by abundant vacuolization in Arsg KO mice) and oligodendrocytes. To gain insight into possible mechanisms leading to ataxia, the pathology in older adult mice (>12 months) was investigated in detail. This study revealed massive loss of Purkinje cells and gliosis in the cerebellum, and secondary accumulation of glycolipids like GM2 and GM3 gangliosides and unesterified cholesterol in surviving Purkinje cells, as well as neurons of some other brain regions. The abundant presence of ubiquitin and p62-positive aggregates in degenerating Purkinje cells coupled with the absence of significant defects in macroautophagy is consistent with lysosomal membrane permeabilization playing a role in the pathogenesis of Arsg-deficient mice and presumably Sanfilippo disease in general. Our data delineating the phenotype of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIE in a mouse KO model should help in the identification of possible human cases of this disease. PMID:25452429

  11. Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a family history of ataxia, but diagnostic tests for known ataxia genes cannot explain the ataxia in their family. In recent years, scientists have developed technologies to sequence thousands of genes at the same ...

  12. Cold episodes in the Peruvian Central Andes: Composites, Types, and their Impacts over South America (1958-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulca, J. C.; Vuille, M. F.; Roundy, P. E.; Trasmonte, G.; Silva, Y.; Takahashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Mantaro basin (MB) is located in the central Peruvian Andes. Occasionally, cold episodes are observed during austral summer (January-March), that strongly damage crops. However, little is known about the causes and impacts of such cold episodes. The main goal of this study is thus to characterize cold episodes in the MB and assess their large-scale circulation and teleconnections over South America (SA) during austral summer. To identify cold events in the MB daily minimum temperature (Tmin) for the period 1958-2014 from Huayao station, located within the MB was used. A cold episode is defined when daily minimum temperature drops below its 10-percentile for at least one day. Additionally, to study the sensitivity between physical mechanisms associated with cold episodes and temperature, cold episodes are classified in three groups: Weak cold episodes (7.5 ≤ Tmin ≤ 10 percentile), strong cold episodes (Tmin ≤ 2.5 percentile), but excluding the 9 coldest events (Tmin ≤ 0 ͦ C), henceforth referred to as extraordinary cold episodes. Several gridded reanalysis were used to characterize the large-scale circulation, cloud cover and rainfall over SA associated with these events. Weak and strong cold episodes in the MB are mainly associated with a weakening of the Bolivian High-Nordeste Low system by tropical-extratropical interactions. Both types of cold episodes are associated with westerly wind anomalies at mid- and upper-tropospheric levels aloft the Peruvian Central Andes, which inhibit the influx of humid air masses from the lowlands to the east and hence limit the development of cloud cover (e.g., positive OLR anomalies over MB). The resulting clear sky conditions cause nighttime temperatures to drop, leading to cold extremes below 10-percentile. Simultaneously, northeastern Brazil (NEB) registers negative OLR anomalies, strong convection and enhanced cloud cover because displacement of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) toward the northeast of

  13. Generation of an isogenic, gene-corrected control cell line of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H271.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Adele G; Schmid, Benjamin; Tubsuwan, Alisa; Poulsen, Ulla B; Engelbrecht, Alexander F; Mau-Holzmann, Ulrike A; Hyttel, Poul; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Nielsen, Troels T; Holst, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting the cerebellum. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and, to date, no cure or treatment is available. We have successfully generated bona fide induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines of SCA2 patients in order to study a disease-specific phenotype. Here, we demonstrate the gene correction of the iPSC line H271 clone 1 where we have exchanged the expanded CAG repeat of the ATXN2 gene with the normal length found in healthy alleles. This gene corrected cell line will provide the ideal control to model SCA2 by iPSC technology. PMID:27345809

  14. Generation of an isogenic, gene-corrected control cell line of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H266.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Adele G; Tubsuwan, Alisa; Schmid, Benjamin; Poulsen, Ulla B; Engelbrecht, Alexander F; Mau-Holzmann, Ulrike A; Hyttel, Poul; Nielsen, Troels T; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Holst, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting the cerebellum. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and, to date, no cure or treatment is available. We have successfully generated bona fide induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines of SCA2 patients in order to study a disease-specific phenotype. Here, we demonstrate the gene correction of the iPSC line H266 clone 10 where we have exchanged the expanded CAG repeat of the ATXN2 gene with the normal length found in healthy alleles. This gene corrected cell line will provide the ideal control to model SCA2 by iPSC technology. PMID:27345815

  15. Generation of an isogenic, gene-corrected control cell line of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H196.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Adele G; Schmid, Benjamin; Tubsuwan, Alisa; Poulsen, Ulla B; Engelbrecht, Alexander F; Mau-Holzmann, Ulrike A; Hyttel, Poul; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Nielsen, Troels T; Holst, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting the cerebellum. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and, to date, no cure or treatment is available. We have successfully generated bona fide induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines of SCA2 patients in order to study a disease-specific phenotype. Here, we demonstrate the gene correction of the iPSC line H196 clone 7 where we have exchanged the expanded CAG repeat of the ATXN2 gene with the normal length found in healthy alleles. This gene corrected cell line will provide the ideal control to model SCA2 by iPSC technology. PMID:27345804

  16. Congenital ataxia and hemiplegic migraine with cerebral edema associated with a novel gain of function mutation in the calcium channel CACNA1A.

    PubMed

    García Segarra, Nuria; Gautschi, Ivan; Mittaz-Crettol, Laureane; Kallay Zetchi, Christine; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Van Bemmelen, Miguel Xavier; Maeder, Philippe; Bonafé, Luisa; Schild, Laurent; Roulet-Perez, Eliane

    2014-07-15

    Mutations in the CACNA1A gene, encoding the α1 subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type), have been associated with three neurological phenotypes: familial and sporadic hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1, SHM1), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2), and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). We report a child with congenital ataxia, abnormal eye movements and developmental delay who presented severe attacks of hemiplegic migraine triggered by minor head traumas and associated with hemispheric swelling and seizures. Progressive cerebellar atrophy was also observed. Remission of the attacks was obtained with acetazolamide. A de novo 3 bp deletion was found in heterozygosity causing loss of a phenylalanine residue at position 1502, in one of the critical transmembrane domains of the protein contributing to the inner part of the pore. We characterized the electrophysiology of this mutant in a Xenopus oocyte in vitro system and showed that it causes gain of function of the channel. The mutant Ca(V)2.1 activates at lower voltage threshold than the wild type. These findings provide further evidence of this molecular mechanism as causative of FHM1 and expand the phenotypic spectrum of CACNA1A mutations with a child exhibiting severe SHM1 and non-episodic ataxia of congenital onset. PMID:24836863

  17. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) in an Egyptian family presenting with polyphagia and marked CAG expansion in infancy.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aleem, Alice; Zaki, Maha S

    2008-03-01

    We describe an Egyptian family having SCA2 affecting three generations with marked molecular and clinical anticipation observed in the index case. Our proband was a male child starting as early as 2 years old with progressive extrapyramidal manifestations, slow eye movements and cognitive impairment. A history of nonspecific mild developmental delay was recorded. The patient lost all cognitive functions, had persistent dystonic posture, trophic changes, vasomotor instability, dysphagia and died at the age of 7 years. The age at presentation among other affected family members varied between 11 and 45 years old across three generations. The early common neurological symptoms were choreoathetotic movements, myoclonic jerk, gait difficulty, expressionless face and emotional liability. Later, overt ataxia, incoordination, dysarthria, mild dementia and slow eye saccades predominated. Brisk tendon reflexes were detected in three cases. Peripheral nerve affection was a late manifestation. Interestingly, polyphagia and obesity were striking manifestations in the middle stage of the disease; an observation that might support a previously suggested relation between the ataxin-2 gene and body weight. The proband showed an amplified allele with marked CAG expansion in the form of a smear sized 69-75 repeats resulted from maternal transmission. To our knowledge, our index case is the second report in the literature presenting with infantile onset SCA2 and intermediate repeat expansion. This family expands the phenotypic spectrum of early onset SCA2 and points out the importance of considering SCA2 gene analysis in children with progressive neurological impairment and abnormal movements with or without polyphagia. PMID:18297329

  18. Loss of Intrinsic Organization of Cerebellar Networks in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1: Correlates with Disease Severity and Duration

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Eitan; Chen, E. Elinor; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Gomez, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of cerebellar degenerative disorders, characterized by progressive gait unsteadiness, hand incoordination, and dysarthria. The mutational mechanism in SCA1, a dominantly inherited form of SCA, consists of an expanded trinucleotide CAG repeat. In SCA1, there is loss of Purkinje cells, neuronal loss in dentate nucleus, olives, and pontine nuclei. In the present study, we sought to apply intrinsic functional connectivity analysis combined with diffusion tensor imaging to define the state of cerebellar connectivity in SCA1. Our results on the intrinsic functional connectivity in lateral cerebellum and thalamus showed progressive organizational changes in SCA1 noted as a progressive increase in the absolute value of the correlation coefficients. In the lateral cerebellum, the anatomical organization of functional clusters seen as parasagittal bands in controls is lost, changing to a patchy appearance in SCA1. Lastly, only fractional anisotropy in the superior peduncle and changes in functional organization in thalamus showed a linear dependence to duration and severity of disease. The present pilot work represents an initial effort describing connectivity biomarkers of disease progression in SCA1. The functional changes detected with intrinsic functional analysis and diffusion tensor imaging suggest that disease progression can be analyzed as a disconnection syndrome. PMID:20886327

  19. Into the depths of ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Harry T.

    2004-01-01

    Ataxia is a lethal neurological disease characterized by incoordination, postural abnormalities, difficulties with gait, and problems with clarity of speech. The etiology of ataxia is divided equally between hereditary and sporadic forms. Regardless of cause, the cerebellar cortex is often a target in ataxia. Thus, how a disruption in cerebellar cortex might lead to ataxia is of considerable interest. A report in this issue of the JCI links ataxia to enhanced hyperexcitability of neurons in the deep cerebellar nuclei. PMID:14966557

  20. Diet for Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... discuss these guidelines with a physical therapist and nutritionist familiar with movement disorders. Ataxia is a complex ... fiber to your diet with your physician or nutritionist, ask them if you might also benefit by ...

  1. Friedreich's Ataxia Research Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cookies ? Yes Wait Leave Provided by OpenGlobal E-commerce Please wait while your page loads ... FARA Cure ... Help Ways to Donate rideATAXIA Team FARA FARA Energy Ball Grassroots Fundraising Fundraising Tools Raising Awareness Advocacy ...

  2. Recovering and Preventing Loss of Detailed Memory: Differential Rates of Forgetting for Detail Types in Episodic Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekeres, Melanie J.; Bonasia, Kyra; St-Laurent, Marie; Pishdadian, Sara; Winocur, Gordon; Grady, Cheryl; Moscovitch, Morris

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memories undergo qualitative changes with time, but little is known about how different aspects of memory are affected. Different types of information in a memory, such as perceptual detail, and central themes, may be lost at different rates. In patients with medial temporal lobe damage, memory for perceptual details is severely impaired,…

  3. The Prevalence, Types and Perceived Outcomes of Crisis Episodes in Early Adulthood and Midlife: A Structured Retrospective-Autobiographical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Oliver C.; Wright, Gordon R. T.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to gain data on the prevalence, types and perceived outcomes of crisis episodes in three age decades of adult life: 20-29, 30-39 and 40-49. A further aim was to explore the relationship between crisis occurrence and empathy. A retrospective-autobiographical survey instrument and an empathy questionnaire were…

  4. Mutant β-III Spectrin Causes mGluR1α Mislocalization and Functional Deficits in a Mouse Model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 5

    PubMed Central

    Armbrust, Karen R.; Wang, Xinming; Hathorn, Tyisha J.; Cramer, Samuel W.; Chen, Gang; Zu, Tao; Kangas, Takashi; Zink, Anastasia N.; Öz, Gülin; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5), a dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by profound Purkinje cell loss, is caused by mutations in SPTBN2, a gene that encodes β-III spectrin. SCA5 is the first neurodegenerative disorder reported to be caused by mutations in a cytoskeletal spectrin gene. We have developed a mouse model to understand the mechanistic basis for this disease and show that expression of mutant but not wild-type β-III spectrin causes progressive motor deficits and cerebellar degeneration. We show that endogenous β-III spectrin interacts with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α (mGluR1α) and that mice expressing mutant β-III spectrin have cerebellar dysfunction with altered mGluR1α localization at Purkinje cell dendritic spines, decreased mGluR1-mediated responses, and deficient mGluR1-mediated long-term potentiation. These results indicate that mutant β-III spectrin causes mislocalization and dysfunction of mGluR1α at dendritic spines and connects SCA5 with other disorders involving glutamatergic dysfunction and synaptic plasticity abnormalities. PMID:25057192

  5. Pharmacological enhancement of mGlu1 metabotropic glutamate receptors causes a prolonged symptomatic benefit in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a genetic disorder characterized by severe ataxia associated with progressive loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. The mGlu1 metabotropic glutamate receptor plays a key role in mechanisms of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum, and its dysfunction is linked to the pathophysiology of motor symptoms associated with SCA1. We used SCA1 heterozygous transgenic mice (Q154/Q2) as a model for testing the hypothesis that drugs that enhance mGlu1 receptor function may be good candidates for the medical treatment of SCA1. Results Symptomatic 30-week old SCA1 mice showed reduced mGlu1 receptor mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum. Interestingly, these mice also showed an intense expression of mGlu5 receptors in cerebellar Purkinje cells, which normally lack these receptors. Systemic treatment of SCA1 mice with the mGlu1 receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), Ro0711401 (10 mg/kg, s.c.), caused a prolonged improvement of motor performance on the rotarod and the paw-print tests. A single injection of Ro0711401 improved motor symptoms for several days, and no tolerance developed to the drug. In contrast, the mGlu5 receptor PAM, VU0360172 (10 mg/kg, s.c.), caused only a short-lasting improvement of motor symptoms, whereas the mGlu1 receptor antagonist, JNJ16259685 (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), further impaired motor performance in SCA1 mice. The prolonged symptomatic benefit caused by Ro0711401 outlasted the time of drug clearance from the cerebellum, and was associated with neuroadaptive changes in the cerebellum, such as a striking reduction of the ectopically expressed mGlu5 receptors in Purkinje cells, increases in levels of total and Ser880-phosphorylated GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors, and changes in the length of spines in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. Conclusions These data demonstrate that pharmacological enhancement of mGlu1 receptors causes a robust and sustained motor improvement in SCA

  6. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 p30 interacts with REGgamma and modulates ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) to promote cell survival.

    PubMed

    Anupam, Rajaneesh; Datta, Antara; Kesic, Matthew; Green-Church, Kari; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Lairmore, Michael D

    2011-03-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a causative agent of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and a variety of inflammatory disorders. HTLV-1 encodes a nuclear localizing protein, p30, that selectively alters viral and cellular gene expression, activates G(2)-M cell cycle checkpoints, and is essential for viral spread. Here, we used immunoprecipitation and affinity pulldown of ectopically expressed p30 coupled with mass spectrometry to identify cellular binding partners of p30. Our data indicate that p30 specifically binds to cellular ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and REGγ (a nuclear 20 S proteasome activator). Under conditions of genotoxic stress, p30 expression was associated with reduced levels of ATM and increased cell survival. Knockdown or overexpression of REGγ paralleled p30 expression, suggesting an unexpected enhancement of p30 expression in the presence of REGγ. Finally, size exclusion chromatography revealed the presence of p30 in a high molecular mass complex along with ATM and REGγ. On the basis of our findings, we propose that HTLV-1 p30 interacts with ATM and REGγ to increase viral spread by facilitating cell survival. PMID:21216954

  7. A VARIANT OF NESPRIN1 GIANT DEVOID OF KASH DOMAIN UNDERLIES THE MOLECULAR ETIOLOGY OF AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE CEREBELLAR ATAXIA TYPE I

    PubMed Central

    Razafsky, David; Hodzic, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Nonsense mutations across the whole coding sequence of Syne1/ Nesprin1 have been linked to Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia Type I (ARCA1). However, nothing is known about the molecular etiology of this late-onset debilitating pathology. In this work, we report that Nesprin1 giant is specifically expressed in CNS tissues. We also identified a CNS-specific splicing event that leads to the abundant expression of a KASH-LESS variant of Nesprin1giant (KLNes1g) in the cerebellum. KLNes1g displayed a noncanonical localization at glomeruli of cerebellar mossy fibers whereas Nesprin2 exclusively decorated the nuclear envelope of all cerebellar neurons. In immunogold electron microscopy, KLNes1g colocalized both with synaptic vesicles within mossy fibers and with dendritic membranes of cerebellar granule neurons. We further identified vesicle- and membrane-associated proteins in KLNes1g immunoprecipitates. Together, our results suggest that the loss of function of KLNes1g resulting from Nesprin1 nonsense mutations underlie the molecular etiology of ARCA1. PMID:25843669

  8. Regional rescue of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 phenotypes by 14-3-3epsilon haploinsufficiency in mice underscores complex pathogenicity in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan; Ward, Christopher S; Richman, Ronald; Orr, Harry T; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2011-02-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat encoding a polyglutamine tract in Ataxin-1 (ATXN1). Both WT and mutant ATXN1 interact with 14-3-3 proteins, and 14-3-3 overexpression stabilizes ATXN1 levels in cells and increases ATXN1 toxicity in flies. To determine whether reducing 14-3-3 levels might mitigate SCA1 pathogenesis, we bred Sca1(154Q/+) mice to mice lacking one allele of 14-3-3ε. 14-3-3ε haploinsufficiency rescued cerebellar pathology and motor phenotypes but, surprisingly, not weight loss, respiratory dysfunction, or premature lethality. Biochemical studies revealed that reducing 14-3-3ε levels exerted different effects in two brain regions especially vulnerable in SCA1: Although diminishing levels of both WT and mutant ATXN1 in the cerebellum, 14-3-3ε haploinsufficiency did not alter ATXN1 levels in the brainstem. Furthermore, 14-3-3ε haploinsufficiency decreased the incorporation of expanded ATXN1 into its large toxic complexes in the cerebellum but not in the brainstem, and the distribution of ATXN1's small and large native complexes differed significantly between the two regions. These data suggest that distinct pathogenic mechanisms operate in different vulnerable brain regions, adding another level of complexity to SCA1 pathogenesis. PMID:21245341

  9. Mitochondrial impairments contribute to Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 progression and can be ameliorated by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ.

    PubMed

    Stucki, David M; Ruegsegger, Céline; Steiner, Silvio; Radecke, Julika; Murphy, Michael P; Zuber, Benoît; Saxena, Smita

    2016-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), due to an unstable polyglutamine expansion within the ubiquitously expressed Ataxin-1 protein, leads to the premature degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs), decreasing motor coordination and causing death within 10-15 years of diagnosis. Currently, there are no therapies available to slow down disease progression. As secondary cellular impairments contributing to SCA1 progression are poorly understood, here, we focused on identifying those processes by performing a PC specific proteome profiling of Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice at a symptomatic stage. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed prominent alterations in mitochondrial proteins. Immunohistochemical and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy analyses confirmed that PCs underwent age-dependent alterations in mitochondrial morphology. Moreover, colorimetric assays demonstrated impairment of the electron transport chain complexes (ETC) and decrease in ATPase activity. Subsequently, we examined whether the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ could restore mitochondrial dysfunction and prevent SCA1-associated pathology in Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice. MitoQ treatment both presymptomatically and when symptoms were evident ameliorated mitochondrial morphology and restored the activities of the ETC complexes. Notably, MitoQ slowed down the appearance of SCA1-linked neuropathology such as lack of motor coordination as well as prevented oxidative stress-induced DNA damage and PC loss. Our work identifies a central role for mitochondria in PC degeneration in SCA1 and provides evidence for the supportive use of mitochondria-targeted therapeutics in slowing down disease progression. PMID:27394174

  10. Comparison of an expanded ataxia interactome with patient medical records reveals a relationship between macular degeneration and ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Juliette J.; Gulbahce, Natali; Shaw, Chad A.; Lim, Janghoo; Hill, David E.; Barabási, Albert-László; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2011-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias 6 and 7 (SCA6 and SCA7) are neurodegenerative disorders caused by expansion of CAG repeats encoding polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts in CACNA1A, the alpha1A subunit of the P/Q-type calcium channel, and ataxin-7 (ATXN7), a component of a chromatin-remodeling complex, respectively. We hypothesized that finding new protein partners for ATXN7 and CACNA1A would provide insight into the biology of their respective diseases and their relationship to other ataxia-causing proteins. We identified 118 protein interactions for CACNA1A and ATXN7 linking them to other ataxia-causing proteins and the ataxia network. To begin to understand the biological relevance of these protein interactions within the ataxia network, we used OMIM to identify diseases associated with the expanded ataxia network. We then used Medicare patient records to determine if any of these diseases co-occur with hereditary ataxia. We found that patients with ataxia are at 3.03-fold greater risk of these diseases than Medicare patients overall. One of the diseases comorbid with ataxia is macular degeneration (MD). The ataxia network is significantly (P= 7.37 × 10−5) enriched for proteins that interact with known MD-causing proteins, forming a MD subnetwork. We found that at least two of the proteins in the MD subnetwork have altered expression in the retina of Ataxin-7266Q/+ mice suggesting an in vivo functional relationship with ATXN7. Together these data reveal novel protein interactions and suggest potential pathways that can contribute to the pathophysiology of ataxia, MD, and diseases comorbid with ataxia. PMID:21078624

  11. What Is Ataxia-Telangiectasia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... what led to naming this disease "ataxia-telangiectasia." Immune System Problems... For most (about 70 percent) of children ... A-T patients, the combination of a weakened immune system and the progressive ataxia can ultimately lead to ...

  12. The Spinocerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Henry L.

    2009-01-01

    Slowly progressive ataxia accompanied by cerebellar degeneration is often genetic in origin. The past fifteen years have witnessed a revolution in our understanding of the causes of dominantly inherited ataxias, now known as the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs). Nearly 30 distinct genetic causes of SCA are known, numbered chronologically in order of discovery. All SCAs display classic cerebellar signs and many display disabling noncerebellar features, most commonly brainstem dysfunction. Eye movement abnormalities are common, reflecting cerebellar and brainstem degeneration. Visual loss from retinal degeneration is rare in SCA, occurring most commonly and profoundly in SCA7. Although the SCAs are relentlessly progressive and currently untreatable, recent scientific advances have begun to shed light on various disease mechanisms that may lead to preventive therapies. PMID:19726947

  13. A Recurrent Mutation in CACNA1G Alters Cav3.1 T-Type Calcium-Channel Conduction and Causes Autosomal-Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Coutelier, Marie; Blesneac, Iulia; Monteil, Arnaud; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Ando, Kunie; Mundwiller, Emeline; Brusco, Alfredo; Le Ber, Isabelle; Anheim, Mathieu; Castrioto, Anna; Duyckaerts, Charles; Brice, Alexis; Durr, Alexandra; Lory, Philippe; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Hereditary cerebellar ataxias (CAs) are neurodegenerative disorders clinically characterized by a cerebellar syndrome, often accompanied by other neurological or non-neurological signs. All transmission modes have been described. In autosomal-dominant CA (ADCA), mutations in more than 30 genes are implicated, but the molecular diagnosis remains unknown in about 40% of cases. Implication of ion channels has long been an ongoing topic in the genetics of CA, and mutations in several channel genes have been recently connected to ADCA. In a large family affected by ADCA and mild pyramidal signs, we searched for the causative variant by combining linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing. In CACNA1G, we identified a c.5144G>A mutation, causing an arginine-to-histidine (p.Arg1715His) change in the voltage sensor S4 segment of the T-type channel protein Cav3.1. Two out of 479 index subjects screened subsequently harbored the same mutation. We performed electrophysiological experiments in HEK293T cells to compare the properties of the p.Arg1715His and wild-type Cav3.1 channels. The current-voltage and the steady-state activation curves of the p.Arg1715His channel were shifted positively, whereas the inactivation curve had a higher slope factor. Computer modeling in deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) neurons suggested that the mutation results in decreased neuronal excitability. Taken together, these data establish CACNA1G, which is highly expressed in the cerebellum, as a gene whose mutations can cause ADCA. This is consistent with the neuropathological examination, which showed severe Purkinje cell loss. Our study further extends our knowledge of the link between calcium channelopathies and CAs. PMID:26456284

  14. A Recurrent Mutation in CACNA1G Alters Cav3.1 T-Type Calcium-Channel Conduction and Causes Autosomal-Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Coutelier, Marie; Blesneac, Iulia; Monteil, Arnaud; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Ando, Kunie; Mundwiller, Emeline; Brusco, Alfredo; Le Ber, Isabelle; Anheim, Mathieu; Castrioto, Anna; Duyckaerts, Charles; Brice, Alexis; Durr, Alexandra; Lory, Philippe; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary cerebellar ataxias (CAs) are neurodegenerative disorders clinically characterized by a cerebellar syndrome, often accompanied by other neurological or non-neurological signs. All transmission modes have been described. In autosomal-dominant CA (ADCA), mutations in more than 30 genes are implicated, but the molecular diagnosis remains unknown in about 40% of cases. Implication of ion channels has long been an ongoing topic in the genetics of CA, and mutations in several channel genes have been recently connected to ADCA. In a large family affected by ADCA and mild pyramidal signs, we searched for the causative variant by combining linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing. In CACNA1G, we identified a c.5144G>A mutation, causing an arginine-to-histidine (p.Arg1715His) change in the voltage sensor S4 segment of the T-type channel protein Cav3.1. Two out of 479 index subjects screened subsequently harbored the same mutation. We performed electrophysiological experiments in HEK293T cells to compare the properties of the p.Arg1715His and wild-type Cav3.1 channels. The current-voltage and the steady-state activation curves of the p.Arg1715His channel were shifted positively, whereas the inactivation curve had a higher slope factor. Computer modeling in deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) neurons suggested that the mutation results in decreased neuronal excitability. Taken together, these data establish CACNA1G, which is highly expressed in the cerebellum, as a gene whose mutations can cause ADCA. This is consistent with the neuropathological examination, which showed severe Purkinje cell loss. Our study further extends our knowledge of the link between calcium channelopathies and CAs. PMID:26456284

  15. Friedreich's Ataxia (FA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Friedreich’s Ataxia Updated December 2009 Michelle Moffitt Smith Michelle and James Smith at their wedding Dear Friends: W hen I ... for a doctorate. I met my husband, James Smith, through MDA’s magazine, Quest. He also has a ...

  16. Loss of MyD88 alters neuroinflammatory response and attenuates early Purkinje cell loss in a spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, Tomonori; Mogushi, Kaoru; Iijima-Tsutsui, Kumiko; Ishikawa, Kinya; Sakurai, Miyano; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Watase, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease, caused by an expansion of CAG repeat encoding a polyglutamine (PolyQ) tract in the Cav2.1 voltage-gated calcium channel. Its key pathological features include selective degeneration of the cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs), a common target for PolyQ-induced toxicity in various SCAs. Mutant Cav2.1 confers toxicity primarily through a toxic gain-of-function mechanism; however, its molecular basis remains elusive. Here, we studied the cerebellar gene expression patterns of young Sca6-MPI118Q/118Q knockin (KI) mice, which expressed mutant Cav2.1 from an endogenous locus and recapitulated many phenotypic features of human SCA6. Transcriptional signatures in the MPI118Q/118Q mice were distinct from those in the Sca1154Q/2Q mice, a faithful SCA1 KI mouse model. Temporal expression profiles of the candidate genes revealed that the up-regulation of genes associated with microglial activation was initiated before PC degeneration and was augmented as the disease progressed. Histological analysis of the MPI118Q/118Q cerebellum showed the predominance of M1-like pro-inflammatory microglia and it was concomitant with elevated expression levels of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 7. Genetic ablation of MyD88, a major adaptor protein conveying TLR signaling, altered expression patterns of M1/M2 microglial phenotypic markers in the MPI118Q/118Q cerebellum. More importantly, it ameliorated PC loss and partially rescued motor impairments in the early disease phase. These results suggest that early neuroinflammatory response may play an important role in the pathogenesis of SCA6 and its modulation could pave the way for slowing the disease progression during the early stage of the disease. PMID:26034136

  17. Segmentation of the Cerebellar Peduncles Using a Random Forest Classifier and a Multi-object Geometric Deformable Model: Application to Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chuyang; Yang, Zhen; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar peduncles, comprising the superior cerebellar peduncles (SCPs), the middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP), and the inferior cerebellar peduncles (ICPs), are white matter tracts that connect the cerebellum to other parts of the central nervous system. Methods for automatic segmentation and quantification of the cerebellar peduncles are needed for objectively and efficiently studying their structure and function. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides key information to support this goal, but it remains challenging because the tensors change dramatically in the decussation of the SCPs (dSCP), the region where the SCPs cross. This paper presents an automatic method for segmenting the cerebellar peduncles, including the dSCP. The method uses volumetric segmentation concepts based on extracted DTI features. The dSCP and noncrossing portions of the peduncles are modeled as separate objects, and are initially classified using a random forest classifier together with the DTI features. To obtain geometrically correct results, a multi-object geometric deformable model is used to refine the random forest classification. The method was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross-validation on five control subjects and four patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). It was then used to evaluate group differences in the peduncles in a population of 32 controls and 11 SCA6 patients. In the SCA6 group, we have observed significant decreases in the volumes of the dSCP and the ICPs and significant increases in the mean diffusivity in the noncrossing SCPs, the MCP, and the ICPs. These results are consistent with a degeneration of the cerebellar peduncles in SCA6 patients. PMID:25749985

  18. Recovering and preventing loss of detailed memory: differential rates of forgetting for detail types in episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Sekeres, Melanie J; Bonasia, Kyra; St-Laurent, Marie; Pishdadian, Sara; Winocur, Gordon; Grady, Cheryl; Moscovitch, Morris

    2016-02-01

    Episodic memories undergo qualitative changes with time, but little is known about how different aspects of memory are affected. Different types of information in a memory, such as perceptual detail, and central themes, may be lost at different rates. In patients with medial temporal lobe damage, memory for perceptual details is severely impaired, while memory for central details is relatively spared. Given the sensitivity of memory to loss of details, the present study sought to investigate factors that mediate the forgetting of different types of information from naturalistic episodic memories in young healthy adults. The study investigated (1) time-dependent loss of "central" and "peripheral" details from episodic memories, (2) the effectiveness of cuing with reminders to reinstate memory details, and (3) the role of retrieval in preventing forgetting. Over the course of 7 d, memory for naturalistic events (film clips) underwent a time-dependent loss of peripheral details, while memory for central details (the core or gist of events) showed significantly less loss. Giving brief reminders of the clips just before retrieval reinstated memory for peripheral details, suggesting that loss of details is not always permanent, and may reflect both a storage and retrieval deficit. Furthermore, retrieving a memory shortly after it was encoded prevented loss of both central and peripheral details, thereby promoting retention over time. We consider the implications of these results for behavioral and neurobiological models of retention and forgetting. PMID:26773100

  19. Rational design of ligands targeting triplet repeating transcripts that cause RNA dominant disease: Application to myotonic muscular dystrophy type 1 and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    PubMed Central

    Pushechnikov, Alexei; Lee, Melissa M.; Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Sobczak, Krzysztof; French, Jonathan M.; Thornton, Charles A.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    Herein, we describe the design of high affinity ligands that bind expanded rCUG- and rCAG-repeat RNAs expressed in myotonic dystrophy and spinocerebellar ataxia. These ligands also inhibit, with nanomolar IC50's, the formation of RNA-protein complexes that are implicated in both disorders. The expanded rCUG and rCAG repeats form stable RNA hairpins with regularly repeating internal loops in the stem and have deleterious effects on cell function. The ligands that bind the repeats display a derivative of the bis-benzimidazole Hoechst 33258, which was identified by searching known RNA-ligand interactions. A series of 13 modularly assembled ligands with defined valencies and distances between ligand modules was synthesized to target multiple motifs in these RNAs simultaneously. The most avid binder, a pentamer, binds the rCUG-repeat hairpin with a Kd of 13 nM. As compared to a series of related RNAs, the pentamer binds to rCUG-repeats with 4.4- to >200-fold specificity. Furthermore, the affinity of binding to rCUG-repeats shows incremental gains with increasing valency while the background binding to genomic DNA is correspondingly reduced. Then, it was determined whether the multivalent ligands inhibit the recognition of RNA repeats by Muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) protein, the expanded-rCUG binding protein whose sequestration leads to splicing defects in DM1. Among several compounds with nanomolar IC50's, the most potent inhibitor is the pentamer, which also inhibits the formation of rCAG repeat-MBNL1 complexes. Comparison of the binding data of the designed synthetic ligands and MBNL1 to repeating RNAs shows that the synthetic ligand is 23-fold higher affinity and more specific to DM1 RNAs than MBNL1. Further studies show that the designed ligands are cell permeable to mouse myoblasts. Thus, cell permeable ligands that bind repetitive RNAs have been designed that exhibit higher affinity and specificity for binding RNA than natural proteins. These studies suggest a

  20. Metronidazole induced cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Aditya; Srikanth, B. Akshaya; Lakshmi, G. Sriranga

    2013-01-01

    Metronidazole is a widely used antimicrobial usually prescribed by many specialist doctors for a short duration of 10-15 days. Prolonged use of metronidazole is rare. The present case is of a patient who used the drug for 4 months and developed peripheral neuropathy, convulsions, and cerebellar ataxia. He was treated with diazepam and levetiracetam. The patient recovered completely following discontinuation of metronidazole. PMID:23833378

  1. 'Costa da Morte' ataxia is spinocerebellar ataxia 36: clinical and genetic characterization.

    PubMed

    García-Murias, María; Quintáns, Beatriz; Arias, Manuel; Seixas, Ana I; Cacheiro, Pilar; Tarrío, Rosa; Pardo, Julio; Millán, María J; Arias-Rivas, Susana; Blanco-Arias, Patricia; Dapena, Dolores; Moreira, Ramón; Rodríguez-Trelles, Francisco; Sequeiros, Jorge; Carracedo, Angel; Silveira, Isabel; Sobrido, María J

    2012-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 36 has been recently described in Japanese families as a new type of spinocerebellar ataxia with motor neuron signs. It is caused by a GGCCTG repeat expansion in intron 1 of NOP56. Family interview and document research allowed us to reconstruct two extensive, multigenerational kindreds stemming from the same village (Costa da Morte in Galicia, Spain), in the 17th century. We found the presence of the spinocerebellar ataxia 36 mutation co-segregating with disease in these families in whom we had previously identified an ~0.8 Mb linkage region to chromosome 20 p. Subsequent screening revealed the NOP56 expansion in eight additional Galician ataxia kindreds. While normal alleles contain 5-14 hexanucleotide repeats, expanded alleles range from ~650 to 2500 repeats, within a shared haplotype. Further expansion of repeat size was frequent, especially upon paternal transmission, while instances of allele contraction were observed in maternal transmissions. We found a total of 63 individuals carrying the mutation, 44 of whom were confirmed to be clinically affected; over 400 people are at risk. We describe here the detailed clinical picture, consisting of a late-onset, slowly progressive cerebellar syndrome with variable eye movement abnormalities and sensorineural hearing loss. There were signs of denervation in the tongue, as well as mild pyramidal signs, but otherwise no signs of classical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were consistent with the clinical course, showing atrophy of the cerebellar vermis in initial stages, later evolving to a pattern of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy. We estimated the origin of the founder mutation in Galicia to have occurred ~1275 years ago. Out of 160 Galician families with spinocerebellar ataxia, 10 (6.3%) were found to have spinocerebellar ataxia 36, while 15 (9.4%) showed other of the routinely tested dominant spinocerebellar ataxia types. Spinocerebellar ataxia 36 is

  2. Cost-effectiveness of reducing glycaemic episodes through community pharmacy management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hendrie, Delia; Miller, Ted R; Woodman, Richard J; Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeff

    2014-12-01

    Accessibility, availability and frequent public contact place community pharmacists in an ideal position to provide medically necessary, intensive health education and preventive health services to diabetes patients, thus reducing physician burden. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of reducing glycaemic episodes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus through a pharmacist-led Diabetes Management Education Program (DMEP) compared to standard care. We recruited eight metropolitan community pharmacies in Perth, Western Australia for the study. We paired them based on geographical location and the socioeconomic status of the population served, and then randomly selected one pharmacy in each pair to be in the intervention group, with the other assigned to the control group. We conducted an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the costs and effectiveness of DMEP with standard pharmacy care. Cost per patient of implementing DMEP was AU$394 (US$356) for the 6-month intervention period. Significantly greater reductions in number of hyperglycaemic and hypoglycaemic episodes occurred in the intervention relative to the control group [OR 0.34 (95 % CI 0.22, 0.52), p = 0.001; OR 0.54 (95 % CI 0.34, 0.86), p = 0.009], respectively, with a net reduction of 1.86 days with glycaemic episodes per patient per month. The cost-effectiveness of DMEP relative to standard pharmacy care was AU$43 (US$39) per day of glycaemic symptoms avoided. Patients with type 2 diabetes in three surveys were willing to pay an average of 1.9 times that amount to avoid a hypoglycaemic day. We conclude that DMEP decreased days with glycaemic symptoms at a reasonable cost. If a larger-scale replication study confirms these findings, widespread adoption of this approach would improve diabetes health without burdening general practitioners. PMID:25257687

  3. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration Information Page Synonym(s): ... Publications and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration? Ataxia often occurs ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia neuropathy spectrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ataxia neuropathy spectrum ataxia neuropathy spectrum Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia neuropathy spectrum is part of a group of conditions ...

  5. Classic ataxia-telangiectasia in a Sudanese boy: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Hadi Babikir, Haydar El

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare hereditary neurodegenerative disorder. Ataxia and telangiectasias are the hallmarks of the disease. A spectrum of manifestations may be seen in one family. There is no gold standard diagnostic test and diagnosis relies on clinical evaluation, exclusion of similar conditions, and supportive laboratory tests. More than 99% of individuals with classic A-T have mutations in ATM, the only gene known to be associated with ataxia-telangiectasia. We report a 28-months-old Sudanese boy who was presented with unsteady gait, frequent falls and telangectasias of the eyes. He also has had frequent episodes of respiratory tract infections.

  6. [Clinical manifestations of cerebellar ataxias].

    PubMed

    Abdulkerimov, Kh T

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of clinical manifestations and focal symptoms in 18 patients with cerebellar ataxia (CA) has shown that these markers are not sufficient for making an accurate diagnosis in all CA cases. It is recommended to verify an ataxia form with objective methods, computed stabilography, in particular. PMID:12958853

  7. Autobiographically significant concepts: more episodic than semantic in nature? An electrophysiological investigation of overlapping types of memory.

    PubMed

    Renoult, Louis; Davidson, Patrick S R; Schmitz, Erika; Park, Lillian; Campbell, Kenneth; Moscovitch, Morris; Levine, Brian

    2015-01-01

    A common assertion is that semantic memory emerges from episodic memory, shedding the distinctive contexts associated with episodes over time and/or repeated instances. Some semantic concepts, however, may retain their episodic origins or acquire episodic information during life experiences. The current study examined this hypothesis by investigating the ERP correlates of autobiographically significant (AS) concepts, that is, semantic concepts that are associated with vivid episodic memories. We inferred the contribution of semantic and episodic memory to AS concepts using the amplitudes of the N400 and late positive component, respectively. We compared famous names that easily brought to mind episodic memories (high AS names) against equally famous names that did not bring such recollections to mind (low AS names) on a semantic task (fame judgment) and an episodic task (recognition memory). Compared with low AS names, high AS names were associated with increased amplitude of the late positive component in both tasks. Moreover, in the recognition task, this effect of AS was highly correlated with recognition confidence. In contrast, the N400 component did not differentiate the high versus low AS names but, instead, was related to the amount of general knowledge participants had regarding each name. These results suggest that semantic concepts high in AS, such as famous names, have an episodic component and are associated with similar brain processes to those that are engaged by episodic memory. Studying AS concepts may provide unique insights into how episodic and semantic memory interact. PMID:25061931

  8. Ocular motor characteristics of different subtypes of spinocerebellar ataxia: distinguishing features.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, Ji Soo; Youn, Jinyoung; Seo, Dae-Won; Jeong, Yuri; Kang, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong Ho; Cho, Jin Whan

    2013-08-01

    Because of frequent involvement of the cerebellum and brainstem, ocular motor abnormalities are key features of spinocerebellar ataxias and may aid in differential diagnosis. Our objective for this study was to distinguish the subtypes by ophthalmologic features after head-shaking and positional maneuvers, which are not yet recognized as differential diagnostic tools in most common forms of spinocerebellar ataxias. Of the 302 patients with a diagnosis of cerebellar ataxia in 3 Korean University Hospitals from June 2011 to June 2012, 48 patients with spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, or 8 or with undetermined spinocerebellar ataxias were enrolled. All patients underwent a video-oculographic recording of fixation abnormalities, gaze-evoked nystagmus, positional and head-shaking nystagmus, and dysmetric saccades. Logistic regression analysis controlling for disease duration revealed that spontaneous and positional downbeat nystagmus and perverted head-shaking nystagmus were strong predictors for spinocerebellar ataxia 6, whereas saccadic intrusions and oscillations were identified as positive indicators of spinocerebellar ataxia 3. In contrast, the presence of gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysmetric saccades was a negative predictor of spinocerebellar ataxia 2. Positional maneuvers and horizontal head shaking occasionally induced or augmented saccadic intrusions/oscillations in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, and 3 and undetermined spinocerebellar ataxia. The results indicated that perverted head-shaking nystagmus may be the most sensitive parameter for SCA6, whereas saccadic intrusions/oscillations are the most sensitive for spinocerebellar ataxia 3. In contrast, a paucity of gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysmetric saccades is more indicative of spinocerebellar ataxia 2. Head-shaking and positional maneuvers aid in defining ocular motor characteristics in spinocerebellar ataxias. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society. PMID:23609488

  9. Talking about Teaching Episodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; DiMattia, Cara; Ribeiro, Branca; Lara-Meloy, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines two types of discourse in which teachers engage when discussing case studies based on classroom episodes, and the ways in which the availability of video data of these episodes may motivate a shift in the mode of discourse used. We interviewed two pairs of secondary school mathematics teachers after they had read a case study…

  10. [Heart involvement in Friedreich's ataxia].

    PubMed

    Weidemann, F; Scholz, F; Florescu, C; Liu, D; Hu, K; Herrmann, S; Ertl, G; Störk, S

    2015-03-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is a rare hereditary disease and although the gene defect has already been identified as a deficiency of the mitochondrial protein frataxin, the pathophysiology is still unknown. Although a multisystem disorder organ involvement is predominantly neurological. Besides the characteristic features of spinocerebellar ataxia the heart is frequently also affected. Cardiac involvement typically manifests as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which can progress to heart failure and death. So far most research has focused on the neurological aspects and cardiac involvement in Friedreich's ataxia has not been systematically investigated. Thus, a better understanding of the progression of the cardiomyopathy, cardiac complications and long-term cardiac outcome is warranted. Although no specific treatment is available general cardiac therapeutic options for cardiomyopathy should be considered. The current review focuses on clinical and diagnostic features of cardiomyopathy and discusses potential therapeutic developments for Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:24848865

  11. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of an experimental model of 'ice-cream headache' in migraine and episodic tension-type headache patients.

    PubMed

    Selekler, H M; Erdogan, M S; Budak, F

    2004-04-01

    This study was designed to compare the prevalence and clinical characteristics of 'cold-induced headache' between migraine and episodic tension-type headache patients. Seventy-six migraine and 38 episodic tension-type headache patients were included in the study. An experimental model of an 'ice-cream headache' was developed for the study. The pain occurrence period, its location and quality were recorded for each patient who felt pain in their head during the test procedure. Pain in the head occurred in 74% of migraine and 32% of 'tension-type headache' patients. Although the most frequent pain location was the temple in both groups of patients, this rate was greater than twofold in migraine patients when compared with episodic tension-type headache patients. While headache quality was throbbing in 71% of migraine patients, it was so in only 8% of the episodic tension-type headache patients. Considering all the results, it seems that 'cold-stimulus headache' is not only more frequent in migraine patients, but also its location and quality differ from 'tension-type headache'. PMID:15030539

  12. Deep Brain Stimulation for Tremor Associated with Underlying Ataxia Syndromes: A Case Series and Discussion of Issues

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Genko; Thompson, Amanda; Foote, Kelly D.; Limotai, Natlada; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; Maling, Nicholas; Malaty, Irene A.; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Subramony, Sankarasubramoney H.; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been utilized to treat various symptoms in patients suffering from movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, and essential tremor. Though ataxia syndromes have not been formally or frequently addressed with DBS, there are patients with ataxia and associated medication refractory tremor or dystonia who may potentially benefit from therapy. Methods A retrospective database review was performed, searching for cases of ataxia where tremor and/or dystonia were addressed by utilizing DBS at the University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration between 2008 and 2011. Five patients were found who had DBS implantation to address either medication refractory tremor or dystonia. The patient's underlying diagnoses included spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), fragile X associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), a case of idiopathic ataxia (ataxia not otherwise specified [NOS]), spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17), and a senataxin mutation (SETX). Results DBS improved medication refractory tremor in the SCA2 and the ataxia NOS patients. The outcome for the FXTAS patient was poor. DBS improved dystonia in the SCA17 and SETX patients, although dystonia did not improve in the lower extremities of the SCA17 patient. All patients reported a transient gait dysfunction postoperatively, and there were no reports of improvement in ataxia-related symptoms. Discussion DBS may be an option to treat tremor, inclusive of dystonic tremor in patients with underlying ataxia; however, gait and other symptoms may possibly be worsened. PMID:25120941

  13. Attentional Episodes in Visual Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyble, Brad; Potter, Mary C.; Bowman, Howard; Nieuwenstein, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Is one's temporal perception of the world truly as seamless as it appears? This article presents a computationally motivated theory suggesting that visual attention samples information from temporal episodes (episodic simultaneous type/serial token model; Wyble, Bowman, & Nieuwenstein, 2009). Breaks between these episodes are punctuated by periods…

  14. Electrophysiologic characterization in spinocerebellar ataxia 17.

    PubMed

    Manganelli, F; Perretti, A; Nolano, M; Lanzillo, B; Bruni, A C; De Michele, G; Filla, A; Santoro, L

    2006-03-28

    The authors performed a multimodal electrophysiologic evaluation in nine patients belonging to four SCA17 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 17) families. Peripheral nerve and visual system were not involved. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials were constantly abnormal with central type lesions. Magnetic motor evoked potentials were abnormal only in the lower limbs, suggesting a length-dependent involvement of the pyramidal tract. Somatosensory evoked potentials were abnormal in almost all our patients, and abnormalities were consistent with a somatosensory pathway involvement along the brainstem. PMID:16567717

  15. Modulation of the age at onset in spinocerebellar ataxia by CAG tracts in various genes.

    PubMed

    Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Durr, Alexandra; Bauer, Peter; Figueroa, Karla P; Ichikawa, Yaeko; Brussino, Alessandro; Forlani, Sylvie; Rakowicz, Maria; Schöls, Ludger; Mariotti, Caterina; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Orsi, Laura; Giunti, Paola; Filla, Alessandro; Szymanski, Sandra; Klockgether, Thomas; Berciano, José; Pandolfo, Massimo; Boesch, Sylvia; Melegh, Bela; Timmann, Dagmar; Mandich, Paola; Camuzat, Agnès; Goto, Jun; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Tsuji, Shoji; Pulst, Stefan-M; Brusco, Alfredo; Riess, Olaf; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Polyglutamine-coding (CAG)n repeat expansions in seven different genes cause spinocerebellar ataxias. Although the size of the expansion is negatively correlated with age at onset, it accounts for only 50-70% of its variability. To find other factors involved in this variability, we performed a regression analysis in 1255 affected individuals with identified expansions (spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7), recruited through the European Consortium on Spinocerebellar Ataxias, to determine whether age at onset is influenced by the size of the normal allele in eight causal (CAG)n-containing genes (ATXN1-3, 6-7, 17, ATN1 and HTT). We confirmed the negative effect of the expanded allele and detected threshold effects reflected by a quadratic association between age at onset and CAG size in spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 3 and 6. We also evidenced an interaction between the expanded and normal alleles in trans in individuals with spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 6 and 7. Except for individuals with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, age at onset was also influenced by other (CAG)n-containing genes: ATXN7 in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2; ATXN2, ATN1 and HTT in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3; ATXN1 and ATXN3 in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6; and ATXN3 and TBP in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7. This suggests that there are biological relationships among these genes. The results were partially replicated in four independent populations representing 460 Caucasians and 216 Asian samples; the differences are possibly explained by ethnic or geographical differences. As the variability in age at onset is not completely explained by the effects of the causative and modifier sister genes, other genetic or environmental factors must also play a role in these diseases. PMID:24972706

  16. Pattern of pharmacotherapy by episode types for patients with bipolar disorders and its concordance with treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Baek, Ji Hyun; Ha, Kyooseob; Yatham, Lakshimi N; Chang, Jae Seung; Ha, Tae Hyon; Jeon, Hong Jin; Hong, Kyung Sue; Chang, Sung Man; Ahn, Yong Min; Cho, Hyun Sang; Moon, Eunsoo; Cha, Boseok; Choi, Jung Eun; Joo, Yeon Ho; Joo, Eun Jeong; Lee, Se Young; Park, Yunseong

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the overall prescription pattern for patients with bipolar disorders in Korea and its relevance to the practice guidelines. Prescription records from all patients with bipolar I and II disorders who have been admitted or who started the outpatient treatment during the year of 2009 in 10 academic setting hospitals were reviewed. A total of 1447 patients with bipolar I and II disorders were included in this study. Longitudinal prescription patterns of inpatients and outpatients were analyzed by episode types and compared with the clinical practice guideline algorithms. In all phases, polypharmacy was chosen as an initial treatment strategy (>80%). The combination of mood stabilizer and atypical antipsychotics was the most favored. Antipsychotics were prescribed in more than 80% of subjects across all phases. The rate of antidepressant use ranged from 15% to 40%, and it was more frequently used in acute treatment and bipolar II subjects. The concordance rate of prescriptions for manic inpatients to the guidelines was higher and relatively more consistent (43.8%-48.7%) compared with that for depressive inpatients (18.6%-46.9%). Polypharmacy was the most common reason for nonconcordance. In Korean psychiatric academic setting, polypharmacy and atypical antipsychotics were prominently favored in the treatment of bipolar disorder, even with the lack of evidence of its superiority. More evidence is needed to establish suitable treatment strategies. In particular, the treatment strategy for acute bipolar depression awaits more consensuses. PMID:25006813

  17. Targeting the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null phenotype in chronic lymphocytic leukemia with pro-oxidants

    PubMed Central

    Agathanggelou, Angelo; Weston, Victoria J.; Perry, Tracey; Davies, Nicholas J.; Skowronska, Anna; Payne, Daniel T.; Fossey, John S.; Oldreive, Ceri E.; Wei, Wenbin; Pratt, Guy; Parry, Helen; Oscier, David; Coles, Steve J.; Hole, Paul S.; Darley, Richard L.; McMahon, Michael; Hayes, John D.; Moss, Paul; Stewart, Grant S.; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated gene in chronic lymphocytic leukemia results in resistance to p53-dependent apoptosis and inferior responses to treatment with DNA damaging agents. Hence, p53-independent strategies are required to target Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-deficient chronic lymphocytic leukemia. As Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated has been implicated in redox homeostasis, we investigated the effect of the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia genotype on cellular responses to oxidative stress with a view to therapeutic targeting. We found that in comparison to Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-wild type chronic lymphocytic leukemia, pro-oxidant treatment of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null cells led to reduced binding of NF-E2 p45-related factor-2 to antioxidant response elements and thus decreased expression of target genes. Furthermore, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells contained lower levels of antioxidants and elevated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Consequently, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but not tumors with 11q deletion or TP53 mutations, exhibited differentially increased sensitivity to pro-oxidants both in vitro and in vivo. We found that cell death was mediated by a p53- and caspase-independent mechanism associated with apoptosis inducing factor activity. Together, these data suggest that defective redox-homeostasis represents an attractive therapeutic target for Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:25840602

  18. Friedreich Ataxia in Classical Galactosaemia.

    PubMed

    Neville, Siobhán; O'Sullivan, Siobhan; Sweeney, Bronagh; Lynch, Bryan; Hanrahan, Donncha; Knerr, Ina; Lynch, Sally Ann; Crushell, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders such as ataxia are a recognized complication of classical galactosaemia, even in diet-compliant patients. Here, we report the coexistence of classical galactosaemia and Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) in nine children from seven Irish Traveller families. These two autosomal recessive disorders, the loci for which are located on either side of the centromere of chromosome 9, appear to be in linkage disequilibrium in this subgroup. Both conditions are known to occur with increased frequency amongst the Irish Traveller population.Each member of our cohort had been diagnosed with galactosaemia in the neonatal period, and all are homozygous for the common Q188R mutation in the GALT gene. Eight of the nine patients later presented with progressive ataxia, between the ages of 5-13 years. Another child presented in cardiac failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy at 7 years of age. He was not ataxic at presentation and, one year from diagnosis, his neurological examination remains normal. The diagnosis of FRDA was confirmed by detecting the common pathogenic GAA expansion in both alleles of the frataxin gene (FXN) in each patient.Neurological symptoms are easily attributed to an underlying diagnosis of galactosaemia. It is important to consider a diagnosis of Friedreich ataxia in a child from the Irish Traveller population with galactosaemia who presents with ataxia or cardiomyopathy. PMID:26219880

  19. Pharmacotherapy for Friedreich ataxia.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Amy Y; Friedman, Lisa S; Wilson, Robert B; Lynch, David R

    2009-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FA) is a progressive genetic neurological disorder associated with degeneration of the dorsal columns, spinocerebellar tracts and other regions of the nervous system. The disorder results from mutations in the gene referred to as FXN. Almost all mutations are expansions of an intronic GAA repeat in this gene, which gives rise to decreased transcription of the gene product (called frataxin). Following these discoveries, drug discovery has moved at a rapid pace. Therapeutic trials in the next 5 years are expected to address amelioration of the effects of frataxin deficiency and methods for increasing frataxin expression. These therapies are directed at all levels of biochemical dysfunction in FA. Agents such as idebenone potentially improve mitochondrial function and decrease production of reactive oxygen species. Idebenone is presently in a phase III trial in the US and in Europe, with the primary outcome measure being neurological function. Deferiprone, an atypical iron chelator, may decrease build-up of toxic iron in the mitochondria in patients. It has entered a phase II trial in Europe, Australia and Canada directed toward improvement of neurological abilities. Finally, targeted histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and erythropoietin increase levels of frataxin when used in vitro, suggesting that they may provide methods for increasing frataxin levels in patients. Erythropoietin has been tested in a small phase II trial in Austria, while HDAC inhibitors are still at a preclinical stage. Symptomatic therapies are also in use for specific symptoms such as spasticity (baclofen). Thus, there is substantial optimism for development of new therapies for FA in the near future, and we suggest that one or several may be available over the next few years. However, continued development of new therapies will require creation of new, more sensitive measures for neurological dysfunction in FA, and clinically relevant measures of cardiac dysfunction. PMID

  20. Cell biology of spinocerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia is a neurological disorder characterized by loss of control of body movements. Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), previously known as autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, is a biologically robust group of close to 30 progressive neurodegenerative diseases. Six SCAs, including the more prevalent SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, and SCA6 along with SCA7 and SCA17 are caused by expansion of a CAG repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in the affected protein. How the mutated proteins in these polyglutamine SCAs cause disease is highly debated. Recent work suggests that the mutated protein contributes to pathogenesis within the context of its “normal” cellular function. Thus, understanding the cellular function of these proteins could aid in the development of therapeutics. PMID:22508507

  1. Ataxia telangiectasia: learning from previous mistakes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naveen; Aggarwal, Puneet; Dev, Nishanth; kumar, Gunjan

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is an early onset neurodegenerative disorder. We report a case of childhood onset ataxia and ocular telangiectasia, presenting with pulmonary infection. The patient was diagnosed as ataxia telangiectasia. The patient succumbed to death owing to late diagnosis and sepsis. PMID:23242084

  2. Ataxia-Telangiectasia Presenting as Cerebral Palsy and Recurrent Wheezing: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Navratil, Marta; Đuranović, Vlasta; Nogalo, Boro; Švigir, Alen; Dubravčić, Iva Dumbović; Turkalj, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 8 Final Diagnosis: Ataxia-telangiectasia Symptoms: Ataxia • sinopulmonary infection • telangiectasiae • wheezing Medication: — Clinical Procedure: IVIG supstitution Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disease that consists of progressive cerebellar ataxia, variable immunodeficiency, sinopulmonary infections, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, radiosensitivity, early aging, and increased incidence of cancer. Case Report: We report the case of an 8-year-old boy affected by A-T. At 12 months of age, he had a waddling gait, with his upper body leaning forward. Dystonic/dyskinetic cerebral palsy was diagnosed at the age of 3 years. At age 6 he was diagnosed with asthma based on recurrent wheezing episodes. A-T was confirmed at the age 8 years on the basis of clinical signs and laboratory findings (increased alpha fetoprotein - AFP, immunodeficiency, undetectable ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein on immunoblotting, and identification A-T mutation, 5932G>T). Conclusions: The clinical and immunological presentation of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is very heterogeneous and diagnostically challenging, especially at an early age, leading to frequent misdiagnosis. PMID:26380989

  3. [Static disorders in hereditary ataxias].

    PubMed

    Badalian, L O; Lebedeva, N N; Sidorova, O P

    1987-01-01

    Static disorders elicited by the adequate methods of the assessment of equilibrium (stabilography) and gait (plantography) in hereditary ataxias have been analyzed. These techniques of examination make it possible to quantitatively estimate motor disorders, supplement clinical findings and provide an opportunity for objective evaluation of the efficacy of the conducted therapy. PMID:3115017

  4. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  5. Lidocaine injection of pericranial myofascial trigger points in the treatment of frequent episodic tension-type headache

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of local lidocaine injections into the myofascial trigger points (TPs) located at the pericranial muscles in patients with episodic tension-type headache (ETTH). Methods The study included 108 patients with frequent ETTH that were randomized into 4 groups. One injection of saline (NaCl 0.9%) was administered to group 1 (n = 27), 1 injection of lidocaine (0.5%) was administered to group 2 (n = 27), group 3 (n = 27) received 5 injections of saline (NaCl 0.9%), and group 4 (n = 27) received 5 injections of lidocaine (0.5%); on alternate days 2 mL for each muscle was injected into the frontal, temporal, masseter, sternocleidomastoid, semispinalis capitis, trapezius and splenius capitis muscles bilaterally. The frequency of painful days per month (FPD) and the patients’ visual analogue scales (VAS) were evaluated before treatment, and 2, 4 and 6 months after treatment. Results Mean age of the patients was 36.28 ± 9.41 years (range: 18–54 years). FPD scores improved significantly in group 2, 3 and 4 at 2 months posttreatment compared to pre- treatment (all P < 0.05), and also VAS scores improved significantly in group 2 and 4 at 2 months posttreatment (P < 0.05) but this improvement insisted at the 6 month only in group 4. Group 2 had better VAS and FPD than group 1 only at 2. and 4. months after treatment (for VAS P < 0.0121, P = 0.0232; for FPD P = 0.0003, P = 0.0004, respectively). Group 4 had better scores than group 3 at the 2., 4. and 6. months after treatment in both parameters (all P < 0.05). Group 2 had better scores than group 1 in FPD at the 2. and 4. months posttreatment (P = 0.0003, P = 0.0004, respectively), but not at the 6. month. Conclusion Local lidocaine injections into the myofascial TPs located in the pericranial muscles could be considered as an effective alternative treatment for ETTH. PMID:23698019

  6. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sun; Cho, Jin Whan

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes. PMID:26090078

  7. Deep Learning for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Functional Score Regression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Zhong, Shenghua; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia is a progressive neuro-degenerative disease that has multiple genetic versions, each with a characteristic pattern of anatomical degeneration that yields distinctive motor and cognitive problems. Studying this pattern of degeneration can help with the diagnosis of disease subtypes, evaluation of disease stage, and treatment planning. In this work, we propose a learning framework using MR image data for discriminating a set of cerebellar ataxia types and predicting a disease related functional score. We address the difficulty in analyzing high-dimensional image data with limited training subjects by: 1) training weak classifiers/regressors on a set of image subdomains separately, and combining the weak classifier/regressor outputs to make the decision; 2) perturbing the image subdomain to increase the training samples; 3) using a deep learning technique called the stacked auto-encoder to develop highly representative feature vectors of the input data. Experiments show that our approach can reliably classify between one of four categories (healthy control and three types of ataxia), and predict the functional staging score for ataxia. PMID:25553339

  8. Hawaiian double volcanic chain triggered by an episodic involvement of recycled material: Constraints from temporal Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic trend of the Loa-type volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryoji; Makishima, Akio; Nakamura, Eizo

    2008-01-01

    The two parallel loci of recent Hawaiian volcanoes, Kea and Loa, have been regarded as the best targets to interpret the chemical structure of an upwelling mantle plume derived from the lower mantle. Here we show that the Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic data of the shield-building lavas along the Loa locus form a systematic trend from the main shield stage of Koolau (> 2.9 Ma) to the active Loihi volcanoes. During the growth of the Koolau volcano, the dominant material in the melting region successively changed from the proposed KEA, DMK (depleted Makapuu), to EMK (enriched Makapuu) components. The proportion of EMK, dominated by a recycled mafic component, is typified by some Koolau Makapuu-stage and some Lanai lavas. Subsequently, the EMK component decreased and LOIHI component increased toward the Loihi lavas. The temporal coincidence between the episodically elevated magma production rate and the abrupt appearance of the typical Loa-type lavas that is restricted to the last 3 Myr should be linked to magma genesis. We suggest that the abrupt appearance of Loa-type magmatism should be attributed to the transient incorporation of the relatively dense recycled material and surrounding less degassed lower mantle material that accumulated near the core-mantle boundary into the upwelling plume. This episodic involvement could have been trigged by episodic thermal pulses and buoyancy increases in the plume. The continuous appearance of Kea-type lavas during the long history of Hawaiian-chain magmatism and the larger magma volume of Kea-type lavas relative to that of the Loa-type lavas in the last 3 Myr indicate that the Kea locus is closer to the thermal centre of the Hawaiian plume relative to that of the Loa locus.

  9. Relapsing encephalopathy with cerebellar ataxia related to an ATP1A3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Dard, Rodolphe; Mignot, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Lesca, Gaetan; Sanlaville, Damien; Roze, Emmanuel; Mochel, Fanny

    2015-12-01

    ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3-subunit of the Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase pump, has been involved in four clinical neurological entities: (1) alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC); (2) rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (RDP); (3) CAPOS (cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, sensorineural hearing loss) syndrome; and (4) early infantile epileptic encephalopathy. Here, we report on a 34-year-old female presenting with a new ATP1A3-related entity involving a relapsing encephalopathy characterized by recurrent episodes of cerebellar ataxia and altered consciousness during febrile illnesses. The term RECA is suggested - relapsing encephalopathy with cerebellar ataxia. The phenotype of this patient, resembling mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation defects, emphasizes the possible role of brain energy deficiency in patients with ATP1A3 mutations. Rather than multiple overlapping syndromes, ATP1A3-related disorders might be seen as a phenotypic continuum. PMID:26400718

  10. Cerebellar ataxia as presenting feature of hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, Suman Kumar; Kotwal, Shalija; Gupta, Rohan; Singh, Jang Bhadur; Mahajan, Annil

    2016-04-01

    Symptoms and signs of the hypothyroidism vary in relation to the magnitude and acuteness of the thyroid hormone deficiency. The usual clinical features are constipation, fatigue, cold intolerance and weight gain. Rarely it can present with neurologic problems like reversible cerebellar ataxia, dementia, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis and coma. Hypothyroidism should be suspected in all cases of ataxia, as it is easily treatable. A 40 year-old male presented with the history facial puffiness, hoarseness of voice and gait-ataxia. Investigations revealed frank primary hypothyroidism. Anti-TPO antibody was positive. Thyroxine was started and patient improved completely within eight weeks. Hypothyroidism can present with ataxia as presenting feature. Hypothyroidism should be considered in all cases of cerebellar ataxia as it is a reversible cause of ataxia. PMID:26886095

  11. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description Dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia (DCMA) syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  13. Migration of objects and inferences across episodes.

    PubMed

    Hannigan, Sharon L; Reinitz, Mark Tippens

    2003-04-01

    Participants viewed episodes in the form of a series of photographs portraying ordinary routines (e.g., eating at a restaurant) and later received a recognition test. In Experiment 1, it was shown that objects (e.g., a vase of flowers, a pewter lantern) that appeared in a single episode during the study phase migrated between memories of episodes described by the same abstract schema (e.g., from Restaurant Episode A at study to Restaurant Episode B at test), and not between episodes anchored by different schemas. In Experiment 2, it was demonstrated that backward causal inferences from one study episode influenced memories of other episodes described by the same schema, and that high-schema-relevant items viewed in one episode were sometimes remembered as having occurred in another episode of the same schematic type. PMID:12795485

  14. SPG7 mutations explain a significant proportion of French Canadian spastic ataxia cases.

    PubMed

    Choquet, Karine; Tétreault, Martine; Yang, Sharon; La Piana, Roberta; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Vanstone, Megan R; Mathieu, Jean; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Rioux, Marie-France; Rouleau, Guy A; Boycott, Kym M; Majewski, Jacek; Brais, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary cerebellar ataxias and hereditary spastic paraplegias are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and often overlapping neurological disorders. Mutations in SPG7 cause the autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7), but recent studies indicate that they are also one of the most common causes of recessive cerebellar ataxia. In Quebec, a significant number of patients affected with cerebellar ataxia and spasticity remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in three French Canadian (FC) patients affected with spastic ataxia and uncovered compound heterozygous variants in SPG7 in all three. Sanger sequencing of SPG7 exons and exon/intron boundaries was used to screen additional patients. In total, we identified recessive variants in SPG7 in 22 FC patients belonging to 12 families (38.7% of the families screened), including two novel variants. The p.(Ala510Val) variant was the most common in our cohort. Cerebellar features, including ataxia, were more pronounced than spasticity in this cohort. These results strongly suggest that variants affecting the function of SPG7 are the fourth most common form of recessive ataxia in FC patients. Thus, we propose that SPG7 mutations explain a significant proportion of FC spastic ataxia cases and that this gene should be considered in unresolved patients. PMID:26626314

  15. Brain activation during immediate and delayed reaching in optic ataxia.

    PubMed

    Himmelbach, Marc; Nau, Marion; Zündorf, Ida; Erb, Michael; Perenin, Marie-Therese; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2009-05-01

    Patients with optic ataxia after lesions of the occipito-parietal cortex demonstrate gross deviations of movements to visual targets in their peripheral visual field. When the same patients point to remembered target locations their accuracy improves considerably. Taking into account opposite findings in a single patient suffering from visual form agnosia due to bilateral occipito-temporal lesions (D.F.), this paradoxical improvement was attributed to brain structures outside the dorsal stream, and supposed to be specifically associated with delayed movement execution. This conclusion was based on the still unverified assumption that the dorsal system is almost completely lacking any localization function in patients with optic ataxia who demonstrate the paradoxical delay effect. We thus investigated brain activity associated with immediately executed and delayed movements in a patient with optic ataxia due to extensive bilateral lesions (I.G.) and in 16 healthy subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Our analysis revealed robust and indistinguishable activation of intact dorsal occipital and parietal areas adjacent to the patient's lesions for both types of movements. In healthy subjects, we found the same visuomotor network activated during immediate and delayed movements as well as additionally higher signal increases for movements to visible targets than for delayed movements in bilateral occipito-parietal and occipito-temporal areas. Our results suggest that in healthy subjects as well as in the optic ataxia patient I.G. dorsal areas are not only involved in immediate but also in delayed reaching. This observation questions the hypothesis that residual visuospatial abilities in patients with optic ataxia could only be mediated by a system outside of the dorsal stream. PMID:19428407

  16. Genes and Genetic Testing in Hereditary Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Sandford, Erin; Burmeister, Margit

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia is a neurological cerebellar disorder characterized by loss of coordination during muscle movements affecting walking, vision, and speech. Genetic ataxias are very heterogeneous, with causative variants reported in over 50 genes, which can be inherited in classical dominant, recessive, X-linked, or mitochondrial fashion. A common mechanism of dominant ataxias is repeat expansions, where increasing lengths of repeated DNA sequences result in non-functional proteins that accumulate in the body causing disease. Greater understanding of all ataxia genes has helped identify several different pathways, such as DNA repair, ubiquitination, and ion transport, which can be used to help further identify new genes and potential treatments. Testing for the most common mutations in these genes is now clinically routine to help with prognosis and treatment decisions, but next generation sequencing will revolutionize how genetic testing will be done. Despite the large number of known ataxia causing genes, however, many individuals with ataxia are unable to obtain a genetic diagnosis, suggesting that more genes need to be discovered. Utilization of next generation sequencing technologies, expression studies, and increased knowledge of ataxia pathways will aid in the identification of new ataxia genes. PMID:25055202

  17. An update on Spino-cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Banashree; Paul, Pritikanta; Paul, Madhuparna; Kumar, Hrishikesh

    2013-01-01

    The dominantly inherited ataxias, also known as Spino-cerebellar ataxias (SCAs), are rapidly expanding entities. New mutations are being identified at remarkable regularity. Recent awareness of molecular abnormalities in SCAs has addressed some of the long sought questions, but gaps in knowledge still exist. Three major categories of SCAs, according to molecular mechanisms, have evolved over recent few years: Polyglutamate expansion ataxia, non-coding zone repeat ataxia, and ataxia due to conventional mutation. Using the fulcrum of these mechanisms, the article provides an update of SCAs. Shared and specific clinical features, genetic abnormalities, and possible links between molecular abnormalities and cerebellar degeneration have been discussed. Emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms of polyglutamate toxicity. PMID:24101804

  18. Lipids and lipoproteins in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J L; Chamberlain, S; Robinson, N

    1980-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessively inherited disease affecting the nervous system with a high incidence of heart involvement. Abnormalities of lipid metabolism are known to be associated with several progressive ataxic conditions. In this study of 46 Friedreich's ataxia patients, serum lipids, fatty acids and lipoproteins were assayed and compared with some earlier findings on Friedreich's ataxia and related disorders. Abnormalities of low and high density lipoproteins suggestive of a major defect have been reported; in the present study the level and chemical composition of high density lipoprotein has been assessed in 20 Friedreich's ataxia patients but previous abnormalities could not be substantiated. Lipid compositional analysis of Friedreich's ataxia central nervous tissue and heart, which has not been previously reported, did not markedly differ from control tissue. PMID:7359148

  19. Recurrent Episodes of Stroke-Like Symptoms in a Patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy X Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ning; Said, Sarita; Sabat, Shyamsunder; Wicklund, Matthew; Stahl, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), also known as hereditary motor sensory neuropathy, is a heterogeneous group of disorders best known for causing inherited forms of peripheral neuropathy. The X-linked form, CMTX1, is caused by mutations in the gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) gene, expressed both by peripheral Schwann cells and central oligodendrocytes. Central manifestations are known but are rare, and there are few case reports of leukoencephalopathy with transient or persistent neurological deficits in patients with this CMT subtype. Here, we report the case of a man with multiple male and female family members affected by neuropathy who carries a pathologic mutation in GJB1. He has experienced three transient episodes with variable neurological deficits over the course of 7 years with corresponding changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This case illustrates CMT1X as a rare cause of transient neurological deficit and demonstrates the evolution of associated reversible abnormalities on MRI over time. To the best of our knowledge, this report provides the longest period of serial imaging in a single patient with this condition in the English language literature. PMID:26955336

  20. Potential contribution of the Alzheimer's disease risk locus BIN1 to episodic memory performance in cognitively normal Type 2 diabetes elderly.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Lior; Ravona-Springer, Ramit; Lubitz, Irit; Schmeidler, James; Cooper, Itzik; Sano, Mary; Silverman, Jeremy M; Heymann, Anthony; Beeri, Michal Schnaider

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, several promising susceptibility loci for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) were discovered, by implementing genome-wide association studies (GWAS) approach. Recent GWAS meta-analysis has demonstrated the association of 19 loci (in addition to the APOE locus) with AD in the European ancestry population at genome-wide significance level. Since Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a substantial risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia, the 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that represent the 19 AD loci were studied for association with performance in episodic memory, a primary cognitive domain affected by AD, in a sample of 848 cognitively normal elderly Israeli Jewish T2D patients. We found a suggestive association of SNP rs6733839, located near the bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) gene, with this phenotype. Controlling for demographic (age, sex, education, disease duration and ancestry) covariates, carriers of two copies of the AD risk allele T (TT genotype) performed significantly worse (p=0.00576; p=0.00127 among Ashkenazi origin sub-sample) in episodic memory compared to carriers of the C allele (CT+CC genotypes). When including additional potential covariates (clinical and APOE genotype), results remained significant (p=0.00769; p=0.00148 among Ashkenazi). Interestingly, as validated in multiple large studies, BIN1 is one of the most established AD risk loci, with a high odds ratio. Although preliminary and require further replications, our findings support a contribution of BIN1 to individual differences in episodic memory performance among T2D patients. PMID:26947052

  1. Speech prosody in cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Casper, Maureen A; Raphael, Lawrence J; Harris, Katherine S; Geibel, Jennifer M

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy speakers and six with ataxia. The speaking task was designed to elicit six different prosodic conditions and four contrastive prosodic events. Distinct prosodic patterns were elicited by the examiner for cerebellar patients and healthy speakers. These utterances were digitally recorded and analysed acoustically and statistically. The healthy speakers showed statistically significant differences among all four prosodic contrasts. The normal model described by the prosodic contrasts provided a sensitive index of cerebellar pathology with quantitative acoustic analyses. A significant interaction between subject groups and prosodic conditions revealed a compromised prosody in cerebellar patients. Significant differences were found for durational parameters, F0 and formant frequencies. The cerebellar speakers demonstrated different patterns of syllable lengthening and syllable reduction from that of the healthy speakers. PMID:17613097

  2. Hereditary ataxias and paraplegias in Cantabria, Spain. An epidemiological and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Polo, J M; Calleja, J; Combarros, O; Berciano, J

    1991-04-01

    A clinical, genetic and epidemiological study of hereditary ataxias and paraplegias was conducted within a defined area (Cantabria) in Northern Spain from 1974 to 1986. The series comprised 48 index cases and 65 affected relatives. On prevalence day, 103 patients were alive, giving a prevalence of 20.2 cases per 100,000. There were 24 patients (18 families) with Friedreich's ataxia (FA), 12 (6 families) with early onset cerebellar ataxia (EOCA) differing from FA, 6 (3 families) with dominantly transmitted late onset cerebellar ataxia (LOCA), 11 with 'idiopathic' LOCA, 49 (9 families) with 'pure' hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), and 1 patient with congenital cerebellar ataxia. The prevalence found here is comparable with the highest figures described in previous surveys. This may in part be due to the great number of secondary cases in our series. A high frequency of parental consanguinity occurred in FA patients, 'pseudodominant' inheritance being observed in 1 family. The clinical features were those of classical FA except for later onset and slower course in 1 family, and retained tendon reflexes in the lower limbs in 2 cases. Such data indicate the need for modification of the essential criteria for the disease. EOCA included 4 patients with normoreflexic ataxia and 1 patient with ataxia and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone deficiency. In addition, there were 7 patients from 2 unrelated families with a homogeneous syndrome characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance, cerebellar ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa and sensory neuropathy. This syndrome is therefore a well defined nosological entity to be added to the list of autosomal recessive mendelian phenotypes. The clinical picture of patients with LOCA was either a 'pure' cerebellar or a 'cerebellar-plus' syndrome. Genetic subgroups of 'pure' HSP were autosomal dominant type I in 5 families and type II in 2, and autosomal recessive in 2 families. PMID:2043954

  3. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    MedlinePlus

    ... it clusters together and forms clumps (aggregates). The effect these aggregates have on cell functioning is unknown. The lack of normal calcium channels in the cell membrane impairs cell communication between neurons in the brain. Diminished cell communication ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... double vision. People with this condition may experience sleep disorders such as restless leg syndrome or REM sleep ... often acts out his or her dreams. These sleep disorders tend to leave affected individuals feeling tired during ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... tremors, and weakness in the muscles that control eye movement (ophthalmoplegia). Eye muscle weakness leads to a decreased ability to make rapid eye movements (saccadic slowing). Over time, individuals with SCA2 may ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... spasticity), and weakness in the muscles that control eye movement (ophthalmoplegia). Eye muscle weakness leads to rapid, involuntary eye movements (nystagmus). Individuals with SCA1 may have difficulty processing, ...

  7. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 14 (SCA14)

    MedlinePlus

    ... human chromosome 19 and encodes a protein called protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ, the gene is PRKCG). Inherited ... may suggest potential therapeutic interventions. PKCγ is a protein kinase – an enzyme involved in activating and inactivating other ...

  8. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 10 (SCA10)

    MedlinePlus

    ... onset, coordination of hands and arms becomes impaired. Fine motor skills such as handwriting and fastening buttons ... that causes SCA10. DNA tests for SCA10 involve analysis of a gene located on chromosome 22q13. (Each ...

  9. [Adult GM2 gangliosidosis: improvement of ataxia with GABAergic drugs].

    PubMed

    Gazulla Abío, J; Benavente Aguilar, I

    2002-03-01

    The authors present a case of adult GM2 gangliosidosis, B1 enzymatic type. The main clinical features found were cerebellar ataxia, proximal lower limb weakness and myokymia. The neurological examination, and the biochemical, electrophysiologic and imaging studies are all described. Decreased activity of the enzyme beta-hexosaminidase A in the metabolism of the sulfate substrate 4-MU-NAGS was found in serum. Global cerebellar atrophy was observed in a cranial nuclear magnetic resonance. The electrophysiologic study showed continuous spontaneous activity integrated by myokymia and neuromyotonic discharges in addition to signs of acute and chronic denervation. Disappearance of the myokymia and improvement in the ataxia were attained with the use of the GABAergic drugs gabapentin and tiagabine. The authors try to explain the clinical improvement obtained with the drugs by relating their mechanisms of action to the central nervous system neurotransmitter alterations proposed for this disease. PMID:11927106

  10. Differential cerebellar GABAA receptor expression in mice with mutations in CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Kaja, S; Payne, A J; Nielsen, E Ø; Thompson, C L; van den Maagdenberg, A M J M; Koulen, P; Snutch, T P

    2015-09-24

    Ataxia is the predominant clinical manifestation of cerebellar dysfunction. Mutations in the human CACNA1A gene, encoding the pore-forming α1 subunit of CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels, underlie several neurological disorders, including Episodic Ataxia type 2 and Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 1 (FHM1). Several mouse mutants exist that harbor mutations in the orthologous Cacna1a gene. The spontaneous Cacna1a mutants Rolling Nagoya (tg(rol)), Tottering (tg) and Leaner (tg(ln)) mice exhibit behavioral motor phenotypes, including ataxia. Transgenic knock-in (KI) mouse strains with the human FHM1 R192Q and S218L missense mutations have been generated. R192Q KI mice are non-ataxic, whereas S218L KI mice display a complex behavioral phenotype that includes cerebellar ataxia. Given the dependence of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor subunit functioning on localized calcium currents, and the functional link between GABAergic inhibition and ataxia, we hypothesized that cerebellar GABAA receptor expression is differentially affected in Cacna1a mutants and contributes to the ataxic phenotype. Herein we quantified functional GABAA receptors and pharmacologically dissociated cerebellar GABAA receptors in several Cacna1a mutants. We did not identify differences in the expression of GABAA receptor subunits or in the number of functional GABAA receptors in the non-ataxic R192Q KI strain. In contrast, tg(rol) mice had a ∼15% decrease in the number of functional GABAA receptors, whereas S218L KI mice showed a ∼29% increase. Our data suggest that differential changes in cerebellar GABAA receptor expression profile may contribute to the neurological phenotype of cerebellar ataxia and that targeting GABAA receptors might represent a feasible complementary strategy to treat cerebellar ataxia. PMID:26208839

  11. A Case of Ataxia with Isolated Vitamin E Deficiency Initially Diagnosed as Friedreich's Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Michael; Ray, Partha

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is caused by a mutation in the alpha tocopherol transfer protein gene. It is almost indistinguishable clinically from Friedreich's ataxia but with appropriate treatment its devastating neurological features can be prevented. Patients can present with a progressive cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal spasticity, and evidence of a neuropathy with absent deep tendon reflexes. It is important to screen for this condition on initial evaluation of a young patient presenting with progressive ataxia and it should be considered in patients with a long standing ataxia without any diagnosis in view of the potential therapeutics and genetic counselling. In this case report we present a patient who was initially diagnosed with Friedreich's ataxia but was later found to have AVED. PMID:26989534

  12. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient’s age. Grade 2–3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2–3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate. PMID:27551274

  13. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient's age. Grade 2-3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2-3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate. PMID:27551274

  14. Ataxia-telangiectasia: future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Mohammed Wajid; Al-Baradie, Raidah Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive multi-system disorder caused by mutation in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM). ATM is a large serine/threonine protein kinase, a member of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family whose best-studied function is as master controller of signal transduction for the DNA damage response (DDR) in the event of double strand breaks (DSBs). The DDR rapidly recognizes DNA lesions and initiates the appropriate cellular programs to maintain genome integrity. This includes the coordination of cell-cycle checkpoints, transcription, translation, DNA repair, metabolism, and cell fate decisions, such as apoptosis or senescence. DSBs can be generated by exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) or various chemical compounds, such as topoisomerase inhibitors, or can be part of programmed generation and repair of DSBs via cellular enzymes needed for the generation of the antibody repertoire as well as the maturation of germ cells. AT patients have immunodeficiency, and are sterile with gonadal dysgenesis as a result of defect in meiotic recombination. In the cells of nervous system ATM has additional role in vesicle dynamics as well as in the maintenance of the epigenetic code of histone modifications. Moderate levels of ATM are associated with prolonged lifespan through resistance to oxidative stress. ATM inhibitors are being viewed as potential radiosensitizers as part of cancer radiotherapy. Though there is no cure for the disease at present, glucocorticoids have been shown to induce alternate splicing site in the gene for ATM partly restoring its activity, but their most effective timing in the disease natural history is not yet known. Gene therapy is promising but large size of the gene makes it technically difficult to be delivered across the blood–brain barrier at present. As of now, apart from glucocorticoids, use of histone deacetylase inhibitors/EZH2 to minimize effect of the absence of

  15. [Late onset Friedreich ataxia: clinical description of a family in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Pérez Akly, Manuel; Alvarez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friedreich Ataxia (FA) is the most common hereditary ataxia, caused by abnormal expansion of the GAA triplet of the first intron of the X25 gene on chromosome 9. Clinically it occurs in patients under the age of 25 and it is frequently associated with musculoskeletal, endocrine and myocardial disorders. Among their phenotypic variants there are patients starting their symptoms after the age of 25. The latter group is defined as late onset Freidreich ataxia (LOFA). The objective of this work is to present three siblings affected by late onset Friedreich ataxia. Their symptoms began between the ages of 32 and 34, with gait disturbance and dysarthria of cerebellar type, which worsened, thus becoming more evident in the course of 6-12 months. None had musculoskeletal or myocardial involvement. There was no family history of ataxia or other neurological disorders. Two of these patients underwent genetic study that showed abnormal expansion of GAA triplet confirming the diagnosis of FA. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed. Proximal spinal cord atrophy, sparing cerebellar structures, was found in two of the cases and vermian atrophy associated with proximal spinal cord atrophy was observed in the third one. Molecular testing GAA expansions in the FA gene should be considered in cerebellar ataxia with dysarthria and loss of proprioception. PMID:24152405

  16. Paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma.

    PubMed

    Fancellu, Roberto; Corsini, Elena; Bernardi, Giorgio; Buzzo, Paolo; Ferrari, Maria Luisa; Lamantea, Eleonora; Garaventa, Alberto; Truini, Mauro; Salvarani, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma. A 28-year-old woman developed progressive ataxia with hyporeflexia at the age of 19. Brain MRI showed progressive cerebellar atrophy. Neurophysiological studies, screening of immune-mediated ataxias, oncological markers, vitamin E and genetic tests for spinocerebellar ataxia types 1,2,3, Friedreich ataxia and POLG1 were negative. Anti-Hu antibodies were positive in Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (1:640). Total-body computed tomography revealed a mediastinum mass; the histological diagnosis was maturing ganglioneuroma. Immunohistochemistry showed a mild reaction between the tumor and the patient's serum, and no reaction between the tumor and control serum. After surgery, serum anti-Hu titer decreased, while ataxic symptoms initially worsened and then stabilized. Ganglioneuroma is a benign tumor, usually derived from the maturation of a neuroblastoma. The benign histology and the presence of anti-Hu antibodies could be related to the positive oncological prognosis and to the slow clinical course mimicking a degenerative ataxia. PMID:25764259

  17. The effects of cervical traction, cranial rhythmic impulse, and Mckenzie exercise on headache and cervical muscle stiffness in episodic tension-type headache patients

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung-Yong; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cervical traction treatment, cranial rhythmic impulse treatment, a manual therapy, and McKenzie exercise, a dynamic strengthening exercise, on patients who have the neck muscle stiffness of the infrequent episodic tension-type (IETTH) headache and frequent episodic tension-type headache(FETTH), as well as to provide the basic materials for clinical interventions. [Subjects] Twenty-seven subjects (males: 15, females: 12) who were diagnosed with IETTH and FETTH after treatment by a neurologist were divided into three groups: (a cervical traction group (CTG, n=9), a cranial rhythmic contractiongroup (CRIG, n=9), and a McKenzie exercise group (MEG, n=9). An intervention was conducted for each group and the differences in their degrees of neck pain and changes in muscle tone were observed. [Results] In the within-group comparison of each group, headache significantly decreased in CTG. According to the results of the analysis of the muscle tone of the upper trapezius, there was a statistically significant difference in MEG on the right side and in CRIG on the left side. According to the results of the analysis of the muscle tone of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, there was a statistically significant difference in MEG on the right side and in CRIG on the left side. [Conclusion] In the comparison of the splenius capitis muscle between the groups, there was a statistically significant difference on the right side. Hence, compared to the other methods, cervical traction is concluded to be more effective at reducing headaches in IETTH and FETTH patients. PMID:27134368

  18. The effects of cervical traction, cranial rhythmic impulse, and Mckenzie exercise on headache and cervical muscle stiffness in episodic tension-type headache patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Yong; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cervical traction treatment, cranial rhythmic impulse treatment, a manual therapy, and McKenzie exercise, a dynamic strengthening exercise, on patients who have the neck muscle stiffness of the infrequent episodic tension-type (IETTH) headache and frequent episodic tension-type headache(FETTH), as well as to provide the basic materials for clinical interventions. [Subjects] Twenty-seven subjects (males: 15, females: 12) who were diagnosed with IETTH and FETTH after treatment by a neurologist were divided into three groups: (a cervical traction group (CTG, n=9), a cranial rhythmic contractiongroup (CRIG, n=9), and a McKenzie exercise group (MEG, n=9). An intervention was conducted for each group and the differences in their degrees of neck pain and changes in muscle tone were observed. [Results] In the within-group comparison of each group, headache significantly decreased in CTG. According to the results of the analysis of the muscle tone of the upper trapezius, there was a statistically significant difference in MEG on the right side and in CRIG on the left side. According to the results of the analysis of the muscle tone of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, there was a statistically significant difference in MEG on the right side and in CRIG on the left side. [Conclusion] In the comparison of the splenius capitis muscle between the groups, there was a statistically significant difference on the right side. Hence, compared to the other methods, cervical traction is concluded to be more effective at reducing headaches in IETTH and FETTH patients. PMID:27134368

  19. Sporadic Ataxia and Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sporadic ataxia and MSA. The disorders include rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder, a condition in which ... sleep disorders and provide specific treatment for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder as well as obstructive sleep ...

  20. Vestibular ataxia and its measurement in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Methods involved in and results obtained with a new comprehensive ataxia test battery are described, and definitions of spontaneous and induced vestibular ataxia in man are given in terms of these findings. In addition, the topic of alcohol-induced ataxia in relation to labyrinth function is investigated. Items in the test battery comprise a sharpened Romberg test, in which the subject stands on the floor with eyes closed and arms folded against his chest, feet heel-to-toe, for 60 seconds; an eyes-open walking test; an eyes-open standing test; an eyes-closed standing test; an eyes-closed on-leg standing test; an eyes-closed walk a line test; an eyes-closed heel-to-toe walking test; and supplementary ataxia tests such as the classical Romberg test.

  1. Rare Disease Patient Registry & Natural History Study - Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    ; Non Progressive Epilepsy and/or Ataxia With Myoclonus as a Major Feature; Spectrin-associated Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia; Spasticity-ataxia-gait Anomalies Syndrome; Spastic Ataxia With Congenital Miosis; Spastic Ataxia - Corneal Dystrophy; Spastic Ataxia; Rare Hereditary Ataxia; Rare Ataxia; Recessive Mitochondrial Ataxia Syndrome; Progressive Epilepsy and/or Ataxia With Myoclonus as a Major Feature; Posterior Column Ataxia - Retinitis Pigmentosa; Post-Stroke Ataxia; Post-Head Injury Ataxia; Post Vaccination Ataxia; Polyneuropathy - Hearing Loss - Ataxia - Retinitis Pigmentosa - Cataract; Muscular Atrophy - Ataxia - Retinitis Pigmentosa - Diabetes Mellitus; Non-progressive Cerebellar Ataxia With Intellectual Disability; Non-hereditary Degenerative Ataxia; Paroxysmal Dystonic Choreathetosis With Episodic Ataxia and Spasticity; Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy - Deafness; NARP Syndrome; Myoclonus - Cerebellar Ataxia - Deafness; Multiple System Atrophy, Parkinsonian Type; Multiple System Atrophy, Cerebellar Type; Multiple System Atrophy; Maternally-inherited Leigh Syndrome; Machado-Joseph Disease Type 3; Machado-Joseph Disease Type 2; Machado-Joseph Disease Type 1; Lethal Ataxia With Deafness and Optic Atrophy; Leigh Syndrome; Leukoencephalopathy With Mild Cerebellar Ataxia and White Matter Edema; Leukoencephalopathy - Ataxia - Hypodontia - Hypomyelination; Leigh Syndrome With Nephrotic Syndrome; Leigh Syndrome With Leukodystrophy; Leigh Syndrome With Cardiomyopathy; Late-onset Ataxia With Dementia; Intellectual Disability-hyperkinetic Movement-truncal Ataxia Syndrome; Infection or Post Infection Ataxia; Infantile-onset Autosomal Recessive Nonprogressive Cerebellar Ataxia; Infantile Onset Spinocerebellar Ataxia; GAD Ataxia; Hereditary Episodic Ataxia; Gliadin/Gluten Ataxia; Friedreich Ataxia; Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome; Familial Paroxysmal Ataxia; Exposure to Medications Ataxia; Episodic Ataxia With Slurred Speech; Episodic Ataxia Unknown Type

  2. Intelligent detection of hypoglycemic episodes in children with type 1 diabetes using adaptive neural-fuzzy inference system.

    PubMed

    San, Phyo Phyo; Ling, Sai Ho; Nguyen, Hung T

    2012-01-01

    Hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, is the most common complication experienced by Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients. It is dangerous and can result in unconsciousness, seizures and even death. The most common physiological parameter to be effected from hypoglycemic reaction are heart rate (HR) and correct QT interval (QTc) of the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. Based on physiological parameters, an intelligent diagnostics system, using the hybrid approach of adaptive neural fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), is developed to recognize the presence of hypoglycemia. The proposed ANFIS is characterized by adaptive neural network capabilities and the fuzzy inference system. To optimize the membership functions and adaptive network parameters, a global learning optimization algorithm called hybrid particle swarm optimization with wavelet mutation (HPSOWM) is used. For clinical study, 15 children with Type 1 diabetes volunteered for an overnight study. All the real data sets are collected from the Department of Health, Government of Western Australia. Several experiments were conducted with 5 patients each, for a training set (184 data points), a validation set (192 data points) and a testing set (153 data points), which are randomly selected. The effectiveness of the proposed detection method is found to be satisfactory by giving better sensitivity, 79.09% and acceptable specificity, 51.82%. PMID:23367375

  3. A new variable phenotype in spinocerebellar ataxia 27 (SCA 27) caused by a deletion in the FGF14 gene.

    PubMed

    Coebergh, J A; Fransen van de Putte, D E; Snoeck, I N; Ruivenkamp, C; van Haeringen, A; Smit, L M

    2014-05-01

    We present a young boy whose mild ataxia and abnormal eye movements repeatedly deteriorated with fever, making him unable to sit or walk during fever episodes. SNP-array analysis identified a 202 kb deletion in chromosome 13q33.1 containing the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)14 gene, which is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) 27. This 13q deletion was also present in the proband's mother and grandmother. The mother was unable to perform tandem gait walking and had abnormal eye movements but had never sought medical attention. The grandmother predominantly had a postural tremor. FGF14 regulates brain sodium channels, especially in the cerebellum. Sodium channels can be fever sensitive. This family demonstrates phenotypic variability of FGF14 deletions (SCA 27), fever sensitivity of ataxia and the added value of SNP-array analysis in making a diagnosis. PMID:24252256

  4. Delusions in first-episode psychosis: Principal component analysis of twelve types of delusions and demographic and clinical correlates of resulting domains.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Enrico; Moretti, Patrizia; Compton, Michael T

    2016-09-30

    Although delusions represent one of the core symptoms of psychotic disorders, it is remarkable that few studies have investigated distinct delusional themes. We analyzed data from a large sample of first-episode psychosis patients (n=245) to understand relations between delusion types and demographic and clinical correlates. First, we conducted a principal component analysis (PCA) of the 12 delusion items within the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS). Then, using the domains derived via PCA, we tested a priori hypotheses and answered exploratory research questions related to delusional content. PCA revealed five distinct components: Delusions of Influence, Grandiose/Religious Delusions, Paranoid Delusions, Negative Affect Delusions (jealousy, and sin or guilt), and Somatic Delusions. The most prevalent type of delusion was Paranoid Delusions, and such delusions were more common at older ages at onset of psychosis. The level of Delusions of Influence was correlated with the severity of hallucinations and negative symptoms. We ascertained a general relationship between different childhood adversities and delusional themes, and a specific relationship between Somatic Delusions and childhood neglect. Moreover, we found higher scores on Delusions of Influence and Negative Affect Delusions among cannabis and stimulant users. Our results support considering delusions as varied experiences with varying prevalences and correlates. PMID:27344587

  5. Abnormal Excitability and Episodic Low-Frequency Oscillations in the Cerebral Cortex of the tottering Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Samuel W.; Popa, Laurentiu S.; Carter, Russell E.; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The Ca2+ channelopathies caused by mutations of the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of the human Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channel include episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2). Although, in EA2 the emphasis has been on cerebellar dysfunction, patients also exhibit episodic, nonmotoric abnormalities involving the cerebral cortex. This study demonstrates episodic, low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) throughout the cerebral cortex of tottering (tg/tg) mice, a widely used model of EA2. Ranging between 0.035 and 0.11 Hz, the LFOs in tg/tg mice can spontaneously develop very high power, referred to as a high-power state. The LFOs in tg/tg mice are mediated in part by neuronal activity as tetrodotoxin decreases the oscillations and cortical neuron discharge contain the same low frequencies. The high-power state involves compensatory mechanisms because acutely decreasing P/Q-type Ca2+ channel function in either wild-type (WT) or tg/tg mice does not induce the high-power state. In contrast, blocking l-type Ca2+ channels, known to be upregulated in tg/tg mice, reduces the high-power state. Intriguingly, basal excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission constrains the high-power state because blocking ionotropic or metabotropic glutamate receptors results in high-power LFOs in tg/tg but not WT mice. The high-power LFOs are decreased markedly by acetazolamide and 4-aminopyridine, the primary treatments for EA2, suggesting disease relevance. Together, these results demonstrate that the high-power LFOs in the tg/tg cerebral cortex represent a highly abnormal excitability state that may underlie noncerebellar symptoms that characterize CACNA1A mutations. PMID:25855180

  6. Abnormal excitability and episodic low-frequency oscillations in the cerebral cortex of the tottering mouse.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Samuel W; Popa, Laurentiu S; Carter, Russell E; Chen, Gang; Ebner, Timothy J

    2015-04-01

    The Ca(2+) channelopathies caused by mutations of the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of the human Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel include episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2). Although, in EA2 the emphasis has been on cerebellar dysfunction, patients also exhibit episodic, nonmotoric abnormalities involving the cerebral cortex. This study demonstrates episodic, low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) throughout the cerebral cortex of tottering (tg/tg) mice, a widely used model of EA2. Ranging between 0.035 and 0.11 Hz, the LFOs in tg/tg mice can spontaneously develop very high power, referred to as a high-power state. The LFOs in tg/tg mice are mediated in part by neuronal activity as tetrodotoxin decreases the oscillations and cortical neuron discharge contain the same low frequencies. The high-power state involves compensatory mechanisms because acutely decreasing P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel function in either wild-type (WT) or tg/tg mice does not induce the high-power state. In contrast, blocking l-type Ca(2+) channels, known to be upregulated in tg/tg mice, reduces the high-power state. Intriguingly, basal excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission constrains the high-power state because blocking ionotropic or metabotropic glutamate receptors results in high-power LFOs in tg/tg but not WT mice. The high-power LFOs are decreased markedly by acetazolamide and 4-aminopyridine, the primary treatments for EA2, suggesting disease relevance. Together, these results demonstrate that the high-power LFOs in the tg/tg cerebral cortex represent a highly abnormal excitability state that may underlie noncerebellar symptoms that characterize CACNA1A mutations. PMID:25855180

  7. Neoproterozoic A-type granitoids of the central and southern Appalachians: Intraplate magmatism associated with episodic rifting of the Rodinian supercontinent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tollo, R.P.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Bartholomew, M.J.; Rankin, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Emplacement of compositionally distinctive granitic plutons accompanied two pulses (765-680 and 620-550Ma) of crustal extension that affected the Rodinian craton at the present location of the central Appalachians during the Neoproterozoic. The dominantly metaluminous plutons display mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of A-type granites including high FeO t/MgO ratios, high abundances of Nb, Zr, Y, Ta, and REE (except Eu), and low concentrations of Sc, Ba, Sr, and Eu. These dike-like, sheet complexes occur throughout the Blue Ridge province of Virginia and North Carolina, and were emplaced at shallow levels in continental crust during active extension, forming locally multiple-intrusive plutons elongated perpendicular to the axis of extension. New U-Pb zircon ages obtained from the Polly Wright Cove (706??4Ma) and Suck Mountain (680??4Ma) plutons indicate that metaluminous magmas continued to be replenished near the end of the first pulse of rifting. The Suck Mountain body is presently the youngest known igneous body associated with earlier rifting. U-Pb zircon ages for the Pound Ridge Granite Gneiss (562??5Ma) and Yonkers Gneiss (563??2Ma) in the Manhattan prong of southeastern New York constitute the first evidence of plutonic felsic activity associated with the later period of rifting in the U.S. Appalachians, and suggest that similar melt-generation processes were operative during both intervals of crustal extension. Fractionation processes involving primary minerals were responsible for much of the compositional variation within individual plutons. Compositions of mapped lithologic units in a subset of plutons studied in detail define overlapping data arrays, indicating that, throughout the province, similar petrologic processes operated locally on magmas that became successively more chemically evolved. Limited variation in source-sensitive Y/Nb and Yb/Ta ratios is consistent with results of melting experiments and indicates that metaluminous

  8. Genetics Home Reference: myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions MEMSA myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia , commonly called MEMSA , is part ...

  9. Fragile X-Associated Tremor and Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications Fragile X-Associated Tremor and Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS): Overview Skip sharing on social media ... this: Page Content Fragile X-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset condition (occurs ...

  10. A Single Amino Acid Deletion (ΔF1502) in the S6 Segment of CaV2.1 Domain III Associated with Congenital Ataxia Increases Channel Activity and Promotes Ca2+ Influx.

    PubMed

    Bahamonde, Maria Isabel; Serra, Selma Angèlica; Drechsel, Oliver; Rahman, Rubayte; Marcé-Grau, Anna; Prieto, Marta; Ossowski, Stephan; Macaya, Alfons; Fernández-Fernández, José M

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the CACNA1A gene, encoding the pore-forming CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) channel α1A subunit, result in heterogeneous human neurological disorders, including familial and sporadic hemiplegic migraine along with episodic and progressive forms of ataxia. Hemiplegic Migraine (HM) mutations induce gain-of-channel function, mainly by shifting channel activation to lower voltages, whereas ataxia mutations mostly produce loss-of-channel function. However, some HM-linked gain-of-function mutations are also associated to congenital ataxia and/or cerebellar atrophy, including the deletion of a highly conserved phenylalanine located at the S6 pore region of α1A domain III (ΔF1502). Functional studies of ΔF1502 CaV2.1 channels, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using the non-physiological Ba2+ as the charge carrier have only revealed discrete alterations in channel function of unclear pathophysiological relevance. Here, we report a second case of congenital ataxia linked to the ΔF1502 α1A mutation, detected by whole-exome sequencing, and analyze its functional consequences on CaV2.1 human channels heterologously expressed in mammalian tsA-201 HEK cells, using the physiological permeant ion Ca2+. ΔF1502 strongly decreases the voltage threshold for channel activation (by ~ 21 mV), allowing significantly higher Ca2+ current densities in a range of depolarized voltages with physiological relevance in neurons, even though maximal Ca2+ current density through ΔF1502 CaV2.1 channels is 60% lower than through wild-type channels. ΔF1502 accelerates activation kinetics and slows deactivation kinetics of CaV2.1 within a wide range of voltage depolarization. ΔF1502 also slowed CaV2.1 inactivation kinetic and shifted the inactivation curve to hyperpolarized potentials (by ~ 28 mV). ΔF1502 effects on CaV2.1 activation and deactivation properties seem to be of high physiological relevance. Thus, ΔF1502 strongly promotes Ca2+ influx in response to either single or trains of action

  11. A Single Amino Acid Deletion (ΔF1502) in the S6 Segment of CaV2.1 Domain III Associated with Congenital Ataxia Increases Channel Activity and Promotes Ca2+ Influx

    PubMed Central

    Drechsel, Oliver; Rahman, Rubayte; Marcé-Grau, Anna; Prieto, Marta; Ossowski, Stephan; Macaya, Alfons; Fernández-Fernández, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the CACNA1A gene, encoding the pore-forming CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) channel α1A subunit, result in heterogeneous human neurological disorders, including familial and sporadic hemiplegic migraine along with episodic and progressive forms of ataxia. Hemiplegic Migraine (HM) mutations induce gain-of-channel function, mainly by shifting channel activation to lower voltages, whereas ataxia mutations mostly produce loss-of-channel function. However, some HM-linked gain-of-function mutations are also associated to congenital ataxia and/or cerebellar atrophy, including the deletion of a highly conserved phenylalanine located at the S6 pore region of α1A domain III (ΔF1502). Functional studies of ΔF1502 CaV2.1 channels, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using the non-physiological Ba2+ as the charge carrier have only revealed discrete alterations in channel function of unclear pathophysiological relevance. Here, we report a second case of congenital ataxia linked to the ΔF1502 α1A mutation, detected by whole-exome sequencing, and analyze its functional consequences on CaV2.1 human channels heterologously expressed in mammalian tsA-201 HEK cells, using the physiological permeant ion Ca2+. ΔF1502 strongly decreases the voltage threshold for channel activation (by ~ 21 mV), allowing significantly higher Ca2+ current densities in a range of depolarized voltages with physiological relevance in neurons, even though maximal Ca2+ current density through ΔF1502 CaV2.1 channels is 60% lower than through wild-type channels. ΔF1502 accelerates activation kinetics and slows deactivation kinetics of CaV2.1 within a wide range of voltage depolarization. ΔF1502 also slowed CaV2.1 inactivation kinetic and shifted the inactivation curve to hyperpolarized potentials (by ~ 28 mV). ΔF1502 effects on CaV2.1 activation and deactivation properties seem to be of high physiological relevance. Thus, ΔF1502 strongly promotes Ca2+ influx in response to either single or trains of action

  12. Landmark Based Shape Analysis for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Cerebellar Atrophy Pattern Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules. PMID:27303111

  13. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  14. PMPCA mutations cause abnormal mitochondrial protein processing in patients with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Rebekah K; Assoum, Mirna; Gakh, Oleksandr; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian A; Mignot, Cyril; Roze, Emmanuel; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Lévy, Nicolas; Prasad, Chitra; Paton, Tara; Paterson, Andrew D; Roslin, Nicole M; Marshall, Christian R; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Roëckel-Trevisiol, Nathalie; Scherer, Stephen W; Rouleau, Guy A; Mégarbané, André; Isaya, Grazia; Delague, Valérie; Yoon, Grace

    2015-06-01

    Non-progressive cerebellar ataxias are a rare group of disorders that comprise approximately 10% of static infantile encephalopathies. We report the identification of mutations in PMPCA in 17 patients from four families affected with cerebellar ataxia, including the large Lebanese family previously described with autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia and short stature of Norman type and localized to chromosome 9q34 (OMIM #213200). All patients present with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, and the majority have intellectual disability of variable severity. PMPCA encodes α-MPP, the alpha subunit of mitochondrial processing peptidase, the primary enzyme responsible for the maturation of the vast majority of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins, which is necessary for life at the cellular level. Analysis of lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts from patients homozygous for the PMPCA p.Ala377Thr mutation and carriers demonstrate that the mutation impacts both the level of the alpha subunit encoded by PMPCA and the function of mitochondrial processing peptidase. In particular, this mutation impacts the maturation process of frataxin, the protein which is depleted in Friedreich ataxia. This study represents the first time that defects in PMPCA and mitochondrial processing peptidase have been described in association with a disease phenotype in humans. PMID:25808372

  15. PMPCA mutations cause abnormal mitochondrial protein processing in patients with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, Rebekah K.; Assoum, Mirna; Gakh, Oleksandr; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian A.; Mignot, Cyril; Roze, Emmanuel; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Lévy, Nicolas; Prasad, Chitra; Paton, Tara; Paterson, Andrew D.; Roslin, Nicole M.; Marshall, Christian R.; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Roëckel-Trevisiol, Nathalie; Scherer, Stephen W.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Mégarbané, André; Isaya, Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Non-progressive cerebellar ataxias are a rare group of disorders that comprise approximately 10% of static infantile encephalopathies. We report the identification of mutations in PMPCA in 17 patients from four families affected with cerebellar ataxia, including the large Lebanese family previously described with autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia and short stature of Norman type and localized to chromosome 9q34 (OMIM #213200). All patients present with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, and the majority have intellectual disability of variable severity. PMPCA encodes α-MPP, the alpha subunit of mitochondrial processing peptidase, the primary enzyme responsible for the maturation of the vast majority of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins, which is necessary for life at the cellular level. Analysis of lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts from patients homozygous for the PMPCA p.Ala377Thr mutation and carriers demonstrate that the mutation impacts both the level of the alpha subunit encoded by PMPCA and the function of mitochondrial processing peptidase. In particular, this mutation impacts the maturation process of frataxin, the protein which is depleted in Friedreich ataxia. This study represents the first time that defects in PMPCA and mitochondrial processing peptidase have been described in association with a disease phenotype in humans. PMID:25808372

  16. Vitamin E deficiency ataxia associated with adenoma.

    PubMed

    Benomar, A; Yahyaoui, M; Marzouki, N; Birouk, N; Bouslam, N; Belaidi, H; Amarti, A; Ouazzani, R; Chkili, T

    1999-01-01

    Vitamin E is one of the most important lipid-soluble antioxidant nutrient. Severe vitamin E deficiency (VED) can have a profound effect on the central nervous system. VED causes ataxia and peripheral neuropathy that resembles Friedreich's ataxia. We report here a patient presenting this syndrome, but also a prolactin and FSH adenoma. Both the neurological syndromes and the adenoma regressed after treatment with alpha-tocopherol. Although, the presence of the prolactinoma in this patient may not be related to his vitamin E deficiency, alpha-tocopherol treatment seems to be beneficial and might usefully be tested in patients with hypophyseal secreting other forms of adenoma. PMID:10064178

  17. Cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying spinocerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Meera, Pratap; Pulst, Stefan M; Otis, Thomas S

    2016-08-15

    Degenerative ataxias are a common form of neurodegenerative disease that affect about 20 individuals per 100,000. The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are caused by a variety of protein coding mutations (single nucleotide changes, deletions and expansions) in single genes. Affected genes encode plasma membrane and intracellular ion channels, membrane receptors, protein kinases, protein phosphatases and proteins of unknown function. Although SCA-linked genes are quite diverse they share two key features: first, they are highly, although not exclusively, expressed in cerebellar Purkinje neurons (PNs), and second, when mutated they lead ultimately to the degeneration of PNs. In this review we summarize ataxia-related changes in PN neurophysiology that have been observed in various mouse knockout lines and in transgenic models of human SCA. We also highlight emerging evidence that altered metabotropic glutamate receptor signalling and disrupted calcium homeostasis in PNs form a common, early pathophysiological mechanism in SCAs. Together these findings indicate that aberrant calcium signalling and profound changes in PN neurophysiology precede PN cell loss and are likely to lead to cerebellar circuit dysfunction that explains behavioural signs of ataxia characteristic of the disease. PMID:27198167

  18. Anti Transglutaminase Antibodies Cause Ataxia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo, Sabrina; Lorenzon, Andrea; Sblattero, Daniele; Florian, Fiorella; Stebel, Marco; Marzari, Roberto; Not, Tarcisio; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Ventura, Alessandro; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder characterized by the presence of anti-transglutaminase 2 (TG2) and anti-gliadin antibodies. Amongst the neurological dysfunctions associated with CD, ataxia represents the most common one. Methods We analyzed by immunohistochemistry, the anti-neural reactivity of the serum from 20 CD patients. To determine the role of anti-TG2 antibodies in ataxia, two anti-TG2 single chain variable fragments (scFv), isolated from a phage-display IgA antibody library, were characterized by immunohistochemistry and ELISA, and injected in mice to study their effects on motor coordination. We found that 75% of the CD patient population without evidence of neurological involvement, has circulating anti-neural IgA and/or IgG antibodies. Two anti-TG2 scFvs, cloned from one CD patient, stained blood vessels but only one reacted with neurons. This anti-TG2 antibody showed cross reactivity with the transglutaminase isozymes TG3 and TG6. Intraventricular injection of the anti-TG2 or the anti-TG2/3/6 cross-reactive scFv provoked transient, equally intensive ataxia in mice. Conclusion The serum from CD patients contains anti-TG2, TG3 and TG6 antibodies that may potentially cause ataxia. PMID:20300628

  19. Empirical typology of bipolar I mood episodes*

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, David A.; Leon, Andrew C.; Endicott, Jean; Coryell, William H.; Li, Chunshan; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Keller, Martin B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Much remains unknown about the phenomenology of bipolar I disorder. Aims To determine the type of bipolar I mood episodes that occur over time, and their relative frequency. Method A total of 219 individuals with Research Diagnostic Criteria bipolar I disorder were prospectively followed for up to 25 years (median 20 years). Psychopathology was assessed with the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. Results Overall, 1208 mood episodes were prospectively observed. The episodes were empirically classified as follows: major depression, 30.9% (n = 373); minor depression, 13.0% (n = 157); mania, 20.4% (n = 246); hypomania, 10.4% (n = 126); cycling, 17.3% (n = 210); cycling plus mixed state, 7.8% (n = 94); and mixed, 0.2% (n = 2). Conclusions Cycling episodes constituted 25% of all episodes. Work groups revising ICD–10 and DSM–IV should add a category for bipolar I cycling episode. PMID:19949203

  20. Insights From Cerebellar Transcriptomic Analysis Into the Pathogenesis of Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Ryten, Mina; Forabosco, Paola; Schorge, Stephanie; Hersheson, Joshua; Hardy, John; Houlden, Henry

    2015-01-01

    other module encloses many genes important for calcium homeostasis and signaling and contains SCA genes associated mostly with pure ataxia. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Using normal gene expression in the human brain, we identified significant cell types and pathways in SCA pathogenesis. The overrepresentation of genes involved in calcium homeostasis and signaling may indicate an important target for therapy in the future. Furthermore, the gene networks provide new candidate genes for ataxias or novel genes that may be critical for cerebellar function. PMID:24862029

  1. Grenvillian magmatism in the northern Virginia Blue Ridge: Petrologic implications of episodic granitic magma production and the significance of postorogenic A-type charnockite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tollo, R.P.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Borduas, E.A.; Dickin, A.P.; McNutt, R.H.; Fanning, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Grenvillian (1.2 to 1.0 Ga) plutonic rocks in northern Virginia preserve evidence of episodic, mostly granitic magmatism that spanned more than 150 million years (m.y.) of crustal reworking. Crystallization ages determined by sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon and monazite, combined with results from previous studies, define three periods of magmatic activity at 1183-1144 Ma (Magmatic Interval I), 1120-1111 Ma (Magmatic Interval II), and 1078-1028 Ma (Magmatic Interval III). Magmatic activity produced dominantly tholeiitic plutons composed of (1) low-silica charnockite, (2) leucogranite, (3) non-leucocratic granitoid (with or without orthopyroxene (opx)), and (4) intermediate biotite-rich granitoid. Field, petrologic, geochemical, and geochronologic data indicate that charnockite and non-charnockitic granitoids were closely associated in both space and time, indicating that presence of opx is related to magmatic conditions, not metamorphic grade. Geochemical and Nd isotopic data, combined with results from experimental studies, indicate that leucogranites (Magmatic Intervals I and III) and non-leucocratic granitoids (Magmatic Intervals I and II) were derived from parental magmas produced by either a high degree of partial melting of isotopically evolved tonalitic sources or less advanced partial melting of dominantly tonalitic sources that also included a more mafic component. Post-orogenic, circa 1050 Ma low-silica charnockite is characterized by A-type compositional affinity including high FeOt/(FeOt + MgO), Ga/Al, Zr, Nb, Y, and Zn, and was derived from parental magmas produced by partial melting of potassic mafic sources in the lower crust. Linear geochemical trends defined by leucogranites, low-silica charnockite, and biotite-rich monzogranite emplaced during Magmatic Interval III reflect differences in source-related characteristics; these features do not represent an igneous fractionation sequence. A

  2. Childhood colon cancer in a patient with ataxia telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Kyeong Min; Park, Jong Ha; Kim, Tae Oh; Jeong, Heui Jeong; Heo, Chang Min; Jang, Ji Hoon; Hur, So Chong; Jeong, Na Ri; Jeong, Su Jin; Seol, Sang Hoon; Nam, Kyung Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurologic impairment and cerebellar ataxia. In addition, patients with this disease are known to have an inherent increased susceptibility to the development of cancer, predominantly hematologic malignancies. Methods We report the case of a young boy with AT from Russia, who had abdominal pain. Laboratory tests and radiologic examinations were performed to him. Results After abdominal computed tomography (CT), colonoscopy and surgical interventions, the young boy was diagnosed with colon cancer that had signet ring cell features. Conclusions It is known that the patient with AT appeared to be predisposed to various tumors, including leukemia or lymphoma, which are more common in childhood. Even if the patient with AT could have solid tumor such as stomach cancer or breast cancer, it is less likely to have colon cancer, especially signet ring cell type. Actually, no case of colon cancer has ever been reported, especially in young patient and hence, we have focused on this point and are hereby reporting this unique case. PMID:26855947

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, Ashley M; Öz, Gülin; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C), compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C. PMID:26265793

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Brouillette, Ashley M.; Öz, Gülin; Gomez, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C), compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C. PMID:26265793

  5. Perinatal episodes across the mood disorder spectrum.

    PubMed

    Di Florio, Arianna; Forty, Liz; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Heron, Jess; Jones, Lisa; Craddock, Nicholas; Jones, Ian

    2013-02-01

    CONTEXT Affective disorders are common in women, with many episodes having an onset in pregnancy or during the postpartum period. OBJECTIVE To investigate the occurrence and timing of perinatal mood episodes in women with bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, and recurrent major depression (RMD). SETTING AND PATIENTS Women were recruited in our ongoing research on the genetic and nongenetic determinants of major affective disorders. Participants were interviewed and case notes were reviewed. Best-estimate diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV criteria. The 1785 parous women identified included 1212 women with bipolar disorder (980 with type I and 232 with type II) and 573 with RMD. Data were available on 3017 live births. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES We report the lifetime occurrence of perinatal mood episodes, the rates of perinatal episodes per pregnancy/postpartum period, and the timing of the onset of episodes in relation to delivery. RESULTS More than two-thirds of all diagnostic groups reported at least 1 lifetime episode of illness during pregnancy or the postpartum period. Women with bipolar I disorder reported an approximately 50% risk of a perinatal major affective episode per pregnancy/postpartum period. Risks were lower in women with RMD or bipolar II disorder, at approximately 40% per pregnancy/postpartum period. Mood episodes were significantly more common in the postpartum period in bipolar I disorder and RMD. Most perinatal episodes occurred within the first postpartum month, with mania or psychosis having an earlier onset than depression. CONCLUSIONS Although episodes of postpartum mood disorder are more common in bipolar I disorder and manic and psychotic presentations occur earlier in the postpartum period, perinatal episodes are highly prevalent across the mood disorder spectrum. PMID:23247604

  6. Abnormal N400 word repetition effects in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Shiaohui; Wong, Ling M.; Schneider, Andrea; Seritan, Andreea; Niese, Adam; Yang, Jin-Chen; Laird, Kelsey; Teichholtz, Sara; Khan, Sara; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Randi

    2010-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, a neurodegenerative disorder associated with premutation alleles (55–200 CGG repeats) of the FMR1 gene, affects many carriers in late-life. Patients with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome typically have cerebellar ataxia, intranuclear inclusions in neurons and astrocytes, as well as cognitive impairment. Dementia can also be present with cognitive deficits that are as severe as in Alzheimer’s disease, however frontosubcortical type impairment is more pronounced in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. We sought to characterize the P600 and N400 word repetition effects in patients with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, using an event-related potential word repetition paradigm with demonstrated sensitivity to very early Alzheimer’s disease. We hypothesized that the fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome-affected participants with poor declarative verbal memory would have pronounced abnormalities in the P600 repetition effect. In the event-related potential experiment, subjects performed a category decision task whilst an electroencephalogram was recorded. Auditory category statements were each followed by an associated visual target word (50% ‘congruous’ category exemplars, 50% ‘incongruous’ nouns). Two-thirds of the stimuli (category statement–target word pairs) were repeated, either at short-lag (∼10–40 s) or long-lag (∼100–140 s). The N400 and P600 amplitude data were submitted to split-plot analyses of variance. These analyses of variance showed a highly significant reduction of the N400 repetition effect (F = 22.5, P < 0.001), but not of the P600 repetition effect, in mild fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (n = 32, mean age = 68.7, mean Mini-Mental State Examination score = 26.8). Patients with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome had significantly smaller late positive amplitude (550–800 ms post-stimulus onset) to congruous words (P = 0

  7. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency May Present with Cervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Andrew E.; Vargas, Wendy; Pearson, Toni S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is an autosomal recessive disorder that usually presents with ataxia, areflexia, and proprioceptive and vibratory sensory loss. Dystonia has been reported rarely. Case Report An 11-year-old female presented with dystonic head tremor and cervical and bilateral arm dystonia. Her 14-year-old older brother had dystonic head tremor and generalized dystonia. One year later, the brother developed dysarthria, limb dysmetria, and gait ataxia. Compound heterozygous mutations in TTPA were detected, confirming the diagnosis of AVED. Discussion AVED may present with dystonia rather than ataxia, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of progressive dystonia. PMID:27274910

  8. Identification of CHIP as a novel causative gene for autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuting; Wang, Junling; Li, Jia-Da; Ren, Haigang; Guan, Wenjuan; He, Miao; Yan, Weiqian; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhengmao; Zhang, Jianguo; Xiao, Jingjing; Su, Zheng; Dai, Meizhi; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Hong; Guo, Jifeng; Zhou, Yafang; Zhang, Fufeng; Li, Nan; Du, Juan; Xu, Qian; Hu, Yacen; Pan, Qian; Shen, Lu; Wang, Guanghui; Xia, Kun; Zhang, Zhuohua; Tang, Beisha

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by complex clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Although more than 20 disease-causing genes have been identified, many patients are still currently without a molecular diagnosis. In a two-generation autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia family, we mapped a linkage to a minimal candidate region on chromosome 16p13.3 flanked by single-nucleotide polymorphism markers rs11248850 and rs1218762. By combining the defined linkage region with the whole-exome sequencing results, we identified a homozygous mutation (c.493CT) in CHIP (NM_005861) in this family. Using Sanger sequencing, we also identified two compound heterozygous mutations (c.389AT/c.441GT; c.621C>G/c.707GC) in CHIP gene in two additional kindreds. These mutations co-segregated exactly with the disease in these families and were not observed in 500 control subjects with matched ancestry. CHIP colocalized with NR2A, a subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, in the cerebellum, pons, medulla oblongata, hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Wild-type, but not disease-associated mutant CHIPs promoted the degradation of NR2A, which may underlie the pathogenesis of ataxia. In conclusion, using a combination of whole-exome sequencing and linkage analysis, we identified CHIP, encoding a U-box containing ubiquitin E3 ligase, as a novel causative gene for autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia. PMID:24312598

  9. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Roots, R.

    1983-07-01

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/..mu..m to over 1000 keV/..mu..m. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/..mu..m. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  10. Identification of CHIP as a Novel Causative Gene for Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuting; Wang, Junling; Li, Jia-Da; Ren, Haigang; Guan, Wenjuan; He, Miao; Yan, Weiqian; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhengmao; Zhang, Jianguo; Xiao, Jingjing; Su, Zheng; Dai, Meizhi; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Hong; Guo, Jifeng; Zhou, Yafang; Zhang, Fufeng; Li, Nan; Du, Juan; Xu, Qian; Hu, Yacen; Pan, Qian; Shen, Lu; Wang, Guanghui; Xia, Kun; Zhang, Zhuohua; Tang, Beisha

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by complex clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Although more than 20 disease-causing genes have been identified, many patients are still currently without a molecular diagnosis. In a two-generation autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia family, we mapped a linkage to a minimal candidate region on chromosome 16p13.3 flanked by single-nucleotide polymorphism markers rs11248850 and rs1218762. By combining the defined linkage region with the whole-exome sequencing results, we identified a homozygous mutation (c.493CT) in CHIP (NM_005861) in this family. Using Sanger sequencing, we also identified two compound heterozygous mutations (c.389AT/c.441GT; c.621C>G/c.707GC) in CHIP gene in two additional kindreds. These mutations co-segregated exactly with the disease in these families and were not observed in 500 control subjects with matched ancestry. CHIP colocalized with NR2A, a subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, in the cerebellum, pons, medulla oblongata, hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Wild-type, but not disease-associated mutant CHIPs promoted the degradation of NR2A, which may underlie the pathogenesis of ataxia. In conclusion, using a combination of whole-exome sequencing and linkage analysis, we identified CHIP, encoding a U-box containing ubiquitin E3 ligase, as a novel causative gene for autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia. PMID:24312598

  11. Genetics Home Reference: PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... All Close All Description PRICKLE1 -related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia is a rare inherited condition characterized ...

  12. Inferior cerebellar hypoplasia resembling a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in purebred Eurasier dogs with familial non-progressive ataxia: a retrospective and prospective clinical cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Filipa; Rentmeister, Kai; Schmidt, Martin J; Bruehschwein, Andreas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Matiasek, Lara A; Lauda, Alexander; Schoon, Heinz A; Fischer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5-6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior) fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. PMID:25668516

  13. Clinical analysis of adult-onset spinocerebellar ataxias in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-ataxic symptoms of spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) vary widely and often overlap with various types of SCAs. Duration and severity of the disease and genetic background may play a role in such phenotypic diversity. We conducted the study in order to study clinical characteristics of common SCAs in Thailand and the factors that may influence their phenotypes. Methods 131 (49.43%) out of 265 Thai ataxia families with cerebellar degeneration had positive tests for SCA1, SCA2, Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) or SCA6. The study evaluated 83 available families including SCA1 (21 patients), SCA2 (15), MJD (39) and SCA6 (8). Comparisons of frequency of each non-ataxic sign among different SCA subtypes were analysed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken to analyze parameters in association with disease severity and size of CAG repeat. Results Mean ages at onset were not different among patients with different SCAs (40.31 ± 11.33 years, mean ± SD). Surprisingly, SCA6 patients often had age at onset and phenotypes indistinguishable from SCA1, SCA2 and MJD. Frequencies of ophthalmoparesis, nystagmus, hyperreflexia and areflexia were significantly different among the common SCAs, whilst frequency of slow saccade was not. In contrast to Caucasian patients, parkinsonism, dystonia, dementia, and facial fasciculation were uncommon in Thai patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ophthalmoparesis (p < 0.001) and sensory impairment (p = 0.025) were associated with the severity of the disease. Conclusions We described clinical characteristics of the 4 most common SCAs in Thailand accounting for almost 90% of familial spinocerebellar ataxias. There were some different observations compared to Caucasian patients including earlier age at onset of SCA6 and the paucity of extrapyramidal features, cognitive impairment and facial fasciculation. Severity of the disease, size of the pathological CAG repeat allele

  14. Episodicity in back-arc tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Stuart R.; Stegman, Dave; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2008-12-01

    The evolution of back-arc basins is tied to the development of the dynamics of the subduction system they are a part of. We present a study of back-arc basins and model their development by implementing 3D time-dependant computer models of subduction including an overriding plate. We define three types of episodicity: pseudo-, quasi- and hyper-episodicity, and find evidence of these in nature. Observations of back-arc basin ages, histories of spreading, quiescence and compression in the overriding plate give us an understanding of the time-development of these subduction zones and back-arc basins. Across the globe today, a number of trenches are advancing—the Izu-Bonin Trench, the Mariana Trench, the Japan Trench, the Java-Sunda Trench and the central portion of the Peru-Chile Trench (the Andes subduction zone). The Izu-Bonin, Mariana and Japan all have established back-arc basins, while the others have documented episodes of spreading, quiescence, compression or a combination of these. The combination of advancing and retreating trench motion places these subduction zones in the category of hyper-episodicity. Quasi-episodicity, in which the back-arc shifts between phases of rifting, spreading and quiescence, is the dominant form of episodic back-arc development in the present. We find this type of episodicity in models for which the system is dynamically consistent—that we have allowed the subducting plate's velocity to be determined by the sinking slabs' buoyancy. Quasi- and hyper-episodicity are only found in subduction zones with relatively high subducting plate velocities, between 6 and 9 cm/year. Finally, those subduction zones for which the subducting plate is moving slowly, such as in the Mediterranean or the Scotia Sea, experience only pseudo-episodicity, where the spreading moves linearly towards the trench but often does so in discrete ridge-jump events.

  15. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  16. Dysarthria and Friedreich's Ataxia: What Can Intelligibility Assessment Tell Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, Bronagh; Hewlett, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    Background: Friedreich's ataxia is one of the most common hereditary disorders of the nervous system. Dysarthria is a pervasive symptom of Friedreich's ataxia, yet the clinical presentation of speech symptoms remains poorly understood, leaving clinicians without the evidence required to develop therapy interventions. Aims: The research reported…

  17. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 associated with parkinsonism: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bruun, Marie; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Thomsen, Carsten; Danielsen, Else; Thomsen, Lise Lykke; Pinborg, Lars Hageman; Khabbazbavani, Nastaran; Nielsen, Joergen Erik

    2015-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the CACNA1A gene on chromosome 19p13. It is well described that FHM1 can present with cerebellar signs, but parkinsonism has not previously been reported in FHM1 or EA2 even though parkinsonism has been described in SCA6. We report a 63-year-old woman with FHM1 caused by an R583Q mutation in the CACNA1A gene, clinically presenting with migraine and permanent cerebellar ataxia. Since the age of 60 years, the patient also developed parkinsonism with rigidity, bradykinesia and a resting tremor. An MRI showed a normal substantia nigra, but a bilateral loss of substance in the basal ganglia, which is in contrast to the typically normal MRI in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography demonstrated a decreased DAT-binding potential in the putamen. We wish to draw attention to FHM1 associated with parkinsonism; however, whether the reported case is a consequence of FHM1 being allelic to SCA6, unknown modifiers to the specific R583Q CACNA1A mutation or idiopathic Parkinson's disease remains unanswered. PMID:25969684

  18. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine Type 1 Associated with Parkinsonism: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bruun, Marie; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Thomsen, Carsten; Danielsen, Else; Thomsen, Lise Lykke; Pinborg, Lars Hageman; Khabbazbavani, Nastaran; Nielsen, Joergen Erik

    2015-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the CACNA1A gene on chromosome 19p13. It is well described that FHM1 can present with cerebellar signs, but parkinsonism has not previously been reported in FHM1 or EA2 even though parkinsonism has been described in SCA6. We report a 63-year-old woman with FHM1 caused by an R583Q mutation in the CACNA1A gene, clinically presenting with migraine and permanent cerebellar ataxia. Since the age of 60 years, the patient also developed parkinsonism with rigidity, bradykinesia and a resting tremor. An MRI showed a normal substantia nigra, but a bilateral loss of substance in the basal ganglia, which is in contrast to the typically normal MRI in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography demonstrated a decreased DAT-binding potential in the putamen. We wish to draw attention to FHM1 associated with parkinsonism; however, whether the reported case is a consequence of FHM1 being allelic to SCA6, unknown modifiers to the specific R583Q CACNA1A mutation or idiopathic Parkinson's disease remains unanswered. PMID:25969684

  19. Sun1 deficiency leads to cerebellar ataxia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-Ya; Yu, I.-Shing; Huang, Chien-Chi; Chen, Chia-Yen; Wang, Wan-Ping; Lin, Shu-Wha; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Chi, Ya-Hui

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Migration and organization of the nucleus are essential for the proliferation and differentiation of cells, including neurons. However, the relationship between the positioning of the nucleus and cellular morphogenesis remains poorly understood. Inherited recessive cerebellar ataxia has been attributed to mutations in SYNE1, a component of the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Regardless, Syne1-mutant mice present with normal cerebellar development. The Sad1-Unc-84 homology (SUN)-domain proteins are located at the inner nuclear membrane and recruit Syne proteins through the KASH domain to the outer nuclear membrane. Here, we report an unrecognized contribution of Sun1 and Sun2 to the postnatal development of murine cerebellum. Mice depleted of Sun1 showed a marked reduction in the cerebellar volume, and this phenotype is exacerbated with additional loss of a Sun2 allele. Consistent with these histological changes, Sun1−/− and Sun1−/−Sun2+/− mice exhibited defective motor coordination. Results of immunohistochemical analyses suggested that Sun1 is highly expressed in Purkinje cells and recruits Syne2 to the periphery of the nucleus. Approximately 33% of Purkinje cells in Sun1−/− mice and 66% of Purkinje cells in Sun1−/−Sun2+/− mice were absent from the surface of the internal granule layer (IGL), whereas the proliferation and migration of granule neurons were unaffected. Furthermore, the Sun1−/−Sun2+/− Purkinje cells exhibited retarded primary dendrite specification, reduced dendritic complexity and aberrant patterning of synapses. Our findings reveal a cell-type-specific role for Sun1 and Sun2 in nucleokinesis during cerebellar development, and we propose the use of Sun-deficient mice as a model for studying cerebellar ataxia that is associated with mutation of human SYNE genes or loss of Purkinje cells. PMID:26035387

  20. Monoclonal gammopathy of the immunoglobulin A class in a two-year-old girl with ataxia telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    McDonald, P S; Cora-Bramble, D; De Palma, L

    1998-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder which is frequently associated with a deficiency of IgA immunoglobulin. We report an unusual case of monoclonal gammopathy of the IgA kappa type in a 2-year-old female patient newly diagnosed with ataxia telangiectasia. Quantitative analysis of the patient's immunoglobulins revealed a marked elevation in the IgA fraction with a value of 672 mg/dL (normal 14-123 mg/dL). The IgG and IgM fractions were normal. Serum protein electrophoresis showed a band of restricted mobility present in the gamma region, which was identified as a monoclonal IgA kappa immunoglobulin on immunofixation electrophoresis. This is the first case report of a patient with ataxia telangiectasia associated with an IgA monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:10463295

  1. Friedreich`s ataxia in American families

    SciTech Connect

    D`Costa, A.; Maguire, B.A.; Sylvester, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Freidreich`s ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder presenting with dysarthia, loss of tendon reflexes, and ataxic gait. Both diabetes mellitus and cardiomyopathy are frequently found associated with the disease. The gene, FRDA, has been localized to 9q13-21. Recent reports of recombination events in individuals homozygous by descent have positioned the gene to a 450 KB region in the FRDA locus centromeric to the original markers. Candidate cDNA`s have been isolated from part of this region, and characterized, but not shown to be responsible for the disease. We have performed linkage analysis on 46 American families with markers in the FRDA region. A recombination has been detected in a family which has the phenotypic criteria for Friedreich`s; none of the three affected exhibit signs of cardiomyopathy which is a required diagnostic criteria. Since this recombination lies within the now excluded D9S5/D9S15 region, it is being tested for linkage to the {open_quotes}ataxia with selective vitamin E deficiency{close_quotes} (AVED) locus on chromosome 8q. Our lab has work in progress to subclone appropriate regions from YACs in order to identify expressed sequences and nucleotide variations (by SSCP) in the FRDA locus.

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction in ataxia-telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Valentin-Vega, Yasmine A; Maclean, Kirsteen H; Tait-Mulder, Jacqueline; Milasta, Sandra; Steeves, Meredith; Dorsey, Frank C; Cleveland, John L; Green, Douglas R; Kastan, Michael B

    2012-02-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in DNA damage responses, and its loss leads to development of T-cell malignancies. Here, we show that ATM loss also leads to intrinsic mitochondrial abnormalities in thymocytes, including elevated reactive oxygen species, increased aberrant mitochondria, high cellular respiratory capacity, and decreased mitophagy. A fraction of ATM protein is localized in mitochondria, and it is rapidly activated by mitochondrial dysfunction. Unexpectedly, allelic loss of the autophagy regulator Beclin-1 significantly delayed tumor development in ATM-null mice. This effect was not associated with rescue of DNA damage signaling but rather with a significant reversal of the mitochondrial abnormalities. These data support a model in which ATM plays direct roles in modulating mitochondrial homeostasis and suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and associated increases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species contribute to the cancer-prone phenotype observed in organisms lacking ATM. Thus, ataxia-telangiectasia should be considered, at least in part, as a mitochondrial disease. PMID:22144182

  3. Episodic coronal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Dixon, W. W.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1990-06-01

    A study is made of the observational consequences of the hypothesis that there is no steady coronal heating, the solar corona instead being heated episodically, such that each short burst of heating is followed by a long period of radiative cooling. The form of the resulting contribution to the differential emission measure (DEM), and to a convenient related function (the differential energy flux, DEF) is calculated. Observational data for the quiet solar atmosphere indicate that the upper branch of the DEM, corresponding to temperatures above 100,000 K, can be interpreted in terms of episodic energy injection at coronal temperatures.

  4. Episodic coronal heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Dixon, W. W.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1990-01-01

    A study is made of the observational consequences of the hypothesis that there is no steady coronal heating, the solar corona instead being heated episodically, such that each short burst of heating is followed by a long period of radiative cooling. The form of the resulting contribution to the differential emission measure (DEM), and to a convenient related function (the differential energy flux, DEF) is calculated. Observational data for the quiet solar atmosphere indicate that the upper branch of the DEM, corresponding to temperatures above 100,000 K, can be interpreted in terms of episodic energy injection at coronal temperatures.

  5. Ten new ATM alterations in Polish patients with ataxia-telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Podralska, Marta Joanna; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Ślęzak, Ryszard; Lewandowicz-Uszyńska, Aleksandra; Pietrucha, Barbara; Kołtan, Sylwia; Wigowska-Sowińska, Jadwiga; Pilch, Jacek; Mosor, Maria; Ziółkowska-Suchanek, Iwona; Dzikiewicz-Krawczyk, Agnieszka; Słomski, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    Inherited biallelic mutations of the ATM gene are responsible for the development of ataxia telangiectasia (AT). The objective of the present study was to conduct molecular analysis of the ATM gene in a cohort of 24 Polish patients with ataxia-telangiectasia with aim being to provide an updated mutational spectrum in Polish AT patients. As a result of molecular analysis, the status of recurrent mutation was confirmed and ten new ATM variants were detected. Application of MLPA analysis allowed the detection of large genomic deletion. Previously, this type of mutation had never been seen in our population. Finally, in silico analysis was carried out for newly detected ATM alterations. In addition, functional analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of intronic variants: c.3402+30_3402+32delATC. PMID:25614872

  6. Animal and cellular models of Friedreich ataxia.

    PubMed

    Perdomini, Morgane; Hick, Aurore; Puccio, Hélène; Pook, Mark A

    2013-08-01

    The development and use of animal and cellular models of Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) are essential requirements for the understanding of FRDA disease mechanisms and the investigation of potential FRDA therapeutic strategies. Although animal and cellular models of lower organisms have provided valuable information on certain aspects of FRDA disease and therapy, it is intuitive that the most useful models are those of mammals and mammalian cells, which are the closest in physiological terms to FRDA patients. To date, there have been considerable efforts put into the development of several different FRDA mouse models and relevant FRDA mouse and human cell line systems. We summarize the principal mammalian FRDA models, discuss the pros and cons of each system, and describe the ways in which such models have been used to address two of the fundamental, as yet unanswered, questions regarding FRDA. Namely, what is the exact pathophysiology of FRDA and what is the detailed genetic and epigenetic basis of FRDA? PMID:23859342

  7. Swayback (Enzootic Ataxia) in Alberta Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    Swayback (enzootic ataxia), a disease not previously described in Canada, occurred in newborn lambs in Alberta in 1972. Of 100 lambs born in one flock, over 60 succumbed in the enzootic. The diagnosis was based on the presence of a) gross cavitations and gelatinous lesions of the cerebral white matter in 16 of 24 (66.67%) lambs examined, b) central chromatolysis and hyalinization of neurons of the red and vestibular nuclei and reticular formation and of the lateral and ventral horns of the spinal cord, c) myelin deficiencies of the dorsolateral and sulcomarginal funiculi of the spinal cord and d) low hepatic and serum copper levels in affected lambs and low serum copper levels in the ewes. The feeding of sugar beet-(beta saccharifera) top silage to the ewes during pregnancy, lambing and lactation, and its relationship to the enzootic is discussed. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:4274817

  8. FXN Promoter Silencing in the Humanized Mouse Model of Friedreich Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Chutake, Yogesh K.; Costello, Whitney N.; Lam, Christina C.; Parikh, Aniruddha C.; Hughes, Tamara T.; Michalopulos, Michael G.; Pook, Mark A.; Bidichandani, Sanjay I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Friedreich ataxia is caused by an expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence in intron 1 of the FXN gene that results in epigenetic silencing of the FXN promoter. This silencing mechanism is seen in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells but it remains unknown if it is a widespread phenomenon affecting multiple cell types and tissues. Methodology / Principal Findings The humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia (YG8sR), which carries a single transgenic insert of the human FXN gene with an expanded GAA triplet-repeat in intron 1, is deficient for FXN transcript when compared to an isogenic transgenic mouse lacking the expanded repeat (Y47R). We found that in YG8sR the deficiency of FXN transcript extended both upstream and downstream of the expanded GAA triplet-repeat, suggestive of deficient transcriptional initiation. This pattern of deficiency was seen in all tissues tested, irrespective of whether they are known to be affected or spared in disease pathogenesis, in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and in cultured primary fibroblasts. FXN promoter function was directly measured via metabolic labeling of newly synthesized transcripts in fibroblasts, which revealed that the YG8sR mouse was significantly deficient in transcriptional initiation compared to the Y47R mouse. Conclusions / Significance Deficient transcriptional initiation accounts for FXN transcriptional deficiency in the humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia, similar to patient-derived cells, and the mechanism underlying promoter silencing in Friedreich ataxia is widespread across multiple cell types and tissues. PMID:26393353

  9. Clinical care management and workflow by episodes.

    PubMed Central

    Claus, P. L.; Carpenter, P. C.; Chute, C. G.; Mohr, D. N.; Gibbons, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of clinically defined episodes of care and the introduction of an episode-based summary list of patient problems across Mayo Clinic Rochester in 1996 and 1997. Although Mayo's traditional paper-based system has always relied on a type of 'episode of care' (called the "registration") for patient and history management, a new, more clinically relevant definition of episode of care was put into practice in November 1996. This was done to improve care management and operational processes and to provide a basic construct for the electronic medical record. Also since November 1996, a computer-generated summary list of patient problems, the "Master Sheet Summary Report," organized by episode, has been placed in all patient histories. In the third quarter of 1997, the ability to view the episode-based problem summary online was made available to the 3000+ EMR-capable workstations deployed across the Mayo Rochester campus. In addition, the clinically oriented problem summarization process produces an improved basic "package" of clinical information expected to lead to improved analytic decision support, outcomes analysis and epidemiological research. PMID:9357595

  10. Episodes, events, and models.

    PubMed

    Khemlani, Sangeet S; Harrison, Anthony M; Trafton, J Gregory

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel computational theory of how individuals segment perceptual information into representations of events. The theory is inspired by recent findings in the cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience of event segmentation. In line with recent theories, it holds that online event segmentation is automatic, and that event segmentation yields mental simulations of events. But it posits two novel principles as well: first, discrete episodic markers track perceptual and conceptual changes, and can be retrieved to construct event models. Second, the process of retrieving and reconstructing those episodic markers is constrained and prioritized. We describe a computational implementation of the theory, as well as a robotic extension of the theory that demonstrates the processes of online event segmentation and event model construction. The theory is the first unified computational account of event segmentation and temporal inference. We conclude by demonstrating now neuroimaging data can constrain and inspire the construction of process-level theories of human reasoning. PMID:26578934

  11. Episodes, events, and models

    PubMed Central

    Khemlani, Sangeet S.; Harrison, Anthony M.; Trafton, J. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel computational theory of how individuals segment perceptual information into representations of events. The theory is inspired by recent findings in the cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience of event segmentation. In line with recent theories, it holds that online event segmentation is automatic, and that event segmentation yields mental simulations of events. But it posits two novel principles as well: first, discrete episodic markers track perceptual and conceptual changes, and can be retrieved to construct event models. Second, the process of retrieving and reconstructing those episodic markers is constrained and prioritized. We describe a computational implementation of the theory, as well as a robotic extension of the theory that demonstrates the processes of online event segmentation and event model construction. The theory is the first unified computational account of event segmentation and temporal inference. We conclude by demonstrating now neuroimaging data can constrain and inspire the construction of process-level theories of human reasoning. PMID:26578934

  12. The Role of Episodic and Semantic Memory in Episodic Foresight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Atance, Cristina M.; Louw, Alyssa

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a special form of future thinking, termed "episodic foresight" and its relation with episodic and semantic memory. We outline the methodologies that have largely been developed in the last five years to assess this capacity in young children and non-human animals. Drawing on Tulving's definition of episodic and semantic…

  13. Perspectives on Episodic-Like and Episodic Memory

    PubMed Central

    Pause, Bettina M.; Zlomuzica, Armin; Kinugawa, Kiyoka; Mariani, Jean; Pietrowsky, Reinhard; Dere, Ekrem

    2013-01-01

    Episodic memory refers to the conscious recollection of a personal experience that contains information on what has happened and also where and when it happened. Recollection from episodic memory also implies a kind of first-person subjectivity that has been termed autonoetic consciousness. Episodic memory is extremely sensitive to cerebral aging and neurodegenerative diseases. In Alzheimer’s disease deficits in episodic memory function are among the first cognitive symptoms observed. Furthermore, impaired episodic memory function is also observed in a variety of other neuropsychiatric diseases including dissociative disorders, schizophrenia, and Parkinson disease. Unfortunately, it is quite difficult to induce and measure episodic memories in the laboratory and it is even more difficult to measure it in clinical populations. Presently, the tests used to assess episodic memory function do not comply with even down-sized definitions of episodic-like memory as a memory for what happened, where, and when. They also require sophisticated verbal competences and are difficult to apply to patient populations. In this review, we will summarize the progress made in defining behavioral criteria of episodic-like memory in animals (and humans) as well as the perspectives in developing novel tests of human episodic memory which can also account for phenomenological aspects of episodic memory such as autonoetic awareness. We will also define basic behavioral, procedural, and phenomenological criteria which might be helpful for the development of a valid and reliable clinical test of human episodic memory. PMID:23616754

  14. High-dose thiamine improves the symptoms of Friedreich's ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Antonio; Giorgi, Rafaela; D'Agostino, Sonia; Pala, Maria Immacolata

    2013-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterised by progressive gait and limb ataxia, dysarthria, areflexia, loss of position sense and a progressive motor weakness of central origin. Some observations indicate that all symptoms of FRDA ataxia could be the manifestation of a thiamine deficiency because of enzymatic abnormalities. Two patients with FRDA were under rehabilitative treatment from February 2012 to February 2013. The scale for assessment and rating of ataxia was performed. The patient began an intramuscular therapy with 100 mg of thiamine every 3–5  days. Injection of high-dose thiamine was effective in reversing the motor failure. From this clinical observation, it is reasonable to infer that a thiamine deficiency due to enzymatic abnormalities could cause a selective neuronal damage in the centres that are typically affected by this disease. PMID:23704441

  15. Concealed semantic and episodic autobiographical memory electrified

    PubMed Central

    Ganis, Giorgio; Schendan, Haline E.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophysiology-based concealed information tests (CIT) try to determine whether somebody possesses concealed information about a crime-related item (probe) by comparing event-related potentials (ERPs) between this item and comparison items (irrelevants). Although the broader field is sometimes referred to as “memory detection,” little attention has been paid to the precise type of underlying memory involved. This study begins addressing this issue by examining the key distinction between semantic and episodic memory in the autobiographical domain within a CIT paradigm. This study also addresses the issue of whether multiple repetitions of the items over the course of the session habituate the brain responses. Participants were tested in a 3-stimulus CIT with semantic autobiographical probes (their own date of birth) and episodic autobiographical probes (a secret date learned just before the study). Results dissociated these two memory conditions on several ERP components. Semantic probes elicited a smaller frontal N2 than episodic probes, consistent with the idea that the frontal N2 decreases with greater pre-existing knowledge about the item. Likewise, semantic probes elicited a smaller central N400 than episodic probes. Semantic probes also elicited a larger P3b than episodic probes because of their richer meaning. In contrast, episodic probes elicited a larger late positive complex (LPC) than semantic probes, because of the recent episodic memory associated with them. All these ERPs showed a difference between probes and irrelevants in both memory conditions, except for the N400, which showed a difference only in the semantic condition. Finally, although repetition affected the ERPs, it did not reduce the difference between probes and irrelevants. These findings show that the type of memory associated with a probe has both theoretical and practical importance for CIT research. PMID:23355816

  16. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated influences cytochrome c oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Akshar Y; McDonald, Todd M; Spears, Larry D; Ching, James Kain; Fisher, Jonathan S

    2011-02-25

    Cells lacking ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) have impaired mitochondrial function. Furthermore, mammalian cells lacking ATM have increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions in the region encoding for cytochrome c oxidase (COX). We hypothesized that ATM specifically influences COX activity in skeletal muscle. COX activity was ∼40% lower in tibialis anterior from ATM-deficient mice than for wild-type mice (P < 0.01, n = 9/group). However, there were no ATM-related differences in activity of succinate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, or complex III. Incubation of wild-type extensor digitorum longus muscles for 1h with the ATM inhibitor KU55933 caused a ∼50% reduction (P<0.05, n = 5/group) in COX activity compared to muscles incubated with vehicle alone. Among the control muscles and muscles treated with the ATM inhibitor, COX activity was correlated (r = 0.61, P<0.05) with activity of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, a key determinant of antioxidant defense through production of NADPH. Overall, the findings suggest that ATM has a protective role for COX activity. PMID:21266166

  17. Spinocerebellar ataxias in Venezuela: genetic epidemiology and their most likely ethnic descent.

    PubMed

    Paradisi, Irene; Ikonomu, Vassiliki; Arias, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    Dominantly inherited ataxias (spinocerebellar ataxias, SCAs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of neurologic diseases characterized by progressive cerebellar and spinal tract degeneration with ataxia and other signs, common to all known subtypes. Several types are relatively frequent worldwide, but in several countries, one specific SCA may show a higher prevalence owing to founder phenomena. In Venezuela, genetic epidemiological features of SCAs have been assessed during the last 30 years; mutations in ATXN1 (SCA1), ATXN2 (SCA2), ATXN3 (SCA3), CACNA1A (SCA6), ATXN7 (SCA7), ATXN8 (SCA8), ATXN10 (SCA10), TBP (SCA17) and ATN1 (dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy, DRPLA) loci were searched among 115 independent families. SCA7 was the most frequent subtype (26.6%), followed by SCA3 (25.0%), SCA2 (21.9%), SCA1 (17.2%), SCA10 (4.7%) and DRPLA (3.1%); in 43% of the families, the subtype remained unidentified. SCA7 mutations displayed strong geographic aggregation in two independent founder foci, and SCA1 showed a very remote founder effect for a subset of families. SCA10 families were scattered across the country, but all had an identical in-phase haplotype carried also by Mexican, Brazilian and Sioux patients, supporting a very old common Amerindian origin. Prevalence for dominant SCAs in Venezuela was estimated as 1:25 000 nuclear families, provenances of which are either Caucasoid, African or Amerindian. PMID:26538302

  18. Lymphoblast Oxidative Stress Genes as Potential Biomarkers of Disease Severity and Drug Effect in Friedreich's Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Genki; Cortopassi, Gino

    2016-01-01

    There is no current approved therapy for the ultimately lethal neuro- and cardio-degenerative disease Friedreich's ataxia (FA). Finding minimally-invasive molecular biomarkers of disease progression and drug effect could support smaller, shorter clinical trials. Since we and others have noted a deficient oxidative stress response in FA, we investigated the expression of 84 genes involved in oxidative stress, signaling, and protection in control and FA lymphoblasts ranging from 460 to 1122 GAA repeats. Several antioxidant genes responded in a dose-dependent manner to frataxin expression at the mRNA and protein levels, which is inversely correlated with disease progression and severity. We tested the effect of experimental Friedreich’s ataxia therapies dimethyl fumarate (DMF) and type 1 histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) on biomarker mRNA expression. We observed that exposure of lymphoblasts to DMF and HDACi dose-dependently unsilenced frataxin expression and restored the potential biomarkers NCF2 and PDLIM1 expression to control levels. We suggest that in addition to frataxin expression, blood lymphoblast levels of NCF2 and PDLIM1 could be useful biomarkers for disease progression and drug effect in future clinical trials of Friedreich’s ataxia. PMID:27078885

  19. Lymphoblast Oxidative Stress Genes as Potential Biomarkers of Disease Severity and Drug Effect in Friedreich's Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Genki; Cortopassi, Gino

    2016-01-01

    There is no current approved therapy for the ultimately lethal neuro- and cardio-degenerative disease Friedreich's ataxia (FA). Finding minimally-invasive molecular biomarkers of disease progression and drug effect could support smaller, shorter clinical trials. Since we and others have noted a deficient oxidative stress response in FA, we investigated the expression of 84 genes involved in oxidative stress, signaling, and protection in control and FA lymphoblasts ranging from 460 to 1122 GAA repeats. Several antioxidant genes responded in a dose-dependent manner to frataxin expression at the mRNA and protein levels, which is inversely correlated with disease progression and severity. We tested the effect of experimental Friedreich's ataxia therapies dimethyl fumarate (DMF) and type 1 histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) on biomarker mRNA expression. We observed that exposure of lymphoblasts to DMF and HDACi dose-dependently unsilenced frataxin expression and restored the potential biomarkers NCF2 and PDLIM1 expression to control levels. We suggest that in addition to frataxin expression, blood lymphoblast levels of NCF2 and PDLIM1 could be useful biomarkers for disease progression and drug effect in future clinical trials of Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:27078885

  20. Supratentorial and infratentorial damage in spinocerebellar ataxia 2: a diffusion-weighted MRI study.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Elena; Tedeschi, Enrico; Mollica, Carmine; Vicidomini, Caterina; Varrone, Andrea; Coda, Anna Rita Daniela; Brunetti, Arturo; Salvatore, Marco; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Pappatà, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal-dominant degenerative disorder that is neuropathologically characterized primarily by infratentorial damage, although less severe supratentorial involvement may contribute to the clinical manifestation. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies of SCA2 have enabled in vivo quantification of neurodegeneration in infratentorial regions, whereas supratentorial regions have been explored less thoroughly. We measured microstructural changes in both infratentorial and supratentorial regions in 13 SCA2 patients (9 men, 4 women; mean age, 50 ± 12 years) and 15 controls (10 men, 5 women; mean age, 49 ± 14 years) using DWI-MRI and correlated the DWI changes with disease severity and duration. Disease severity was evaluated using the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale. Cerebral diffusion trace ( D¯) values were generated, and regions of interest (ROIs) and voxel-based analysis with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) were used for data analysis. In SCA2 patients, ROI analysis and SPM confirmed significant increases in D¯ values in the pons, cerebellar white matter (CWM) and middle cerebellar peduncles. Moreover, SPM analysis revealed increased D¯ values in the right thalamus, bilateral temporal cortex/white matter, and motor cortex/pyramidal tract regions. Increased diffusivity in the frontal white matter (FWM) and the CWM was significantly correlated with ataxia severity. DWI-MRI revealed that both infratentorial and supratentorial microstructural changes may characterize SCA2 patients in the course of the disease and might contribute to the severity of the symptoms. PMID:24375449

  1. The Composition of Episodic Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Benton J.; And Others

    This study examined the interrelationships among a number of episodic memory tasks and among various attributes of memory. A sample of 200 college students was tested for ten sessions; 28 different measures of episodic memory were obtained. In addition, five measures of semantic memory were available. Results indicated that episodic and semantic…

  2. Recurrent Episodes of Dissociative Fugue

    PubMed Central

    Angothu, Hareesh; Pabbathi, Lokeswar Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Dissociative fugue is rare entity to encounter with possible differentials of epilepsy and malingering. It is one of the dissociative disorders rarely seen in clinical practice more often because of the short lasting nature of this condition. This might also be because of organized travel of the individuals during the episodes and return to their families after the recovery from episodes. This is a case description of a patient who has experienced total three episodes of dissociative fugue. The patient has presented during the third episode and two prior episodes were diagnosed as fugue episodes retrospectively based on the history. Planned travel in this case by the patient to a distant location was prevented because of early diagnosis and constant vigilance till the recovery. As in this case, it may be more likely that persons with Dissociative fugue may develop similar episodes if they encounter exceptional perceived stress. However, such conclusions may require follow-up studies. PMID:27114633

  3. Evidence for different episodes of aeolian construction and a new type of wind streak in the 2016 ExoMars landing ellipse in Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestro, S.; Vaz, D. A.; Di Achille, G.; Popa, I. C.; Esposito, F.

    2015-04-01

    We present evidence for a complex, multigenerational bed form pattern and a new type of wind streak (the ripple streak) in the landing site ellipse of the 2016 ExoMars Entry descent and landing Demonstrator Module (EDM) in Meridiani Planum (Mars). We identified three main groups of bright-toned bed forms. Population 3, represented by NE-SW trending bed forms located inside craters, was emplaced by winds coming from the NW or the SE. Population 2, emplaced by strong easterlies, formed by intracrater transverse aeolian ridges (TARs) and N-S trending megaripples (plains ripples). Population 1 consists of a relict bed form pattern emplaced by winds coming from the north or south. Alternatively, population 1 can represent a sand ribbon pattern that formed together with the plain ripples. We also report the presence of a new type of wind streak, the ripple streak, which is formed by the population 2 bed forms clustered in the wake zone of impact craters. Based on the results of this work, we now know the EDM module is set to land in a complex aeolian environment. Data from the Dust Characterization, Risk Assessment, and Environment Analyser on the Martian Surface onboard the EDM can help to better decipher the wind regime in Meridiani Planum.

  4. Neuropsychological picture of 33 spinocerebellar ataxia cases.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Laura; D'Agata, Federico; Caroppo, Paola; Franco, Alessandra; Caglio, Marcella Maria; Avidano, Federica; Manzone, Cristina; Mortara, Paolo

    2011-03-01

    We administered a large battery of neuropsychological tests to an heterogeneous cohort of genetically defined spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) patients in order to assess their cognitive profile and to compare cognitive impairment among different SCA genotypes, particularly between SCA with the classical pattern of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (SCA1 and SCA2) and those with a relatively "pure" olivo-cerebellar atrophy (SCA6 and SCA8). Our data revealed a neuropsychological picture characterized by fronto-parietal involvement with mnestic, linguistic, visuospatial, attentional, executive, and mood changes, in agreement with the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome definition. We found a homogeneous neuropsychological profile among SCA subgroups with a prominent role of frontal dysfunction--particularly, attention, memory, and executive functions. We analyzed the possible interactions between neuropsychological pattern and clinical, demographical, and genetic variables. We found the presence of a cognitive impairment at the early stages of the disease, without visuospatial alterations, which appeared later. Age and education represented the most important demographic factors to predict the neuropsychological performance in SCA and in controls, but their effect in patients had definitely more impact. In our sample education could represent a protective factor and a marker of an enriched environment or a better developmental cognitive differentiation. We demonstrated that in our patients there was a distinct subgroup of high functional subjects and that triplet repeats modulated the effect of aging on cognition and progression of motor disability. PMID:21302172

  5. Chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Shigematsu, N.; Furusawa, Y.; Uno, T.; Isobe, K.; Ito, H.

    Understanding of biological effects of heavy ions is important to assess healt h risk in space. One of the most important issues may be to take into account individual susceptibility. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells are known to exhibit abnormal responses to radiations but the mechanism of hyper radiosensitivity of A-T still remains unknown. We report chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts and AT fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique combined with chromosome- painting technique was applied to score chromosome aberrations in G2/M-phase cells. Following gamma irradiation, GM02052 cells were approximately 5 times more sensitive to g-rays than AG1522 cells. GM02052 cells had a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. When the frequency of complex type aberrations was compared, GM02052 cells showed more than 10 times higher frequency than AG1522 cells. The results will be compared with those obtained from high-LET irradiations.

  6. Kv3.3 potassium channels and spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalan; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-08-15

    The voltage-dependent potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed at high levels in cerebellar Purkinje cells, in auditory brainstem nuclei and in many other neurons capable of firing at high rates. In the cerebellum, it helps to shape the very characteristic complex spike of Purkinje cells. Kv3.3 differs from other closely related channels in that human mutations in the gene encoding Kv3.3 (KCNC3) result in a unique neurodegenerative disease termed spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13). This primarily affects the cerebellum, but also results in extracerebellar symptoms. Different mutations produce either early onset SCA13, associated with delayed motor and impaired cognitive skill acquisition, or late onset SCA13, which typically produces cerebellar degeneration in middle age. This review covers the localization and physiological function of Kv3.3 in the central nervous system and how the normal function of the channel is altered by the disease-causing mutations. It also describes experimental approaches that are being used to understand how Kv3.3 mutations are linked to neuronal survival, and to develop strategies for treatment. PMID:26442672

  7. The Emergence of Episodic Future Thinking in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atance, C.M.; O'Neill, D.K.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the construct of episodic future thinking. We have previously defined episodic future thinking as the ability to project oneself into the future to pre-experience an event (Atance & O'Neill, 2001). We distinguish this type of thinking about the future from that which is largely based on a script of how an event routinely…

  8. Episodicity of Orogeny Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condie, K. C.; Aster, R. C.

    2008-12-01

    Although it is well established that orogeny is episodic, the duration, correlation and geographic distribution of orogenic episodes is not well constrained. Using large numbers of concordant U/Pb zircon ages from subduction-related granitoids (> 7000), it is now possible to better constrain these variables. Monte Carlo simulation probabilistic histograms of zircon age spectra remove questionable and spurious age peaks, yet allow resolution of peaks with >10 My duration with the data sets. Orogenic episodes with durations < 20 My, herein called pulses, are generally of regional geographic extent, whereas long-lived events (100-250 My), herein called periods, may be of regional or global extent. Orogenic periods comprise several to many pulses. Most orogenic pulses reflect geographic variations in intensity of subduction or/and plate collisions as for instance recorded around the perimeter of the Pacific basin in the last 100 My. Neither of the widely recognized pulses at 2.7 nor 1.9 Ga is global in extent. Orogenic pulses at 2700 and 2680 Ma occur on four continents each (2700: Superior, Hearne-Rae, Nain, North China; 2680: Yilgarn, Africa, Slave, Wyoming). Likewise, an orogenic pulse at 1880 is found on four continents (Laurentia, Baltica, East Asia, South America), and another pulse at 1860 Ma occurs on three continents (Africa, Siberia, Australia). Some orogenic pulses track lateral continental growth, such as 2730, 2715, and 2700 Ma pulses in the Abitibi greenstone belt, and 850, 800 and 750 Ma pulses in the Arabian-Nubian shield. Major orogenic periods are recognized at 2750-2650, 1900-1650, and 1250-1000 Ma and each of these is associated with supercontinent formation. Orogenic periods at 2600-2500 (China and India) and 2150-2050 Ma (West Africa, Amazonia, Rio de la Plata) may be associated with the formation of small supercontinents. Our results suggest that orogenic periods with intervening gaps may not require sudden and short-lived changes in mantle

  9. [A woman with cerebellar ataxia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism].

    PubMed

    Wada, Sayoko; Takaoka, Toshio; Kasama, Shuhei; Kimura, Takashi; Kajiyama, Koji; Takeda, Masanaka; Yoshikawa, Hiroo

    2010-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman with primary amenorrhea in association with hypergonadotropinism, and lacking a vagina and uterus, suffered from a gradually progressive gait disturbance in her adolescence. The patient has no family history of ataxia and a chromosome study showed a normal karyotype (46,XX). Using the revised Hasegawa Dementia Scale, her cognitive function was measured as that of a normal adult, however, neurological examination revealed symptoms of scanning speech, horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus, and ataxia. Bulging eyes, high-arched palate, scoliosis and ventricular septal defect were also observed. A brain MRI showed atrophy of the cerebellum. A 123I-IMP brain SPECT study showed hypoperfusion in the cerebellum. Previous studies show that among patients with cerebellar ataxia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, some show an autosomal recessive inheritance, while others have no family history. As a cause, a chromosomal abnormality is unlikely because all reported karyotypes were normal. This case is different from other reported cases in that she is not mentally impaired or deaf. The present case indicates that there is a close relationship between cerebellar ataxia and hypogonadism, and that other symptoms such as deafness and mental impairment could be an additional variable in patients with cerebellar ataxia arid hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. PMID:20120350

  10. Harry Lee Parker and paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Klaas, James P.; Burkholder, David B.; Singer, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review descriptions of paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia in multiple sclerosis (MS), with special attention given to Parker and his 1946 case series. Methods: Evaluation of original publications describing paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia, bibliographic information, writings, and unpublished letters from the Mayo Clinic Historical Unit. Results: In 1940, Störring described a patient with MS with paroxysmal symptoms that included dizziness and trouble speaking, but also unilateral extremity weakness. In 1946, Parker published a series of 11 patients with paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia. Six of these patients had MS, and he recognized this phenomenon as a manifestation of the disease. The term “paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia” was first used in 1959 by Andermann and colleagues. Since that time, paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia has become a well-recognized phenomenon in MS. More recent reports have suggested that the responsible lesion is located in the midbrain, near or involving the red nucleus. Conclusions: Parker was the first to accurately describe paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia in patients with MS. PMID:23319475

  11. Episodic Tremor at UPSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, J. B.; Spudich, P.; Baker, L. M.

    2008-12-01

    UPSAR (U.S. Geological Survey Parkfield Seismic Array) was modified to record continuously at 40 sps in January 2005 following reports that tremor near Cholame had been detected. During January and early February, numerous episodes of tremor were recorded including one on January 21 at 07.58 UTC, which was recorded with particularly high signal levels. Here we report on the azimuth and apparent velocity of the waves from tremor impinging on the array and what these array measurements suggest about the location, depth, and frequency of tremor on the Parkfield/Cholame segment of the San Andreas fault. 11 stations were used in the analysis. We used cross correlation of all pairs of stations to determine slowness of incoming rays to analyze tremor data. A number of checks were made on the method such as correctly locating micro- earthquakes on the San Andreas fault. The tremor sources were localized to a section of the San Andreas fault south of where Highway 46 crosses the Cholame valley close to previous estimates of tremor locations. Depths are in the 14-24km range, below the seismogenic zone, but above the Moho. Estimates of error do not preclude locations below the Moho, however. Apparent velocity diminish by 0.5 to 1 km/s as the tremor episode progresses for about 3/4 of the total duration, implying a change in depth of the source, but the effect is small and may not be statistically significant. Polarizations across the array appear to be affected by local topography and show significant scatter. Nonetheless a NE-SW trend is apparent at some stations. Polarizations of direct S-waves from an earthquake near Cholame are more consistent and again trend NE- SW. Early coda from the same earthquake display polarization patterns similar to that for tremor suggesting that tremor signals are scattered rather than direct S waves.

  12. Moral judgment in episodic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Craver, Carl F; Keven, Nazim; Kwan, Donna; Kurczek, Jake; Duff, Melissa C; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the role of episodic thought about the past and future in moral judgment, we administered a well-established moral judgment battery to individuals with hippocampal damage and deficits in episodic thought (insert Greene et al. 2001). Healthy controls select deontological answers in high-conflict moral scenarios more frequently when they vividly imagine themselves in the scenarios than when they imagine scenarios abstractly, at some personal remove. If this bias is mediated by episodic thought, individuals with deficits in episodic thought should not exhibit this effect. We report that individuals with deficits in episodic memory and future thought make moral judgments and exhibit the biasing effect of vivid, personal imaginings on moral judgment. These results strongly suggest that the biasing effect of vivid personal imagining on moral judgment is not due to episodic thought about the past and future. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028169

  13. Principal component analysis of cerebellar shape on MRI separates SCA types 2 and 6 into two archetypal modes of degeneration.

    PubMed

    Jung, Brian C; Choi, Soo I; Du, Annie X; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Geng, Zhuo Z; Ying, Howard S; Perlman, Susan L; Toga, Arthur W; Prince, Jerry L; Ying, Sarah H

    2012-12-01

    Although "cerebellar ataxia" is often used in reference to a disease process, presumably there are different underlying pathogenetic mechanisms for different subtypes. Indeed, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) types 2 and 6 demonstrate complementary phenotypes, thus predicting a different anatomic pattern of degeneration. Here, we show that an unsupervised classification method, based on principal component analysis (PCA) of cerebellar shape characteristics, can be used to separate SCA2 and SCA6 into two classes, which may represent disease-specific archetypes. Patients with SCA2 (n=11) and SCA6 (n=7) were compared against controls (n=15) using PCA to classify cerebellar anatomic shape characteristics. Within the first three principal components, SCA2 and SCA6 differed from controls and from each other. In a secondary analysis, we studied five additional subjects and found that these patients were consistent with the previously defined archetypal clusters of clinical and anatomical characteristics. Secondary analysis of five subjects with related diagnoses showed that disease groups that were clinically and pathophysiologically similar also shared similar anatomic characteristics. Specifically, Archetype #1 consisted of SCA3 (n=1) and SCA2, suggesting that cerebellar syndromes accompanied by atrophy of the pons may be associated with a characteristic pattern of cerebellar neurodegeneration. In comparison, Archetype #2 was comprised of disease groups with pure cerebellar atrophy (episodic ataxia type 2 (n=1), idiopathic late-onset cerebellar ataxias (n=3), and SCA6). This suggests that cerebellar shape analysis could aid in discriminating between different pathologies. Our findings further suggest that magnetic resonance imaging is a promising imaging biomarker that could aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management in patients with cerebellar syndromes. PMID:22258915

  14. Comorbid Medical Conditions in Friedreich Ataxia: Association With Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shinnick, Julianna E; Schadt, Kimberly; Strawser, Cassandra; Wilcox, Nicholas; Perlman, Susan L; Wilmot, George R; Gomez, Christopher M; Mathews, Katherine D; Yoon, Grace; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Hoyle, Chad; Subramony, S H; Yiu, Eppie M; Delatycki, Martin B; Brocht, Alicia F; Farmer, Jennifer M; Lynch, David R

    2016-08-01

    Friedreich ataxia is a progressive degenerative disease with neurologic and cardiac involvement. This study characterizes comorbid medical conditions in a large cohort of patients with Friedreich ataxia. Patient diagnoses were collected in a large natural history study of 641 subjects. Prevalence of diagnoses in the cohort with Friedreich ataxia was compared with prevalence in the population without Friedreich ataxia. Ten patients (1.6%) had inflammatory bowel disease, 3.5 times more common in this cohort of individuals with Friedreich ataxia than in the general population. Four subjects were growth hormone deficient, reflecting a prevalence in Friedreich ataxia that is 28 times greater than the general population. The present study identifies specific diagnoses not traditionally associated with Friedreich ataxia that are found at higher frequency in this disease. These associations could represent coincidence, shared genetic background, or potentially interactive disease mechanisms with Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27071470

  15. The evolution of episodic memory

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Timothy A.; Fortin, Norbert J.

    2013-01-01

    One prominent view holds that episodic memory emerged recently in humans and lacks a “(neo)Darwinian evolution” [Tulving E (2002) Annu Rev Psychol 53:1–25]. Here, we review evidence supporting the alternative perspective that episodic memory has a long evolutionary history. We show that fundamental features of episodic memory capacity are present in mammals and birds and that the major brain regions responsible for episodic memory in humans have anatomical and functional homologs in other species. We propose that episodic memory capacity depends on a fundamental neural circuit that is similar across mammalian and avian species, suggesting that protoepisodic memory systems exist across amniotes and, possibly, all vertebrates. The implication is that episodic memory in diverse species may primarily be due to a shared underlying neural ancestry, rather than the result of evolutionary convergence. We also discuss potential advantages that episodic memory may offer, as well as species-specific divergences that have developed on top of the fundamental episodic memory architecture. We conclude by identifying possible time points for the emergence of episodic memory in evolution, to help guide further research in this area. PMID:23754432

  16. Optic ataxia: from Balint's syndrome to the parietal reach region.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Richard A; Andersen, Kristen N; Hwang, Eun Jung; Hauschild, Markus

    2014-03-01

    Optic ataxia is a high-order deficit in reaching to visual goals that occurs with posterior parietal cortex (PPC) lesions. It is a component of Balint's syndrome that also includes attentional and gaze disorders. Aspects of optic ataxia are misreaching in the contralesional visual field, difficulty preshaping the hand for grasping, and an inability to correct reaches online. Recent research in nonhuman primates (NHPs) suggests that many aspects of Balint's syndrome and optic ataxia are a result of damage to specific functional modules for reaching, saccades, grasp, attention, and state estimation. The deficits from large lesions in humans are probably composite effects from damage to combinations of these functional modules. Interactions between these modules, either within posterior parietal cortex or downstream within frontal cortex, may account for more complex behaviors such as hand-eye coordination and reach-to-grasp. PMID:24607223

  17. The physiological basis of therapies for cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2016-09-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a group of heterogeneous disorders impacting on activities of daily living and quality of life. Various therapies have been proposed to improve symptoms in cerebellar ataxias. This review examines the physiological background of the various treatments currently administered worldwide. We analyze the mechanisms of action of drugs with a focus on aminopyridines and other antiataxic medications, of noninvasive cerebellar stimulation, and of motor rehabilitation. Considering the cerebellum as a controller, we propose the novel concept of 'restorable stage'. Because of its unique anatomical architecture and its diffuse connectivity in particular with the cerebral cortex, keeping in mind the anatomophysiology of the cerebellar circuitry is a necessary step to understand the rationale of therapies of cerebellar ataxias and develop novel therapeutic tools. PMID:27582895

  18. The physiological basis of therapies for cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a group of heterogeneous disorders impacting on activities of daily living and quality of life. Various therapies have been proposed to improve symptoms in cerebellar ataxias. This review examines the physiological background of the various treatments currently administered worldwide. We analyze the mechanisms of action of drugs with a focus on aminopyridines and other antiataxic medications, of noninvasive cerebellar stimulation, and of motor rehabilitation. Considering the cerebellum as a controller, we propose the novel concept of ‘restorable stage’. Because of its unique anatomical architecture and its diffuse connectivity in particular with the cerebral cortex, keeping in mind the anatomophysiology of the cerebellar circuitry is a necessary step to understand the rationale of therapies of cerebellar ataxias and develop novel therapeutic tools. PMID:27582895

  19. [Familial cerebellar ataxia: clinical, radiological and electrophysiological findings].

    PubMed

    Gajkowski, K; Rysz, A; Walecki, J; Bojakowski, J

    1988-01-01

    A family with cerebellar ataxia of late onset occurring in four generations was observed. Neurological abnormalities included signs of cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal tract damage and damage to the peripheral motor neuron. Computerized tomography demonstrated in five out of six studied patients an image suggesting olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy. In the cerebellar structures, brainstem and cerebral hemispheres evidence of atrophy was detected. No correlation was demonstrated between the intensity of the clinical signs and the progression of changes in CT image. Electrophysiological investigations demonstrated changes compatible with damage to the motor and sensory fibres in the peripheral nerves and signs suggesting damage to the spinal motor neurons and pyramidal tract. These observations confirm the multilevel development of the process. The use of similar diagnostic methods will permit a more accurate classification of cerebellar ataxia and obtaining of better information for prognostication of individual cases. PMID:3164096

  20. Cerebellar Expression of the Neurotrophin Receptor p75 in Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi Balaei, Maryam; Jiao, Xiaodan; Ashtari, Niloufar; Afsharinezhad, Pegah; Ghavami, Saeid; Marzban, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous mutation in the lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2) mouse (nax—naked-ataxia mutant mouse) correlates with severe cerebellar defects including ataxia, reduced size and abnormal lobulation as well as Purkinje cell (Pc) degeneration. Loss of Pcs in the nax cerebellum is compartmentalized and harmonized to the classic pattern of gene expression of the cerebellum in the wild type mouse. Usually, degeneration starts in the anterior and posterior zones and continues to the central and nodular zones of cerebellum. Studies have suggested that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (NTR) plays a role in Pc degeneration; thus, in this study, we investigated the p75NTR pattern and protein expression in the cerebellum of the nax mutant mouse. Despite massive Pc degeneration that was observed in the nax mouse cerebellum, p75NTR pattern expression was similar to the HSP25 pattern in nax mice and comparable with wild type sibling cerebellum. In addition, immunoblot analysis of p75NTR protein expression did not show any significant difference between nax and wild type sibling (p > 0.5). In comparison with wild type counterparts, p75NTR pattern expression is aligned with the fundamental cytoarchitecture organization of the cerebellum and is unchanged in the nax mouse cerebellum despite the severe neurodevelopmental disorder accompanied with Pc degeneration. PMID:26784182

  1. The Episodic Nature of Episodic-Like Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Alexander; Webster, Lisa A. D.; Eacott, Madeline J.

    2012-01-01

    Studying episodic memory in nonhuman animals has proved difficult because definitions in humans require conscious recollection. Here, we assessed humans' experience of episodic-like recognition memory tasks that have been used with animals. It was found that tasks using contextual information to discriminate events could only be accurately…

  2. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Associated with Kinetic Tremor and Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a clinically variable syndrome caused by low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure due to a non-traumatic CSF leak. Phenomenology Shown This case describes a 68-year-old gentleman who presents with chronic and slightly progressive kinetic tremor of bilateral hands associated with gait ataxia and gait start hesitation. Educational Value This case underscores the importance of having a high index of suspicion for the diagnosis of SIH when encountering a patient presenting with late-onset progressive kinetic tremor and gait ataxia syndrome. PMID:27351232

  3. Bilateral maculopathy in a patient with ataxia telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Lauren V; Bonsall, Dean; Moffett, Kathryn; Leys, Monique

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of toxoplasmosis with bilateral maculopathy in a 7-year-old boy diagnosed with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) at age 6. AT manifests as ataxia, apraxia, telangiectasia, and dysarthria. Common ophthalmologic findings in AT include fine conjunctival telangiectasia. Patients also suffer from recurrent sinopulmonary infections; however, serious opportunistic infection is rarely diagnosed. At 8 years of age he developed disseminated Toxoplasma gondii (toxoplasmosis) infection and meningoencephalitis. This ophthalmologic finding and the subsequent toxoplasmosis meningoencephalitis have not been previously reported in AT. PMID:26917084

  4. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Mailankody, Pooja; Isnwara, Pawanraj Palu; Prasad, Chandrajit; Mustare, Veerendrakumar

    2015-01-01

    Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X) was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1) gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation). Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes. PMID:25745327

  5. Neuronal Atrophy Early in Degenerative Ataxia Is a Compensatory Mechanism to Regulate Membrane Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Orco, James M.; Wasserman, Aaron H.; Chopra, Ravi; Ingram, Melissa A. C.; Hu, Yuan-Shih; Singh, Vikrant; Wulff, Heike; Opal, Puneet; Orr, Harry T.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal atrophy in neurodegenerative diseases is commonly viewed as an early event in a continuum that ultimately results in neuronal loss. In a mouse model of the polyglutamine disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), we tested the hypothesis that cerebellar Purkinje neuron atrophy serves an adaptive role rather than being simply a nonspecific response to injury. In acute cerebellar slices from SCA1 mice, we find that Purkinje neuron pacemaker firing is initially normal but, with the onset of motor dysfunction, becomes disrupted, accompanied by abnormal depolarization. Remarkably, subsequent Purkinje cell atrophy is associated with a restoration of pacemaker firing. The early inability of Purkinje neurons to support repetitive spiking is due to unopposed calcium currents resulting from a reduction in large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and subthreshold-activated potassium channels. The subsequent restoration of SCA1 Purkinje neuron firing correlates with the recovery of the density of these potassium channels that accompanies cell atrophy. Supporting a critical role for BK channels, viral-mediated increases in BK channel expression in SCA1 Purkinje neurons improves motor dysfunction and partially restores Purkinje neuron morphology. Cerebellar perfusion of flufenamic acid, an agent that restores the depolarized membrane potential of SCA1 Purkinje neurons by activating potassium channels, prevents Purkinje neuron dendritic atrophy. These results suggest that Purkinje neuron dendritic remodeling in ataxia is an adaptive response to increases in intrinsic membrane excitability. Similar adaptive remodeling could apply to other vulnerable neuronal populations in neurodegenerative disease. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In neurodegenerative disease, neuronal atrophy has long been assumed to be an early nonspecific event preceding neuronal loss. However, in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), we identify a previously unappreciated

  6. Cerebellar ataxia with recovery related to central pontine myelinolysis.

    PubMed

    Steller, U; Koschorek, F; Strenge, H

    1988-07-01

    Development of severe ataxia and mild pyramidal signs without mental deterioration, tetraparesis or pseudobulbar palsy during recovery from withdrawal delirium and initial hyponatraemia are unusual clinical features consistent with central pontine myelinolysis. This diagnosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an alcoholic man. Clinical and electrodiagnostic improvement occurred, whereas the MRI findings remained unchanged in a follow-up study. PMID:3171622

  7. Voicing Status of Word Final Plosives in Friedreich's Ataxia Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, B. E.; Hewlett, N.

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, the authors identified final plosive voicing contrast as the highest single error source in dysarthria associated with Friedreich's Ataxia in a group of Irish English-speaking participants. This study aimed to determine the acoustic features underlying misperceptions of voicing status and implications for clinical management.…

  8. Speech Characteristics Associated with Three Genotypes of Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidtis, John J.; Ahn, Ji Sook; Gomez, Christopher; Sidtis, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Advances in neurobiology are providing new opportunities to investigate the neurological systems underlying motor speech control. This study explores the perceptual characteristics of the speech of three genotypes of spino-cerebellar ataxia (SCA) as manifest in four different speech tasks. Methods: Speech samples from 26 speakers with SCA…

  9. Progressive Ataxia and Palatal Tremor: Think about POLG Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mongin, Marie; Delorme, Cécile; Lenglet, Timothée; Jardel, Claude; Vignal, Catherine; Roze, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Progressive ataxia and palatal tremor (PAPT) can be observed in both acquired brainstem or cerebellar lesions and genetic disorders. Phenomenology shown PAPT due to mutation in POLG, the gene encoding the mitochondrial DNA polymerase. Educational value POLG mutation should be considered in patients with PAPT, particularly when additional clues such as a sensory neuronopathy or an ophthalmoplegia are present.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... this condition have developed an eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa that causes vision loss. Most people who have ... Registry: Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Retinitis pigmentosa MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Vitamin E These resources from MedlinePlus ...

  11. Speech Perception Ability in Individuals with Friedreich Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rance, Gary; Fava, Rosanne; Baldock, Heath; Chong, April; Barker, Elizabeth; Corben, Louise; Delatycki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate auditory pathway function and speech perception ability in individuals with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA). Ten subjects confirmed by genetic testing as being homozygous for a GAA expansion in intron 1 of the FXN gene were included. While each of the subjects demonstrated normal, or near normal sound detection, 3…

  12. Visual System Involvement in Patients with Friedreich's Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortuna, Filippo; Barboni, Piero; Liguori, Rocco; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Savini, Giacomo; Gellera, Cinzia; Mariotti, Caterina; Rizzo, Giovanni; Tonon, Caterina; Manners, David; Lodi, Raffaele; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    Optic neuropathy is common in mitochondrial disorders, but poorly characterized in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), a recessive condition caused by lack of the mitochondrial protein frataxin. We investigated 26 molecularly confirmed FRDA patients by studying both anterior and posterior sections of the visual pathway using a new, integrated approach.…

  13. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology for modelling and therapy of cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Lauren M.; Wong, Maggie M. K.; Becker, Esther B. E.

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has emerged as an important tool in understanding, and potentially reversing, disease pathology. This is particularly true in the case of neurodegenerative diseases, in which the affected cell types are not readily accessible for study. Since the first descriptions of iPSC-based disease modelling, considerable advances have been made in understanding the aetiology and progression of a diverse array of neurodegenerative conditions, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. To date, however, relatively few studies have succeeded in using iPSCs to model the neurodegeneration observed in cerebellar ataxia. Given the distinct neurodevelopmental phenotypes associated with certain types of ataxia, iPSC-based models are likely to provide significant insights, not only into disease progression, but also to the development of early-intervention therapies. In this review, we describe the existing iPSC-based disease models of this heterogeneous group of conditions and explore the challenges associated with generating cerebellar neurons from iPSCs, which have thus far hindered the expansion of this research. PMID:26136256

  14. Motor training in degenerative spinocerebellar disease: ataxia-specific improvements by intensive physiotherapy and exergames.

    PubMed

    Synofzik, Matthis; Ilg, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames ("exergames"). The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability). Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease. PMID:24877117

  15. Motor Training in Degenerative Spinocerebellar Disease: Ataxia-Specific Improvements by Intensive Physiotherapy and Exergames

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”). The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability). Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease. PMID:24877117

  16. 'Continuous muscle fibre activity' in six dogs with episodic myokymia, stiffness and collapse.

    PubMed

    Van Ham, L; Bhatti, S; Polis, I; Fatzer, R; Braund, K; Thoonen, H

    2004-12-11

    Continuous muscle fibre activity was observed in a crossbred dog, a Yorkshire terrier, a border collie and three Jack Russell terriers. The clinical signs consisted of episodes of generalised myokymia which developed into muscle stiffness and delayed muscle relaxation and generally led to the dogs collapsing into lateral recumbency. These episodes were preceded by intense facial rubbing in three of the dogs, and were associated with severe hyperthermia in five of them. All three Jack Russell terriers showed continuous ataxia. The dogs had above normal activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and creatine kinase, but their cerebrospinal fluid was normal. Myokymic discharges were observed by electromyography in two of the dogs. Two of them were treated with membrane-stabilising agents, with variable results. PMID:15638001

  17. Behind the Webb Episode 27

    NASA Video Gallery

    This episode of "Behind the Webb" explores the multi-tasking capabilities of one of the cameras on the Webb Space Telescope, the Near-Infrared Spectrograph. Newly designed technology known as "micr...

  18. SYNE1 ataxia is a common recessive ataxia with major non-cerebellar features: a large multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Synofzik, Matthis; Smets, Katrien; Mallaret, Martial; Di Bella, Daniela; Gallenmüller, Constanze; Baets, Jonathan; Schulze, Martin; Magri, Stefania; Sarto, Elisa; Mustafa, Mona; Deconinck, Tine; Haack, Tobias; Züchner, Stephan; Gonzalez, Michael; Timmann, Dagmar; Stendel, Claudia; Klopstock, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Tranchant, Christine; Sturm, Marc; Hamza, Wahiba; Nanetti, Lorenzo; Mariotti, Caterina; Koenig, Michel; Schöls, Ludger; Schüle, Rebecca; de Jonghe, Peter; Anheim, Mathieu; Taroni, Franco; Bauer, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the synaptic nuclear envelope protein 1 (SYNE1) gene have been reported to cause a relatively pure, slowly progressive cerebellar recessive ataxia mostly identified in Quebec, Canada. Combining next-generation sequencing techniques and deep-phenotyping (clinics, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, muscle histology), we here established the frequency, phenotypic spectrum and genetic spectrum of SYNE1 in a screening of 434 non-Canadian index patients from seven centres across Europe. Patients were screened by whole-exome sequencing or targeted panel sequencing, yielding 23 unrelated families with recessive truncating SYNE1 mutations (23/434 = 5.3%). In these families, 35 different mutations were identified, 34 of them not previously linked to human disease. While only 5/26 patients (19%) showed the classical SYNE1 phenotype of mildly progressive pure cerebellar ataxia, 21/26 (81%) exhibited additional complicating features, including motor neuron features in 15/26 (58%). In three patients, respiratory dysfunction was part of an early-onset multisystemic neuromuscular phenotype with mental retardation, leading to premature death at age 36 years in one of them. Positron emission tomography imaging confirmed hypometabolism in extra-cerebellar regions such as the brainstem. Muscle biopsy reliably showed severely reduced or absent SYNE1 staining, indicating its potential use as a non-genetic indicator for underlying SYNE1 mutations. Our findings, which present the largest systematic series of SYNE1 patients and mutations outside Canada, revise the view that SYNE1 ataxia causes mainly a relatively pure cerebellar recessive ataxia and that it is largely limited to Quebec. Instead, complex phenotypes with a wide range of extra-cerebellar neurological and non-neurological dysfunctions are frequent, including in particular motor neuron and brainstem dysfunction. The disease course in this multisystemic neurodegenerative disease can be fatal

  19. The neural basis of involuntary episodic memories.

    PubMed

    Hall, Shana A; Rubin, David C; Miles, Amanda; Davis, Simon W; Wing, Erik A; Cabeza, Roberto; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2014-10-01

    Voluntary episodic memories require an intentional memory search, whereas involuntary episodic memories come to mind spontaneously without conscious effort. Cognitive neuroscience has largely focused on voluntary memory, leaving the neural mechanisms of involuntary memory largely unknown. We hypothesized that, because the main difference between voluntary and involuntary memory is the controlled retrieval processes required by the former, there would be greater frontal activity for voluntary than involuntary memories. Conversely, we predicted that other components of the episodic retrieval network would be similarly engaged in the two types of memory. During encoding, all participants heard sounds, half paired with pictures of complex scenes and half presented alone. During retrieval, paired and unpaired sounds were presented, panned to the left or to the right. Participants in the involuntary group were instructed to indicate the spatial location of the sound, whereas participants in the voluntary group were asked to additionally recall the pictures that had been paired with the sounds. All participants reported the incidence of their memories in a postscan session. Consistent with our predictions, voluntary memories elicited greater activity in dorsal frontal regions than involuntary memories, whereas other components of the retrieval network, including medial-temporal, ventral occipitotemporal, and ventral parietal regions were similarly engaged by both types of memories. These results clarify the distinct role of dorsal frontal and ventral occipitotemporal regions in predicting strategic retrieval and recalled information, respectively, and suggest that, although there are neural differences in retrieval, involuntary memories share neural components with established voluntary memory systems. PMID:24702453

  20. Saharan dust episodes and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dadvand, Payam; Basagaña, Xavier; Figueras, Francesc; Amoly, Elmira; Tobias, Aurelio; de Nazelle, Audrey; Querol, Xavier; Sunyer, Jordi; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2011-11-01

    Desert dust is one of the natural contributors to atmospheric particulate matter worldwide. Although particulate pollution has been shown to adversely affect pregnancy, the available evidence on the impact of dust episodes on pregnancy is very scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Saharan dust episodes on pregnancy complications (preeclampsia and bacteriuria) and outcomes (birth weight and gestational age at delivery). This study was based on a cohort of births (N = 3565) that occurred in a major university hospital in Barcelona during 2003-2005. To determine Saharan dust episodes, we developed a two-stage approach based on meteorological evidence of the presence of Saharan dust cloud over the region and unusually high levels of particulate levels on the ground while taking account of traffic sources. The associations between the number of Saharan dust episodes during whole pregnancy as well as each pregnancy trimester and pregnancy complications and outcomes were analysed. There were 152 days (out of 838 days) with Saharan dust cloud over the region from which 45 days were determined as episodic days. We did not observe any statistically significant harmful effect of Saharan dust episodes on our included pregnancy complications and outcomes. However, we observed a small but statistically significant increase in gestational age at delivery in association with the number of episodic days during the third trimester and whole pregnancy (0.8 and 0.5 days respectively). Our findings were not suggestive for any adverse effect of Saharan dust episodes on our included pregnancy complications and outcomes. PMID:21964628

  1. Ecological momentary assessment of eating episodes in obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Andrea B.; Crosby, Ross D.; Cao, Li; Engel, Scott G.; Durkin, Nora; Beach, Heather M.; Berg, Kelly C.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The context of eating episodes in obesity is poorly understood. This study examined emotional, physiological, and environmental correlates of pathological and non-pathological eating episodes in a heterogeneous sample of obese adults. Methods Community-based participants [n=50; 84% female (n=42); M body mass index=40.3±8.5; M age=43.0±11.9] with (n=5; 10%) and without binge eating disorder (BED; n=45; 90%) recorded all eating episodes and their associated emotional, physiological, and environmental factors via ecological momentary assessment for two weeks. Generalized estimating equations examined relations between these variables and eating episodes characterized by both self-identified loss of control while eating and overeating (binge eating; BE), loss of control only (LOC), overeating only (OE), and neither loss of control nor overeating (non-pathological eating; NE). Results Episodes involving loss of control (BE and LOC) were associated with the highest levels of pre- and post-episode negative affect (Wald chi-square range=15.67–24.39; ps≤.001), while those involving overeating (BE and OE) were associated with the lowest levels of pre- and post-episode hunger (Wald chi-square range=18.14–39.75; ps<.001). LOC episodes were followed by the highest level of post-episode cravings (Wald chi-square=25.87; p<.001) and were most likely to occur when participants were alone (Wald chi-square=13.20; p=.004). Conclusion Binge and loss of control eating were more consistently associated with emotional and physiological cues than overeating and non-pathological eating, while most environmental variables did not differ among eating episode types. Results support distinctions among the different objective and subjective constructs characterizing aberrant eating, and should be used to inform interventions for obesity and related eating pathology. PMID:25373891

  2. Generation and validation of a zebrafish model of EAST (epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness and tubulopathy) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Fahad; Mozere, Monika; Zdebik, Anselm A.; Stanescu, Horia C.; Tobin, Jonathan; Beales, Philip L.; Kleta, Robert; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Russell, Claire

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Recessive mutations in KCNJ10, which encodes an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, were recently identified as the cause of EAST syndrome, a severe and disabling multi-organ disorder consisting of epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness and tubulopathy that becomes clinically apparent with seizures in infancy. A Kcnj10 knockout mouse shows postnatal mortality and is therefore not suitable for drug discovery. Because zebrafish are ideal for in vivo screening for potential therapeutics, we tested whether kcnj10 knockdown in zebrafish would fill this need. We cloned zebrafish kcnj10 and demonstrated that its function is equivalent to that of human KCNJ10. We next injected splice- and translation-blocking kcnj10 antisense morpholino oligonucleotides and reproduced the cardinal symptoms of EAST syndrome – ataxia, epilepsy and renal tubular defects. Several of these phenotypes could be assayed in an automated manner. We could rescue the morphant phenotype with complementary RNA (cRNA) encoding human wild-type KCNJ10, but not with cRNA encoding a KCNJ10 mutation identified in individuals with EAST syndrome. Our results suggest that zebrafish will be a valuable tool to screen for compounds that are potentially therapeutic for EAST syndrome or its individual symptoms. Knockdown of kcnj10 represents the first zebrafish model of a salt-losing tubulopathy, which has relevance for blood pressure control. PMID:23471908

  3. p53 centrosomal localization diagnoses ataxia-telangiectasia homozygotes and heterozygotes

    PubMed Central

    Prodosmo, Andrea; De Amicis, Andrea; Nisticò, Cecilia; Gabriele, Mario; Di Rocco, Giuliana; Monteonofrio, Laura; Piane, Maria; Cundari, Enrico; Chessa, Luciana; Soddu, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by radiosensitivity, genomic instability, and predisposition to cancer. A-T is caused by biallelic mutations in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, but heterozygous carriers, though apparently healthy, are believed to be at increased risk for cancer and more sensitive to ionizing radiation than the general population. Despite progress in functional and sequencing-based assays, no straightforward, rapid, and inexpensive test is available for the identification of A-T homozygotes and heterozygotes, which is essential for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and carrier prediction. The oncosuppressor p53 prevents genomic instability and centrosomal amplification. During mitosis, p53 localizes at the centrosome in an ATM-dependent manner. We capitalized on the latter finding and established a simple, fast, minimally invasive, reliable, and inexpensive test to determine mutant ATM zygosity. The percentage of mitotic lymphoblasts or PBMCs bearing p53 centrosomal localization clearly discriminated among healthy donors (>75%), A-T heterozygotes (40%–56%), and A-T homozygotes (<30%). The test is specific for A-T, independent of the type of ATM mutations, and recognized tumor-associated ATM polymorphisms. In a preliminary study, our test confirmed that ATM is a breast cancer susceptibility gene. These data open the possibility of cost-effective, early diagnosis of A-T homozygotes and large-scale screenings for heterozygotes. PMID:23454770

  4. Hereditary cerebellar ataxia progressively impairs force adaptation during goal-directed arm movements.

    PubMed

    Maschke, Matthias; Gomez, Christopher M; Ebner, Timothy J; Konczak, Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    We investigated how humans with hereditary cerebellar degeneration [spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) type 6 and 8, n = 9] and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 9) adapted goal-directed arm movements to an unknown external force field. We tested whether learning could be generalized to untrained regions in the workspace, an aspect central to the idea of an internal model, and if any learning could be retained. After removal of the force field, SCA patients showed little or no learning-related aftereffects indicating that repeated force-field exposure never led to successful force compensation. In contrast, healthy control subjects quickly adapted their movements to the new force field. The difference in force adaptation was significant for movements to targets that required both the shoulder and elbow joint (P < 0.001). Moreover, the generalization of learned movements to targets outside the learned workspace was prevented by the cerebellar degeneration (P < 0.01). Retention of force adaptation was significantly lower in SCA patients (P = 0.003). The severity of ataxia in SCA patients correlated negatively with the extent of learning (r = -0.84, P = 0.004). Our findings imply that progressive loss of cerebellar function gradually impairs force adaptation. The failure to generalize learning suggests that cerebellar degeneration prevents the formation of an internal representation of the limb dynamics. PMID:13679403

  5. A high frequency of distinct ATM gene mutations in ataxia-telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Teraoka, S.; Concannon, P.

    1996-10-01

    The clinical features of the autosomal recessive disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) include a progressive cerebellar ataxia, hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, and an increased susceptibility to malignancies. Epidemiological studies have suggested that AT heterozygotes may also be at increased risk for malignancy, possibly as a consequence of radiation exposure. A gene mutated in AT patients (ATM) has recently been isolated, making mutation screening in both patients and the general population possible. Because of the relatively large size of the ATM gene, the design of screening programs will depend on the types and distribution of mutations in the general population. In this report, we describe 30 mutations identified in a panel of unrelated AT patients and controls. Twenty-five of the 30 were distinct, and most patients were compound heterozygotes. The most frequently detected mutation was found in three different families and had previously been reported in five others. This corresponds to a frequency of 8% of all reported ATM mutations. Twenty-two of the alterations observed would be predicted to lead to protein truncation at sites scattered throughout the molecule. Two fibroblast cell lines, which displayed normal responses to ionizing radiation, also proved to be heterozygous for truncation mutations of ATM. These observations suggest that the carrier frequency of ATM mutations may be sufficiently high to make population screening practical. However, such screening may need to be done prospectively, that is, by searching for new mutations rather than by screening for just those already identified in AT families. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Lgr4 protein deficiency induces ataxia-like phenotype in mice and impairs long term depression at cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xin; Duan, Yanhong; Zeng, Qingwen; Pan, Hongjie; Qian, Yu; Li, Dali; Cao, Xiaohua; Liu, Mingyao

    2014-09-19

    Cerebellar dysfunction causes ataxia characterized by loss of balance and coordination. Until now, the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of several types of inherited cerebellar ataxia have not been completely clarified. Here, we report that leucine-rich G protein-coupled receptor 4 (Lgr4/Gpr48) is highly expressed in Purkinje cells (PCs) in the cerebellum. Deficiency of Lgr4 leads to an ataxia-like phenotype in mice. Histologically, no obvious morphological changes were observed in the cerebellum of Lgr4 mutant mice. However, the number of PCs was slightly but significantly reduced in Lgr4(-/-) mice. In addition, in vitro electrophysiological analysis showed an impaired long term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-PC (PF-PC) synapses in Lgr4(-/-) mice. Consistently, immunostaining experiments showed that the level of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (Creb) was significantly decreased in Lgr4(-/-) PCs. Furthermore, treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase agonist, rescued phospho-Creb in PCs and reversed the impairment in PF-PC LTD in Lgr4(-/-) cerebellar slices, indicating that Lgr4 is an upstream regulator of Creb signaling, which is underlying PF-PC LTD. Together, our findings demonstrate for first time an important role for Lgr4 in motor coordination and cerebellar synaptic plasticity and provide a potential therapeutic target for certain types of inherited cerebellar ataxia. PMID:25063812

  7. Genes for spinocerebellar ataxia with blindness and deafness (SCABD/SCAR3, MIM# 271250 and SCABD2).

    PubMed

    Guissart, Claire; Drouot, Nathalie; Oncel, Ibrahim; Leheup, Bruno; Gershoni-Barush, Ruth; Muller, Jean; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Larrieu, Lise; Anheim, Mathieu; Arslan, Elif Acar; Claustres, Mireille; Tranchant, Christine; Topaloglu, Haluk; Koenig, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Ataxia is a symptom that is often associated with syndromic inherited diseases. We previously reported the linkage of a novel syndrome, ataxia with blindness and deafness (SCAR3/SCABD, OMIM# 271250), to chromosome 6p21-p23 by linkage mapping of an Arab Israeli consanguineous family. We have now identified by whole-exome sequencing a homozygous missense mutation in the Arab Israeli family in the SLC52A2 gene located in 8qter, therefore excluding linkage of this family to 6p. We confirmed the involvement of SLC52A2 by the identification of a second mutation in an independent family with an identical syndromic presentation, which we suggest to name SCABD2. SCABD2 is therefore allelic to Brown-Vialleto-Van Laere syndrome type 2 defined by prominent motoneuronopathy and deafness, and also caused by SLC52A2 mutations. In the course of this project, we identified a clinically similar family with a homozygous missense mutation in PEX6, which is located in 6p21. Therefore, despite false linkage in the initial family, SCABD1/SCAR3 is located in 6p21 and is caused by PEX6 mutations. Both SLC52A2 and PEX6 should be included in screening panels for the diagnosis of syndromic inherited ataxias, particularly as patients with mutations in SLC52A2 can be ameliorated by riboflavin supplementation. PMID:26669662

  8. Using human pluripotent stem cells to study Friedreich ataxia cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Crombie, Duncan E; Pera, Martin F; Delatycki, Martin B; Pébay, Alice

    2016-06-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common of the inherited ataxias. It is an autosomal recessive disease characterised by degeneration of peripheral sensory neurons, regions of the central nervous system and cardiomyopathy. FRDA is usually due to homozygosity for trinucleotide GAA repeat expansions found within first intron of the FRATAXIN (FXN) gene, which results in reduced levels of the mitochondrial protein FXN. Reduced FXN protein results in mitochondrial dysfunction and iron accumulation leading to increased oxidative stress and cell death in the nervous system and heart. Yet the precise functions of FXN and the underlying mechanisms leading to disease pathology remain elusive. This is particularly true of the cardiac aspect of FRDA, which remains largely uncharacterized at the cellular level. Here, we summarise current knowledge on experimental models in which to study FRDA cardiomyopathy, with a particular focus on the use of human pluripotent stem cells as a disease model. PMID:27019046

  9. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics of the Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated (ATM) and Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) Dependent DNA Damage Response in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Roitinger, Elisabeth; Hofer, Manuel; Köcher, Thomas; Pichler, Peter; Novatchkova, Maria; Yang, Jianhua; Schlögelhofer, Peter; Mechtler, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is an important biological regulatory mechanism. In the context of genome integrity, signaling cascades driven by phosphorylation are crucial for the coordination and regulation of DNA repair. The two serine/threonine protein kinases ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) are key factors in this process, each specific for different kinds of DNA lesions. They are conserved across eukaryotes, mediating the activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, chromatin modifications, and regulation of DNA repair proteins. We designed a novel mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics approach to study DNA damage repair in Arabidopsis thaliana. The protocol combines filter aided sample preparation, immobilized metal affinity chromatography, metal oxide affinity chromatography, and strong cation exchange chromatography for phosphopeptide generation, enrichment, and separation. Isobaric labeling employing iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) was used for profiling the phosphoproteome of atm atr double mutants and wild type plants under either regular growth conditions or challenged by irradiation. A total of 10,831 proteins were identified and 15,445 unique phosphopeptides were quantified, containing 134 up- and 38 down-regulated ATM/ATR dependent phosphopeptides. We identified known and novel ATM/ATR targets such as LIG4 and MRE11 (needed for resistance against ionizing radiation), PIE1 and SDG26 (implicated in chromatin remodeling), PCNA1, WAPL, and PDS5 (implicated in DNA replication), and ASK1 and HTA10 (involved in meiosis). PMID:25561503

  10. Factitious psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes.

    PubMed

    Romano, Alissa; Alqahtani, Saeed; Griffith, James; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z

    2014-01-01

    Mistaking psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes (PNEPEs) for epileptic seizures (ES) is potentially dangerous, and certain features should alert physicians to a possible PNEPE diagnosis. Psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes due to factitious seizures carry particularly high risks of morbidity or mortality from nonindicated emergency treatment and, often, high costs in wasted medical treatment expenditures. We report a case of a 28-year-old man with PNEPEs that were misdiagnosed as ES. The patient had been on four antiseizure medications (ASMs) with therapeutic serum levels and had had multiple intubations in the past for uncontrolled episodes. He had no episodes for two days of continuous video-EEG monitoring. He then disconnected his EEG cables and had an episode of generalized stiffening and cyanosis, followed by jerking and profuse bleeding from the mouth. The manifestations were unusually similar to those of ES, except that he was clearly startled by spraying water on his face, while he was stiff in all extremities and unresponsive. There were indications that he had sucked blood from his central venous catheter to expel through his mouth during his PNEPEs while consciously holding his breath. Normal video-EEG monitoring; the patient's volitional and deceptive acts to fabricate the appearance of illness, despite pain and personal endangerment; and the absence of reward other than remaining in a sick role were all consistent with a diagnosis of factitious disorder. PMID:25667902

  11. Factitious psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Alissa; Alqahtani, Saeed; Griffith, James; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z.

    2014-01-01

    Mistaking psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes (PNEPEs) for epileptic seizures (ES) is potentially dangerous, and certain features should alert physicians to a possible PNEPE diagnosis. Psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes due to factitious seizures carry particularly high risks of morbidity or mortality from nonindicated emergency treatment and, often, high costs in wasted medical treatment expenditures. We report a case of a 28-year-old man with PNEPEs that were misdiagnosed as ES. The patient had been on four antiseizure medications (ASMs) with therapeutic serum levels and had had multiple intubations in the past for uncontrolled episodes. He had no episodes for two days of continuous video-EEG monitoring. He then disconnected his EEG cables and had an episode of generalized stiffening and cyanosis, followed by jerking and profuse bleeding from the mouth. The manifestations were unusually similar to those of ES, except that he was clearly startled by spraying water on his face, while he was stiff in all extremities and unresponsive. There were indications that he had sucked blood from his central venous catheter to expel through his mouth during his PNEPEs while consciously holding his breath. Normal video-EEG monitoring; the patient's volitional and deceptive acts to fabricate the appearance of illness, despite pain and personal endangerment; and the absence of reward other than remaining in a sick role were all consistent with a diagnosis of factitious disorder. PMID:25667902

  12. Friedreich Ataxia: From the Eye of a Molecular Biologist.

    PubMed

    Muthuswamy, Srinivasan; Agarwal, Sarita

    2015-09-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is caused by the expansion of a GAA triplet repeat in the first intron of the FXN gene. This disease was named after Nicholaus Friedreich, Germany, who depicted the essential finding. Among ataxias, FRDA is the most common hereditary ataxia. It has the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The expansion of the GAA triplet repeat hinders the transcription, thereby reducing the level of the FXN transcript and consequently reducing the level of frataxin, a 210-amino acid protein. The disease pathogenesis is fundamentally due to a lack of frataxin, which is claimed to play a role in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis. Oxidative stress builds up as a result of Fe accumulation in the mitochondria, causing degeneration of the cells, which primarily occurs in the neurons and later in the cardiac tissues, and to some extent in the pancreas. The therapeutic interventions are at infancy; however, current treatments are targeted toward the reduction of iron overload and its effects. PMID:26375377

  13. MME mutation in dominant spinocerebellar ataxia with neuropathy (SCA43)

    PubMed Central

    Depondt, Chantal; Donatello, Simona; Rai, Myriam; Wang, François Charles; Manto, Mario; Simonis, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the causative gene mutation in a 5-generation Belgian family with dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxia and polyneuropathy, in which known genetic etiologies had been excluded. Methods: We collected DNA samples of 28 family members, including 7 living affected individuals, whose clinical records were reviewed by a neurologist experienced in ataxia. We combined linkage data of 21 family members with whole exome sequencing in 2 affected individuals to identify shared heterozygous variants mapping to potentially linked regions. Variants were screened for rarity and for predicted damaging effect. A candidate mutation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing and tested for cosegregation with the disease. Results: Affected individuals presented with late-onset sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy; all but one also had cerebellar ataxia. We identified a variant in the MME gene, p.C143Y, that was absent from control databases, cosegregated with the phenotype, and was predicted to have a strong damaging effect on the encoded protein by all algorithms we used. Conclusions: MME encodes neprilysin (NEP), a zinc-dependent metalloprotease expressed in most tissues, including the central and peripheral nervous systems. The mutated cysteine 143 forms a disulfide bridge, which is 100% conserved in NEP and in similar enzymes. The recent identification of recessive MME mutations in 10 unrelated individuals from Japan with axonal polyneuropathy further supports the causality of the mutation, despite the dominant mode of inheritance and the presence of cerebellar involvement in our study family. Functional studies are needed to identify the mechanisms underlying these differences. PMID:27583304

  14. Friedreich Ataxia: Molecular Mechanisms, Redox Considerations, and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Seguin, Alexandra; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage are at the origin of numerous neurodegenerative diseases like Friedreich ataxia and Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common hereditary ataxia, with one individual affected in 50,000. This disease is characterized by progressive degeneration of the central and peripheral nervous systems, cardiomyopathy, and increased incidence of diabetes mellitus. FRDA is caused by a dynamic mutation, a GAA trinucleotide repeat expansion, in the first intron of the FXN gene. Fewer than 5% of the patients are heterozygous and carry point mutations in the other allele. The molecular consequences of the GAA triplet expansion is transcription silencing and reduced expression of the encoded mitochondrial protein, frataxin. The precise cellular role of frataxin is not known; however, it is clear now that several mitochondrial functions are not performed correctly in patient cells. The affected functions include respiration, iron–sulfur cluster assembly, iron homeostasis, and maintenance of the redox status. This review highlights the molecular mechanisms that underlie the disease phenotypes and the different hypothesis about the function of frataxin. In addition, we present an overview of the most recent therapeutic approaches for this severe disease that actually has no efficient treatment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 0000–0000. PMID:20156111

  15. Ataxia-telangiectasia: some historic, clinical and pathologic observations.

    PubMed

    Boder, E

    1975-01-01

    Although an isolated clinical case report was published in 1926 and another in 1941, ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) was not established as a distinct entity until 1957, when it was first delineated clinicopathologically. Susceptibility to sinopulmonary infection was identified as the main cause of death and as the third major component of the syndrome; its heredofamilial nature was documented, and it was designated "ataxia-telangiectasia." In a later review of 101 published cases, lymphoreticular malignancy emerged as the second most frequent cause of death. Although the thymus was found to be absent in the first reported autopsy in 1957 and the serum IgA deficiency was first recorded in 1961, A-T was not established as an immunodeficiency disease until 1963. Thymic abnormality and dysgammaglobulinemia explain the 2 main causes of death, sinopulmonary and neoplastic, but the immunodeficiency is probably not the central defect. It does not appear to explain either of the 2 main clinical diagnostic keys, the ataxia and the telangiectasia, or any of the other seemingly unrealted multisystemic facets of this complex disorder. Some of our most provocative long-term clinical observations and recent pathologic findings in our series of 9 autopsies are discussed. PMID:1096982

  16. Episodic Memory: A Comparative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Call, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Historically, episodic memory has been described as autonoetic, personally relevant, complex, context-rich, and allowing mental time travel. In contrast, semantic memory, which is theorized to be free of context and personal relevance, is noetic and consists of general knowledge of facts about the world. The field of comparative psychology has adopted this distinction in order to study episodic memory in non-human animals. Our aim in this article is not only to reflect on the concept of episodic memory and the experimental approaches used in comparative psychology to study this phenomenon, but also to provide a critical analysis of these paradigms. We conclude the article by providing new avenues for future research. PMID:23781179

  17. Centres of Excellence for the care of people with progressive ataxias.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Julie; Treacy, Colm; Giunti, Paola

    This article provides a description of the progressive ataxias and how such a diagnosis impacts on a person's life. The nurse's role in helping these patients, who can face numerous difficulties in everyday life, is highlighted. Moreover, the authors discuss the development of Ataxia Specialist Centres of Excellence for the diagnosis and management of people with ataxia, and the benefits believe these centres will bring to the care of these patients. PMID:17077786

  18. Ornidazole-induced ataxia in an Indian woman: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Wilson, Benny Paul; Viggeswarpu, Surekha; Mathews, Prasad K; Mani, Sunithi

    2015-01-01

    The nitroimidazole group of antibiotics like metronidazole have been reported to cause cerebellar ataxia as a rare side effect. Ornidazole, the newest derivative of this class, has a long half life and is very rarely known to cause cerebellar ataxia. Here, we report a 61-year-old patient who developed ataxia due to ornidazole to highlight an unusual adverse event that improved rapidly after discontinuation of the offending drug.

  19. SETX mutations are a frequent genetic cause of juvenile and adult onset cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/background Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia defines a group of genetically distinct recessive ataxias including ataxia-telangectasia (A-T, ATM gene), ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1, APTX gene) and type 2 (AOA2, SETX gene). Although, a few unique clinical features differentiate each of these forms, the patients also share common clinical signs, such as the presence of cerebellar atrophy, sensorimotor axonal neuropathy, and elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) serum level. Materials and methods We selected 22 Italian patients from 21 families, presenting progressive cerebellar ataxia, axonal neuropathy, and elevated serum AFP. We screened the coding regions of ATM, APTX and SETX genes for point mutations by direct sequencing or DHPLC, and searched genomic rearrangements in SETX by MLPA analysis. In selected cases, quantification of ATM and senataxin proteins was performed by Western blot. Clinical, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging data were collected. Results Thirteen patients (12 families) carried SETX mutations (AOA2, 57%), two were mutated in ATM (A-T), and three in APTX (AOA1). In three remaining patients, we could not find pathogenic mutations, and in one case we found, in homozygosis, the SETX p.K992R polymorphism (population frequency 1-2%). In AOA2 cases, we identified 14 novel and three reported SETX mutations. Signs at onset were gait ataxia and facial dyskinesia, and the age ranged between 11 and 18 years. None had obvious oculomotor apraxia at the latest examination (age 14–45 years). The patient carrying the p.K992R SETX polymorphism had a phenotype similar to that of the diagnosed AOA2 patients, while the other three undiagnosed subjects had a very late onset and a few distinguishing clinical features. Discussion and conclusions We describe a large series of 13 AOA2 Italian patients. The phenotype was consistent with previous descriptions of AOA2, except for a higher frequency of strabism, and for the absence of oculomotor

  20. Estimating Determinants of Multiple Treatment Episodes for Substance Abusers.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Allen C.; Hankin, Janet R.; Kalist, David E.; Peng, Yingwei; Spurr, Stephen J.

    2001-06-01

    BACKGROUND: Health services researchers have increasingly used hazard functions to examine illness or treatment episode lengths and related treatment utilization and treatment costs. There has been little systematic hazard analysis, however, of mental health/substance abuse (MH/SA) treatment episodes. AIMS OF THE STUDY: This article uses proportional hazard functions to characterize multiple treatment episodes for a sample of insured clients with at least one alcohol or drug treatment diagnosis over a three-year period. It addresses the lengths and timing of treatment episodes, and the relationships of episode lengths to the types and locations of earlier episodes. It also identifies a problem that occurs when a portion of the sample observations is ǣpossibly censored. Failure to account for sample censoring will generate biased hazard function estimates, but treating all potentially censored observations as censored will overcompensate for the censoring bias. METHODS: Using insurance claims data, the analysis defines health care treatment episodes as all events that follow the initial event irrespective of diagnosis, so long as the events are not separated by more than 30 days. The distribution of observations ranges from 1 day to 3 years, and individuals have up to 10 episodes. Due to the data collection process, observations may be right censored if the episode is either ongoing at the time that data collection starts, or when the data collection effort ends. The Andersen-Gill (AG) and Wei-Lin-Weissfeld (WLW) estimation methods are used to address relationships among individuals multiple episodes. These methods are then augmented by a probit censoring model that estimates censoring probability and adjusts estimated behavioral coefficients and related treatment utilization and treatment costs. There has been little systematic hazard analysis, however, of mental health/substance abuse (MH/SA) treatment episodes. RESULTS: Five sets of variables explain episode

  1. Expression of Caytaxin Protein in Cayman Ataxia Mouse Models Correlates with Phenotype Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Kristine M.; Nosavanh, LaGina M.; Kantheti, Prameela; Burmeister, Margit; Hortsch, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Caytaxin is a highly-conserved protein, which is encoded by the Atcay/ATCAY gene. Mutations in Atcay/ATCAY have been identified as causative of cerebellar disorders such as the rare hereditary disease Cayman ataxia in humans, generalized dystonia in the dystonic (dt) rat, and marked motor defects in three ataxic mouse lines. While several lines of evidence suggest that Caytaxin plays a critical role in maintaining nervous system processes, the physiological function of Caytaxin has not been fully characterized. In the study presented here, we generated novel specific monoclonal antibodies against full-length Caytaxin to examine endogenous Caytaxin expression in wild type and Atcay mutant mouse lines. Caytaxin protein is absent from brain tissues in the two severely ataxic Atcayjit (jittery) and Atcayswd (sidewinder) mutant lines, and markedly decreased in the mildly ataxic/dystonic Atcayji-hes (hesitant) line, indicating a correlation between Caytaxin expression and disease severity. As the expression of wild type human Caytaxin in mutant sidewinder and jittery mice rescues the ataxic phenotype, Caytaxin’s physiological function appears to be conserved between the human and mouse orthologs. Across multiple species and in several neuronal cell lines Caytaxin is expressed as several protein isoforms, the two largest of which are caused by the usage of conserved methionine translation start sites. The work described in this manuscript presents an initial characterization of the Caytaxin protein and its expression in wild type and several mutant mouse models. Utilizing these animal models of human Cayman Ataxia will now allow an in-depth analysis to elucidate Caytaxin’s role in maintaining normal neuronal function. PMID:23226316

  2. RAGG - R EPISODIC AGGREGATION PACKAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The RAGG package is an R implementation of the CMAQ episodic model aggregation method developed by Constella Group and the Environmental Protection Agency. RAGG is a tool to provide climatological seasonal and annual deposition of sulphur and nitrogen for multimedia management. ...

  3. Retinitis pigmentosa, ataxia, and mental retardation associated with mitochondrial DNA mutation in an Italian family.

    PubMed Central

    Puddu, P; Barboni, P; Mantovani, V; Montagna, P; Cerullo, A; Bragliani, M; Molinotti, C; Caramazza, R

    1993-01-01

    An Italian pedigree including two sisters and their mother affected by a neuro-ophthalmic disease characterised by retinitis pigmentosa, ataxia, and psychomotor retardation is reported. Molecular analysis of mitochondrial DNA showed the presence of heteroplasmic 8993 point mutation in the subunit 6 of the ATPase gene. The clinical features and genetic findings in this family were comparable with those recently described in an English family. The mitochondrial DNA analysis of the family showed a correlation between the amount of mutated DNA and the disease severity in the probands, and indicated the presence of a threshold amount of mutated genome inducing ophthalmic defects. Moreover, the comparative analysis of blood, hairs, muscle, and urinary tract epithelia of two probands revealed an essentially similar distribution of mutated and wild type mitochondrial genomes. Our results suggest that the 8993 mitochondrial DNA mutation characterises a disease with similar clinical features in different populations. Images PMID:8435424

  4. Cell and Molecular Biology of Ataxia Telangiectasia Heterozygous Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Irradiated in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Autologous isolates of cell types from obligate heterozygotes with the autosomal disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T)were used to begin a tissue culture model for assessing pathways of radiation-induced cancer formation in this target tissue. This was done by establishing cultures of stromal fibroblasts and long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in standard 2-dimensional tissue culture in order to establish expression of markers detailing early steps of carcinogenesis. The presumptive breast cancer susceptibility of A-T heterozygotes as a sequel to damage caused by ionizing radiation provided reason to study expression of markers in irradiated HMEC. Findings from our study with HMEC have included determination of differences in specific protein expression amongst growth phase (e.g., log vs stationary) and growth progression (e.g., pass 7 vs pass 9), as well as differences in morphologic markers within populations of irradiated HMEC (e.g., development of multinucleated cells).

  5. Mutation in ATG5 reduces autophagy and leads to ataxia with developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungjin; Sandford, Erin; Gatica, Damian; Qiu, Yu; Liu, Xu; Zheng, Yumei; Schulman, Brenda A; Xu, Jishu; Semple, Ian; Ro, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Boyoung; Mavioglu, R Nehir; Tolun, Aslıhan; Jipa, Andras; Takats, Szabolcs; Karpati, Manuela; Li, Jun Z; Yapici, Zuhal; Juhasz, Gabor; Lee, Jun Hee; Klionsky, Daniel J; Burmeister, Margit

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is required for the homeostasis of cellular material and is proposed to be involved in many aspects of health. Defects in the autophagy pathway have been observed in neurodegenerative disorders; however, no genetically-inherited pathogenic mutations in any of the core autophagy-related (ATG) genes have been reported in human patients to date. We identified a homozygous missense mutation, changing a conserved amino acid, in ATG5 in two siblings with congenital ataxia, mental retardation, and developmental delay. The subjects' cells display a decrease in autophagy flux and defects in conjugation of ATG12 to ATG5. The homologous mutation in yeast demonstrates a 30-50% reduction of induced autophagy. Flies in which Atg5 is substituted with the mutant human ATG5 exhibit severe movement disorder, in contrast to flies expressing the wild-type human protein. Our results demonstrate the critical role of autophagy in preventing neurological diseases and maintaining neuronal health. PMID:26812546

  6. Alleviating transcript insufficiency caused by Friedreich’s ataxia triplet repeats

    PubMed Central

    Grabczyk, Ed; Usdin, Karen

    2000-01-01

    Expanded GAA·TTC trinucleotide repeats in intron 1 of the frataxin gene cause Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) by reducing frataxin mRNA levels. Insufficient frataxin, a nuclear encoded mitochondrial protein, leads to the progressive neurodegeneration and cardiomyopathy characteristic of FRDA. Previously we demonstrated that long GAA·TTC tracts impede transcription elongation in vitro and provided evidence that the impediment results from an intramolecular purine·purine·pyrimidine DNA triplex formed behind an advancing RNA polymerase. Our model predicts that inhibiting formation of this triplex during transcription will increase successful elongation through GAA·TTC tracts. Here we show that this is the case. Oligodeoxyribonucleotides designed to block particular types of triplex formation provide specific and concentration-dependent increases in full-length transcript. In principle, therapeutic agents that selectively interfere with triplex formation could alleviate the frataxin transcript insufficiency caused by pathogenic FRDA alleles. PMID:11121484

  7. Nature of a defect in cells from individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Cornforth, M.N.; Bedford, J.S.

    1985-03-29

    The cells and tissues of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), an inherited disease characterized by a high degree of proneness to cancer, are abnormally sensitive to ionizing radiation. Noncycling cultures of normal human and A-T fibroblasts were exposed to x-rays so that the breakage and rejoining of prematurely condensed chromosomes in the G1 phase could be compared. After a dose of 6.0 grays, both cell types had the same initial frequency of breaks and the same rate for rejoining of the breaks, but the fraction of breaks that did not rejoin was five to six times greater for the A-T cells. The results also show that progression of cells into the S phase is not a prerequisite for the increased frequency of chromosome fragments that appear in mitosis after A-T cells are irradiated in the G1 or G0 phase.

  8. Ataxia-Pancytopenia Syndrome Is Caused by Missense Mutations in SAMD9L.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong-Hui; Below, Jennifer E; Shimamura, Akiko; Keel, Sioban B; Matsushita, Mark; Wolff, John; Sul, Youngmee; Bonkowski, Emily; Castella, Maria; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu; Nickerson, Deborah; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Bird, Thomas D; Raskind, Wendy H

    2016-06-01

    Ataxia-pancytopenia (AP) syndrome is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, variable hematologic cytopenias, and predisposition to marrow failure and myeloid leukemia, sometimes associated with monosomy 7. Here, in the four-generation family UW-AP, linkage analysis revealed four regions that provided the maximal LOD scores possible, one of which was in a commonly microdeleted chromosome 7q region. Exome sequencing identified a missense mutation (c.2640C>A, p.His880Gln) in the sterile alpha motif domain containing 9-like gene (SAMD9L) that completely cosegregated with disease. By targeted sequencing of SAMD9L, we subsequently identified a different missense mutation (c.3587G>C, p.Cys1196Ser) in affected members of the first described family with AP syndrome, Li-AP. Neither variant is reported in the public databases, both affect highly conserved amino acid residues, and both are predicted to be damaging. With time in culture, lymphoblastic cell lines (LCLs) from two affected individuals in family UW-AP exhibited copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity for large portions of the long arm of chromosome 7, resulting in retention of only the wild-type SAMD9L allele. Newly established LCLs from both individuals demonstrated the same phenomenon. In addition, targeted capture and sequencing of SAMD9L in uncultured blood DNA from both individuals showed bias toward the wild-type allele. These observations indicate in vivo hematopoietic mosaicism. The hematopoietic cytopenias that characterize AP syndrome and the selective advantage for clones that have lost the mutant allele support the postulated role of SAMD9L in the regulation of cell proliferation. Furthermore, we show that AP syndrome is distinct from the dyskeratoses congenita telomeropathies, with which it shares some clinical characteristics. PMID:27259050

  9. Classification of ischaemic episodes with ST/HR diagrams.

    PubMed

    Faganeli Pucer, Jana; Demšar, Janez; Kukar, Matjaž

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the developed world's premier cause of mortality and the most probable cause of myocardial ischaemia. More advanced diagnostic tests aside, in electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis it manifests itself as a ST segment deviation, targeted by both exercise ECG and ambulatory ECG. In ambulatory ECG, besides ischaemic ST segment deviation episodes there are also non-ischaemic heart rate related episodes which aggravate real ischaemia detection. We present methods to transform the features developed for the heart rate adjustment of ST segment depression in exercise ECG for use in ambulatory ECG. We use annotations provided by the Long-Term ST Database to plot the ST/HR diagrams and then estimate the overall and maximal slopes of the diagrams in the exercise and recovery phase for each ST segment deviation episode. We also estimate the angle at the extrema of the ST/HR diagrams. Statistical analysis shows that ischaemic ST segment deviation episodes have significantly steeper overall and maximal slopes than heart rate related episodes, which indicates the explored features' utility for distinguishing between the two types of episodes. This makes the proposed features very useful in automated ECG analysis. PMID:22874369

  10. Subjective Experience of Episodic Memory and Metacognition: A Neurodevelopmental Approach

    PubMed Central

    Souchay, Céline; Guillery-Girard, Bérengère; Pauly-Takacs, Katalin; Wojcik, Dominika Zofia; Eustache, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Episodic retrieval is characterized by the subjective experience of remembering. This experience enables the co-ordination of memory retrieval processes and can be acted on metacognitively. In successful retrieval, the feeling of remembering may be accompanied by recall of important contextual information. On the other hand, when people fail (or struggle) to retrieve information, other feelings, thoughts, and information may come to mind. In this review, we examine the subjective and metacognitive basis of episodic memory function from a neurodevelopmental perspective, looking at recollection paradigms (such as source memory, and the report of recollective experience) and metacognitive paradigms such as the feeling of knowing). We start by considering healthy development, and provide a brief review of the development of episodic memory, with a particular focus on the ability of children to report first-person experiences of remembering. We then consider neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) such as amnesia acquired in infancy, autism, Williams syndrome, Down syndrome, or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. This review shows that different episodic processes develop at different rates, and that across a broad set of different NDDs there are various types of episodic memory impairment, each with possibly a different character. This literature is in agreement with the idea that episodic memory is a multifaceted process. PMID:24399944

  11. Principal Component Analysis of Cerebellar Shape on MRI Separates SCA Types 2 and 6 into Two Archetypal Modes of Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Brian C.; Choi, Soo I.; Du, Annie X.; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Geng, Zhuo Z.; Ying, Howard S.; Perlman, Susan L.; Toga, Arthur W.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Although “cerebellar ataxia” is often used in reference to a disease process, presumably there are different underlying pathogenetic mechanisms for different subtypes. Indeed, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) types 2 and 6 demonstrate complementary phenotypes, thus predicting a different anatomic pattern of degeneration. Here, we show that an unsupervised classification method, based on principal component analysis (PCA) of cerebellar shape characteristics, can be used to separate SCA2 and SCA6 into two classes, which may represent disease-specific archetypes. Patients with SCA2 (n=11) and SCA6 (n=7) were compared against controls (n=15) using PCA to classify cerebellar anatomic shape characteristics. Within the first three principal components, SCA2 and SCA6 differed from controls and from each other. In a secondary analysis, we studied five additional subjects and found that these patients were consistent with the previously defined archetypal clusters of clinical and anatomical characteristics. Secondary analysis of five subjects with related diagnoses showed that disease groups that were clinically and pathophysiologically similar also shared similar anatomic characteristics. Specifically, Archetype #1 consisted of SCA3 (n=1) and SCA2, suggesting that cerebellar syndromes accompanied by atrophy of the pons may be associated with a characteristic pattern of cerebellar neurodegeneration. In comparison, Archetype #2 was comprised of disease groups with pure cerebellar atrophy (episodic ataxia type 2 (n=1), idiopathic late-onset cerebellar ataxias (n=3), and SCA6). This suggests that cerebellar shape analysis could aid in discriminating between different pathologies. Our findings further suggest that magnetic resonance imaging is a promising imaging biomarker that could aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management in patients with cerebellar syndromes. PMID:22258915

  12. There May Be More to Reaching than Meets the Eye: Re-Thinking Optic Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Stephen R.; Newport, Roger; Husain, Masud; Fowlie, Jane E.; O'Donoghue, Michael; Bajaj, Nin

    2009-01-01

    Optic ataxia (OA) is generally thought of as a disorder of visually guided reaching movements that cannot be explained by any simple deficit in visual or motor processing. In this paper we offer a new perspective on optic ataxia; we argue that the popular characterisation of this disorder is misleading and is unrepresentative of the pattern of…

  13. Impaired Inhibition of Prepotent Motor Tendencies in Friedreich Ataxia Demonstrated by the Simon Interference Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corben, L. A.; Akhlaghi, H.; Georgiou-Karistianis, N.; Bradshaw, J. L.; Egan, G. F.; Storey, E.; Churchyard, A. J.; Delatycki, M. B.

    2011-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common of the genetically inherited ataxias. We recently demonstrated that people with FRDA have impairment in motor planning--most likely because of pathology affecting the cerebral cortex and/or cerebello-cortical projections. We used the Simon interference task to examine how effective 13 individuals with…

  14. Two sisters with mental retardation, cataract, ataxia, progressive hearing loss, and polyneuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Begeer, J H; Scholte, F A; van Essen, A J

    1991-01-01

    Two sisters are described with a disorder characterised by mental retardation, congenital cataract, progressive spinocerebellar ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and signs of peripheral neuropathy. Progressive hearing loss, ataxia, and polyneuropathy became evident in the third decade. The differential diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed including the syndromes described by Berman et al and Koletzko et al. PMID:1661780

  15. Episodic Volunteers: Reality for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macduff, Nancy

    1990-01-01

    Episodic volunteer opportunities allow for short-term services--either one-time or recurring. The organization using such volunteers must identify new jobs that can be performed on an episodic basis or redesign traditional volunteer jobs. (SK)

  16. UBA5 Mutations Cause a New Form of Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ranhui; Shi, Yuting; Yu, Li; Zhang, Gehan; Li, Jia; Lin, Yunting; Guo, Jifeng; Wang, Junling; Shen, Lu; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Guanghui; Tang, Beisha

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA) comprises a large and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. For many affected patients, the genetic cause remains undetermined. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme 5 gene (UBA5) in two Chinese siblings presenting with ARCA. Moreover, copy number variations in UBA5 or ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 gene (UFM1) were documented with the phenotypes of global developmental delays and gait disturbances in the ClinVar database. UBA5 encodes UBA5, the ubiquitin-activating enzyme of UFM1. However, a crucial role for UBA5 in human neurological disease remains to be reported. Our molecular study of UBA5-R246X revealed a dramatically decreased half-life and loss of UFM1 activation due to the absence of the catalytic cysteine Cys250. UBA5-K310E maintained its interaction with UFM1, although with less stability, which may affect the ability of this UBA5 mutant to activate UFM1. Drosophila modeling revealed that UBA5 knockdown induced locomotive defects and a shortened lifespan accompanied by aberrant neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Strikingly, we found that UFM1 and E2 cofactor knockdown induced markedly similar phenotypes. Wild-type UBA5, but not mutant UBA5, significantly restored neural lesions caused by the absence of UBA5. The finding of a UBA5 mutation in cerebellar ataxia suggests that impairment of the UFM1 pathway may contribute to the neurological phenotypes of ARCA. PMID:26872069

  17. UBA5 Mutations Cause a New Form of Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Zhang, Gehan; Li, Jia; Lin, Yunting; Guo, Jifeng; Wang, Junling; Shen, Lu; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Guanghui; Tang, Beisha

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA) comprises a large and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. For many affected patients, the genetic cause remains undetermined. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme 5 gene (UBA5) in two Chinese siblings presenting with ARCA. Moreover, copy number variations in UBA5 or ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 gene (UFM1) were documented with the phenotypes of global developmental delays and gait disturbances in the ClinVar database. UBA5 encodes UBA5, the ubiquitin-activating enzyme of UFM1. However, a crucial role for UBA5 in human neurological disease remains to be reported. Our molecular study of UBA5-R246X revealed a dramatically decreased half-life and loss of UFM1 activation due to the absence of the catalytic cysteine Cys250. UBA5-K310E maintained its interaction with UFM1, although with less stability, which may affect the ability of this UBA5 mutant to activate UFM1. Drosophila modeling revealed that UBA5 knockdown induced locomotive defects and a shortened lifespan accompanied by aberrant neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Strikingly, we found that UFM1 and E2 cofactor knockdown induced markedly similar phenotypes. Wild-type UBA5, but not mutant UBA5, significantly restored neural lesions caused by the absence of UBA5. The finding of a UBA5 mutation in cerebellar ataxia suggests that impairment of the UFM1 pathway may contribute to the neurological phenotypes of ARCA. PMID:26872069

  18. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant – a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Karla P.; Paul, Sharan; Calì, Tito; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Karan, Sukanya; Frizzarin, Martina; Ames, Darren; Zanni, Ginevra; Brini, Marisa; Dansithong, Warunee; Milash, Brett; Scoles, Daniel R.; Carafoli, Ernesto; Pulst, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF)/Brown Norwegian (BN) F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm). In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R) to cysteine (C) change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca2+ transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3) gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT) replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3R35C function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes. PMID:27013529

  19. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant - a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Karla P; Paul, Sharan; Calì, Tito; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Karan, Sukanya; Frizzarin, Martina; Ames, Darren; Zanni, Ginevra; Brini, Marisa; Dansithong, Warunee; Milash, Brett; Scoles, Daniel R; Carafoli, Ernesto; Pulst, Stefan M

    2016-05-01

    The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF)/Brown Norwegian (BN) F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm). In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R) to cysteine (C) change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca(2+) transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3) gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT) replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3(R35C) function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes. PMID:27013529

  20. Episodic pain in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Ribeiro, Maria D C

    2002-01-01

    Episodic pain is a common problem for patients with advanced cancer and is often difficult to manage successfully. In this article, the daily variations in cancer-related episodic pain in a patient with metastatic lung cancer are described. The definition, etiology, prevalence, and pharmacological management of episodic pain are also reviewed PMID:12141792

  1. Planning Physical Education Lessons as Teaching "Episodes"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatoupis, Constantine

    2016-01-01

    An "episode" is a unit of time within which teachers and students are working on the same objective and are engaged in the same teaching/learning style. The duration of each episode, as well as the number of them in a single lesson, may vary. Additionally, the multiple episodes of a lesson may have similar objectives, offer similar…

  2. Clinical features of Friedreich's ataxia: classical and atypical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Michael H; Boesch, Sylvia; Nachbauer, Wolfgang; Mariotti, Caterina; Giunti, Paola

    2013-08-01

    One hundred and fifty years since Nikolaus Friedreich's first description of the degenerative ataxic syndrome which bears his name, his description remains at the core of the classical clinical phenotype of gait and limb ataxia, poor balance and coordination, leg weakness, sensory loss, areflexia, impaired walking, dysarthria, dysphagia, eye movement abnormalities, scoliosis, foot deformities, cardiomyopathy and diabetes. Onset is typically around puberty with slow progression and shortened life-span often related to cardiac complications. Inheritance is autosomal recessive with the vast majority of cases showing an unstable intronic GAA expansion in both alleles of the frataxin gene on chromosome 9q13. A small number of cases are caused by a compound heterozygous expansion with a point mutation or deletion. Understanding of the underlying molecular biology has enabled identification of atypical phenotypes with late onset, or atypical features such as retained reflexes. Late-onset cases tend to have slower progression and are associated with smaller GAA expansions. Early-onset cases tend to have more rapid progression and a higher frequency of non-neurological features such as diabetes, cardiomyopathy, scoliosis and pes cavus. Compound heterozygotes, including those with large deletions, often have atypical features. In this paper, we review the classical and atypical clinical phenotypes of Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:23859346

  3. Gastrocnemius and soleus spasticity and muscle length in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Milne, Sarah C; Corben, Louise A; Yiu, Eppie; Delatycki, Martin B; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie

    2016-07-01

    Lower limb spasticity compromises the independence of people with Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA). This study sought to examine lower limb spasticity in FRDA in order to offer new insight as to the best approach and timing of spasticity management. Gastrocnemius and soleus spasticity and muscle length were measured by the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS) in 31 participants with typical and late-onset FRDA. Relationships between the MTS and the Friedreich Ataxia Rating Scale (FARS), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and disease duration were analysed. Differences between ambulant (n=18) and non-ambulant (n=13) participants were also examined. All participants had spasticity in at least one muscle, and 38.9% of ambulant and 69.2% of non-ambulant participants had contracture in one or both of their gastrocnemius muscles. Significant negative correlations were found between both gastrocnemius and soleus angle of catch and the FARS score. The FIM score also demonstrated significant correlations with gastrocnemius muscle length and angle of catch. Gastrocnemius and soleus spasticity and contracture is apparent in people with FRDA. Spasticity is evident early in the disease and in ambulant participants. Management of spasticity and reduced muscle length should be considered in people with FRDA at disease onset to optimise function. PMID:27021226

  4. Predicting and correcting ataxia using a model of cerebellar function

    PubMed Central

    Bhanpuri, Nasir H.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar damage results in uncoordinated, variable and dysmetric movements known as ataxia. Here we show that we can reliably model single-joint reaching trajectories of patients (n = 10), reproduce patient-like deficits in the behaviour of controls (n = 11), and apply patient-specific compensations that improve reaching accuracy (P < 0.02). Our approach was motivated by the theory that the cerebellum is essential for updating and/or storing an internal dynamic model that relates motor commands to changes in body state (e.g. arm position and velocity). We hypothesized that cerebellar damage causes a mismatch between the brain’s modelled dynamics and the actual body dynamics, resulting in ataxia. We used both behavioural and computational approaches to demonstrate that specific cerebellar patient deficits result from biased internal models. Our results strongly support the idea that an intact cerebellum is critical for maintaining accurate internal models of dynamics. Importantly, we demonstrate how subject-specific compensation can improve movement in cerebellar patients, who are notoriously unresponsive to treatment. PMID:24812203

  5. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hagerman, Paul J; Hagerman, Randi J

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that affects some but not all carriers of small, non-coding CGG-repeat expansions (55–200 repeats; premutation) within the fragile X gene (FMR1). Principal features of FXTAS include intention tremor, cerebellar ataxia, Parkinsonism, memory and executive function deficits, autonomic dysfunction, brain atrophy with white matter disease, and cognitive decline. Although FXTAS was originally considered to be confined to the premutation range, rare individuals with a gray zone (45 to 54 repeats) or an unmethylated full mutation (>200 repeats) allele have now been described; the constant feature of the disorder remaining the requirement for FMR1 expression, in contradistinction to the gene silencing mechanism of fragile X syndrome. Although transcriptional activity is required for FXTAS pathogenesis, the specific trigger(s) for FXTAS pathogenesis remains elusive, highlighting the need for more research in this area. This need is underscored by recent neuroimaging findings of changes in the central nervous system that consistently appear well before the onset of clinical symptoms, thus creating an opportunity to delay or prevent the appearance of FXTAS. PMID:25622649

  6. Consensus Paper: Pathological Mechanisms Underlying Neurodegeneration in Spinocerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Matilla-Dueñas, A.; Ashizawa, T.; Brice, A.; Magri, S.; McFarland, K. N.; Pandolfo, M.; Pulst, S. M.; Riess, O.; Rubinsztein, D. C.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, T.; Scoles, D. R.; Stevanin, G.; Taroni, F.; Underwood, B. R.; Sánchez, I.

    2014-01-01

    Intensive scientific research devoted in the recent years to understand the molecular mechanisms or neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are identifying new pathways and targets providing new insights and a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis in these diseases. In this consensus manuscript, the authors discuss their current views on the identified molecular processes causing or modulating the neurodegenerative phenotype in spinocerebellar ataxias with the common opinion of translating the new knowledge acquired into candidate targets for therapy. The following topics are discussed: transcription dysregulation, protein aggregation, autophagy, ion channels, the role of mitochondria, RNA toxicity, modulators of neurodegeneration and current therapeutic approaches. Overall point of consensus includes the common vision of neurodegeneration in SCAs as a multifactorial, progressive and reversible process, at least in early stages. Specific points of consensus include the role of the dysregulation of protein folding, transcription, bioenergetics, calcium handling and eventual cell death with apoptotic features of neurons during SCA disease progression. Unresolved questions include how the dysregulation of these pathways triggers the onset of symptoms and mediates disease progression since this understanding may allow effective treatments of SCAs within the window of reversibility to prevent early neuronal damage. Common opinions also include the need for clinical detection of early neuronal dysfunction, for more basic research to decipher the early neurodegenerative process in SCAs in order to give rise to new concepts for treatment strategies and for the translation of the results to preclinical studies and, thereafter, in clinical practice. PMID:24307138

  7. Common data elements for clinical research in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Lynch, David R; Pandolfo, Massimo; Schulz, Jorg B; Perlman, Susan; Delatycki, Martin B; Payne, R Mark; Shaddy, Robert; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Farmer, Jennifer; Kantor, Paul; Raman, Subha V; Hunegs, Lisa; Odenkirchen, Joanne; Miller, Kristy; Kaufmann, Petra

    2013-02-01

    To reduce study start-up time, increase data sharing, and assist investigators conducting clinical studies, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke embarked on an initiative to create common data elements for neuroscience clinical research. The Common Data Element Team developed general common data elements, which are commonly collected in clinical studies regardless of therapeutic area, such as demographics. In the present project, we applied such approaches to data collection in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), a neurological disorder that involves multiple organ systems. To develop FRDA common data elements, FRDA experts formed a working group and subgroups to define elements in the following: ataxia and performance measures; biomarkers; cardiac and other clinical outcomes; and demographics, laboratory tests, and medical history. The basic development process included identification of international experts in FRDA clinical research, meeting by teleconference to develop a draft of standardized common data elements recommendations, vetting of recommendations across the subgroups, and dissemination of recommendations to the research community for public comment. The full recommendations were published online in September 2011 at http://www.commondataelements.ninds.nih.gov/FA.aspx. The subgroups' recommendations are classified as core, supplemental, or exploratory. Template case report forms were created for many of the core tests. The present set of data elements should ideally lead to decreased initiation time for clinical research studies and greater ability to compare and analyze data across studies. Their incorporation into new, ongoing studies will be assessed in an ongoing fashion to define their utility in FRDA. PMID:23239403

  8. Huntington’s disease masquerading as spinocerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Quiroga, Sergio Alejandro; Gonzalez-Morón, Dolores; Garretto, Nelida; Kauffman, Marcelo Andres

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterised by the presence of choreic abnormal movements, behavioural or psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Noteworthy, despite atypical motor symptoms other than chorea have been reported as initial presentation in some patients, a very few number of HD patients, presenting at onset mostly cerebellar dysfunction masquerading dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), were occasionally reported. We report the case of a 42-year-old man with a 5-year history of gait disturbance, dysarthria and cognitive impairment and familial antecedents of dementia and movement disorders. Initially the clinical picture suggested the diagnosis of a dominant SCA, but finally a diagnosis of HD was made based on the molecular evidence of abnormal 39 Cytosine-Adenine-Guanine (CAG) repeats in exon 1 of Huntingtin gene. The authors highlight the importance of suspecting HD in the aetiology of spinocerebellar ataxias when dementia is a prominent feature in the proband or their family. PMID:23853009

  9. Characterization of aerosol episodes in the greater Mediterranean Sea area from satellite observations (2000-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, A.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Torres, O.

    2016-03-01

    An algorithm able to identify and characterize episodes of different aerosol types above sea surfaces of the greater Mediterranean basin (GMB), including the Black Sea and the Atlantic Ocean off the coasts of Iberia and northwest Africa, is presented in this study. Based on this algorithm, five types of intense (strong and extreme) aerosol episodes in the GMB are identified and characterized using daily aerosol optical properties from satellite measurements, namely MODIS-Terra, Earth Probe (EP)-TOMS and OMI-Aura. These aerosol episodes are: (i) biomass-burning/urban-industrial (BU), (ii) desert dust (DD), (iii) dust/sea-salt (DSS), (iv) mixed (MX) and (v) undetermined (UN). The identification and characterization is made with our algorithm using a variety of aerosol properties, namely aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), fine fraction (FF), effective radius (reff) and Aerosol Index (AI). During the study period (2000-2007), the most frequent aerosol episodes are DD, observed primarily in the western and central Mediterranean Sea, and off the northern African coasts, 7 times/year for strong episodes and 4 times/year for extreme ones, on average. The DD episodes yield 40% of all types of strong aerosol episodes in the study region, while they account for 71.5% of all extreme episodes. The frequency of occurrence of strong episodes exhibits specific geographical patterns, for example the BU are mostly observed along the coasts of southern Europe and off the Atlantic coasts of Portugal, the MX episodes off the Spanish Mediterranean coast and over the Adriatic and northern Aegean Sea, while the DSS ones over the western and central Mediterranean Sea. On the other hand, the extreme episodes for all but DD aerosol display more patchy spatial patterns. The strong episodes exhibit AOD at 550 nm as high as 1.6 in the southernmost parts of central and eastern Mediterranean Sea, which rise up to 5 for the extreme, mainly DD and DSS, episodes. Although more

  10. The attentional blink provides episodic distinctiveness

    PubMed Central

    Wyble, Brad; Bowman, Howard; Nieuwenstein, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The attentional blink (Raymond et al 1992) refers to an apparent gap in perception that can be elicited when a second target follows a first at a temporal lag of several hundred milliseconds. . Theoretical and computational work have provided a variety of explanations for early sets of blink data, but more recent data have challenged these accounts by showing that the blink is attenuated when subjects encode entire strings of stimuli (Nieuwenstein & Potter, 2006, Olivers et al 2007, Kawahara et al 2007), are distracted (Olivers & Nieuwenhuis 2005) or are provided with irrelevant motion cues (Arend, Johnston, & Shapiro 2006) while viewing the RSVP stream. In this paper, we describe the Episodic Simultaneous Type Serial Token model (eSTST), a computational account of encoding visual stimuli into working memory which suggests that the attentional blink is a cognitive strategy rather than a resource limitation. This model is composed of neurobiologically plausible neural elements and simulates the attentional blink with a competitive attentional mechanism facilitates the formation of episodically distinct representations within working memory. In addition to the blink, the model addresses the phenomena of repetition blindness and whole report superiority, producing predictions which are supported by experimental work. PMID:19485692

  11. Absence of systematic relationships between REMS duration episodes and spectral power Delta and Ultra-Slow bands in contiguous NREMS episodes in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Le Bon, O; Linkowski, P

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies in animals and humans have reported correlations between the durations of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) episodes and immediately preceding or subsequent non-REMS (NREMS) episodes. The relationship between these two types of sleep is a crucial component in understanding the regulation and neurophysiology of ultradian alternations that occur during sleep. Although the present study replicated previous studies, we also measured NREMS in terms of spectral power Delta and Ultra-Slow bands in addition to duration in examining correlations. The spectral power Delta band, also known as slow-wave activity, measures sleep quantity and is believed to reflect sleep physiology better than mere episode durations. The Ultra-Slow spectral power band was analyzed in parallel. Healthy human participants of both sexes (n = 26, age range 15-45 yr, n = 12 female) were carefully selected to participate in two consecutive series of home polysomnograms performed after 2 nights of habituation to the equipment. In the analyses, REMS episode durations (minutes) were compared with immediately preceding and immediately subsequent NREMS episodes (Delta and Ultra-Slow power) in each sleep cycle. REMS episode duration was more strongly correlated with preceding NREMS episodes than with subsequent NREMS episodes. However, in most cases, no correlations were observed in either direction. One ultradian sleep regulation hypothesis, which is based on stronger correlations between REMS and subsequent NREMS episode durations, holds that the main purpose of REMS is to reactivate NREMS during each sleep cycle. The present results do not support that hypothesis. PMID:23596336

  12. [A case of incomplete Kearns-Sayre syndrome with a stroke like episode].

    PubMed

    Furuya, H; Sugimura, T; Yamada, T; Hayashi, K; Kobayashi, T

    1997-08-01

    A 32-year-old woman developed chronic progressive hearing impairment, trunkal ataxia, bilateral ptosis and external ophthalmoplegia. She also showed slowly progressive mild to moderate proximal dominant muscle weakness and atrophy. ECG showed incomplete right bundle branch block. An aerobic exercise test showed abnormal blood lactate elevation and muscle biopsy revealed ragged-red fibers in addition to the myopathic change. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA extracted from biopsied muscle and fibroblast samples revealed a 1,758bp deletion from the cytochrome b to ND6 coding regions. Common mutations in tRNALeu(UUR) coding region to the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) were not present. She was diagnosed as having incomplete Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS). Since the age of 35, she developed complex partial seizure attacks with secondary generalization frequently and at the age of 42, she had a severe generalized seizure with delayed consciousness loss followed by left hemiplegia. MRI showed wide T2-high signal lesions in the right temporo-parieto-occipital area. The proton MR-spectroscopy showed prominent increase of lactate beyond the lesions detected by MRI, indicating diffuse aerobic metabolic dysfunction in the central nervous system. We reviewed two other KSS cases with a stroke like episode, who also had epilepsy and large deletion but no tRNALeu(UUR) mutation, in mitochondrial DNA. Patients with KSS who have seizure may develop the stroke-like episode as seen in MELAS patients. PMID:9404143

  13. Episodic Memories in Anxiety Disorders: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zlomuzica, Armin; Dere, Dorothea; Machulska, Alla; Adolph, Dirk; Dere, Ekrem; Margraf, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize research on the emerging role of episodic memories in the context of anxiety disorders (AD). The available literature on explicit, autobiographical, and episodic memory function in AD including neuroimaging studies is critically discussed. We describe the methodological diversity of episodic memory research in AD and discuss the need for novel tests to measure episodic memory in a clinical setting. We argue that alterations in episodic memory functions might contribute to the etiology of AD. We further explain why future research on the interplay between episodic memory function and emotional disorders as well as its neuroanatomical foundations offers the promise to increase the effectiveness of modern psychological treatments. We conclude that one major task is to develop methods and training programs that might help patients suffering from AD to better understand, interpret, and possibly actively use their episodic memories in a way that would support therapeutic interventions and counteract the occurrence of symptoms. PMID:24795583

  14. Fragment based G-QSAR and molecular dynamics based mechanistic simulations into hydroxamic-based HDAC inhibitors against spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Siddharth; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-10-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine (CAG) triplets within the coding gene ataxin 2 results in transcriptional repression, forming the molecular basis of the neurodegenerative disorder named spinocerebellar ataxia type-2 (SCA2). HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been elements of great interest in polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's and Ataxia's. In this study, we have selected hydroxamic acid derivatives as HDACi and performed fragment-based G-QSAR, molecular docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations for elucidating the dynamic mode of action of HDACi with His-Asp catalytic dyad of HDAC4. The model was statistically validated to establish its predictive robustness. The model was statistically significant with r(2) value of .6297, cross-validated co-relation coefficient q(2) value of .5905 and pred_r(2) (predicted square co-relation coefficient) value of .85. An F-test value of 56.11 confirms absolute robustness of the model. Two combinatorial libraries comprising of 3180 compounds were created with hydroxamate moiety as the template and their pIC50 activities were predicted based on the G-QSAR model. The combinatorial library created was screened on the basis of predicted activity (pIC50), with two resultant top scoring compounds, HIC and DHC. The interaction of the compounds with His-Asp dyad in terms of H-bond interactions with His802, Asp840, Pro942, and Gly975 residues of HDAC4 was evaluated by docking and 20 ns long molecular dynamics simulations. This study provides valuable leads for structural substitutions required for hydroxamate moiety to exhibit enhanced inhibitory activity against HDAC4. The reported compounds demonstrated good binding and thus can be considered as potent therapeutic leads against ataxia. PMID:26510381

  15. Infectious delivery and expression of a 135 kb human FRDA genomic DNA locus complements Friedreich's ataxia deficiency in human cells.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Sebastian, Silvia; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Diaz-Nido, Javier; Lim, Filip; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2007-02-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive ataxia, affecting 1-2 in 50,000 Caucasians, and there is currently no effective cure or treatment. FA results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial protein frataxin brought about by a repeat expansion in intron 1 of the FRDA gene. The main areas affected are the central nervous system (particularly the spinocerebellar system) and cardiac tissue. Therapies aimed at alleviating the neurological degeneration have proved unsuccessful to date. Here, we describe the construction and delivery of high capacity herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors expressing the entire 80 kb FRDA genomic locus, driven by the endogenous FRDA promoter and including all introns and flanking regulatory sequences within a 135 kb genomic DNA insert. FA patient primary fibroblasts deficient in frataxin protein and exhibiting sensitivity to oxidative stress were transduced at high efficiency by FRDA genomic locus vectors. Following vector transduction, expression of FRDA protein by immunofluorescence was shown. Finally, functional complementation studies demonstrated restoration of the wild-type cellular phenotype in response to oxidative stress in transduced FA patient cells. These results suggest the potential of the infectious bacterial artificial chromosome-FRDA vectors for gene therapy of FA. PMID:17235301

  16. Episodic and electrical nervous system disorders caused by nonchannel genes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsien-yang; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptáček, Louis J

    2015-01-01

    As noted in the separate introduction to this special topic section, episodic and electrical disorders can appear quite different clinically and yet share many overlapping features, including attack precipitants, therapeutic responses, natural history, and the types of genes that cause many of the genetic forms (i.e., ion channel genes). Thus, as we mapped and attempted to clone genes causing other episodic disorders, ion channels were always outstanding candidates when they mapped to the critical region of linkage in such a family. However, some of these disorders do not result from mutations in channels. This realization has opened up large and exciting new areas for the pathogenesis of these disorders. In some cases, the mutations occur in genes of unknown function or without understanding of molecular pathogenesis. Recently, emerging insights into a fascinating group of episodic movement disorders, the paroxysmal dyskinesias, and study of the causative genes and proteins are leading to the emerging concept of episodic electric disorders resulting from synaptic dysfunction. Much work remains to be done, but the field is evolving rapidly. As it does, we have come to realize that the molecular pathogenesis of electrical and episodic disorders is more complex than a scenario in which such disorders are simply due to mutations in the primary determinants of membrane excitability (channels). PMID:25340963

  17. Retinal and pontine striations: neurodiagnostic signs of autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, Jacqueline A; Singer, Wolfgang; Brown, William L; Pulido, Jose S; Brodsky, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    A 39-year-old man with long-standing ataxia, spasticity, dysarthria, and peripheral neuropathy was found to have diffuse thickening of the retinal nerve fiber layer in both eyes, as manifested by prominent retinal striations and confirmed by optical coherence tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging showed severe atrophy of the superior cerebellar vermis with linear "footprint" hypointensities in the pons with irregular striations. Genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis of spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). The clinical evaluation of progressive cerebellar ataxia should include a dedicated search for retinal nerve fiber layer thickening, which establishes the diagnosis of ARSACS. PMID:25237835

  18. Common and unique gray matter correlates of episodic memory dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Irish, Muireann; Piguet, Olivier; Hodges, John R; Hornberger, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Conflicting evidence exists regarding the integrity of episodic memory in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Recent converging evidence suggests that episodic memory in progressive cases of bvFTD is compromised to the same extent as in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The underlying neural substrates of these episodic memory deficits, however, likely differ contingent on dementia type. In this study we sought to elucidate the neural substrates of episodic memory performance, across recall and recognition tasks, in both patient groups using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses. We predicted that episodic memory dysfunction would be apparent in both patient groups but would relate to divergent patterns of neural atrophy specific to each dementia type. We assessed episodic memory, across verbal and visual domains, in 19 bvFTD, 18 AD patients, and 19 age- and education-matched controls. Behaviorally, patient groups were indistinguishable for immediate and delayed recall, across verbal and visual domains. Whole-brain VBM analyses revealed regions commonly implicated in episodic retrieval across groups, namely the right temporal pole, right frontal lobe, left paracingulate gyrus, and right anterior hippocampus. Divergent neural networks specific to each group were also identified. Whereas a widespread network including posterior regions such as the posterior cingulate cortex, parietal and occipital cortices was exclusively implicated in AD, the frontal and anterior temporal lobes underpinned the episodic memory deficits in bvFTD. Our results point to distinct neural changes underlying episodic memory decline specific to each dementia syndrome. PMID:23670951

  19. Walking unsteadily: a case of acute cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Simonetta, Federico; Christou, Fotini; Vandoni, Riccardo E; Nierle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia is an infrequent neurological syndrome in adults especially if complicated by additional neurological deficits. We report the case of a 69-year-old woman who presented with sudden onset of left facial droop, dizziness, slurred speech and impaired balance. Her medical history included paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and a sigmoid diverticular abscess treated with ciprofloxacin and metronidazole. Cranial computed tomographic angiography and MRI showed no signs of acute ischaemia or haemorrhage but demonstrated symmetrically distributed lesions in the cerebellar dentate nuclei. A diagnosis of metronidazole-induced encephalopathy was suspected. Metronidazole was stopped and the patient completely recovered. Metronidazole is a commonly prescribed medication. Clinicians should be aware of the clinical and radiological presentation of metronidazole-induced encephalopathy so that this serious but completely reversible condition can be promptly diagnosed. PMID:23283615

  20. Neuropsychological test performance of patients with Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Wollmann, Tone; Barroso, Jose; Monton, Fernando; Nieto, Antonieta

    2002-08-01

    Although recognized as one of the most common hereditary diseases of the nervous system, the neuropsychological deficits in Friedreich's ataxia (FA) have rarely been studied. A protocol was constructed to assess the major cognitive areas in patients with FA and pair-matched normal controls. Motor difficulties, dysarthria and fatigability were taken into account. Neuropsychological assessment showed decreased motor and mental reaction times, reduced verbal span, deficits in letter fluency, impaired acquisition and consolidation of verbal information, proactive interference effect, and alterations in complex visuoperceptual and visuoconstructive abilities, in comparison with the control group. Magnetic resonance images showing cerebellar atrophy in the majority of patients suggest that cerebellar degeneration and the interruption of afferent and efferent cerebellar connections could be related to the cognitive deficits shown by our patients. PMID:12187450

  1. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Jayesh M; Bush, Andrew; van Gerven, Marjo; Nissenkorn, Andreea; Renke, Michael; Yarlett, Lian; Taylor, Malcolm; Tonia, Thomy; Warris, Adilia; Zielen, Stefan; Zinna, Shairbanu; Merkus, Peter J F M

    2015-12-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include immune dysfunction leading to recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections; aspiration resulting from dysfunctional swallowing due to neurodegenerative deficits; inefficient cough; and interstitial lung disease/pulmonary fibrosis. Malnutrition is a significant comorbidity. The increased radiosensitivity and increased risk of cancer should be borne in mind when requesting radiological investigations. Aggressive proactive monitoring and treatment of these various aspects of lung disease under multidisciplinary expertise in the experience of national multidisciplinary clinics internationally forms the basis of this statement on the management of lung disease in A-T. Neurological management is outwith the scope of this document. PMID:26621971

  2. Ataxia telangiectasia in Chinese children. A clinical and electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Wong, V; Yu, Y L; Chan-Lui, W Y; Woo, E; Yeung, C Y

    1987-01-01

    The clinical manifestations, immunological, chromosomal, and multimodal electrophysiological studies of five Chinese patients with ataxia telangiectasia are described. One died of hepatocellular carcinoma not associated with Hepatitis B-antigenaemia. Another died of respiratory failure. Two siblings are free of sinopulmonary infections although they are wheelchair bound. Computed tomography of the brain showed cerebellar atrophy in four cases. Nerve conduction studies showed evidence of axonal neuropathy in all cases with the earliest detection at six years. Electromyography showed mild denervation changes in two cases. Two patients had abnormal somatosensory evoked potentials and one had abnormal visual and brain stem auditory evoked potentials. The level of alpha foetal protein was elevated whereas the serum carcino-embryonic antigen was normal in all patients. PMID:3665286

  3. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a restrictive vegan diet with little to no intake of animal products or other fortified foods. The child was diagnosed with presumed vitamin B12 deficiency and was treated with intramuscular B12 injections. Neurological symptoms resolved promptly within several days after starting therapy. This case underlines the importance of assessing nutritional status in the evaluation of neurological dysfunction in the pediatric patient. PMID:23536622

  4. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a restrictive vegan diet with little to no intake of animal products or other fortified foods. The child was diagnosed with presumed vitamin B12 deficiency and was treated with intramuscular B12 injections. Neurological symptoms resolved promptly within several days after starting therapy. This case underlines the importance of assessing nutritional status in the evaluation of neurological dysfunction in the pediatric patient. PMID:23536622

  5. The cerebellar component of Friedreich’s ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ashley N.; Morral, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Lack of frataxin in Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) causes a complex neurological and pathological phenotype. Progressive atrophy of the dentate nucleus (DN) is a major intrinsic central nervous system lesion. Antibodies to neuron-specific enolase (NSE), calbindin, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), and vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (VGluT1, VGluT2) allowed insight into the disturbed synaptic circuitry of the DN. The available case material included autopsy specimens of 24 patients with genetically defined FRDA and 14 normal controls. In FRDA, the cerebellar cortex revealed intact Purkinje cell somata and dendrites as assessed by calbindin immunore-activity. The DN, however, displayed severe loss of large NSE-reactive neurons. Small neurons remained intact. Labeling of Purkinje cells, basket fibers, Golgi neurons, and Golgi axonal plexuses with antibodies to GAD indicated normal intrinsic circuitry of the cerebellar cortex involving γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In contrast, the DN displayed severe loss of GABA-ergic terminals and formation of GAD- and calbindin-reactive grumose degeneration. The surviving small GAD-positive DN neurons provided normal GABA-ergic terminals to intact inferior olivary nuclei. The olives also received normal glutamatergic terminals as shown by VGluT2-reactivity. VGluT1-immunocytochemistry of the cerebellar cortex confirmed normal glutamatergic input to the molecular layer by parallel fibers and the granular layer by mossy fibers. VGluT2-immunoreactivity visualized normal climbing fibers and mossy fiber terminals. The DN, however, showed depletion of VGluT1- and VGluT2-reactive terminals arising from climbing and mossy fiber collaterals. The main functional deficit underlying cerebellar ataxia in FRDA is defective processing of inhibitory and excitatory impulses that converge on the large neurons of the DN. The reason for the selective vulnerability of these nerve cells remains elusive. PMID:21638087

  6. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinocerebellar ataxia-2.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia -2 is a progressive, degenerative genetic disease caused by an expanded (CAG) trinucleotide repetition on the chromosome 12 resulting in production of an abnormal protein called ataxin-2. There is no known effective management or cure in biomedicine for this genetic disease. In the present study a case of SCA2 that was treated with Ayurvedic intervention is reported. Ayurvedic treatments in this case were directed towards alleviating symptoms and to reduce severe disability due to progressive nature of disease. A 42 year old male patient was diagnosed for Vāta vyādhi (group of various neurological disorders) and was- treated with Śālisastika pinda svedana (sudation with bolus of medicated cooked rice) for 30 days-, Śirobasti (sudation of head with the help of a cap on head) with Aśvagandhā taila for 45 days and Balādi ksīra basti (enema with medicated milk) with Aśvagandhā taila anuvāsana (enema with oil) for 30 days in Karma basti krama (30 days regime of purification and oleation enema) along with a combination of Ayurvedic oral drugs which consisted of Brahadvātacintāmanirasa - 125 mg, Vasantāmaltī rasa- 125 mg, Daśamūla kvātha- 40 ml, Aśvagandhā cūrṇa (powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL)- 3g, Amrtā cūrṇa (powder of Tinospora cordifolia Willd.)- 500 mg, Muktāśukti pisti - 500 mg, Yogarāja Guggulu - 500 mg twice a day for 2 months. Patient's condition was assessed on the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Before treatment, mean SARA score was 35. This reduced to 15 after treatment. Good relief in dysarthria, fasciculation, heaviness in eye, blurred vision, axial tremor; constipation and quality of life were observed in this case. PMID:27143801

  7. Frataxin levels in peripheral tissue in Friedreich ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Lazaropoulos, Michael; Dong, Yina; Clark, Elisia; Greeley, Nathaniel R; Seyer, Lauren A; Brigatti, Karlla W; Christie, Carlton; Perlman, Susan L; Wilmot, George R; Gomez, Christoper M; Mathews, Katherine D; Yoon, Grace; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Hoyle, Chad; Subramony, Sub H; Brocht, Alicia F; Farmer, Jennifer M; Wilson, Robert B; Deutsch, Eric C; Lynch, David R

    2015-01-01

    Objective Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive ataxia resulting from mutations in the frataxin gene (FXN). Such mutations, usually expanded guanine–adenine–adenine (GAA) repeats, give rise to decreased levels of frataxin protein in both affected and unaffected tissues. The goal was to understand the relationship of frataxin levels in peripheral tissues to disease status. Methods Frataxin levels were measured in buccal cells and blood, and analyzed in relation to disease features. Site-directed mutant frataxin was also transfected into human embryonic kidney cells to model results from specific point mutations. Results There was no evidence for change in frataxin levels over time with repeated measures analysis, although linear regression analysis of cross-sectional data predicted a small increase over decades. GAA repeat length predicted frataxin levels in both tissues, and frataxin levels themselves predicted neurological ratings (accounting for age). Compound heterozygous patients for a GAA expansion and a point mutation in FXN generally had lower levels of frataxin than those homozygous for the presence of two GAA repeat expansions, though levels varied dramatically between tissues in some compound heterozygotes for point mutations. The G130V mutation led to decreased levels of frataxin in vitro as well as in vivo, while the R165C mutation produced normal immunoreactive levels of frataxin both in vitro and in vivo. Start codon mutations led to low levels of frataxin in buccal cells but preserved immunoreactive frataxin levels in blood. Interpretation The present data show that peripheral frataxin levels reflect disease features in FRDA, but emphasize the need for interpretation of such levels in the context of specific mutations. PMID:26339677

  8. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinocerebellar ataxia-2

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia -2 is a progressive, degenerative genetic disease caused by an expanded (CAG) trinucleotide repetition on the chromosome 12 resulting in production of an abnormal protein called ataxin-2. There is no known effective management or cure in biomedicine for this genetic disease. In the present study a case of SCA2 that was treated with Ayurvedic intervention is reported. Ayurvedic treatments in this case were directed towards alleviating symptoms and to reduce severe disability due to progressive nature of disease. A 42 year old male patient was diagnosed for Vāta vyādhi (group of various neurological disorders) and was- treated with Śālisastika pinda svedana (sudation with bolus of medicated cooked rice) for 30 days-, Śirobasti (sudation of head with the help of a cap on head) with Aśvagandhā taila for 45 days and Balādi ksīra basti (enema with medicated milk) with Aśvagandhā taila anuvāsana (enema with oil) for 30 days in Karma basti krama (30 days regime of purification and oleation enema) along with a combination of Ayurvedic oral drugs which consisted of Brahadvātacintāmanirasa – 125 mg, Vasantāmaltī rasa- 125 mg, Daśamūla kvātha- 40 ml, Aśvagandhā cūrṇa (powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL)- 3g, Amrtā cūrṇa (powder of Tinospora cordifolia Willd.)- 500 mg, Muktāśukti pisti – 500 mg, Yogarāja Guggulu – 500 mg twice a day for 2 months. Patient's condition was assessed on the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Before treatment, mean SARA score was 35. This reduced to 15 after treatment. Good relief in dysarthria, fasciculation, heaviness in eye, blurred vision, axial tremor; constipation and quality of life were observed in this case. PMID:27143801

  9. Ethanol-Induced Cerebellar Ataxia: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dar, M Saeed

    2015-08-01

    The cerebellum is an important target of ethanol toxicity given that cerebellar ataxia is the most consistent physical manifestation of acute ethanol consumption. Despite the significance of the cerebellum in ethanol-induced cerebellar ataxia (EICA), the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying EICA are incompletely understood. However, two important findings have shed greater light on this phenomenon. First, ethanol-induced blockade of cerebellar adenosine uptake in rodent models points to a role for adenosinergic A1 modulation of EICA. Second, the consistent observation that intracerebellar administration of nicotine in mice leads to antagonism of EICA provides evidence for a critical role of cerebellar nitric oxide (NO) in EICA reversal. Based on these two important findings, this review discusses the potential molecular events at two key synaptic sites (mossy fiber-granule cell-Golgi cell (MGG synaptic site) and granule cell parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (GPP synaptic site) that lead to EICA. Specifically, ethanol-induced neuronal NOS inhibition at the MGG synaptic site acts as a critical trigger for Golgi cell activation which leads to granule cell deafferentation. Concurrently, ethanol-induced inhibition of adenosine uptake at the GPP synaptic site produces adenosine accumulation which decreases glutamate release and leads to the profound activation of Purkinje cells (PCs). These molecular events at the MGG and GPP synaptic sites are mutually reinforcing and lead to cerebellar dysfunction, decreased excitatory output of deep cerebellar nuclei, and EICA. The critical importance of PCs as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex suggests normalization of PC function could have important therapeutic implications. PMID:25578036

  10. The temporal attributes of episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Raymond P; Hunsaker, Michael R

    2010-12-31

    From a temporal dynamic processing point of view, episodic memory can be divided into three critical time periods: short-term episodic memory with a duration of seconds, intermediate-term episodic memory with a duration from minutes to hours, and long-term or remote episodic memory with a duration from days to years. We propose that short-term episodic memory is mediated by the CA3 subregion of the hippocampus, intermediate-term episodic memory is mediated by the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus (in certain situations aided by the CA3 subregion), and that long-term or remote episodic memory may be mediated by the CA1 subregion. In support of the above mentioned proposal data are presented to support the short-term and intermediate episodic memory functions of CA3 and CA1 based on single item object, spatial location, and object-place association tasks. Additional data are presented for a role for CA3 in short-term episodic memory based on multiple sequential spatial locations, visual objects, and odors tasks. The same episodic memory model based on duration mentioned above cannot easily be applied to the functions of the CA3 (short-term episodic) and CA1 (intermediate-term episodic) for a multiple sequentially presented item, such as a places, objects or odors. The reason for this is that the CA1 region supports, in addition to intermediate episodic memory, temporal pattern separation processes which would reduce interference among sequentially experienced items. The consequence is that this temporal pattern separation process can result in CA1 involvement in short-term episodic tasks based on duration. Also, data are presented based on tasks that involved multiple-trials tested within a day and between days short-term and intermediate-term episodic memory. Furthermore, the mechanisms for understanding the interactions and dissociations between CA3 and CA1 are discussed. The DG appears to have a modulatory influence on the CA3 and CA1 mediation of short-term and

  11. Episodic Accretion in Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audard, M.; Ábrahám, P.; Dunham, M. M.; Green, J. D.; Grosso, N.; Hamaguchi, K.; Kastner, J. H.; Kóspál, Á.; Lodato, G.; Romanova, M. M.; Skinner, S. L.; Vorobyov, E. I.; Zhu, Z.

    In the last 20 years, the topic of episodic accretion has gained significant interest in the star-formation community. It is now viewed as a common, although still poorly understood, phenomenon in low-mass star formation. The FU Orionis objects (FUors) are long-studied examples of this phenomenon. FU Orionis objects are believed to undergo accretion outbursts during which the accretion rate rapidly increases from typically 10-7 to a few 10-4 M⊙ yr-1, and remains elevated over several decades or more. EXors, a loosely defined class of pre-main-sequence stars, exhibit shorter and repetitive outbursts, associated with lower accretion rates. The relationship between the two classes, and their connection to the standard pre-main-sequence evolutionary sequence, is an open question: Do they represent two distinct classes, are they triggered by the same physical mechanism, and do they occur in the same evolutionary phases? Over the past couple of decades, many theoretical and numerical models have been developed to explain the origin of FUor and EXor outbursts. In parallel, such accretion bursts have been detected at an increasing rate, and as observing techniques improve, each individual outburst is studied in increasing detail. We summarize key observations of pre-main-sequence star outbursts, and review the latest thinking on outburst triggering mechanisms, the propagation of outbursts from star/disk to disk/jet systems, the relation between classical EXors and FUors, and newly discovered outbursting sources — all of which shed new light on episodic accretion. We finally highlight some of the most promising directions for this field in the near- and long-term.

  12. Gluten Sensitivity – A Potentially Reversible Cause of Progressive Cerebellar Ataxia and Myoclonus - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bohra, Vikram; Duggal, Ashish; Ghuge, Vijay V; Chaudhary, Neera

    2015-01-01

    Gluten sensitivity is an umbrella term used for diverse clinical manifestations occurring as a result of abnormal immunological reactivity to dietary gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Celiac disease is the most well-known but not the only manifestation of gluten sensitivity. Myoclonus with Ataxia is a rare manifestation of gluten sensitivity and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with idiopathic sporadic ataxia. The presence of gluten-related immune markers in normal population however complicates the reliable diagnosis of gluten related neurological disorders and clinical improvement on gluten free diet can serve as a diagnostic tool for this disease. We report a case of sporadic progressive cerebellar ataxia with myoclonus with positive antigliadin antibodies, which improved with a trial of gluten free diet. This case highlights an important diagnostic and therapeutic principle in management of late onset idiopathic ataxia. PMID:26673942

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid as a reflector of central cholinergic and amino acid neurotransmitter activity in cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Manyam, B V; Giacobini, E; Ferraro, T N; Hare, T A

    1990-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amino acid neurotransmitters, related compounds, and their precursors, choline levels, and acetylcholinesterase activity were measured in the CSF of patients with cerebellar ataxia during a randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled clinical trial of physostigmine salicylate. The CSF gamma-aminobutyric acid, methionine, and choline levels, adjusted for age, were significantly lower in patients with cerebellar ataxia compared with controls. Physostigmine selectively reduced the level of CSF isoleucine and elevated the levels of phosphoethanolamine. No change occurred in CSF acetylcholinesterase activity and in the levels of plasma amino compounds in patients with cerebellar ataxia when compared with controls. Median ataxia scores did not statistically differ between placebo and physostigmine nor did functional improvement occur in any of the patients. PMID:1978660

  14. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay

    MedlinePlus

    ... with ARSACS have also been identified in Japan, Turkey, Tunisia, Spain, Italy, and Belgium. The signs and ... spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) families from Turkey. Neurogenetics. 2004 Sep;5(3):165-70. Epub ...

  15. Spinocerebellar ataxia: patient and health professional perspectives on whether and how patents affect access to clinical genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ashton; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Genetic testing for spinocerebellar ataxia is used in diagnosis of rare movement disorders. Such testing generally does not affect treatment, but confirmation of mutations in a known gene can confirm diagnosis and end an often years-long quest for the cause of distressing and disabling symptoms. Through interviews and a web forum hosted by the National Ataxia Foundation, patients and health professionals related their experiences with the effect of patents on access to genetic testing for spinocerebellar ataxia. In the United States, Athena Diagnostics holds either a patent or an exclusive license to a patent in the case of six spinocerebellar ataxia variants (spinocerebellar ataxia 1-3 and 6-8) and two other hereditary ataxias (Friedreich's Ataxia and Early Onset Ataxia). Athena has enforced its exclusive rights to spinocerebellar ataxia-related patents by sending notification letters to multiple laboratories offering genetic testing for inherited neurological conditions, including spinocerebellar ataxia. Roughly half of web forum respondents had decided not to get genetic tests. Price, coverage and reimbursement by insurers and health plans, and fear of genetic discrimination were the main reasons cited for deciding not to get tested. Price was cited as an access concern by the physicians, and as sole US provider, coverage and reimbursement depend on having payment agreements between Athena and payers. In cases in which payers do not reimburse, the patient is responsible for payment, although some patients can apply to the voluntary Athena Access and Patient Protection Plan offered by the company. PMID:20393313

  16. Exome Sequencing in the Clinical Diagnosis of Sporadic or Familial Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Brent L.; Lee, Hane; Deignan, Joshua L.; Strom, Samuel P.; Kantarci, Sibel; Wang, Xizhe; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Vilain, Eric; Grody, Wayne W.; Perlman, Susan; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Nelson, Stanley F.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cerebellar ataxias are a diverse collection of neurologic disorders with causes ranging from common acquired etiologies to rare genetic conditions. Numerous genetic disorders have been associated with chronic progressive ataxia and this consequently presents a diagnostic challenge for the clinician regarding how to approach and prioritize genetic testing in patients with such clinically heterogeneous phenotypes. Additionally, while the value of genetic testing in early-onset and/or familial cases seems clear, many patients with ataxia present sporadically with adult onset of symptoms and the contribution of genetic variation to the phenotype of these patients has not yet been established. OBJECTIVE To investigate the contribution of genetic disease in a population of patients with predominantly adult- and sporadic-onset cerebellar ataxia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We examined a consecutive series of 76 patients presenting to a tertiary referral center for evaluation of chronic progressive cerebellar ataxia. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Next-generation exome sequencing coupled with comprehensive bioinformatic analysis, phenotypic analysis, and clinical correlation. RESULTS We identified clinically relevant genetic information in more than 60% of patients studied (n = 46), including diagnostic pathogenic gene variants in 21% (n = 16), a notable yield given the diverse genetics and clinical heterogeneity of the cerebellar ataxias. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This study demonstrated that clinical exome sequencing in patients with adult-onset and sporadic presentations of ataxia is a high-yield test, providing a definitive diagnosis in more than one-fifth of patients and suggesting a potential diagnosis in more than one-third to guide additional phenotyping and diagnostic evaluation. Therefore, clinical exome sequencing is an appropriate consideration in the routine genetic evaluation of all patients presenting with chronic progressive cerebellar ataxia

  17. The occurrence of ataxia-telangiectasia and common variable immunodeficiency in siblings: case report.

    PubMed

    Osundwa, V M; Dawod, S T

    1994-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency and ataxia-telangiectasia with immunodeficiency are both well recognized syndromes which occur in children. The aetiological factors responsible for both these conditions have yet to be defined clearly. The clinical and laboratory features in two siblings, one with common variable immunodeficiency and the other with ataxia-telangiectasia, are presented. This is the first report of these two entities occurring in siblings. PMID:7516139

  18. A Transactional Approach to Transfer Episodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jornet, Alfredo; Roth, Wolff-Michael; Krange, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    In this article we present an analytical framework for approaching transfer episodes--episodes in which participants declare or can be declared to bring prior experience to bear on the current task organization. We build on Dewey's writings about the continuity of experience, Vygotsky's ideas of unit analysis, as well as more recent developments…

  19. Tracking the Construction of Episodic Future Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Argembeau, Arnaud; Mathy, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    The ability to mentally simulate possible futures ("episodic future thinking") is of fundamental importance for various aspects of human cognition and behavior, but precisely how humans construct mental representations of future events is still essentially unknown. We suggest that episodic future thoughts consist of transitory patterns of…

  20. Binding of episodic memories in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Jonathon D.; Smith, Alexandra E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary People remember an event as a coherent scene [1-4]. Memory of such an episode is thought to reflect binding of a fully integrated representation, rather than memory of unconnected features [4-7]. However, it is not known if rodents form bound representations. Here we show that rats remember episodes as bound representations. Rats were presented with multiple features of unique episodes at memory encoding: what (food flavor), where (maze location), source (self-generated food seeking–running to the food site– or experimenter-generated food seeking –placement by the experimenter at the food site), and context (spatial cues in the room where the event occurred). After a delay, the trial continued with a memory assessment in which one flavor replenished at the self-generated- but not at experimenter-generated-locations. We presented rats with multiple overlapping features, in rapid succession, to ensure that successful memory retrieval required them to disambiguate multiple study episodes (using two rooms). We found that binding is resistant to interference from highly similar episodes and survives long retention intervals (~1 week). Our results suggest that multiple episodic memories are each structured as bound representations, which suggests that nonhumans represent episodic memories using a structure similar to that of people. This finding enhances the translational potential for utilizing animal models of episodic memory to explore the biological mechanisms of memory and validate therapeutic approaches for treating disorders of memory. PMID:25466681

  1. Episodic plate tectonics on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Studies of impact craters on Venus from the Magellan images have placed important constraints on surface volcanism. Some 840 impact craters have been identified with diameters ranging from 2 to 280 km. Correlations of this impact flux with craters on the Moon, Earth, and Mars indicate a mean surface age of 0.5 +/- 0.3 Ga. Another important observation is that 52 percent of the craters are slightly fractured and only 4.5 percent are embayed by lava flows. These observations led researchers to hypothesize that a pervasive resurfacing event occurred about 500 m.y. ago and that relatively little surface volcanism has occurred since. Other researchers have pointed out that a global resurfacing event that ceased about 500 MYBP is consistent with the results given by a recent study. These authors carried out a series of numerical calculations of mantle convection in Venus yielding thermal evolution results. Their model considered crustal recycling and gave rapid planetary cooling. They, in fact, suggested that prior to 500 MYBP plate tectonics was active in Venus and since 500 MYBP the lithosphere has stabilized and only hot-spot volcanism has reached the surface. We propose an alternative hypothesis for the inferred cessation of surface volcanism on Venus. We hypothesize that plate tectonics on Venus is episodic. Periods of rapid plate tectonics result in high rates of subduction that cool the interior resulting in more sluggish mantle convection.

  2. Cytokines in Machado Joseph Disease/Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3.

    PubMed

    da Silva Carvalho, Gerson; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Haas, Clarissa Branco; Torrez, Vitor Rocco; Brochier, Andressa Wigner; Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Gheno, Tailise; Russo, Aline; Monte, Thais Lampert; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur; D'Avila, Rui; Donis, Karina Carvalho; Castilhos, Raphael Machado; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Torman, Vanessa Leotti; Camey, Suzi; Portela, Luis Valmor; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the serum concentrations of a broad spectrum of cytokines in symptomatic and asymptomatic carriers of Machado Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) CAG expansions. Molecularly confirmed carriers and controls were studied. Age at onset, disease duration, and clinical scales Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), Neurological Examination Score for Spinocerebellar Ataxias (NESSCA), SCA Functional Index (SCAFI), and Composite Cerebellar Functional Score (CCFS) were obtained from the symptomatic carriers. Serum was obtained from all individuals and a cytokine panel "consisted of" eotaxin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, interferon gamma-induced protein (IP)-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-a, MIP-b, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was analyzed. In a subgroup of symptomatic carriers, the cytokine panel was repeated after 360 days. Cytokine distribution among groups was studied by discriminant analysis; changes in serum levels after 360 days were studied by generalized estimation equation. Sixty-six symptomatic carriers, 13 asymptomatic carriers, and 43 controls were studied. No differences in cytokine patterns were found between controls and carriers of the CAG expansions or between controls and symptomatic carriers only. In contrast, eotaxin concentrations were significantly higher in asymptomatic than in symptomatic carriers or in controls (p = 0.001, ANCOVA). Eotaxin did not correlate with age, disease duration, CAG expansion, NESSCA score, and SARA score. Among symptomatic carriers, eotaxin dropped after 360 days (p = 0.039, GEE). SCA3/MJD patients presented a benign pattern of

  3. Episodic-like memory in animals

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Jonathon D.

    2010-01-01

    Episodic memory consists of representations of unique past events. It has been argued that episodic memory is grounded in a temporal framework, meaning that we remember when an event occurred. The ability to model the temporal aspects of episodic memory in non-human animals has been challenging and controversial. This article briefly reviews the theoretical perspective in which temporal processing plays a prominent role in episodic memory. Next, the article reviews experimental attempts to identify temporal processes of episodic memory in animals. Recent studies suggest that, at the time of memory assessment, rats remember a unique earlier event, including when it occurred, what happened, and where it took place, referred to as what-where-when memory. PMID:20211205

  4. Pharmacotherapy of cancer-related episodic pain.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Ribeiro, Maria D C

    2003-04-01

    Episodic pain is a transient increase in pain intensity over background pain. Episodic pain occurs commonly in cancer patients; it is a heterogeneous phenomenon that is incapacitating, debilitating and can have a significant impact on quality of life. Episodic pain can be difficult to manage; it is often unpredictable, typically of fast onset, of short duration and feels similar to background pain except that it may be more severe. The successful management of episodic pain can only be achieved following a thorough assessment. The subsequent management usually involves both pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies integrated into the overall care and appropriate for the stage of the patient's disease. Pharmacological management includes the implementation of primary therapies (e.g., chemotherapy for the underlying aetiology of the pain, optimising the scheduled medication (e.g., analgesics and adjuvant analgesics) and specific pharmacological interventions for the episodic pain (e.g., rescue medication). PMID:12667112

  5. SNP Analysis and Whole Exome Sequencing: Their Application in the Analysis of a Consanguineous Pedigree Segregating Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Sarah L.; Marquis-Nicholson, Renate; Claxton, Karen; Ashton, Fern; Leong, Ivone U. S.; Prosser, Debra O.; Love, Jennifer M.; George, Alice M.; Taylor, Graham; Wilson, Callum; McKinlay Gardner, R. J.; Love, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia encompasses a large and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. We employed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis and whole exome sequencing to investigate a consanguineous Maori pedigree segregating ataxia. We identified a novel mutation in exon 10 of the SACS gene: c.7962T>G p.(Tyr2654*), establishing the diagnosis of autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). Our findings expand both the genetic and phenotypic spectrum of this rare disorder, and highlight the value of high-density SNP analysis and whole exome sequencing as powerful and cost-effective tools in the diagnosis of genetically heterogeneous disorders such as the hereditary ataxias.

  6. A case of cystinuria presenting with cerebellar ataxia and dementia.

    PubMed

    Tohge, Rie; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Takahashi, Makio

    2016-08-01

    Cystinuria normally manifests as recurrent urinary stones and renal dysfunction, but can present to neurologists with ataxia, posterior column impairment, intellectual deficiency and pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs; the neuroradiological features include cerebellar, brainstem and cerebral atrophy. It is an autosomal recessive disease caused by a transport disorder of cystine and dibasic amino acids in renal proximal tubules. Most cases have an SLC3A1 and/or SLC7A9 gene mutation but some recent Japanese patients have had distinct heterozygous gene mutations. We report a patient with cystinuria with a heterozygous P482L mutation in the SLC7A9 gene, presenting with atrophy in the cerebellum, brainstem and cerebrum and with no urinary stones. Cystine, an amino acid comprising two cysteine molecules, is transported into cells via a cystine transporter. It is essential for producing hydrogen sulfate and the cellular antioxidant glutathione: these exert neuroprotection in astrocytes and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Although cystinuria is a metabolic disorder associated with renal dysfunction, we suspect that a trafficking defect of transporter rBAT-BAT1 in brain might cause neuronal degeneration, leading to cerebellar and cerebral atrophy. PMID:26929440

  7. Speech characteristics associated with three genotypes of ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Sidtis, John J.; Ahn, Ji Sook; Gomez, Christopher; Sidtis, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Advances in neurobiology are providing new opportunities to investigate the neurological systems underlying motor speech control. This study explores the perceptual characteristics of the speech of three genotypes of spino-cerebellar ataxia (SCA) as manifest in four different speech tasks. Methods Speech samples from 26 speakers with SCA were perceptually rated by experienced listeners. The genotypes were: SCA1, SCA5, or SCA6. The speech tasks were: diadochokinesis, word repetition, sentence reading, and picture description. The speech samples were rated using two sets of dimensions characterized as primary (e.g., articulation, rate, and rhythm) or secondary (e.g., imprecise consonants, excess and equal stress, and harsh voice). Results On primary dimensions, SCA6 was the most impaired generally. Articulation was the most severely affected dimension and the diadochokinesis task was most effective in revealing speech impairments. On secondary dimensions, picture description was the task most likely to produce abnormal speech. The SCA groups shared articulatory problems but differed with respect to abnormal voice features. Conclusions These results support previous characterizations of ataxic dysarthria, and provide further information about the speech characteristics of genetic subtypes. Task demands affect perceptual ratings. Voice characteristics may be key to differentiating ataxic subtypes. As the genetic disorders that affect speech become better understood, more detailed characterizations of motor control systems should emerge. PMID:21592489

  8. Primary and secondary drug screening assays for Friedreich ataxia.

    PubMed

    Cotticelli, M Grazia; Rasmussen, Lynn; Kushner, Nicole L; McKellip, Sara; Sosa, Melinda Ingrum; Manouvakhova, Anna; Feng, Shuang; White, E Lucile; Maddry, Joseph A; Heemskerk, Jill; Oldt, Robert J; Surrey, Lea F; Ochs, Rachel; Wilson, Robert B

    2012-03-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neuro- and cardiodegenerative disorder for which there are no proven effective treatments. FRDA is caused by decreased expression and/or function of the protein frataxin. Frataxin chaperones iron in the mitochondrial matrix for the assembly of iron-sulfur clusters (ISCs), which are prosthetic groups critical for the function of the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). Decreased expression of frataxin or the yeast frataxin orthologue, Yfh1p, is associated with decreased ISC assembly, mitochondrial iron accumulation, and increased oxidative stress, all of which contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. Using yeast depleted of Yfh1p, a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was developed in which mitochondrial function was monitored by reduction of the tetrazolium dye WST-1 in a growth medium with a respiration-only carbon source. Of 101 200 compounds screened, 302 were identified that effectively rescue mitochondrial function. To confirm activities in mammalian cells and begin understanding mechanisms of action, secondary screening assays were developed using murine C2C12 cells and yeast mutants lacking specific complexes of the ETC, respectively. The compounds identified in this study have potential relevance for other neurodegenerative disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, such as Parkinson disease. PMID:22086726

  9. Design of a bioactive small molecule that targets r(AUUCU) repeats in spinocerebellar ataxia 10.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wang-Yong; Gao, Rui; Southern, Mark; Sarkar, Partha S; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    RNA is an important target for chemical probes of function and lead therapeutics; however, it is difficult to target with small molecules. One approach to tackle this problem is to identify compounds that target RNA structures and utilize them to multivalently target RNA. Here we show that small molecules can be identified to selectively bind RNA base pairs by probing a library of RNA-focused small molecules. A small molecule that selectively binds AU base pairs informed design of a dimeric compound (2AU-2) that targets the pathogenic RNA, expanded r(AUUCU) repeats, that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) in patient-derived cells. Indeed, 2AU-2 (50 nM) ameliorates various aspects of SCA10 pathology including improvement of mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced activation of caspase 3, and reduction of nuclear foci. These studies provide a first-in-class chemical probe to study SCA10 RNA toxicity and potentially define broadly applicable compounds targeting RNA AU base pairs in cells. PMID:27248057

  10. Design of a bioactive small molecule that targets r(AUUCU) repeats in spinocerebellar ataxia 10

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wang-Yong; Gao, Rui; Southern, Mark; Sarkar, Partha S.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA is an important target for chemical probes of function and lead therapeutics; however, it is difficult to target with small molecules. One approach to tackle this problem is to identify compounds that target RNA structures and utilize them to multivalently target RNA. Here we show that small molecules can be identified to selectively bind RNA base pairs by probing a library of RNA-focused small molecules. A small molecule that selectively binds AU base pairs informed design of a dimeric compound (2AU-2) that targets the pathogenic RNA, expanded r(AUUCU) repeats, that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) in patient-derived cells. Indeed, 2AU-2 (50 nM) ameliorates various aspects of SCA10 pathology including improvement of mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced activation of caspase 3, and reduction of nuclear foci. These studies provide a first-in-class chemical probe to study SCA10 RNA toxicity and potentially define broadly applicable compounds targeting RNA AU base pairs in cells. PMID:27248057

  11. Mutation in ATG5 reduces autophagy and leads to ataxia with developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myungjin; Sandford, Erin; Gatica, Damian; Qiu, Yu; Liu, Xu; Zheng, Yumei; Schulman, Brenda A; Xu, Jishu; Semple, Ian; Ro, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Boyoung; Mavioglu, R Nehir; Tolun, Aslıhan; Jipa, Andras; Takats, Szabolcs; Karpati, Manuela; Li, Jun Z; Yapici, Zuhal; Juhasz, Gabor; Lee, Jun Hee; Klionsky, Daniel J; Burmeister, Margit

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is required for the homeostasis of cellular material and is proposed to be involved in many aspects of health. Defects in the autophagy pathway have been observed in neurodegenerative disorders; however, no genetically-inherited pathogenic mutations in any of the core autophagy-related (ATG) genes have been reported in human patients to date. We identified a homozygous missense mutation, changing a conserved amino acid, in ATG5 in two siblings with congenital ataxia, mental retardation, and developmental delay. The subjects' cells display a decrease in autophagy flux and defects in conjugation of ATG12 to ATG5. The homologous mutation in yeast demonstrates a 30-50% reduction of induced autophagy. Flies in which Atg5 is substituted with the mutant human ATG5 exhibit severe movement disorder, in contrast to flies expressing the wild-type human protein. Our results demonstrate the critical role of autophagy in preventing neurological diseases and maintaining neuronal health. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12245.001 PMID:26812546

  12. Targeting the ataxia telangiectasia mutated pathway for effective therapy against hirsutine-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    LOU, CHENGHUA; YOKOYAMA, SATORU; ABDELHAMED, SHERIF; SAIKI, IKUO; HAYAKAWA, YOSHIHIRO

    2016-01-01

    The present authors have recently demonstrated that hirsutine, one of the major alkaloids in Uncaria species, promotes cell apoptosis by inducing DNA damage and suppresses metastasis of breast cancer cells. Despite its potent anti-cancer activity, certain types of human breast cancer cells exhibit resistance to hirsutine. To maximize the clinical utility of hirsutine therapy against breast cancer, it is critical to explore the underlying mechanism that protects hirsutine-resistant breast cancer cell lines. To identify potential targets for overcoming hirsutine-resistance, the present study investigated a library of kinase inhibitors in combination with hirsutine treatment in the hirsutine-resistant human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cell line. Amongst the 96 compounds tested, inhibitors of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) pathway sensitized MCF-7 cells to hirsutine-induced cell death along with a sustained DNA damage response. This sensitization of MCF-7 cells to the hirsutine-induced DNA damage response by interfering with the ATM pathway did not require p53. Instead, radical oxygen species generation was significantly increased in hirsute and ATM inhibitor-treated MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, the present findings suggest the importance of the ATM pathway for optimizing the anti-cancer effect of hirsutine in breast cancer cells. PMID:27347141

  13. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Ataxia-Telangiectasia Recapitulate the Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Nayler, Sam; Gatei, Magtouf; Kozlov, Sergei; Gatti, Richard; Mar, Jessica C.; Wells, Christine A.

    2012-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into every cell type of the human body. Reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) therefore provides an opportunity to gain insight into the molecular and cellular basis of disease. Because the cellular DNA damage response poses a barrier to reprogramming, generation of iPSCs from patients with chromosomal instability syndromes has thus far proven to be difficult. Here we demonstrate that fibroblasts from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), a disorder characterized by chromosomal instability, progressive neurodegeneration, high risk of cancer, and immunodeficiency, can be reprogrammed to bona fide iPSCs, albeit at a reduced efficiency. A-T iPSCs display defective radiation-induced signaling, radiosensitivity, and cell cycle checkpoint defects. Bioinformatic analysis of gene expression in the A-T iPSCs identifies abnormalities in DNA damage signaling pathways, as well as changes in mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways. A-T iPSCs can be differentiated into functional neurons and thus represent a suitable model system to investigate A-T-associated neurodegeneration. Collectively, our data show that iPSCs can be generated from a chromosomal instability syndrome and that these cells can be used to discover early developmental consequences of ATM deficiency, such as altered mitochondrial function, that may be relevant to A-T pathogenesis and amenable to therapeutic intervention. PMID:23197857

  14. How do episodic and semantic memory contribute to episodic foresight in young children?

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Atance, Cristina M.; Caza, Julian S.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are able to transcend the present and mentally travel to another time, place, or perspective. Mentally projecting ourselves backwards (i.e., episodic memory) or forwards (i.e., episodic foresight) in time are crucial characteristics of the human memory system. Indeed, over the past few years, episodic memory has been argued to be involved both in our capacity to retrieve our personal past experiences and in our ability to imagine and foresee future scenarios. However, recent theory and findings suggest that semantic memory also plays a significant role in imagining future scenarios. We draw on Tulving’s definition of episodic and semantic memory to provide a critical analysis of their role in episodic foresight tasks described in the developmental literature. We conclude by suggesting future directions of research that could further our understanding of how both episodic memory and semantic memory are intimately connected to episodic foresight. PMID:25071690

  15. Episodic coma in a new leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Espay, Alberto J; Bodensteiner, John B; Patel, Hema

    2002-02-01

    Among the leukodystrophies of a hypomyelinating nature, childhood ataxia with diffuse central nervous system hypomyelination exhibits the unique feature of rapid decrease in mental status after relatively minor head injuries or otherwise noncomplicated febrile illnesses. This article reports the case of a child with progressive spastic quadriparesis in whom unconsciousness developed repeatedly as a result of minor head trauma and required prolonged critical-care nursing. Although cognition is believed to be relatively preserved in this disorder, this child developed progressive cognitive decline. A detailed review of the literature is presented along with discussion of the potential mechanisms of neurologic deterioration. PMID:11897479

  16. Episodic acidification of small streams in the northeastern united states: ionic controls of episodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wigington, P.J., Jr.; DeWalle, David R.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Kretser, W.A.; Simonin, H.A.; Van Sickle, J.; Baker, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the Episodic Response Project (ERP), we intensively monitored discharge and stream chemistry of 13 streams located in the Northern Appalachian region of Pennsylvania and in the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains of New York from fall 1988 to spring 1990. The ERP clearly documented the occurrence of acidic episodes with minimum episodic pH ??? 5 and inorganic monomeric Al (Alim) concentrations >150 ??g/L in at least two study streams in each region. Several streams consistently experienced episodes with maximum Alim concentrations >350 ??g/L. Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) depressions resulted from complex interactions of multiple ions. Base cation decreases often made the most important contributions to ANC depressions during episodes. Organic acid pulses were also important contributors to ANC depressions in the Adirondack streams, and to a lesser extent, in the Catskill and Pennsylvania streams. Nitrate concentrations were low in the Pennsylvania streams, whereas the Catskill and Adirondack study streams had high NO3- concentrations and large episodic pulses (???54 ??eq/L). Most of the Pennsylvania study streams also frequently experienced episodic pulses of SO42- (???78 ??eq/L), whereas the Adirondack and Catskill streams did not. High baseline concentrations of SO42- (all three study areas) and NO3- (Adirondacks and Catskills) reduced episodic minimum ANC, even when these ions did not change during episodes. The ion changes that controlled the most severe episodes (lowest minimum episodic ANC) differed from the ion changes most important to smaller, more frequent episodes. Pulses of NO3- (Catskills and Adirondacks), SO42- (Pennsylvania), or organic acids became more important during major episodes. Overall, the behavior of streamwater SO42- and NO4- is an indicator that acidic deposition has contributed to the severity of episodes in the study streams.

  17. Aging, Estrogens, and Episodic Memory in Women

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Victor W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To review the relation in midlife and beyond between estrogen exposures and episodic memory in women. Background Episodic memory performance declines with usual aging, and impairments in episodic memory often portend the development of Alzheimer's disease. In the laboratory, estradiol influences hippocampal function and animal learning. However, it is controversial whether estrogens affect memory after a woman's reproductive years. Method Focused literature review, including a summary of a systematic search of clinical trials of estrogens in which outcomes included an objective measure of episodic memory. Results The natural menopause transition is not associated with objective changes in episodic memory. Strong clinical trial evidence indicates that initiating estrogen-containing hormone therapy after about age 60 years does not benefit episodic memory. Clinical trial findings in middle-age women before age 60 are limited by smaller sample sizes and shorter treatment durations, but these also do not indicate substantial memory effects. Limited short-term evidence, however, suggests that estrogens may improve verbal memory after surgical menopause. Although hormone therapy initiation in old age increases dementia risk, observational studies raise the question of an early critical window during which midlife estrogen therapy reduces late-life Alzheimer's disease. However, almost no data address whether midlife estrogen therapy affects episodic memory in old age. Conclusions Episodic memory is not substantially impacted by the natural menopause transition or improved by use of estrogen-containing hormone therapy after age 60. Further research is needed to determine whether outcomes differ after surgical menopause or whether episodic memory later in life is modified by midlife estrogenic exposures. PMID:19996872

  18. [Young person's first-episode psychosis].

    PubMed

    Mäki, Pirjo; Veijola, Juha

    2012-01-01

    Young person's first-episode psychosis may signify the onset of schizophrenia, psychotic depression or bipolar disorder. It can also be a brief condition resulting in full recovery. The psychosis may be caused by drugs. First-episode psychosis is usually preceded by a long period of nonspecific symptoms. Provision of close and active follow-up is important in the prodromal phase. Treatment of first-episode psychosis is individual. Usually it involves medication, individual discussions, psychotherapy or music therapy as well as family meetings. The therapy helps the young person become independent. PMID:22312825

  19. An action to an object does not improve its episodic encoding but removes distraction.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Xavier; Ensslin, Astrid; Marí-Beffa, Paloma

    2016-04-01

    There is some debate as to whether responding to objects in our environment improves episodic memory or does not impact it. Some authors claim that actively encoding objects improves their representation in episodic memory. Conversely, episodic memory has also been shown to improve in passive conditions, suggesting that the action itself could interfere with the encoding process. This study looks at the impact of attention and action on episodic memory using a novel what-where-when (WWW) task that includes information about object identity (what) and spatial (where) and temporal (when) properties. With this approach, we studied the episodic memory of 2 types of objects: a target, where attention or an action is defined, and a distractor, an object to be ignored, following 2 selective states: active versus passive selection. When targets were actively selected, we found no evidence of episodic memory enhancement compared to passive selection; instead, memory from irrelevant sources was suppressed. The pattern was replicated across a 2-D static display and a more realistic 3-D virtual environment. This selective attention effect on episodic memory was not observed on nonepisodic measures, demonstrating a link between attention and the encoding of episodic experiences. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26523488

  20. Modelisation of northerly snow episodes over Andorra (Pyrenees) using WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapero, L.; Esteban, P.

    2010-09-01

    North episodes over the Pyrenees represent a challenge in terms of forecasting associated effects, especially during the winter season. Andorra, a small country located in the Pyrenees, between France and Spain, is highly sensitive to these episodes. Usually these episodes generate heavy snowfalls and intense windstorms which can substantially increase hazards and accident occurrence in this mountainous region. Slight variations of the forecasted snowfall distribution and accumulation can cause a severe impact to the population: avalanche hazard, incidents on the communication systems and transports and other derivates social impacts. With north episodes, precipitation mainly affects the North Slope of the Pyrenees and nearby areas. However, in some cases, certain factors allow the precipitation to cross over to the leeward mountain slope and intense snowfalls can affect an extended area and low elevations. The challenge comes down to the difficulty that the models have in forecasting the regional effects of these events and how far over the southern side of the Pyrenees range will precipitation extend. The episode that took place on the 10-11th February 2009 is a recent example. Previous research done by Esteban et al. (2005) over this area, examined the relationship between circulation types and heavy snowfall days in Andorra. Additionally, this study has provided a first climatology of N-NW episodes with at least 30 cm of snow in a 24h period during the winter seasons from 1986 to 2001 and has pointed out differences between similar atmospheric fluxes in the snow precipitation amount and distribution. The specific objective of this study is to determine common features of these events and evaluate the ability of the high-resolution Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF) over complex terrain to predict them, especially the spatial precipitation distribution. Preliminary experiments for 10-11 February 2009 case have tested the performance of two different land

  1. Characterization of intense aerosol episodes in the Mediterranean basin from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, Antonis; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    The properties and distribution of aerosols over the broader Mediterranean region are complex since particles of different nature are either produced within its boundaries or transported from other regions. Thus, coarse dust aerosols are transported primarily from Sahara and secondarily from Middle East, while fine polluted aerosols are either produced locally from anthropogenic activities or they are transported from neighbouring or remote European areas. Also during summer biomass aerosols are transported towards the Mediterranean, originating from massive and extended fires occurring in northern Balkans and Eastern Europe and favoured by the prevailing synoptic conditions. In addition, sea-salt aerosols originate from the Mediterranean Sea or the Atlantic Ocean. Occasionally, aerosols are encountered at very high concentrations (aerosol episodes or events) significantly affecting atmospheric dynamics and climate as well as human health. Given the coexistence of different aerosols as internal and external mixtures characterizing and discriminating between the different types of aerosol episodes is a big challenge. A characterization and classification of intense aerosol episodes in the Mediterranean basin (March 2000 - February 2007) is attempted in the present study. This is achieved by implementing an objective and dynamic algorithm which uses daily aerosol optical properties derived from satellite measurements, namely MODIS-Terra, Earth Probe (EP)-TOMS and OMI-Aura. The aerosol episodes are first classified into strong and extreme ones, according to their intensity, by means of aerosol optical depth at 550nm (AOD550nm). Subsequently, they are discriminated into the following aerosol types: (i) biomass/urban-industrial (BU), (ii) desert dust (DD), (iii) sea-salt like (SS), (iv) mixed (MX) and (v) undetermined (UN). The classification is based on aerosol optical properties accounting for the particles' size (Ångström exponent, Effective radius), the

  2. Does Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) protect testicular and germ cell DNA integrity by regulating the redox status?

    PubMed

    Godschalk, Roger W L; Vanhees, Kimberly; Maas, Lou; Drittij, Marie-Jose; Pachen, Daniëlle; van Doorn-Khosrovani, Sahar van Waalwijk; van Schooten, Frederik J; Haenen, Guido R M M

    2016-08-01

    A balanced redox homeostasis in the testis is essential for genetic integrity of sperm. Reactive oxygen species can disturb this balance by oxidation of glutathione, which is regenerated using NADPH, formed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). G6PDH is regulated by the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (Atm) protein. Therefore, we studied the redox status and DNA damage in testes and sperm of mice that carried a deletion in Atm. The redox status in heterozygote mice, reflected by glutathione levels and antioxidant capacity, was lower than in wild type mice, and in homozygotes the redox status was even lower. The redox status correlated with oxidative DNA damage that was highest in mice that carried Atm deletions. Surprisingly, G6PDH activity was highest in homozygotes carrying the deletion. These data indicate that defective Atm reduces the redox homeostasis of the testis and genetic integrity of sperm by regulating glutathione levels independently from G6PDH activity. PMID:27318254

  3. ANO10 mutations cause ataxia and coenzyme Q₁₀ deficiency.

    PubMed

    Balreira, Andrea; Boczonadi, Veronika; Barca, Emanuele; Pyle, Angela; Bansagi, Boglarka; Appleton, Marie; Graham, Claire; Hargreaves, Iain P; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Lochmüller, Hanns; Griffin, Helen; Taylor, Robert W; Naini, Ali; Chinnery, Patrick F; Hirano, Michio; Quinzii, Catarina M; Horvath, Rita

    2014-11-01

    Inherited ataxias are heterogeneous disorders affecting both children and adults, with over 40 different causative genes, making molecular genetic diagnosis challenging. Although recent advances in next-generation sequencing have significantly improved mutation detection, few treatments exist for patients with inherited ataxia. In two patients with adult-onset cerebellar ataxia and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency in muscle, whole exome sequencing revealed mutations in ANO10, which encodes anoctamin 10, a member of a family of putative calcium-activated chloride channels, and the causative gene for autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-10 (SCAR10). Both patients presented with slowly progressive ataxia and dysarthria leading to severe disability in the sixth decade. Epilepsy and learning difficulties were also present in one patient, while retinal degeneration and cataract were present in the other. The detection of mutations in ANO10 in our patients indicate that ANO10 defects cause secondary low CoQ10 and SCAR10 patients may benefit from CoQ10 supplementation. PMID:25182700

  4. Does modulation of the endocannabinoid system have potential therapeutic utility in cerebellar ataxia?

    PubMed

    Stephens, G J

    2016-08-15

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a spectrum of disorders which are, however, linked by common symptoms of motor incoordination and typically associated with deficiency in Purkinje cell firing activity and, often, degeneration. Cerebellar ataxias currently lack a curative agent. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system includes eCB compounds and their associated metabolic enzymes, together with cannabinoid receptors, predominantly the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1 R) in the cerebellum; activation of this system in the cerebellar cortex is associated with deficits in motor coordination characteristic of ataxia, effects which can be prevented by CB1 R antagonists. Of further interest are various findings that CB1 R deficits may also induce a progressive ataxic phenotype. Together these studies suggest that motor coordination is reliant on maintaining the correct balance in eCB system signalling. Recent work also demonstrates deficient cannabinoid signalling in the mouse 'ducky(2J) ' model of ataxia. In light of these points, the potential mechanisms whereby cannabinoids may modulate the eCB system to ameliorate dysfunction associated with cerebellar ataxias are considered. PMID:26970080

  5. Novel aberrant genetic and epigenetic events in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Mari Paz; Jones, Jonathan; Rodríguez-Lozano, F J; Moraleda, Jose M; Martinez, Salvador

    2015-07-01

    It is generally accepted that Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is caused by a deficiency in frataxin expression, a mitochondrial protein involved in iron homeostasis, which mainly affects the brain, dorsal root ganglia of the spinal cord, heart and in certain cases the pancreas. However, there is little knowledge as to other possible genes that may be affected in this disorder, and which can contribute to its complexity. In the current study we compared human periodontal ligament cells gene expression of healthy individuals and FRDA patients. The expression of active-caspase 3, as well as other apoptosis-related genes, was increased in the FRDA cells. Furthermore, iron-sulphur cluster genes, as well as oxidative stress-related genes were overexpressed in FRDA. Moreover, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neuregulin 1 and miR-132 were all upregulated. These three genes are capable of regulating the expression of each other. Interestingly, when the cells from FRDA patients were co-cultured in the presence of idebenone and deferiprone, caspase expression decreased while antioxidant gene expression, as well as frataxin expression, increased. Regarding epigenetic mechanisms, the frataxin gene was hypermethylated, compared to the healthy counterparts, in the upstream GAA repetitive region. Of the three DNA methyltransferases, DNMT1 but not DNMT3׳s gene expression was higher in FRDA cells. In conclusion, our data show that FRDA cells present altered expression of genes related to cell cycle, oxidative stress and iron homeostasis which may be implicated in the increased apoptotic levels. Also, the altered expression is in a certain degree normalized in the presence of idebenone and deferiprone. PMID:25929520

  6. Friedreich’s ataxia: Pathology, pathogenesis, and molecular genetics

    PubMed Central

    Koeppen, Arnulf H.

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenic mutation in Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) is a homozygous guanine-adenine-adenine (GAA) trinucleotide repeat expansion on chromosome 9q13 that causes a transcriptional defect of the frataxin gene. Deficiency of frataxin, a small mitochondrial protein, is responsible for all clinical and morphological manifestations of FRDA. This autosomal recessive disease affects central and peripheral nervous systems, heart, skeleton, and endocrine pancreas. Long expansions lead to early onset, severe clinical illness, and death in young adult life. Patients with short expansions have a later onset and a more benign course. Some are not diagnosed during life. The neurological phenotype reflects lesions in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), sensory peripheral nerves, corticospinal tracts, and dentate nuclei (DN). Most patients succumb to cardiomyopathy, and many become diabetic during the course of their disease. This review seeks to reconcile the diverse clinical features with pathological and molecular data. In the pathogenesis of the lesion in DRG, dorsal spinal roots, and sensory peripheral nerves, developmental defects and atrophy occur in combination. The progressive lesion of the DN lacks a known developmental component. Destruction of the DN, optic atrophy, and degeneration of the corticospinal tracts are intrinsic central nervous system lesions. Fiber loss in dorsal columns and spinocerebellar tracts, and atrophy of the neurons in the dorsal nuclei of Clarke are secondary to the lesion in DRG. The role of frataxin deficiency in the pathogenesis of FRDA is still unclear because the protein has multiple functions in the normal state, including biogenesis of iron–sulfur clusters; iron chaperoning; iron storage; and control of iron-mediated oxidative tissue damage. PMID:21315377

  7. The Neuropathology of Late-Onset Friedreich’s Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Morral, Jennifer A.; McComb, Rodney D.; Feustel, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) affects very young persons. In a large series, the mean ages of onset and death were 11 and 38 years, respectively. The clinical spectrum of FRDA has expanded after genetic confirmation of the mutation became a routine laboratory test. The main cause of death in juvenile-onset FRDA is cardiomyopathy whereas patients with late-onset are more likely to succumb to neurological disability or an intercurrent illness. Many patients with early onset now survive for 20 years or longer. This study made a systematic comparison of the neuropathology in 14 patients with juvenile onset and long survival, and five patients with late onset and long survival. Mean ages of onset (± standard deviation) were 10±5 and 28± 13 years, respectively. Disease durations were 33±11 and 47±11 years, respectively. Cross-sectional areas of the thoracic spinal cord were greatly reduced from the normal state but did not differ between the two groups. Similarly, the neurons of dorsal root ganglia were significantly reduced in size in both juvenile- and late-onset cases of FRDA. The dentate nucleus showed severe loss of neurons as well as modification and destruction of corticonuclear terminals in all FRDA patients. Delayed atrophy of the dentate nucleus is the likely cause of the ataxic phenotype of FRDA in late-onset cases, but the reason for the delay is unknown. Frataxin levels in the dentate nucleus of two patients with late onset were similar to those of seven patients with juvenile onset. PMID:21128039

  8. [Critical time intervention for individuals with first episode psychosis].

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Ruben; Schilling, Sara; Jorquera, María José

    2015-01-01

    The necessity of providing individuals experiencing first episode psychosis with early, comprehensive, and effective treatment, in order to improve their long-term prognosis, has been widely recognized. However, despite the important role of psychosocial interventions in treatment, only a portion of patients receive this type of care, and it is often of poor quality, especially in countries with limited resources. The Critical Time Intervention (CTI) model has been shown to effectively improve clinical and social outcomes of individuals with a history of psychosis, while also being cost-effective. It is a time-limited, community-based intervention, carried out by technical community workers who are specifically trained and continuously supervised by professionals. Therefore, CTI is a promising psychosocial intervention model for individuals experiencing a first psychotic episode, in countries with limited mental health service resources. PMID:27107285

  9. Episodic repetitive thought: dimensions, correlates, and consequences.

    PubMed

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Stanton, Annette L; Flynn, Sarah McQueary; Roach, Abbey R; Testa, Jamie J; Hardy, Jaime K

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive thought (RT) - attentive, prolonged, or frequent thought about oneself and one's world - plays an important role in many models of psychological and physical ill health (e.g., rumination and worry), as well as models of recovery and well-being (e.g., processing and reminiscing). In these models, repetitive thought is typically treated as stable or trait-like. In contrast, episodic RT reflects what people have "on their minds" at a particular point in time. In four studies, young women (N=94), college students (N=166), first-year law students (N=73), and older adults (N=174) described their episodic RT, which was then rated for qualities including valence, purpose, and theme. Episodic RT valence was associated with mood and depressive symptoms both between (Studies 1-4) and within people (Studies 3-4), and it mediated the effects of dispositional coping through emotional approach (Study 1). The effect of episodic RT valence in turn was moderated by other properties of episodic RT, including purpose, "trait" valence, and theme (Studies 1-4). The study of episodic RT complements that of trait RT and allows for observations of how RT and psychological adjustment change in concert and in context, as well as examining how the RT qualities that are not reflected in trait measures affect adjustment. PMID:21861772

  10. Episodic Repetitive Thought: Dimensions, Correlates, and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C.; Stanton, Annette L.; Flynn, Sarah McQueary; Roach, Abbey R.; Testa, Jamie J.; Hardy, Jaime K.

    2011-01-01

    Repetitive thought (RT) – attentive, prolonged, or frequent thought about oneself and one’s world – plays an important role in many models of psychological and physical ill health (e.g., rumination and worry), as well as models of recovery and well-being (e.g., processing and reminiscing). In these models, repetitive thought is typically treated as stable or trait-like. In contrast, episodic RT reflects what people have “on their minds” at a particular point in time. In four studies, young women (N = 94), college students (N = 166), first-year law students (N = 73), and older adults (N = 174) described their episodic RT, which was then rated for qualities including valence, purpose, and theme. Episodic RT valence was associated with mood and depressive symptoms both between (Studies 1–4) and within people (Studies 3–4), and it mediated the effects of dispositional coping through emotional approach (Study 1). The effect of episodic RT valence in turn was moderated by other properties of episodic RT, including purpose, “trait” valence, and theme (Studies 1–4). The study of episodic RT complements that of trait RT and allows for observations of how RT and psychological adjustment change in concert and in context, as well as examining the RT qualities that are not reflected in trait measures affecting adjustment. PMID:21861772

  11. ATFresno: a phenotype linking ataxia-telangiectasia with the Nijmegen breakage syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Curry, C J; O'Lague, P; Tsai, J; Hutchison, H T; Jaspers, N G; Wara, D; Gatti, R A; Hutchinson, H T

    1989-01-01

    This report describes twin girls with typical features of ataxia-telangiectasia, including increased alpha-fetoprotein, radio-resistant DNA synthesis, characteristic chromosome abnormality, and immunodeficiency. They have, in addition, microcephaly and mental retardation. Complementation studies were performed utilizing Sendai virus--mediated fusion of fibroblast cell lines. Complementation was observed with patients in ataxia-telangiectasia complementation groups A, C, and E but not with the cell line from a patient with the Nijmegen breakage syndrome, in which patients have microcephaly, radio-resistant DNA synthesis, chromosome aberrations, and immunodeficiency but lack ataxia and telangiectasia. These data suggest that the Nijmegen breakage syndrome and the patients described here are not genetically distinct entities but form a spectrum of one disorder. Images Figure 1 PMID:2491181

  12. Location of the 9257 and ataxia mutations on mouse chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Griffith, A J; Radice, G L; Burgess, D L; Kohrman, D C; Hansen, G M; Justice, M J; Johnson, K R; Davisson, M T; Meisler, M H

    1996-06-01

    The location of three mutations on proximal Chromosome (Chr) 18 was determined by analysis of the offspring of several backcrosses. The results demonstrate that ataxia and the insertional mutation TgN9257Mm are separated by less than 1 cM and are located approximately 3 cM from the centromere, while the balding locus is 7 cM more distal. Previous data demonstrated that the twirler locus also maps within 1 cM of ataxia. The corrected locations will contribute to identification of appropriate candidate genes for these mutations. Two polymorphic microsatellite markers for proximal Chr 18 are described, D18Umi1 and D18Umi2. The Lama3 locus encoding the alpha 3 subunit of nicein was mapped distal to ataxia and did not recombine with Tg9257. PMID:8662222

  13. A case considered gluten ataxia with anti-TG6 IgA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kenji; Kobayashi, Makiko; Ueta, Yuki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Nanri, Kazunori

    2016-06-22

    An 81-year-old woman presented with a chief complaint of gait disturbance. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed mild cerebellar atrophy and cerebral blood flow scintigraphy revealed reduced blood flow in the cerebellum. The patient was diagnosed with cortical cerebellar atrophy, and was given taltirelin hydrate, but symptoms slowly progressed. Thirteen years after onset, a positive result for anti-transglutaminase 6 (TG6) IgA antibodies was identified, and gluten ataxia was diagnosed. Despite steroid therapy and gluten-free diet therapy, no improvements were seen, and independent walking became difficult for the patient. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy resulted in improvements in the Posture and Gait subscore of the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) from 15 to 11 points, and the patient regained the ability to walk independently. Gluten ataxia are rarely reported in Japan and anti-TG6 antibodies were considered useful for its diagnosis. PMID:27212675

  14. Clinical responses to rituximab in a case of neuroblastoma with refractory opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Samin; Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Moradveisi, Borhan; Aminasnafi, Ali; Arzanian, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-01-01

    Opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurologic syndrome. In a high proportion of children, it is associated with neuroblastoma. The etiology of this condition is thought to be immune mediated. In children, immunotherapy with conventional treatments such as corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and even antiepileptic drugs has been tried. Recently rituximab has been used safely for refractory OMS in children with neuroblastoma. Our patient was a 3.5-year-old girl referred for ataxia and dancing eye movements starting since 1.5 years ago. She was diagnosed with neuroblastoma on imaging studies on admission. The OMS was refractory to surgical resection, chemotherapy, corticosteroids, and intravenous immunoglobulin. Patient received rituximab simultaneously with chemotherapy. The total severity score decreased by 61.1% after rituximab. Patient's ataxia markedly improved that she was able to walk independently after 6 months. Our case confirmed the clinical efficacy and safety of rituximab in a refractory case of OMS. PMID:23198199

  15. HIV-related opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome: report on two cases.

    PubMed

    Kanjanasut, Natlada; Phanthumchinda, Kammant; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj

    2010-09-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia (OMA) syndrome is a rare neurological disorder, characterized by a rapid onset of generalized myoclonus in association with chaotic multi-directional eye movements and, less frequently, cerebellar ataxia. OMA is commonly related to a paraneoplastic process, specifically neuroblastoma in children and lung or breast cancer in adults. Nevertheless, OMA may occur in association with various infectious agents, such as Coxsackie virus B3, Epstein-Barr virus, mumps, enterovirus, and streptococcus. We recently encountered two cases of HIV-related OMA syndrome. The first patient developed a sudden onset of OMA at the time of HIV seroconversion. The second patient experienced severe ataxia with a mild degree of myoclonus and opsoclonus, associated with an elevated CD4 count following the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). We suggest that OMA syndrome may be another rare manifestation of HIV infection at the time of seroconversion or during an immune restoration period. PMID:20427123

  16. An elderly man with progressive ataxia and palatal tremor presenting with dizziness and oculopalatal tremor.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Yuka; Suzuki, Keisuke; Kokubun, Norito; Nakamura, Toshiki; Takekawa, Hidehiro; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-08-31

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our department for dizziness and progressive unsteady gait over 6 years. His family history was unremarkable. Neurological examination showed dysarthria, saccadic eye movement, palatal tremor (1.7 Hz)-synchronous with rotational ocular movement, and truncal ataxia. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed hyperintense and hypertrophic bilateral inferior olivary nuclei at the medulla and mild cerebellar atrophy. On the basis of neurological findings of oculopalatal tremor and cerebellar ataxia with brain MRI findings, the diagnosis of progressive ataxia and palatal tremor (PAPT) was made. PAPT should be included in differential diagnosis of dizziness observed in elderly individuals. PMID:27477579

  17. Intermittent ataxia and immunodeficiency with multiple carboxylase deficiencies: a biotin-responsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Sander, J E; Malamud, N; Cowan, M J; Packman, S; Amman, A J; Wara, D W

    1980-11-01

    A small group of inborn errors of metabolism are manifested by intermittent cerebellar ataxia. We have previously reported a family with an inherited metabolic defect resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiencies which were responsive to pharmacological doses of biotin. Affected children presented with a skin rash, infections, acute intermittent ataxia, and lactic acidosis. Two affected siblings died prior to diagnosis and therapy, and a detailed postmortem examination was performed on one of them. The brain was characterized by atrophy restricted to the superior vermis of the cerebellum, a finding strikingly similar to that found in chronic alcoholism. Intermittent ataxia would suggest a potentially treatable metabolic disease, and clinical evaluation should include studies of intermediary metabolism and immune function. PMID:7436398

  18. Mutant SNAP25B causes myasthenia, cortical hyperexcitability, ataxia, and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Selcen, Duygu; Brengman, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify and characterize the molecular basis of a syndrome associated with myasthenia, cortical hyperexcitability, cerebellar ataxia, and intellectual disability. Methods: We performed in vitro microelectrode studies of neuromuscular transmission, performed exome and Sanger sequencing, and analyzed functional consequences of the identified mutation in expression studies. Results: Neuromuscular transmission at patient endplates was compromised by reduced evoked quantal release. Exome sequencing identified a dominant de novo variant, p.Ile67Asn, in SNAP25B, a SNARE protein essential for exocytosis of synaptic vesicles from nerve terminals and of dense-core vesicles from endocrine cells. Ca2+-triggered exocytosis is initiated when synaptobrevin attached to synaptic vesicles (v-SNARE) assembles with SNAP25B and syntaxin anchored in the presynaptic membrane (t-SNAREs) into an α-helical coiled-coil held together by hydrophobic interactions. Pathogenicity of the Ile67Asn mutation was confirmed by 2 measures. First, the Ca2+ triggered fusion of liposomes incorporating v-SNARE with liposomes containing t-SNAREs was hindered when t-SNAREs harbored the mutant SNAP25B moiety. Second, depolarization of bovine chromaffin cells transfected with mutant SNAP25B or with mutant plus wild-type SNAP25B markedly reduced depolarization-evoked exocytosis compared with wild-type transfected cells. Conclusion: Ile67Asn variant in SNAP25B is pathogenic because it inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis. We attribute the deleterious effects of the mutation to disruption of the hydrophobic α-helical coiled-coil structure of the SNARE complex by replacement of a highly hydrophobic isoleucine by a strongly hydrophilic asparagine. PMID:25381298

  19. IMPAIRED CATEGORY FLUENCY IN MEDIAL TEMPORAL LOBE AMNESIA: THE ROLE OF EPISODIC MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Daniel L.; Keane, Margaret M.; Ryan, Lee; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2009-01-01

    Memory tasks are often classified as semantic or episodic, but recent research shows that these types of memory are highly interactive. Category fluency, for example, is generally considered to reflect retrieval from semantic memory, but behavioral evidence suggests that episodic memory is also involved: Participants frequently draw on autobiographical experiences while generating exemplars of certain categories. Neuroimaging studies accordingly have reported increased medial temporal lobe (MTL) activation during exemplar generation. Studies of fluency in MTL amnesics have yielded mixed results but were not designed to determine the precise contributions of episodic memory. We addressed this issue by asking MTL amnesics and controls to generate exemplars of three types of categories. One type tended to elicit autobiographical and spatial retrieval strategies (AS). Another type elicited strategies that were autobiographical but nonspatial (AN). The third type elicited neither autobiographical nor spatial strategies (N). Amnesic patients and control participants generated exemplars for 8 categories of each type. Patients were impaired on all category types but were more impaired on AS and AN categories. After covarying for phonemic fluency (total FAS score), the N category impairment was not significant, but the impairment on AS and AN categories remained. The same results were obtained for patients with lesions restricted to the MTL and those with more extensive lesions. We conclude that patients’ episodic memory impairment hindered their performance on this putatively semantic task. This interaction between episodic and semantic memory might partially account for fluency deficits seen in aging, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:19726648

  20. The interrelationship between disease severity, dynamic stability, and falls in cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Schniepp, Roman; Schlick, Cornelia; Pradhan, Cauchy; Dieterich, Marianne; Brandt, Thomas; Jahn, Klaus; Wuehr, Max

    2016-07-01

    Cerebellar ataxia (CA) results in discoordination of body movements (ataxia), a gait disorder, and falls. All three aspects appear to be obviously interrelated; however, experimental evidence is sparse. This study systematically correlated the clinical rating of the severity of ataxia with dynamic stability measures and the fall frequency in patients with CA. Clinical severity of CA in patients with sporadic (n = 34) and hereditary (n = 24) forms was assessed with the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Gait performance was examined during slow, preferred, and maximally fast walking speeds. Spatiotemporal variability parameters in the fore-aft and medio-lateral directions were analyzed. The fall frequency was assessed using a standardized interview about fall events within the last 6 months. Fore-aft gait variability showed significant speed-dependent characteristics with highest magnitudes during slow and fast walking. The SARA score correlated positively with fore-aft gait variability, most prominently during fast walking. The fall frequency was significantly associated to fore-aft gait variability during slow walking. Severity of ataxia, dynamic stability, and the occurrence of falls were interrelated in a speed-dependent manner: (a) Severity of ataxia symptoms was closely related to instability during fast walking. (b) Fall frequency was associated with instability during slow walking. These findings suggest the presence of a speed-dependent, twofold cerebellar locomotor control. Assessment of gait performance during non-preferred, slow and fast walking speeds provides novel insights into the pathophysiology of cerebellar locomotor control and may become a useful approach in the clinical evaluation of patients with CA. PMID:27159995

  1. Heterogeneity in clinical features and disease severity in ataxia-associated SYNE1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Wiethoff, Sarah; Hersheson, Joshua; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Wood, Nicholas W; Houlden, Henry

    2016-08-01

    The autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxias are an exciting field of study, with a growing number of causal genes and an expanding phenotypic spectrum. SYNE1 was originally discovered in 2007 as the causal gene underlying autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia 1, a disease clinically thought to manifest with mainly pure cerebellar ataxia. Since the original report SYNE1 mutations have also been identified in families with motor neuronopathy and arthrogryposis but few families have been screened as the gene is very large at 146 exons in length. We screened 196 recessive and sporadic ataxia patients for mutations in SYNE1 using next generation sequencing in order to assess its frequency and extend the clinicogenetic spectrum. We identified four novel truncating mutations spread throughout the SYNE1 gene from three families living in London that originated from England, Turkey and Sri Lanka. The phenotype was mainly pure cerebellar ataxia in two families, cognitive decline was present in all three families, axonal neuropathy in one family and marked spasticity in the Turkish family, with a range of disease severities. Searching for genotype-phenotype correlations in the SYNE1 gene, defects located near the 3' prime end of the gene are more frequently associated with motor neuron or neuromuscular involvement so far. Our data indicate SYNE1 mutations are not an uncommon cause of recessive ataxia with or without additional clinical features in patients from various ethnicities. The use of next generation sequencing allows the rapid analysis of large genes and will likely reveal more SYNE1 associated cases and further expand genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:27178001

  2. Brain glucose metabolism in adults with ataxia-telangiectasia and their asymptomatic relatives.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Studentsova, Yana; Margus, Brad; Crawford, Thomas O

    2014-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia is a recessive genetic disorder (ATM is the mutated gene) of childhood with severe motor impairments and whereas homozygotes manifest the disorder, heterozygotes are asymptomatic. Structural brain imaging and post-mortem studies in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia have reported cerebellar atrophy; but abnormalities of motor control characteristic of extrapyramidal dysfunction suggest impairment of broader motor networks. Here, we investigated possible dysfunction in other brain areas in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia and tested for brain changes in asymptomatic relatives to assess if heterozygocity affects brain function. We used positron emission tomography and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose to measure brain glucose metabolism (quantified as µmol/100 g/min), which serves as a marker of brain function, in 10 adults with ataxia-telangiectasia, 19 non-affected adult relatives (12 siblings, seven parents) and 29 age-matched healthy controls. Statistical parametric mapping and region of interest analyses were used to compare individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia, asymptomatic relatives, and unrelated controls. We found that participants with ataxia-telangiectasia had lower metabolism in cerebellar hemispheres (14%, P < 0.001), anterior vermis (40%, P < 0.001) and fusiform gyrus (20%, P < 0.001) compared with controls or siblings, and lower metabolism in hippocampus (12%, P = 0.05) compared with controls, and showed significant intersubject variability (decreases in vermis ranged from 18% to 60%). Participants with ataxia-telangiectasia also had higher metabolism in globus pallidus (16%, P = 0.05), which correlated negatively with motor performance. Asymptomatic relatives had lower metabolism in anterior vermis (12%; P = 0.01) and hippocampus (19%; P = 0.002) than controls. Our results indicate that, in addition to the expected decrease in cerebellar metabolism, participants with ataxia-telangiectasia had widespread changes in metabolic

  3. Cerebellar ataxia as a possible complication of babesiosis in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, L S

    1994-09-01

    A 6-month-old Miniature Doberman Pinscher was presented with inappetance and cerebellar signs. Babesia canis organisms were found on a capillary bloodsmear. The cerebellar signs resolved rapidly following treatment with diminazene aceturate. A 7-month-old Siberian Husky developed cerebellar signs, blindness and quadriparesis 9 d after presentation with clinical signs typical of uncomplicated canine babesiosis. The dog responded favourably to treatment with prednisolone. Both acute and delayed cerebellar ataxia have been associated with malaria in humans. The clinical signs shown by these dogs were similar to those reported for malaria in humans. Cerebellar ataxia should be considered a possible complication of canine babesiosis. PMID:7595921

  4. New aspects of hereditary ataxia in smooth-haired fox terriers.

    PubMed

    Rohdin, C; Lüdtke, L; Wohlsein, P; Jäderlund, K Hultin

    2010-05-01

    Hereditary ataxia was diagnosed in three smooth-haired fox terrier puppies from Sweden, 25 years after the previous known case in the breed. In addition to the characteristic spinal cord pathology, brain involvement was evident clinically, in the form of behavioural changes and bilaterally decreased menace responses, and histopathologically, with degenerative changes in the brainstem. The striking similarities to hereditary ataxia in the Jack Russell terrier suggest the same disease process in both breeds. A common ancestor, a female dog born in 1951 and considered a carrier of the disease at that time, was found in both the maternal and paternal lines of the three puppies. PMID:20435980

  5. A Comparison of Efficacy and Safety of Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs versus Acetaminophen in the Treatment of Episodic Tension-type Headache: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeo Jung; Kim, Ju Heon; Hwang, In Hong; Kim, Mi Ra

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen are widely used in the treatment of tension headache. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of single doses of acetaminophen and NSAIDs using meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trial studies. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane, KMbase, KoreaMed, RiCH, National Assembly Library, Riss4u, and DBPIA for studies released through 27th July 2010. Two authors independently extracted the data. To assess the risk of bias, the Cochrane Collaborations risk of bias tool was used. Review Manager 5.0 was used for statistics. Results We identified 6 studies. The relative benefit of the NSAIDs group compared to the acetaminophen group for participants with at least 50% pain relief was 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99 to 1.39; I2 = 85%). We did subgroup analysis based on allocation concealment versus non-allocation concealment, and low-dose NSAIDs versus high-dose NSAIDs. The relative benefit of the low-dose NSAIDs subgroup to the acetaminophen group was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.91 to 1.06; I2 = 0%). However, the heterogeneity of other subgroup analysis was not settled. The relative risk for using rescue medication of the NSAIDs group compared to the acetaminophen group was 0.84 (95% CI, 0.64 to 1.12; I2 = 47%). The relative risk for adverse events was 1.31(95% CI, 0.96 to 1.80; I2 = 0%). Conclusion In this meta-analysis, there was no difference between low-dose NSAIDs and acetaminophen in the efficacy of the treatment for tension type headache. The results suggested that high-dose NSAIDs have more effect but also have more adverse events. The balance of benefit and harm needs to be considered when using high-dose NSAIDs for tension headache. PMID:23115700

  6. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with First Episode Febrile Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Sharawat, Indar Kumar; Singh, Jitender; Singh, Amitabh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Febrile seizure (FS) is the single most common type of seizure seen in children between 6 months to 5 years of age. The purpose of our study was to identify the risk factors associated with the first episode of febrile seizures, which would help in the better management and preventive measures in children at risk for FS episodes. Aim To evaluate the risk factors associated with the first episode of febrile seizures in Indian children. Materials and Methods This was a hospital based, case control study. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with the first FS episode in children. Seventy (70) children between age 6 months to 5 years with their first episode of FS were compared with 70 children with fever but without seizures based on various risk factors. Results The mean age was 24.90±16.11 months in cases and 26.34±16.93 months in controls. Male: female ratio was 2:1. A positive family history was found in 31.4% of first degree and 11.4% in second degree relatives. Mean maximum temperature was 102.06±1.1°F and URI (upper respiratory infection) was most common cause of fever. Antenatal complication was significantly higher in the case group. RBC (Red Blood Cells) indices like lower mean haemoglobin, MCV (Mean Corpuscular Volume), MCH (Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin concentration) and higher RDW (Red Cell Distribution Width) values were seen in patients. Serum sodium, Serum calcium and random blood sugar values of the cases were significantly lower than those of controls (p<0.05). Conclusion Our study shows that male gender, family history of febrile seizures, peak body temperature, underlying cause of fever, antenatal complications, low serum calcium, sodium, blood sugar and microcytic hypochromic anaemia are the risk factors associated with the occurrence of first episode of febrile seizure and, thus, preventive measures in removing these risk factors could lead to a decrease in incidence of FS. PMID:27437319

  7. Post-Plasmodium vivax malaria cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis: A new form of delayed cerebellar ataxia or cerebellar variant of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kasundra, Gaurav M.; Bhargava, Amita Narendra; Bhushan, Bharat; Shubhakaran, Khichar; Sood, Isha

    2015-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is commonly seen after viral and bacterial infections, immunization, and Plasmodium falciparum (PF) malaria. Plasmodium vivax (PV) rarely causes ADEM. We report a 14-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset bilateral cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis, 2 weeks after recovery from PV. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral cerebellar hyperintensities suggestive of ADEM. No specific viral etiology was found on cerebrospinal fluid examination. Patient responded well to treatment without any sequelae. Thus, PV too is an important cause of ADEM along with PF. Two of the previously reported cases had co-infection with falciparum malaria. The only other two reported cases, as also this patient, are from Asia. A geographical or racial predisposition needs to be evaluated. Also, a possibility of post-PV delayed cerebellar ataxia, which is classically described post-PF infection, may be considered as it may be clinically, radiologically, and prognostically indistinguishable from a milder presentation of ADEM. PMID:25878748

  8. Correlates of Homeless Episodes among Indigenous People

    PubMed Central

    Whitbeck, Les B.; Crawford, Devan M.; Hartshorn, Kelley J. Sittner

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the correlates of homeless episodes among 873 Indigenous adults who are part of an ongoing longitudinal study on four reservations in the Northern Midwest and four Canadian First Nation reserves. Descriptive analyses depict differences between those who have and have not experienced an episode of homelessness in their lifetimes. Multivariate analyses assess factors associated with a history of homeless episodes at the time of their first interview. Results show that individuals with a history of homeless episodes had significantly more individual and family health, mental health, and substance abuse problems. Periods of homelessness also were associated with financial problems. Among the female caretakers who experienced episodes of homelessness over the course of the study, the majority had been homeless at least once prior to the start of the study and approximately one–fifth met criteria for lifetime alcohol dependence, drug abuse, or major depression. Family adversity during childhood was also common for women experiencing homelessness during the study. PMID:21656303

  9. Hierarchical organization of context in the hippocampal episodic code

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampal system appears to be critically important in establishing episodic memory of both internal and external events within contexts as well as spatial memory, which enables flexible spatial navigation. However, the neuronal substrates that function across different memories in the hippocampal system are poorly understood. I monitored large-scale activity patterns of hippocampal neuronal ensembles in rats performing a novel, continuous task that combined one visually guided and two memory-guided types of navigations in a constant environment. I found that the activity patterns of the hippocampal ensemble represent spatiotemporal contexts (journeys) constructed by temporally ordered past, present and expected future places in tandem with visually or mnemonically guided non-spatial contexts (task-demands) to form episodes. This finding therefore suggests that the hierarchical organization of contexts based on pattern separation and completion enables the hippocampus to play a dual role in spatial navigation and recall of episodic memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00321.001 PMID:23390588

  10. The Prevalence and Diagnostic Validity of Short-Duration Hypomanic Episodes and Major Depressive Episodes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Shefali; Dennehy, Ellen B; Suppes, Trisha

    2016-03-01

    Current diagnostic criteria for a hypomanic episode, as outlined in both the fourth and fifth editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV and DSM-5), require a minimum duration of four consecutive days of symptoms of mood elevation. The 4-day criterion for duration of hypomania has been challenged as arbitrary and lacking empirical support, with many arguing that shorter-duration hypomanic episodes are highly prevalent and that those experiencing these episodes are clinically more similar to patients with bipolar disorder than to those with unipolar major depressive disorder. We review the current evidence regarding the prevalence, diagnostic validity, and longitudinal illness correlates of shorter-duration hypomanic episodes and summarize the arguments for and against broadening the diagnostic criteria for hypomania to include shorter-duration variants. Accumulating findings suggest that patients with major depressive episodes and shorter-duration hypomanic episodes represent a complex clinical phenotype, perhaps best conceptualized as being on the continuum between those with unipolar depressive episodes alone and those with DSM-5-defined bipolar II disorder. Further investigation is warranted, ideally involving large prospective, controlled studies, to elucidate the diagnostic and treatment implications of depression with shorter-duration hypomanic episodes. PMID:26830885

  11. Episodic Memory and Episodic Foresight in 3- and 5-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayne, Harlene; Gross, Julien; McNamee, Stephanie; Fitzgibbon, Olivia; Tustin, Karen

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the development of episodic memory and episodic foresight. Three- and 5-year-olds were interviewed individually using a personalised timeline that included photographs of them at different points in their life. After constructing the timeline with the experimenter, each child was asked to discuss a number of…

  12. Mutations in FLVCR1 Cause Posterior Column Ataxia and Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M.; Elemento, Olivier; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Schierberl, Kathryn C.; Xiang, Jenny Z.; Putorti, Maria L.; Berciano, José; Poulin, Chantal; Brais, Bernard; Michaelides, Michel; Weleber, Richard G.; Higgins, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The study of inherited retinal diseases has advanced our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in sensory neural signaling. Dysfunction of two specific sensory modalities, vision and proprioception, characterizes the phenotype of the rare, autosomal-recessive disorder posterior column ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (PCARP). Using targeted DNA capture and high-throughput sequencing, we analyzed the entire 4.2 Mb candidate sequence on chromosome 1q32 to find the gene mutated in PCARP in a single family. Employing comprehensive bioinformatic analysis and filtering, we identified a single-nucleotide coding variant in the feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular receptor 1 (FLVCR1), a gene encoding a heme-transporter protein. Sanger sequencing confirmed the FLVCR1 mutation in this family and identified different homozygous missense mutations located within the protein's transmembrane channel segment in two other unrelated families with PCARP. To determine whether the selective pathologic features of PCARP correlated with FLVCR1 expression, we examined wild-type mouse Flvcr1 mRNA levels in the posterior column of the spinal cord and the retina via quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR. The Flvcr1 mRNA levels were most abundant in the retina, followed by the posterior column of the spinal cord and other brain regions. These results suggest that aberrant FLVCR1 causes a selective degeneration of a subpopulation of neurons in the retina and the posterior columns of the spinal cord via dysregulation of heme or iron homeostasis. This finding broadens the molecular basis of sensory neural signaling to include common mechanisms that involve proprioception and vision. PMID:21070897

  13. Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase deficiency exacerbates left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling late after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Laura L; Scofield, Stephanie L C; Thrasher, Patsy; Dalal, Suman; Daniels, Christopher R; Foster, Cerrone R; Singh, Mahipal; Singh, Krishna

    2016-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase (ATM), a cell cycle checkpoint protein, is activated in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress. We have previously shown that ATM deficiency is associated with increased apoptosis and fibrosis and attenuation of cardiac dysfunction early (1-7 days) following myocardial infarction (MI). Here, we tested the hypothesis that enhanced fibrosis and apoptosis, as observed early post-MI during ATM deficiency, exacerbate cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in ATM-deficient mice late post-MI. MIs were induced in wild-type (WT) and ATM heterozygous knockout (hKO) mice by ligation of the left anterior descending artery. Left ventricular (LV) structural and functional parameters were assessed by echocardiography 14 and 28 days post-MI, whereas biochemical parameters were measured 28 days post-MI. hKO-MI mice exhibited exacerbated LV dysfunction as observed by increased LV end-systolic volume and decreased percent fractional shortening and ejection fraction. Infarct size and thickness were not different between the two genotypes. Myocyte cross-sectional area was greater in hKO-MI group. The hKO-MI group exhibited increased fibrosis in the noninfarct and higher expression of α-smooth muscle actin (myofibroblast marker) in the infarct region. Apoptosis and activation of GSK-3β (proapoptotic kinase) were significantly lower in the infarct region of hKO-MI group. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) expression was not different between the two genotypes. However, MMP-9 expression was significantly lower in the noninfarct region of hKO-MI group. Thus ATM deficiency exacerbates cardiac remodeling late post-MI with effects on cardiac function, fibrosis, apoptosis, and myocyte hypertrophy. PMID:27288435

  14. A novel GAA-repeat-expansion-based mouse model of Friedreich’s ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Anjomani Virmouni, Sara; Ezzatizadeh, Vahid; Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Sandi, Madhavi; Al-Mahdawi, Sahar; Chutake, Yogesh; Pook, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a GAA repeat expansion mutation within intron 1 of the FXN gene, resulting in reduced levels of frataxin protein. We have previously reported the generation of human FXN yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) transgenic FRDA mouse models containing 90–190 GAA repeats, but the presence of multiple GAA repeats within these mice is considered suboptimal. We now describe the cellular, molecular and behavioural characterisation of a newly developed YAC transgenic FRDA mouse model, designated YG8sR, which we have shown by DNA sequencing to contain a single pure GAA repeat expansion. The founder YG8sR mouse contained 120 GAA repeats but, due to intergenerational expansion, we have now established a colony of YG8sR mice that contain ~200 GAA repeats. We show that YG8sR mice have a single copy of the FXN transgene, which is integrated at a single site as confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis of metaphase and interphase chromosomes. We have identified significant behavioural deficits, together with a degree of glucose intolerance and insulin hypersensitivity, in YG8sR FRDA mice compared with control Y47R and wild-type (WT) mice. We have also detected increased somatic GAA repeat instability in the brain and cerebellum of YG8sR mice, together with significantly reduced expression of FXN, FAST-1 and frataxin, and reduced aconitase activity, compared with Y47R mice. Furthermore, we have confirmed the presence of pathological vacuoles within neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of YG8sR mice. These novel GAA-repeat-expansion-based YAC transgenic FRDA mice, which exhibit progressive FRDA-like pathology, represent an excellent model for the investigation of FRDA disease mechanisms and therapy. PMID:25681319

  15. Increasing cutaneous afferent feedback improves proprioceptive accuracy at the knee in patients with sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Goulding, Niamh; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Fuente Mora, Cristina; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type III (HSAN III) features disturbed proprioception and a marked ataxic gait. We recently showed that joint angle matching error at the knee is positively correlated with the degree of ataxia. Using intraneural microelectrodes, we also documented that these patients lack functional muscle spindle afferents but have preserved large-diameter cutaneous afferents, suggesting that patients with better proprioception may be relying more on proprioceptive cues provided by tactile afferents. We tested the hypothesis that enhancing cutaneous sensory feedback by stretching the skin at the knee joint using unidirectional elasticity tape could improve proprioceptive accuracy in patients with a congenital absence of functional muscle spindles. Passive joint angle matching at the knee was used to assess proprioceptive accuracy in 25 patients with HSAN III and 9 age-matched control subjects, with and without taping. Angles of the reference and indicator knees were recorded with digital inclinometers and the absolute error, gradient, and correlation coefficient between the two sides calculated. Patients with HSAN III performed poorly on the joint angle matching test [mean matching error 8.0 ± 0.8° (±SE); controls 3.0 ± 0.3°]. Following application of tape bilaterally to the knee in an X-shaped pattern, proprioceptive performance improved significantly in the patients (mean error 5.4 ± 0.7°) but not in the controls (3.0 ± 0.2°). Across patients, but not controls, significant increases in gradient and correlation coefficient were also apparent following taping. We conclude that taping improves proprioception at the knee in HSAN III, presumably via enhanced sensory feedback from the skin. PMID:26655817

  16. Polyglandular endocrinopathy type II (Schmidt's syndrome) in a Dobermann pinscher.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, J A; Stone, J; Rick, M; Dunning, M D

    2016-09-01

    A three-year-old, female neutered, Dobermann pinscher was presented for investigation of lethargy, episodic collapse, ataxia and myxoedema. Primary hypothyroidism and primary cortisol-deficient hypoadrenocorticism were diagnosed based on history, physical examination and compatible hormonal analysis. Increased serum concentrations of thyroglobulin autoantibodies and 21-hydroxylase autoantibodies indicated an immune-mediated aetiology. The case was complicated by lymphadenopathy with hand-mirror lymphocytes, classically identified in lymphoma. A polymerase chain reaction test for antigen receptor rearrangement indicated polyclonality and therefore reactive lymphadenopathy. The dog's clinical signs resolved following introduction of levothyroxine and prednisolone. Prioritising the problem-based approach in this case facilitated the diagnosis of hypoadrenocorticism in addition to hypothyroidism due to the persistence of clinical signs despite thyroxine replacement. Importantly, atypical adrenal gland dysfunction was not misinterpreted as inadequate therapeutic response to thyroxine supplementation. The observation that polyglandular endocrinopathy type II can occur in dogs suggests that in dogs with a suboptimal response to treatment for hypothyroidism or hypoadrenocorticism comorbid endocrinopathies should be investigated. PMID:27487017

  17. Timing of spontaneous sleep-paralysis episodes.

    PubMed

    Girard, Todd A; Cheyne, J Allan

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this prospective naturalistic field study was to determine the distribution of naturally occurring sleep-paralysis (SP) episodes over the course of nocturnal sleep and their relation to bedtimes. Regular SP experiencers (N = 348) who had previously filled out a screening assessment for SP as well as a general sleep survey were recruited. Participants reported, online over the World Wide Web, using a standard reporting form, bedtimes and subsequent latencies of spontaneous episodes of SP occurring in their homes shortly after their occurrence. The distribution of SP episodes over nights was skewed to the first 2 h following bedtime. Just over one quarter of SP episodes occurred within 1 h of bedtime, although episodes were reported throughout the night with a minor mode around the time of normal waking. SP latencies following bedtimes were moderately consistent across episodes and independent of bedtimes. Additionally, profiles of SP latencies validated self-reported hypnagogic, hypnomesic, and hypnopompic SP categories, as occurring near the beginning, middle, and end of the night/sleep period respectively. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that SP timing is controlled by mechanisms initiated at or following sleep onset. These results also suggest that SP, rather than uniquely reflecting anomalous sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) periods, may result from failure to maintain sleep during REM periods at any point during the sleep period. On this view, SP may sometimes reflect the maintenance of REM consciousness when waking and SP hallucinations the continuation of dream experiences into waking life. PMID:16704578

  18. Memory loss and ataxia after hyperemesis gravidarum: a case of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Accetta, Solange G; Abeche, Alberto M; Buchabqui, Jorge A; Hammes, Luciano; Pratti, Raquel; Afler, Taciana; Capp, Edison

    2002-04-10

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can induce Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), a thiamin deficiency disorder characterized by ocular abnormalities, ataxia and disturbance of consciousness. This should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pregnant patients with persisting vomiting and neurological alterations. PMID:12039101

  19. Characteristic brain MRI findings in ataxia-neuropathy spectrum related to POLG mutation.

    PubMed

    Henao, Adriana I; Pira, Sonia; Herrera, Diego A; Vargas, Sergio A; Montoya, Jorge; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-02-01

    Patients with mutations in the polymerase gamma gene (POLG) may present with progressive ataxia and in such situations neuroimaging findings may suggest the diagnosis. Herein we report a patient with a POLG gene W748S homozygous mutation and characteristic lesions in the thalamus, cerebellum and inferior olivary nucleus seen on magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26755490

  20. Cerebellar Ataxia with Bilateral Vestibulopathy: Description of a Syndrome and Its Characteristic Clinical Sign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migliaccio, Americo A.; Halmagyi, G. Michael; McGarvie, Leigh A.; Cremer, Phillip D.

    2004-01-01

    We report four patients with the syndrome of cerebellar ataxia with bilateral vestibulopathy (CABV) and, using search coil oculography, we validate its characteristic clinical sign, namely impairment of the visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VVOR) or doll's head reflex. In our four patients, CABV began in the sixth decade of life; they are…

  1. Reversal of epigenetic promoter silencing in Friedreich ataxia by a class I histone deacetylase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Chutake, Yogesh K.; Lam, Christina C.; Costello, Whitney N.; Anderson, Michael P.; Bidichandani, Sanjay I.

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia, the most prevalent inherited ataxia, is caused by an expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence in intron 1 of the FXN gene. Repressive chromatin spreads from the expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence to cause epigenetic silencing of the FXN promoter via altered nucleosomal positioning and reduced chromatin accessibility. Indeed, deficient transcriptional initiation is the predominant cause of transcriptional deficiency in Friedreich ataxia. Treatment with 109, a class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, resulted in increased level of FXN transcript both upstream and downstream of the expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence, without any change in transcript stability, suggesting that it acts via improvement of transcriptional initiation. Quantitative analysis of transcriptional initiation via metabolic labeling of nascent transcripts in patient-derived cells revealed a >3-fold increase (P < 0.05) in FXN promoter function. A concomitant 3-fold improvement (P < 0.001) in FXN promoter structure and chromatin accessibility was observed via Nucleosome Occupancy and Methylome Sequencing, a high-resolution in vivo footprint assay for detecting nucleosome occupancy in individual chromatin fibers. No such improvement in FXN promoter function or structure was observed upon treatment with a chemically-related inactive compound (966). Thus epigenetic promoter silencing in Friedreich ataxia is reversible, and the results implicate class I HDACs in repeat-mediated promoter silencing. PMID:26896803

  2. Genetics Home Reference: fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... This Page Galloway JN, Nelson DL. Evidence for RNA-mediated toxicity in the fragile X-associated tremor/ ... 55. Citation on PubMed Li Y, Jin P. RNA-mediated neurodegeneration in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia ...

  3. The human δ2 glutamate receptor gene is not mutated in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinxiang; Lin, Aiyu; Dong, Haiyan; Wang, Chaodong

    2014-01-01

    The human glutamate receptor delta 2 gene (GRID2) shares 90% homology with the orthologous mouse gene. The mouse Grid2 gene is involved with functions of the cerebellum and spontaneous mutation of Grid2 leads to a spinocerebellar ataxia-like phenotype. To investigate whether such mutations occur in humans, we screened for mutations in the coding sequence of GRID2 in 24 patients with familial or sporadic spinocerebellar ataxia and in 52 normal controls. We detected no point mutations or insertion/deletion mutations in the 16 exons of GRID2. However, a polymorphic 4 nucleotide deletion (IVS5-121_-118 GAGT) and two single nucleotide polymorphisms (c.1251G>T and IVS14-63C>G) were identified. The frequency of these polymorphisms was similar between spinocerebellar ataxia patients and normal controls. These data indicate that spontaneous mutations do not occur in GRID2 and that the incidence of spinocerebellar ataxia in humans is not associated with GRID2 mutation or polymorphisms. PMID:25206761

  4. Novel mutation in spacer region of POLG associated with ataxia neuropathy spectrum and gastroparesis.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Alionka; Glibert, Gerald; Dachy, Bernard; Dan, Bernard

    2012-09-25

    Clinical expression of POLG mutations is largely variable. We present a patient with a new mutation in spacer region of mitochondrial polymerase gamma protein (P765T). The clinical picture is characterized by the presence of sensory-ataxic neuropathy, ophthalmoplegia, dysarthria and gastroparesis, which had not been previously observed in ataxia neuropathy spectrum. PMID:22805437

  5. Decreased Functional Brain Activation in Friedreich Ataxia Using the Simon Effect Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiou-Karistianis, N.; Akhlaghi, H.; Corben, L. A.; Delatycki, M. B.; Storey, E.; Bradshaw, J. L.; Egan, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    The present study applied the Simon effect task to examine the pattern of functional brain reorganization in individuals with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thirteen individuals with FRDA and 14 age and sex matched controls participated, and were required to respond to either congruent or incongruent…

  6. The Training and Support Programme for Parents of Children with Ataxia: Parents' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, L. A.; Barlow, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the Training and Support Programme (TSP) among parents of children with ataxia. Twenty-seven parents and their children completed the TSP. Data were collected by home record sheets and observation sheets completed by parents and therapists, respectively, and telephone interviews with 10 parents. Benefits reported…

  7. Differentiating Profiles of Speech Impairments in Friedreich's Ataxia: A Perceptual and Instrumental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folker, Joanne E.; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Rosen, Kristin M.; Cahill, Louise M.; Delatycki, Martin B.; Corben, Louise A.; Vogel, Adam P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The speech disorder associated with Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is classically described as ataxic dysarthria. However, variable neuropathology beyond the cerebellum, which may include the corticospinal and corticobulbar tracts, means that the dysarthria can be mixed rather than a pure ataxic dysarthria. Aims: To characterize…

  8. The incidence and treatment of bleeding episodes in non-severe haemophilia A patients with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, Alice S; Eckhardt, Corien L; Streefkerk, Nina; Peters, Marjolein; Hart, Daniel P; Hamulyak, Karly; Klamroth, Robert; Meijer, Karina; Nijziel, Marten; Schinco, Piercarla; Yee, Thynn T; van der Bom, Johanna G; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2016-03-01

    The development of an inhibitory antibody in non-severe haemophilia A patients may aggravate the bleeding phenotype considerably. Effective treatment of bleeding episodes may be challenging, with ensuing severe complications. At present, evidence is scarce for optimal treatment of bleeding episodes in this patient group. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence and the treatment of bleeding episodes in inhibitor patients in a population-based unselected cohort of non-severe haemophilia A patients with clinically relevant inhibitors. Data were available for 100 of the 107 non-severe haemophilia A patients (factor VIII (FVIII) baseline, 2-40 IU/dl) from 29 centres in Europe and one centre in Australia who had developed a clinically relevant inhibitor between 1980 and 2011. The majority (89 %) of the patients were treated during the inhibitor period for bleeding episodes or a surgical intervention: 66 % needed treatment for bleeding episodes, at a median annual bleeding rate (ABR) of 1.1 (interquartile range (IQR) 0.1-2.5) and a median total of 2 (IQR 1-6) bleeding episodes. Compared to the median ABR before inhibitor development of 0.095 bleeds per year (IQR 0.02-0.42), the increase in ABR is more than a 10-fold. More than 90 % of the bleeding episodes were treated with only one type of product, most frequently (51 %) FVIII concentrates. This study provides the incidence of bleeding episodes and treatment choices in non-severe haemophilia A patients with inhibitors. The 10-fold increase to a median ABR of 1.1 episodes per year emphasizes the impact of inhibitor development for non-severe haemophilia A patients. PMID:26582077

  9. Fragile X-Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome: The Expanding Clinical Picture, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology, and Update on Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Deborah A.; O'keefe, Joan A.

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a progressive degenerative movement disorder characterized by kinetic tremor, cerebellar gait ataxia, parkinsonism, and cognitive decline. This disorder occurs in both males and females, frequently in families with children who have fragile X syndrome. The clinical features of this disorder, both classic and newly described, are summarized in this paper. In screening studies, fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene premutation (55–200 CGG) expansions are most frequently seen in men with ataxia who have tested negative for spinocerebellar ataxias. Since the original description, the classic FXTAS phenotype has now been reported in females and in carriers of smaller (45–54 CGG) and larger (>200 CGG) expansions in FMR1. Premutation carriers may present with a Parkinson disease phenotype or hypotension, rather than with tremor and/or ataxia. Parkinsonism and gait ataxia may also be seen in individuals with gray zone (41–54 CGG) expansions. Studies regarding medication to treat the symptoms in FXTAS are few in number and suggest that medications targeted to specific symptoms, such as kinetic tremor or gait ataxia, may be most beneficial. Great progress has been made in regards to FXTAS research, likely given the readily available gene test and the screening of multiple family members, including parents and grandparents, of fragile X syndrome children. Expansion of genotypes and phenotypes in the disorder may suggest that a broader disease definition might be necessary in the future. PMID:23439567

  10. Chromosome Aberrations in Normal and Ataxia-Telangiectasia Cells Exposed to Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Ito, H.; Liu, C.; Shigematsu, N.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Although cells derived from Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT) patients are known to exhibit abnormal responses to ionizing radiations, its underlying mechanism still remains unclear. Previously, the authors reported that at the same gamma-irradiation dose AT cells show higher frequencies of misrepair and deletions compared to normal human fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of heavy ions beams on chromosomal aberrations in normal and AT cells. Normal and AT fibroblast cells arrested at G0/G1 phase were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, 490 MeV/u Silicon (LET 55 keV/m), 500 MeV/u Iron (LET 185 keV/m) and 200 MeV/u Iron (LET 440 keV/m) particles, and then cells were allowed to repair for 24 hours at 37 degrees before subculture. Calyculin-A induced PCC method was employed to collect G2/M chromosomes and whole DNA probes 1 and 3 were used to analyze chromosomal aberrations such as color-junctions, deletions, simple exchanges (incomplete and reciprocal exanges) and complex-type exchanges. The percentages of aberrant cells were higher when normal and AT cells were exposed to heavy ions compared to X-rays, and had a tendency to increase with increasing LET up to 185 keV/m and then decreased at 440 keV/m. When the frequency of color-junctions per cell was compared after X-ray exposure, AT cells had around three times higher frequency of color-junctions (mis-rejoining) than normal cells. However, at 185 keV/m there was no difference in the frequency of color-junctions between two cell lines. It was also found that the frequency of simple exchanges per cell was almost constant in AT cells regardless LET levels, but it was LET dependent for normal cells. Interestingly, the frequency of simple exchanges was higher for AT cells when it was compared at 185 keV/m but AT cells had more complex-type exchanges at the same LET levels. Heavy ions are more efficient in inducing chromosome aberrations in normal and AT cells compared to X-rays, and the aberration types

  11. Spanish for Agricultural Purposes: The Video Episodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainous, Bruce H.; And Others

    The transcripts of dialogues from videotape recordings were developed, along with accompanying language laboratory material, as part of a one-semester course in Spanish for North American agriculture specialists preparing to work in Latin America. Included are 48 episodes covering such topics as: working with a local Spanish-speaking counterpart,…

  12. Autobiographical Thinking Interferes with Episodic Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Michael; Della Sala, Sergio; Dewar, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    New episodic memories are retained better if learning is followed by a few minutes of wakeful rest than by the encoding of novel external information. Novel encoding is said to interfere with the consolidation of recently acquired episodic memories. Here we report four experiments in which we examined whether autobiographical thinking, i.e. an ‘internal’ memory activity, also interferes with episodic memory consolidation. Participants were presented with three wordlists consisting of common nouns; one list was followed by wakeful rest, one by novel picture encoding and one by autobiographical retrieval/future imagination, cued by concrete sounds. Both novel encoding and autobiographical retrieval/future imagination lowered wordlist retention significantly. Follow-up experiments demonstrated that the interference by our cued autobiographical retrieval/future imagination delay condition could not be accounted for by the sound cues alone or by executive retrieval processes. Moreover, our results demonstrated evidence of a temporal gradient of interference across experiments. Thus, we propose that rich autobiographical retrieval/future imagination hampers the consolidation of recently acquired episodic memories and that such interference is particularly likely in the presence of external concrete cues. PMID:24736665

  13. Effects of Episodic Crowding: A Developmental Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiello, John R.

    The social, behavioral, and physiological effects of episodic crowding on children and elderly adults are reported in this paper. Children ranging in ages from 9 to 16 and elderly adults ranging in ages from 60 to 90 were grouped by age into small and large rooms. Each group sat silently for 30 minutes in the rooms while skin conductance equipment…

  14. Episodic Accretion among the Orion Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, William J.; Safron, Emily; Megeath, S. Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Episodic accretion, where a young stellar object undergoes stochastic spikes in its disk-to-star accretion rate one or more times over its formation period, may be a crucial process in the formation of low-mass stars. These spikes result in a factor of 10 to 100 increase in the source luminosity over the course of several months that may persist for years. Six years after the Spitzer survey of the Orion molecular clouds, the WISE telescope mapped Orion with similar wavelength coverage. Thus, the two surveys can be used to explore the mid-infrared variability of young stars on this timescale, which is suitable for discovering episodic accretion events. Out of 319 Orion protostars that were targets of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey, we identified two examples of episodic accretion with this method. One of them, HOPS 223, was previously known. The other, HOPS 383, is the first known example of episodic accretion in a Class 0 protostar (age < 0.2 Myr). With these and one other outburst that began early in the Spitzer mission, we estimate that the most likely interval between protostellar outbursts is 740 years, with a 90% confidence interval of 470 to 6200 years. These outbursts are weaker than the optically revealed FU Ori events. We will update the mid-infrared light curves of HOPS 223 and HOPS 383 with recent data from FORCAST aboard SOFIA; HOPS 223 shows signs of fading.

  15. A Calendar Savant with Episodic Memory Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Ingrid R.; Berryhill, Marian E.; Drowos, David B.; Brown, Lawrence; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2010-01-01

    Patients with memory disorders have severely restricted learning and memory. For instance, patients with anterograde amnesia can learn motor procedures as well as retaining some restricted ability to learn new words and factual information. However, such learning is inflexible and frequently inaccessible to conscious awareness. Here we present a case of patient AC596, a 25-year old male with severe episodic memory impairments, presumably due to anoxia during a preterm birth. In contrast to his poor episodic memory, he exhibits savant-like memory for calendar information that can be flexibly accessed by day, month, and year cues. He also has the ability to recollect the exact date of a wide range of personal experiences over the past 20 years. The patient appears to supplement his generally poor episodic memory by using memorized calendar information as a retrieval cue for autobiographical events. These findings indicate that islands of preserved memory functioning, such as a highly developed semantic memory system, can exist in individuals with severely impaired episodic memory systems. In this particular case, our patient’s memory for dates far outstripped that of normal individuals and served as a keen retrieval cue, allowing him to access information that was otherwise unavailable. PMID:20104390

  16. The Interpersonal Conflict Episode: A Systems Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slawski, Carl

    A detailed systems diagram elaborates the process of dealing with a single conflict episode between two parties or persons. Hypotheses are fully stated to lead the reader through the flow diagram. A concrete example illustrates its use. Detail is provided in an accounting scheme of virtually all possible variables to consider in analyzing a…

  17. Determining empirical thresholds for "definitely large" amounts of food for defining binge-eating episodes.

    PubMed

    Forney, K Jean; Holland, Lauren A; Joiner, Thomas E; Keel, Pamela K

    2015-01-01

    Binge episodes involve "definitely large" amounts of food, yet limited data exist regarding the upper limits of food consumption in non-binge eating episodes. Study 1 examined the concurrent validity of a self-report measure developed to measure "usual" food consumption. Results support good concurrent validity for most items across response versions. Study 2 identified the upper limits of normal food consumption (i.e., 85(th) percentile of participants' largest reported usual servings). Thresholds differed across types of foods, and men reported higher thresholds than women for several foods. Type of food and gender should be considered when assessing for "definitely large" amounts of food. PMID:24983483

  18. Episodic weakness and vacuolar myopathy in hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Basali, Diana; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    We report a 50-year-old woman who presented with a 20 year history of gradually progressive lower extremity weakness, characterized by knee buckling with occasional falls and foot dragging. She also experienced difficulty in lifting her arms above her shoulders. The primary periodic paralyses are rare disorders caused by dysfunctional ion channels in skeletal muscle. The hypokalemic type is generally an autosomal dominant condition, due to missense mutations in the alpha subunits of the skeletal muscle L-type calcium channel genes, CACN1AS, or the skeletal muscle sodium channel gene, SCN4A. The affected patients typically present with episodic weakness. For our patient, the consumption of foods high in carbohydrates seemed to precipitate the episodes of weakness. Her family history was significant for six blood relatives, including three sons and three relatives on the paternal side, who had experienced similar symptoms. A biopsy of the left rectus femoralis muscle showed vacuolar myopathic changes in the scattered muscle fibers, accompanied by occasional degenerating and regenerating muscle fibers. There was no evidence of inflammation on the biopsy. The vacuoles were often associated with increased acid phosphatase staining. An electron microscopic examination showed that the vacuolar changes were due to T-tubule dilation, a characteristic of hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Other metabolic etiologies of vacuolar myopathy, such as acid phosphatase (lysosomal) associated acid maltase deficiency (a glycogen storage disease), need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26190219

  19. Circadian and sleep episode duration influences on cognitive performance following the process of awakening.

    PubMed

    Matchock, Robert L

    2010-01-01

    The process of waking up from an episode of sleep can produce temporary deficits in cognitive functioning and low levels of alertness and vigilance, a process referred to as sleep inertia. Cognitive ability varies as a function of time-of-day; cognitive ability associated with sleep inertia also shows circadian influences with deleterious effects most pronounced when awakened from biological night, possibly paralleling the core body temperature minimum. The length of the sleep episode may contribute to the severity of sleep inertia. Short sleep episodes (<20 min) produce little cognitive impairment, probably because of a lack of slow-wave sleep in the sleep episode. With longer sleep episodes, aspects of sleep depth such as percentage of slow-wave sleep or total length of the sleep episode may be important. Finally, myriad tasks have been used to measure sleep inertia effects, and cognitive deficits associated with waking up have been demonstrated on both simple and complex tasks for both speed and accuracy. More research is needed on how the type of task may interact with sleep inertia. Tests that measure known specific aspects of cognition and that can be mapped to brain systems and neurotransmitters (e.g., the Attentional Network Test: ANT) are recommended to further understand how information processing during the process of awakening is distinct from other aspects of awareness. PMID:20970004

  20. Pathway for inpatients with depressive episode in Flemish psychiatric hospitals: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Desplenter, Franciska A; Laekeman, Gert M; Simoens, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Background Within the context of a biopsychosocial model of the treatment of depressive episodes, a multidisciplinary approach is needed. Clinical pathways have been developed and implemented in hospitals to support multidisciplinary teamwork. The aim of this study is to explore current practice for the treatment of depressive episodes in Flemish psychiatric hospitals. Current practice in different hospitals is studied to get an idea of the similarities (outlined as a pathway) and the differences in the treatment of depressive episodes. Methods A convenience sample of 11 Flemish psychiatric hospitals participated in this qualitative study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with different types of health care professionals (n = 43). The websites of the hospitals were searched for information on their approach to treating depressive episodes. Results A flow chart was made including the identified stages of the pathway: pre-admission, admission (observation and treatment), discharge and follow-up care. The characteristics of each stage are described. Although the stages are identified in all hospitals, differences between hospitals on various levels of the pathway exist. Hospitals emphasized the individual approach of each patient. The results point to a biopsychosocial approach to treating depressive episodes. Conclusion This study outlined current practice as a pathway for Flemish inpatients with depressive episodes. Within the context of surveillance of quality and quantity of care, this study may encourage hospitals to consider developing clinical pathways. PMID:19840384

  1. Episode-Based Evolution Pattern Analysis of Haze Pollution: Method Development and Results from Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guangjie; Duan, Fengkui; Ma, Yongliang; Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Tao; Kimoto, Takashi; Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; He, Kebin

    2016-05-01

    Haze episodes occurred in Beijing repeatedly in 2013, resulting in 189 polluted days. These episodes differed in terms of sources, formation processes, and chemical composition and thus required different control policies. Therefore, an overview of the similarities and differences among these episodes is needed. For this purpose, we conducted one-year online observations and developed a program that can simultaneously divide haze episodes and identify their shapes. A total of 73 episodes were identified, and their shapes were linked with synoptic conditions. Pure-haze events dominated in wintertime, whereas mixed haze-dust (PM2.5/PM10 < 60%) and mixed haze-fog (Aerosol Water/PM2.5 ∼ 0.3) events dominated in spring and summer-autumn, respectively. For all types, increase of ratio of PM2.5 in PM10 was typically achieved before PM2.5 reached ∼150 μg/m(3). In all PM2.5 species observed, organic matter (OM) was always the most abundant component (18-60%), but it was rarely the driving factor: its relative contribution usually decreased as the pollution level increased. The only OM-driven episode observed was associated with intensive biomass-burning activities. In comparison, haze evolution generally coincided with increasing sulfur and nitrogen oxidation ratios (SOR and NOR), indicating the enhanced production of secondary inorganic species. Applicability of these conclusions required further tests with simultaneously multisite observations. PMID:27050081

  2. Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix Saguenay (ARSACS): expanding the genetic, clinical and imaging spectrum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in SACS, leading to autosomal-recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS), have been identified as a frequent cause of recessive early-onset ataxia around the world. Here we aimed to enlarge the spectrum of SACS mutations outside Quebec, to establish the pathogenicity of novel variants, and to expand the clinical and imaging phenotype. Methods Sequencing of SACS in 22 patients with unexplained early-onset ataxia, assessment of novel SACS variants in 3.500 European control chromosomes and extensive phenotypic investigations of all SACS carriers. Results We identified 11 index patients harbouring 17 novel SACS variants. 9/11 patients harboured two variants of at least probable pathogenicity which were not observed in controls and, in case of missense mutations, were located in highly conserved domains. These 9 patients accounted for at least 11% (9/83) in our series of unexplained early onset ataxia subjects. While most patients (7/9) showed the classical ARSACS triad, the presenting phenotype reached from pure neuropathy (leading to the initial diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) in one subject to the absence of any signs of neuropathy in another. In contrast to its name “spastic ataxia”, neither spasticity (absent in 2/9=22%) nor extensor plantar response (absent in 3/9=33%) nor cerebellar ataxia (absent in 1/9=11%) were obligate features. Autonomic features included urine urge incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Apart from the well-established MRI finding of pontine hypointensities, all patients (100%) showed hyperintensities of the lateral pons merging into the (thickened) middle cerebellar peduncles. In addition, 63% exhibited bilateral parietal cerebral atrophy, and 63% a short circumscribed thinning of the posterior midbody of the corpus callosum. In 2 further patients with differences in important clinical features, VUS class 3 variants (c.1373C>T [p.Thr458Ile] and c.2983 G>T [p.Val995Phe]) were identified

  3. Next generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis of neurological disorders using ataxias as a model

    PubMed Central

    Kwasniewska, Alexandra C.; Lise, Stefano; Parolin Schnekenberg, Ricardo; Becker, Esther B. E.; Bera, Katarzyna D.; Shanks, Morag E.; Gregory, Lorna; Buck, David; Zameel Cader, M.; Talbot, Kevin; de Silva, Rajith; Fletcher, Nicholas; Hastings, Rob; Jayawant, Sandeep; Morrison, Patrick J.; Worth, Paul; Taylor, Malcolm; Tolmie, John; O’Regan, Mary; Valentine, Ruth; Packham, Emily; Evans, Julie; Seller, Anneke; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2013-01-01

    Many neurological conditions are caused by immensely heterogeneous gene mutations. The diagnostic process is often long and complex with most patients undergoing multiple invasive and costly investigations without ever reaching a conclusive molecular diagnosis. The advent of massively parallel, next-generation sequencing promises to revolutionize genetic testing and shorten the ‘diagnostic odyssey’ for many of these patients. We performed a pilot study using heterogeneous ataxias as a model neurogenetic disorder to assess the introduction of next-generation sequencing into clinical practice. We captured 58 known human ataxia genes followed by Illumina Next-Generation Sequencing in 50 highly heterogeneous patients with ataxia who had been extensively investigated and were refractory to diagnosis. All cases had been tested for spinocerebellar ataxia 1–3, 6, 7 and Friedrich’s ataxia and had multiple other biochemical, genetic and invasive tests. In those cases where we identified the genetic mutation, we determined the time to diagnosis. Pathogenicity was assessed using a bioinformatics pipeline and novel variants were validated using functional experiments. The overall detection rate in our heterogeneous cohort was 18% and varied from 8.3% in those with an adult onset progressive disorder to 40% in those with a childhood or adolescent onset progressive disorder. The highest detection rate was in those with an adolescent onset and a family history (75%). The majority of cases with detectable mutations had a childhood onset but most are now adults, reflecting the long delay in diagnosis. The delays were primarily related to lack of easily available clinical testing, but other factors included the presence of atypical phenotypes and the use of indirect testing. In the cases where we made an eventual diagnosis, the delay was 3–35 years (mean 18.1 years). Alignment and coverage metrics indicated that the capture and sequencing was highly efficient and the

  4. Family exhibiting cerebellar-like ataxia, photosensitivity and shortness of stature - a new inborn error of tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, D A; Wilkinson, J D; Toseland, P A

    1983-01-01

    Two cases in a brother and sister of a previously undescribed hereditary syndrome are reported. The features, which include shortness of stature, photosensitivity and cerebellar-like ataxia, are attributed to a new inborn error of tryptophan metabolism. PMID:6620277

  5. Hereditary Coproporphyria Associated with the Q306X Mutation in the Coproporphyrin Oxidase Gene Presenting with Acute Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Agúndez, José A. G.; Martínez, Carmen; Navacerrada, Francisco; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; García-Martín, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Background Hereditary coproporphyria (HCPO) is a low-penetrance, autosomal dominant, acute hepatic porphyria characterized by the overproduction and excretion of coproporphyrin. The most common neurological manifestations of this entity include peripheral, predominantly motor dysfunction, and central nervous system dysfunction. Ataxia associated with HCPO has not been reported previously. The aim of this article is to report a patient with HCPO presenting with acute ataxia. Case Report We describe a 44-year-old patient presenting clinically with acute ataxia who was diagnosed with HCPO; mutations were analyzed in the coproporphyrin-oxidase III (CPOX) gene in the patient and in six asymptomatic first-degree relatives. Discussion The patient was heterozygous for a mutation causing the amino acid exchange Q306X in the CPOX gene. No relatives carried the same or another mutation in the CPOX gene. HCPO should be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with ataxia. PMID:24156084

  6. Modest increased sensitivity to radiation oncogenesis in ATM heterozygous versus wild-type mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smilenov, L. B.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Subpopulations that are genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer could have significant public health consequences. Individuals homozygous for null mutations at the ataxia telangiectasia gene are indeed highly radiosensitive, but their numbers are very small. Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes (1-2% of the population) have been associated with somewhat increased radiosensitivity for some end points, but none directly related to carcinogenesis. Here, intralitter comparisons between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts and mouse embryo fibroblasts carrying ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) null mutation indicate that the heterozygous cells are more sensitive to radiation oncogenesis than their normal, litter-matched, counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive human subpopulation.

  7. The ataxia-telangiectasia-variant genes 1 and 2 are distinct from the ataxia-telangiectasia gene on chromosome 11q23.1

    SciTech Connect

    Stumm, M.; Reis, A.; Sperling, K.

    1995-10-01

    The autosomal recessive disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) was linked to chromosome 11q22-23 in 1988. A recent publication reports now on a gene, ATM, located in this region and found to be mutated in patients from the four complementation groups - A, C, D, and E - that have been established so far. These findings indicate that ATM is probably the sole gene causing the disease. In the course of identification of the gene by positional cloning, the AT region was physically mapped by cosmid and YAC contigs and various highly polymorphic microsatellite markers that can be tested by PCR-based protocols were isolated. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Age-dependent gait abnormalities in mice lacking the Rnf170 gene linked to human autosomal-dominant sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Kook Hwan; Chae, Sujin; Kim, Chanki; Kim, Jeongjin; Shin, Hee-Sup; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kim, Daesoo

    2015-12-20

    Really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein 170 (RNF170) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase known to mediate ubiquitination-dependent degradation of type-I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (ITPR1). It has recently been demonstrated that a point mutation of RNF170 gene is linked with autosomal-dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), which is characterized by an age-dependent increase of walking abnormalities, a rare genetic disorder reported in only two families. Although this mutant allele is known to be dominant, the functional identity thereof has not been clearly established. Here, we generated mice lacking Rnf170 (Rnf170(-/-)) to evaluate the effect of its loss of function in vivo. Remarkably, Rnf170(-/-) mice began to develop gait abnormalities in old age (12 months) in the form of asynchronous stepping between diagonal limb pairs with a fixed step sequence during locomotion, while age-matched wild-type mice showed stable gait patterns using several step sequence repertoires. As reported in ADSA patients, they also showed a reduced sensitivity for proprioception and thermal nociception. Protein blot analysis revealed that the amount of Itpr1 protein was significantly elevated in the cerebellum and spinal cord but intact in the cerebral cortex in Rnf170(-/-) mice. These results suggest that the loss of Rnf170 gene function mediates ADSA-associated phenotypes and this gives insights on the cure of patients with ADSA and other age-dependent walking abnormalities. PMID:26433933

  9. Safe sex and first-episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mason, S E; Miller, R

    2001-01-01

    The need for educating patients about the dangers of unprotected sexual activity is well documented in the literature. Using clinical examples, the authors describe safe-sex strategies for patients experiencing their first episode of schizophrenia. Interventions are based on a 2-year experience of working in a hospital-based treatment and research project with 68 patients. Strategies that begin in the healing phase of schizophrenia take place in both individual and group sessions. First-episode patients are encouraged to speak explicitly about their sex-related behaviors, and HIV testing is suggested when needed. The goal of this approach is to emphasize safe-sex/HIV prevention strategies within a framework of good clinical practice. PMID:11407142

  10. Episodic future thinking in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jade Q; Szpunar, Karl K; Godovich, Sheina A; Schacter, Daniel L; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2015-12-01

    Research on future-oriented cognition in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has primarily focused on worry, while less is known about the role of episodic future thinking (EFT), an imagery-based cognitive process. To characterize EFT in this disorder, we used the experimental recombination procedure, in which 21 GAD and 19 healthy participants simulated positive, neutral and negative novel future events either once or repeatedly, and rated their phenomenological experience of EFT. Results showed that healthy controls spontaneously generated more detailed EFT over repeated simulations. Both groups found EFT easier to generate after repeated simulations, except when GAD participants simulated positive events. They also perceived higher plausibility of negative-not positive or neutral-future events than did controls. These results demonstrate a negativity bias in GAD individuals' episodic future cognition, and suggest their relative deficit in generating vivid EFT. We discuss implications for the theory and treatment of GAD. PMID:26398003

  11. Antipsychotic medication for early episode schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bola, John; Kao, Dennis; Soydan, Haluk; Adams, Clive E

    2014-01-01

    Background Long-term treatment with antipsychotic medications in early episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders is common, but both short and long-term effects on the illness are unclear. There have been numerous suggestions that people with early episodes of schizophrenia appear to respond differently than those with multiple prior episodes. The number of episodes may moderate response to drug treatment. Objectives To assess the effects of antipsychotic medication treatment on people with early episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group register (July 2007) as well as references of included studies. We contacted authors of studies for further data. Selection criteria Studies with a majority of first and second episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders comparing initial antipsychotic medication treatment with placebo, milieu, or psychosocial treatment. Data collection and analysis Working independently, we critically appraised records from 681 studies, of which five studies met inclusion criteria. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) where possible. For continuous data, we calculated mean difference (MD). We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. Main results Five studies (combined total n=998) met inclusion criteria. Four studies (n=724) provided leaving the study early data and results suggested that individuals treated with a typical antipsychotic medication are less likely to leave the study early than those treated with placebo (Chlorpromazine: 3 RCTs n=353, RR 0.4 CI 0.3 to 0.5, NNT 3.2, Fluphenaxine: 1 RCT n=240, RR 0.5 CI 0.3 to 0.8, NNT 5; Thioridazine: 1 RCT n=236, RR 0.44 CI 0.3 to 0.7, NNT 4.3, Trifulperazine: 1 RCT n=94, RR 0.96 CI 0.3 to 3.6). Two studies contributed data to assessment of adverse effects and present a general pattern of more frequent side effects among individuals treated with typical antipsychotic medications

  12. Saharan dust outbreaks and iberulite episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Hernandez, Jose L.; Sanchez-Navas, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Mineral dust aerosols coming from the arid and semiarid regions of the world can aggregate and form microspherulites under special atmospheric conditions. This is the case for iberulites, formed in the atmosphere from Saharan dust intrusions into the southern Iberian Peninsula during the summer, prompting a noteworthy case of dust accretion unique in the world. This study consists of a long-term monitoring of Saharan dust outbreaks producing haze that reaches the southern Iberian Peninsula. Aerosol concentration, relative humidity, and temperature time series available at the ground stations in this area indicate sharp variations of these atmospheric variables during the iberulite-forming events. Most of these events occurred during the summer (60%), with 65 episodes for the period 2005-2013, in which 107 plumes reached the Iberian Peninsula. Iberulite episodes lasted 5 days on average, during which an initial increase of particulate matter (PM) levels and temperature, accompanied by a decrease in relative humidity, was registered until the third day. These trends reversed when the plume began to abate. Our data also indicate that iberulites form during dusty episodes when a minimum threshold in the content of large aerosol particles (PM10) reached concentrations above 15 µg × m-3. Surface evaporation due to the sharply rising air temperatures give rise to clouds associated with the plume, where the water droplets that formed from condensation capture large amounts of aerosols as they fall. In this sense, muddy raindrop impacts with variable water:dust ratios recorded during red-rain episodes are interpreted as the precursor of the iberulites. A singular process of dust aggregation is here proposed for the formation of iberulites.

  13. A new form of childhood onset, autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia and epilepsy is localized at 16q21-q23.

    PubMed

    Gribaa, M; Salih, M; Anheim, M; Lagier-Tourenne, C; H'mida, D; Drouot, N; Mohamed, A; Elmalik, S; Kabiraj, M; Al-Rayess, M; Almubarak, M; Bétard, C; Goebel, H; Koenig, M

    2007-07-01

    Childhood ataxias are a complex set of inherited disorders. Ataxias associated with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy are usually included with the progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PME). Five disease entities, Unverricht-Lundborg disease, Lafora's disease, neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibres and sialidoses, account for the majority of PME cases. Two rare forms of ataxia plus epilepsy, sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria and ophthalmoparesis, and infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia were described recently and found to be caused by defective mitochondrial proteins. We report here a large consanguineous family from Saudi Arabia with four affected children presenting with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy, ataxia and mental retardation, but neither myoclonus nor mental deterioration. MRI and muscle biopsy of one patient revealed, respectively, posterior white matter hyperintensities and vacuolization of the sarcotubular system. We localized the defective gene by homozygosity mapping to a 19 Mb interval in 16q21-q23 between markers D16S3091 and D16S3050. Linkage studies in this region will allow testing for homogeneity of this novel ataxia-epilepsy entity. PMID:17470496

  14. Impairment in episodic and chronic cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Tim P; Gaul, Charly; Lindwurm, Andrea; Dresler, Thomas; Paelecke-Habermann, Yvonne; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Lürding, Ralf; Henkel, Karsten; Leinisch, Elke

    2011-04-01

    Despite being an excruciating headache, little is known about the burden of cluster headache (CH) regarding its various subtypes. In a multicentre, prospective study, patients with chronic CH (n = 27), with episodic CH in the active (n = 26) and outside the active period (n = 22), migraine patients (n = 24) and healthy controls (n = 31) were included. Epidemiological data, the German version of the Headache Disability Inventory (HDI) and a screening for psychiatric complaints were applied. About 25% of chronic CH patients in our study received invalidity allowance due to CH. HDI scores (total and subscales emotion and function) indicated a severe headache-specific disability (one-way ANOVA: P < 0.01). Patients with chronic and active episodic CH were significantly more affected than patients with inactive CH and migraine. Healthy volunteers were significantly less affected than all headache patients. Symptoms suggestive of psychiatric co-morbidity were found predominantly in chronic CH: depressive symptoms (56%), signs of agoraphobia (33%) and suicidal tendencies (25%) were frequently reported. Patients with chronic and active episodic CH were severely impaired in non-economic and economic domains such as disability, working life and psychiatric complaints. Remarkably, psychiatric co-morbidity was highest in chronic CH. Thus, especially chronic CH warrants special medical and further supportive care. PMID:21123629

  15. Semantic generation can cause episodic forgetting.

    PubMed

    Bäuml, Karl-Heinz

    2002-07-01

    The repeated retrieval of a subset of previously learned items can cause forgetting of the nonretrieved items. The study reported here investigated whether retrieval-induced forgetting generalizes to a situation in which the retrieved and nonretrieved items are not part of the same experiential episode and task. Subjects learned an item list that they had to recall later in the experiment. In a separate intermediate phase, they repeatedly generated related items from semantic memory, or were presented the same items intact for study. Only the semantic generation of items, and not their presentation for study, induced forgetting of the initially learned items. This result indicates that, first, semantic generation can cause recall-specific episodic forgetting and, second, retrieval-induced forgetting can occur even if the retrieved and nonretrieved items belong to different experiential episodes and tasks. Connections of the present results to other memory phenomena, such as part-set cuing and the generation effect, social cognition, and eyewitness memory, are discussed. PMID:12137139

  16. Capgras Syndrome in First-Episode Psychotic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Paola; Bhuvaneswar, Chaya; Tohen, Mauricio; Khalsa, Hari-Mandir K.; Maggini, Carlo; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Misidentification phenomena, including the delusion of “imposters” named after Joseph Capgras, occur in various major psychiatric and neurological disorders but have rarely been studied systematically in broad samples of modern patients. This study investigated the prevalence and correlated clinical factors of Capgras phenomenon in a broad sample of patient-subjects with first-lifetime episodes of psychotic affective and non affective disorders. Methods We evaluated 517 initially hospitalized, first-episode psychotic-disorder patients for prevalence of Capgras phenomenon and its association with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses including schizophreniform, brief psychotic, unspecified psychotic, delusional, and schizoaffective disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar-I disorder and major depression with psychotic features, and with characteristics of interest including antecedent psychiatric and neurological morbidity, onset-type and presenting psychopathological phenomena, using standard bivariate and multivariate statistical methods. Results Capgras syndrome was identified in 73/517 (14.1%) patients (8.2%–50% across diagnoses). Risk was greatest with acute or brief psychotic disorders (schizophreniform [50%], brief [34.8%], or unspecified [23.9%] psychoses), intermediate in major depression (15%), schizophrenia (11.4%) and delusional disorder (11.1%), and lowest in bipolar-I (10.3%) and schizoaffective disorders (8.2%). Associated were somatosensory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations, Schneiderian (especially delusional perception), and cycloid features as described by Perris and Brockington including polymorphous psychotic phenomena, rapidly shifting psychomotor and affective symptoms, pan-anxiety, ecstasy, over-concern with death, and perplexity or confusion, as well as rapid-onset, but not sex, age, abuse-history, dissociative features, or indications of neurological disorders. Conclusions Capgras syndrome was prevalent across a broad spectrum of first-episode

  17. Depressive Episode May Not Always Follow Mania in Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Depressive Episode May Not Always Follow Mania in Bipolar Disorder New study finds anxiety could be a third ... 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While many may associate bipolar disorder with episodes of mania followed by periods of ...

  18. Familial cosegregation of manic-depressive illness and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia

    SciTech Connect

    Piqueras, J.F.; Santos, J.; Puertollano, R.

    1995-06-19

    We report on a Spanish family with co-occurrence of manic-depression and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia. All affected individuals in the second generation showed cerebellar ataxia and manic-depression simultaneously. Since anticipation has been described in both disorders and the pattern of segregation may be autosomal as well as X-linked, we have searched for a possible involvement of two candidate genes which are located either on an autosome (SCA1) or on the X-chromosome (GABRA3). We concluded that expansion of trinucleotide repeats at SCA1 gene cannot be considered as a disease-causing mutation, and this gene should be initially discarded. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  19. New observations in the fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Fraint, Avram; Vittal, Padmaja; Szewka, Aimee; Bernard, Bryan; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Hall, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) was originally defined as tremor, ataxia, cognitive decline, and parkinsonism in individuals who carry between 55 and 200 CGG repeats in the promoter region of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. This paper describes a series of patients who meet the definition of FXTAS who presented for care between 2009 and 2014. Methods/Results: Retrospective chart review of patients seen in the FXTAS clinic at Rush University in Chicago. Conclusions: Patients with FXTAS may present with a progressive supranuclear palsy-like phenotype and other eye movement abnormalities are common in these patients as well. Rapid worsening of gait abnormalities in FXTAS may be due to a secondary spinal issue and should be aggressively treated to regain function. Finally, the FXTAS Rating Scale score does not reliably inform the certainty of diagnosis or CGG repeat size in these patients. PMID:25368631

  20. Ataxia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism with Intrafamilial Variability Caused by RNF216 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Alqwaifly, Mohammed; Bohlega, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a distinct phenotype of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia, characterized by ataxia, dementia, reproductive defects and hypogonadism; it has been recently found to be associated with RNF216 mutation. We performed whole-exome sequencing and filtered the resulting novel variants by the coordinates of the shared autozygome. We identified a novel splicing variant in RNF216 that is likely to abolish the canonical splice site at the junction of exon/intron 13 (NM_207111.3:c.2061G>A). We herein report two patients with GHS caused by a novel RNF216 mutation as the first follow up report on RNF216-related GHS, and show interfamilial variability of phenotype supporting the previously reported RNF216-related cases. PMID:27441066