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Sample records for epithelial tumors outcome

  1. Peritoneal tumor spread in serous ovarian cancer-epithelial mesenchymal status and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Katharina; Bachmayr-Heyda, Anna; Aust, Stefanie; Sukhbaatar, Nyamdelger; Reiner, Agnes Teresa; Grimm, Christoph; Horvat, Reinhard; Zeillinger, Robert; Pils, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    In this study we aimed to analyze the biological mechanisms underlying apparently different modes of peritoneal tumor spread in serous ovarian cancer: miliary (widespread, millet-like lesions) versus non-miliary (bigger, exophytically growing implants). Tumor tissues and ascites from 23 chemotherapy naive patients were analyzed by RNA-sequencing and flow cytometry. On the basis of differential gene expression between miliary and non-miliary, gene signatures were developed. A calculated tumor spread factor revealed a significant independent negative impact of miliary spread on overall survival (HR 3.77; CI95 1.14–12.39; p = 0.029) in an independent cohort of 165 serous ovarian cancer patients. Comparing previously published epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) gene signatures, non-miliary spread correlated significantly with a reduced epithelial status. We conclude that serous ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease with distinct modes of peritoneal tumor spread, differing not only in clinical appearance, but also in molecular characteristics and outcome.. EMT, peritoneal inflammation status, and therapeutic options are discussed. Significance More than half of serous epithelial ovarian cancer patients present with a newly described type of intraperitoneal tumor spread, associated with differences in the inflammation status, activated oncogenic pathways, lack of EMT, and thus reduced overall survival. Both, the diminished immune reaction and the enhanced epithelial and malignant characteristics of the tumor cells open new avenues for therapeutic options and strategies, like Catumaxomab, already in clinical use. PMID:25991672

  2. Isolation of Cancer Epithelial Cells from Mouse Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sara; Chen, Hexin; Lo, Pang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of cancer epithelial cells from mouse mammary tumor is accomplished by digestion of the solid tumor. Red blood cells and other contaminates are removed using several washing techniques such that primary epithelial cells can further enriched. This procedure yields primary tumor cells that can be used for in vitro tissue culture, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and a wide variety of other experiments (Lo et al., 2012).

  3. Epithelial derived CTGF promotes breast tumor progression via inducing EMT and collagen I fibers deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Sheng, Jianting; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Jiyong; Cui, Kemi; Chang, Jenny; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Interactions among tumor cells, stromal cells, and extracellular matrix compositions are mediated through cytokines during tumor progression. Our analysis of 132 known cytokines and growth factors in published clinical breast cohorts and our 84 patient-derived xenograft models revealed that the elevated connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in tumor epithelial cells significantly correlated with poor clinical prognosis and outcomes. CTGF was able to induce tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and promote stroma deposition of collagen I fibers to stimulate tumor growth and metastasis. This process was mediated through CTGF-tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFR1)-IκB autocrine signaling. Drug treatments targeting CTGF, TNFR1, and IκB signaling each prohibited the EMT and tumor progression. PMID:26318291

  4. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Cancer: Parallels Between Normal Development and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Micalizzi, Douglas S.; Farabaugh, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    From the earliest stages of embryonic development, cells of epithelial and mesenchymal origin contribute to the structure and function of developing organs. However, these phenotypes are not always permanent, and instead, under the appropriate conditions, epithelial and mesenchymal cells convert between these two phenotypes. These processes, termed Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), or the reverse Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition (MET), are required for complex body patterning and morphogenesis. In addition, epithelial plasticity and the acquisition of invasive properties without the full commitment to a mesenchymal phenotype are critical in development, particularly during branching morphogenesis in the mammary gland. Recent work in cancer has identified an analogous plasticity of cellular phenotypes whereby epithelial cancer cells acquire mesenchymal features that permit escape from the primary tumor. Because local invasion is thought to be a necessary first step in metastatic dissemination, EMT and epithelial plasticity are hypothesized to contribute to tumor progression. Similarities between developmental and oncogenic EMT have led to the identification of common contributing pathways, suggesting that the reactivation of developmental pathways in breast and other cancers contributes to tumor progression. For example, developmental EMT regulators including Snail/Slug, Twist, Six1, and Cripto, along with developmental signaling pathways including TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin, are misexpressed in breast cancer and correlate with poor clinical outcomes. This review focuses on the parallels between epithelial plasticity/EMT in the mammary gland and other organs during development, and on a selection of developmental EMT regulators that are misexpressed specifically during breast cancer. PMID:20490631

  5. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition, the tumor microenvironment, and metastatic behavior of epithelial malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Lindsay J; Bhattacharya, Syamal D; Kuo, Paul C

    2012-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms of cancer metastasis have been intensely studied recently and may provide vital therapeutic targets for metastasis prevention. We sought to review the contribution of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the tumor microenvironment to cancer metastasis. Summary Background Data Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is the process by which epithelial cells lose cell-cell junctions and baso-apical polarity and acquire plasticity, mobility, invasive capacity, stemlike characteristics, and resistance to apoptosis. This cell biology program is active in embryology, wound healing, and pathologically in cancer metastasis, and along with the mechanical and cellular components of the tumor microenvironment, provides critical impetus for epithelial malignancies to acquire metastatic capability. Methods A literature review was performed using PubMed for “epithelial-mesenchymal transition”, “tumor microenvironment”, “TGF-β and cancer”, “Wnt and epithelial-mesenchymal transition”, “Notch and epithelial-mesenchymal transition”, “Hedgehog and epithelial-mesenchymal transition” and “hypoxia and metastasis”. Relevant primary studies and review articles were assessed. Results Major signaling pathways involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition include TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and others. These pathways converge on several transcription factors, including zinc finger proteins Snail and Slug, Twist, ZEB 1/2, and Smads. These factors interact with one another and others to provide crosstalk between the relevant signaling pathways. MicroRNA suppression and epigenetic changes also influence the changes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Cellular and mechanical components of the tumor microenvironment are also critical in determining metastatic potential. Conclusions While the mechanisms promoting metastasis are extremely wide ranging and still under intense investigation, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition program and

  6. Epithelial-mesenchymal, mesenchymal-epithelial, and endothelial-mesenchymal transitions in malignant tumors: An update

    PubMed Central

    Gurzu, Simona; Turdean, Sabin; Kovecsi, Attila; Contac, Anca Otilia; Jung, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) represents conversion of an epithelial cell in an elongated cell with mesenchymal phenotype, which can occur in physiologic and pathologic processes such as embryogenesis (type 1 EMT), wound healing and/or fibrosis (type 2 EMT) and malignant tumors (type 3 EMT). The proliferation rate, metastasizing and recurrence capacity, as also the individualized response at chemotherapics, in both epithelial and mesenchymal malignant tumors is known to be influenced by reversible switch between EMT and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). Although much research work has already been done in these fields, the specific molecular pathways of EMT, relating to the tumor type and tumor localization, are yet to be elucidated. In this paper, based on the literature and personal experience of the authors, an update in the field of EMT vs MET in epithelial and mesenchymal tumors is presented. The authors tried to present the latest data about the particularities of these processes, and also of the so-called endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on tumor location. The EMT-angiogenesis link is discussed as a possible valuable parameter for clinical follow-up and targeted therapeutic oncologic management. The paper begins with presentation of the basic aspects of EMT, its classification and assessment possibilities, and concludes with prognostic and therapeutic perspectives. The particularities of EMT and MET in gastric and colorectal carcinomas, pancreatic cancer, hepatocellular and cholangiocarcinomas, and lung, breast and prostate cancers, respectively in sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors are presented in detail. PMID:25984514

  7. Epithelial-mesenchymal, mesenchymal-epithelial, and endothelial-mesenchymal transitions in malignant tumors: An update.

    PubMed

    Gurzu, Simona; Turdean, Sabin; Kovecsi, Attila; Contac, Anca Otilia; Jung, Ioan

    2015-05-16

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) represents conversion of an epithelial cell in an elongated cell with mesenchymal phenotype, which can occur in physiologic and pathologic processes such as embryogenesis (type 1 EMT), wound healing and/or fibrosis (type 2 EMT) and malignant tumors (type 3 EMT). The proliferation rate, metastasizing and recurrence capacity, as also the individualized response at chemotherapics, in both epithelial and mesenchymal malignant tumors is known to be influenced by reversible switch between EMT and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). Although much research work has already been done in these fields, the specific molecular pathways of EMT, relating to the tumor type and tumor localization, are yet to be elucidated. In this paper, based on the literature and personal experience of the authors, an update in the field of EMT vs MET in epithelial and mesenchymal tumors is presented. The authors tried to present the latest data about the particularities of these processes, and also of the so-called endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on tumor location. The EMT-angiogenesis link is discussed as a possible valuable parameter for clinical follow-up and targeted therapeutic oncologic management. The paper begins with presentation of the basic aspects of EMT, its classification and assessment possibilities, and concludes with prognostic and therapeutic perspectives. The particularities of EMT and MET in gastric and colorectal carcinomas, pancreatic cancer, hepatocellular and cholangiocarcinomas, and lung, breast and prostate cancers, respectively in sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors are presented in detail. PMID:25984514

  8. Ovarian yolk sac tumors in older women arising from epithelial ovarian tumors or with no detectable epithelial component.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lawrence M; Talerman, Aleksander; Levy, Tally; Sukmanov, Oleg; Czernobilsky, Bernard

    2011-09-01

    Yolk sac tumor (YST) occurs rarely in older women, either in association with a variety of ovarian epithelial tumors or, considerably less often, without an identifiable epithelial precursor. The patients often have elevated serum levels of α-fetoprotein that roughly correlate with the amount of the YST component. In postmenopausal women with an ovarian mass and elevated serum levels of α-fetoprotein, a tumor of this type should be suspected. Endometrioid carcinoma is the most common putative precursor, and the tumor is often associated with an endometriotic cyst; however, malignant Müllerian mixed tumor and mucinous neoplasms have also been reported as precursors. We report 4 cases of YST in postmenopausal women. Of the 3 cases with an identified epithelial component, 1 was serous carcinoma, another was clear cell adenocarcinoma, and the third was an admixture of endometrioid and clear cell adenocarcinoma arising from an endometriotic cyst. Although a precursor epithelial ovarian neoplasm, typically a malignancy (somatic carcinoma), is usually identified, no precursor neoplasm was observed in 1 of our cases and in 5 cases from the literature. We believe that YSTs in older women, whether or not an epithelial component is detected histologically, constitute a single entity that is distinct from YSTs in younger patients and should be treated aggressively. Neoplasms with a YST component in older women are less responsive to the chemotherapy currently used for ovarian germ cell tumors; therefore, adjuvant therapy should include platinum-based chemotherapy designed to treat both epithelial ovarian cancer and germ cell tumors. Of the 24 reported cases, including our own, 17 died of neoplasms within 25 months and another was living with disease at 2 months. However, 2 more recent patients treated aggressively with platinum-based chemotherapy designed to treat both epithelial and germ cell tumor components with stage 1 disease are living and have been disease free >1

  9. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition can suppress major attributes of human epithelial tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Celià-Terrassa, Toni; Meca-Cortés, Óscar; Mateo, Francesca; Martínez de Paz, Alexia; Rubio, Nuria; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Ell, Brian J.; Bermudo, Raquel; Díaz, Alba; Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Lozano, Juan José; Estarás, Conchi; Ulloa, Catalina; ρlvarez-Simón, Daniel; Milà, Jordi; Vilella, Ramón; Paciucci, Rosanna; Martínez-Balbás, Marian; García de Herreros, Antonio; Gomis, Roger R.; Kang, Yibin; Blanco, Jerónimo; Fernández, Pedro L.; Thomson, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant progression in cancer requires populations of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) endowed with unlimited self renewal, survival under stress, and establishment of distant metastases. Additionally, the acquisition of invasive properties driven by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is critical for the evolution of neoplastic cells into fully metastatic populations. Here, we characterize 2 human cellular models derived from prostate and bladder cancer cell lines to better understand the relationship between TIC and EMT programs in local invasiveness and distant metastasis. The model tumor subpopulations that expressed a strong epithelial gene program were enriched in highly metastatic TICs, while a second subpopulation with stable mesenchymal traits was impoverished in TICs. Constitutive overexpression of the transcription factor Snai1 in the epithelial/TIC-enriched populations engaged a mesenchymal gene program and suppressed their self renewal and metastatic phenotypes. Conversely, knockdown of EMT factors in the mesenchymal-like prostate cancer cell subpopulation caused a gain in epithelial features and properties of TICs. Both tumor cell subpopulations cooperated so that the nonmetastatic mesenchymal-like prostate cancer subpopulation enhanced the in vitro invasiveness of the metastatic epithelial subpopulation and, in vivo, promoted the escape of the latter from primary implantation sites and accelerated their metastatic colonization. Our models provide new insights into how dynamic interactions among epithelial, self-renewal, and mesenchymal gene programs determine the plasticity of epithelial TICs. PMID:22505459

  10. Pten in Stromal Fibroblasts Suppresses Mammary Epithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Trimboli, Anthony J.; Cantemir-Stone, Carmen Z.; Li, Fu; Wallace, Julie A.; Merchant, Anand; Creasap, Nicholas; Thompson, John C.; Caserta, Enrico; Wang, Hui; Chong, Jean-Leon; Naidu, Shan; Wei, Guo; Sharma, Sudarshana M.; Stephens, Julie A.; Fernandez, Soledad A.; Gurcan, Metin N.; Weinstein, Michael B.; Barsky, Sanford H.; Yee, Lisa; Rosol, Thomas J.; Stromberg, Paul C.; Robinson, Michael L.; Pepin, Francois; Hallett, Michael; Park, Morag; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Leone, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The tumor stroma is believed to contribute to some of the most malignant characteristics of epithelial tumors. However, signaling between stromal and tumor cells is complex and remains poorly understood. Here we show that the genetic inactivation of Pten in stromal fibroblasts of mouse mammary glands accelerated the initiation, progression and malignant transformation of mammary epithelial tumors. This was associated with the massive remodeling of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM), innate immune cell infiltration and increased angiogenesis. Loss of Pten in stromal fibroblasts led to increased expression, phosphorylation (T72) and recruitment of Ets2 to target promoters known to be involved in these processes. Remarkably, Ets2 inactivation in Pten stroma-deleted tumors ameliorated disruption of the tumor microenvironment and was sufficient to decrease tumor growth and progression. Global gene expression profiling of mammary stromal cells identified a Pten-specific signature that was highly represented in the tumor stroma of breast cancer patients. These findings identify the Pten-Ets2 axis as a critical stroma-specific signaling pathway that suppresses mammary epithelial tumors. PMID:19847259

  11. [A case of the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg's tumor). Reported and literature review].

    PubMed

    Peña-Torres, Leandro Miguel; Monterrubio-Guerrero, Alejandro; Díaz de León-Sandoval, Laura Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor known as Pindborg's tumor, is a rare odontogenic neoplasm of the jaws. One of their characteristics is the cortical expansion and the relationship with a non erupted tooth. Since the original description in 1955, only 200 cases approximately have been described in the world literature. This article reviews the literature and describes a case of patient who presented calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor in the jaw undergoing surgical excision treatment with an evolution without complications. PMID:20929626

  12. Immunological Consequences of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Chockley, Peter J; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G

    2016-08-01

    Microenvironments that tumor cells encounter are different during the stages of cancer progression-primary tumor, metastasis, and at the metastatic site. This suggests potential differences in immune surveillance of primary tumor and metastasis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key reversible process in which cancer cells transition into highly motile and invasive cells for dissemination. Only a tiny proportion successfully metastasize, supporting the notion of metastasis-specific immune surveillance. EMT involves extensive molecular reprogramming of cells conferring many clinically relevant features to cancer cells and affects tumor cell interactions within the tumor microenvironment. We review the impact of tumor immune infiltrates on tumor cell EMT and the consequences of EMT in shaping the immune microenvironment of tumors. The usefulness of EMT as a model to investigate metastasis-specific immune surveillance mechanisms are also explored. Finally, we discuss potential implications of EMT for tumor immunogenicity, as well as current immunotherapies and future strategies. PMID:27431984

  13. LOXL2 in epithelial cell plasticity and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Cano, Amparo; Santamaría, Patricia G; Moreno-Bueno, Gema

    2012-09-01

    Several members of the lysyl oxidase family have recently emerged as important regulators of tumor progression. Among them, LOXL2 has been shown to be involved in tumor progression and metastasis of several tumor types, including breast carcinomas. Secreted LOXL2 participates in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix of the tumor microenvironment, in a similar fashion to prototypical lysyl oxidase. In addition, new intracellular functions of LOXL2 have been described, such as its involvement in the regulation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, epithelial cell polarity and differentiation mediated by transcriptional repression mechanisms. Importantly, intracellular (perinuclear) expression of LOXL2 is associated with poor prognosis and distant metastasis of specific tumor types, such as larynx squamous cell carcinoma and basal breast carcinomas. These recent findings open new avenues for the therapeutic utility of LOXL2. PMID:23030485

  14. Autoantibodies to tumor-associated antigens in epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Piura, Benjamin; Piura, Ettie

    2009-01-01

    This review will focus on recent knowledge related to circulating autoantibodies (AAbs) to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) in epithelial ovarian carcinoma. So far, the following TAAs have been identified to elicit circulating AAbs in epithelial ovarian carcinoma: p53, homeobox proteins (HOXA7, HOXB7), heat shock proteins (HSP-27, HSP-90), cathepsin D, cancer-testis antigens (NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1), MUC1, GIPC-1, IL-8, Ep-CAM, and S100A7. Since AAbs to TAAs have been identified in the circulation of patients with early-stage cancer, it has been speculated that the assessment of a panel of AAbs specific for epithelial ovarian carcinoma TAAs might hold great potential as a novel tool for early diagnosis of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. PMID:20145720

  15. Recent classification of renal epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Tanaka, Azusa

    2014-06-01

    The recent classification of renal tumors is based on genetic evidence as well as on histologic features. Malignant tumor includes clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), multilocular cystic RCC, papillary RCC, chromophobe RCC, carcinoma of the collecting duct of Bellini, renal carcinoma associated with Xp11.2 translocations/TFE3 gene fusions and mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma. Benign tumor is subdivided into papillary adenoma, renal oncocytoma and metanephric adenoma. Recently, new disease entities such as acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell papillary RCC and renal carcinoma with t(6;11)(p21:q12) have been discovered. In this article, we briefly review and introduce the clinical, morphological and genetic features of these tumor entities. PMID:23529139

  16. Epithelial calcineurin controls microbiota-dependent intestinal tumor development.

    PubMed

    Peuker, Kenneth; Muff, Stefanie; Wang, Jun; Künzel, Sven; Bosse, Esther; Zeissig, Yvonne; Luzzi, Giuseppina; Basic, Marijana; Strigli, Anne; Ulbricht, Andrea; Kaser, Arthur; Arlt, Alexander; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; van den Brink, Gijs R; Schafmayer, Clemens; Egberts, Jan-Hendrik; Becker, Thomas; Bianchi, Marco E; Bleich, André; Röcken, Christoph; Hampe, Jochen; Schreiber, Stefan; Baines, John F; Blumberg, Richard S; Zeissig, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation-associated pathways are active in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and contribute to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Calcineurin, a phosphatase required for the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors, shows increased expression in CRC. We therefore investigated the role of calcineurin in intestinal tumor development. We demonstrate that calcineurin and NFAT factors are constitutively expressed by primary IECs and selectively activated in intestinal tumors as a result of impaired stratification of the tumor-associated microbiota and toll-like receptor signaling. Epithelial calcineurin supports the survival and proliferation of cancer stem cells in an NFAT-dependent manner and promotes the development of intestinal tumors in mice. Moreover, somatic mutations that have been identified in human CRC are associated with constitutive activation of calcineurin, whereas nuclear translocation of NFAT is associated with increased death from CRC. These findings highlight an epithelial cell-intrinsic pathway that integrates signals derived from the commensal microbiota to promote intestinal tumor development. PMID:27043494

  17. Metabolic history impacts mammary tumor epithelial hierarchy and early drug response in mice.

    PubMed

    Montales, Maria Theresa E; Melnyk, Stepan B; Liu, Shi J; Simmen, Frank A; Liu, Y Lucy; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2016-09-01

    The emerging links between breast cancer and metabolic dysfunctions brought forth by the obesity pandemic predict a disproportionate early disease onset in successive generations. Moreover, sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents may be influenced by the patient's metabolic status that affects the disease outcome. Maternal metabolic stress as a determinant of drug response in progeny is not well defined. Here, we evaluated mammary tumor response to doxorubicin in female mouse mammary tumor virus-Wnt1 transgenic offspring exposed to a metabolically compromised environment imposed by maternal high-fat diet. Control progeny were from dams consuming diets with regular fat content. Maternal high-fat diet exposure increased tumor incidence and reduced tumor latency but did not affect tumor volume response to doxorubicin, compared with control diet exposure. However, doxorubicin-treated tumors from high-fat-diet-exposed offspring demonstrated higher proliferation status (Ki-67), mammary stem cell-associated gene expression (Notch1, Aldh1) and basal stem cell-like (CD29(hi)CD24(+)) epithelial subpopulation frequencies, than tumors from control diet progeny. Notably, all epithelial subpopulations (CD29(hi)CD24(+), CD29(lo)CD24(+), CD29(hi)CD24(+)Thy1(+)) in tumors from high-fat-diet-exposed offspring were refractory to doxorubicin. Further, sera from high-fat-diet-exposed offspring promoted sphere formation of mouse mammary tumor epithelial cells and of human MCF7 cells. Untargeted metabolomics analyses identified higher levels of kynurenine and 2-hydroxyglutarate in plasma of high-fat diet than control diet offspring. Kynurenine/doxorubicin co-treatment of MCF7 cells enhanced the ability to form mammosphere and decreased apoptosis, relative to doxorubicin-only-treated cells. Maternal metabolic dysfunctions during pregnancy and lactation may be targeted to reduce breast cancer risk and improve early drug response in progeny, and may inform clinical management of disease

  18. Identification of Epithelial Ovarian Tumor-Specific Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Benedetto, Gregory; Hamp, Timothy J.; Wesselman, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed in late stages with few treatment options and poor long-term prognosis. New clinical tools for early detection of ovarian malignancies will significantly help reduce mortality and improve current long-term survival rates. The objective of this work was to identify ovarian tumor-specific single-stranded DNA aptamers that bind to malignant ovarian tumor cells and internalize with high affinity and specificity. Aptamers can identify unique tumor biomarkers, can aid in early detection and diagnosis of neoplastic disorders, and can be functionalized by conjugation to small molecules. To identify aptamers from random single-stranded DNA pools (60 bases long), we used whole Cell-SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) to enrich and isolate tumor-specific aptamers that bind to tumor-specific receptors in their native state on the cell surface. Next-Generation sequencing identified seven novel aptamers and detailed analyses of three are described. Aptamers bound to, and were internalized by, target Caov-3 cell populations, but not nontarget nonmalignant ovarian epithelial HOSE 6-3 cells or multiple other epithelial tumor cell lines. Furthermore, aptamers showed unique binding affinities with apparent dissociation constants (Kd) measuring in the submicromolar range supporting their physiological relevance and potential use in clinical applications. PMID:25894736

  19. Giant Pindborg Tumor (Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor): An Unusual Case Report with Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Satya Ranjan; Lenka, Sthitaprajna; Sahoo, Sujit Ranjan; Mishra, Sobhan

    2013-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors develop in the jaws from odontogenic tissues such as enamel organ, Hertwig epithelial root sheath, dental lamina, and so on. A variety of tumors unique to the maxilla and mandible are therefore seen. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare, aggressive, benign odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin accounting for only about 1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is eponymously called “Pindborg tumor”, as it was first described by Pindborg in 1955. The origin of this locally invasive tumor remains unknown. It is thought to arise from stratum intermedium. It commonly affects the posterior mandible manifesting as a slow-growing asymptomatic swelling often associated with an impacted tooth. We report a case of CEOT, for which, owing to its huge size we have proposed the term “giant” Pindborg tumor (CEOT). This is probably the largest case of this tumor reported so far in the English literature. The present case also has the classic yet rare “driven snow” appearance of the tumor on radiographs. PMID:24516774

  20. Treatment of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor/Pindborg tumor by a conservative surgical method

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswaran, T.; Naveena, R.

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) also known as Pindborg tumor is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far nearly 200 cases have been reported in literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. Approximately, 50% of the cases are associated with an unerupted tooth or odontome, but was not so with our case. Considering the intrabony mandibular location of the lesion and its limited size, we opted for a more conservative surgery. The clinical, radiographic and histopathologic features and the surgical treatment done are discussed with relevant references. PMID:26015736

  1. Intraosseous calcifying epithelial odontogenic (Pindborg) tumor: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    More, Chandramani B; Vijayvargiya, Ritika

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a locally aggressive, rare benign odontogenic neoplasm that accounts for <1% of all odontogenic tumors. It was first described by a Dutch pathologist Jens Jorgen Pindborg in 1955. It is most often located in the posterior mandible. The tumor usually appears between the second and sixth decade of life and has no gender predilection. It is slow-growing neoplasm with a recurrence rate of 10–15% and with rare malignant transformation. Early diagnosis is essential to avoid oro-maxillofacial deformation and destruction. CEOT is rarely reported in India. We, herewith present a rare case of CEOT with unusual features associated with an impacted right third molar in the posterior mandible of 35 years male, with an emphasis on clinical, radiographic, histopathology and immunohistochemical features. PMID:26604515

  2. Immunomagnetic separation can enrich fixed solid tumors for epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yaremko, M. L.; Kelemen, P. R.; Kutza, C.; Barker, D.; Westbrook, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    Immunomagnetic separation is a highly specific technique for the enrichment or isolation of cells from a variety of fresh tissues and microorganisms or molecules from suspensions. Because new techniques for molecular analysis of solid tumors are now applicable to fixed tissue but sometimes require or benefit from enrichment for tumor cells, we tested the efficacy of immunomagnetic separation for enriching fixed solid tumors for malignant epithelial cells. We applied it to two different tumors and fixation methods to separate neoplastic from non-neoplastic cells in primary colorectal cancers and metastatic breast cancers, and were able to enrich to a high degree of purity. Immunomagnetic separation was effective in unembedded fixed tissue as well as fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. The magnetically separated cells were amenable to fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction amplification of their DNA with minimal additional manipulation. The high degree of enrichment achieved before amplification contributed to interpretation of loss of heterozygosity in metastatic breast cancers, and simplified fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis because only neoplastic cells were hybridized and counted. Immunomagnetic separation is effective for the enrichment of fixed solid tumors, can be performed with widely available commercial antibodies, and requires little specialized instrumentation. It can contribute to interpretation of results in situations where enrichment by other methods is difficult or not possible. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8546231

  3. Ultrasound increases nanoparticle delivery by reducing intratumoral pressure and increasing transport in epithelial and epithelial-mesenchymal transition tumors

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Katherine D.; Lai, Chun-Yen; Qin, Shengping; Kruse, Dustin E.; Lin, Yueh-Chen; Seo, Jai Woong; Cardiff, Robert D.; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Beegle, Julie; Ingham, Elizabeth S.; Curry, Fitz-Roy; Reed, Rolf K.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2012-01-01

    Acquisition of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) tumor phenotype is associated with impaired chemotherapeutic delivery and a poor prognosis. In this study, we investigated the application of therapeutic ultrasound methods available in the clinic to increase nanotherapeutic particle accumulation in epithelial and EMT tumors by labeling particles with a positron emission tomography tracer. Epithelial tumors were highly vascularized with tight cell-cell junctions, compared to EMT tumors where cells displayed an irregular, elongated shape with loosened cell-cell adhesions and a reduction in E-cadherin and cytokeratins 8/18 and 19. Without ultrasound, the accumulation of liposomal nanoparticles administered to tumors in vivo was ~1.5 times greater in epithelial tumors than EMT tumors. When ultrasound was applied, both nanoaccumulation and apparent tumor permeability were increased in both settings. Notably, ultrasound effects differed with thermal and mechanical indices, such that increasing the thermal ultrasound dose increased nanoaccumulation in EMT tumors. Taken together, our results illustrate how ultrasound can be used to enhance nanoparticle accumulation in tumors by reducing their intratumoral pressure and increasing their vascular permeability. PMID:22282664

  4. Noncoding RNAs in Tumor Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Wen; Lin, Pei-Ying; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-derived tumor cells acquire the capacity for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which enables them to invade adjacent tissues and/or metastasize to distant organs. Cancer metastasis is the main cause of cancer-related death. Molecular mechanisms involved in the switch from an epithelial phenotype to mesenchymal status are complicated and are controlled by a variety of signaling pathways. Recently, a set of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including miRNAs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), were found to modulate gene expressions at either transcriptional or posttranscriptional levels. These ncRNAs are involved in EMT through their interplay with EMT-related transcription factors (EMT-TFs) and EMT-associated signaling. Reciprocal regulatory interactions between lncRNAs and miRNAs further increase the complexity of the regulation of gene expression and protein translation. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding EMT-regulating ncRNAs and their associated signaling pathways involved in cancer progression. PMID:26989421

  5. Belinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer or Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  6. Detection of Human Polyomavirus 7 in human thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rennspiess, Dorit; Pujari, Sreedhar; Keijzers, Marlies; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A.; Hochstenbag, Monique; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Kurz, Anna Kordelia; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Haugg, Anke; Pastrana, Diana V.; Buck, Christopher B.; De Baets, Marc H.; zur Hausen, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although the molecular genetics possibly underlying the pathogenesis of human thymoma have been extensively studied, its etiology remains poorly understood. Since murine polyomavirus consistently induces thymomas in mice, we assessed the presence of the novel human polyomavirus 7 (HPyV7) in human thymic epithelial tumors. Methods HPyV7-DNA Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), DNA-PCR and immuno-histochemistry (IHC) were performed in 37 thymomas. Of these, 26 were previously diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG). In addition, 20 thymic hyperplasias and 20 fetal thymic tissues were tested. Results HPyV7-FISH revealed specific nuclear hybridization signals within the neoplastic epithelial cells of 23 thymomas (62.2%). With some exceptions, the HPyV7-FISH data correlated with the HPyV7-DNA PCR. By IHC large T antigen (LTAg) expression of HPyV7 was detected, and double staining confirmed its expression in the neoplastic epithelial cells. Eighteen of the 26 MG-positive and 7 of the 11 MG-negative thymomas were HPyV7-positive. 40% of the 20 hyperplastic thymi were HPyV7-positive by PCR as confirmed by FISH and IHC in the follicular lymphocytes. All 20 fetal thymi tested HPyV7-negative. Conclusions The presence of HPyV7-DNA and LTAg expression in the majority of thymomas possibly link HPyV7 to human thymomagenesis. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the possible associations of HPyV7 and MG. PMID:25526237

  7. Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Ayub, Adil; Naeem, Buria; Najam, Sehrish; Ahmed, Zubair; Jafri, Wasim; Hamid, Saeed

    2016-03-01

    Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor (PHCT) represents an extremely rare clinical entity with only a few cases reported to date. These tumors are rarely associated with metastasis and surgical resection is usually curative. Herein, we report two cases of PHCT associated with poor outcomes due to late diagnosis. Both cases presented late with non-specific symptoms. One patient presented after a 2-week history of symptoms and the second case had a longstanding two years symptomatic interval during which he remained undiagnosed and not properly worked up. Both these cases were diagnosed with hepatic carcinoid tumor, which originates from neuroendocrine cells. Case 1 opted for palliative care and expired in one month’s time. Surgical resection was advised to the second case, but he left against medical advice. PMID:26975959

  8. Primary polyoma virus-induced murine thymic epithelial tumors. A tumor model of thymus physiology.

    PubMed Central

    Hoot, G. P.; Kettman, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Thymic tumors were induced in C3'/Bittner mice by neonatal inoculation with polyoma virus. The objective of this study was to identify the phenotypes of the cells within the tumors and to attempt to determine the origin of the neoplastic cell population(s). At the ultrastructural level, the neoplastic cells resembled normal thymic epithelium with tonofilaments and desmosomes. Immunoperoxidase staining demonstrated the presence of cytokeratin, Iak, -beta 2-microglobulin, -asialo-GM1, the thymic cortical epithelial marker ER-TR4, and the medullary epithelial marker ER-TR5. Islands of normal cortical thymocytes supported by residual normal cortical epithelium and acid phosphatase-positive cortical macrophages were interspersed in the tumors. Residual islands of normal medullary architecture with nonspecific esterase-positive IDCs were rarely identified in tumors. Most lymphocytes in the tumors were normal immature cortical thymocytes with the phenotype Tdt+, PNA+, Thy 1.2bright, Ly-1dull, H-2Kkdull, ThB+, J11d+, and Lyt-2+L3T4+. Lymphocytes in the tumors were steroid-sensitive like normal thymocytes. The proportions of Lyt-2+L3T4- and Lyt-2-L3T4+ cells were generally larger in the tumors than in normal thymus and reflected the higher frequency of lymphocytes in the tumors capable of proliferating in vitro in response to Con A plus IL-2. The data were consistent with the hypothesis that the neoplasia originates from thymic epithelium that is interspersed with normal, developing thymic lymphocytes. Images Figure 4 p[688]-a Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 p687-a Figure 7 PMID:2552813

  9. Epithelial Tumors Originate in Tumor Hotspots, a Tissue-Intrinsic Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Tamori, Yoichiro; Suzuki, Emiko; Deng, Wu-Min

    2016-09-01

    Malignant tumors are caused by uncontrolled proliferation of transformed mutant cells that have lost the ability to maintain tissue integrity. Although a number of causative genetic backgrounds for tumor development have been discovered, the initial steps mutant cells take to escape tissue integrity and trigger tumorigenesis remain elusive. Here, we show through analysis of conserved neoplastic tumor-suppressor genes (nTSGs) in Drosophila wing imaginal disc epithelia that tumor initiation depends on tissue-intrinsic local cytoarchitectures, causing tumors to consistently originate in a specific region of the tissue. In this "tumor hotspot" where cells constitute a network of robust structures on their basal side, nTSG-deficient cells delaminate from the apical side of the epithelium and begin tumorigenic overgrowth by exploiting endogenous Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling activity. Conversely, in other regions, the "tumor coldspot" nTSG-deficient cells are extruded toward the basal side and undergo apoptosis. When the direction of delamination is reversed through suppression of RhoGEF2, an activator of the Rho family small GTPases, and JAK/STAT is activated ectopically in these coldspot nTSG-deficient cells, tumorigenesis is induced. These data indicate that two independent processes, apical delamination and JAK/STAT activation, are concurrently required for the initiation of nTSG-deficient-induced tumorigenesis. Given the conservation of the epithelial cytoarchitecture, tumorigenesis may be generally initiated from tumor hotspots by a similar mechanism. PMID:27584724

  10. Early inflammatory response in epithelial ovarian tumor cyst fluids.

    PubMed

    Kristjánsdóttir, Björg; Partheen, Karolina; Fung, Eric T; Yip, Christine; Levan, Kristina; Sundfeldt, Karin

    2014-10-01

    Mortality rates for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) are high, mainly due to late-stage diagnosis. The identification of biomarkers for this cancer could contribute to earlier diagnosis and increased survival rates. Given that chronic inflammation plays a central role in cancer initiation and progression, we selected and tested 15 cancer-related cytokines and growth factors in 38 ovarian cyst fluid samples. We used ovarian cyst fluid since it is found in proximity to the pathology and mined it for inflammatory biomarkers suitable for early detection of EOC. Immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sample fractionation were obtained by using tandem antibody libraries bead and mass spectrometry. Two proteins, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and interleucin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8), were significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the malignant (n = 16) versus benign (n = 22) tumor cysts. Validation of MCP-1, IL-8, and growth-regulated protein-α (GROα/CXCL1) was performed with ELISA in benign, borderline, and malignant cyst fluids (n = 256) and corresponding serum (n = 256). CA125 was measured in serum from all patients and used in the algorithms performed. MCP-1, IL-8, and GROα are proinflammatory cytokines and promoters of tumor growth. From 5- to 100-fold higher concentrations of MCP-1, IL-8 and GROα were detected in the cyst fluids compared to the serum. Significant (P < 0.001) cytokine response was already established in borderline cyst fluids and stage I EOC. In serum a significant (P < 0.01) increase of IL-8 and GROα was found, but not until stage I and stage III EOC, respectively. These findings confirm that early events in tumorigenesis can be analyzed and detected in the tumor environment and we conclude that ovarian cyst fluid is a promising source in the search for new biomarkers for early ovarian tumors. PMID:24947406

  11. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: I. Ameloblastoma and Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Sook

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs) are common epithelial tumors of odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are clinico-pathologically classified into solid/multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic, and peripheral types, and also divided into follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular types, etc., based on their histological features. Craniopharyngiomas, derived from the remnants of Rathke's pouch or a misplaced enamel organ, are also comparable to the odontogenic tumors. The malignant transformation of ameloblastomas results in the formation of ameloblastic carcinomas and malignant ameloblastomas depending on cytological dysplasia and metastasis, respectively. AOTs are classified into follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral types. Ameloblastomas are common, have an aggressive behavior and recurrent course, and are rarely metastatic, while AOTs are hamartomatous benign lesions derived from the complex system of the dental lamina or its remnants. With advances in the elucidation of molecular signaling mechanisms in cells, the cytodifferentiation of epithelial tumor cells in ameloblastomas and AOTs can be identified using different biomarkers. Therefore, it is suggested that comprehensive pathological observation including molecular genetic information can provide a more reliable differential diagnosis for the propagation and prognosis of ameloblastomas and AOTs. This study aimed to review the current concepts of ameloblastomas and AOTs and to discuss their clinico-pathological features relevant to tumorigenesis and prognosis. PMID:23837011

  12. Detection of Human Papillomavirus-16 E6-Oncoprotein in Epithelial Ovarian Tumors Samples of Iraqi Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Fahem Mohsin; Kadhim, Haider Sabah; Mousa Al Khuzaee, Liqaa Riadh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causal factor for cervical cancer. However, the role of HPV infection in ovarian cancer is unclear. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the presence of human papillomavirus-16 (HPV-16) in ovarian tumor tissues. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective study, which included 61 Archived human ovarian tumor tissues embedded in paraffin blocks. The ovarian tumor tissues were divided into four groups. The first group was the malignant ovarian epithelial tumor group; it included 31 cases with invasive surface epithelial ovarian tumors. The second group was the borderline epithelial ovarian tumor group: it included four cases with borderline intermediate malignancy. The third group was the benign epithelial ovarian tumors group: it included 18 cases with benign epithelial ovarian tumors. The fourth group had functional ovarian cystic lesions: it included eight cases with non-neoplastic functional ovarian cysts. Sections were made from each of the paraffin embedded blocks and examined using immunohistochemistry to detect HPV 16-E6-oncoprotein in ovarian tumor tissues. Results: Out of the eight cases with functional cysts only one case (12.5%) expressed HPV. No HPV expression was seen in cases with benign and borderline tumors. Out of the 31 cases with one malignant surface epithelial ovarian tumor only three (9.67%) cases expressed HPV. There was no significant statistical difference in HPV expression among neoplastic and non-neoplastic ovarian tumors included in the present study (P= 0.476). Conclusions: HPV type 16 was detected in only 9.67% of malignant epithelial tumors. It appears that HPV infection plays a relatively minor role in the pathogenesis of ovarian carcinomas. PMID:25485061

  13. STAT3 in Epithelial Cells Regulates Inflammation and Tumor Progression to Malignant State in Colon1

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Andrew V; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Donghai; Nguyen, Stephanie; Loh, Ricky; Pang, Joey; Friedman, Kenneth; Orlofsky, Amos; Augenlicht, Leonard; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Lin, Elaine Y

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is an important risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer; however, the mechanism of tumorigenesis especially tumor progression to malignancy in the inflamed colon is still unclear. Our study shows that epithelial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), persistently activated in inflamed colon, is not required for inflammation-induced epithelial overproliferation and the development of early-stage tumors; however, it is essential for tumor progression to advanced malignancy. We found that one of the mechanisms that epithelial STAT3 regulates in tumor progression might be to modify leukocytic infiltration in the large intestine. Activation of epithelial STAT3 promotes the infiltration of the CD8+ lymphocyte population but inhibits the recruitment of regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes. The loss of Stat3 in epithelial cells promoted the expression of cytokines/chemokines including CCL19, CCL28, and RANTES, which are known to be able to recruit Treg lymphocytes. Linked to these changes was the pathway mediated by sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 and sphingosine 1-phosphate kinases, which is activated in colonic epithelial cells in inflamed colon with functional STAT3 but not in epithelial cells deleted of STAT3. Our data suggest that epithelial STAT3 plays a critical role in inflammation-induced tumor progression through regulation of leukocytic recruitment especially the infiltration of Treg cells in the large intestine. PMID:24027425

  14. Surgical Outcome of Intradural Spinal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M K; Sakeb, N; Ali, M Y; Awwal, M A; Khan, S I; Goni, M M; Mia, M B; Alam, M B; Zaman, N; Jannat, S N

    2016-07-01

    Results of 63 surgically treated intradural spinal tumors between the period of October 2003 and December 2014 at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and in our private settings, Dhaka, were analyzed retrospectively. There were 33 males, 30 females with an average age of 52.4 years (13-70 years) and followed up for at least a year. The preoperative symptom with duration, tumors location and intradural space occupancy and the histopathological diagnosis were analyzed. Pain was evaluated by the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the neurologic function was assessed by Nurick's grade. The tumors were located as, thoracic (n=32, 50.79%), lumbar (n=16, 25.39%), cervical (n=05, 07.93%), and junctional (n=10, 15.87%, CervicoThoracic-01, Thoracolumbar-09). The histopathological diagnosis included schwannoma (n=30, 47.7%), meningiomas (n=14, 22.3%), neurofibroma, arachnoid cyst and myxopapillary ependymoma (n=03, 04.76%) each and paraganglioma (n=01, 01.59%). Among the intramedullary tumors, ependymoma (n=03, 04.76%), astrocytoma and epidermoid cyst (n=02, 03.17%), haemangioblastoma, paraganglioma and cavernous haemangioma (n=01, 01.59%) each. The VAS score was reduced in all cases from 8.0±1.2 to 1.2±0.8 (p<0.003) and the Nurick's grade was improved in all cases from 3.0±1.3 to 1.0±0.0 (p<0.005). The preoperative neurological deficit improved within 8 postoperative weeks in most cases and within 1 postoperative year in all cases. Complications included cerebrospinal fluid leakage, parasthesia and further neurological deterioration (Astrocytoma) (n=02, 03.17%) and dependant bedsore and recurrence (Ependymoma) (n=01, 01.59%). Aggressive surgical excision potentially minimizes neurologic morbidity and improved outcome except intramedullary tumors where initial treatment consists of maximum safe surgical resection or biopsy. PMID:27612900

  15. ABCA Transporter Gene Expression and Poor Outcome in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hedditch, Ellen L.; Gao, Bo; Russell, Amanda J.; Lu, Yi; Emmanuel, Catherine; Beesley, Jonathan; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Harnett, Paul; George, Joshy; Williams, Rebekka T.; Flemming, Claudia; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Walsh, Christine; Fasching, Peter; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Nakanishi, Toru; Yatabe, Yasushi; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Heitz, Florian; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susan K.; Jensen, Allan; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Brown, Bob; Flanagan, James; Metcalf, Michelle D; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sellers, Thomas; Fridley, Brooke; Cunningham, Julie; Schildkraut, Joellen; Iversen, Ed; Weber, Rachel P.; Berchuck, Andrew; Goode, Ellen; Bowtell, David D.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; deFazio, Anna; Norris, Murray D.; MacGregor, Stuart; Haber, Michelle; Henderson, Michelle J.

    2014-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play various roles in cancer biology and drug resistance, but their association with outcomes in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is unknown. Methods The relationship between clinical outcomes and ABC transporter gene expression in two independent cohorts of high-grade serous EOC tumors was assessed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, analysis of expression microarray data, and immunohistochemistry. Associations between clinical outcomes and ABCA transporter gene single nucleotide polymorphisms were tested in a genome-wide association study. Impact of short interfering RNA–mediated gene suppression was determined by colony forming and migration assays. Association with survival was assessed with Kaplan–Meier analysis and log-rank tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Associations with outcome were observed with ABC transporters of the “A” subfamily, but not with multidrug transporters. High-level expression of ABCA1, ABCA6, ABCA8, and ABCA9 in primary tumors was statistically significantly associated with reduced survival in serous ovarian cancer patients. Low levels of ABCA5 and the C-allele of rs536009 were associated with shorter overall survival (hazard ratio for death = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.26 to 1.79; P = 6.5e−6). The combined expression pattern of ABCA1, ABCA5, and either ABCA8 or ABCA9 was associated with particularly poor outcome (mean overall survival in group with adverse ABCA1, ABCA5 and ABCA9 gene expression = 33.2 months, 95% CI = 26.4 to 40.1; vs 55.3 months in the group with favorable ABCA gene expression, 95% CI = 49.8 to 60.8; P = .001), independently of tumor stage or surgical debulking status. Suppression of cholesterol transporter ABCA1 inhibited ovarian cancer cell growth and migration in vitro, and statin treatment reduced ovarian cancer cell migration. Conclusions Expression of ABCA transporters was associated with poor

  16. Survival outcomes and toxicity of intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji-Young; Koo, Yu-Jin; Kim, Mi-Jung; Kim, Tae-Jin; Lim, Kyung-Taek

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of single-dose cisplatin intraperitoneally administered during cytoreductive surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Data from patients who underwent surgical management followed by intravenous (IV) chemotherapy for stage III epithelial ovarian cancer from 2003 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Subjects were divided into intraperitoneal (IP) and no-intraperitoneal (NIP) groups according to the administration of IP cisplatin 100 mg during the staging surgery. Clinical results such as survival outcomes and chemotherapeutic toxicity were compared between the two groups. Results Thirty-seven patients in the IP group and 26 in the NIP group were identified. There were no significant differences between the two groups in basic characteristics such as age, histology, and surgical procedures. After the surgery with or without IP chemotherapy, there was no difference in the rate of either hematologic or gastrointestinal toxicity or in the rate of incompletion of following IV chemotherapy. Tumor recurrence occurred in 67.6% (25 patients) of IP group and 57.7% (15 patients) of NIP group (P=0.423) during the mean follow-up period of 37 months. The 3-year disease free-survival rate was 39.9% in the IP group and 35.8% in the NIP group, and the relative risk of recurrence was 0.864 (95% confidence interval, 0.447-1.673; P=0.665) in the IP group as compared with the NIP group. Conclusion IP chemotherapy with single-dose cisplatin during cytoreductive surgery is safe and feasible with little chemotherapeutic toxicity in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer, but no distinct improvement in survival could be demonstrated in the present study. PMID:25469337

  17. Expression of AQP6 and AQP8 in epithelial ovarian tumor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiong; Zhou, Chunxia; Yang, Jianhua; Ding, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Yunshan; Chen, Xuejun

    2016-04-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs), the rapid transition pores for water molecules, play an important role in maintenance of intracellular water balance. Studies showed that AQPs were also involved in occurrence, development, invasion and metastasis of tumors. In this study, we aimed to explore the distribution and expression differences of aquaporin 6 (AQP6) and aquaporin 8 (AQP8) in epithelial ovarian tumors. The expression of AQP6 and AQP8 in 47 cases of epithelial ovarian tumors were measured by immunochemical technique and Western blotting. AQP6 was strongly expressed in benign ovarian tumors, but weak signal was shown in malignant tumors. The difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Compared with serous adenoma and normal tissues, AQP6 expression in serous carcinoma was obviously decreased (P < 0.05). AQP8 expressions were both identified in benign and malignant tumors, but there was no significantly statistical difference (P > 0.05). For patients with large volume of malignant ascites (>1000 ml), AQP8 expression was increased (P < 0.05). AQP8 expression in malignant tumors was not related to different clinical stages, presence of lymphatic metastasis, and differentiation degrees (P > 0.05). These data showed that AQP6 and AQP8 had different expression degrees in epithelial ovarian tissues, which suggests that AQP6 and AQP8 may play certain roles in epithelial ovarian tumors. PMID:26779650

  18. Isolating Epithelial and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Populations from Primary Tumors by Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Nicole M; Rhim, Andrew D; Stanger, Ben Z

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice that express conditional reporters allow for the isolation of specific cell lineages. These cells can be further stratified by gene expression and collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) for further analysis. Using Cre-recombinase (Cre) technology we have generated a transgenic mouse line termed PKCY in which all pancreatic epithelial cells and therefore all pancreatic cancer cells are constitutively labeled with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). We have used immunofluorescent staining for E-cadherin to divide the YFP(+) tumor population into epithelial cells (E-cadherin positive) and cells that have undergone an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT; E-cadherin negative). This protocol describes how to prepare a tumor sample for FACS, with an emphasis on separating epithelial and EMT populations. These cells can then be used for a number of applications including, but not limited to, the generation of cell lines, gene-expression analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) or RNA sequencing, DNA sequencing, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and western blots. PMID:26729901

  19. Downregulation of miR-153 contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor metastasis in human epithelial cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Jianjun; Yu, Jingshuang; Chen, Wantao; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2013-03-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial step in epithelial cancer invasion and metastasis. The aims of this study were to investigate and validate unidentified micro RNAs (miRNAs) that regulate EMT and to reveal their clinical relevance in epithelial cancer patients. By applying miRNA array screening in a natural epithelial-mesenchymal phenotype cell line pair and in a transforming growth factor β-induced EMT cell model, we found miR-153 was markedly downregulated in the cells that underwent an EMT. A close association was confirmed between inhibition of miR-153 and the EMT phenotype, as well as the invasive ability of epithelial cancer cells. Ectopic expression of miR-153 in mesenchymal-like cells resulted in an epithelial morphology change with decreased cellular invasive ability. On the contrary, transfection of a miR-153 inhibitor in epithelial-like cells led to a mesenchymal phenotype change. In vivo ectopic expression of miR-153 significantly inhibited tumor cell metastasis formation. Data from the dual-luciferase reporter gene assay showed, for the first time, that SNAI1 and ZEB2 were direct targets of miR-153. Inverse correlations were also observed between miR-153 and SNA1 and ZEB2 levels in oral cancer patients' samples. Furthermore, low expression level of miR-153 was found to be significantly related to metastasis and poor prognosis in oral cancer patients. These data demonstrate that miR-153 is a novel regulator of EMT by targeting SNAI1 and ZEB2 and indicate its potential therapeutic value for reducing cancer metastasis. PMID:23188671

  20. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Florian; Hermawan, Adam; Oak, Prajakta Shirish; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Herrmann, Annika; Elnikhely, Nefertiti; Thakur, Chitra; Xiao, Zhiguang; Knyazev, Pjotr; Ataseven, Beyhan; Savai, Rajkumar; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC)-specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:25500079

  1. Nested stromal epithelial tumor of liver presenting with Cushing syndrome: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Foroutan, Hamidreza; Foroutan, Ali; Bordbar, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Nested stromal and epithelial tumor of the liver is an extremely rare pediatric hepatic tumor. To the best of our knowledge, about 25 cases have been reported in the English literature so far, few of which accompanied with Cushing syndrome. Herein we report our experience with an 8-year-old boy presented with Cushing's syndrome because of ectopic ACTH production by this tumor. PMID:22771659

  2. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor in Anterior Maxilla Associated with a Supernumerary Tooth: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Urvashi; Gulati, Anubha; Batra, Hemant; Singh, Devinderpreet

    2013-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors are derived from epithelial, ectomesenchymal and/or mesenchymal elements that are or have been a part of the tooth-forming apparatus. Of all the odontogenic tumors, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor accounts for 1% of the cases. Approximately 200 cases have been reported to date. There is no sex predilection, with a 2:1 predilection for the mandible, mostly in the premolar/molar region. It is often locally invasive. Most often, it is associated with an impacted tooth, is asymptomatic and requires biopsy for diagnosis. Presented here is a rare case of an intraosseous calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor surrounding a supernumerary tooth. Furthermore, the occurrence of this tumor in the anterior maxilla (an uncommon site) in a pediatric patient makes it rarer. Although the present case was asymptomatic, root resorption and displacement of adjacent teeth necessitated its surgical removal. The lesion was surgically enucleated and histopathological examination confirmed calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, showing abundant calcifications in the form of Liesegang rings. PMID:23487408

  3. Perivascular epithelial cell tumor (PEComa) of the pancreas: a case report and review of previous literatures.

    PubMed

    Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Nishihara, Kazuyoshi; Hayashi, Akifumi; Tamiya, Sadafumi; Toyoshima, Satoshi; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakano, Toru

    2016-12-01

    Perivascular epithelial cell tumors (PEComas), firstly described by Bonetti in 1992, are a family of mesenchymal tumor composed of perivascular epithelioid cells having epithelioid or spindle morphology and exhibiting melanocytic and myogenic immunoreactivities. We herein described a 61-year-old woman who presented with epigastric pain. Preoperative imaging studies showed that 7-cm-sized mass was located in pancreatic head and body, and pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histological findings showed that the tumor was composed of clear epithelioid cells with abundant glycogen granules, which grew in a nested and alveolar pattern around blood vessels. The tumor cells showed immunoreactivities for HMB-45 but did not express epithelial or endocrine markers. These histological features indicated those of PEComa. This report underlines that we should recognize PEComa as a preoperative differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. PMID:27307283

  4. Microvesicles released from tumor cells disrupt epithelial cell morphology and contractility.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Francois; Chan, Bryan; Antonyak, Marc A; Lampi, Marsha C; Cerione, Richard A; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-05-24

    During tumor progression, cancer cells interact and communicate with non-malignant cells within their local microenvironment. Microvesicles (MV) derived from human cancer cells play an important role in mediating this communication. Another critical aspect of cancer progression involves widespread ECM remodeling, which occur both at the primary and metastatic sites. ECM remodeling and reorganization within the tumor microenvironment is generally attributed to fibroblasts. Here, using MCF10a cells, a well-characterized breast epithelial cell line that exhibits a non-malignant epithelial phenotype, and MVs shed by aggressive MDA-MB-231 carcinoma cells, we show that non-malignant epithelial cells can participate in ECM reorganization of 3D collagen matrices following their treatment with cancer cell-derived MVs. In addition, MVs trigger several changes in epithelial cells under 3D culture conditions. Furthermore, we show that this ECM reorganization is associated with an increase in cellular traction force following MV treatment, higher acto-myosin contractility, and higher FAK activity. Overall, our findings suggest that MVs derived from tumor cells can contribute to ECM reorganization occurring within the tumor microenvironment by enhancing the contractility of non-malignant epithelial cells. PMID:26477404

  5. Epithelial Junction Opener Improves Oncolytic Adenovirus Therapy in Mouse Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Yumul, Roma; Richter, Maximilian; Lu, Zhuo-Zhuang; Saydaminova, Kamola; Wang, Hongjie; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2016-04-01

    A central resistance mechanism in solid tumors is the maintenance of epithelial junctions between malignant cells that prevent drug penetration into the tumor. Human adenoviruses (Ads) have evolved mechanisms to breach epithelial barriers. For example, during Ad serotype 3 (Ad3) infection of epithelial tumor cells, massive amounts of subviral penton-dodecahedral particles (PtDd) are produced and released from infected cells to trigger the transient opening of epithelial junctions, thus facilitating lateral virus spread. We show here that an Ad3 mutant that is disabled for PtDd production is significantly less effective in killing of epithelial human xenograft tumors than the wild-type Ad3 virus. Intratumoral spread and therapeutic effect of the Ad3 mutant was enhanced by co-administration of a small recombinant protein (JO; produced in Escherichia coli) that incorporated the minimal junction opening domains of PtDd. We then demonstrated that co-administration of JO with replication-competent Ads that do not produce PtDd (Ad5, Ad35) resulted in greater attenuation of tumor growth than virus injection alone. Furthermore, we genetically modified a conditionally replicating Ad5-based oncolytic Ad (Ad5Δ24) to express a secreted form of JO upon replication in tumor cells. The JO-expressing virus had a significantly greater antitumor effect than the unmodified AdΔ24 version. Our findings indicate that epithelial junctions limit the efficacy of oncolytic Ads and that this problem can be address by co-injection or expression of JO. JO has also the potential for improving cancer therapy with other types of oncolytic viruses. PMID:26993072

  6. The APC tumor suppressor is required for epithelial cell polarization and three-dimensional morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lesko, Alyssa C; Goss, Kathleen H; Yang, Frank F; Schwertner, Adam; Hulur, Imge; Onel, Kenan; Prosperi, Jenifer R

    2015-03-01

    The Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) tumor suppressor has been previously implicated in the control of apical-basal polarity; yet, the consequence of APC loss-of-function in epithelial polarization and morphogenesis has not been characterized. To test the hypothesis that APC is required for the establishment of normal epithelial polarity and morphogenesis programs, we generated APC-knockdown epithelial cell lines. APC depletion resulted in loss of polarity and multi-layering on permeable supports, and enlarged, filled spheroids with disrupted polarity in 3D culture. Importantly, these effects of APC knockdown were independent of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, but were rescued with either full-length or a carboxy (c)-terminal segment of APC. Moreover, we identified a gene expression signature associated with APC knockdown that points to several candidates known to regulate cell-cell and cell-matrix communication. Analysis of epithelial tissues from mice and humans carrying heterozygous APC mutations further supports the importance of APC as a regulator of epithelial behavior and tissue architecture. These data also suggest that the initiation of epithelial-derived tumors as a result of APC mutation or gene silencing may be driven by loss of polarity and dysmorphogenesis. PMID:25578398

  7. A survey of epithelial odontogenic tumors and cysts in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Poulet, F M; Valentine, B A; Summers, B A

    1992-09-01

    A retrospective histologic study of 12 canine and eight feline epithelial odontogenic tumors and cysts was conducted from oral masses (n = 3,917) obtained between 1980 and 1990. No sex or breed predilection was identified. Ameloblastoma was observed in two dogs (case Nos. 1, 2) 6 and 8 months of age. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors were seen in a dog (case No. 3) and in two cats (case Nos. 4, 5) between 8 and 16 years of age. Ameloblastic fibroma (or fibroameloblastoma) was observed in cats (case Nos. 6-10) only. Inductive fibroameloblastoma was observed in four cats (case Nos. 6-9) up to 1 year of age, whereas ameloblastic fibroma was seen in a 14-year-old cat (case No. 10). A single ameloblastic odontoma was identified in a 20-month-old dog (case No. 11). Two complex odontomas occurred in a 6-month-old (case No. 12) and a 4-year-old (case No. 13) dog. Odontogenic cysts were identified in five dogs (case Nos. 14-18) aged 4.5 months to 16 years and in a 1-year-old cat (case No. 19) and have not been previously reported in these species. These cysts were lined by a stratified epithelium reminiscent of the appearance of ameloblastic epithelium. An odontogenic keratocyst with prominent central parakeratotic keratinization was identified in one 9-year-old female dog (case No. 20). Almost all epithelial odontogenic tumors were circumscribed, benign tumors that warranted a good prognosis for survival, although local recurrence may have followed (or may follow) incomplete excision. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors may be locally invasive. Of six odontogenic cysts (case Nos. 14-19), two (case Nos. 15, 18) gave rise to basi-squamous carcinomas. The classification and behavior of epithelial odontogenic tumors and cysts in human beings, dogs, and cats are discussed. PMID:1413403

  8. Virtual karyotyping with SNP microarrays reduces uncertainty in the diagnosis of renal epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hagenkord, Jill M; Parwani, Anil V; Lyons-Weiler, Maureen A; Alvarez, Karla; Amato, Robert; Gatalica, Zoran; Gonzalez-Berjon, Jose M; Peterson, Leif; Dhir, Rajiv; Monzon, Federico A

    2008-01-01

    Background Renal epithelial tumors are morphologically, biologically, and clinically heterogeneous. Different morphologic subtypes require specific management due to markedly different prognosis and response to therapy. Each common subtype has characteristic chromosomal gains and losses, including some with prognostic value. However, copy number information has not been readily accessible for clinical purposes and thus has not been routinely used in the diagnostic evaluation of these tumors. This information can be useful for classification of tumors with complex or challenging morphology. 'Virtual karyotypes' generated using SNP arrays can readily detect characteristic chromosomal lesions in paraffin embedded renal tumors and can be used to correctly categorize the common subtypes with performance characteristics that are amenable for routine clinical use. Methods To investigate the use of virtual karyotypes for diagnostically challenging renal epithelial tumors, we evaluated 25 archived renal neoplasms where sub-classification could not be definitively rendered based on morphology and other ancillary studies. We generated virtual karyotypes with the Affymetrix 10 K 2.0 mapping array platform and identified the presence of genomic lesions across all 22 autosomes. Results In 91% of challenging cases the virtual karyotype unambiguously detected the presence or absence of chromosomal aberrations characteristic of one of the common subtypes of renal epithelial tumors, while immunohistochemistry and fluorescent in situ hybridization had no or limited utility in the diagnosis of these tumors. Conclusion These results show that virtual karyotypes generated by SNP arrays can be used as a practical ancillary study for the classification of renal epithelial tumors with complex or ambiguous morphology. PMID:18990225

  9. The Significance of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition for Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kölbl, Alexandra C.; Jeschke, Udo; Andergassen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process involved in embryonic development, but it also plays a role in remote metastasis formation in tumor diseases. During this process cells lose their epithelial features and adopt characteristics of mesenchymal cells. Thereby single tumor cells, which dissolve from the primary tumor, are enabled to invade the blood vessels and travel throughout the body as so called “circulating tumor cells” (CTCs). After leaving the blood stream the reverse process of EMT, the mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) helps the cells to seed in different tissues, thereby generating the bud of metastasis formation. As metastasis is the main reason for tumor-associated death, CTCs and the EMT process are in the focus of research in recent years. This review summarizes what was already found out about the molecular mechanisms driving EMT, the consequences of EMT for tumor cell detection, and suitable markers for the detection of CTCs which underwent EMT. The research work done in this field could open new roads towards combating cancer. PMID:27529216

  10. Outcomes of laparoscopic fertility-sparing surgery in clinically early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Yoo-Young; Kim, Tae-Joong; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fertility-sparing surgery (FSS) is becoming an important technique in the surgical management of young women with early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We retrospectively evaluated the outcome of laparoscopic FSS in presumed clinically early-stage EOC. Methods We retrospectively searched databases of patients who received laparoscopic FSS for EOC between January 1999 and December 2012 at Samsung Medical Center. Women aged ≤40 years were included. The perioperative, oncological, and obstetric outcomes of these patients were evaluated. Results A total of 18 patients was evaluated. The median age of the patients was 33.5 years (range, 14 to 40 years). The number of patients with clinically stage IA and IC was 6 (33.3%) and 12 (66.7%), respectively. There were 7 (38.9%), 5 (27.8%), 3 (16.7%), and 3 patients (16.7%) with mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell, and serous tumor types, respectively. Complete surgical staging to preserve the uterus and one ovary with adnexa was performed in 4 patients (22.2%). Two out of them were upstaged to The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIIA1. During the median follow-up of 47.3 months (range, 11.5 to 195.3 months), there were no perioperative or long term surgical complications. Four women (22.2%) conceived after their respective ovarian cancer treatments. Three (16.7%) of them completed full-term delivery and one is expecting a baby. One patient had disease recurrence. No patient died of the disease. Conclusion FSS in young patients with presumed clinically early-stage EOC is a challenging and cautious procedure. Further studies are urgent to determine the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic FSS in young patients with presumed clinically early-stage EOC. PMID:26768783

  11. Bilateral ovarian mixed epithelial adenocarcinoma in a postmenopausal woman with unilateral ovarian yolk sac tumor component.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin; Chen, Xiaoduan

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian yolk sac tumors (YSTs) usually occur in the young women and have been rarely documented in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. The different age distribution supposes their complex nomenclature and histogenesis. We report a case of bilateral ovarian epithelial carcinoma with right ovarian YST component in a postmenopausal woman. The patient was treated by surgery and adjuvant combination chemotherapy of taxol and carboplatin for 6 courses and has been clinically free of tumor for 6 months. The correlation between the YST and the epithelial components always confuse us. Ovarian yolk sac tumors are not a discrete entity and represent a multifaceted group of neoplasms. The conjunction of multi antibodies help in differential diagnoses. In addition to a thorough case description, the literature concerning this entity is reviewed and discussed. PMID:25550883

  12. Tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes improve clinical outcome of therapy-resistant neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Marco; Boldrini, Renata; Citti, Arianna; Romania, Paolo; D'Alicandro, Valerio; De Ioris, Maretta; Castellano, Aurora; Furlanello, Cesare; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma grows within an intricate network of different cell types including epithelial, stromal and immune cells. The presence of tumor-infiltrating T cells is considered an important prognostic indicator in many cancers, but the role of these cells in neuroblastoma remains to be elucidated. Herein, we examined the relationship between the type, density and organization of infiltrating T cells and clinical outcome within a large collection of neuroblastoma samples by quantitative analysis of immunohistochemical staining. We found that infiltrating T cells have a prognostic value greater than, and independent of, the criteria currently used to stage neuroblastoma. A variable in situ structural organization and different concurrent infiltration of T-cell subsets were detected in tumors with various outcomes. Low-risk neuroblastomas were characterized by a higher number of proliferating T cells and a more structured T-cell organization, which was gradually lost in tumors with poor prognosis. We defined an immunoscore based on the presence of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ infiltrating T cells that associates with favorable clinical outcome in MYCN-amplified tumors, improving patient survival when combined with the v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene neuroblastoma derived homolog (MYCN) status. These findings support the hypothesis that infiltrating T cells influence the behavior of neuroblastoma and might be of clinical importance for the treatment of patients. PMID:26405592

  13. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition in tumor cells as consequence of phenotypic instability

    PubMed Central

    García de Herreros, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    During the last years many articles have reported epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) induced by a myriad of gene products either when added to the cell medium or when transfected. Molecularly the EMT is characterized by the up-regulation of transcriptional factors (EMT-TFs) repressing the epithelial gene E-cadherin, a protein essential for the maintenance of the epithelial phenotype. These EMT-TFs are subjected to a complex regulation involving binary self-stimulatory loops, allowing the possibility of the amplification of input signals. The capability of EMT-TFs to promote an EMT is controlled by E-cadherin that limits the transcription of mesenchymal genes. We discuss here the differences between normal and tumor epithelial cells; in the latter a partial inactivation of E-cadherin function enables extracellular signals to be amplified and induce an EMT. This tumor cell phenotypic instability is exacerbated in cell culture conditions. Therefore, it is likely that many of the gene products reported to control this transition act only in very specific cell tumor cell lines; thus, in cells with an unstable phenotype due to pre-existing alterations in E-cadherin safeguard mechanism. PMID:25566541

  14. SIRT7 inactivation reverses metastatic phenotypes in epithelial and mesenchymal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Shivani; Villanova, Lidia; Tanaka, Shinji; Aonuma, Misato; Roy, Nilotpal; Berber, Elisabeth; Pollack, Jonathan R.; Michishita-Kioi, Eriko; Chua, Katrin F.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for over 90% of cancer-associated mortality. In epithelial carcinomas, a key process in metastatic progression is the epigenetic reprogramming of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-like (EMT) change towards invasive cellular phenotypes. In non-epithelial cancers, different mechanisms must underlie metastatic change, but relatively little is known about the factors involved. Here, we identify the chromatin regulatory Sirtuin factor SIRT7 as a key regulator of metastatic phenotypes in both epithelial and mesenchymal cancer cells. In epithelial prostate carcinomas, high SIRT7 levels are associated with aggressive cancer phenotypes, metastatic disease, and poor patient prognosis, and depletion of SIRT7 can reprogram these cells to a less aggressive phenotype. Interestingly, SIRT7 is also important for maintaining the invasiveness and metastatic potential of non-epithelial sarcoma cells. Moreover, SIRT7 inactivation dramatically suppresses cancer cell metastasis in vivo, independent of changes in primary tumor growth. Mechanistically, we also uncover a novel link between SIRT7 and its family member SIRT1, providing the first demonstration of direct interaction and functional interplay between two mammalian sirtuins. Together with previous work, our findings highlight the broad role of SIRT7 in maintaining the metastatic cellular phenotype in diverse cancers. PMID:25923013

  15. Sox10 expression in ovarian epithelial tumors is associated with poor overall survival.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ah-Young; Heo, Ilyeong; Lee, Hye Jin; Kim, Gwangil; Kang, Haeyoun; Heo, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Tae Hoen; An, Hee Jung

    2016-05-01

    Sox10 is a transcription factor regulating the development of several cell lineages and is involved in tumor development. However, the clinicopathological relevance of Sox10 expression in ovarian cancer has not been examined. We assessed expression of Sox10 in ovarian epithelial tumors by immunohistochemistry and assessed its prognostic value by analyzing the correlation between its expression and clinicopathological factors. We used tissue microarrays including 244 ovarian epithelial tumors. Sox10 staining was found in the cytoplasm or nucleus of tumor cells. Malignant serous, mucinous, and endometrioid tumors were significantly more likely to express Sox10 than benign and borderline tumors. Expression patterns in adenocarcinomas were different for histologic subtypes: nuclear Sox10 staining was common in clear-cell adenocarcinomas and serous adenocarcinomas, whereas all cases of mucinous and endometrioid tumors were negative for nuclear staining. Nuclear Sox10 staining was also associated with chemoresistance and shorter overall survival in ovarian adenocarcinomas, notably in high-grade serous adenocarcinoma. Sox10 is expressed in many ovarian carcinomas, suggesting that it might be involved in oncogenesis of ovarian carcinoma. Expression pattern of Sox10 differs between histological subtypes. Nuclear Sox10 expression is an independent indicator of poor prognosis in ovarian adenocarcinomas, notably in high-grade serous adenocarcinomas. PMID:26951260

  16. The Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5 promotes tumor malignancy via epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Komiya, Y; Onodera, Y; Kuroiwa, M; Nomimura, S; Kubo, Y; Nam, J-M; Kajiwara, K; Nada, S; Oneyama, C; Sabe, H; Okada, M

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial tumor cells often acquire malignant properties, such as invasion/metastasis and uncontrolled cell growth, by undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the mechanisms by which EMT contributes to malignant progression remain elusive. Here we show that the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) ARHGEF5 promotes tumor malignancy in a manner dependent on EMT status. We previously identified ARHGEF5, a member of the Dbl family of GEFs, as a multifunctional mediator of Src-induced cell invasion and tumor growth. In the present study, ARHGEF5 was upregulated during tumor growth factor-β-induced EMT in human epithelial MCF10A cells, and promoted cell migration by activating the Rho-ROCK pathway. ARHGEF5 was necessary for the invasive and in vivo metastatic activity of human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells. These findings underscore the crucial role of ARHGEF5 in cell migration and invasion/metastasis. An in vivo tumorigenesis assay revealed that ARHGEF5 had the potential to promote tumor growth via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. However, ARHGEF5 was not required for tumor growth in epithelial-like human colorectal cancer HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas the growth of mesenchymal-like SW480 and SW620 cells depended on ARHGEF5. Induction of EMT by tumor necrosis factor-α or Slug in HCT116 cells resulted in the dependence of tumor growth on ARHGEF5. In these mesenchymal-like cells, Akt was activated via ARHGEF5 and its activity was required for tumor growth. Analysis of a transcriptome data set revealed that the combination of ARHGEF5 upregulation and E-cadherin downregulation or Snail upregulation was significantly correlated with poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancers. Taken together, our findings suggest that EMT-induced ARHGEF5 activation contributes to the progression of tumor malignancy. ARHGEF5 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in a subset of malignant tumors that have undergone EMT. PMID

  17. Neutrophils Oppose Uterine Epithelial Carcinogenesis via Debridement of Hypoxic Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Blaisdell, Adam; Crequer, Amandine; Columbus, Devin; Daikoku, Takiko; Mittal, Khush; Dey, Sudhansu K; Erlebacher, Adrian

    2015-12-14

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are largely considered to foster cancer development despite wielding an arsenal of cytotoxic agents. Using a mouse model of PTEN-deficient uterine cancer, we describe a surprising inhibitory role for PMNs in epithelial carcinogenesis. By inducing tumor cell detachment from the basement membrane, PMNs impeded early-stage tumor growth and retarded malignant progression. Unexpectedly, PMN recruitment and tumor growth control occurred independently of lymphocytes and cellular senescence and instead ensued as part of the tumor's intrinsic inflammatory response to hypoxia. In humans, a PMN gene signature correlated with improved survival in several cancer subtypes, including PTEN-deficient uterine cancer. These findings provide insight into tumor-associated PMNs and reveal a context-specific capacity for PMNs to directly combat tumorigenesis. PMID:26678340

  18. Impaired expression of acyl-CoA-synthetase 5 in epithelial tumors of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Schneider, Armin; Kopitz, Jürgen; Schnölzer, Martina; Obermüller, Nicholas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Otto, Herwart F; Autschbach, Frank

    2003-10-01

    Fatty acids are implicated in tumorigenesis, but data are limited concerning endogenous fatty acid metabolism of tumor cells in adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the small intestine. The recently cloned human acyl-CoA-synthetase 5 (ACS5) is predominantly found in the small intestine and represents a key enzyme in providing cytosolic acyl-CoA thioesters. Protein synthesis and mRNA expression of ACS5 were studied in human intestinal tissues using different methods, including a newly established monoclonal antibody. In the healthy small intestine, expression of ACS5 was restricted to the villus surface epithelium but was not detectable in enterocytes lining crypts. ACS5 protein and mRNA were progressively diminished in epithelial cells of adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the small intestine. In conclusion, altered expression of ACS5 is probably related to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence of small intestinal epithelial tumors due to an impaired acyl-CoA thioester synthesis. PMID:14608540

  19. Ophthalmological outcomes of patients treated for pineal region tumors.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, Elizabeth V; Lyons, Christopher J; Hukin, Juliette; Cochrane, David D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The ophthalmological outcomes of children treated for pineal tumors have received limited attention in the literature. METHODS This paper reviews the outcomes of 29 children treated for pineal and posterior third ventricular tumors in the contemporary era using chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and resection as defined by the histology and/or marker profile of the tumor. RESULTS At the time of diagnosis, all patients except 1 had hydrocephalus and all had ophthalmological involvement. Papilledema was found in 69% of patients. Seventy-five percent of patients had partial or complete Parinaud's syndrome, and diplopia or blurred vision was noted in the remaining patients. Visual acuity was impaired in 8 patients. Outcomes were dependent on the histology of the tumor and the treatment required. Those patients who did not requiring resection showed a lower rate of ophthalmological worsening during treatment and greater long-term improvement, in particular with respect to up-gaze palsy. Patients who underwent resection for postchemotherapy residual disease or primary resection showed greater worsening during treatment and lesser degrees of recovery. All patients with impaired visual acuity improved with treatment. CONCLUSIONS As the mortality of germ cell and other pineal tumors decreases, posttreatment morbidity remains, specifically that related to convergence nystagmus, accommodation, and diplopia. In addition to survival, ophthalmological morbidity should be reported in studies concerning the outcomes of treatment for pineal neoplasms. PMID:26799411

  20. Aggressive Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxillary Sinus with Extraosseous Oral Mucosal Involvement: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Vidya; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors are benign odontogenic neoplasms whose occurrence in the maxillary sinus is rare. Maxillary tumors tend to be locally aggressive and may rapidly involve the surrounding vital structures. We report a case of a large calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla, involving the maxillary sinus in a 48-year-old woman. The tumor was largely intraosseous. In the canine and first premolar regions, the loss of bone could be palpated but the oral mucosa appeared normal. Histologically, the tumor tissue could be seen in the connective tissue below the oral epithelium. The most significant finding was the presence of an intraosseous tumor with an extraosseous involvement in a single tumor, indicating aggressive behavior and warranting aggressive treatment. In this article, we discuss the rare presentation of the tumor and its radiological appearance and histological features. We also highlight the importance of a detailed histopathological examination of the excised specimen. PMID:26989286

  1. Aggressive Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxillary Sinus with Extraosseous Oral Mucosal Involvement: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rani, Vidya; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari

    2016-03-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors are benign odontogenic neoplasms whose occurrence in the maxillary sinus is rare. Maxillary tumors tend to be locally aggressive and may rapidly involve the surrounding vital structures. We report a case of a large calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla, involving the maxillary sinus in a 48-year-old woman. The tumor was largely intraosseous. In the canine and first premolar regions, the loss of bone could be palpated but the oral mucosa appeared normal. Histologically, the tumor tissue could be seen in the connective tissue below the oral epithelium. The most significant finding was the presence of an intraosseous tumor with an extraosseous involvement in a single tumor, indicating aggressive behavior and warranting aggressive treatment. In this article, we discuss the rare presentation of the tumor and its radiological appearance and histological features. We also highlight the importance of a detailed histopathological examination of the excised specimen. PMID:26989286

  2. Cystic nephroma/mixed epithelial stromal tumor: a benign neoplasm with potential for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Belinda L; Abern, Michael; Garzon, Steven; Setty, Suman

    2015-05-01

    Cystic nephroma (CN) is a rare, benign, renal neoplasm composed of epithelial and stromal elements. Only about 200 cases have been reported since 1892 and recurrence has rarely been observed. We report a 32-year-old Hispanic woman, with a history of a right, complex cystic, renal mass treated by robotic decortication 2 years ago, who presented with flank pain, hematuria, and recurrent urinary tract infection. A magnetic resonance imaging study showed a 3.4-cm multicystic lesion with thickened septa and enhancement at the right kidney. The partial nephrectomy specimen revealed a well-circumscribed, multicystic tumor abutting the renal pelvis, with thick septa and smooth walls, filled with clear fluid. Microscopic examination showed variably sized cysts lined by cuboidal epithelium with focal hobnailing, without significant cytologic atypia and mitosis. The epithelial lining was positive for CK19, high molecular weight cytokeratin, and α-methylacyl-CoA racemase suggesting a primitive tubular epithelial phenotype. Primitive glomeruli-like structures were also present. The ovarian-like stroma was condensed around the cysts and was variably cellular with areas of muscle differentiation and thick-walled vessels. The stroma was positive for desmin, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and CD10. We suggest that CN represents a variable mixture of epithelial and stromal elements, immature glomerular, tubular, muscle, and vascular elements, which may be present in variable proportions creating a spectrum of lesions previously described as CN and mixed epithelial and stromal tumors (MEST). This case emphasizes that CN/MEST clinically/radiologically mimics other cystic renal neoplasms, especially cystic renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma, necessitating histopathological examination and immunohistochemial studies for definitive diagnosis. Additionally, CN has the tendency to recur when not completely excised initially. PMID:25525149

  3. Outcome of pregnancy in survivors of Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.P.; Gimbrere, K.; Gelber, R.D.; Sallan, S.E.; Flamant, F.; Green, D.M.; Heyn, R.M.; Meadows, A.T.

    1987-01-09

    Outcome of pregnancy was reported by 99 patients who were cured of childhood Wilms' tumor at seven pediatric cancer centers during 1931 to 1979. These patients carried or sired 191 singleton pregnancies of at least 20 weeks in duration. Among the 114 pregnancies in women who had received abdominal radiotherapy for Wilms' tumor, an adverse outcome occurred in 34 (30%). There were 17 perinatal deaths (five in premature low-birth-weight infants) and 17 other low-birth-weight infants. Compared with white women in the United States, the irradiated women had an increased perinatal mortality rate (relative risk, 7.9) and an excess of low-birth-weight infants (relative risk, 4.0). In contrast, an adverse outcome was found in two (3%) of the 77 pregnancies in nonirradiated female patients with Wilms' tumor and wives of male patients. The high risk of adverse pregnancy outcome should be considered in the counseling and prenatal care of women who have received abdominal radiotherapy for Wilms' tumor.

  4. Neutrophil Granulocytes in Ovarian Cancer - Induction of Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal-Transition and Tumor Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christine; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Meyer, Anne-Sophie; Hübner, Katrin; Rom, Joachim; Sohn, Christof; Braicu, Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid; Hänsch, G. Maria; Gaida, Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer (OvCa) is a highly aggressive malignoma with a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) is frequently seen, raising the question of their impact on tumor development. In that context, effects of PMN on human ovarian cancer cells were assessed. Methods: Human epithelial ovarian cancer cells were incubated with human PMN, lysate of PMN, or neutrophil elastase. Morphological alterations were observed by time-lapse video-microscopy, and the underlying molecular mechanism was analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Functional alternations were assessed by an in vitro wound healing assay. In parallel, a large cohort of n=334 primary OvCa tissue samples of various histological subtypes was histologically evaluated. Results: Co-cultivation of cancer cells with either PMN or PMN lysate causes a change of the polygonal epithelial phenotype of the cells towards a spindle shaped morphology, causing a cribriform cell growth. The PMN-induced alteration could be attributed to elastase, a major protease of PMN. Elastase-induced shape change was most likely due to the degradation of membranous E-cadherin, which results in loss of cell contacts and polarity. Moreover, in response to elastase, epithelial cytokeratins were downmodulated, in parallel with a nuclear translocation of β-catenin. These PMN-elastase induced alterations of cells are compatible with an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the cancer cells. Following EMT, the cells displayed a more migratory phenotype. In human biopsies, neutrophil infiltration was seen in 72% of the cases. PMN infiltrates were detected preferentially in areas with low E-cadherin expression. Conclusion: PMN in the microenvironment of OvCa can alter tumor cells towards a mesenchymal and migratory phenotype. PMID:27053953

  5. Thyroid spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE): is cytopathological diagnosis possible?

    PubMed

    Kloboves-Prevodnik, Veronika; Jazbec, Janez; Us-Krasovec, Marija; Lamovec, Janez

    2002-05-01

    Spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE) is a rare tumor of the thyroid gland which occurs predominantly in children, adolescents, and young adults. It usually presents as a painless neck or thyroid mass and only exceptionally as a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland, without metastatic disease at diagnosis. We report on the case of 12-yr-old girl who had diffusely enlarged thyroid gland for about 1 yr and was initially treated for thyroiditis. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) was performed 8 mo after the first admission. Cytological examination of smears showed unusual morphological features. FNAB smears were cellular, with dissociated cells, naked oval nuclei, aggregates, and groups. Three main cell types were observed: spindle, epithelioid, and epithelial. These cells were uniform, cytologically bland, with few mitotic figures. The distinction between these cells was not always unequivocal. In the background of the smears abundant red extracellular material in the form of fine, dust-like granules and irregular patches were present. It was also observed in some aggregates and groups of tumor cells. Spindle and epithelioid cells were immunocytochemically diffusely pan-cytokeratin-positive. In the differential diagnosis, medullary thyroid carcinoma and SETTLE were suggested. The final histological diagnosis was SETTLE. In cases of SETTLE presented as a diffuse thyromegaly the correct diagnosis may be delayed because clinically and ultrasonographically thyroiditis is suspected. To avoid such a delay, FNAB should be used preoperatively. It can provide specific cytological diagnosis based on morphological features and certain immunocytochemical characteristics of the tumor. PMID:11992375

  6. Classification of Extraovarian Implants in Patients With Ovarian Serous Borderline Tumors (Tumors of Low Malignant Potential) Based on Clinical Outcome.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Jesse K; Gilks, C Blake; Kalloger, Steve; Longacre, Teri A

    2016-09-01

    The classification of extraovarian disease into invasive and noninvasive implants predicts patient outcome in patients with high-stage ovarian serous borderline tumors (tumors of low malignant potential). However, the morphologic criteria used to classify implants vary between studies. To date, there has been no large-scale study with follow-up data comparing the prognostic significance of competing criteria. Peritoneal and/or lymph node implants from 181 patients with high-stage serous borderline tumors were evaluated independently by 3 pathologists for the following 8 morphologic features: micropapillary architecture; glandular architecture; nests of epithelial cells with surrounding retraction artifact set in densely fibrotic stroma; low-power destructive tissue invasion; single eosinophilic epithelial cells within desmoplastic stroma; mitotic activity; nuclear pleomorphism; and nucleoli. Follow-up of 156 (86%) patients ranged from 11 to 264 months (mean, 89 mo; median, 94 mo). Implants with low-power destructive invasion into underlying tissue were the best predictor of adverse patient outcome with 69% overall and 59% disease-free survival (P<0.01). In the evaluation of individual morphologic features, the low-power destructive tissue invasion criterion also had excellent reproducibility between observers (κ=0.84). Extraovarian implants with micropapillary architecture or solid nests with clefts were often associated with tissue invasion but did not add significant prognostic value beyond destructive tissue invasion alone. Implants without attached normal tissue were not associated with adverse outcome and appear to be noninvasive. Because the presence of invasion in an extraovarian implant is associated with an overall survival analogous to that of low-grade serous carcinoma, the designation low-grade serous carcinoma is recommended. Even though the low-power destructive tissue invasion criterion has excellent interobserver reproducibility, it is further

  7. Regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition by tumor-associated macrophages in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia; Yao, Hongmei; Song, Ge; Liao, Xia; Xian, Yao; Li, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    It should be urgently better understood of the mechanism that contributes cancer aggressiveness. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a fundamental role in tumor progression and metastasis formation by invasion, resistance to cell death and senescence, resistance to chemotherapy and immunotherapy, immune surveillance, immunosuppression and inflammation, confers stem cell properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are key orchestrators and a set of macrophages in tumor microenvironment. They are major players in the connection between inflammation and cancer. TAMs could promote proliferation, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, stimulate tumor angiogenesis, and inhibit anti-tumor immune response mediated by T cell followed by promoting tumor progression. Recently, studies showed that TAMs played critical role in the regulation of EMT in cancer, although the underlying mechanism of TAMs-mediated acquisition of EMT has been largely unclear. This review will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the role of TAMs in the regulation of EMT during tumorigenesis and summarize the recent ongoing experimental and pre-clinical TAMs targeted studies. PMID:26692918

  8. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is expressed by glomerular visceral epithelial cells in human membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Neale, T. J.; Rüger, B. M.; Macaulay, H.; Dunbar, P. R.; Hasan, Q.; Bourke, A.; Murray-McIntosh, R. P.; Kitching, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was examined in biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, immunogold electron microscopy, immunoassay in serum and urine, and urinary immunoblot. Striking glomerular capillary wall and visceral glomerular epithelial cell TNF-alpha protein staining was observed in all cases of membranous nephropathy and membranous lupus nephropathy. Staining was less frequently observed in crescentic glomerulonephritis and in isolated cases of other histological subtypes of glomerulonephritis, usually in association with glomerular macrophages. By immunogold electron microscopy TNF-alpha was localized in membranous nephropathy within the visceral glomerular epithelial cells, and also in the glomerular basement membrane, especially in relation to immune deposits. In situ hybridization localized TNF-alpha mRNA exclusively to glomerular epithelial cells in all biopsies with membranous morphology but not in other histological subtypes. Concentrations of TNF-alpha were significantly increased compared with normal controls in the urine of patients with membranous nephropathy and with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The expression of TNF-alpha by glomerular epithelial cells exclusively and universally in biopsies showing a membranous morphology strongly suggests this cytokine has a role in the pathogenesis of membranous nephropathy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7778683

  9. Flow cytometry--principles and feasibility in transfusion medicine. Enumeration of epithelial derived tumor cells in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Terstappen, L W; Rao, C; Gross, S; Kotelnikov, V; Racilla, E; Uhr, J; Weiss, A

    1998-01-01

    Immunomagnetic selection of epithelial cells from peripheral blood was combined with flowcytometric or microscopic analysis to characterize and enumerate epithelium derived tumor cells in the circulation of patients with carcinoma of the breast. Highly significant differences in the number of circulating epithelial cells were found between normal controls and patients with breast cancer. In addition, significant differences in the number of circulating epithelial cells were found in patients in whom the tumor is confined to the primary tumor and those with metastatic disease to local lymphnodes or distant sites [1]. The malignant nature of the cells was demonstrated by their cytology and immunophenotype. In following up the number of epithelial cells in the blood of patients with metastatic carcinoma of the breast, it was shown that it was well correlated with the activity of the disease. PMID:9704456

  10. Available evidence and new biological perspectives on medical treatment of advanced thymic epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Serpico, D; Trama, A; Haspinger, E R; Agustoni, F; Botta, L; Berardi, R; Palmieri, G; Zucali, P; Gallucci, R; Broggini, M; Gatta, G; Pastorino, U; Pelosi, G; de Braud, F; Garassino, M C

    2015-05-01

    Thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) are rare primary mediastinal tumors arising from thymic epithelium. Their rarity and complexity hinder investigations of their causes and therapy development. Here, we summarize the existing knowledge regarding medical treatment of these tumors, and thoroughly review the known genetic aberrations associated with TETs and the present status of potential biological treatments. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), stem-cell factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R), and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and VEGF-2) are overexpressed in TETs. EGFR overexpression in TETs is associated with higher stage, and IGF1R overexpression has poor prognostic value. Data indicate that anti-IGF1R monoclonal antibodies, and inhibitors of angiogenesis, somatostatin receptors, histone deacetylase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and cyclin-dependent kinases may be active against TETs. Continued investigations in this field could lead to advancement of targeted and biological therapies for TETs. PMID:25411417

  11. The Tumor-Associated Marker, PVRL4 (Nectin-4), is the Epithelial Receptor for Morbilliviruses

    PubMed Central

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S.; Richardson, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    PVRL4 (nectin-4) was recently identified as the epithelial receptor for members of the Morbillivirus genus, including measles virus, canine distemper virus and peste des petits ruminants virus. Here, we describe the role of PVRL4 in morbillivirus pathogenesis and its promising use in cancer therapies. This discovery establishes a new paradigm for the spread of virus from lymphocytes to airway epithelial cells and its subsequent release into the environment. Measles virus vaccine strains have emerged as a promising oncolytic platform for cancer therapy in the last ten years. Given that PVRL4 is a well-known tumor-associated marker for several adenocarcinoma (lung, breast and ovary), the measles virus could potentially be used to specifically target, infect and destroy cancers expressing PVRL4. PMID:24892636

  12. Phenotype of circulating tumor cell: face-off between epithelial and mesenchymal masks.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yupeng; Zhang, Qi

    2016-05-01

    Most patients with cancers died of distant metastasis. It is always difficult to find cancer metastasis in early time, let alone to prevent or cure it. Currently, oncologists place high hopes on circulating tumor cell (CTC), which, compared to current imaging methods, is found more sensitive for early metastasis. Recently, techniques for CTC enrichment and identification are developing quickly. However, there are great challenges in the clinical interpretation of CTC assessments. Increasing studies have shown the heterogeneity of CTCs, which may play different roles in cancer metastasis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is not only the main mechanism of the cancer cells invading the circulation system but also a distinguished characteristic of CTCs. Investigators are trying to differentiate specific subgroups of CTCs that are truly responsible for cancer metastasis. Here, we reviewed the current evidences on epithelial-mesenchymal transition of CTCs from perspectives of enrichment methods, biology, and its subgroups. PMID:26758432

  13. Expression of cell cycle and apoptosis regulators in thymus and thymic epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Papoudou-Bai, Alexandra; Barbouti, Alexandra; Galani, Vassiliki; Stefanaki, Kalliopi; Rontogianni, Dimitra; Kanavaros, Panagiotis

    2016-05-01

    The human thymus supports the production of self-tolerant T cells with competent and regulatory functions. Various cellular components of the thymic microenvironment such as thymic epithelial cells (TEC) and dendritic cells play essential roles in thymic T cell differentiation. The multiple cellular events occurring during thymic T cell and TEC differentiation involve proteins regulating cell cycle and apoptosis. Dysregulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis networks is involved in the pathogenesis of thymic epithelial tumors (TET) which are divided into two broad categories, thymomas and thymic carcinomas. The present review focuses on the usefulness of the analysis of the expression patterns of major cell cycle and apoptosis regulators in order to gain insight in the histophysiology of thymus and the histopathology, the clinical behavior and the biology of TET. PMID:25794494

  14. Rac1 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer: effect on cell EMT and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Leng, Ruobing; Liao, Gang; Wang, Haixia; Kuang, Jun; Tang, Liangdan

    2015-02-01

    Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (rac1) has been implicated in tumor epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT); however, limited information is available regarding the role of rac1 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation of rac1 expression with EMT and EOC prognosis. Rac1 protein levels of 150 EOC specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Survival analysis was performed to determine the correlation between rac1 expression and survival. Cellular and molecular changes were also examined after rac1 in ovarian cancer cells was silenced in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of rac1 on EMT was investigated by Western blot analysis. Rac1 was highly expressed in EOC. Rac1 overexpression was closely associated with advanced stage based on International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, poor grade, serum Ca-125, and residual tumor size. Survival analyses demonstrated that patients with high rac1 expression levels were more susceptible to early tumor recurrence with very poor prognosis. This study revealed that rac1 downregulation decreased cell EMT and proliferation capability in vitro and in vivo. Rac1 expression possibly altered cell EMT by interacting with p21-activated kinase 1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. The present study showed that rac1 overexpression is associated with cell EMT and poor EOC prognosis. Rac1 possibly plays an important role in predicting EOC metastasis. PMID:25585684

  15. High levels of EGFR expression in tumor stroma are associated with aggressive clinical features in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Li, Dan; Sun, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and biological function of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expressed in tumor stroma of epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Immunohistological staining of EGFR was evaluated in 242 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. The correlations of EGFR expression in tumor stroma with clinicopathological features and with the expression level of Ki-67 were analyzed by SPSS software. Kaplan–Meier analysis and the Cox proportional hazard model were used to analyze the effect of EGFR expression in tumor stroma on the prognosis of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. Meanwhile, the activities of proliferation and migration of tumor cells were detected when EGFR overexpressed in stroma cells. Results EGFR expression in tumor stroma correlated significantly with clinical stage (χ2=7.002, P=0.008) and distant metastases (χ2=16.59, P<0.001). Furthermore, there was a significantly positive correlation between the level of EGFR expressed in tumor stroma and the level of Ki-67 expressed in tumor cells (χ2=6.120, P=0.013). Patients with high EGFR expression level in tumor stroma showed poor survival (P=0.002). Multivariate analysis showed that high expression of EGFR in tumor stroma was an independent predictor for epithelial ovarian cancer patients (hazard ratio =1.703; 95% confidence interval 1.125–2.578, P=0.012). Furthermore, stroma cells overexpressing EGFR could promote the proliferation and migration of adjacent tumor cells. Conclusion High expression of EGFR in tumor stroma correlates with aggressive clinical features in epithelial ovarian cancer, and is an independent prognostic factor. PMID:26855586

  16. CT staging and preoperative assessment of resectability for thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yan; Gu, Zhitao; Ye, Jianding; Mao, Teng; Chen, Wenhu

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the computed tomography (CT) features potentially helpful for accurate staging and predicting resectability of thymic epithelial tumors (TET). Methods One hundred and thirty-eight consecutive TET patients undergoing surgical resection from April 2010 to November 2011 were prospectively entered into a database. All patients were staged according to the Masaoka-Koga staging system. The relationship between CT features with tumor staging and complete resection was reviewed after surgery. Results Surgico-pathological staging was stage I in 63, stage II in 32, stage III in 32, and stage IV in 11 patients. Preoperative CT staging was highly consistent with postoperative surgico-pathological staging (Kappa =0.525). Tumor shape, contour, enhancement, with or without invasion of the adjacent structures (mediastinal fat, mediastinal pleura, lung, pericardium, mediastinal vessels, phrenic nerve), and presence of pleural, pericardial effusionor intrapulmonary metastasis were correlated with Masaoka-Koga staging (P<0.05). However, tumor size, internal density or presence of calcification was not associated with staging (P>0.05). Tumor size, presence of calcification and mediastinal lymph node enlargement were not correlated with complete tumor resection (P>0.05). Tumor shape, contour, internal density, enhancement pattern, and invasion of adjacent structures were related to complete resection of the primary tumor in univariate analysis (P<0.05). However, upon multivariate logistic regression, only absence of artery systems invasion was predictive of complete resection (P<0.05). Conclusions Clinical staging of TET could be accurately evaluated with CT features including tumor shape, contour, enhancement pattern, with or without invasion of adjacent structures, and presence of pleural, pericardial effusion or intrapulmonary metastasis. Absence of arterial system invasion on CT was the only predictive feature for predicting

  17. Dendritic cell-derived tumor necrosis factor α modifies airway epithelial cell responses.

    PubMed

    Lutfi, R; Ledford, J R; Zhou, P; Lewkowich, I P; Page, K

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal dendritic cells (DC) are intimately associated with the airway epithelium and thus are ideally situated to be first responders to pathogens. We hypothesize that DC drive innate immune responses through early release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, which drives airway epithelial cell responses. In a mouse model, TNFα release was significantly increased following a single exposure to German cockroach (GC) frass, an event independent of neutrophil recruitment into the airways. While lung epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages failed to release TNFα following GC frass exposure, bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) produced substantial amounts of TNFα suggesting their importance as early responding cells. This was confirmed by flow cytometry of pulmonary myeloid DC. Addition of GC frass-pulsed BMDC or conditioned media from GC frass-pulsed BMDC to primary mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTEC) or MLE-15 cells induced chemokine (C-C) motif ligand (CCL) 20 and granulocyte macrophage (GM) colony-stimulating factor (CSF), both of which are important for DC recruitment, survival and differentiation. Importantly, DC do not produce CCL20 or GM-CSF following allergen exposure. Blocking TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) completely abolished chemokine production, suggesting that BMDC-derived TNFα induced airway epithelial cell activation and enhancement of the innate immune response. Lastly, blocking TNFR1 in vivo resulted in significantly decreased CCL20 and GM-CSF production in the lungs of mice. Together, our data strongly suggest that DC-derived TNFα plays a crucial role in the initiation of innate immune responses through the modification of airway epithelial cell responses. PMID:22517116

  18. Flotillin-1 protein is upregulated in human endometrial cancer and localization shifts from epithelial to stromal with increasing tumor grade.

    PubMed

    Winship, Amy Louise; Rainczuk, Kate; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynecological malignancy. Flotillin-1 is an integral membrane protein and estrogen responsive gene. Flotillin-1 expression and localization in human endometrial cancers grades 1-3 was investigated using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Flotillin-1 mRNA levels were unchanged in endometrial cancer versus benign endometrium. Flotillin-1 protein was significantly reduced in the epithelial compartment with increasing tumor grade, although levels increased in the tumor stroma across grades. We have identified a novel factor in human endometrial cancer and observed a shift in epithelial to stromal localization with increasing tumor grade in women. PMID:26682635

  19. Whom to blame for metastasis, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition or the tumor microenvironment?

    PubMed

    Pietilä, M; Ivaska, J; Mani, S A

    2016-09-28

    Changes in the tumor microenvironment (TME) can trigger the activation of otherwise non-malignant cells to become highly aggressive and motile. This is evident during initial tumor growth when the poor vascularization in tumors generates hypoxic regions that trigger the latent embryonic program, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), in epithelial carcinoma cells (e-cars) leading to highly motile mesenchymal-like carcinoma cells (m-cars), which also acquire cancer stem cell properties. After that, specific bidirectional interactions take place between m-cars and the cellular components of TME at different stages of metastasis. These interactions include several vicious positive feedback loops in which m-cars trigger a phenotypic switch, causing normal stromal cells to become pro-tumorigenic, which then further promote the survival, motility, and proliferation of m-cars. Accordingly, there is not a single culprit accounting for metastasis. Instead both m-cars and the TME dynamically interact, evolve and promote metastasis. In this review, we discuss the current status of the known interactions between m-cars and the TME during different stages of metastasis and how these interactions promote the metastatic activity of highly malignant m-cars by promoting their invasive mesenchymal phenotype and CSC properties. PMID:26791236

  20. Tumor Exosomal RNAs Promote Lung Pre-metastatic Niche Formation by Activating Alveolar Epithelial TLR3 to Recruit Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfang; Gu, Yan; Han, Yanmei; Zhang, Qian; Jiang, Zhengping; Zhang, Xiang; Huang, Bo; Xu, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Jianming; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-08-01

    The pre-metastatic niche educated by primary tumor-derived elements contributes to cancer metastasis. However, the role of host stromal cells in metastatic niche formation and organ-specific metastatic tropism is not clearly defined. Here, we demonstrate that lung epithelial cells are critical for initiating neutrophil recruitment and lung metastatic niche formation by sensing tumor exosomal RNAs via Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). TLR3-deficient mice show reduced lung metastasis in the spontaneous metastatic models. Mechanistically, primary tumor-derived exosomal RNAs, which are enriched in small nuclear RNAs, activate TLR3 in lung epithelial cells, consequently inducing chemokine secretion in the lung and promoting neutrophil recruitment. Identification of metastatic axis of tumor exosomal RNAs and host lung epithelial cell TLR3 activation provides potential targets to control cancer metastasis to the lung. PMID:27505671

  1. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Florian; Hermawan, Adam; Oak, Prajakta Shirish; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Herrmann, Annika; Elnikhely, Nefertiti; Thakur, Chitra; Xiao, Zhiguang; Knyazev, Pjotr; Ataseven, Beyhan; Savai, Rajkumar; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC)–specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:25500079

  2. Favorable outcome of patients affected by rhabdoid tumors due to rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome (RTPS).

    PubMed

    Kordes, Uwe; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Modena, Piergiorgio; Massimino, Maura; Biassoni, Veronica; Reinhard, Harald; Hasselblatt, Martin; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Frühwald, Michael C

    2014-05-01

    Rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome is usually associated with shorter survival in patients with malignant rhabdoid tumors regardless of anatomical origin. Here we present four children harboring truncating heterozygous SMARCB1/INI1 germline mutations with favorable outcome. All four patients received multi-modality treatment, three according to therapeutic recommendations by the EU-RHAB registry, two without radiotherapy, and mean event-free survival accounts for 7 years. In conclusion, intensive treatment with curative intent is justified for children with rhabdoid tumors even if an underlying rhabdoid predisposition syndrome is demonstrated. PMID:24123847

  3. Management and outcomes in massive bilateral Wilms’ tumors

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Sandeep; Mittal, Deepak; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar; Srinivas, M; Bakhshi, Sameer; Bajpai, Minu; Gupta, Devendra Kumar; Iyer, V. K.; Mohanti, Bidyut K; Thulkar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of children with bilateral Wilms’ tumor (BWT) treated on All India Institute of Medical Sciences-Wilms Tumor-99 (AIIMS-WT-99) protocol. Materials and Methods: All children with BWT, registered in our solid tumor clinic from August 1999 through December 2010 were included. Results: Of the 178 fresh cases of Wilms Tumor (WT) treated during this period, 11 (6.2%) had bilateral involvement. All patients except one (12 and 3 cm), had massive bilateral tumors of more than 10 cm on each side. There were eight boys and three girls in the age range 6–30 months. One patient had Denys-Drash syndrome. Twenty renal units were operated upon (12 tumorectomy, five partial nephrectomy, and three nephrectomies), while one patient with inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombus died of renal failure. Tumor spill occurred in three units, lymphnode was positive in two patients. Local recurrence occurred in four patients (six of 18 renal units (33%)—two bilateral and two unilateral). There was one recurrence in the liver that was treated with radio-frequency ablation. The 5-year overall survival (OS) was 90% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 50.8–98.6) and the relapse free survival (RFS) was 38% (95% CI = 6.1–71.6). Conclusion: Massive BWT respond poorly to preoperative chemotherapy, are often not amenable to partial nephrectomy/tumorectomy and have a higher local recurrence rate, giving a poor RFS. PMID:25336802

  4. Architectural Transcription Factor HMGI(Y) Promotes Tumor Progression and Mesenchymal Transition of Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Raymond; Edberg, Dale D.; Li, Ying

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that overexpression or aberrant expression of the HMGI(Y) family of architectural transcription factors is frequently associated with both neoplastic transformation of cells and metastatic tumor progression. Little is known, however, about the molecular roles played by the HMGI(Y) proteins in these events. Here we report that human breast epithelial cells harboring tetracycline-regulated HMGI(Y) transgenes acquire the ability to form both primary and metastatic tumors in nude mice only when the transgenes are actively expressed. Unexpectedly, the HMG-Y, rather than the HMG-I, isoform of these proteins is the most effective elicitor of both neoplastic transformation and metastatic progression in vivo. Furthermore, expression of either antisense or dominant-negative HMGI(Y) constructs inhibits both the rate of proliferation of tumor cells and their ability to grow anchorage independently in soft agar. Array analysis of transcription profiles demonstrates that the HMG-I and HMG-Y isoform proteins each modulate the expression of distinctive constellations of genes known to be involved in signal transduction, cell proliferation, tumor initiation, invasion, migration, induction of angiogenesis, and colonization. Immunohistochemical analyses of tumors formed in nude mice indicate that many have undergone an epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate that overexpression of the HMGI(Y) proteins, more specifically, the HMG-Y isoform protein, is causally associated with both neoplastic transformation and metastatic progression and suggest that induction of integrins and their signaling pathways may play significant molecular roles in these biological events. PMID:11134344

  5. Architectural transcription factor HMGI(Y) promotes tumor progression and mesenchymal transition of human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Reeves, R; Edberg, D D; Li, Y

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that overexpression or aberrant expression of the HMGI(Y) family of architectural transcription factors is frequently associated with both neoplastic transformation of cells and metastatic tumor progression. Little is known, however, about the molecular roles played by the HMGI(Y) proteins in these events. Here we report that human breast epithelial cells harboring tetracycline-regulated HMGI(Y) transgenes acquire the ability to form both primary and metastatic tumors in nude mice only when the transgenes are actively expressed. Unexpectedly, the HMG-Y, rather than the HMG-I, isoform of these proteins is the most effective elicitor of both neoplastic transformation and metastatic progression in vivo. Furthermore, expression of either antisense or dominant-negative HMGI(Y) constructs inhibits both the rate of proliferation of tumor cells and their ability to grow anchorage independently in soft agar. Array analysis of transcription profiles demonstrates that the HMG-I and HMG-Y isoform proteins each modulate the expression of distinctive constellations of genes known to be involved in signal transduction, cell proliferation, tumor initiation, invasion, migration, induction of angiogenesis, and colonization. Immunohistochemical analyses of tumors formed in nude mice indicate that many have undergone an epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate that overexpression of the HMGI(Y) proteins, more specifically, the HMG-Y isoform protein, is causally associated with both neoplastic transformation and metastatic progression and suggest that induction of integrins and their signaling pathways may play significant molecular roles in these biological events. PMID:11134344

  6. Circulating tumor cells and epithelial, mesenchymal and stemness markers: characterization of cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Fici, Pietro; Gallerani, Giulia; Fabbri, Francesco; Zoli, Wainer; Rigaud, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Until now detection and numeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were essentially used as a prognostic factor in cancer progression. To extend the role of these kinds of analysis, it seems necessary to improve analytical methods related to isolation and characterization of CTCs. Discrepancies between published results corroborates this requirement. In this review we suggest a combination of markers able to reach the goal. Moreover to improve the clinical utility of CTC analysis, particularly in the therapeutic follow up of the disease, epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) level of a global CTC population should be studied. PMID:25489583

  7. [Preserving ovarian function in the treatment of epithelial and special (other) malignant ovarian tumors].

    PubMed

    Kolstad, P

    1987-10-01

    About 90% of malignant tumors of the ovary in Scandinavia develop from the germinal epithelium. There are great differences in the incidence rates between countries in the Western world and in Africa and Asia. The WHO classification of ovarian malignancies is generally used. The epithelial tumors comprise the serous, mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell, undifferentiated and mixed true carcinomas. In addition, borderline lesions of especially the serous and mucinous types are of interest when the question of preservation of ovarian function comes into notice. Conservative surgery, which means removal of only the afflicted ovary should be restricted to young women of the childbearing age who want to preserve the possibility of becoming pregnant. However, certain prerequisites must be fulfilled. The tumor must be located to one ovary only (Stage Ia) and must be either a borderline lesion or a Grade 1 true carcinoma of either the serous, mucinous or endometrioid type. There must be no ascites and peritoneal washings must be negative for cancer cells. Germ cell tumors are usually found in young women. Only the dysgerminomas are regularly bilateral in 10-15% of the cases. All other germ cell tumors are rarely bilateral. But both in borderline lesions, Grade 1 true carcinomas, and in germ cell tumors, a biopsy of the normal looking contralateral ovary should always be performed. Endodermal sinus tumors and immature teratomas may well be treated conservatively by surgery, but modern triple chemotherapy (VAC, PVB) must be added. Granulosa theca cell tumors are bilateral in only about 5% of the cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2824278

  8. Caveolin-1-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma primary tumors display increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition and prometastatic properties

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Alain C.; Ray, Anne-Marie; Ramolu, Ludivine; Macabre, Christine; Simon, Florian; Noulet, Fanny; Blandin, Anne-Florence; Renner, Guillaume; Lehmann, Maxime; Choulier, Laurence; Kessler, Horst; Abecassis, Joseph; Dontenwill, Monique; Martin, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Distant metastases arise in 20-30% of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) in the 2 years following treatment. Therapeutic options are limited and the outcome of the patients is poor. The identification of predictive biomarkers of patient at risk for distant metastasis and therapies are urgently needed. We previously identified a clinical subgroup, called “R1” characterized by high propensity for rapid distant metastasis. Here, we showed that “R1” patients do not or at very low level express caveolin-1 (Cav1). Low or no expression of Cav1 is of bad prognosis. Disappearance of Cav1 enables cells to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT is associated with enhanced migration and invasion. Our study uncovered a new target, α5β1 integrin. Targeting α5β1 integrins might not only prevent metastasis of HNSCC but also delay the development of the primary tumor by reducing tumor cell viability. Cav1 detection might be taken into consideration in the future in the clinic not only to identify patients at high risk of metastasis but also to select patient who might benefit from an anti-integrin therapy. PMID:26474461

  9. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell–cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:25735303

  10. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell-cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:25735303

  11. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell–cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:26148352

  12. Clinicopathologic Features and Clinical Outcomes of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Liu, Shushang; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in esophagus are limited, because of the relatively rare incidence of esophageal GISTs. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of esophageal GISTs, and to investigate the potential factors that may predict prognosis. Esophageal GIST cases were obtained from our center and from case reports and clinical studies extracted from MEDLINE. Clinicopathologic features and survivals were analyzed and compared with gastric GISTs from our center. The most common location was lower esophagus (86.84%), followed by middle and upper esophagus (11.40% and 1.76%). The majority of esophageal GISTs were classified as high-risk category (70.83%). Mitotic index was correlated with histologic type, mutational status, and tumor size. The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival were 65.1% and 65.9%, respectively. Tumor size, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were associated with prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Only tumor size, however, was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. In comparison to gastric GISTs, the distribution of tumor size, histologic type, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were significantly different between esophageal GISTs and gastric GISTs. The disease-free survival and disease-specific survival of esophageal GISTs were significantly lower than that of gastric GISTs. The most common location for esophageal GISTs was lower esophagus, and most of the esophageal GISTs are high-risk category. Tumor size was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Esophageal GISTs differ significantly from gastric GISTs in respect to clinicopathologic features. The prognosis of esophageal GISTs was worse than that of gastric GISTs. PMID:26765432

  13. Diagnostically Challenging Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: A Selective Review of 7 Jawbone Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Kenji; Saito, Ichiro; Kusama, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    Considerable variation in the clinicopathologic presentation of epithelial odontogenic tumors can sometimes be confusing and increase the chance of misdiagnosis. Seven diagnostically challenging jawbone lesions are described. There were 2 cases of mistaken identity in our ameloblastoma file. One unicystic type, initially diagnosed and treated as a lateral periodontal cyst, showed destructive recurrence 6 years postoperatively. The other globulomaxillary lesion was managed under the erroneous diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and recurred 4 times over an 11-year period. This tumor was found in retrospect to be consistent with an adenoid ameloblastoma with dentinoid. The diagnosis of cystic squamous odontogenic tumor (SOT) occurring as a radicular lesion of an impacted lower third molar was one of exclusion. Of two unsuspected keratocystic odontogenic tumors, one depicted deceptive features of pericoronitis, while the other case has long been in our files with the diagnosis of globulomaxillary SOT. Two cases of primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma appeared benign clinically and exhibited unexpected findings; an impacted third molar began to erupt in association with the growth of carcinoma and another periradicular carcinoma showed dentinoid formation. Cases selectively reviewed in this article present challenging problems which require clinical and radiographic correlation to avoid potential diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:20596984

  14. Prognostic Significance of the Tumor-Stroma Ratio in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Wenxin; Liu, Xiangyu

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-stroma ratio (TSR) has recently been identified as a promising prognostic parameter for several solid tumors. This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic role of TSR in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and 838 EOC patients were enrolled in this study. TSR was estimated on hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained tissue sections from the most invasive part of the primary tumor. Patients were classified as stroma-rich or stroma-poor according to the proportion of stroma ≥50% or <50%. Chi-square test analysis revealed that TSR were significantly associated with FIGO stage, LN status, and recurrence or not (all of them P < 0.001). The higher stroma-rich proportions were found in EOC patients with advanced stage (36.13% versus 19.75%), LN metastasis (51.93% versus 27.25%), and recurrence (34.27% versus 6.82%). Stroma-rich EOC patients had obvious shorter median time of progression-free survival (29 versus 39 months) and overall survival (50 versus 58 months), respectively. TSR was an independent prognostic factor for the evaluation of PFS in EOC. Stroma-rich tumors had worse prognosis and higher risk of relapse compared with those in stroma-poor tumors in EOC patients. Considered easy to determine for routine pathological examination, TSR may serve as a new prognostic histological parameter in EOC. PMID:26609529

  15. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-06-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting.

  16. Keratin 8 phosphorylation regulates keratin reorganization and migration of epithelial tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Tobias; Armacki, Milena; Eiseler, Tim; Joodi, Golsa; Temme, Claudia; Jansen, Julia; von Wichert, Götz; Omary, M. Bishr; Spatz, Joachim; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration and invasion are largely dependent on the complex organization of the various cytoskeletal components. Whereas the role of actin filaments and microtubules in cell motility is well established, the role of intermediate filaments in this process is incompletely understood. Organization and structure of the keratin cytoskeleton, which consists of heteropolymers of at least one type 1 and one type 2 intermediate filament, are in part regulated by post-translational modifications. In particular, phosphorylation events influence the properties of the keratin network. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) is a bioactive lipid with the exceptional ability to change the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton, leading to reorganization of keratin filaments, increased elasticity, and subsequently increased migration of epithelial tumor cells. Here we investigate the signaling pathways that mediate SPC-induced keratin reorganization and the role of keratin phosphorylation in this process. We establish that the MEK–ERK signaling cascade regulates both SPC-induced keratin phosphorylation and reorganization in human pancreatic and gastric cancer cells and identify Ser431 in keratin 8 as the crucial residue whose phosphorylation is required and sufficient to induce keratin reorganization and consequently enhanced migration of human epithelial tumor cells. PMID:22344252

  17. Association between EZH2 expression, silencing of tumor suppressors and disease outcome in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, M.; Michaud, A.; Margueron, R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT EZH2, the main catalytic component of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is apparently upregulated in most solid tumors. Furthermore its expression generally associates with poor prognosis. It was proposed that this correlation reflects a causal event, EZH2 mediating the silencing of key tumor suppressor loci. In contrast, we recently showed that EZH2 is dispensable for solid tumor development and that its elevated expression reflects the abnormally high proliferation rate of cancer cells. Here, we investigate the functional association between EZH2 expression and silencing of key tumor suppressor loci and further illustrate the confounding effect of proliferation on EZH2′s association to outcome. PMID:27419533

  18. Inhibition of histamine receptor 3 suppresses glioblastoma tumor growth, invasion, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Ji; Zhao, Tian-Zhi; Cai, Wen-Ke; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Zhang, Zhuo; Xu, Yu-Qiao; Chang, Ting; Li, Zhu-Yi

    2015-07-10

    Histamine receptor 3 (H3R) is expressed in various tumors and correlated with malignancy and tumor proliferation. However, the role of H3R in tumor invasion and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains unknown. Here, we explored the H3R in the highly invasive glioblastoma (GBM) and U87MG cells. We found that H3R mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the GBM and glioma cell lines compared to normal brain tissue and astrocytes. In U87MG cell line, inhibition of H3R by siRNA or the antagonist ciproxifan (CPX) suppressed proliferation, invasiveness, and the expression of EMT activators (Snail, Slug and Twist). In addition, expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and ZO-1) was up-regulated and expression of mesenchymal markers (vimentin and N-cadherin) was down-regulated in vitro and in vivo in a xenograft model. In addition, we also showed that inhibition of H3R by siRNA or CPX inactivated the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK signaling pathways, while inhibition of Akt or ERK activity with antagonists or siRNAs suppressed H3R agonist (R)-(α)-(-)- methylhistamine dihydrobromide (RAMH) mediated invasion and reorganization of cadherin-household. In conclusion, overexpression of H3R is associated with glioma progression. Inhibition of H3R leads to suppressed invasion and EMT of GBM by inactivating the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways in gliomas. PMID:25940798

  19. Validity of the semi-infinite tumor model in diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for epithelial cancer diagnosis: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Caigang; Liu, Quan

    2011-08-01

    The accurate understanding of optical properties of human tissues plays an important role in the optical diagnosis of early epithelial cancer. Many inverse models used to determine the optical properties of a tumor have assumed that the tumor was semi-infinite, which infers infinite width and length but finite thickness. However, this simplified assumption could lead to large errors for small tumor, especially at the early stages. We used a modified Monte Carlo code, which is able to simulate light transport in a layered tissue model with buried tumor-like targets, to investigate the validity of the semi-infinite tumor assumption in two common epithelial tissue models: a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissue model and a basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tissue model. The SCC tissue model consisted of three layers, i.e. the top epithelium, the middle tumor and the bottom stroma. The BCC tissue model also consisted of three layers, i.e. the top epidermis, the middle tumor and the bottom dermis. Diffuse reflectance was simulated for two common fiber-optic probes. In one probe, both source and detector fibers were perpendicular to the tissue surface; while in the other, both fibers were tilted at 45 degrees relative to the normal axis of the tissue surface. It was demonstrated that the validity of the semi-infinite tumor model depends on both the fiber-optic probe configuration and the tumor dimensions. Two look-up tables, which relate the validity of the semi-infinite tumor model to the tumor width in terms of the source-detector separation, were derived to guide the selection of appropriate tumor models and fiber optic probe configuration for the optical diagnosis of early epithelial cancers.

  20. Lung Epithelial Cell-Specific Expression of Human Lysosomal Acid Lipase Ameliorates Lung Inflammation and Tumor Metastasis in Lipa(-/-) Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Ding, Xinchun; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway of neutral lipids, has a close connection with inflammation and tumor progression. One major manifestation in LAL-deficient (Lipa(-/-)) mice is an increase of tumor growth and metastasis associated with expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In the lung, LAL is highly expressed in alveolar type II epithelial cells. To assess how LAL in lung epithelial cells plays a role in this inflammation-related pathogenic process, lung alveolar type II epithelial cell-specific expression of human LAL (hLAL) in Lipa(-/-) mice was established by crossbreeding of CCSP-driven rtTA transgene and (TetO)7-CMV-hLAL transgene into Lipa(-/-) mice (CCSP-Tg/KO). hLAL expression in lung epithelial cells not only reduced tumor-promoting myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the lung, but also down-regulated the synthesis and secretion of tumor-promoting cytokines and chemokines into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of Lipa(-/-) mice. hLAL expression reduced the immunosuppressive functions of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells, inhibited bone marrow cell transendothelial migration, and inhibited endothelial cell proliferation and migration in Lipa(-/-) mice. As a result, hLAL expression in CCSP-Tg/KO mice corrected pulmonary damage, and inhibited tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and tumor metastasis to the lung in vivo. These results support a concept that LAL is a critical metabolic enzyme in lung epithelial cells that regulates lung homeostasis, immune response, and tumor metastasis. PMID:27461363

  1. Epithelial and Mesenchymal Tumor Compartments Exhibit In Vivo Complementary Patterns of Vascular Perfusion and Glucose Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Galie, Mirco; Farace, Paolo; Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Nicolato, Elena; Boschi, Federico; Magnani, Paolo; Trespidi, Silvia; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano; Merigo, Flavia; Osculati, Francesco; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Glucose transport and consumption are increased in tumors, and this is considered a diagnostic index of malignancy. However, there is recent evidence that carcinoma-associated stromal cells are capable of aerobic metabolism with low glucose consumption, at least partly because of their efficient vascular supply. In the present study, using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), we mapped in vivo the vascular supply and glucose metabolism in syngeneic experimental models of carcinoma and mesenchymal tumor. We found that in both tumor histotypes, regions with high vascular perfusion exhibited a significantly lower FDG uptake. This reciprocity was more conspicuous in carcinomas than in mesenchymal tumors, and regions with a high-vascular/low-FDG uptake pattern roughly overlapped with a stromal capsule and intratumoral large connectival septa. Accordingly, mesenchymal tumors exhibited a higher vascular perfusion and a lower FDG uptake than carcinomas. Thus, we provide in vivo evidence of vascular/metabolic reciprocity between epithelial and mesenchymal histotypes in tumors, suggesting a new intriguing aspect of epithelial-stromal interaction. Our results suggests that FDG-PET-based clinical analysis can underestimate the malignity or tumor extension of carcinomas exhibiting any trait of “mesenchymalization” such as desmoplasia or epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:18030358

  2. Three-dimensional telomere architecture of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: comparison of tumor and normal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sunpaweravong, S; Sunpaweravong, P; Sathitruangsak, C; Mai, S

    2016-05-01

    Telomeres are repetitive nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG)n located at the ends of chromosomes that function to preserve chromosomal integrity and prevent terminal end-to-end fusions. Telomere loss or dysfunction results in breakage-bridge-fusion cycles, aneuploidy, gene amplification and chromosomal rearrangements, which can lead to genomic instability and promote carcinogenesis. Evaluating the hypothesis that changes in telomeres contribute to the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and to determine whether there are differences between young and old patients, we compared the three-dimensional (3D) nuclear telomere architecture in ESCC tumor cells with that of normal epithelial cells obtained from the same patient. Patients were equally divided by age into two groups, one comprising those less than 45 years of age and the other consisting of those over 80 years of age. Tumor and normal epithelial cells located at least 10 cm from the border of the tumor were biopsied in ESCC patients. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for each sample to confirm and identify the cancer and normal epithelial cells. This study was based on quantitative 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH), 3D imaging and 3D analysis of paraffin-embedded slides. The 3D telomere architecture data were computer analyzed using 100 nuclei per slide. The following were the main parameters compared: the number of signals (number of telomeres), signal intensity (telomere length), number of telomere aggregates, and nuclear volume. Tumor and normal epithelial samples from 16 patients were compared. The normal epithelial cells had more telomere signals and higher intensities than the tumor cells, with P-values of P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0078, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the numbers of telomere aggregates or the nuclear volumes between the tumor and normal epithelial cells. Secondary analyses examined the effects of age on 3D telomere

  3. Diffuse High Intensity PD-L1 Staining in Thymic Epithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Padda, Sukhmani K.; Riess, Jonathan W.; Schwartz, Erich J.; Lu, Tian; Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Neal, Joel W.; West, Robert B.; Wakelee, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Blockade of the immune checkpoint programmed death receptor ligand-1 (PD-L1)/PD-1 pathway has well-established clinical activity across many tumor types. PD-L1 protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) is emerging as a predictive biomarker of response to these therapies. Here, we examine PD-L1 expression in a thymic epithelial tumor (TET) tissue microarray (TMA). Methods The TMA contained 69 TETs and 17 thymic controls, with each case represented by triplicate cores. The TMA was stained with rabbit monoclonal antibody (clone 15, Sino Biological) to human PD-L1. PD-L1 staining was scored based on intensity as follows: 0=none, 1=equivocal/uninterpretable, 2=weak, and 3=intermediate-strong. Those cases with all cores scoring 3 in the epithelial component were categorized as PD-L1high and the remaining as PD-L1low. Results PD-L1high scores were more frequent in TETs than controls (68.1% vs. 17.6%, p=0.0036). PD-L1 scores and histology were significantly correlated, with higher intensity staining in WHO B2/B3/C TETs. Only 14.8% of TETs had PD-L1 staining of associated lymphocytes. In an adjusted analysis (age/gender), PD-L1high TETs had a significantly worse overall survival (HR 5.40, 95% CI 1.13-25.89, p=0.035) and a trend for worse event-free survival (HR 2.94, 95% CI 0.94-9.24, p=0.064). Conclusions PD-L1 expression was present in all cases of TETs within the epithelial component but only in a minority in the lymphocytic component. TETs stained more intensely for PD-L1 than controls, and PD-L1high TETs were associated with more aggressive histology and worse prognosis. This study lends rationale to a clinical trial with anti-PD1/PD-L1 therapy in this rare tumor type. PMID:25402569

  4. Epidemiologic and molecular characteristics of borderline and malignant epithelial ovarian tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Eugenia Maria Chaves De Moraes

    Data from the Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study, a multicenter, population-based, case-control study were used to identify risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer according to tumor behavior, histologic types, as well as p53 expression. Cases were women between 20 to 54 years old diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer from 1980 to 1982. Controls were women selected by random digit dialing. Tumor samples were analyzed for p53 overexpression using immunohistochemistry. Case-case and case-control conditional logistic regression models matched on age and diagnosing centers were used to calculate odds ratios (OR's) and 95% confidence intervals (CI's) for borderline, malignant, mucinous, and nonmucinous tumors, and p53 positive and p53 negative cases. The OR's for high number of lifetime ovulatory cycles (376-533 compared with less than 234) were 3.1 (95% CI 1.6-6.1) for malignant and 1.4 (95% CI 0.5-3.7) for borderline cases. The high number of ovulatory cycles was also a strong risk factor among nonmucinous cases. OR's for current and recent ex-smokers compared with never smokers were 2.8 (95% CI 1.7-4.8) for mucinous and 0.9 (95% CI 0.7-1.1) for nonmucinous types. Infertility showed a positive association with borderline ovarian cancer. Family history of ovarian or breast cancer was positively associated with malignant and nonmucinous cases. Parity had an inverse association with malignant ovarian cancer cases. When cases were subdivided by p53 results, the OR for tobacco smoking and p53 positive ovarian cancer was elevated for mucinous (OR = 3.9; 95% CI 0.8-18) at localized stage. Alcohol use showed a positive association with p53 positive malignant cases at advanced stage (OR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.2-3.2) and with p53 positive nonmucinous cases at advanced stage (OR = 2.1; 95% CI 1.2-3.4). A positive association between high number of ovulatory cycles and p53 positive malignant cases was observed in cases with localized stage (OR = 6.6; 95% CI 1.0-45) and advanced

  5. Activation of PKA leads to mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and loss of tumor-initiating ability.

    PubMed

    Pattabiraman, Diwakar R; Bierie, Brian; Kober, Katharina Isabelle; Thiru, Prathapan; Krall, Jordan A; Zill, Christina; Reinhardt, Ferenc; Tam, Wai Leong; Weinberg, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition enables carcinoma cells to acquire malignancy-associated traits and the properties of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). TICs have emerged in recent years as important targets for cancer therapy, owing to their ability to drive clinical relapse and enable metastasis. Here, we propose a strategy to eliminate mesenchymal TICs by inducing their conversion to more epithelial counterparts that have lost tumor-initiating ability. We report that increases in intracellular levels of the second messenger, adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, and the subsequent activation of protein kinase A (PKA) induce a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in mesenchymal human mammary epithelial cells. PKA activation triggers epigenetic reprogramming of TICs by the histone demethylase PHF2, which promotes their differentiation and loss of tumor-initiating ability. This study provides proof-of-principle for inducing an MET as differentiation therapy for TICs and uncovers a role for PKA in enforcing and maintaining the epithelial state. PMID:26941323

  6. Local anesthetics inhibit kinesin motility and microtentacle protrusions in human epithelial and breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jennifer R; Whipple, Rebecca A; Balzer, Eric M; Cho, Edward H; Matrone, Michael A; Peckham, Michelle; Martin, Stuart S

    2011-10-01

    Detached breast tumor cells produce dynamic microtubule protrusions that promote reattachment of cells and are termed tubulin microtentacles (McTNs) due to their mechanistic distinctions from actin-based filopodia/invadopodia and tubulin-based cilia. McTNs are enriched with vimentin and detyrosinated α-tubulin, (Glu-tubulin). Evidence suggests that vimentin and Glu-tubulin are cross-linked by kinesin motor proteins. Using known kinesin inhibitors, Lidocaine and Tetracaine, the roles of kinesins in McTN formation and function were tested. Live-cell McTN counts, adhesion assays, immunofluorescence, and video microscopy were performed to visualize inhibitor effects on McTNs. Viability and apoptosis assays were used to confirm the non-toxicity of the inhibitors. Treatments of human non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial and breast tumor cells with Lidocaine or Tetracaine caused rapid collapse of vimentin filaments. Live-cell video microscopy demonstrated that Tetracaine reduces motility of intracellular GFP-kinesin and causes centripetal collapse of McTNs. Treatment with Tetracaine inhibited the extension of McTNs and their ability to promote tumor cell aggregation and reattachment. Lidocaine showed similar effects but to a lesser degree. Our current data support a model in which the inhibition of kinesin motor proteins by Tetracaine leads to the reductions in McTNs, and provides a novel mechanism for the ability of this anesthetic to decrease metastatic progression. PMID:21069453

  7. Collagen-binding proteins of rat mammary tumor epithelial cells: A biochemical and immunological study

    SciTech Connect

    Wirl, G.; Pfaeffle, M. )

    1988-05-01

    Collagen-binding proteins were studied in mammary epithelial cells of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced rat mammary tumors. Using affinity chromatography on type I collagen-Sepharose and polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis, three major proteins of 34,000, 36,000, and 38,000 Da were found. Pulse-chase experiments did not indicate a precursor-product relationship of these proteins. Tryptic/chymotryptic peptide maps, however, revealed that the 36,000- and 38,000-Da proteins are very similar but are quite different from the 34,000-Da molecular form. The distribution and function of these proteins were then analyzed by using polyclonal antibodies directed against the entire set of major proteins. In immunofluorescence studies the authors observed a dense, punctate distribution of fluorescence on the cell surface of isolated and unfixed epithelial organoids and a bright pericellular staining in cultures after fixation. Treatment with the antiserum did not affect attachment and spreading of cuboidal mammary cells to plastic or to a collagen substratum. However, when the antiserum was added to the medium of growing cuboidal cells, it caused the formation of duct-like structures. These studies indicate that collagen-binding proteins may play a role in mammary gland morphology.

  8. CD133 initiates tumors, induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and increases metastasis in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Alice; Banerjee, Sulagna; Chugh, Rohit; Dudeja, Vikas; Yamamoto, Masato; Vickers, Selwyn M.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2015-01-01

    CD133 has been implicated as a cancer stem cell (CSC) surface marker in several malignancies including pancreatic cancer. However, the functional role of this surface glycoprotein in the cancer stem cell remains elusive. In this study, we determined that CD133 overexpression induced “stemness” properties in MIA-PaCa2 cells along with increased tumorigenicity, tumor progression, and metastasis in vivo. Additionally, CD133 expression induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and increased in vitro invasion. EMT induction and increased invasiveness were mediated by NF-κB activation, as inhibition of NF-κB mitigated these effects. This study showed that CD133 expression contributes to pancreatic cancer “stemness,” tumorigenicity, EMT induction, invasion, and metastasis. PMID:25829252

  9. Toward an integrative analysis of the tumor microenvironment in ovarian epithelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Serio, Ryan N

    2012-08-01

    Ovarian epithelial carcinomas are heterogeneous malignancies exhibiting great diversity in histological phenotypes as well as genetic and epigenetic aberrations. A general early event in tumorigenesis is regional dissemination into the peritoneal cavity. Initial spread to the peritoneum is made possible by cooperative signaling between a wide array of molecules constituting the tissue microenvironment in the coelomic epithelium. Changes in the activity of key microenvironmental components not constitutively expressed in normal tissue, including several disclosed adhesion molecules, growth factors, proteases, and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), coordinate the transition. Remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and subsequent cell surface interactions enable transformation by promoting chromosomal instability (CIN) and stimulating several common signal transduction cascades to prepare the tissue for harboring and facilitating growth, angiogenesis and metastasis of the developing tumor. PMID:22109660

  10. COLONY FORMATION ENHANCEMENT OF RAT TRACHEAL AND NASAL EPITHELIAL CELLS BY POLYACETATE, INDOLE ALKALOID, AND PHORBOL ESTER TUMOR PROMOTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), teleocidin, and two polyacetate tumor promoters (aplysiatoxin and debromoaplysiatoxin) have been tested for their effect on colony forming efficiency (CFE) of rat tracheal and nasal turbinate epithelial cells. In rat t...

  11. The Numb/p53 circuitry couples replicative self-renewal and tumor suppression in mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tosoni, Daniela; Zecchini, Silvia; Coazzoli, Marco; Colaluca, Ivan; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Rubio, Alicia; Caccia, Michele; Villa, Emanuele; Zilian, Olav

    2015-01-01

    The cell fate determinant Numb orchestrates tissue morphogenesis and patterning in developmental systems. In the human mammary gland, Numb is a tumor suppressor and regulates p53 levels. However, whether this function is linked to its role in fate determination remains unclear. Here, by exploiting an ex vivo system, we show that at mitosis of purified mammary stem cells (SCs), Numb ensures the asymmetric outcome of self-renewing divisions by partitioning into the progeny that retains the SC identity, where it sustains high p53 activity. Numb also controls progenitor maturation. At this level, Numb loss associates with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and results in differentiation defects and reacquisition of stemness features. The mammary gland of Numb-knockout mice displays an expansion of the SC compartment, associated with morphological alterations and tumorigenicity in orthotopic transplants. This is because of low p53 levels and can be inhibited by restoration of Numb levels or p53 activity, which results in successful SC-targeted treatment. PMID:26598619

  12. Prognostic analysis of invasive circulating tumor cells (iCTCs) in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Michael L.; Zhao, Qiang; Yang, Jie; Dong, Huan; Tulley, Shaun; Zhang, Qiao1; Golightly, Marc; Zucker, Stanley; Chen, Wen-Tien

    2014-01-01

    Goals: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been introduced as a biomarker in detecting advanced Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC). The goals are to examine the prevalence of the invasive subpopulation of CTCs (iCTCs) in patients at high risk of EOC and to compare this biomarker to serum CA125. Methods: We used a unique Cell Adhesion Matrix (CAM)-based, functional cell enrichment and identification platform to isolate iCTCs from 129 preoperative patients. We confirmed the identity of iCTCs using positive epithelial (Epi+) markers and negative hematopoietic lineage (HL-) markers. Sensitivity and specificity of the assays were examined and iCTCs / CA125 were correlated with overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and clinical parameters. Results: We found a 41.2% sensitivity, 95.1% specificity and 77.8% positive predictive value (PPV) of the iCTC assay in detecting patients with stage I and II EOC malignancy, and a 83% sensitivity and 97.3% PPV in detecting all stages of EOC malignancy. However, a positive CA125 test provided weak evidence to detect stage I and II malignancy (61.6% PPV) and all EOC (92.1% PPV), because of its 76.2% specificity. A significantly stronger concordance in OS and PFS of clinical factors (tumor stage, debulking and platinum sensitivity) was noted for elevated iCTCs than for serum CA125. Conclusion: The CAM-initiated CTC enrichment / identification method enabled the detection of early stage EOC. iCTCs were better correlated with worse OS and PFS, more specific and better PPV than CA125 in detecting EOC malignancy in patients at high risk of EOC. PMID:24972191

  13. Characterization of circulating tumor cell aggregates identified in patients with epithelial tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Edward H.; Wendel, Marco; Luttgen, Madelyn; Yoshioka, Craig; Marrinucci, Dena; Lazar, Daniel; Schram, Ethan; Nieva, Jorge; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Morgan, Alison; Ko, Andrew H.; Korn, W. Michael; Kolatkar, Anand; Bethel, Kelly; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been implicated as a population of cells that may seed metastasis and venous thromboembolism (VTE), two major causes of mortality in cancer patients. Thus far, existing CTC detection technologies have been unable to reproducibly detect CTC aggregates in order to address what contribution CTC aggregates may make to metastasis or VTE. We report here an enrichment-free immunofluorescence detection method that can reproducibly detect and enumerate homotypic CTC aggregates in patient samples. We identified CTC aggregates in 43% of 86 patient samples. The fraction of CTC aggregation was investigated in blood draws from 24 breast, 14 non-small cell lung, 18 pancreatic, 15 prostate stage IV cancer patients and 15 normal blood donors. Both single CTCs and CTC aggregates were measured to determine whether differences exist in the physical characteristics of these two populations. Cells contained in CTC aggregates had less area and length, on average, than single CTCs. Nuclear to cytoplasmic ratios between single CTCs and CTC aggregates were similar. This detection method may assist future studies in determining which population of cells is more physically likely to contribute to metastasis and VTE.

  14. miR-494 suppresses tumor growth of epithelial ovarian carcinoma by targeting IGF1R.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Zhao, Xiaosu; Wang, Lufei; Zhang, Shi; Cui, Manhua; He, Jin

    2016-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that microRNA-494 (miR-494) could act as tumor-suppressive or oncogenic microRNAs (miRNAs) in different types of tumors. However, the biological roles and underlying mechanisms of miR-494 remain unknown in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate the miR-494 expression and the significance of its clinical diagnosis in patients suffering EOC and to analyze its role and underlying molecular mechanism on the carcinogenesis of EOC. Here, we found that miR-494 was significantly decreased in EOC cell lines and tissues and its expression was negatively correlated with advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, high pathological grade, and lymph node metastasis (all P < 0.01). Functional studies showed that overexpression of miR-494 in EOC cells could remarkably inhibit proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion and induce cell apoptosis, G0/G1 phase arrest. An in vivo analysis revealed that the overexpression of miR-494 suppressed tumor growth in a nude mouse xenograft model system. Bioinformatic assay and dual-luciferase assay confirmed that insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) was as a direct target of miR-494 in EOC cells. Western blot assay showed that overexpression of miR-494 inhibited IGF1R expression and its downstream signal protein expression. In addition, downregulation of IGF1R has similar effects with miR-494 overexpression on EOC cells and overexpression of IGF1R effectively rescued the inhibition of overexpressed miR-494 in EOC cells. These data suggested that miR-494 functions as a tumor suppressor in EOC by targeting IGF1R. PMID:26695144

  15. Inflammatory markers and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer by tumor subtypes: the EPIC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ose, Jennifer; Schock, Helena; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Baglietto, Laura; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopolou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Lagiou, Pagona; Masala, Giovanna; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; de Mesquita, H.Bas Bueno; Peeters, Petra H M; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger T; Sánchez, Soledad; Obon-Santacana, Mireia; Sànchez-Pérez, Maria-José; Larrañaga, Nerea; Castaño, José María Huerta; Ardanaz, Eva; Brändstedt, Jenny; Lundin, Eva; Idahl, Annika; Travis, Ruth C; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Merrit, Melissa A; Gunter, Marc J; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renée T

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests an etiologic role for inflammation in ovarian carcinogenesis and heterogeneity between tumor subtypes and anthropometric indices. Prospective studies on circulating inflammatory markers and epithelial invasive ovarian cancer (EOC) have predominantly investigated overall risk; data characterizing risk by tumor characteristics (histology, grade, stage, dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis) and anthropometric indices are sparse. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort to evaluate C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and EOC risk by tumor characteristics. A total of 754 eligible EOC cases were identified; two controls (n=1,497) were matched per case. We used multivariable conditional logistic regression to assess associations. Results CRP and IL-6 were not associated with overall EOC risk. However, consistent with prior research, CRP >10 vs. CRP ≤1 mg/L was associated with higher overall EOC risk (OR=1.67 [1.03 - 2.70]). We did not observe significant associations or heterogeneity in analyses by tumor characteristics. In analyses stratified by waist circumference, inflammatory markers were associated with higher risk among women with higher waist circumference; no association was observed for women with normal waist circumference: (e.g., IL-6: waist ≤80: ORlog2=0.97 [0.81 - 1.16]; waist >88: ORlog2=1.78 [1.28 - 2.48], pheterogeneity ≤0.01). Conclusions Our data suggest that high CRP is associated with increased risk of overall EOC, and that IL-6 and CRP may be associated with EOC risk among women with higher adiposity. Impact Our data add to global evidence that ovarian carcinogenesis may be promoted by an inflammatory milieu. PMID:25855626

  16. P12: Somatostatin analogs as maintenance therapy in heavily pretreated thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Giovannella; Ottaviano, Margaret; Nappi, Lucia; Rescigno, Pasquale; Tucci, Irene; Marino, Mirella; von Arx, Claudia; Palumbo, Giuliano; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Damiano, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) are rare neoplasms with a particular biological behavior, treated with a combination of therapeutic strategies such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and target agents. No continuation maintenance therapy exists for these rare tumors. A high uptake of indium-labeled octreotide (111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide) and curative application of somatostatin analogs in thymic tumors have been widely demonstrated. Methods Eighteen patients (nine women and nine men, median age 54.5 years; range, 32–78 years) with advanced thymic tumors (seven patients with stage III; seven with IVa; four with IVb according to the Masaoka-Koga staging system), histotype sec. WHO revised by central review (three AB, two B1, three B2, five B3, three B2/B3, two thymic carcinoma) with a partial response or stable disease to conventional chemotherapeutic regimens platinum or not platinum-based, after performed OctreoScan, were enrolled in this monocentric referral center study. The schedule includes administration of long-acting analog octreotide (30 mg/every 28 days intramuscularly), until progression of disease was documented. Median time to progression and toxicity were evaluated. Results Median follow-up was of 43 months with a median time to progression of 14.5 months (range, 2–77 months). Treatment was generally well tolerated with acceptable toxicity: grade 1 diarrhea (five patients), grade 2 hyperglycemia (four patients). No patients interrupted treatment because of toxicity. Conclusions The current study indicates that single-agent somatostatin analogs maintenance therapy is a potential treatment strategy for advanced TETs OctreoScan positive which respond to previous conventional chemotherapy. In particular, somatostatin analogs may provide effective maintenance treatment duration regardless of histotype and stage of disease with an acceptable toxicity and an improved patients’ compliance.

  17. Preoperative endoscopic diagnosis of superficial non-ampullary duodenal epithelial tumors, including magnifying endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Shigetsugu; Doyama, Hisashi; Tsuji, Kunihiro; Tsuyama, Sho; Tominaga, Kei; Yoshida, Naohiro; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Niwa, Hideki; Katayanagi, Kazuyoshi; Kurumaya, Hiroshi; Okada, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    Superficial non-ampullary duodenal epithelial tumor (SNADET) is defined as a sporadic tumor that is confined to the mucosa or submucosa that does not arise from Vater’s papilla, and it includes adenoma and adenocarcinoma. Recent developments in endoscopic technology, such as high-resolution endoscopy and image-enhanced endoscopy, may increase the chances of detecting SNADET lesions. However, because SNADET is rare, little is known about its preoperative endoscopic diagnosis. The use of endoscopic resection for SNADET, which has no risk of metastasis, is increasing, but the incidence of complications, such as perforation, is significantly higher than in any other part of the digestive tract. A preoperative diagnosis is required to distinguish between lesions that should be followed up and those that require treatment. Retrospective studies have revealed certain endoscopic findings that suggest malignancy. In recent years, several new imaging modalities have been developed and explored for real-time diagnosis of these lesion types. Establishing an endoscopic diagnostic tool to differentiate between adenoma and adenocarcinoma in SNADET lesions is required to select the most appropriate treatment. This review describes the current state of knowledge about preoperative endoscopic diagnosis of SNADETs, such as duodenal adenoma and duodenal adenocarcinoma. Newer endoscopic techniques, including magnifying endoscopy, may help to guide these diagnostics, but their additional advantages remain unclear, and further studies are required to clarify these issues. PMID:26557007

  18. Automated ensemble segmentation of epithelial proliferation, necrosis, and fibrosis using scatter tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Allende, P. Beatriz; Conde, Olga M.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pogue, Brian W.; Mirapeix, Jesus; Lopez-Higuera, Jose M.

    2010-04-01

    Conventional imaging systems used today in surgical settings rely on contrast enhancement based on color and intensity and they are not sensitive to morphology changes at the microscopic level. Elastic light scattering spectroscopy has been shown to distinguish ultra-structural changes in tissue. Therefore, it could provide this intrinsic contrast being enormously useful in guiding complex surgical interventions. Scatter parameters associated with epithelial proliferation, necrosis and fibrosis in pancreatic tumors were previously estimated in a quantitative manner. Subtle variations were encountered across the distinct diagnostic categories. This work proposes an automated methodology to correlate these variations with their corresponding tumor morphologies. A new approach based on the aggregation of the predictions of K-nearest neighbors (kNN) algorithm and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) has been developed. The major benefit obtained from the combination of the distinct classifiers is a significant increase in the number of pixel localizations whose corresponding tissue type is reliably assured. Pseudo-color diagnosis images are provided showing a strong correlation with sample segmentations performed by a veterinary pathologist.

  19. ALA-based photodynamic therapy in epithelial tumors: in vivo and in vitro models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Adriana; Fukuda, Haydee; Batlle, Alcira

    2000-03-01

    PDT shows considerable potential as a treatment modality for superficial tumors. PDT is based on the accumulation of a photosensitizer in the target tissue. Subsequent illumination with light of an appropriate wavelength provokes a photochemical reaction that results in tumor destruction. Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a porphyrin precursor, and its administration result in the endogenous production of phototoxic porphyrins, which has been exploited for PDT. We assessed PDT efficacy employing both in vivo and in vitro models. We used papillomas, keratoacanthomas and in situ carcinomas chemically induced in the skin of SENCAR mice. Using ALA lotion and cream formulations, the maximal amount of porphyrin accumulation in papillomas was 5.52 (mu) g/g tissue. An energy of 150 of J/cm2 was delivered by a copper-dye laser tuned at 630 nm. Microscopically, we found several signs of tissue destruction, more markedly in the upper strata of the in situ carcinomas. Papillomas, characterized by hyperkeratinization, were resistant to PDT. In our in vitro studies, we used an epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line. We tested ALA and its hexyl and methyl derivatives with the aim of increasing porphyrin synthesis. We found that hexyl-ALA was the best compound. When cultures incubated 3 hours in 0.6 mM ALA and 0.1 mM hexyl-ALA respectively were irradiated with 3 J/cm2 only 5 percent of cells survived.

  20. Periostin in tumor microenvironment is associated with poor prognosis and platinum resistance in epithelial ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Pi-Lin; Jan, Yi-Hua; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Hao; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Lai, Chiung-Ru; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wu, Hua-Hsi; Twu, Nae-Fang; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Hsiao, Michael; Huang, Chi-Ying F.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between tumor microenvironment and cancer that causes chemoresistance remains unclear. By analyzing public available microarray datasets, we identified that periostin (POSTN) was overexpressed in cancer stroma in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed overexpression of stromal POSTN is a powerful independent poor prognostic predictor for EOC patients. Furthermore, patients with high levels of stromal POSTN tend to have higher percentage of cisplatin resistance compared to those with low levels of stromal POSTN. Moreover, we found POSTN treatment can induce cisplatin resistant and activate AKT pathway in A2780 cells in vitro. Inhibition of AKT activity by AKT inhibitor MK-2206 abolished POSTN-induced AKT activation and cisplatin resistance in vitro. Taken together, we found high POSTN expression in cancer microenvironment is correlated with poor prognosis in EOC patients and associated with platinum resistance. The effect of POSTN in cancer stroma cells may activate AKT pathway in tumor and AKT inhibitor can be beneficial to augment the efficacy of existing cancer therapeutics. PMID:26716408

  1. Periostin in tumor microenvironment is associated with poor prognosis and platinum resistance in epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pi-Lin; Jan, Yi-Hua; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Hao; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Lai, Chiung-Ru; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wu, Hua-Hsi; Twu, Nae-Fang; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Hsiao, Michael; Huang, Chi-Ying F

    2016-01-26

    The interplay between tumor microenvironment and cancer that causes chemoresistance remains unclear. By analyzing public available microarray datasets, we identified that periostin (POSTN) was overexpressed in cancer stroma in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed overexpression of stromal POSTN is a powerful independent poor prognostic predictor for EOC patients. Furthermore, patients with high levels of stromal POSTN tend to have higher percentage of cisplatin resistance compared to those with low levels of stromal POSTN. Moreover, we found POSTN treatment can induce cisplatin resistant and activate AKT pathway in A2780 cells in vitro. Inhibition of AKT activity by AKT inhibitor MK-2206 abolished POSTN-induced AKT activation and cisplatin resistance in vitro. Taken together, we found high POSTN expression in cancer microenvironment is correlated with poor prognosis in EOC patients and associated with platinum resistance. The effect of POSTN in cancer stroma cells may activate AKT pathway in tumor and AKT inhibitor can be beneficial to augment the efficacy of existing cancer therapeutics. PMID:26716408

  2. Heterogeneity of tumor chemosensitivity in ovarian epithelial cancer revealed using the adenosine triphosphate-tumor chemosensitivity assay

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIN; LI, HONGXIA

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis, primarily due to the heterogeneity in chemosensitivity among patients. In the present study, this heterogeneity was evaluated in ovarian epithelial cancer (OEC) using an in vitro adenosine triphosphate tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA). Specimens were collected from 80 patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery. Viable ovarian cancer cells obtained from malignant tissues were tested for sensitivity to paclitaxel (PTX), carboplatin (CBP), topotecan (TPT), gemcitabine (GEM), docetaxel (TXT), etoposide, bleomycin and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide using ATP-TCA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for the clinical chemotherapy sensitivity of OEC were 88.6, 77.8, 83 and 84.8%, respectively. PTX demonstrated the highest sensitivity of all agents tested (82.5% in all specimens, 85.7% in recurrent specimens), followed by CBP (58.8 and 60.7%, respectively). The sensitivities to PTX and docetaxel (P<0.001) were correlated, in addition to those of CBP, TPT and GEM (P<0.001). Early-stage (I/II) and high- to mildly-differentiated OEC specimens revealed a lower chemosensitivity than advanced-stage (III) or low-differentiated specimens, respectively. The present study indicated that ATP-TCA is an effective method for guiding the choice of chemotherapy drugs. Notable heterogeneity of chemosensitivity was observed in the OEC specimens. PMID:26137074

  3. Sds22/PP1 Links Epithelial Integrity and Tumor Suppression via Regulation of Myosin II and JNK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuwei; Scott, Kenneth L.; Kwak, Su-Jin; Chen, Rui; Mardon, Graeme

    2011-01-01

    Loss of epithelial integrity often correlates with the progression of malignant tumors. Sds22, a regulatory subunit of Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1), has recently been linked to regulation of epithelial polarity in Drosophila. However, its role in tumorigenesis remains obscure. Here, using Drosophila imaginal tissue as an in vivo model system, we show that sds22 is a new potential tumor suppressor gene in Drosophila. Without sds22, cells lose epithelial architecture, and become invasive and tumorigenic when combined with Ras overexpression; conversely, sds22 overexpression can largely suppress tumorigenic growth of RasV12scrib−/ − mutant cells. Mechanistically, we show that sds22 prevents cell invasion and metastasis by inhibiting myosin II and JNK activity downstream of PP1. Loss of this inhibition causes cells to lose epithelial organization and promotes cell invasion. Finally, human Sds22 is focally deleted and down-regulated in multiple carcinomas, and this downregulation correlates with tumor progression, suggesting that sds22 inactivation may contribute to tumorigenesis and metastatic potential in human cancers via a similar mechanism. PMID:21399659

  4. Surgical Treatment and Clinical Outcome of Nonfunctional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Su, An-ping; Yue, Peng-ju; Tian, Bo-le

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Our primary aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical characteristics and surgical outcome of nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (non-F-P-NETs), with an emphasis on evaluating the prognostic value of the newly updated 2010 grading classification of the World Health Organization (WHO). Data of 55 consecutive patients who were surgically treated and pathologically diagnosed as non-F-P-NETs in our single institution from January 2000 to December 2013 were retrospectively collected. This entirety comprised of 55 patients (31 males and 24 females), with a mean age of 51.24 ± 12.95 years. Manifestations of non-F-P-NETs were nonspecific. Distal pancreatectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy, and local resection of pancreatic tumor were the most frequent surgical procedures, while pancreatic fistula was the most common but acceptable complication (30.3%). The overall 5-year survival rate of this entire cohort was 41.0%, with a median survival time of 60.4 months. Patients who underwent R0 resections obtained a better survival than those who did not (P < 0.005). As for the prognostic analysis, tumor size and lymph invasion were only statistically significant in univariate analysis (P = 0.046 and P < 0.05, respectively), whereas the newly updated 2010 grading classification of WHO (G1 and G2 vs G3), distant metastasis, and surgical margin were all meaningful in both univariate and multivariate analysis (P = 0.045, 0.001, and 0.042, respectively). Non-F-P-NETs are a kind of rare neoplasm, with mostly indolent malignancy. Patients with non-F-P-NETs could benefit from the radical resections. The new WHO criteria, distant metastasis and surgical margin, might be independent predictors for the prognosis of non-F-P-NETs. PMID:25396335

  5. Upregulation of centrosomal protein 55 is associated with unfavorable prognosis and tumor invasion in epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijing; Niu, Chunhao; He, Weiling; Hou, Teng; Sun, Xiaoying; Xu, Liqun; Zhang, Yanna

    2016-05-01

    Centrosomal protein 55 (CEP55) is a cell cycle regulator implicated in development of certain cancers. However, characteristics of CEP55 expression and its clinical/prognostic significance are unclear in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). Therefore, we investigated the expression and clinicopathological significance of CEP55 in patients with EOC and its role in regulating invasion and metastasis of ovarian cell lines. CEP55 mRNA and protein expression levels were detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Potential associations of CEP55 expression scores with clinical parameters and patient survival were evaluated. CEP55 function was investigated further using RNA interference, wound healing assay, transwell assay, immunofluorescence analysis, qRT-PCR, and Western blotting. CEP55 was significantly upregulated in ovarian cancer cell lines and lesions compared with normal cells and adjacent noncancerous ovarian tissues. In the 213 EOC samples, CEP55 protein levels were positively correlated with clinical stage (P < 0.001), lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001), intraperitoneal metastasis (P < 0.001), tumor recurrence (P < 0.001), differentiation grade (P < 0.001), residual tumor size (P < 0.001), ascites see tumor cells (P = 0.020), and serum CA153 level (P < 0.001). Moreover, patients with aberrant CEP55 protein expression showed tendencies to receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P < 0.001) and cytoreductive surgery (P = 0.020). By contrast, no significant correlation was detected between the protein levels and patient age, histological type, or serum CA125, CA199, CA724, NSE, CEA, and β-HCG levels. Patients with high CEP55 protein expression had shorter overall survival and disease-free survival compared with those with low CEP55 expression. Multivariate analysis implicated CEP55 as an independent prognostic indicator for EOC patients. Additionally, downregulation of

  6. Regulatory T cells, inherited variation, and clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Keith L; Maurer, Matthew J; Preston, Claudia C; Moysich, Kirsten B; Goergen, Krista; Hawthorne, Kieran M; Cunningham, Julie M; Odunsi, Kunle; Hartmann, Lynn C; Kalli, Kimberly R; Oberg, Ann L; Goode, Ellen L

    2015-12-01

    The immune system constitutes one of the host factors modifying outcomes in ovarian cancer. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are believed to be a major factor in preventing the immune response from destroying ovarian cancers. Understanding mechanisms that regulate Tregs in the tumor microenvironment could lead to the identification of novel targets aimed at reducing their influence. In this study, we used immunofluorescence-based microscopy to enumerate Tregs, total CD4 T cells, and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells in fresh frozen tumors from over 400 patients with ovarian cancer (>80 % high-grade serous). We sought to determine whether Tregs were associated with survival and genetic variation in 79 genes known to influence Treg induction, trafficking, or function. We used Cox regression, accounting for known prognostic factors, to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) associated with T cell counts and ratios. We found that the ratios of CD8 T cells and total CD4 T cells to Tregs were associated with improved overall survival (CD8/Treg HR 0.84, p = 0.0089; CD4/Treg HR 0.88, p = 0.046) and with genetic variation in IL-10 (p = 0.0073 and 0.01, respectively). In multivariate analyses, the associations between the ratios and overall survival remained similar (IL-10 and clinical covariate-adjusted CD8/Treg HR 0.85, p = 0.031; CD4/Treg HR 0.87, p = 0.093), suggesting that this association was not driven by variation in IL-10. Thus, integration of novel tumor phenotyping measures with extensive clinical and genetic information suggests that the ratio of T cells to Tregs may be prognostic of outcome in ovarian cancer, regardless of inherited genotype in genes related to Tregs. PMID:26298430

  7. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi; Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer; Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M.; Knox, Susan J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  8. Chemo-mechanical modeling of tumor growth in elastic epithelial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratsun, Dmitry A.; Zakharov, Andrey P.; Pismen, Len

    2016-08-01

    We propose a multiscale chemo-mechanical model of the cancer tumor development in the epithelial tissue. The epithelium is represented by an elastic 2D array of polygonal cells with its own gene regulation dynamics. The model allows the simulation of the evolution of multiple cells interacting via the chemical signaling or mechanically induced strain. The algorithm includes the division and intercalation of cells as well as the transformation of normal cells into a cancerous state triggered by a local failure of the spatial synchronization of the cellular rhythms driven by transcription/translation processes. Both deterministic and stochastic descriptions of the system are given for chemical signaling. The transformation of cells means the modification of their respective parameters responsible for chemo-mechanical interactions. The simulations reproduce a distinct behavior of invasive and localized carcinoma. Generally, the model is designed in such a way that it can be readily modified to take account of any newly understood gene regulation processes and feedback mechanisms affecting chemo-mechanical properties of cells.

  9. Telomere length variation in normal epithelial cells adjacent to tumor: potential biomarker for breast cancer local recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Meeker, Alan K.; Makambi, Kepher H.; Kosti, Ourania; Kallakury, Bhaskar V.S.; Sidawy, Mary K.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Zheng, Yun-Ling

    2012-01-01

    A better understanding of the risk of local recurrence (LR) will facilitate therapeutic decision making in the management of early breast cancers. In the present study, we investigated whether telomere length in the normal breast epithelial cells surrounding the tumor is predictive of breast cancer LR; 152 women who were diagnosed with breast cancer at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center were included in this nested case–control study. Cases (patients had LR) and controls (patients had no LR) were matched on year of surgery, age at diagnosis and type of surgery. Telomere fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to determine the telomere length using formalin fixed paraffin-embedded breast tissues. Small telomere length variation (TLV), defined as the coefficient variation of telomere lengths among examined cells, in normal epithelial cells adjacent to the tumor was significantly associated with a 5-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.2–22.2) increased risk of breast cancer LR. When the subjects were categorized into quartiles, a significant inverse dose–response relationship was observed with lowest versus highest quartile odds ratio of 15.3 (Ptrend = 0.012). Patients who had large TLV had significantly better 10 year recurrence free survival rate compared with patients who had small TLV (80 versus 33%). The present study revealed that TLV in normal epithelial cells adjacent to tumor is a strong predictor of breast cancer LR. If confirmed by future studies, TLV in normal epithelial cells adjacent to tumor has the potential to become a promising biomarker for predicting breast cancer LR after breast conserving surgery. PMID:22072619

  10. Mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney: a rare case report and review of the literatures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng; Wang, Jianzhong; Du, Hexi; Chen, Mingwei; Zhu, Xia; Zhou, Jun; Hao, Zongyao; Shi, Haoqiang; Zhang, Li; Liang, Chaozhao

    2015-01-01

    Mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney (MESTK) is a rare complex renal neoplasm composed of a mixture of cystic and solid components. Until date only few cases of MESTK have been reported. We present here a rare case of MESTK that was diagnosed in a 56-year-old female. The patients were referred to our hospital due to a mass on the right kidney identified incidentally in a routine physical examination. A pre-operative diagnosis of cystic renal cell carcinoma was made and a right radical nephrectomy was carried out. Macroscopically, a cystic tumor was noticed in the upper portion of the right kidney. Various-sized cysts accompanied by multiple cysts and few solid areas were observed. Immunohistochemically, various epithelial markers as well as stromal markers were identified. Taken together with all the immunohistochemical results and morphological pattern of the tumor, a diagnosis of MESTK was made. MESTK is relatively rare and generally benign. However, it is difficult to distinguish between benign or malignant tumors according to the current radiological method. Therefore a complete resection of the tumor by partial or radical nephrectomy is suggested. PMID:26550392

  11. Spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE): clinical-pathological features, differential pathological diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Serena; Bellevicine, Claudio; Arpaia, Debora; Peirce, Carmela; Ciancia, Giuseppe; Vigliar, Elena; Troncone, Giancarlo; Biondi, Bernadette

    2016-03-01

    Spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE) is a very rare tumor of the thyroid gland. An algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of SETTLE has yet to be established. The aim of this study was to identify all case reports of SETTLE and to compare the clinical-pathological features and therapy of the cases identified. We performed a PubMed search for case reports of SETTLE in English published up to November 2014 in which "SETTLE" and "Spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation" were keywords. We identified 35 articles for a total of 42 cases. We found that SETTLE usually occurs in children and adolescents as an asymptomatic neck mass. Thyroid function tests and tumor markers are invariably within normal range in all patients, and fine needle aspiration biopsy is rarely diagnostic for SETTLE. All 42 patients had undergone thyroidectomy. After surgical resection, chemotherapy (adjuvant or first/second-line treatment) and/or radiotherapy were administered to control tumor growth in cases with metastatic involvement. Although SETTLE presents a low-grade malignancy, it can metastasize to lymph nodes, the mediastinum, lung, vertebrae, and kidney even many years after the initial diagnosis. SETTLE may have a good prognosis if appropriately treated at initial presentation and if patients undergo long-term monitoring with regular clinical and morphological evaluations. PMID:26289127

  12. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 expression regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlienger, Sabrina; Campbell, Shirley; Pasquin, Sarah; Gaboury, Louis; Claing, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic capacities are fundamental features of tumor malignancy. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 1 has emerged as a key regulator of invasion in breast cancer cells. However, the importance of this GTPase, in vivo, remains to be demonstrated. We report that ARF1 is highly expressed in breast tumors of the most aggressive and advanced subtypes. Furthermore, we show that lowered expression of ARF1 impairs growth of primary tumors and inhibits lung metastasis in a murine xenograft model. To understand how ARF1 contributes to invasiveness, we used a poorly invasive breast cancer cell line, MCF7 (ER+), and examined the effects of overexpressing ARF1 to levels similar to that found in invasive cell lines. We demonstrate that ARF1 overexpression leads to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Mechanistically, ARF1 controls cell–cell adhesion through ß-catenin and E-cadherin, oncogenic Ras activation and expression of EMT inducers. We further show that ARF1 overexpression enhances invasion, proliferation and resistance to a chemotherapeutic agent. In vivo, ARF1 overexpressing MCF7 cells are able to form more metastases to the lung. Overall, our findings demonstrate that ARF1 is a molecular switch for cancer progression and thus suggest that limiting the expression/activation of this GTPase could help improve outcome for breast cancer patients. PMID:26908458

  13. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 expression regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Sabrina; Campbell, Shirley; Pasquin, Sarah; Gaboury, Louis; Claing, Audrey

    2016-03-29

    Metastatic capacities are fundamental features of tumor malignancy. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 1 has emerged as a key regulator of invasion in breast cancer cells. However, the importance of this GTPase, in vivo, remains to be demonstrated. We report that ARF1 is highly expressed in breast tumors of the most aggressive and advanced subtypes. Furthermore, we show that lowered expression of ARF1 impairs growth of primary tumors and inhibits lung metastasis in a murine xenograft model. To understand how ARF1 contributes to invasiveness, we used a poorly invasive breast cancer cell line, MCF7 (ER+), and examined the effects of overexpressing ARF1 to levels similar to that found in invasive cell lines. We demonstrate that ARF1 overexpression leads to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Mechanistically, ARF1 controls cell-cell adhesion through ß-catenin and E-cadherin, oncogenic Ras activation and expression of EMT inducers. We further show that ARF1 overexpression enhances invasion, proliferation and resistance to a chemotherapeutic agent. In vivo, ARF1 overexpressing MCF7 cells are able to form more metastases to the lung. Overall, our findings demonstrate that ARF1 is a molecular switch for cancer progression and thus suggest that limiting the expression/activation of this GTPase could help improve outcome for breast cancer patients. PMID:26908458

  14. Circulating Tumor Cell Analyses in Patients With Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using Epithelial Marker-Dependent and -Independent Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Song, Pingping; Zou, Benkui; Liu, Min; Cui, Kai; Zhou, Pengfei; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Baijiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In several epithelial malignancies, detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood has diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. However, the clinical relevance of CTCs in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has not yet been ascertained. The study was conducted with the aim of determining the clinical significance of CTCs in patients with ESCC by using 2 CTC detection systems, one epithelial marker-dependent and the other epithelial marker-independent. Paired peripheral blood samples were prospectively obtained from 61 ESCC patients before treatment and were analyzed for CTCs isolated by the CellSearchTM system (CS) and the method of isolation by size of epithelial tumor (ISET). Blood samples from 22 healthy volunteers were used as controls. Out of 61 study subjects, CTCs were detected in 20 patients (32.8%) by the ISET method and in only 1 patient (1.6%) by the CS method. Circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) were observed in 3 of 61 (4.9%) patients using ISET, but were undetectable in any of the patient by CS method. No CTCs/CTM were detected by either method in control groups. By ISET method, the presence of CTCs appeared to correlate with the stage of ESCC and with the baseline median platelet levels. No correlation with any other relevant clinicopathological variables was observed. Our results clearly indicate the ability of both CS and ISET methods to detect CTCs in peripheral blood samples from ESCC patients. However, the CellSearchTM system appears to have a poorer sensitivity as compared with the ISET method. Further studies are essential for assessing the role of such technologies in ESCC. PMID:26402816

  15. Photodynamic therapy induced production of cytokines by latent Epstein Barr virus infected epithelial tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koon, H. K.; Lo, K. W.; Lung, M. L.; Chang, C. K. C.; Wong, R. N. S.; Mak, N. K.

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a method to treat cancer or non-cancer diseases by activation of the light-sensitive photosensitizers. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the development of certain cancers such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and B cell lymphoma. This study aims to examine the effects of EBV infection on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in cells after the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM PDT treatment. Epithelial tumor cell lines HONE-1 and latent EBV-infected HONE-1 (EBV-HONE-1) cells were used in this study. Cells were treated with the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM for 24 hours before light irradiation. RT-PCR and quantitative ELISA methods were used for the evaluation of mRNA expression and production of cytokines, respectively. Results show that Zn-BC-AM PDT increases the production of IL-1a and IL-1b in EBV-HONE-1. Over a 10-fold increase in the production of IL-6 was observed in the culture supernatant of Zn-BC-AM PDT-treated HONE-1 cells. PDT-induced IL-6 production was observed in HONE-1 cells. EBV-HONE-1 has a higher background level of IL-8 production than the HONE-1. The production of IL-8 was suppressed in EBV-HONE-1cells after Zn-BC-AM PDT. Our results indicate that the response of HONE-1 cells to Zn-BC-AM PDT depends on the presence of latent EBV infection. Since IL-8 is a cytokine with angiogenic activity, Zn-BC-AM PDT may exert an anti-angiogenic effect through the suppression of IL-8 production by the EBV-infected cells.

  16. HSP27 and 70 expression in thymic epithelial tumors and benign thymic alterations: diagnostic, prognostic and physiologic implications

    PubMed Central

    Janik, S.; Schiefer, A. I.; Bekos, C.; Hacker, P.; Haider, T.; Moser, J.; Klepetko, W.; Müllauer, L.; Ankersmit, H. J.; Moser, B.

    2016-01-01

    Thymic Epithelial Tumors (TETs), the most common tumors in the anterior mediastinum in adults, show a unique association with autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and represent a multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Neither risk factors nor established biomarkers for TETs exist. Predictive and diagnostic markers are urgently needed. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are upregulated in several malignancies promoting tumor cell survival and metastases. We performed immunohistochemical staining of HSP27 and 70 in patients with TETs (n = 101) and patients with benign thymic alterations (n = 24). Further, serum HSP27 and 70 concentrations were determined in patients with TETs (n = 46), patients with benign thymic alterations (n = 33) and volunteers (n = 49) by using ELISA. HSPs were differentially expressed in histologic types and pathological tumor stages of TETs. Weak HSP tumor expression correlated with worse freedom from recurrence. Serum HSP concentrations were elevated in TETs and MG, correlated with clinical tumor stage and histologic subtype and decreased significantly after complete tumor resection. To conclude, we found HSP expression in the vast majority of TETs, in physiologic thymus and staining intensities in patients with TETs have been associated with prognosis. However, although interesting and promising the role of HSPs in TETs as diagnostic and prognostic or even therapeutic markers need to be further evaluated. PMID:27097982

  17. HSP27 and 70 expression in thymic epithelial tumors and benign thymic alterations: diagnostic, prognostic and physiologic implications.

    PubMed

    Janik, S; Schiefer, A I; Bekos, C; Hacker, P; Haider, T; Moser, J; Klepetko, W; Müllauer, L; Ankersmit, H J; Moser, B

    2016-01-01

    Thymic Epithelial Tumors (TETs), the most common tumors in the anterior mediastinum in adults, show a unique association with autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and represent a multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Neither risk factors nor established biomarkers for TETs exist. Predictive and diagnostic markers are urgently needed. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are upregulated in several malignancies promoting tumor cell survival and metastases. We performed immunohistochemical staining of HSP27 and 70 in patients with TETs (n = 101) and patients with benign thymic alterations (n = 24). Further, serum HSP27 and 70 concentrations were determined in patients with TETs (n = 46), patients with benign thymic alterations (n = 33) and volunteers (n = 49) by using ELISA. HSPs were differentially expressed in histologic types and pathological tumor stages of TETs. Weak HSP tumor expression correlated with worse freedom from recurrence. Serum HSP concentrations were elevated in TETs and MG, correlated with clinical tumor stage and histologic subtype and decreased significantly after complete tumor resection. To conclude, we found HSP expression in the vast majority of TETs, in physiologic thymus and staining intensities in patients with TETs have been associated with prognosis. However, although interesting and promising the role of HSPs in TETs as diagnostic and prognostic or even therapeutic markers need to be further evaluated. PMID:27097982

  18. MUC1 upregulation promotes immune resistance in tumor cells undergoing brachyury-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    David, Justin M.; Hamilton, Duane H.; Palena, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a molecular and cellular program in which epithelial cells lose their well-differentiated phenotype and adopt mesenchymal characteristics. This process, which occurs naturally during embryogenesis, has also been shown to be associated with cancer progression and with tumor recurrence following conventional therapies. Brachyury is a transcription factor that mediates EMT during development, and is aberrantly expressed in various human cancers where it promotes tumor cell EMT, metastatic dissemination, and resistance to conventional therapies. We have recently shown that very high expression of brachyury can protect tumor cells against immune cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In seeking to elucidate mechanisms of immunotherapy resistance, we have discovered a novel positive association between brachyury and mucin-1 (MUC1). MUC1 is overexpressed in the majority of carcinomas, and it has been shown to mediate oncogenic signaling and confer resistance to genotoxic agents. We found that MUC1 is concomitantly upregulated in tumor cell lines that highly express brachyury due to an enhancement of MUC1 mRNA stability. Analysis of patient lung tumor tissues also identified a positive association between these two proteins in the majority of samples. Inhibition of MUC1 by siRNA-based gene silencing markedly enhanced the susceptibility of brachyury-expressing cancer cells to killing by tumor necrosis-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and to perforin/granzyme-dependent lysis by immune cytotoxic cells. These studies confirm a protective role for MUC1 in brachyury-expressing cancer cells, and suggest that inhibition of MUC1 can restore the susceptibility of mesenchymal-like cancer cells to immune attack. PMID:27141403

  19. Utility of Serum miR-125b as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Indicator and Its Alliance with a Panel of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Rashid; Gandhi, Gauri; Ray, Prakash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to be dysregulated in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and may function as either tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) or as oncogenes. Hypermethylation of miRNA silences the tumour suppressive function of a miRNA or hypermethylation of a TSG regulating that miRNA (or vice versa) leads to its loss of function. The present study aims to evaluate the impact of aberrant microRNA-125b (miR-125b) expression on various clinicopathological features in epithelial ovarian cancer and its association with anomalous methylation of several TSGs. We enrolled 70 newly diagnosed cases of epithelial ovarian cancer, recorded their clinical history and 70 healthy female volunteers. Serum miR-125b levels were determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and the methylation status of various TSGs was investigated by methylation specific PCR. ROC curves were constructed to estimate the diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of miR-125b. The Kaplan—Meier method was applied to compare survival curves. Expression of miR-125b was found to be significantly upregulated (p<0.0001) in comparison with healthy controls. The expression level of miR-125b was found to be significantly associated with FIGO stage, lymph node and distant metastasis. ROC curve for diagnostic potential yielded significant AUC with an equitable sensitivity and specificity. ROC curves for prognosis yielded significant AUCs for histological grade, distal metastasis, lymph node status and survival. The expression of miR-125b also correlated significantly with the hypermethylation of TSGs. Our results indicate that DNA hypermethylation may be involved in the inactivation of miR-125b and miR-125b may function as a potential independent biomarker for clinical outcome in EOC. PMID:27092777

  20. Disruption of Smad4 in odontoblasts and dental epithelial cells influences the phenotype of multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weipeng; Yang, Guan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiao; Li, Tiejun

    2015-07-31

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are cystic epithelial neoplasms with a high recurrence rate. The molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of KCOTs are still largely unknown. Previous research showed that specific ablation of Smad4 in odontoblasts and dental epithelia resulted in spontaneous KCOTs in mice, and that constitutively activated Hedgehog (Hh) signaling was detected in the cyst epithelia of both Smad4(Co/Co) OC-Cre and Smad4(Co/Co) K5-Cre mice. Here, we ablated Smad4 in mouse odontoblasts and dental epithelia and compared the sizes and numbers of KCOTs. Both the number and size of KCOTs in Smad4(Co/Co) OC-Cre mice were larger than those in Smad4(Co/Co) K5-Cre mice, suggesting that paracrine signals from root odontoblasts play a more important role than those from Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) cells. PMID:26002469

  1. Intramedullary Spinal Cord Tumors: Part II—Management Options and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Samartzis, Dino; Gillis, Christopher C.; Shih, Patrick; O'Toole, John E.; Fessler, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Broad narrative review. Objectives Intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCT) are uncommon lesions that can affect any age group or sex. However, numerous IMSCT exist and the clinical course of each tumor varies. The following article addresses the various management options and outcomes in patients with IMSCT. Methods An extensive review of the peer-reviewed literature was performed, addressing management options and clinical outcomes of patients with IMSCT. Results Early diagnosis and intervention are essential to obtain optimal functional outcome. Each IMSCT have specific imaging characteristics, which help in the clinical decision-making and prognostication. A comprehension of the tumor pathology and the clinical course associated with each tumor can allow for the proper surgical and nonsurgical management of these tumors, and reduce any associated morbidity and mortality. Recent advances in the operative management of such lesions have increased the success rate of tumor removal while minimizing iatrogenic-related trauma to the patient and, in tandem, improving patient outcomes. Conclusions Awareness and understanding of IMSCT is imperative to design proper management and obtain optimal patient outcomes. Meticulous operative technique and the use of surgical adjuncts are essential to accomplish proper tumor removal, diminish the risk of recurrence, and preserve neurologic function. Operative management of IMSCT should be individualized and based on tumor type, location, and dimensional extensions. To assist with preoperative and intraoperative decision-making, a general algorithm is provided. PMID:26933620

  2. Tumor suppressor role of miR-217 in human epithelial ovarian cancer by targeting IGF1R.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieyan; Li, Dongmei; Zhang, Weiyuan

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that microRNA-217 (miR-217) is frequently dysregulated in various cancers, and plays crucial roles in tumorigenesis and metastasis; however, the role and underlying molecular mechanism of miR-217 in human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remains unclear. Here, we report that miR-217 expression was downregulated in EOC tissue and inversely correlated with advanced FIGO stage, high histological grading and lymph node metastasis (P<0.01). Function analysis revealed that the ectopic expression of miR-217 in EOC cells inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, as well as suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Bioinformatics analysis and dual luciferase assays identified insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) as a direct target of miR-217 in EOC cells. Western blot assay showed that overexpression of miR-217 in EOC cells inhibited IGF1R expression. In addition, downregulation of IGF1R mimicked the tumor-suppressive effects of miR-217 in EOC cells, whereas the reintroduction of IGF1R partially abrogated the suppression effect induced by miR-217 on EOC cells. Collectively, these results demonstrated that miR-217 plays a tumor suppressor role in human epithelial ovarian cancer by directly targeting IGF1R gene, suggesting a new potential therapeutic target in EOC. PMID:26708715

  3. P08: Somatostatin analogs plus prednisone in aggressive histotype and advanced stage of thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ottaviano, Margaret; Damiano, Vincenzo; Nappi, Lucia; Rescigno, Pasquale; Marino, Mirella; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Tucci, Irene; von Arx, Claudia; Palumbo, Giuliano; Palmieri, Giovannella

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) are rare neoplasms characterized by histological variability and different expression at the molecular level. Several biological agents have been evaluated in TETs in small phase II trials. Efficacy of octreotide/lanreotide with or without prednisone in TETs OctreoScan positive has been widely demonstrated in thymoma, but no clearly in thymic carcinoma. Methods Twelve patients (five men, seven women; median age 47 years; range, 27–70 years) with advanced stage disease according to the Masaoka-Koga staging system (seven with IVa stage; five with IVb stage), and aggressive histotype according to WHO classification, revised by central review (two B2/B3; five B3; one B3/thymic carcinoma; four thymic carcinoma) were enrolled in this monocentric referral study. All the patients showed a progressive disease according to RECIST 1.1 criteria to previous conventional chemotherapeutic regimens platinum or not platinum-based. All the patients performed OctreoScan. The schedule includes administration of long-acting analog octreotide (30 mg/every 28 days intramuscularly) plus prednisone 0.2 mg/kg/day until progression of disease was documented. Overall response rate and toxicity were evaluated. Results The median time to progression was 6 months (range, 3–24 months), the overall response rate was 74.9%, particularly three patients (25%) obtained stable disease; four patients (33.3%) partial response; two patients (16.6%) complete response; three patients (25%) progression disease. One patient with Good Syndrome interrupted treatment after 6 months for infection disease. One patient has been lost to follow-up after 24 months of treatment. One patient died after progression disease for PRCA. Treatment was generally well tolerated with acceptable toxicity: no symptomatic cholelithiasis (one patient), grade 1 diarrhea (two patients) hyperglycemia (one patient). One patient with thymic carcinoma and IVB stage had PS improvement from 2

  4. Functional and neuropsychological late outcomes in posterior fossa tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Lassaletta, Alvaro; Bouffet, Eric; Mabbott, Donald; Kulkarni, Abhaya V

    2015-10-01

    Tumors of the posterior fossa (PF) account for up to 60 % of all childhood intracranial tumors. Over the last decades, the mortality rate of children with posterior fossa tumors has gradually decreased. While survival has been the primary objective in most reports, quality of survival increasingly appears to be an important indicator of a successful outcome. Children with a PF tumor can sustain damage to the cerebellum and other brain structures from the tumor itself, concomitant hydrocephalus, the consequences of treatment (surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy), or a combination of these factors. Together, these contribute to long-term sequelae in physical functioning, neuropsychological late outcomes (including academic outcome, working memory, perception and estimation of time, and selective attention, long-term neuromotor speech deficits, and executive functioning). Long-term quality of life can also be affected by endocrinological complication or the occurrence of secondary tumors. A significant proportion of survivors of PF tumors require long-term special education services and have reduced rates of high school graduation and employment. Interventions to improve neuropsychological functioning in childhood PF tumor survivors include (1) pharmacological interventions (such as methylphenidate, modafinil, or donepezil), (2) cognitive remediation, and (3) home-based computerized cognitive training. In order to achieve the best possible outcome for survivors, and ultimately minimize long-term complications, new interventions must be developed to prevent and ameliorate the neuro-toxic effects experienced by these children. PMID:26351237

  5. Canine mammary tumors: a review and consensus of standard guidelines on epithelial and myoepithelial phenotype markers, HER2, and hormone receptor assessment using immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Peña, L; Gama, A; Goldschmidt, M H; Abadie, J; Benazzi, C; Castagnaro, M; Díez, L; Gärtner, F; Hellmén, E; Kiupel, M; Millán, Y; Miller, M A; Nguyen, F; Poli, A; Sarli, G; Zappulli, V; de las Mulas, J Martín

    2014-01-01

    Although there have been several studies on the use of immunohistochemical biomarkers of canine mammary tumors (CMTs), the results are difficult to compare. This article provides guidelines on the most useful immunohistochemical markers to standardize their use and understand how outcomes are measured, thus ensuring reproducibility of results. We have reviewed the biomarkers of canine mammary epithelial and myoepithelial cells and identified those biomarkers that are most useful and those biomarkers for invasion and lymph node micrometastatic disease. A 10% threshold for positive reaction for most of these markers is recommended. Guidelines on immunolabeling for HER2, estrogen receptors (ERs), and progesterone receptors (PRs) are provided along with the specific recommendations for interpretation of the results for each of these biomarkers in CMTs. Only 3+ HER2-positive tumors should be considered positive, as found in human breast cancer. The lack of any known response to adjuvant endocrine therapy of ER- and PR-positive CMTs prevents the use of the biological positive/negative threshold used in human breast cancer. Immunohistochemistry results of ER and PR in CMTs should be reported as the sum of the percentage of positive cells and the intensity of immunolabeling (Allred score). Incorporation of these recommendations in future studies, either prospective or retrospective, will provide a mechanism for the direct comparison of studies and will help to determine whether these biomarkers have prognostic significance. Finally, these biomarkers may ascertain the most appropriate treatment(s) for canine malignant mammary neoplasms. PMID:24227007

  6. The relationship between clinicopathological features and expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers in spontaneous canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kota; Yoshida, Saori; Choisunirachon, Nan; Saito, Tomochika; Matsumoto, Kaori; Saeki, Kohei; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Sasaki, Nobuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2014-10-01

    It is known that epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) contributes to the acquisition of malignant property in human cancers. However, the role of EMT in canine tumors remains to be elucidated. To evaluate the correlation between expression levels of protein markers involved in EMT and clinicopathological characteristics in canine mammary gland tumors, immunohistochemistry using antibodies against ZO-1, E-cadherin, vimentin, N-cadherin and fibronectin was performed on 119 clinical tissue samples. Consequently, loss of ZO-1 and E-cadherin, and gain of vimentin and N-cadherin were more frequently observed in malignant tumors than in benign tumors. However, there was no correlation among expression of these molecules. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified that loss of E-cadherin independently had a low one-year survival rate (adjusted odds ratio: 2.3, P=0.02). These results suggested that EMT might relate to acquisition of malignancy, and additionally, E-cadherin was strongly correlated with malignant behavior in canine mammary gland tumors. PMID:24931646

  7. Enhanced detection and comprehensive in situ phenotypic characterization of circulating and disseminated heteroploid epithelial and glioma tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daisy Dandan; Li, Linda; Lin, Peter Ping

    2015-01-01

    Conventional strategy of anti-EpCAM capture and immunostaining of cytokeratins (CKs) to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is limited by highly heterogeneous and dynamic expression or absence of EpCAM and/or CKs in CTCs. In this study, a novel integrated cellular and molecular approach of subtraction enrichment (SE) and immunostaining-FISH (iFISH) was successfully developed. Both large or small size CTCs and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) in various biofluid samples including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of cancer patients and patient-derived-xenograft (PDX) mouse models were efficiently enriched and comprehensively identified and characterized by SE-iFISH. Non-hematopoietic CTCs with heteroploid chromosome 8 were detected in 87–92% of lung, esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Characterization of CTCs performed by CK18-iFISH showed that CK18, the dual epithelial marker and tumor biomarker, was strong positive in only 14% of lung and 24% of esophageal CTCs, respectively. Unlike conventional methodologies restricted only to the large and/or both EpCAM and CK positive CTCs, SE-iFISH enables efficient enrichment and performing in situ phenotypic and karyotypic identification and characterization of the highly heterogeneous CTC subtypes classified by both chromosome ploidy and the expression of various tumor biomarkers. Each CTC subtype may possess distinct clinical significance relative to tumor metastasis, relapse, therapeutic drug sensitivity or resistance, etc. PMID:26267323

  8. Long-Term Outcomes of Cultivated Limbal Epithelial Transplantation: Evaluation and Comparison of Results in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ganger, Anita; Vanathi, M.; Mohanty, Sujata; Tandon, Radhika

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the long-term clinical outcomes of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET) in children and adults with limbal stem cell deficiency. Design. Retrospective case series. Methods. Case records of patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) who underwent CLET from April 2004 to December 2014 were studied. Outcome measures were compared in terms of anatomical success and visual improvement. Parameters for total anatomical success were avascular, epithelized, and clinically stable corneal surface without conjunctivalization, whereas partial anatomical success was considered when mild vascularization (sparing centre of cornea) and mild conjunctivalization were noted along with complete epithelization. Results. A total of 62 cases underwent the CLET procedure: 38 (61.3%) were children and 24 (38.7%) were adults. Patients with unilateral LSCD (33 children and 21 adults) had autografts and those with bilateral LSCD (5 children and 3 adults) had allografts. Amongst the 54 autografts partial and total anatomical success were noted in 21.2% and 66.6% children, respectively, and 19.0% and 80.9% in adults, respectively (p value 0.23). Visual improvement of 1 line and ≥2 lines was seen in 57.5% and 21.2% children, respectively, and 38% and 38% in adults, respectively (p value 0.31). Conclusion. Cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation gives good long-term results in patients with LSCD and the outcomes are comparable in children and adults. PMID:26770973

  9. Infection of human fallopian tube epithelial cells with Neisseria gonorrhoeae protects cells from tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Priscilla; Reyes, Paz; Vargas, Macarena; Rios, Miguel; Imarai, Mónica; Cardenas, Hugo; Croxatto, Horacio; Orihuela, Pedro; Vargas, Renato; Fuhrer, Juan; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron; Velasquez, Luis

    2006-06-01

    Following infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, bacteria may ascend into the Fallopian tubes (FT) and induce salpingitis, a major cause of infertility. In the FT, interactions between mucosal epithelial cells and gonococci are pivotal events in the pathogen's infection cycle and the inflammatory response. In the current study, primary FT epithelial cells were infected in vitro with different multiplicities of infection (MOI) of Pil+ Opa+ gonococci. Bacteria showed a dose-dependent association with cells and induced the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). A significant finding was that gonococcal infection (MOI = 1) induced apoptosis in approximately 30% of cells, whereas increasing numbers of bacteria (MOI = 10 to 100) did not induce apoptosis. Apoptosis was observed in only 11% of cells with associated bacteria, whereas >84% of cells with no adherent bacteria were apoptotic. TNF-alpha was a key contributor to apoptosis, since (i) culture supernatants from cells infected with gonococci (MOI = 1) induced apoptosis in naïve cultures, suggesting that a soluble factor was responsible; (ii) gonococcal infection-induced apoptosis was inhibited with anti-TNF-alpha antibodies; and (iii) the addition of exogenous TNF-alpha induced apoptosis, which was inhibited by the presence of increasing numbers of bacteria (MOI = 10 to 100). These data suggest that TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis of FT epithelial cells is likely a primary host defense mechanism to prevent pathogen colonization. However, epithelial cell-associated gonococci have evolved a mechanism to protect the cells from undergoing TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis, and this modulation of the host innate response may contribute to establishment of infection. Understanding the antiapoptotic mechanisms used by Neisseria gonorrhoeae will inform the pathogenesis of salpingitis and could suggest new intervention strategies for prevention and treatment of the disease. PMID:16714596

  10. Expression of serum amyloid a in human ovarian epithelial tumors: implication for a role in ovarian tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Urieli-Shoval, Simcha; Finci-Yeheskel, Zvezdana; Dishon, Shira; Galinsky, Daliah; Linke, Reinhold P; Ariel, Ilana; Levin, Mark; Ben-Shachar, Inbar; Prus, Diana

    2010-11-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute phase protein which is expressed primarily in the liver as a part of the systemic response to various injuries and inflammatory stimuli; its expression in ovarian tumors has not been described. Here, we investigated the expression of SAA in human benign and malignant ovarian epithelial tumors. Non-radioactive in situ hybridization applied on ovarian paraffin tissue sections revealed mostly negative SAA mRNA expression in normal surface epithelium. Expression was increased gradually as epithelial cells progressed through benign and borderline adenomas to primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas. Similar expression pattern of the SAA protein was observed by immunohistochemical staining. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the overexpression of the SAA1 and SAA4 genes in ovarian carcinomas compared with normal ovarian tissues. In addition, strong expression of SAA mRNA and protein was found in the ovarian carcinoma cell line OVCAR-3. Finally, patients with ovarian carcinoma had high SAA serum levels, which strongly correlated with high levels of CA-125 and C-reactive protein. Enhanced expression of SAA in ovarian carcinomas may play a role in ovarian tumorigenesis and may have therapeutic application. PMID:20713982

  11. Maximum recovery potential of human tumor cells may predict clinical outcome in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Beckett, M.

    1987-05-01

    We studied inherent radiosensitivity/resistance (D0), ability to accumulate sublethal damage (n) and repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) in established human tumor cell lines as well as early passage human tumor cell lines derived from patients with known outcome following radiotherapy. Survival 24 hrs after treatment of human tumor cells with X rays in plateau phase cultures is a function of initial damage (D0, n), as well as recovery over 24 hrs (PLDR). A surviving fraction greater than .1 24 hrs following treatment with 7 Gy in plateau phase cultures is associated with tumor cell types (melanoma, osteosarcoma) with a high probability of radiotherapy failure or tumor cells derived from patients who actually failed radiotherapy. Therefore, total cellular recovery following radiation may be an important determinant of radiocurability. Accurate assays of radiotherapy outcome may need to account for all these radiobiological parameters.

  12. Targeting matriptase in breast cancer abrogates tumor progression via impairment of stromal-epithelial growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zoratti, Gina L.; Tanabe, Lauren M.; Varela, Fausto A.; Murray, Andrew S.; Bergum, Christopher; Colombo, Eloic; Lang, Julie; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Leduc, Richard; Marsault, Eric; Boerner, Julie; List, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Matriptase is an epithelia-specific membrane-anchored serine protease that has received considerable attention in recent years due to its consistent dysregulation in human epithelial tumors, including breast cancer. Mice with reduced levels of matriptase display a significant delay in oncogene-induced mammary tumor formation and blunted tumor growth. The abated tumor growth is associated with a decrease in cancer cell proliferation. Here we demonstrate by genetic deletion and silencing that the proliferation impairment in matriptase deficient breast cancer cells is caused by their inability to initiate activation of the c-Met signaling pathway in response to fibroblast-secreted pro-HGF. Similarly, inhibition of matriptase catalytic activity using a selective small-molecule inhibitor abrogates the activation of c-Met, Gab1 and AKT, in response to pro-HGF, which functionally leads to attenuated proliferation in breast carcinoma cells. We conclude that matriptase is critically involved in breast cancer progression and represents a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:25873032

  13. Targets of the tumor suppressor miR-200 in regulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cancer.

    PubMed

    Schliekelman, Mark J; Gibbons, Don L; Faca, Vitor M; Creighton, Chad J; Rizvi, Zain H; Zhang, Qing; Wong, Chee-Hong; Wang, Hong; Ungewiss, Christin; Ahn, Young-Ho; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kurie, Jonathan M; Hanash, Samir M

    2011-12-15

    The microRNA-200 (miR-200) family restricts epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis in tumor cell lines derived from mice that develop metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. To determine the mechanisms responsible for EMT and metastasis regulated by this microRNA, we conducted a global liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis to compare metastatic and nonmetastatic murine lung adenocarcinoma cells which had undergone EMT because of loss of miR-200. An analysis of syngeneic tumors generated by these cells identified multiple novel proteins linked to metastasis. In particular, the analysis of conditioned media, cell surface proteins, and whole-cell lysates from metastatic and nonmetastatic cells revealed large-scale modifications in the tumor microenvironment. Specific increases were documented in extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, peptidases, and changes in distribution of cell adhesion proteins in the metastatic cell lines. Integrating proteomic data from three subproteomes, we defined constituents of a multilayer protein network that both regulated and mediated the effects of TGFβ. Lastly, we identified ECM proteins and peptidases that were directly regulated by miR-200. Taken together, our results reveal how expression of miR-200 alters the tumor microenvironment to inhibit the processes of EMT and metastasis. PMID:21987723

  14. Targets of the tumor suppressor gene miR-200 in regulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schliekelman, Mark J.; Gibbons, Don L.; Faca, Vitor M.; Creighton, Chad J.; Rizvi, Zain H.; Zhang, Qing; Wong, Chee-Hong; Wang, Hong; Ungewiss, Christin; Ahn, Young-Ho; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Hanash, Samir M.

    2012-01-01

    The microRNA-200 family restricts epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis in tumor cell lines derived from mice that develop metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. To determine the mechanisms responsible for EMT and metastasis regulated by this microRNA, we conducted a global LC-MS/MS analysis to compare metastatic and non-metastatic murine lung adenocarcinoma cells which had undergone EMT due to loss of miR-200. An analysis of syngeneic tumors generated by these cells identified multiple novel proteins linked to metastasis. In particular, the analysis of conditioned media, cell surface proteins, and whole cell lysates from metastatic and non-metastatic cells revealed large scale modifications in the tumor microenvironment. Specific increases were documented in extracellular matrix proteins, peptidases, and changes in distribution of cell adhesion proteins in the metastatic cell lines. Integrating proteomic data from three sub-proteomes, we defined constituents of a multilayer protein network that both regulated and mediated the effects of transforming growth factor TGFβ. Lastly, we identified extracellular matrix proteins and peptidases that were directly regulated by miR-200. Taken together, our results reveal how expression of miR-200 alters the tumor microenvironment to inhibit the processes of EMT and metastasis. PMID:21987723

  15. Phenotypic characterization of telomerase-immortalized primary non-malignant and malignant tumor-derived human prostate epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Yongpeng; Li Hongzhen; Miki, Jun; Kim, Kee-Hong; Furusato, Bungo; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Chu, Wei-Sing; McLeod, David G.; Srivastava, Shiv; Ewing, Charles M.; Isaacs, William B.; Rhim, Johng S. . E-mail: jrhim@cpdr.org

    2006-04-01

    In vitro human prostate cell culture models are critical for clarifying the mechanism of prostate cancer progression and for testing preventive and therapeutic agents. Cell lines ideal for the study of human primary prostate tumors would be those derived from spontaneously immortalized tumor cells; unfortunately, explanted primary prostate cells survive only short-term in culture, and rarely immortalize spontaneously. Therefore, we recently have generated five immortal human prostate epithelial cell cultures derived from both the benign and malignant tissues of prostate cancer patients with telomerase, a gene that prevents cellular senescence. Examination of these cell lines for their morphologies and proliferative capacities, their abilities to grow in low serum, to respond to androgen stimulation, to grow above the agar layer, to form tumors in SCID mice, suggests that they may serve as valid, useful tools for the elucidation of early events in prostate tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the chromosome alterations observed in these immortalized cell lines expressing aspects of the malignant phenotypes imply that these cell lines accurately recapitulate the genetic composition of primary tumors. These novel in vitro models may offer unique models for the study of prostate carcinogenesis and also provide the means for testing both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents.

  16. Aspirin blocks growth of breast tumor cells and tumor-initiating cells and induces reprogramming factors of mesenchymal to epithelial transition.

    PubMed

    Maity, Gargi; De, Archana; Das, Amlan; Banerjee, Snigdha; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2015-07-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), also known as aspirin, a classic, nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is widely used to relieve minor aches and pains and to reduce fever. Epidemiological studies and other experimental studies suggest that ASA use reduces the risk of different cancers including breast cancer (BC) and may be used as a chemopreventive agent against BC and other cancers. These studies have raised the tempting possibility that ASA could serve as a preventive medicine for BC. However, lack of in-depth knowledge of the mechanism of action of ASA reshapes the debate of risk and benefit of using ASA in prevention of BC. Our studies, using in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft models, show a strong beneficial effect of ASA in the prevention of breast carcinogenesis. We find that ASA not only prevents breast tumor cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in nude mice xenograft model through the induction of apoptosis, but also significantly reduces the self-renewal capacity and growth of breast tumor-initiating cells (BTICs)/breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) and delays the formation of a palpable tumor. Moreover, ASA regulates other pathophysiological events in breast carcinogenesis, such as reprogramming the mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and delaying in vitro migration in BC cells. The tumor growth-inhibitory and reprogramming roles of ASA could be mediated through inhibition of TGF-β/SMAD4 signaling pathway that is associated with growth, motility, invasion, and metastasis in advanced BCs. Collectively, ASA has a therapeutic or preventive potential by attacking possible target such as TGF-β in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:25867761

  17. Spectrum of Cystic Epithelial Tumors of the Prostate: Most Cystadenocarcinomas Are Ductal Type With Intracystic Papillary Pattern.

    PubMed

    Paner, Gladell P; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; So, Jeffrey S; Antic, Tatjana; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; McKenney, Jesse K

    2016-07-01

    Cystic epithelial tumors arising from the prostate are rare, and their full histologic spectrum has yet to be defined. Herein, we present 8 examples of prostatic cystic tumors including 1 giant multilocular cystadenoma and 7 cystadenocarcinomas. We divided the cystadenocarcinomas into "giant multilocular" cystadenocarcinoma (3) and "microscopic" cystadenocarcinoma (4) because of their differing clinical presentations with clinically apparent cystic masses in the former. The cystadenoma was an 11 cm multilocular cystic pelvic tumor in a 55-year-old man who presented with lower urinary tract symptoms. The cystadenoma was lined predominantly by benign acinar cells and had a distinct basal cell layer. No recurrence occurred 3 months after resection. The 3 patients with giant multilocular cystadenocarcinomas were 62 to 82 years old, had large pelvic cystic masses (up to 16 cm), and 2 presented with obstructive urinary and lower intestinal tract symptoms. One giant multilocular cystadenocarcinoma had a markedly high cystic fluid prostate-specific antigen at >80,000 ng/mL. All 3 giant multilocular cystadenocarcinomas were ductal adenocarcinoma with exuberant intracystic papillary formations. One tumor was associated with a high-grade noncystic conventional (acinar) adenocarcinoma (Gleason score 9 [ISUP grade group 5]). Follow-up on the 3 giant multilocular cystadenocarcinoma cases (7 to 21 mo) showed multiple metastases in 1 patient but was attributed to the high-grade conventional adenocarcinoma component. In addition, we described 4 examples of microscopic cystadenocarcinomas that were small (≤1 cm) solitary or multiple cystic tumors identified on pathologic examination of the prostate. In 3 of 4 microscopic cystadenocarcinomas the lining was ductal adenocarcinoma with occasional to exuberant papillae and appeared similar to the smaller cysts in the giant multilocular cystadenocarcinomas. One of the 4 microscopic cystadenocarcinomas had an acinar adenocarcinoma lining

  18. Radiotherapy in epithelial tumors of the parotid gland: Case presentation and literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Ravasz, L.A.; Terhaard, C.H.; Hordijk, G.J. )

    1990-07-01

    A group of 113 patients irradiated for parotid tumor was studied retrospectively. Sixty-two patients were irradiated after superficial parotidectomy or enucleation of a pleomorphic adenoma. None of them had a recurrence after 5-15 years. Sixteen patients were irradiated postoperatively after surgery for a recurrence of pleomorphic adenoma. Only one of them had developed a recurrent tumor. Thirty-five patients with a malignant parotid tumor were treated by irradiation, 22 after surgery and 13 after biopsy only. Patients with a low malignancy tumor (10/11) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (6/12) responded better than patients with a high malignancy carcinoma (2/12). A tumor larger than 4 cm, facial nerve palsy, lymph node metastasis, and inoperability indicate a poor prognosis. With high dose radiotherapy it is possible to treat inoperable tumors successfully. Adenoid cystic carcinomas can respond well to irradiation alone.43 references.

  19. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Rare and Heavily Pretreated Solid Tumors Treated according to the Results of Tumor Molecular Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Patients with heavily pretreated advanced cancer or with rare tumors are difficult to treat. Molecular profiling (MP) of tumors to identify biomarkers that predict potential outcomes with individual therapies is an emerging strategy to guide treatment decisions. Patients with rare tumors for which standard-of-care therapy was unavailable or more common tumors for which standard-of-care options had been exhausted underwent MP at a single Australian center. Data regarding treating physicians' choice of therapy, MP results and recommendations, and patient outcomes were collected. Seven patients had received prior standard first-line therapy (PST), 16 had rare tumors, and 31 had been heavily pretreated (HPT; ≥2 prior lines). Most treatments suggested by MP (541/594; 91.1%) were common chemotherapy drugs available in generic formulations. MP-guided therapy recommendations differed from physician's recommendations in 48 patients (88.9%). MP-guided therapy produced clinical benefit (improved QOL and/or performance status, symptoms, bodyweight, or RECIST) in 19/31 (61.3%), 11/16 (68.8%), and 3/7 (42.9%) patients with HPTs, rare tumors, and PSTs, respectively, and had a PFS ratio ≥1.3 in 22/37 evaluable patients (59.5%; 95% confidence interval 44–76%). The null hypothesis that ≤15% of these patients would have a PFS ratio ≥1.3 was rejected (one-sided p < 0.0001). In conclusion, using MP to guide therapy selection is feasible in clinical practice and may improve patient outcomes. PMID:27525268

  20. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Rare and Heavily Pretreated Solid Tumors Treated according to the Results of Tumor Molecular Profiling.

    PubMed

    Dean, Andrew; Byrne, Aisling; Marinova, Mira; Hayden, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Patients with heavily pretreated advanced cancer or with rare tumors are difficult to treat. Molecular profiling (MP) of tumors to identify biomarkers that predict potential outcomes with individual therapies is an emerging strategy to guide treatment decisions. Patients with rare tumors for which standard-of-care therapy was unavailable or more common tumors for which standard-of-care options had been exhausted underwent MP at a single Australian center. Data regarding treating physicians' choice of therapy, MP results and recommendations, and patient outcomes were collected. Seven patients had received prior standard first-line therapy (PST), 16 had rare tumors, and 31 had been heavily pretreated (HPT; ≥2 prior lines). Most treatments suggested by MP (541/594; 91.1%) were common chemotherapy drugs available in generic formulations. MP-guided therapy recommendations differed from physician's recommendations in 48 patients (88.9%). MP-guided therapy produced clinical benefit (improved QOL and/or performance status, symptoms, bodyweight, or RECIST) in 19/31 (61.3%), 11/16 (68.8%), and 3/7 (42.9%) patients with HPTs, rare tumors, and PSTs, respectively, and had a PFS ratio ≥1.3 in 22/37 evaluable patients (59.5%; 95% confidence interval 44-76%). The null hypothesis that ≤15% of these patients would have a PFS ratio ≥1.3 was rejected (one-sided p < 0.0001). In conclusion, using MP to guide therapy selection is feasible in clinical practice and may improve patient outcomes. PMID:27525268

  1. Outcome of nonsurgical treatment for locally advanced thymic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chang-Lu; Gao, Lan-Ting; Lv, Chang-Xing; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical resection remains the mainstay of treatment for patients with early-staged thymic tumors, while chemotherapy is most commonly used in stage IV cases. As for locally advanced thymic tumors, especially those unsuitable for surgery, the optimal therapy is still controversial. Thus, we conducted this retrospective study by comparing three nonsurgical treatment modalities to find some clues. Methods Three treatment modalities were used in 42 patients from October 2000 to December 2010, including radiotherapy (RT) alone, sequential chemoradiation (SCRT) and concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT). Objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS) and toxicity of the three regimens were compared accordingly. Results The ORR in all 42 patients was 61.9%, and 5-year OS was 46%. The ORR of RT, SCRT and CCRT were 43.8%, 50% and 87.5%, respectively (RT vs. SCRT, P=0.692; RT vs. CCRT, P=0.009; SCRT vs. CCRT, P=0.051). The 5-year OS of RT, SCRT and CCRT were 30%, 50% and 61.9%, respectively. (RT vs. SCRT, P=0.230; RT vs. CCRT, P=0.011; SCRT vs. CCRT, P=0.282). Eleven patients developed neutropenia of grade 3–4, with 7 in CCRT group and 4 in SCRT, respectively. Nine patients experienced esophagitis of grade 3 with 2 in RT, 3 in SCRT and 4 in CCRT. There were also two cases of grade 3 radiation induced pneumonitis in CCRT group. No life-threatening side effects were noted. Conclusions When used to treat locally advanced thymic tumors unsuitable for surgery, CCRT performed more favorably than RT alone or SCRT in both tumor response and long time survival, but probably with the increasing risk of pulmonary damage. CCRT may offer the best chance of disease control in the management of locally advanced disease. PMID:27114838

  2. Suppression of tumor-forming ability and related traits in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells by fusion with immortal mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zajchowski, D A; Band, V; Trask, D K; Kling, D; Connolly, J L; Sager, R

    1990-01-01

    Somatic cell hybrids between MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and normal immortalized human mammary epithelial cells have been obtained by polyethylene glycol-mediated cell fusion. The hybrid cells are suppressed in their ability to form tumors in nude mice, as well as in traits specific to the tumorigenic MCF-7 parent: growth factor independence, tumor necrosis factor sensitivity, and pS2 gene expression. In addition, they display other characteristics of the "normal" parent, including increased expression relative to the MCF-7 cells of the genes for the extracellular matrix component fibronectin, the intermediate filament keratin 5, and the angiogenesis inhibitor thrombospondin. The levels of keratins 8 and 18 also resemble those of the nontumorigenic parent. These results provide evidence for the existence of tumor suppressor gene products in immortal mammary epithelial cells. We propose a characteristic "suppressed" tumor cell phenotype, which encompasses altered cytoarchitecture, angiogenesis capabilities, and growth factor requirements. Images PMID:1690427

  3. Perioperative problems in patients with brainstem tumors and their influence on patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bharati, Sachidanand J; Pandia, Mihir Prakash; Rath, Girija Prasad; Bithal, Parmod Kumar; Dash, Hari Hara; Dube, Surya K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Patients with brainstem tumors have many associated systemic abnormalities and are prone to develop perioperative complications. We studied the problems associated with brainstem tumors and their influence on the postoperative neurological outcome. Material and Methods: Retrospective review of records of patients who underwent surgery for brainstem tumors over a period of 8 years was done. Preoperative variables, perioperative complications and neurological outcome as assessed by Glasgow Outcome Scale at the time of hospital discharge were noted. Association between perioperative factors and the unfavorable neurological outcome was evaluated. Results: Data of 70 patients were retrieved, 7 patients were excluded from the study because of incomplete data and data analysis was carried out for 63 patients. We found that lower cranial nerve palsies (32%) and hydrocephalus (43%) were common preoperatively. Various intraoperative problems encountered were hemodynamic instability (56%), major blood loss requiring blood transfusion (40%) and venous air embolism (11%), and postoperative problems were meningitis (51%), hypokalemia (38%), chest infection (21%), seizure (11%), deterioration of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, 11%), hyponatremia (8%), hydrocephalus (6%), respiratory distress (3%) and operatives site hematoma (3%). Fifty-six (89%) patients had favorable outcome at hospital discharge whereas, 7 (11%) had an unfavorable outcome. There was no association between pre- and intra-operative factors and the neurological outcome. Deterioration of GCS, chest infection, and the need for reintubation and tracheostomy were associated with unfavorable neurological outcome. Conclusion: Patients of brainstem tumors are at increased risk of perioperative complications. Some of the postoperative complications were associated with unfavorable neurological outcome. PMID:27275044

  4. Imaging and surgical outcomes of spinal tumors in 18 dogs and one cat.

    PubMed

    Besalti, Omer; Caliskan, Murat; Can, Pinar; Vural, Sevil Atalay; Algin, Oktay; Ahlat, Ozan

    2016-06-30

    Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, histological appearances and surgical outcomes of 18 dogs and one cat with spinal tumors are presented. Medical records of the cases admitted for spinal disorders were reviewed, and cases of spinal tumors that were diagnosed by MRI and confirmed by histological examination were included in this study. T1 weighted, T2 weighted and contrast enhanced T1 weighted images were taken and interpreted to evaluate the spinal tumors. The tumors were diagnosed as: meningioma (n = 6), ependymoma (n = 1), nerve sheath tumor (n = 4), metastatic spinal tumor (n = 3), osteosarcoma (n = 2), osteoma (n = 1), rhabdomyosarcoma (n = 1), and nephroblastoma (n = 1). Thirteen cases underwent surgical operation and the remaining six cases were euthanized at the request of the owners. The neurological status of the surgical cases did not deteriorate, except for one dog that showed ependymoma in the early period after the operation. These results indicate the potential for surgical gross total tumor removal of vertebral tumors to provide better quality of life and surgical collection of histological specimens for definitive diagnosis. For effective case management, dedicated MRI examination is important to accurate evaluation of the spinal tumors, and surgical treatment is useful for extradural and intradural-extramedullary spinal tumors. PMID:26645333

  5. Imaging and surgical outcomes of spinal tumors in 18 dogs and one cat

    PubMed Central

    Caliskan, Murat; Can, Pinar; Vural, Sevil Atalay; Algin, Oktay; Ahlat, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, histological appearances and surgical outcomes of 18 dogs and one cat with spinal tumors are presented. Medical records of the cases admitted for spinal disorders were reviewed, and cases of spinal tumors that were diagnosed by MRI and confirmed by histological examination were included in this study. T1 weighted, T2 weighted and contrast enhanced T1 weighted images were taken and interpreted to evaluate the spinal tumors. The tumors were diagnosed as: meningioma (n = 6), ependymoma (n = 1), nerve sheath tumor (n = 4), metastatic spinal tumor (n = 3), osteosarcoma (n = 2), osteoma (n = 1), rhabdomyosarcoma (n = 1), and nephroblastoma (n = 1). Thirteen cases underwent surgical operation and the remaining six cases were euthanized at the request of the owners. The neurological status of the surgical cases did not deteriorate, except for one dog that showed ependymoma in the early period after the operation. These results indicate the potential for surgical gross total tumor removal of vertebral tumors to provide better quality of life and surgical collection of histological specimens for definitive diagnosis. For effective case management, dedicated MRI examination is important to accurate evaluation of the spinal tumors, and surgical treatment is useful for extradural and intradural-extramedullary spinal tumors. PMID:26645333

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-α mediates interactions between macrophages and epithelial cells underlying proinflammatory gene expression induced by particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Musah, Sadiatu; DeJarnett, Natasha; Hoyle, Gary W

    2012-09-28

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure is known to have adverse effects on respiratory health, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. We tested the hypothesis that macrophages and epithelial cells synergize to produce maximal cytokine release in response to PM exposure, thereby promoting inflammatory responses. We developed a co-culture model using MLE-12 (mouse lung epithelial) cells and RAW 264.7 (mouse monocyte/macrophage) cells. MLE-12 cells produced KC (Cxcl1) but not tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), and KC was upregulated only at high levels of urban particulate matter (UPM; NIST 1648a). RAW 264.7 cells produced TNF but not KC, and TNF production was increased by treatment with UPM. In contrast, KC production was upregulated by co-culture of MLE-12 and RAW 264.7 cells, and it was further increased by treatment with a concentration of UPM that had no effect on MLE-12 cells alone. Multiplex cytokine assay revealed a similar pattern of synergistic production of MIG (Cxcl9) and IP-10 (Cxcl10) in co-cultures in response to UPM. TNF was implicated as mediating the synergistic increase in KC production because TNF upregulated KC production in MLE-12 cells, and UPM-induced KC production in co-cultures could be inhibited by a TNF blocking antibody. Intratracheal instillation of UPM into both wild-type and TNF receptor knockout mice resulted in increased TNF production in lavage fluid and increased TNF mRNA expression in cells recovered from lavage fluid. Additionally, UPM instillation into wild-type mice resulted in increased neutrophils and KC in lavage fluid, and these were inhibited in UPM-exposed TNF receptor knockout mice. These results are consistent with a model in which PM activates TNF production in macrophages which in turn stimulates epithelial cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines such as KC. The findings suggest a potential mechanism by which inhaled PM induces inflammation in the lung. PMID:22634322

  7. Site-Specific Epithelial-Mesenchymal Interactions in Digestive Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dumortier, Jérôme; Ratineau, Christelle; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Pourreyron, Céline; Anderson, Wena; Jacquier, Marie-France; Blanc, Martine; Bernard, Christine; Bellaton, Claire; Remy, Lionel; Chayvialle, Jean-Alain; Roche, Colette

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about the functional interactions between digestive neuroendocrine tumor cells and their stromal microenvironment. The focus of our study is whether mesenchymal cells modulate peptide expression, cell proliferation, and invasiveness in digestive neuroendocrine tumor cells. We designed an experimental in vivo and in vitro study using the mouse enteroendocrine cell line STC-1. In vivo, STC-1 cells were injected subcutaneously in 18 immunosuppressed newborn rats. At day 21, all animals presented poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors with lung metastases. Subcutaneous tumors were usually limited by a capsule containing basement membrane components and myofibroblasts that presented a low mitotic index. Lung tumors were devoid of capsule and poor in myofibroblasts, and their mitotic index was high. The profile of peptide expression in STC-1 tumors was different from that of cultured STC-1 cells. In vitro, STC-1 cells were cultured with fibroblasts of different origins, including dermis, lung, digestive tract, and liver. Based on their origin, myofibroblasts differentially modulated hormone synthesis, proliferation, spreading, and adhesion of STC-1 cells. In conclusion, our results show that site-specific functional interactions between mesenchymal and neuroendocrine cells may contribute to modulating the behavior of digestive neuroendocrine tumors, depending on their growth site. PMID:10666396

  8. Nanoelectromechanical Chip (NELMEC) Combination of Nanoelectronics and Microfluidics to Diagnose Epithelial and Mesenchymal Circulating Tumor Cells from Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seied Ali; Abdolahad, Mohammad; Zanganeh, Somayeh; Dahmardeh, Mahyar; Gharooni, Milad; Abiri, Hamed; Alikhani, Alireza; Mohajerzadeh, Shams; Mashinchian, Omid

    2016-02-17

    An integrated nano-electromechanical chip (NELMEC) has been developed for the label-free distinguishing of both epithelial and mesenchymal circulating tumor cells (ECTCs and MCTCs, respectively) from white blood cells (WBCs). This nanoelectronic microfluidic chip fabricated by silicon micromachining can trap large single cells (>12 µm) at the opening of the analysis microchannel arrays. The nature of the captured cells is detected using silicon nanograss (SiNG) electrodes patterned at the entrance of the channels. There is an observable difference between the membrane capacitance of the ECTCs and MCTCs and that of WBCs (measured using SiNG electrodes), which is the key indication for our diagnosis. The NELMEC chip not only solves the problem of the size overlap between CTCs and WBCs but also detects MCTCs without the need for any markers or tagging processes, which has been an important problem in previously reported CTC detection systems. The great conductivity of the gold-coated SiNG nanocontacts as well as their safe penetration into the membrane of captured cells, facilitate a precise and direct signal extraction to distinguish the type of captured cell. The results achieved from epithelial (MCF-7) and mesenchymal (MDA-MB231) breast cancer cells circulated in unprocessed blood suggest the significant applications for these diagnostic abilities of NELMEC. PMID:26727927

  9. GSK3β controls epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor metastasis by CHIP-mediated degradation of Slug.

    PubMed

    Kao, S-H; Wang, W-L; Chen, C-Y; Chang, Y-L; Wu, Y-Y; Wang, Y-T; Wang, S-P; Nesvizhskii, A I; Chen, Y-J; Hong, T-M; Yang, P-C

    2014-06-12

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) is highly inactivated in epithelial cancers and is known to inhibit tumor migration and invasion. The zinc-finger-containing transcriptional repressor, Slug, represses E-cadherin transcription and enhances epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we find that the GSK3β-pSer9 level is associated with the expression of Slug in non-small cell lung cancer. GSK3β-mediated phosphorylation of Slug facilitates Slug protein turnover. Proteomic analysis reveals that the carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) interacts with wild-type Slug (wtSlug). Knockdown of CHIP stabilizes the wtSlug protein and reduces Slug ubiquitylation and degradation. In contrast, nonphosphorylatable Slug-4SA is not degraded by CHIP. The accumulation of nondegradable Slug may further lead to the repression of E-cadherin expression and promote cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Our findings provide evidence of a de novo GSK3β-CHIP-Slug pathway that may be involved in the progression of metastasis in lung cancer. PMID:23851495

  10. Twist-mediated Epithelial-mesenchymal Transition Promotes Breast Tumor Cell Invasion via Inhibition of Hippo Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Liu, Jingyi; Ying, Xuhua; Lin, Pengnian Charles; Zhou, Binhua P.

    2016-01-01

    Twist is a key transcription factor for Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is a cellular de-differentiation program that promotes invasion and metastasis, confers tumor cells with cancer stem cell (CSC)-like characteristics, and increases therapeutic resistance. However, the mechanisms that facilitate the functions of Twist remain unclear. Here we report that Twist overexpression increased expression of PAR1, an upstream regulator of the Hippo pathway; PAR1 promotes invasion, migration, and CSC-like properties in breast cancer by activating the transcriptional co-activator TAZ. Our study indicates that Hippo pathway inhibition is required for the increased migratory and invasiveness ability of breast cancer cells in Twist-mediated EMT. PMID:27094683

  11. Twist-mediated Epithelial-mesenchymal Transition Promotes Breast Tumor Cell Invasion via Inhibition of Hippo Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Liu, Jingyi; Ying, Xuhua; Lin, Pengnian Charles; Zhou, Binhua P

    2016-01-01

    Twist is a key transcription factor for Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is a cellular de-differentiation program that promotes invasion and metastasis, confers tumor cells with cancer stem cell (CSC)-like characteristics, and increases therapeutic resistance. However, the mechanisms that facilitate the functions of Twist remain unclear. Here we report that Twist overexpression increased expression of PAR1, an upstream regulator of the Hippo pathway; PAR1 promotes invasion, migration, and CSC-like properties in breast cancer by activating the transcriptional co-activator TAZ. Our study indicates that Hippo pathway inhibition is required for the increased migratory and invasiveness ability of breast cancer cells in Twist-mediated EMT. PMID:27094683

  12. Natural History, Growth Kinetics and Outcomes of Untreated Clinically Localized Renal Tumors Under Active Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Crispen, Paul L.; Viterbo, Rosalia; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Chen, David Y.T.; Uzzo, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Background The growth kinetics of untreated solid organ malignancies are not defined. Radiographic active surveillance (AS) of renal tumors in patient unfit or unwilling to undergo intervention provides an opportunity to quantitate the natural history of untreated localized tumors. Here we report the radiographic growth kinetics of renal neoplasms during a period of surveillance. Methods We identified patients with enhancing renal masses who were radiographically observed for at least 12 months. Clinical and pathological records were reviewed to determine tumor growth kinetics and clinical outcomes. Tumor growth kinetics were expressed in terms of absolute and relative linear and volumetric growth. Results We identified 172 renal tumors in 154 patients under AS. Median tumor diameter and volume on presentation was 2.0 cm (mean 2.5, range 0.4 - 12.0) and 4.18 cm3 (mean 20.0, range 0.0033 – 904). Median duration of follow-up was 24 months (mean 31, range 12 – 156). A significant association between presenting tumor size and proportional growth was noted, with smaller tumors growing faster than larger tumors. 39% (68/173) of tumors underwent delayed intervention and 84% (57/68) were pathologically malignant. Progression to metastatic disease was noted in 1.3% (2/154) of patients. Conclusions We demonstrate the association between a tumor’s volume and subsequent growth with smaller tumors exhibiting significantly faster volumetric growth than larger tumors, consistent with Gompertzian kinetics. Surveillance of localized renal tumors is associated with a low rate of disease progression in the intermediate term and suggests potential over-treatment biases in select patients. PMID:19402168

  13. Targeting tumor perfusion and oxygenation to improve the outcome of anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bénédicte F; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are widespread clinical modalities for cancer treatment. Among other biological influences, hypoxia is a main factor limiting the efficacy of radiotherapy, primarily because oxygen is involved in the stabilization of the DNA damage caused by ionizing radiations. Radiobiological hypoxia is found in regions of rodent and human tumors with a tissue oxygenation level below 10 mmHg at which tumor cells become increasingly resistant to radiation damage. Since hypoxic tumor cells remain clonogenic, their resistance to the treatment strongly influences the therapeutic outcome of radiotherapy. There is therefore an urgent need to identify adjuvant treatment modalities aimed to increase tumor pO(2) at the time of radiotherapy. Since tumor hypoxia fundamentally results from an imbalance between oxygen delivery by poorly efficient blood vessels and oxygen consumption by tumor cells with high metabolic activities, two promising approaches are those targeting vascular reactivity and tumor cell respiration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the development and use of tumor-selective vasodilators, inhibitors of tumor cell respiration, and drugs and treatments combining both activities in the context of tumor sensitization to X-ray radiotherapy. Tumor-selective vasodilation may also be used to improve the delivery of circulating anticancer agents to tumors. Imaging tumor perfusion and oxygenation is of importance not only for the development and validation of such combination treatments, but also to determine which patients could benefit from the therapy. Numerous techniques have been developed in the preclinical setting. Hence, this review also briefly describes both magnetic resonance and non-magnetic resonance in vivo methods and compares them in terms of sensitivity, quantitative or semi-quantitative properties, temporal, and spatial resolutions, as well as translational aspects. PMID:22661950

  14. Targeting Tumor Perfusion and Oxygenation to Improve the Outcome of Anticancer Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Bénédicte F.; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are widespread clinical modalities for cancer treatment. Among other biological influences, hypoxia is a main factor limiting the efficacy of radiotherapy, primarily because oxygen is involved in the stabilization of the DNA damage caused by ionizing radiations. Radiobiological hypoxia is found in regions of rodent and human tumors with a tissue oxygenation level below 10 mmHg at which tumor cells become increasingly resistant to radiation damage. Since hypoxic tumor cells remain clonogenic, their resistance to the treatment strongly influences the therapeutic outcome of radiotherapy. There is therefore an urgent need to identify adjuvant treatment modalities aimed to increase tumor pO2 at the time of radiotherapy. Since tumor hypoxia fundamentally results from an imbalance between oxygen delivery by poorly efficient blood vessels and oxygen consumption by tumor cells with high metabolic activities, two promising approaches are those targeting vascular reactivity and tumor cell respiration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the development and use of tumor-selective vasodilators, inhibitors of tumor cell respiration, and drugs and treatments combining both activities in the context of tumor sensitization to X-ray radiotherapy. Tumor-selective vasodilation may also be used to improve the delivery of circulating anticancer agents to tumors. Imaging tumor perfusion and oxygenation is of importance not only for the development and validation of such combination treatments, but also to determine which patients could benefit from the therapy. Numerous techniques have been developed in the preclinical setting. Hence, this review also briefly describes both magnetic resonance and non-magnetic resonance in vivo methods and compares them in terms of sensitivity, quantitative or semi-quantitative properties, temporal, and spatial resolutions, as well as translational aspects. PMID:22661950

  15. NOTCH2 expression is decreased in epithelial ovarian cancer and is related to the tumor histological subtype

    PubMed Central

    Galic, Vijaya; Shawber, Carrie J.; Reeves, Claire; Shah, Monjri; Murtomaki, Aino; Wright, Jason; Herzog, Thomas; Tong, Guo Xia; Kitajewski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Notch family members function as both oncogenes and tumor suppressors. NOTCH2 is down-regulated in colon cancer, and reduced expression is associated with a less differentiated, more aggressive phenotype, and reduced overall survival. NOTCH2 has also been shown to have pro-apoptotic and growth suppressive effects in thyroid carcinoma, and carcinoid tumors. The expression pattern of NOTCH2 in ovarian cancer is unknown. Methods: An immunohistochemical analysis using a polyclonal antibody to the NOTCH2 intracellular domain was performed on a total of 119 ovarian carcinomas, and 7 serous borderline tumors, arranged onto tissue arrays. Normal ovarian and fallopian tube epithelium were used as controls. Specimens were scored as low or high NOTCH2 expression. The score distributions for the subtypes were analyzed with the chi square test. Results: Fifty two of 61 (85.2%) papillary serous, eight of 13 (61.5%) clear cell, and 23 of 30 (76.7%) endometrioid, demonstrated negative or lower NOTCH2 expression than normal fallopian tubal epithelium or ovarian surface epithelium. In contrast, 10 of 15 (66.7%) mucinous carcinomas had a high level of NOTCH2 expression and consistently demonstrated intense polarized staining (P<.001). The apical expression of NOTCH2 protein present in the normal fallopian tube epithelium and many borderline tumors was absent in the high grade carcinomas, most notably in papillary serous. Conclusion: Decreased NOTCH2 expression is associated with the poorly differentiated serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma histology. Further studies are needed to assess the functional role of NOTCH2 in ovarian cancer and its effect on prognosis. PMID:24707357

  16. [Epithelial tumor-like changes, precancerous conditions and skin neoplasms (standardization study)].

    PubMed

    Bednár, B; Stanová, M

    1976-05-01

    A retrospective study of bioptic material was used to design the following outline of a histological classification of epithelial skin tumours tentatively compared with handbooks published by the WHO (1) and AFIP (2): I. Tumour-like changes: 1. senile verruca (mixed, acanthotic, melanoacanthotic, hyperkeratonic, reticular, inverted). 2. Virus verrucosities (v. vulgaris, v. plana, c. accuminatum, molluscom contagiosum). 3. Hamartogenic verrucosities (naevus verrucosus, n. comedonicus, fibroepithelial papilloma. 4. Genetically undefined verrucosities (acanthosis nigricans, light cell acanthoma, verrucous dyskeratosis). 5. Cysts (atheroma, epidermoid cyst, dermoid cyst, others). 6. Unclassified. II. Precanceroses: 1. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasis, 2. keratosis senilis, 3. Radiation dermatosis, 4. Unclassified. III. Epithelial tumours A. From surface epithelium 1. Spinocellular carcinoma (basic type, anaplastic, adenoid, sarcomatoid, clear cell carcinoma, intraepidermal). 2. Basocellular carcinoma: a) varieties derived from surface epithelium (intraepithelial, superficial, solid, cystic, invasive), b) varieties with adenoid features (cylindromatous, fibroepithelia), c) varieties with trichoepithelial features (keratinizing, pigment-type, clear cell type), d) naevus varieties (basocellular naevi). 3. Spinobasocellular carcinoma. 4. Unclassifiable. B. Sweat gland tumours: 1. syringocystadenoma papilliferum, 2. hidradenoma papillare, 3. nodular hidradenoma (eccrine spiradenoma, eccrine acrospiroma, myxochondroepithelioma, myoepithelioma, mucinous epithelioma), 4. syringoma, 5. eccrine cylindroma, 6. hidrocystoma, 7. eccrine poroma, 8. carcinomas (so called extramammary Paget carcinoma), 9. unclassifiable. C. Sebaceous gland tumours: 1. adenoma sebaceum, 2. carcinoma sebaceum, 3. quasi tumours (naevus sebaceus, Pringle's hamartoma, steatocystoma multiplex, hyperplasia), 4. unclassifiable. D. Trichoepithelial tumours: 1. trichofolliculoma, 2. follicular poroma, 3

  17. Molecular beacon-based quantitiation of epithelial tumor marker mucin 1.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seonmi; Nam, Hye Yeon; Lee, Eun Jeong; Jung, Woong; Hah, Sang Soo

    2012-10-01

    Mucin 1 (Muc1) is a glycoprotein expressed on most epithelial cell surfaces, which has been confirmed as a useful biomarker for the diagnosis of early cancers. In this study, we demonstrate that a quantum dot (QD)-aptamer beacon acts by folding-induced dissociation of a DNA intercalating dye, BOBO-3, in the presence of the target molecules, Muc1. Release of intercalated BOBO-3s from the QD-conjugated aptamers results in a decrease in QD fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-mediated BOBO-3 emission, allowing for label-free Muc1 detection and quantitation. We attain highly specific and wide-range detection (from 50nM to 20μM) of Muc1, suggesting that our QD-aptamer beacon can be a potential alternative to immuno-based assays for Muc1 detection. The detection methodology is expected to be improved for the early diagnosis of different types of epithelial cancers of large populations. PMID:22959521

  18. Biologic therapy for the treatment of malignant common epithelial tumors of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, T C; Ozols, R F; Longo, D L

    1987-10-15

    There are a number of strategies to the treatment of gynecologic tumors that involve the use of biologic agents. Biologic agents may be immunologic in nature and act directly on the tumor or to boost an immune response to the tumor, or they may be nonimmune in nature and directly affect the tumor or a physiologic process on which the tumor depends. Although the potential for these agents in the treatment of all gynecologic tumors is great, most of the data to date have been generated in ovarian cancer. Clinical trials of alpha interferon administered intraperitoneally in patients with small volume ovarian cancer have revealed high response rates with acceptable toxicity. The mechanism of the antitumor effect (i.e., direct tumor killing vs. indirect boosting host immune response) has not yet been determined. Clinical trials of intraperitoneal lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells plus recombinant interleukin-2 have also been started based upon significant antitumor effects noted in xenogeneic systems. The finding that the peritoneal fluid of interferon-treated patients is rich with monocytes and macrophages has led to the development of a clinical trial using intraperitoneal human monocytes activated with recombinant gamma interferon along with gamma interferon. Monoclonal antibodies have already made a significant impact on the diagnosis of ovarian cancer, and are being brought to clinical trial as therapeutic agents. The OC-125 antigen is shed by ovarian tumor cells and its elevation in the serum of patients with undiagnosed pelvic masses is highly predictive for ovarian neoplasia. Furthermore, its persistence in the serum of patients with ovarian cancer during chemotherapy is nearly always associated with persistent disease. A number of monoclonal antibodies specific for ovarian cancer have been developed. Radiolabeled antibodies administered intralymphatically and intraperitoneally may be able to demonstrate the presence of tumor reliably enough to save some

  19. Plasma membrane reorganization induced by tumor promoters in an epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    PACKARD, BEVERLY S.; SAXTON, MICHAEL J.; BISSELL, MINA J.; KLEIN, MELVIN P.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of phorbol ester tumor promoters on the lateral diffusion in plasma membrane lipid environments were examined by the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. To this end, the probe collarein, a fluorescent lipid analog that has the property of exclusive localization in the plasma membrane, was synthesized. Measured decreases in three parameters [percentage of fluorescence bleached (30%), percentage of recovery (52%), and half-time for recovery (52%)] connoted the appearance of an immobile fraction upon exposure to tumor promoters. These data are consistent with lipid reorganization in response to a reorganization of the intra- and perimembranous macromolecular scaffolding upon the interaction of cells with tumor promoters. The idea of induced reorganization is supported by experiments in which cell shape change, brought about by either exposure to cytochalasin B or growth on matrices of collagen, fibronectin, or laminin, resulted in values in the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique similar to those with active phorbol esters.

  20. Stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers are frequently overexpressed in circulating tumor cells of metastatic breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Bahriye; Tewes, Mitra; Fehm, Tanja; Hauch, Siegfried; Kimmig, Rainer; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The persistence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in breast cancer patients might be associated with stem cell like tumor cells which have been suggested to be the active source of metastatic spread in primary tumors. Furthermore, these cells also may undergo phenotypic changes, known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which allows them to travel to the site of metastasis formation without getting affected by conventional treatment. Here we evaluated 226 blood samples of 39 metastatic breast cancer patients during a follow-up of palliative chemo-, antibody – or hormonal therapy for the expression of the stem cell marker ALDH1 and markers for EMT and correlated these findings with the presence of CTC and response to therapy. Methods 2 × 5 ml blood was analyzed for CTC with the AdnaTest BreastCancer (AdnaGen AG) for the detection of EpCAM, MUC-1 and HER2 transcripts. The recovered c-DNA was additionally multiplex tested for three EMT markers [Twist1, Akt2, PI3Kα] and separately for the tumor stem-cell markers ALDH1. The identification of EMT markers was considered positive if at least one marker was detected in the sample. Results 97% of 30 healthy donor samples investigated were negative for EMT and 95% for ALDH1 transcripts. CTC were detected in 69/226 (31%) cancer samples. In the CTC (+) group, 62% were positive for at least one of the EMT markers and 69% for ALDH1, respectively. In the CTC (-) group the percentages were 7% and 14%, respectively. In non-responders, EMT and ALDH1 expression was found in 62% and 44% of patients, in responders the rates were 10% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions Our data indicate that a major proportion of CTC of metastatic breast cancer patients shows EMT and tumor stem cell characteristics. Further studies are needed to prove whether these markers might serve as an indicator for therapy resistant tumor cell populations and, therefore, an inferior prognosis. PMID:19589136

  1. Treatment with the vascular disruptive agent OXi4503 induces an immediate and widespread epithelial to mesenchymal transition in the surviving tumor.

    PubMed

    Fifis, Theodora; Nguyen, Linh; Malcontenti-Wilson, Cathy; Chan, Lie Sam; Nunes Costa, Patricia Luiza; Daruwalla, Jurstine; Nikfarjam, Mehrdad; Muralidharan, Vijayaragavan; Waltham, Mark; Thompson, Erik W; Christophi, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is considered an important mechanism in tumor resistance to drug treatments; however, in vivo observation of this process has been limited. In this study we demonstrated an immediate and widespread EMT involving all surviving tumor cells following treatment of a mouse model of colorectal liver metastases with the vascular disruptive agent OXi4503. EMT was characterized by significant downregulation of E-cadherin, relocation and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin as well as significant upregulation of ZEB1 and vimentin. Concomitantly, significant temporal upregulation in hypoxia and the pro-angiogenic growth factors hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta were seen within the surviving tumor. The process of EMT was transient and by 5 days after treatment tumor cell reversion to epithelial morphology was evident. This reversal, termed mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) is a process implicated in the development of new metastases but has not been observed in vivo histologically. Similar EMT changes were observed in response to other antitumor treatments including chemotherapy, thermal ablation, and antiangiogenic treatments in our mouse colorectal metastasis model and in a murine orthotopic breast cancer model after OXi4503 treatment. These results suggest that EMT may be an early mechanism adopted by tumors in response to injury and hypoxic stress, such that inhibition of EMT in combination with other therapies could play a significant role in future cancer therapy. PMID:24403226

  2. Significance of the NOR1-FOXA1/HDAC2-Slug regulatory network in epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shengnan; Li, Junjun; Li, Guo; Yang, Jianbo; Zheng, Pan; Zhang, Haijing; Xiong, Wei; McCarthy, James B.; Li, Guiyuan; Li, Xiaoling; Xiang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process is believed to play a crucial role in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) progression, a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with the tendency to metastasize early. At present, much attention has been given to the inducer of EMT involved in NPC progression, while antagonists have been less intensively characterized. In this study, unbiased analysis of EMT-associated gene expression patterns was performed using data mining of global gene expression profiles derived from NPC samples, leading to the successful identification of NOR1, FOXA1, and Slug, all of which showed aberrant expression during NPC progression. The effect of tumor suppressor NOR1 on Slug-induced NPC cells during the EMT process was investigated by use of ectopic expression and RNA interference methods. The molecular mechanisms underlying the tumor-suppressing effect of NOR1 on Slug-induced EMT were thought to be dependent on the cooperation of NOR1 with the FOXA1-HDAC2 complex. We also showed that FOXA1 and HDAC2 bind the slug promoter and directly repress its transcription. Our data revealed a previously unrecognized role of the NOR1-FOXA1/HDAC2-Slug network in the regulation of the EMT process and aggressiveness of NPC. PMID:26934447

  3. Significance of the NOR1-FOXA1/HDAC2-Slug regulatory network in epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yi, Mei; Chen, Shengnan; Li, Junjun; Li, Guo; Yang, Jianbo; Zheng, Pan; Zhang, Haijing; Xiong, Wei; McCarthy, James B; Li, Guiyuan; Li, Xiaoling; Xiang, Bo

    2016-03-29

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process is believed to play a crucial role in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) progression, a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with the tendency to metastasize early. At present, much attention has been given to the inducer of EMT involved in NPC progression, while antagonists have been less intensively characterized. In this study, unbiased analysis of EMT-associated gene expression patterns was performed using data mining of global gene expression profiles derived from NPC samples, leading to the successful identification of NOR1, FOXA1, and Slug, all of which showed aberrant expression during NPC progression. The effect of tumor suppressor NOR1 on Slug-induced NPC cells during the EMT process was investigated by use of ectopic expression and RNA interference methods. The molecular mechanisms underlying the tumor-suppressing effect of NOR1 on Slug-induced EMT were thought to be dependent on the cooperation of NOR1 with the FOXA1-HDAC2 complex. We also showed that FOXA1 and HDAC2 bind the slug promoter and directly repress its transcription. Our data revealed a previously unrecognized role of the NOR1-FOXA1/HDAC2-Slug network in the regulation of the EMT process and aggressiveness of NPC. PMID:26934447

  4. YThe BigH3 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Radiation-Induced Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shao, G.; Piao, C.; Hei, T.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequences of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a 7 fold down- regulation of the novel tumor suppressor Big-h3 among radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells Furthermore ectopic re-expression of this gene suppresses tumorigenic phenotype and promotes the sensitivity of these tumor cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line we ectopically expresses the catalytic subunit of telomerase hTERT in primary human small airway epithelial SAE cells and generated several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV nucleon of 56 Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium These findings indicate

  5. Outcomes of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer with integration of metronomic chemotherapy: An Indian rural cancer centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Avinash; Abhay, Desai; Sunny, Jandyal; Vikas, Ostwal; Vijay, Patil; Rajeshri, Kulkarni; Netaji, Patil; Sudeep, Gupta; Banavali, Shripad D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Paclitaxel-platinum and optimal cytoreductive surgery are the standard of care for ovarian carcinoma. Poor socioeconomic profile and therapeutic constraints in rural India poses a therapeutic challenge. Aim: To evaluate outcomes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Objectives: To calculate disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and factors affecting outcomes. Materials and Methods: Data of patients diagnosed as ovarian carcinoma registered between March 2009 and March 2014 were retrieved. Demographic profile, chemotherapy and response, surgery, and disease progression were collected. Patients who underwent surgery or completed three cycles of chemotherapy were selected. Kaplan–Meir survival was used to determine disease-free and OS. Log-rank test used to evaluate factors affecting outcome. Results: Median follow-up is 26 months. 93/102 patients (91%) underwent cytoreductive surgery, of which 37 had primary cytoreduction (40%) while 56 had interval cytoreduction. 21/93 (23%), 57/93 (61%), and 15/93 (16%) patients were operated by local surgeons, surgeons of our hospital, and trained oncosurgeons, respectively. Induction paclitaxel-platinum was used in 35/63 (56%) patients while 28/63 patients (44%) received neoadjuvant metronomic chemotherapy. Median DFS and OS are 17 and 54 months respectively while 3 year OS of 66%. Median DFS of patients operated by oncosurgeons versus local surgeons were 22 months versus 15 months (P = 0.01), OS was 54 versus 26 months (P = 0.01).40/88 (45%) patients received maintenance metronomic therapy after adjuvant chemotherapy with median of 6 months (range 2–18 months). Patients receiving metronomic maintenance had better DFS, 18 months versus 15 months (P = 0.69). Conclusion: Induction therapy in ovarian carcinoma helps in selecting patients for cytoreductive surgery. Outcomes are better if operated by trained oncosurgeons. Maintenance metronomic has potential to delay disease progression. PMID:27275448

  6. EGFR, HER-2 and KRAS in canine gastric epithelial tumors: a potential human model?

    PubMed

    Terragni, Rossella; Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Sabattini, Silvia; Bettini, Giuliano; Amadori, Dino; Talamonti, Chiara; Vignoli, Massimo; Capelli, Laura; Saunders, Jimmy H; Ricci, Marianna; Ricci, Marianna; Ulivi, Paola; Ulivi, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or HER-1) and its analog c-erbB-2 (HER-2) are protein tyrosine kinases correlated with prognosis and response to therapy in a variety of human cancers. KRAS mediates the transduction of signals between EGFR and the nucleus, and its mutation has been identified as a predictor of resistance to anti-EGFR drugs. In human oncology, the importance of the EGFR/HER-2/KRAS signalling pathway in gastric cancer is well established, and HER-2 testing is required before initiating therapy. Conversely, this pathway has never been investigated in canine gastric tumours. A total of 19 canine gastric epithelial neoplasms (5 adenomas and 14 carcinomas) were retrospectively evaluated for EGFR/HER-2 immunohistochemical expression and KRAS mutational status. Five (35.7%) carcinomas were classified as intestinal-type and 9 (64.3%) as diffuse-type. EGFR was overexpressed (≥ 1+) in 8 (42.1%) cases and HER-2 (3+) in 11 (57.9%) cases, regardless of tumour location or biological behaviour. The percentage of EGFR-positive tumours was significantly higher in the intestinal-type (80%) than in the diffuse-type (11.1%, p = 0.023). KRAS gene was wild type in 18 cases, whereas one mucinous carcinoma harboured a point mutation at codon 12 (G12R). EGFR and HER-2 may be promising prognostic and therapeutic targets in canine gastric epithelial neoplasms. The potential presence of KRAS mutation should be taken into account as a possible mechanism of drug resistance. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of dog as a model for human gastric cancer. PMID:24454858

  7. EGFR, HER-2 and KRAS in Canine Gastric Epithelial Tumors: A Potential Human Model?

    PubMed Central

    Bettini, Giuliano; Amadori, Dino; Talamonti, Chiara; Vignoli, Massimo; Capelli, Laura; Saunders, Jimmy H.; Ricci, Marianna; Ulivi, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or HER-1) and its analog c-erbB-2 (HER-2) are protein tyrosine kinases correlated with prognosis and response to therapy in a variety of human cancers. KRAS mediates the transduction of signals between EGFR and the nucleus, and its mutation has been identified as a predictor of resistance to anti-EGFR drugs. In human oncology, the importance of the EGFR/HER-2/KRAS signalling pathway in gastric cancer is well established, and HER-2 testing is required before initiating therapy. Conversely, this pathway has never been investigated in canine gastric tumours. A total of 19 canine gastric epithelial neoplasms (5 adenomas and 14 carcinomas) were retrospectively evaluated for EGFR/HER-2 immunohistochemical expression and KRAS mutational status. Five (35.7%) carcinomas were classified as intestinal-type and 9 (64.3%) as diffuse-type. EGFR was overexpressed (≥1+) in 8 (42.1%) cases and HER-2 (3+) in 11 (57.9%) cases, regardless of tumour location or biological behaviour. The percentage of EGFR-positive tumours was significantly higher in the intestinal-type (80%) than in the diffuse-type (11.1%, p = 0.023). KRAS gene was wild type in 18 cases, whereas one mucinous carcinoma harboured a point mutation at codon 12 (G12R). EGFR and HER-2 may be promising prognostic and therapeutic targets in canine gastric epithelial neoplasms. The potential presence of KRAS mutation should be taken into account as a possible mechanism of drug resistance. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of dog as a model for human gastric cancer. PMID:24454858

  8. [BETA-III TUBULIN AS A POTENTIAL TARGET FOR BLOCKING INVASIVE GROWTH OF MALIGNANT EPITHELIAL TUMORS].

    PubMed

    Portyanko, A S; Akalovich, S T; Doroshenko, T M

    2015-01-01

    Invasive growth is the first step of metastatic cascade in the growth of malignant tumors. The mobility of cells, which is a necessary factor of the invasive growth of malignant tumors, is closely linked to the dynamic structure of cytoskeleton. An important role in cell motility is played by microtubules and actin microfilaments. Microtubules consist of tubulin--a heterodimer comprising α and β subunits, which can be represented by different isotypes. The appearance of beta-III tubulin in a tumor is essential for chemoresistance and prognosis of some tumors in humans. This study focuses on determining the possibility of using beta-III tubulin as a target molecule for the suppression of invasive growth. It is established that blocking of the beta-III tubulin expression in colorectal cancer cells does not affect their viability, but reduces the cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix by 40% for HT-29 (∂ = 0.0044) and by 15% (p = 0.0436) for HCT 116) and produces a four-fold decrease in the invasive activity (p = 0.0000 and 0.0001, respectively). These facts allow considering beta-III tubulin as a target molecule in the development of antitumor drugs. PMID:26591579

  9. ERK and PI3K regulate different aspects of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition of mammary tumor cells induced by truncated MUC1

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Galit; Gaziel, Avital; Wreschner, Daniel H.; Smorodinsky, Nechama I.; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2009-05-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) integrates changes to cell morphology and signaling pathways resulting from modifications to the cell's transcriptional response. Different combinations of stimuli ignite this process in the contexts of development or tumor progression. The human MUC1 gene encodes multiple alternatively spliced forms of a polymorphic oncoprotein that is aberrantly expressed in epithelial malignancies. MUC1 is endowed with various signaling modules and has the potential to mediate proliferative and morphological changes characteristic of the progression of epithelial tumors. The tyrosine-rich cytoplasmic domain and the heavily glycosylated extracellular domain both play a role in MUC1-mediated signal transduction. However, the attribution of function to specific domains of MUC1 is difficult due to the concomitant presence of multiple forms of the protein, which stem from alternative splicing and proteolytic cleavage. Here we show that DA3 mouse mammary tumor cells stably transfected with a truncated genomic fragment of human MUC1 undergo EMT. In their EMT, these cells demonstrate altered [i] morphology, [ii] signaling pathways and [iii] expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Similarly to well characterized human breast cancer cell lines, cells transfected with truncated MUC1 show an ERK-dependent increased spreading on fibronectin, and a PI3K-dependent enhancement of their proliferative rate.

  10. Deletion of cyclooxygenase 2 in mouse mammary epithelial cells delays breast cancer onset through augmentation of type 1 immune responses in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Markosyan, Nune; Chen, Edward P.; Ndong, Victoire N.; Yao, Yubing; Sterner, Christopher J.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Lawson, John A.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Smyth, Emer M.

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) 2, which is associated with >40% of breast cancers, decreases the risk of tumorigenesis and breast cancer recurrence. To study the role of COX-2 in breast cancer, we engineered mice that lack selectively mammary epithelial cell (MEC) COX-2 (COX-2 KOMEC). Compared with wild type (WT), MEC from COX-2 KOMEC mice expressed >90% less COX-2 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein and produced 90% less of the dominant pro-oncogenic COX-2 product, prostaglandin (PG) E2. We confirmed COX-2 as the principle source of PGE2 in MEC treated with selective COX-2 and COX-1 inhibitors. Tumors were induced in mice using medroxyprogesterone acetate and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene. Breast cancer onset was significantly delayed in COX-2 KOMEC compared with WT (P = 0.03), equivalent to the delay following systemic COX-2 inhibition with rofecoxib. Compared with WT, COX-2 KOMEC tumors showed increased mRNA for Caspase-3, Ki-67 and common markers for leukocytes (CD45) and macrophages (F4/80). Analysis of multiple markers/cytokines, namely CD86, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and Tim-3 indicated a shift toward antitumorigenic type 1 immune responses in COX-2 KOMEC tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed elevated expression of CD45, F4/80 and CD86 in COX-2 KOMEC tumors. Concordant with a role for COX-2 in restraining M1 macrophage polarization, CD86 and TNFα expression were offset by exogenous PGE2 in bone marrow-derived macrophages polarized in vitro to the M1 phenotype. Our data reveal the importance of epithelial COX-2 in tumor promotion and indicate that deletion of epithelial COX-2 may skew tumor immunity toward type 1 responses, coincident with delayed tumor development. PMID:21771729

  11. Gene Expression in Wilms’ Tumor Mimics the Earliest Committed Stage in the Metanephric Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chi-Ming; Guo, Meirong; Borczuk, Alain; Powell, Charles A.; Wei, Michelle; Thaker, Harshwardhan M.; Friedman, Richard; Klein, Ulf; Tycko, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    Wilms’ tumor (WT) has been considered a prototype for arrested cellular differentiation in cancer, but previous studies have relied on selected markers. We have now performed an unbiased survey of gene expression in WTs using oligonucleotide microarrays. Statistical criteria identified 357 genes as differentially expressed between WTs and fetal kidneys. This set contained 124 matches to genes on a microarray used by Stuart and colleagues (Stuart RO, Bush KT, Nigam SK: Changes in global gene expression patterns during development and maturation of the rat kidney. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:5649–5654) to establish genes with stage-specific expression in the developing rat kidney. Mapping between the two data sets showed that WTs systematically overexpressed genes corresponding to the earliest stage of metanephric development, and underexpressed genes corresponding to later stages. Automated clustering identified a smaller group of 27 genes that were highly expressed in WTs compared to fetal kidney and heterologous tumor and normal tissues. This signature set was enriched in genes encoding transcription factors. Four of these, PAX2, EYA1, HBF2, and HOXA11, are essential for cell survival and proliferation in early metanephric development, whereas others, including SIX1, MOX1, and SALL2, are predicted to act at this stage. SIX1 and SALL2 proteins were expressed in the condensing mesenchyme in normal human fetal kidneys, but were absent (SIX1) or reduced (SALL2) in cells at other developmental stages. These data imply that the blastema in WTs has progressed to the committed stage in the mesenchymal-epithelial transition, where it is partially arrested in differentiation. The WT-signature set also contained the Wnt receptor FZD7, the tumor antigen PRAME, the imprinted gene NNAT and the metastasis-associated transcription factor E1AF. PMID:12057921

  12. Microsurgical resectability, outcomes, and tumor control in meningiomas occupying the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Thakur, Jai Deep; Sonig, Ashish; Missios, Symeon

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Cavernous sinus meningiomas (CSMs) represent a cohort of challenging skull base tumors. Proper management requires achieving a balance between optimal resection, restoration of cranial nerve (CN) function, and maintaining or improving quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess the pre-, intra-, and postoperative factors related to clinical and neurological outcomes, morbidity, mortality, and tumor control in patients with CSM. METHODS A retrospective review of a single surgeon's experience with microsurgical removal of CSM in 65 patients between January 1996 and August 2013 was done. Sekhar's classification, modified Kobayashi grading, and the Karnofsky Performance Scale were used to define tumor extension, tumor removal, and clinical outcomes, respectively. RESULTS Preoperative CN dysfunction was evident in 64.6% of patients. CN II deficits were most common. The greatest improvement was seen for CN V deficits, whereas CN II and CN IV deficits showed the smallest degree of recovery. Complete resection was achieved in 41.5% of cases and was not significantly associated with functional CN recovery. Internal carotid artery encasement significantly limited the complete microscopic resection of CSM (p < 0.0001). Overall, 18.5% of patients showed symptomatic recurrence after their initial surgery (mean follow-up 60.8 months [range 3-199 months]). The use of adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) after microsurgery independently decreased the recurrence rate (p = 0.009; OR 0.036; 95% CI 0.003-0.430). CONCLUSIONS Modified Kobayashi tumor resection (Grades I-IIIB) was possible in 41.5% of patients. CN recovery and tumor control were independent of extent of tumor removal. The combination of resection and adjuvant SRS can achieve excellent tumor control. Furthermore, the use of adjuvant SRS independently decreases the recurrence rates of CSM. PMID:26745483

  13. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Tumor Volume and Velocity in Predicting Head-and-Neck Cancer Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Karen P.; Murphy, James D.; La, Trang H.; Krakow, Trevor E.; Iagaru, Andrei; Graves, Edward E.; Hsu, Annie; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy; Chang, Daniel T.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We previously showed that metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) predicts for disease recurrence and death in head-and-neck cancer (HNC). We hypothesized that increases in MTV over time would correlate with tumor growth and biology, and would predict outcome. We sought to examine tumor growth over time in serial pretreatment PET-CT scans. Methods and Materials: From 2006 to 2009, 51 patients had two PET-CT scans before receiving HNC treatment. MTV was defined as the tumor volume {>=}50% of maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}). MTV was calculated for the primary tumor, nodal disease, and composite (primary tumor + nodes). MTV and SUV velocity were defined as the change in MTV or SUV{sub max} over time, respectively. Cox regression analyses were used to examine correlations between SUV, MTV velocity, and outcome (disease progression and overall survival). Results: The median follow-up time was 17.5 months. The median time between PET-CT scans was 3 weeks. Unexpectedly, 51% of cases demonstrated a decrease in SUV{sub max} (average, -0.1 cc/week) and MTV (average, -0.3 cc/week) over time. Despite the variability in MTV, primary tumor MTV velocity predicted disease progression (hazard ratio 2.94; p = 0.01) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.85; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Primary tumor MTV velocity appears to be a better prognostic indicator of disease progression and survival in comparison to nodal MTV velocity. However, substantial variability was found in PET-CT biomarkers between serial scans. Caution should be used when PET-CT biomarkers are integrated into clinical protocols for HNC.

  14. A benign salivary gland tumor of minor salivary gland mimicking an epithelial malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vandana; Wadhwan, Vijay; Aggarwal, Pooja; Sharma, Preeti; Reddy, Munish

    2015-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma (PA) is the most common benign tumor of major or minor salivary glands. Microscopically, PA exhibits a great diversity of morphological aspects. Here, we present an unusual case of PA with extensive squamous metaplasia and keratin-filled cysts in the left retromolar region of a 50-year-old edentulous person whose microscopic finding may represent a diagnostic dilemma for pathologists. PMID:26097365

  15. Sustained Akt Activity Is Required to Maintain Cell Viability in Seborrheic Keratosis, a Benign Epithelial Tumor.

    PubMed

    Neel, Victor A; Todorova, Kristina; Wang, Jun; Kwon, Eunjeong; Kang, Minjeong; Liu, Qingsong; Gray, Nathanael; Lee, Sam W; Mandinova, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Seborrheic keratoses (SKs) are common benign skin tumors that share many morphological features with their malignant counterpart, squamous cell carcinoma. SKs frequently have acquired oncogenic mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling cascade. We developed a reliable culture system to study SKs in vitro and screened these cells using a library of selective kinase inhibitors to evaluate effects on cell survival. These benign tumors are sensitive to inhibition by ATP-competitive Akt inhibitors, including A-443654 and GSK690693. RNA interference-mediated Akt suppression mimicked the effects of enzyme inhibition in cultured cells. Akt inhibition suppressed phosphorylation of downstream targets of Akt kinase that are critical for cell survival, including MDM2 and FOXO3a, and induced apoptosis. Cell death was also dependent on p53, mutations in which, although common in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, have not been identified in SKs. Intact explants of SKs were also sensitive to Akt inhibition. In addition to the obvious therapeutic implications of these findings, identifying the signaling characteristics that differentiate benign and malignant tumors may inform our understanding of the malignant state. PMID:26739095

  16. MiR-143 targets CTGF and exerts tumor-suppressing functions in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lufei; He, Jin; Xu, Hongmei; Xu, Longjie; Li, Na

    2016-01-01

    A series of recent studies suggested that miR-143 might involve in the tumorigenesis and metastasis of various cancer types. However, the biological function and underlying mechanisms of miR-143 in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) remain unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the miR-143 expression and its clinical diagnosis significance in patients suffering EOC and to analyze its role and underlying molecular mechanism in EOC. Our result showed that the expression levels of miR-143 were downregulated in EOC tissues and cell lines, was associated with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, pathological grade and lymph node metastasis (all P < 0.01) . Overexpression of miR-143 significantly inhibited EOC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Furthermore, computational algorithm combined with luciferase reporter assays identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) as the direct target of miR-143 in EOC cells. The expression level of CTGF was significantly increased in EOC tissues, was inversely correlated with miR-143 expression in clinical EOC tissues. Knockdown of CTGF mimicked the suppression effect induced by miR-143 overexpression. Restoration of CTGF expression partially reversed the suppression effect induced by miR-143 overexpression. These results suggested that miR-143 inhibited EOC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, at least in part, via suppressing CTGF expression. PMID:27398154

  17. Factors Associated With Outcomes in Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection of Gastric Cardia Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yae Su; Lee, Bong Eun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Park, Do Youn; Jeon, Hye Kyung; Baek, Dong Hoon; Kim, Dong Uk; Song, Geun Am

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tumors of the gastric cardia are among the most technically difficult lesions to remove by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic outcomes of ESD in gastric cardia tumors according to clinicopathologic characteristics, and to assess the predictive factors for incomplete resection. We conducted a retrospective observational study of 82 patients with adenomas and early cancers of the gastric cardia who underwent ESD between January 2006 and December 2013 at the Pusan National University Hospital. Therapeutic outcomes of ESD and procedure-related complications were analyzed. En bloc resection, complete resection, and curative resection rates were 87%, 79%, and 66%, respectively. Deep submucosal invasion was the most common cause of noncurative resection in the cases in which complete resection was achieved. On multivariate analyses, hemispheric distribution (anterior hemisphere; odds ratio [OR] 4.808) and depth of tumor invasion (submucosal cancer; OR 22.056) were independent factors associated with incomplete resection. The rates of procedure-related bleeding, perforation, and stenosis were 6%, 1%, and 0%, respectively; none of the complications required surgical intervention. In conclusion, ESD is a safe, effective, and feasible treatment for gastric cardia tumors. However, the complete resection rate decreases for tumors that are located in the anterior hemisphere or have deep submucosal invasion. PMID:26252277

  18. Altered Expression and Splicing of ESRP1 in Malignant Melanoma Correlates with Epithelial-Mesenchymal Status and Tumor-Associated Immune Cytolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Caballero, Otavia L; Huang, Ying; Lin, Calvin; Rimoldi, Donata; Behren, Andreas; Cebon, Jonathan S; Hung, Mien-Chie; Weinstein, John N; Strausberg, Robert L; Zhao, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Melanoma is one of the major cancer types for which new immune-based cancer treatments have achieved promising results. However, anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 therapies are effective only in some patients. Hence, predictive molecular markers for the development of clinical strategies targeting immune checkpoints are needed. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNAseq data, we found that expression of ESRP1, encoding a master splicing regulator in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), was inversely correlated with tumor-associated immune cytolytic activity. That association holds up across multiple TCGA tumor types, suggesting a link between tumor EMT status and infiltrating lymphocyte activity. In melanoma, ESRP1 mainly exists in a melanocyte-specific truncated form transcribed from exon 13. This was validated by analyzing CCLE cell line data, public CAGE data, and RT-PCR in primary cultured melanoma cell lines. Based on ESRP1 expression, we divided TCGA melanoma cases into ESRP1-low, -truncated, and -full-length groups. ESRP1-truncated tumors comprise approximately two thirds of melanoma samples and reside in an apparent transitional state between epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes. ESRP1 full-length tumors express epithelial markers and constitute about 5% of melanoma samples. In contrast, ESRP1-low tumors express mesenchymal markers and are high in immune cytolytic activity as well as PD-L2 and CTLA-4 expression. Those tumors are associated with better patient survival. Results from our study suggest a path toward the use of ESRP1 and other EMT markers as informative biomarkers for immunotherapy. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 552-61. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27045022

  19. Methylation of tumor suppressor genes in a novel panel predicts clinical outcome in paraffin-embedded bladder tumors.

    PubMed

    García-Baquero, Rodrigo; Puerta, Patricia; Beltran, Manuel; Alvarez-Mújica, Miguel; Alvarez-Ossorio, Jose Luis; Sánchez-Carbayo, Marta

    2014-06-01

    DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) represents a frequent and early epigenetic event with potential applications for cancer detection and disease evolution. Our aim was to examine the stratification and prognostic biomarker role of the methylation of a novel panel of TSGs in bladder cancer. The methylation status of 18 TSGs was evaluated in bladder cancer cells (n=14) and paraffin-embedded primary bladder tumors (n=61), using a methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (MS-MLPA). Recurrence, progression, and disease-specific survival were analyzed using univariate and multivariate Cox models. PRDM2, HLTF, ID4, DLC1, BNIP3, H2AFX, CACNA1G, TGIF, and CACNA1A were discovered methylated in bladder cancer. The methylation of RUNX3 (p=0.026), TWIST1 (p=0.009), SFRP4 (p=0.002), and CCND2 (p=0.027) correlated to tumor stage. Univariate analyses indicated prognostic associations for recurrence (DLC1, SFRP5, H2AFX, CACNA1G), progression (DLC1, SFRP5, CACNA1G), disease-specific (PRDM2, DLC1, SFRP5, CACNA1G, and TIMP3), and overall survival (SFRP5 and TIMP3). In multivariate analyses, several TSGs remained as independent prognosticators for recurrence (SFRP5, H2AFX), progression (CACNA1G), and disease-specific survival (SFRP5). Thus, a novel set of TSGs was identified, frequently methylated in bladder cancer cells and tumors. TSG methylation allowed histopathologic and outcome stratification using paraffin-embedded tumors. This is clinically relevant by offering a strategy for the management of patients affected with uroepithelial neoplasias in pathology routine laboratories. PMID:24577895

  20. Immunostimulatory early phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages does not predict tumor growth outcome in an HLA-DR mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riabov, Vladimir; Kim, David; Chhina, Surmeet; Alexander, Richard B; Klyushnenkova, Elena N

    2015-07-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were shown to support the progression of many solid tumors. However, anti-tumor properties of TAM were also reported in several types of cancer. Here, we investigated the phenotype and functions of TAM in two transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer that display striking differences in tumor growth outcome. Mice expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a self-antigen specifically in prostate (PSAtg mice) rejected PSA-expressing transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) tumors. However, the introduction of HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2b) transgene presenting PSA-derived peptides in a MHC class II-restricted manner exacerbated the growth of TRAMP-PSA tumors in DR2bxPSA F 1 mice. Despite the difference in tumor growth outcome, tumors in both strains were equally and intensively infiltrated by macrophages on the first week after tumor challenge. TAM exhibited mixed M1/M2 polarization and simultaneously produced pro-inflammatory (TNFα, IL1β) and anti-inflammatory (IL10) cytokines. TAM from both mouse strains demonstrated antigen-presenting potential and pronounced immunostimulatory activity. Moreover, they equally induced apoptosis of tumor cells. In vivo depletion of macrophages in DR2bxPSA F 1 but not PSAtg mice aggravated tumor growth suggesting that macrophages more strongly contribute to anti-tumor immunity when specific presentation of PSA to CD4+ T cells is possible. In summary, we conclude that in the early stages of tumor progression, the phenotype and functional properties of TAM did not predict tumor growth outcome in two transgenic prostate cancer models. Furthermore, we demonstrated that during the initial stage of prostate cancer development, TAM have the potential to activate T cell immunity and mediate anti-tumor effects. PMID:25893810

  1. Tissue Reactivity of the 14F7 Mab Raised against N-Glycolyl GM3 Ganglioside in Tumors of Neuroectodermal, Mesodermal, and Epithelial Origin

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Rancés; Quintana, Yisel; Blanco, Damián; Cedeño, Mercedes; Rengifo, Charles E.; Frómeta, Milagros; Ríos, Martha; Rengifo, Enrique; Carr, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    The expression of N-glycolylneuraminic acid forming the structure of gangliosides and/or other glycoconjugates (Hanganutziu-Deicher antigen) in human has been considered as a tumor-associated antigen. Specifically, some reports of 14F7 Mab (a highly specific Mab raised against N-glycolyl GM3 ganglioside) reactivity in human tumors have been recently published. Nevertheless, tumors of epithelial origin have been mostly evaluated. The goal of the present paper was to evaluate the immunohistochemical recognition of 14F7 Mab in different human tumors of neuroectodermal, mesodermal, and epithelial origins using an immunoperoxidase staining method. Samples of fetal, normal, and reactive astrocytosis of the brain were also included in the study. In general, nontumoral tissues, as well as, low-grade brain tumors showed no or a limited immunoreaction with 14F7 Mab. Nevertheless, high-grade astrocytomas (III-IV) and neuroblastomas, as well as, sarcomas and thyroid carcinomas were mostly reactive with 14F7. No reaction was evidenced in medulloblastomas and ependymoblastomas. Our data suggest that the expression of N-glycolyl GM3 ganglioside could be related to the aggressive behavior of malignant cells, without depending on the tumor origin. Our data could also support the possible use of N-glycolyl GM3 as a target for both active and passive immunotherapies of malignancies expressing this molecule. PMID:26317019

  2. EZH2 Inhibition Blocks Multiple Myeloma Cell Growth through Upregulation of Epithelial Tumor Suppressor Genes.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Henar; Gelato, Kathy A; Lesche, Ralf; Beckmann, Georg; Koehr, Silke; Otto, Saskia; Steigemann, Patrick; Stresemann, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by marked heterogeneous genomic instability including frequent genetic alterations in epigenetic enzymes. In particular, the histone methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) is overexpressed in multiple myeloma. EZH2 is the catalytic component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), a master transcriptional regulator of differentiation. EZH2 catalyzes methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 and its deregulation in cancer has been reported to contribute to silencing of tumor suppressor genes, resulting in a more undifferentiated state, and thereby contributing to the multiple myeloma phenotype. In this study, we propose the use of EZH2 inhibitors as a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of multiple myeloma. We demonstrate that EZH2 inhibition causes a global reduction of H3K27me3 in multiple myeloma cells, promoting reexpression of EZH2-repressed tumor suppressor genes in a subset of cell lines. As a result of this transcriptional activation, multiple myeloma cells treated with EZH2 inhibitors become more adherent and less proliferative compared with untreated cells. The antitumor efficacy of EZH2 inhibitors is also confirmed in vivo in a multiple myeloma xenograft model in mice. Together, our data suggest that EZH2 inhibition may provide a new therapy for multiple myeloma treatment and a promising addition to current treatment options. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(2); 287-98. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26590165

  3. Efficacy of pemetrexed-based regimen in relapsed advanced thymic epithelial tumors and its association with thymidylate synthetase level

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xinyu; Song, Zhengbo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Due to the rarity of thymic epithelial tumors (TET), no standard chemotherapy regimen has been identified in the relapsed setting. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of a pemetrexed-based regimen in advanced TET as palliative treatment after failure of previous chemotherapy, and to detect its association with thymidylate synthetase (TS) level. Methods Patients with pathologically confirmed TET and treated with pemetrexed-based regimen were evaluated from 2006 to 2014 in Zhejiang Cancer Hospital. TS mRNA level was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The Kaplan–Meier method was used for survival analysis. Results A total of 22 TET patients were identified, of whom eight had thymoma and 14 had thymic carcinoma. In total, the objective response rate and disease control rate of the 22 patients were 22.7% and 68.2%, respectively. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 4.5 months and 34.9 months, respectively. A trend of lower TS mRNA levels existed in patients with disease control compared to those with progressive disease (268.0±160.5×10−4 vs 567.0±445.0×10−4, P=0.065). Conclusion Patients with advanced TET may benefit from pemetrexed-based regimen therapy. TS mRNA level is valuable for predicting the efficacy of pemetrexed in TET. PMID:27524908

  4. Early Cognitive Outcomes Following Proton Radiation in Pediatric Patients With Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Sethi, Roshan V.; Kuhlthau, Karen A.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To report, from a longitudinal study, cognitive outcome in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT) for central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients receiving PRT for medulloblastoma (38.3%), gliomas (18.3%), craniopharyngioma (15.0%), ependymoma (11.7%), and other CNS tumors (16.7%) were administered age-appropriate measures of cognitive abilities at or near PRT initiation (baseline) and afterward (follow-up). Patients were aged ≥6 years at baseline to ensure consistency in neurocognitive measures. Results: Mean age was 12.3 years at baseline; mean follow-up interval was 2.5 years. Treatment included prior surgical resection (76.7%) and chemotherapy (61.7%). Proton radiation therapy included craniospinal irradiation (46.7%) and partial brain radiation (53.3%). At baseline, mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ was 104.6; means of all 4 Index scores were also in the average range. At follow-up, no significant change was observed in mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ, Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning/Organization, or Working Memory. However, Processing Speed scores declined significantly (mean 5.2 points), with a significantly greater decline for subjects aged <12 years at baseline and those with the highest baseline scores. Cognitive outcome was not significantly related to gender, extent of radiation, radiation dose, tumor location, histology, socioeconomic status, chemotherapy, or history of surgical resection. Conclusions: Early cognitive outcomes after PRT for pediatric CNS tumors are encouraging, compared with published outcomes from photon radiation therapy.

  5. Molecular genetic analysis of VRK1 in mammary epithelial cells: depletion slows proliferation in vitro and tumor growth and metastasis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, T P; Traktman, P

    2013-01-01

    The vaccinia-related kinases (VRKs) comprise a branch of the casein kinase family. VRK1, a ser/thr kinase with a nuclear localization, is the most well-studied paralog and has been described as a proproliferative protein. In lower eukaryotes, a loss of VRK1 activity is associated with severe mitotic and meiotic defects. Mice that are hypomorphic for VRK1 expression are infertile, and depletion of VRK1 in tissue culture cells can impair cell proliferation and alter several signaling pathways. VRK1 has been implicated as part of a ‘gene-expression signature' whose overexpression correlates with poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. We present here our investigation of the role of VRK1 in the growth of normal (MCF10) and malignant (MDA-MB-231) human mammary epithelial cells, and demonstrate that shRNA-mediated depletion of VRK1 slows their proliferation significantly. Conversely, stable overexpression of a FLAG-tagged VRK1 transgene imparts a survival advantage to highly malignant MDA-MB-231 cells under conditions of nutrient and growth factor deprivation. Moreover, in a murine orthotopic xenograft model of breast cancer, we demonstrate that tumors depleted of VRK1 show a 50% reduction in size from 4–13 weeks postengraftment. The incidence and burden of distal metastases in the lungs and brain was also significantly reduced in mice engrafted with VRK1-depleted cells. These studies demonstrate that VRK1 depletion or overexpression has an impact on the proliferation and survival of cell lines derived from normal or malignant mammary tissue, and moreover show that depletion of VRK1 in MDA-MB-231 cells reduces their oncogenic and metastatic properties in vivo. PMID:23732708

  6. Treatment Outcome and Prognostic Molecular Markers of Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Kyu-Won; Han, Jung Woo; Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lyu, Chuhl Joo; Kim, Jun Won; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Background To identify prognostic factors and define the optimal management of patients with supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNETs), we investigated treatment outcomes and explored the prognostic value of specific molecular markers. Methods A total of 47 consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed sPNETs between May 1985 and June 2012 were included. Immunohistochemical analysis of LIN28, OLIG2, and Rad51 expression was performed and correlated with clinical outcome. Results With a median follow-up of 70 months, 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was 55.5% and 40%, respectively, for all patients. Age, surgical extent, and radiotherapy were significant prognostic factors for OS and PFS. Patients who received initially planned multimodal treatment without interruption (i.e., radiotherapy and surgery (≥subtotal resection), with or without chemotherapy) showed significantly higher 5-year OS (71.2%) and PFS (63.1%). In 29 patients with available tumor specimens, tumors with high expression of either LIN28 or OLIG2 or elevated level of Rad51 were significantly associated with poorer prognosis. Conclusions We found that multimodal treatment improved outcomes for sPNET patients, especially when radiotherapy and ≥subtotal resection were part of the treatment regimen. Furthermore, we confirmed the prognostic significance of LIN28 and OLIG2 and revealed the potential role of Rad51 in sPNETs. PMID:27074032

  7. Calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumor (CNSET) of the liver: a newly recognized entity to be considered in the radiologist's differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Lauren R; Shehata, Bahig M; Yin, Julie; Schemankewitz, Erwin; Alazraki, Adina

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumor (CNSET), an extremely rare tumor found in the liver, was first described in 2001 by Ishak et al. The characteristic imaging features include large size, well-circumscribed, enhancing mass with calcification. To our knowledge, since 2001, there have been 29 reported. Typically arising from the right hepatic lobe, it is primarily found in children and shows clear predilection for females. Emphasizing imaging, we report a 14-year-old female with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome who presented with CNSET. PMID:26589005

  8. Clinicopathologic Features and Clinical Outcomes of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Evaluation of a Pooled Case Series.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Liu, Shushang; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in esophagus are limited, because of the relatively rare incidence of esophageal GISTs. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of esophageal GISTs, and to investigate the potential factors that may predict prognosis.Esophageal GIST cases were obtained from our center and from case reports and clinical studies extracted from MEDLINE. Clinicopathologic features and survivals were analyzed and compared with gastric GISTs from our center.The most common location was lower esophagus (86.84%), followed by middle and upper esophagus (11.40% and 1.76%). The majority of esophageal GISTs were classified as high-risk category (70.83%). Mitotic index was correlated with histologic type, mutational status, and tumor size. The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival were 65.1% and 65.9%, respectively. Tumor size, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were associated with prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Only tumor size, however, was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. In comparison to gastric GISTs, the distribution of tumor size, histologic type, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were significantly different between esophageal GISTs and gastric GISTs. The disease-free survival and disease-specific survival of esophageal GISTs were significantly lower than that of gastric GISTs.The most common location for esophageal GISTs was lower esophagus, and most of the esophageal GISTs are high-risk category. Tumor size was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Esophageal GISTs differ significantly from gastric GISTs in respect to clinicopathologic features. The prognosis of esophageal GISTs was worse than that of gastric GISTs. PMID:26765432

  9. Clinical outcomes of systemic therapy for patients with deep fibromatoses (desmoid tumors)

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Veridiana Pires; Keohan, Mary L.; D’Adamo, David R.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Brennan, Murray F.; Singer, Samuel; Ahn, Linda S.; Maki, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We examined outcomes of patients with desmoid tumors receiving systemic therapy at a single institution to provide a basis for examination of newer agents. Methods We reviewed records of patients with desmoid tumors treated with chemotherapy at our institution. The activity of NSAIDs was not addressed. Patients without measurable disease, those receiving therapy we could not document, and those receiving prophylactic therapy were excluded. Results Sixty-eight patients received 157 lines of therapy. Nine patients died, 7 of progressive disease. The cohort was 62% female with median age 32.5, 32% with Gardner syndrome, median follow-up 63 months, and median of 2 lines of therapy. Intra-abdominal primary location was most common (44%). The greatest RECIST response rate was observed with anthracyclines and hormonal therapy and lowest with single agent dacarbazine/temozolomide or tyrosine kinase inhibitors, principally imatinib. In a multivariate analysis, only nodular gross morphology and presence of Gardner syndrome were the only tumor factors associated with greater time to progression. Conclusions Anti-estrogens and anthracycline-containing regimens are associated with a higher radiological response rate against desmoid tumors than other agents. Systemic therapy for desmoid tumors can be successful in patients with desmoids, and is a viable option in lieu of morbid or disabling surgery. PMID:20187095

  10. Surgical treatment outcomes of patients with bilateral warthin tumors in the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2014-01-01

    We describe the treatment outcomes of patients with bilateral Warthin tumors in the parotid gland according to surgical methods. The medical records of ten patients with bilateral Warthin tumors in the parotid gland who underwent surgery between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Ten patients were included in the study and 13 parotidectomies were performed. Patients with bilateral Warthin tumors in the parotid gland were divided into three groups according to the surgical methods used to treat these individuals. In group 1, the patients were closely observed without undergoing contralateral parotidectomy after unilateral parotidectomy. In group 2, the patients underwent concurrent bilateral parotidectomies. In group 3, the patient underwent contralateral parotidectomy 2 months after unilateral parotidectomy was performed. The overall rate of transient facial nerve dysfunction was 31%. Our findings suggest that concurrent superficial parotidectomy may be an appropriate method for treating bilateral Warthin tumors in the parotid gland, at least for desired patients. The symptoms of this type of tumor and physical examination findings are frequently non-specific and present in the unilateral parotid gland. Therefore, a high degree of discernment is needed and imaging techniques are essential for the determining the correct pre-operative diagnosis. PMID:24533403

  11. Gamma knife radiosurgery of radiation-induced intracranial tumors: Local control, outcomes, and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Ashley W.; Brown, Paul D.; Pollock, Bruce E.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.; Gorman, Deborah A.; Schomberg, Paula J.

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To determine local control (LC) and complication rates for patients who underwent radiosurgery for radiation-induced intracranial tumors. Methods and Materials: Review of a prospectively maintained database (2,714 patients) identified 16 patients (20 tumors) with radiation-induced tumors treated with radiosurgery between 1990 and 2004. Tumor types included typical meningioma (n = 17), atypical meningioma (n = 2), and schwannoma (n 1). Median patient age at radiosurgery was 47.5 years (range, 27-70 years). The median tumor margin dose was 16 Gy (range, 12-20 Gy). Median follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 10.8-146.2 months). Time-to-event outcomes were calculated with Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: Three-year and 5-year LC rates were 100%. Three-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 92% and 80%, respectively. Cause-specific survival rates at 3 and 5 years were 100%. Three patients died: 1 had in-field progression 65.1 months after radiosurgery and later died of the tumor, 1 died of progression of a preexisting brain malignancy, and 1 died of an unrelated cause. One patient had increased seizure activity that correlated with development of edema seen on neuroimaging. Conclusions: LC, survival, and complication rates in our series are comparable to those in previous reports of radiosurgery for intracranial meningiomas. Also, LC rates with radiosurgery are at least comparable to those of surgical series for radiation-induced meningiomas. Radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for radiation-induced intracranial tumors, most of which are typical meningiomas.

  12. Origin of craniopharyngiomas: implications for growth pattern, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of tumor recurrence.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yun; Pan, Jun; Qi, Song-Tao; Lu, Yun-Tao; Peng, Jun-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Craniopharyngiomas are associated with a high rate of recurrence. The surgical management of recurrent lesions has been among the most challenging neurosurgical procedures because of the craniopharyngioma's complex topographical relationship with surrounding structures. The aim of this study was to define the determinative role of the site of origin on the growth pattern and clinical features of recurrent craniopharyngiomas. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 52 patients who had undergone uniform treatment by a single surgeon. For each patient, data concerning symptoms and signs, imaging features, hypothalamic-pituitary function, and recurrence-free survival rate were collected. RESULTS For children, delayed puberty was more frequent in the group with Type I (infradiaphragmatic) craniopharyngioma than in the group with Type TS (tuberoinfundibular and suprasellar extraventricular) lesions (p < 0.05). For adults, blindness was more frequent in the Type I group than in the Type TS group (p < 0.05). Nausea or vomiting, delayed puberty, and growth retardation were more frequent in children than in adults (p < 0.05). Overall clinical outcome was good in 48.07% of the patients and poor in 51.92%. Patients with Type TS recurrent tumors had significantly worse functional outcomes and hypothalamic function than patients with the Type I recurrent tumors but better pituitary function especially in children. CONCLUSIONS The origin of recurrent craniopharyngiomas significantly affected the symptoms, signs, functional outcomes, and hypothalamic-pituitary functions of patients undergoing repeated surgery. Differences in tumor growth patterns and site of origin should be considered when one is comparing outcomes and survival across treatment paradigms in patients with recurrent craniopharyngiomas. PMID:26654183

  13. Gene Knockdown by EpCAM Aptamer-siRNA Chimeras Suppresses Epithelial Breast Cancers and Their Tumor-Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Gilboa-Geffen, Adi; Hamar, Peter; Le, Minh T N; Wheeler, Lee Adam; Trifonova, Radiana; Petrocca, Fabio; Wittrup, Anders; Lieberman, Judy

    2015-10-01

    Effective therapeutic strategies for in vivo siRNA delivery to knockdown genes in cells outside the liver are needed to harness RNA interference for treating cancer. EpCAM is a tumor-associated antigen highly expressed on common epithelial cancers and their tumor-initiating cells (TIC, also known as cancer stem cells). Here, we show that aptamer-siRNA chimeras (AsiC, an EpCAM aptamer linked to an siRNA sense strand and annealed to the siRNA antisense strand) are selectively taken up and knock down gene expression in EpCAM(+) cancer cells in vitro and in human cancer biopsy tissues. PLK1 EpCAM-AsiCs inhibit colony and mammosphere formation (in vitro TIC assays) and tumor initiation by EpCAM(+) luminal and basal-A triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines, but not EpCAM(-) mesenchymal basal-B TNBCs, in nude mice. Subcutaneously administered EpCAM-AsiCs concentrate in EpCAM(+) Her2(+) and TNBC tumors and suppress their growth. Thus, EpCAM-AsiCs provide an attractive approach for treating epithelial cancer. PMID:26264278

  14. Normal and tumor-derived myoepithelial cells differ in their ability to interact with luminal breast epithelial cells for polarity and basement membrane deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Villadsen, Rene; Rank, Fritz; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2001-10-04

    The signals that determine the correct polarity of breast epithelial structures in vivo are not understood. We have shown previously that luminal epithelial cells can be polarized when cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane gel. We reasoned that such cues in vivo may be given by myoepithelial cells. Accordingly, we used an assay where luminal epithelial cells are incorrectly polarized to test this hypothesis. We show that culturing human primary luminal epithelial cells within collagen-I gels leads to formation of structures with no lumina and with reverse polarity as judged by dual stainings for sialomucin, epithelial specific antigen or occludin. No basement membrane is deposited, and {beta}4-integrin staining is negative. Addition of purified human myoepithelial cells isolated from normal glands corrects the inverse polarity, and leads to formation of double-layered acini with central lumina. Among the laminins present in the human breast basement membrane (laminin-1, -5 and -10/11), laminin-1 was unique in its ability to substitute for myoepithelial cells in polarity reversal. Myoepithelial cells were purified also from four different breast cancer sources including a biphasic cell line. Three out of four samples either totally lacked the ability to interact with luminal epithelial cells, or conveyed only correction of polarity in a fraction of acini. This behavior was directly related to the ability of the tumor myoepithelial cells to produce {alpha}-1 chain of laminin. In vivo, breast carcinomas were either negative for laminin-1 (7/12 biopsies) or showed a focal, fragmented deposition of a less intensely stained basement membrane (5/12 biopsies). Dual staining with myoepithelial markers revealed that tumorassociated myoepithelial cells were either negative or weakly positive for expression of laminin-1, establishing a strong correlation between loss of laminin-1 and breast cancer. We conclude that the double-layered breast acinus may be

  15. Abnormal Localization and Tumor Suppressor Function of Epithelial Tissue-Specific Transcription Factor ESE3 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xing, Jie; Cheng, Rui; Shao, Ying; Li, Peng; Zhu, Shengtao; Zhang, Shutian

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common malignant cancers worldwide. The molecular mechanism of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is still poorly understood. ESE3 is a member of the Ets transcription family, which is only expressed in epithelial tissues and acts as a tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer. Our study aim was to confirm whether ESE3 is involved in the carcinogenesis of ESCC. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that ESE3 was mainly located in cell nuclei of normal tissues and the cytoplasm in ESCC tissues. Immunofluorescence and western blot analyses of the normal esophageal cell line HEEpiC and ESCC cell lines EC9706 TE-1, KYSE150, and KYSE410 confirmed these results. pEGFP-ESE3 and pcDNA3.1-V5/HisA-ESE3 plasmids were constructed for overexpression of ESE3 in EC9706 and KYSE150 cells. The stably transfected cells showed restoration of the nuclear localization of ESE3. EC9706 cells with re-localization of ESE3 to the nucleus showed inhibition of proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion. To explore the possible mechanism of the differences in localization of ESE3 in normal esophageal cells and ESCC cells, ESCC cell lines were treated with the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B, transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, PKC inhibitor sphinganine, P38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190, and CK II inhibitor TBCA. These reagents were chosen according to the well-known mechanisms of protein translocation. However, the localization of ESE3 was unchanged after these treatments. The sequence of ESE3 cDNA in ESCC cells was identical to the standard sequence of ESE3 in the NCBI Genebank database, indicating that there was no mutation in the coding region of ESE3 in ESCC. Taken together, our study suggests that ESE3 plays an important role in the carcinogenesis of ESCC through changes in subcellular localization and may act as a tumor suppressor gene in ESCC, although the mechanisms require further study. PMID:25950810

  16. Neuroblastoma patient outcomes, tumor differentiation, and ERK activation are correlated with expression levels of the ubiquitin ligase UBE4B

    PubMed Central

    Woodfield, Sarah E.; Guo, Rong Jun; Liu, Yin; Major, Angela M.; Hollingsworth, Emporia Faith; Indiviglio, Sandra; Whittle, Sarah B.; Mo, Qianxing; Bean, Andrew J.; Ittmann, Michael; Lopez-Terrada, Dolores; Zage, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Background UBE4B is an E3/E4 ubiquitin ligase whose gene is located in chromosome 1p36.22. We analyzed the associations of UBE4B gene and protein expression with neuroblastoma patient outcomes and with tumor prognostic features and histology. Methods We evaluated the association of UBE4B gene expression with neuroblastoma patient outcomes using the R2 Platform. We screened neuroblastoma tumor samples for UBE4B protein expression using immunohistochemistry. FISH for UBE4B and 1p36 deletion was performed on tumor samples. We then evaluated UBE4B expression for associations with prognostic factors and with levels of phosphorylated ERK in neuroblastoma tumors and cell lines. Results Low UBE4B gene expression is associated with poor outcomes in patients with neuroblastoma and with worse outcomes in all patient subgroups. UBE4B protein expression was associated with neuroblastoma tumor differentiation, and decreased UBE4B protein levels were associated with high-risk features. UBE4B protein levels were also associated with levels of phosphorylated ERK. Conclusions We have demonstrated associations between UBE4B gene expression and neuroblastoma patient outcomes and prognostic features. Reduced UBE4B protein expression in neuroblastoma tumors was associated with high-risk features, a lack of differentiation, and with ERK activation. These results suggest UBE4B may contribute to the poor prognosis of neuroblastoma tumors with 1p36 deletions and that UBE4B expression may mediate neuroblastoma differentiation. PMID:27014418

  17. Galectin-1 Upregulates CXCR4 to Promote Tumor Progression and Poor Outcome in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chang-Shuo; Tang, Shye-Jye; Chung, Ling-Yen; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Ho, Jar-Yi; Cha, Tai-Lung; Hsieh, Chii-Cheng; Wang, Hsiao-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-1, a β-galactoside–binding lectin, is involved in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including cell adhesion, differentiation, angiogenesis, and tumor progression. However, the role of galectin-1 in kidney cancer remains elusive. This study evaluated the role of galectin-1 in the progression and clinical prognosis of renal cell carcinoma. We found significant overexpression of galectin-1 in both kidney cancer cell lines and metastatic tissue specimens from patients with renal cell carcinoma. Knockdown of galectin-1 gene expression in renal cancer cell lines reduced cell invasion, clonogenic ability, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vitro; reduced tumor outgrowth in vivo; and inhibited the angiogenesis-inducing activity of these cells in vitro and in vivo. Galectin-1 knockdown decreased CXCR4 expression levels in kidney cancer cells, and restoration of CXCR4 expression in galectin-1–silenced cells rescued cell motility and clonogenic ability. Additional studies suggested that galectin-1 induced CXCR4 expression through activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Analysis of patient specimens confirmed the clinical significance and positive correlation between galectin-1 and CXCR4 expression levels and revealed concomitant overexpression of galectin-1 and CXCR4 associated adversely with overall and disease-free survival. Our findings suggest that galectin-1 promotes tumor progression through upregulation of CXCR4 via NF-κB. The coordinated upregulation of galectin-1 and CXCR4 may be a novel prognostic factor for survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma and the galectin-1-CXCR4 axis may serve as a therapeutic target in this disease. PMID:24511119

  18. A favorable role of prolactin in human breast cancer reveals novel pathway-based gene signatures indicative of tumor differentiation and favorable patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Hachim, Ibrahim Y; Shams, Anwar; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques; Ali, Suhad

    2016-07-01

    Prolactin (PRL) hormone is known to play a key role in mammary gland development allowing for successful lactation. The role of this hormone in breast tumorigenesis is still controversial. Here, we evaluated PRL protein and gene expression levels in human breast cancer using tissue microarray of 100 breast cancer cases, as well as different publically available human breast cancer gene profiling databases. Interestingly, our results showed a significant downregulation of PRL expression in breast cancer compared to normal adjacent tissue. Moreover, expression of PRL was associated with more differentiated tumors, early stage, smaller tumor size and absence of distant metastasis. Importantly, our results indicate that higher PRL mRNA levels are significantly associated with prolonged relapse-free survival (RFS) in breast cancer patients (P=3.7 x 10(-9)). Additionally, examining expression of PRL pathway-based gene signature composed of PRL, PRLR, Jak2 and Stat5a showed a significant association with more differentiated tumors (P<.00001), prolonged RFS (P=1.8 x 10(-6)) as well as overall survival (OS) (P=.0026). As well, our results indicate that PRL-directed differentiation program in mammary epithelial cells offer good prognosis in human breast cancer. Indeed, expression of a gene signature composed of PRL-upregulated genes showed a significant association with well-differentiated tumors (P<.00001). Whereas expression of a gene signature composed of PRL-downregulated genes showed a significant association with shortened distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (P=.0086). Altogether our results highlight that PRL hormone and its signaling pathway may play an important role in maintaining tumor differentiation state and in turn better patient outcome. PMID:26980025

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brainstem metastases: Survival, tumor control, and patient outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Aamir; Brown, Paul D. . E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.; Pollock, Bruce E.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Patients with brainstem metastases have limited treatment options. In this study, we reviewed outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of patients with brainstem metastases. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed of 22 consecutive patients presenting with brainstem metastases who underwent SRS. The most frequent primary malignancy was the lung (n = 11), followed by breast (n = 3) and kidney (n = 2). Three patients (14%) also underwent whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). The median tumor volume was 0.9 mL (range, 0.1-3.3 mL); the median tumor margin dose was 16 Gy (range, 14-23 Gy). Results: Median survival time after SRS was 8.5 months. Although local tumor control was achieved in all patients with imaging follow-up (n = 19), 5 patients died from development and progression of new brain metastases. Two patients (9%) had symptom improvement after SRS, whereas 1 patient (5%) developed a new hemiparesis after SRS. Conclusions: Radiosurgery is safe and provides a high local tumor control rate for patients with small brainstem metastases. Patients with limited systemic disease and good performance status should be strongly considered for SRS.

  20. Acute phase response induced following tumor treatment by photodynamic therapy: relevance for the therapy outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush; Stott, Brandon; Cecic, Ivana; Payne, Peter; Sun, Jinghai

    2006-02-01

    Acute phase response is an effector process orchestrated by the innate immune system for the optimal mobilization of the resources of the organism distant from the local insult site needed in the execution of a host-protecting reaction. Our research has shown that mice bearing tumors treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) exhibit the three major hallmarks of acute phase response: release of acute phase reactants, neutrophilia, and pituitary/adrenal axis activation. Of particular interest in this study were acute phase proteins that have a pivotal role in the clearance of dead cells, since the occurrence of this process in PDT-treated tumors emerges as a critical event in the course of PDT-associated host response. It is shown that this type of acute phase reactants, including complement proteins (C3, C5, C9, mannose-binding lectin, and ficolin A) and related pentraxins (serum amyloid P component and PTX3), are upregulated following tumor PDT and accumulate in the targeted lesions. Based on the recently accumulated experimental evidence it is definitely established that the acute phase response is manifested in the hosts bearing PDT-treated tumors and it is becoming clear that this effector process is an important element of PDT-associated host response bearing in impact on the eventual outcome of this therapy.

  1. Long-Term Outcomes after Endoscopic Treatment of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of gastric subepithelial tumors (SETs) has several advantages over biopsy techniques, such as superior diagnostic yield and definite diagnosis. Removal of gastric SETs and histopathologic confirmation should be considered whenever gastric SETs are highly suspected to have malignant potential such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) or neuroendocrine tumor. According to our clinical experience, we suggest that endoscopic resection of gastric SETs is feasible for GISTs less than 3.0 cm without positive endoscopic ultrasonography findings or for hypoechoic SETs less than 3.0 cm. However, serious complications such as macroperforation may occur during endoscopic resection, and this procedure is highly dependent on endoscopists’ skills. We recently reported the long-term clinical outcomes of endoscopic resection of gastric GIST, which showed a relatively low recurrence rate (2.2%) during long-term follow-up (46.0±28.5 months) despite the low R0 resection rate (25.0%). We suggest that endoscopic surveillance might be possible without additional surgical resection in completely resected GISTs without residual tumor confirmed to be lower risk, even if they show an R1 resection margin. PMID:27196737

  2. Validation that Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chad; Murphy, James D.; Khong, Brian; La, Trang H.; Kong, Christina; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Iagaru, Andrei H.; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We have previously reported that metabolic tumor volume (MTV) obtained from pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxydeglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/ computed tomography (CT) predicted outcome in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). The purpose of this study was to validate these results on an independent dataset, determine whether the primary tumor or nodal MTV drives this correlation, and explore the interaction with p16{sup INK4a} status as a surrogate marker for human papillomavirus (HPV). Methods and Materials: The validation dataset in this study included 83 patients with squamous cell HNC who had a FDG PET/CT scan before receiving definitive radiotherapy. MTV and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) were calculated for the primary tumor, the involved nodes, and the combination of both. The primary endpoint was to validate that MTV predicted progression-free survival and overall survival. Secondary analyses included determining the prognostic utility of primary tumor vs. nodal MTV. Results: Similarly to our prior findings, an increase in total MTV of 17 cm{sup 3} (difference between the 75th and 25th percentiles) was associated with a 2.1-fold increase in the risk of disease progression (p = 0.0002) and a 2.0-fold increase in the risk of death (p = 0.0048). SUV{sub max} was not associated with either outcome. Primary tumor MTV predicted progression-free (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.94; p < 0.0001) and overall (HR = 1.57; p < 0.0001) survival, whereas nodal MTV did not. In addition, MTV predicted progression-free (HR = 4.23; p < 0.0001) and overall (HR = 3.21; p = 0.0029) survival in patients with p16{sup INK4a}-positive oropharyngeal cancer. Conclusions: This study validates our previous findings that MTV independently predicts outcomes in HNC. MTV should be considered as a potential risk-stratifying biomarker in future studies of HNC.

  3. Overexpression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor in breast cancer cells induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eunhye; Kim, Ji Young; Cho, Youngkwan; An, Hyunsook; Lee, Nahyun; Jo, Hunho; Ban, Changill; Seo, Jae Hong

    2016-06-01

    The angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1) has been implicated in diverse aspects of human disease, from the regulation of blood pressure and cardiovascular homeostasis to cancer progression. We sought to investigate the role of AGTR1 in cell proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), migration, invasion, angiogenesis and tumor growth in the breast cancer cell line MCF7. Stable overexpression of AGTR1 was associated with accelerated cell proliferation, concomitant with increased expression of survival factors including poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. AGTR1-overexpressing MCF7 cells were more aggressive than their parent line, with significantly increased activity in migration and invasion assays. These observations were associated with changes in EMT markers, including reduced E-cadherin expression and increased p-Smad3, Smad4 and Snail levels. Treatment with the AGTR1 antagonist losartan attenuated these effects. AGTR1 overexpression also accelerated tumor growth and increased Ki-67 expression in a xenograft model. This was associated with increased tumor angiogenesis, as evidenced by a significant increase in microvessels in the intratumoral and peritumoral areas, and enhanced tumor invasion, with the latter response associated with increased EMT marker expression and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) upregulation. In vivo administration of losartan significantly reduced both tumor growth and angiogenesis. Our findings suggest that AGTR1 plays a significant role in tumor aggressiveness, and its inhibition may have therapeutic implications. PMID:26975580

  4. Niclosamide inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor growth in lapatinib-resistant human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junjun; Chen, Xiaosong; Ward, Toby; Mao, Yan; Bockhorn, Jessica; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Gen; Pegram, Mark; Shen, Kunwei

    2016-02-01

    Acquired resistance to lapatinib, a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 kinase inhibitor, remains a clinical problem for women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive advanced breast cancer, as metastasis is commonly observed in these patients. Niclosamide, an anti-helminthic agent, has recently been shown to exhibit cytotoxicity to tumor cells with stem-like characteristics. This study was designed to identify the mechanisms underlying lapatinib resistance and to determine whether niclosamide inhibits lapatinib resistance by reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Here, two human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer cell lines, SKBR3 and BT474, were exposed to increasing concentrations of lapatinib to establish lapatinib-resistant cultures. Lapatinib-resistant SKBR3 and BT474 cells exhibited up-regulation of the phenotypic epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers Snail, vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin, accompanied by activation of nuclear factor-кB and Src and a concomitant increase in stem cell marker expression (CD44(high)/CD24(low)), compared to naive lapatinib-sensitive SKBR3 and BT474 cells, respectively. Interestingly, niclosamide reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition, induced apoptosis and inhibited cell growth by perturbing aberrant signaling pathway activation in lapatinib-resistant human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive cells. The ability of niclosamide to alleviate stem-like phenotype development and invasion was confirmed. Collectively, our results demonstrate that lapatinib resistance correlates with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and that niclosamide inhibits lapatinib-resistant cell viability and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. These findings suggest a role of niclosamide or derivatives optimized for more favorable bioavailability not only in reversing lapatinib resistance but also in reducing metastatic potential during the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor

  5. Long-Term Outcomes of Sacrococcygeal Germ Cell Tumors in Infancy and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Niramis, Rangsan; Anuntkosol, Maitree; Buranakitjaroen, Veera; Tongsin, Achariya; Mahatharadol, Varaporn; Poocharoen, Wannisa; La-orwong, Suranetr; Tiansri, Kulsiri

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term outcomes of sacrococcygeal germ cell tumors (SC-GCTs) over a 15-year period. Materials and Methods. A retrospective review was conducted of all pediatric patients treated for SC-GCTs at our hospital from 1998 to 2012. Results. Fifty-seven patients were treated for SC-GCTs with the most common in Altman's classification type I. Age at surgery ranged from one day to 5.6 years. Tumor resection and coccygectomy were primarily performed in about 84% of the cases. Pathology revealed mature, immature, malignant sacrococcygeal teratomas (SCTs), and endodermal sinus tumors (ESTs) in 41 (72%), 4 (77%), 6 (10.5%), and 6 (10.5%), respectively. Recurrence of discase occurred in 3 of 41 patients with mature teratomas (7.3%); 2 recurrences with mature teratomas and one recurrence with EST. Five of 6 malignant SCTs and 3 of 6 ESTs responded well to the treatment. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level was elevated in both malignant teratomas and ESTs. No immediate patient death was noted in any of the 57 cases, but 4 patients with malignant tumors and distant metastasis succumbed at home within 2 years of the initial treatment. Conclusion. Benign SCTs have a significant recurrence rate of approximately 7%. Close follow-up with serial AFP level monitoring should be done for 5 years after initial tumor resection and coccygectomy. The survival rate for malignant SC-GCTs with distant metastasis was unfavorable in the present study. PMID:26504900

  6. ED-27CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND LONG-TERM OUTCOME IN MOVEMENT DISORDER IN CHILDHOOD THALAMIC TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Sadighi, Zsila; Zabrowski, Jennifer; Broniscer, Alberto; Gajjar, Amar; Khan, Raja

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical observations of children with thalamic tumors and secondary movement disorders (MD) suggest correlation between anatomical location and treatment modalities to severity of MD. METHODS: We conducted an IRB approved retrospective review of patients ≤ 18 years old with thalamic tumors and MD at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital from 1996-2013. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was reviewed and thalamic nuclei involved with tumor and/or surgical site were documented. MD severity was rated with Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS); Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale (ESRS), which scores 0 (absent) to 6 (extremely severe); and Clinical Global Impression of Severity for dystonia and dyskinesia (CGI-S), which scores 0 (absent) to 8 (extremely severe). RESULTS: We reviewed 83 patients with thalamic with 9 confirmed MD by neurological evaluation. Median age at tumor diagnosis was 7 years old (3 months-11 years), median age at MD onset was 7 years old (18 months-11 years). Types of MD found were postural tremor (7), ballismus (4), myoclonus (1), and athetosis (4). Median time to last follow-up was 3 years. 8 patients had onset of MD median of 1.5 months (0-4 months) time after surgical intervention. Initial median KPS was 80 (60-90) and at last follow-up was 80 (50-90). Initial median ESRS was 5 (3-8) and at last follow-up was 5 (0-5). Initial median CGI-S was 5 (3-6) and at last follow-up was 4 (0-6). Based on these severity scales, 2 patients showed no change, 1 patient worsened, 1 patient completely resolved, and 4 patients had improvement regardless of initial extent of surgery or number of nuclei involved. CONCLUSION: This retrospective analysis compares thalamic tumor anatomical locations and treatment intervention with respect to movement disorder clinical characteristics and outcomes. Extent of location and surgical intervention did not correlate to severity and will be included in final presentation.

  7. Curcumin inhibits tumor epithelial-mesenchymal transition by downregulating the Wnt signaling pathway and upregulating NKD2 expression in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZEWEI; CHEN, HAITAO; XU, CHAO; SONG, LU; HUANG, LULU; LAI, YUEBIAO; WANG, YUQI; CHEN, HANLU; GU, DANLIN; REN, LILI; YAO, QINGHUA

    2016-01-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis are closely associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT refers to epithelial cells under physiological and pathological conditions that are specific to mesenchymal transition. Curcumin inhibits EMT progression via Wnt signaling. The Wnt signaling pathway is a conservative EMT-related signaling pathway that is involved in the development of various tumors. In the present study, MTS assays were employed to analyze the proliferation of curcumin-treated cells. Naked cuticle homolog 2 (NKD2), chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and antibodies associated with EMT were examined in SW620 colorectal cancer cell lines using western blot analysis and real-time qPCR. NKD2 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and CXCR4 expression plasmid was synthesized and transfected into the colorectal cancer cell lines, and NKD2 and CXCR4 expression levels were detected. The results showed that curcumin significantly inhibited the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells and upregulated the expression of NKD2 in SW620 colorectal cancer cells and in the xenograft, resulting in the downregulation of key markers in the Wnt signaling. In addition, the progression of ETM was inhibited due to the overexpression of E-cadherin as well as the downregulation of vimentin. Curcumin also inhibited tumor metastasis by downregulating the expression of CXCR4 significantly. The results suggested involvement of the NKD2-Wnt-CXCR4 signaling pathway in colorectal cancer cells. In addition, curcumin is inhibit this signaling and the development of colorectal cancer. PMID:26985708

  8. Fibroblasts induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition in breast tumor cells which is prevented by fibroblasts treatment with histamine in high concentration.

    PubMed

    Porretti, Juliana C; Mohamad, Nora A; Martín, Gabriela A; Cricco, Graciela P

    2014-06-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells is an essential process in cancer progression. Cancer cells that undergone EMT loose cell-cell contacts, acquire mesenchymal properties and develop migratory and invasive abilities. In previous studies we have demonstrated that histamine may modify the invasive phenotype of pancreatic and mammary tumor cells. In this work we proposed to investigate whether histamine may also influence the interaction between tumor cells and normal fibroblasts. The potential activation of normal CCD-1059Sk fibroblasts by histamine and EMT phenotypic changes induced in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells by the conditioned media (CM) derived from fibroblasts were evaluated. Initially, we determined the presence of H1, H2 and H4 histamine receptors and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) mRNA in CCD-1059Sk fibroblasts. MMP2 gelatinolytic activity, cell migration and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression were increased in fibroblasts by low doses (<1μM) and decreased by high doses (20μM) of histamine. MCF-7 cells cultured with CM from fibroblasts exhibited spindle-shaped morphology, cell spreading and cytoplasmic expression of β-catenin but there was no change in MMP2 activity and cell migration. MDA-MB-231 cells cultured with CM from fibroblasts showed a more elongated phenotype, cell spreading, cytoplasmic β-catenin, increased MMP2 activity and endogenous TGF-β1 expression, and enhanced cell migration and invasion. Notably, all these features were reversed when mammary tumor cells were cultured with CM from fibroblasts treated with 20μM histamine. In conclusion, high doses of histamine may prevent the activation of fibroblasts and also avert the EMT related changes induced in epithelial tumor cells by fibroblasts CM. PMID:24685678

  9. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Pediatric Patients with Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bent, Melissa A.; Padilla, Benjamin E.; Goldsby, Robert E.; DuBois, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy that typically affects pediatric and young adult patients. There are limited data on the clinical features of pediatric DSRCT. We selected patients aged 0-21 years reported to the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program from 1991-2011. We estimated overall survival using Kaplan-Meier approaches and compared outcomes using the log rank test. The median age of the 95 pediatric patients was 15.3 years (range: 0-21). The majority of tumors originated in the abdomen and pelvis (84.4%) and the majority of patients had distant metastasis (72.6%). A minority of patients received radiation (34%). Overall survival at 5 years was poor (18.1%; 95% confidence interval 10.1-27.9%). Radiation therapy was associated with superior survival. Pediatric patients with DSRCT have significant disease burden. Outcomes for children are poor, though patients selected for radiation appear to have improved survival. PMID:27134714

  10. Prognostic stratification of thymic epithelial tumors based on both Masaoka-Koga stage and WHO classification systems

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Geun Dong; Choi, Se Hoon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Dong Kwan; Park, Seung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to stratify the risk of recurrence based on the Masaoka-Koga stage and World Health Organization (WHO) classification systems after R0-resection for thymic epithelial tumors (TETs). Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on 479 patients who underwent surgery between Jan 1994 and Feb 2014 for TETs. The study group comprised 251 males and 228 females, with a median age of 52 years (range, 15–84 years). Results Of the 479 patients, 406 (84.8%) patients underwent R0-resection. Recurrence after R0-resection occurred in 32 patients during a median follow-up of 53 months (range, 2–227 months). A multivariate analysis revealed that the preoperative treatment including chemotherapy (P=0.036), Masaoka-Koga stage (P=0.011) and the WHO classification (P=0.001) were predictors for recurrence after R0-resection. Patients were stratified into four risk groups using a potential model incorporating both the Masaoka-Koga stage and WHO classifications. Group 1 comprised WHO types A/AB/B1 in stage I/II; Group 2 comprised WHO type A/AB/B1 in stage III or WHO type B2/B3 in stage I/II or WHO type C in stage I; Group 3 comprised Type B2/B3/C in stage III, or WHO type C in stage II/III; and Group 4 comprised WHO type B2/B3/C in stage IV. The 5-year freedom-from-recurrence (FFR) rates were 99.4% for group 1, 84.7% for group 2, 63.7% for group 3, and less than 44.4% for group 4 (P<0.001). In group 3, the rate of locoregional recurrence of patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy was lower than patients treated without postoperative radiation therapy (P=0.032). Conclusions A risk model incorporating both Masaoka-Koga stage and WHO classification systems may provide multi-faceted information about recurrence and adjuvant treatment after R0-resection of TETs. PMID:27162665

  11. Early Clinical Outcomes Using Proton Radiation for Children With Central Nervous System Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    De Amorim Bernstein, Karen; Sethi, Roshan; Trofimov, Alexei; Zeng, Chuan; Fullerton, Barbara; Yeap, Beow Y.; Ebb, David; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; MacDonald, Shannon M.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) is an uncommon and aggressive tumor that often affects infants. Irradiation improves survival but has traditionally been avoided in patients under the age of 3 due to the increasing risk of neurocognitive side effects. We report the first cohort of AT/RT patients treated with proton therapy. Methods and Materials: All patients with AT/RT treated at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Frances H. Burr Proton Beam Therapy Benter between July 2004 and November 2011 were included in this study. All patients were treated with 3-dimensional conformal proton therapy (3D-CPT). Results: Ten consecutive patients of a median 2.3 years of age and with a median follow-up of 27.3 months (range, 11.3-99.4 months) were identified. Two patients suffered distant relapse; 1 patient was successfully treated with involved field irradiation and chemotherapy, while the second patient died of disease. At last follow-up, 9 patients were alive without evidence of disease. Proton radiation demonstrated increasing sparing of the cerebrum, temporal lobe, cochlea, and hypothalamus. Conclusions: Initial clinical outcomes with proton therapy are favorable. The advantages of proton therapy are particularly suited to the treatment of AT/RT, a tumor that often requires irradiation treatment at an age when avoiding irradiation to healthy tissues is most desirable.

  12. Clinical Outcome of Treatment for Patients with Giant Cell Tumor in Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon Chun; Cho, Wonik; Chang, Ung-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The treatment of giant cell tumor (GCT) is mainly performed surgically. However, GCT in spine seems difficult to treat because of the limited surgical accessibility and proximity. In this report, we analyzed the outcome of GCT treatment in spine. Methods Between 2000 and 2012, 19 patients received treatment for GCT in spine. Median age at their first diagnosis was 31 years, 10 patients were male, and 9 female. Fourteen tumors were located in the sacrum, 1 in cervical, 1 in thoracic and 3 in lumbar spine. As primary treatment, gross total removal (GTR) was done in 6 patients, and subtotal removal (STR) in 13 patients. Radiation therapy (RT) as an adjuvant therapy was performed in 2 cases in GTR group and 10 cases in STR group. Results During the follow-up, 7 patients had local recurrence (36.8%). The average period until recurrence after primary treatment was 14 months. No recurrence was detected in GTR group. Recurrence was noted in 7 out of 13 patients who underwent STR. These differences were statistically significant (p=0.024). A median of recurrence free period (RFP) was 84 months. Also average RFP of the RT group was 112 months, and non-RT group was 65 months. These differences were statistically significant (p=0.041). Conclusion Treatment of choice for GCT in spine is a complete removal of tumor without neurological deficits. In case of incomplete removal, radiation therapy may be a useful adjuvant treatment modality. PMID:26539269

  13. Differentiation of MCF-7 tumor cells from leukocytes and fibroblast cells using epithelial cell adhesion molecule targeted multicore surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, Isabel; Matthäus, Christian; Csaki, Andrea; Clement, Joachim H.; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    Identification of tumor and normal cells is a promising application of Raman spectroscopy. The throughput of Raman-assisted cell sorting is limited by low sensitivity. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a well-recognized candidate to increase the intensity of Raman signals of cells. First, different strategies are summarized to detect tumor cells using targeted SERS probes. Then, a protocol is described to prepare multicore-SERS-labels (MSLs) by aggregating gold nanoparticles, coating with a reporter molecule and a thin silver shell to further boost enhancement, encapsulating with a stable silica layer, and functionalizing by epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies. Raman, dark field and fluorescence microscopy proved the specific and nonspecific binding of functionalized and nonfunctionalized MSLs to MCF-7 tumor cells, leukocytes from blood, and nontransformed human foreskin fibroblasts. Raman imaging and dark field microscopy indicated no uptake of MSLs, yet binding to the cellular membrane. Viability tests were performed with living tumor cells to demonstrate the low toxicity of MSL-EpCAM. The SERS signatures were detected from cells with exposure times down to 25 ms at 785-nm laser excitation. The prospects of these MSLs in multiplex assays, for enumeration and sorting of circulating tumor cells in microfluidic chips, are discussed.

  14. Signaling Mechanism(S) of Reactive Oxygen Species in Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Reminiscent of Cancer Stem Cells in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Yiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to serve as a second messenger in the intracellular signal transduction pathway for a variety of cellular processes, including inflammation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, aging and cancer. Recently, ROS have been found to be associated with tumor metastasis involving the processes of tumor cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Emerging evidence also suggests that Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), a process that is reminiscent of cancer stem cells, is an important step towards tumor invasion and metastasis, and intimately involved in de novo and acquired drug resistance. In the light of recent advances, we are summarizing the role of ROS in EMT by cataloging how its deregulation is involved in EMT and tumor aggressiveness. Further attempts have been made to summarize the role of several chemopreventive agents that could be useful for targeted inactivation of ROS, suggesting that many natural agents could be useful for the reversal of EMT, which would become a novel approach for the prevention of tumor progression and/or the treatment of human malignancies especially by killing EMT-type cells that share similar characteristics with cancer stem cells. PMID:19951255

  15. Long-Term Outcomes for Desmoid Tumors Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh Zagars, Gunar K.; Ballo, Matthew T.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcomes in patients with desmoid fibromatosis treated with radiation therapy (RT), with or without surgery. Methods and Materials: Between 1965 and 2005, 115 patients with desmoid tumors were treated with RT at our institution. The median age was 29 years (range, 8-73 years). Of the patients, 41 (36%) received RT alone (median dose, 56 Gy) for gross disease, and 74 (64%) received combined-modality treatment (CMT) consisting of a combination of surgery and RT (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 10.1 years. Local control (LC) rates at 5 and 10 years were 75% and 74%, respectively. On univariate analysis, LC was significantly influenced by tumor size ({<=}5 cm vs. 5-10 cm vs. >10 cm) (p = 0.02) and age ({<=} 30 vs. >30 years) (p = 0.02). There was no significant difference in LC for patients treated with RT alone for gross disease vs. CMT. For patients treated with CMT, only tumor size significantly influenced LC (p = 0.02). Patients with positive margins after surgery did not have poorer LC than those with negative margins (p = 0.38). Radiation-related complications occurred in 20 (17%) of patients and were associated with dose >56 Gy (p = 0.001), age {<=}30 years (p = 0.009), and receipt of RT alone vs. CMT (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Desmoid tumors are effectively controlled with RT administered either as an adjuvant to surgery when resection margins are positive or alone for gross disease when surgical resection is not feasible. Doses >56 Gy may not be necessary to control gross disease and are associated with high rates of radiation-related complications.

  16. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes for Solitary Fibrous Tumor (SFT): A Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    DeVito, Nicholas; Henderson, Evita; Han, Gang; Reed, Damon; Bui, Marilyn M; Lavey, Robert; Robinson, Lary; Zager, Jonathan S; Gonzalez, Ricardo J; Sondak, Vernon K; Letson, G Douglas; Conley, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a mesenchymal neoplasm of fibrous origin. The 2013 WHO classification of soft tissue tumors defines malignant forms as hypercellular, mitotically active (>4 mitosis/10 high-power fields), with cytological atypia, tumor necrosis, and/or infiltrative margins. With an IRB-approved protocol, we investigated patient records and clinicopathologic data from our Sarcoma Database to describe the clinical characteristics of both benign and malignant SFT. All pathology specimens were reviewed by two pathologists. Descriptive statistics and univariate/multivariate survival analysis were performed. Patient records and Social Security Death Index were used to evaluate vital status. Of 82 patients, 47 (57%) were women and 73 (89%) were Caucasian. Median age was 62 years (range, 20 to 89). Thirty-two (39%) patients succumbed to the disease. Primary tumor site was lung/pleura in 28 (34%), abdomen/pelvis in 23 (28%), extremity in 13 (16%), and head/neck in 9 (11%) patients. Pathology was described as benign in 42 (51%) and malignant in 40 (49%) patients. Compared to benign SFT, malignant histology is associated with larger tumor size, higher mitotic counts, metastatic disease at diagnosis, and greater use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Gender, age, and tumor site were not significantly different between benign and malignant subtypes. By univariate analysis, only benign vs. malignant variant and complete resection positively impacted overall survival (P = 0.02 and P<0.0001, respectively). In the multivariable analysis of overall survival, receiving chemotherapy or not receiving surgery were two variables significantly associated with higher failure rate in overall survival: patients with chemotherapy vs. no chemotherapy (P = 0.003, HR = 4.55, with 95% CI: 1.68-12.34) and patients without surgery vs. with surgery (P = 0.005, HR = 25.49, with 95% CI: 2.62-247.57). Clear survival differences exist between benign and malignant SFT. While surgery

  17. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes for Solitary Fibrous Tumor (SFT): A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    DeVito, Nicholas; Henderson, Evita; Han, Gang; Reed, Damon; Bui, Marilyn M.; Lavey, Robert; Robinson, Lary; Zager, Jonathan S.; Gonzalez, Ricardo J.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Letson, G. Douglas; Conley, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a mesenchymal neoplasm of fibrous origin. The 2013 WHO classification of soft tissue tumors defines malignant forms as hypercellular, mitotically active (>4 mitosis/10 high-power fields), with cytological atypia, tumor necrosis, and/or infiltrative margins. With an IRB-approved protocol, we investigated patient records and clinicopathologic data from our Sarcoma Database to describe the clinical characteristics of both benign and malignant SFT. All pathology specimens were reviewed by two pathologists. Descriptive statistics and univariate/multivariate survival analysis were performed. Patient records and Social Security Death Index were used to evaluate vital status. Of 82 patients, 47 (57%) were women and 73 (89%) were Caucasian. Median age was 62 years (range, 20 to 89). Thirty-two (39%) patients succumbed to the disease. Primary tumor site was lung/pleura in 28 (34%), abdomen/pelvis in 23 (28%), extremity in 13 (16%), and head/neck in 9 (11%) patients. Pathology was described as benign in 42 (51%) and malignant in 40 (49%) patients. Compared to benign SFT, malignant histology is associated with larger tumor size, higher mitotic counts, metastatic disease at diagnosis, and greater use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Gender, age, and tumor site were not significantly different between benign and malignant subtypes. By univariate analysis, only benign vs. malignant variant and complete resection positively impacted overall survival (P = 0.02 and P<0.0001, respectively). In the multivariable analysis of overall survival, receiving chemotherapy or not receiving surgery were two variables significantly associated with higher failure rate in overall survival: patients with chemotherapy vs. no chemotherapy (P = 0.003, HR = 4.55, with 95% CI: 1.68–12.34) and patients without surgery vs. with surgery (P = 0.005, HR = 25.49, with 95% CI: 2.62–247.57). Clear survival differences exist between benign and malignant SFT. While

  18. Characterizing Tumor Heterogeneity With Functional Imaging and Quantifying High-Risk Tumor Volume for Early Prediction of Treatment Outcome: Cervical Cancer as a Model

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Nina A.; Huang Zhibin; Wang, Jian Z.; Lo, Simon S.; Fan, Joline M.; Grecula, John C.; Sammet, Steffen; Sammet, Christina L.; Jia Guang; Zhang Jun; Knopp, Michael V.; Yuh, William T.C.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Treatment response in cancer has been monitored by measuring anatomic tumor volume (ATV) at various times without considering the inherent functional tumor heterogeneity known to critically influence ultimate treatment outcome: primary tumor control and survival. This study applied dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) functional MRI to characterize tumors' heterogeneous subregions with low DCE values, at risk for treatment failure, and to quantify the functional risk volume (FRV) for personalized early prediction of treatment outcome. Methods and Materials: DCE-MRI was performed in 102 stage IB{sub 2}-IVA cervical cancer patients to assess tumor perfusion heterogeneity before and during radiation/chemotherapy. FRV represents the total volume of tumor voxels with critically low DCE signal intensity (<2.1 compared with precontrast image, determined by previous receiver operator characteristic analysis). FRVs were correlated with treatment outcome (follow-up: 0.2-9.4, mean 6.8 years) and compared with ATVs (Mann-Whitney, Kaplan-Meier, and multivariate analyses). Results: Before and during therapy at 2-2.5 and 4-5 weeks of RT, FRVs >20, >13, and >5 cm{sup 3}, respectively, significantly predicted unfavorable 6-year primary tumor control (p = 0.003, 7.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}, 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}) and disease-specific survival (p = 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}, respectively). The FRVs were superior to the ATVs as early predictors of outcome, and the differentiating power of FRVs increased during treatment. Discussion: Our preliminary results suggest that functional tumor heterogeneity can be characterized by DCE-MRI to quantify FRV for predicting ultimate long-term treatment outcome. FRV is a novel functional imaging heterogeneity parameter, superior to ATV, and can be clinically translated for personalized early outcome prediction before or as early as 2-5 weeks

  19. The O-Linked Glycome and Blood Group Antigens ABO on Mucin-Type Glycoproteins in Mucinous and Serous Epithelial Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Vitiazeva, Varvara; Kattla, Jayesh J.; Flowers, Sarah A.; Lindén, Sara K.; Premaratne, Pushpa; Weijdegård, Birgitta; Sundfeldt, Karin; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins where the glycosylation has been shown to play an important role in cancer. Normal epithelial ovarian cells do not express secreted mucins, but their abnormal expression has previously been described in epithelial ovarian cancer and may relate to tumor formation and progression. The cyst fluids were shown to be a rich source for acidic glycoproteins. The study of these proteins can potentially lead to the identification of more effective biomarkers for ovarian cancer. Methods In this study, we analyzed the expression of the MUC5AC and the O-glycosylation of acidic glycoproteins secreted into ovarian cyst fluids. The samples were obtained from patients with serous and mucinous ovarian tumors of different stages (benign, borderline, malignant) and grades. The O-linked oligosaccharides were released and analyzed by negative-ion graphitized carbon Liquid Chromatography (LC) coupled to Electrospray Ionization tandem Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MSn). The LC-ESI-MSn of the oligosaccharides from ovarian cyst fluids displayed differences in expression of fucose containing structures such as blood group ABO antigens and Lewis-type epitopes. Results The obtained data showed that serous and mucinous benign adenomas, mucinous low malignant potential carcinomas (LMPs, borderline) and mucinous low-grade carcinomas have a high level of blood groups and Lewis type epitopes. In contrast, this type of fucosylated structures were low abundant in the high-grade mucinous carcinomas or in serous carcinomas. In addition, the ovarian tumors that showed a high level of expression of blood group antigens also revealed a strong reactivity towards the MUC5AC antibody. To visualize the differences between serous and mucinous ovarian tumors based on the O-glycosylation, a hierarchical cluster analysis was performed using mass spectrometry average compositions (MSAC). Conclusion Mucinous benign and LMPs along with mucinous low-grade carcinomas

  20. Downregulation of the cancer susceptibility protein WRAP53β in epithelial ovarian cancer leads to defective DNA repair and poor clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hedström, E; Pederiva, C; Farnebo, J; Nodin, B; Jirström, K; Brennan, D J; Farnebo, M

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the scaffold protein WRAP53β have previously been linked to carcinogenesis and, in particular, associated with an increased risk for epithelial ovarian cancer. Here, we investigated the pathogenic impact and prognostic significance of WRAP53β in connection with epithelial ovarian cancer and examined the underlying mechanisms. We find that reduced expression of WRAP53β in ovarian tumors correlated with attenuated DNA damage response and poor patient survival. Furthermore, in ovarian cancer cell lines, WRAP53β was rapidly recruited to DNA double-strand breaks, where it orchestrated the recruitment of repair factors involved in homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining, including RNF168, 53BP1, BRCA1 and RAD51. Mechanistically, WRAP53β accomplishes this by facilitating the necessary ubiquitinylation at DNA breaks. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of WRAP53β significantly impairs the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, resulting in their accumulation. Our findings establish WRAP53β as a regulator of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining repair in ovarian cancer cells, suggesting that loss of this protein contributes to the development and/or progression of ovarian tumors. Moreover, our current observations identify the nuclear levels of WRAP53β as a promising biomarker for the survival of patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:26426684

  1. Effects of curcumin in pediatric epithelial liver tumors: inhibition of tumor growth and alpha-fetoprotein in vitro and in vivo involving the NFkappaB- and the beta-catenin pathways.

    PubMed

    Bortel, Nicola; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin; Schmid, Evi; Kirchner, Bettina; Frank, Jan; Kocher, Alexa; Schiborr, Christina; Warmann, Steven; Fuchs, Jörg; Ellerkamp, Verena

    2015-12-01

    In children with hepatocellular carcinoma (pHCC) the 5-year overall survival rate is poor. Effects of cytostatic therapies such as cisplatin and doxorubicin are limited due to chemoresistance and tumor relapse. In adult HCC, several antitumor properties are described for the use of curcumin. Curcumin is one of the best-investigated phytochemicals in complementary oncology without relevant side effects. Its use is limited by low bioavailability. Little is known about the influence of curcumin on pediatric epithelial hepatic malignancies. We investigated the effects of curcumin in combination with cisplatin on two pediatric epithelial liver tumor cell lines. As mechanisms of action inhibition of NFkappaB, beta-catenin, and decrease of cyclin D were identified. Using a mouse xenograft model we could show a significant decrease of alpha-fetoprotein after combination therapy of oral micellar curcumin and cisplatin. Significant concentrations of curcuminoids were found in blood samples, organ lysates, and tumor tissue after oral micellar curcumin administration. Micellar curcumin in combination with cisplatin can be a promising strategy for treatment of pediatric HCC. PMID:26515460

  2. Effects of curcumin in pediatric epithelial liver tumors: inhibition of tumor growth and alpha-fetoprotein in vitro and in vivo involving the NFkappaB- and the beta-catenin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bortel, Nicola; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin; Schmid, Evi; Kirchner, Bettina; Frank, Jan; Kocher, Alexa; Schiborr, Christina; Warmann, Steven; Fuchs, Jörg; Ellerkamp, Verena

    2015-01-01

    In children with hepatocellular carcinoma (pHCC) the 5-year overall survival rate is poor. Effects of cytostatic therapies such as cisplatin and doxorubicin are limited due to chemoresistance and tumor relapse. In adult HCC, several antitumor properties are described for the use of curcumin. Curcumin is one of the best-investigated phytochemicals in complementary oncology without relevant side effects. Its use is limited by low bioavailability. Little is known about the influence of curcumin on pediatric epithelial hepatic malignancies. We investigated the effects of curcumin in combination with cisplatin on two pediatric epithelial liver tumor cell lines. As mechanisms of action inhibition of NFkappaB, beta-catenin, and decrease of cyclin D were identified. Using a mouse xenograft model we could show a significant decrease of alpha-fetoprotein after combination therapy of oral micellar curcumin and cisplatin. Significant concentrations of curcuminoids were found in blood samples, organ lysates, and tumor tissue after oral micellar curcumin administration. Micellar curcumin in combination with cisplatin can be a promising strategy for treatment of pediatric HCC. PMID:26515460

  3. Aggressive Locoregional Treatment Improves the Outcome of Liver Metastases from Grade 3 Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Du, Shunda; Ni, Jianjiao; Weng, Linqian; Ma, Fei; Li, Shaohua; Wang, Wenze; Sang, Xinting; Lu, Xin; Zhong, Shouxian; Mao, Yilei

    2015-08-01

    Grade 3 (G3) gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare, and there is no report specifically dealing with patients of liver metastases from G3 GEP NETs.From January 2004 to January 2014, 36 conservative patients with G3 GEP NET liver metastases were retrospectively identified from 3 hepatobiliary centers in China. The clinical features and treatment outcomes were analyzed.Aggressive locoregional treatments (LT, including cytoreductive surgery, radiofrequency ablation, and liver-directed intra-arterial intervention) and systemic therapy (ST) were introduced separately or combined, with 26 (72%) patients receiving resection of primary tumor and/or hepatic metastases, 12 patients receiving non-surgical locoregional interventions (NSLRIs), and 22 patients receiving certain kind of STs. Median overall survival (OS) was 20.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.9-31.1 months) and survival rates were 62.6%, 30.1%, and 19.8%, at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. The median OS was 9.0 months (95%CI: 3.3-14.7 months) for patients receiving only STs (n = 6), 19 months (95%CI: 1.3-36.8 months) for patients receiving LT followed by STs (n = 16), and 101 months (95%CI: 0.0-210.2 months) for patients receiving only LT (n = 12). Moreover, compared with those receiving only ST or best supportive care, patients given certain types of LTs had higher rates of symptom alleviation (3/8 versus 20/23). On univariate analysis, positive prognostic factors of survival were pancreatic primary tumor (P = 0.013), normal total bilirubin level (P = 0.035), receiving surgery (P = 0.034), receiving NSLRI (P = 0.014), and sum of diameters of remnant tumor < 5 cm (P = 0.008). On multivariate analyses, pancreatic primary tumor (P = 0.015), normal total bilirubin level (P = 0.002), and sum of diameters of remnant tumor < 5 cm (P = 0.001) remained to be independent prognostic factors.For patients with G3 GEP NET liver

  4. Pindborg tumor

    PubMed Central

    Caliaperoumal, Santhosh Kumar; Gowri, S.; Dinakar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references. PMID:27041911

  5. Outcome and Prognostic Indicators in Cats Undergoing Splenectomy for Splenic Mast Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Kelly A; Clifford, Craig A; Davis, Garrett J; Kiefer, Kristina M; Drobatz, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    This was a multi-institutional retrospective study evaluating the outcome and clinical parameters associated with the postoperative prognosis of 36 cats with splenic mast cell tumors treated with splenectomy. Clinical parameters reviewed included signalment, clinical history, results of staging tests, surgical variables, administration of blood products, presence of metastasis, postoperative complications, administration of chemotherapy postoperatively, chemotherapy protocol, and response to chemotherapy. Overall median survival time was 390 days (range, 2-1737 days). Administration of a blood product (P < .0001), metastasis to a regional lymph node (P = .022), and evidence of either concurrent or historical neoplasia (P = .037) were negatively associated with survival. Response to chemotherapy (P = .0008) was associated with an improved median survival time. Larger-scale prospective studies evaluating different chemotherapy protocols are required to elucidate the discrepancy between lack of survival benefit with administration of chemotherapy and improvement in survival time with positive response to chemotherapy. PMID:26083443

  6. Clinical outcome and prognosis of carbon ion radiotherapy on thoracic malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha

    Objective To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and side-response of high-LET carbon ion radiotherapy on thoracic malignant tumors. Methods Ten patients with pathological confirmed thoracic malignant tumors received treatment using heavy ion accelerator, which included 6 cases with non-small lung cancer, one case with small lung cancer, 2 cases with metastatic sarcomas and one case with invasive thymoma. The applied regimen included fractioned dose (5.5-6.8GyE/Fraction), one faction/day, and 7 fractions/week. The total dose ranged from 55 to 70 GyE. Results The short-term results showed that the response rate (the complete response (CR) rate +the partial response (PR) rate) was 10% at the first month, 40% at the third month and 90% at the sixth month. The overall response rate was 90% and the rate of stable disease was 10%. There was no relation between the response rate and tumor pathology (P>0.05) while significance between the response rate and the tumor volume.At median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6 to 36 months), the local control rate and free-disease rate were respectively 100% an 90% at the first year, 90% and 80% at the secondary year, 80% and 70% at the third year. The death rate due to disease progression was 20% and the non-specific death rate was 10%. Side and toxicity effects: Grade I skin effect occurred in three cases and Grade I lung effect occurred in two cases. The blood counts didn’t reach significance among pre-radiation course, peri-radiation course and post-radiation course (P>0.05). The subgoups of T cells detected in humoral immunity and cytoimmunity didn’t change between pre-radiation and post radiation(P>0.05). Conclusions Carbon ion radiotherapy is effective and safe in the management of patients with thoracic malignant tumors. There were no obvious side effects. The long term of clinical outcome and the late effect need to be further observed.

  7. Survival Outcomes and Tumor IMP3 Expression in Patients with Sarcomatoid Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tantravahi, Srinivas K.; Albertson, Daniel; Agarwal, Archana M.; Poole, Austin; Patel, Shiven B.; Hawatmeh, Jamil S.; Straubhar, Alli M.; Liu, Ting; Stenehjem, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid histology (SmRCC) is associated with poor survival. No data is available from randomized trials on the efficacy of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors in SmRCC. We identified SmRCC patients from a single institutional database. To identify predictive and prognostic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis was performed on the tumor samples for downstream targets of VEGF and mTOR pathways. Survival outcomes were stratified by IHC analysis, extent of sarcomatoid component, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), and Heng risk criteria. Twenty-seven patients with SmRCC were included. First line therapy included targeted therapy (n = 19), immunotherapy (n = 4), cytotoxic chemotherapy (n = 1), and no treatment (n = 3). Median OS was 8.2 months (95% CI 3.8–14.2 months). Median survival in months, based on MSKCC and Heng risk groups, was favorable 89.3 versus 84.5, intermediate 9.5 versus 12.7, and poor 3.9 versus 5.1. None of the IHC markers predicted outcomes of treatment with VEGF or mTOR inhibitors. Only tumor IMP3 expression was associated with inferior OS, although not statistically significant (IMP3 negative 14.2 versus IMP3 positive 4.9 months; HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.16–1.21; P = 0.12). The study was limited by small sample size. PMID:25688268

  8. Persistent Uroplakin Expression in Advanced Urothelial Carcinomas: Implications in Urothelial Tumor Progression and Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Ying; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Sun, Tung-Tien; Lepor, Herbert; Shapiro, Ellen; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Ashfaq, Raheela; Lotan, Yair; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2007-01-01

    As the terminal differentiation products of human urothelium, uroplakins (UPs) would be expected to diminish during urothelial tumorigenesis. Surprisingly, recent studies found UPs to be retained even by well-advanced urothelial carcinomas, suggesting that the loss of UPs does not strictly parallel urothelial transformation. Little is known, however, about whether the status of UPs is associated with a particular pathological parameter, tumor’s biological behavior or patient outcome. Here we assessed UP expression by immunohistochemistry on tissue arrays from 285 patients with bladder urothelial carcinomas or non-tumor conditions. UPs were expressed in all 9 normal urothelial specimens, 63/74 (85%) patients with non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinomas on transurethral resection, 104/202 (51.5%) patients who underwent radical cystectomy for advanced urothelial carcinomas, and 33/50 (66%) lymph node metastases. Normally associated with urothelial apical surface, UPs were localized aberrantly in tumors, including micro-luminal, basal-laminal, cytoplasmic or uniform patterns. In non-muscle-invasive diseases, there was no association between UP expression and disease recurrence, progression or mortality. In contrast, in invasive diseases, absent UP expression was significantly associated with advanced pathologic stage, lymph node metastases, disease recurrence and bladder cancer-specific mortality (p=0.042, p=0.035, p=0.023 and p=0.022, respectively) in univariate analyses. Furthermore, UP status was independent of key cell-cycle regulators, including p53, pRb, p27 and cyclin D1, thus excluding a functional link between these two groups of proteins. Our data demonstrate for the first time that persistent UP expression is associated with a favorable clinical outcome and that UPs may be used as adjunct markers for predicting the prognoses of patients with invasive and metastatic bladder carcinomas. Our results also suggest that UP-positive and –negative carcinomas

  9. MicroRNA-31 functions as a tumor suppressor by regulating cell cycle and epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulatory proteins in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyun Jin; Eun, Jung Woo; Shen, Qingyu; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Woo Chan; Yang, Hee Doo; Park, Mijung; Park, Won Sang; Kang, Yong-Koo; Nam, Suk Woo

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-31 (miR-31) is among the most frequently altered microRNAs in human cancers and altered expression of miR-31 has been detected in a large variety of tumor types, but the functional role of miR-31 still hold both tumor suppressive and oncogenic roles in different tumor types. MiR-31 expression was down-regulated in a large cohort of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, and low expression of miR-31 was significantly associated with poor prognosis of HCC patients. Ectopic expression of miR-31 mimics suppressed HCC cell growth by transcriptional deregulation of cell cycle proteins. Additional study evidenced miR-31 directly to suppress HDAC2 and CDK2 expression by inhibiting mRNA translation in HCC cells. We also found that ectopic expression of miR-31 mimics reduced metastatic potential of HCC cells by selectively regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) regulatory proteins such as N-cadherin, E-cadherin, vimentin and fibronectin. HCC tissues derived from chemical-induced rat liver cancer models validated that miR-31 expression is significantly down-regulated, and that those cell cycle- and EMT-regulatory proteins are deregulated in rat liver cancer. Overall, we suggest that miR-31 functions as a tumor suppressor by selectively regulating cell cycle and EMT regulatory proteins in human hepatocarcinogenesis providing a novel target for the molecular treatment of liver malignancies. PMID:25797269

  10. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Deyi; Barry, Samantha; Kmetz, Daniel; Egger, Michael; Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh N; Qu, Jifu; McMasters, Kelly M; Hao, Hongying

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is abundant with exosomes that are secreted by the cancer cells themselves. Exosomes are nanosized, organelle-like membranous structures that are increasingly being recognized as major contributors in the progression of malignant neoplasms. A critical element in melanoma progression is its propensity to metastasize, but little is known about how melanoma cell-derived exosomes modulate the microenvironment to optimize conditions for tumor progression and metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote phenotype switching in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling. We found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated during the exosome-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-resembling process, which promotes metastasis. Let-7i, an miRNA modulator of EMT, was also involved in this process. We further defined two other miRNA modulators of EMT (miR-191 and let-7a) in serum exosomes for differentiating stage I melanoma patients from non-melanoma subjects. These results provide the first strong molecular evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote the EMT-resembling process in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, novel strategies targeting EMT and modulating the tumor microenvironment may emerge as important approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:27063098

  11. Inhibitor of growth 4 suppresses colorectal cancer growth and invasion by inducing G1 arrest, inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hui; Yin, Hong; Yan, Su; Tao, Min; Xie, Yufeng; Chen, Weichang

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have found that inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4), a tumor suppressor, is reduced in human colorectal cancer (CRC), and is inversely correlated with clinical Dukes' stage, histological grade, lymph node metastasis and microvessel density (MVD). However, its underlying mechanism remains undetermined. In the present study, we analyzed ING4 expression in a panel of human CRC cells using low (LS174T and SW480) and high (LoVo and SW620) metastatic cell lines. We demonstrated that both the low and high metastatic CRC cells exhibited a lower level of ING4 compared to the level in normal human colorectal mucous epithelial FHC cells. Furthermore, ING4 expression in high metastatic CRC cells was less than that in low metastatic CRC cells. We then generated a lentivirus construct expressing ING4 and green fluorescent protein (GFP), established a ING4-stably transgenic LoVo CRC cell line, and investigated the effect of lentiviral-mediated ING4 expression on high metastatic LoVo CRC cells. Gain-of-function studies revealed that ING4 significantly inhibited LoVo CRC cell growth and invasion in vitro and induced cell cycle G1 phase arrest. Moreover, ING4 obviously suppressed LoVo CRC subcutaneously xenografted tumor growth and reduced tumor MVD in vivo in athymic BALB/c nude mice. Mechanistically, ING4 markedly upregulated P21 and E-cadherin but downregulated cyclin E, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Snail1, N-cadherin and vimentin in the LoVo CRC cells. Our data provide compelling evidence that i) ING4 suppresses CRC growth possibly via induction of G1 phase arrest through upregulation of P21 cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor and downregulation of cyclin E as well as inhibition of tumor angiogenesis through reduction of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF proangiogenic factors; ii) ING4 inhibits CRC invasion and metastasis probably via a switch from mesenchymal marker N-cadherin to epithelial marker E-cadherin through

  12. Validation of Heat Shock Protein 70 as a Tumor-Specific Biomarker for Monitoring the Outcome of Radiation Therapy in Tumor Mouse Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Christine; Liebhardt, Michael E.; Schmid, Thomas E.; Trajkovic-Arsic, Marija; Hube, Kathrin; Specht, Hanno M.; Schilling, Daniela; Gehrmann, Mathias; Stangl, Stefan; Siveke, Jens T.; Wilkens, Jan J.; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Tumor cells, in contrast to normal cells, frequently overexpress heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the cytosol, present it on their cell surface, and actively release it. Therefore, soluble Hsp70 (sHsp70) was investigated as a potential tumor biomarker for monitoring the outcome of radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plasma from mice bearing membrane Hsp70 (mHsp70)-positive FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and spontaneous pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) was investigated. A cohort of mice with FaDu tumors (0.32 cm{sup 3}) was irradiated with 30 Gy, and plasma was collected 24 hours after irradiation, after the tumors had shrunk to 50% of their starting volume and after complete remission. sHsp70 levels in the plasma were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: sHsp70 levels were significantly higher in the blood of tumor-bearing mice than that of control animals. A correlation between increasing sHsp70 plasma levels and tumor volume in the range of 0.01 cm{sup 3} to 0.66 cm{sup 3} was observed. Radiation-induced regression of the tumors was associated with significantly decreased sHsp70 levels, which returned to the level of control animals after complete remission. Conclusion: We propose sHsp70 as an innovative biomarker for detecting tumors and for monitoring the clinical outcome of radiation therapy in cancer patients.

  13. DNA alterations in the tumor genome and their associations with clinical outcome in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wennuan

    2016-01-01

    Although most prostate cancer (PCa) cases are not life-threatening, approximately 293 000 men worldwide die annually due to PCa. These lethal cases are thought to be caused by coordinated genomic alterations that accumulate over time. Recent genome-wide analyses of DNA from subjects with PCa have revealed most, if not all, genetic changes in both germline and PCa tumor genomes. In this article, I first review the major, somatically acquired genomic characteristics of various subtypes of PCa. I then recap key findings on the relationships between genomic alterations and clinical parameters, such as biochemical recurrence or clinical relapse, metastasis and cancer-specific mortality. Finally, I outline the need for, and challenges with, validation of recent findings in prospective studies for clinical utility. It is clearer now than ever before that the landscape of somatically acquired aberrations in PCa is highlighted by DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) and TMPRSS2-ERG fusion derived from complex rearrangements, numerous single nucleotide variations or mutations, tremendous heterogeneity, and continuously punctuated evolution. Genome-wide CNAs, PTEN loss, MYC gain in primary tumors, and TP53 loss/mutation and AR amplification/mutation in advanced metastatic PCa have consistently been associated with worse cancer prognosis. With this recently gained knowledge, it is now an opportune time to develop DNA-based tests that provide more accurate patient stratification for prediction of clinical outcome, which will ultimately lead to more personalized cancer care than is possible at present. PMID:26975494

  14. DNA alterations in the tumor genome and their associations with clinical outcome in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wennuan

    2016-01-01

    Although most prostate cancer (PCa) cases are not life-threatening, approximately 293 000 men worldwide die annually due to PCa. These lethal cases are thought to be caused by coordinated genomic alterations that accumulate over time. Recent genome-wide analyses of DNA from subjects with PCa have revealed most, if not all, genetic changes in both germline and PCa tumor genomes. In this article, I first review the major, somatically acquired genomic characteristics of various subtypes of PCa. I then recap key findings on the relationships between genomic alterations and clinical parameters, such as biochemical recurrence or clinical relapse, metastasis and cancer-specific mortality. Finally, I outline the need for, and challenges with, validation of recent findings in prospective studies for clinical utility. It is clearer now than ever before that the landscape of somatically acquired aberrations in PCa is highlighted by DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) and TMPRSS2-ERG fusion derived from complex rearrangements, numerous single nucleotide variations or mutations, tremendous heterogeneity, and continuously punctuated evolution. Genome-wide CNAs, PTEN loss, MYC gain in primary tumors, and TP53 loss/mutation and AR amplification/mutation in advanced metastatic PCa have consistently been associated with worse cancer prognosis. With this recently gained knowledge, it is now an opportune time to develop DNA-based tests that provide more accurate patient stratification for prediction of clinical outcome, which will ultimately lead to more personalized cancer care than is possible at present. PMID:26975494

  15. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors: Early Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Trofimov, Alexei; Safai, Sairos; Adams, Judith; Fullerton, Barbara; Ebb, David; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes for children with central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumors treated with protons; to compare dose distributions for intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT), three-dimensional conformal proton radiation (3D-CPT), and intensity-modulated proton therapy with pencil beam scanning (IMPT) for whole-ventricular irradiation with and without an involved-field boost. Methods and Materials: All children with CNS germinoma or nongerminomatous germ cell tumor who received treatment at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1998 and 2007 were included in this study. The IMRT, 3D-CPT, and IMPT plans were generated and compared for a representative case. Results: Twenty-two patients were treated with 3D-CPT. At a median follow-up of 28 months, there were no CNS recurrences; 1 patient had a recurrence outside the CNS. Local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 100%, 95%, and 100%, respectively. Comparable tumor volume coverage was achieved with IMRT, 3D-CPT, and IMPT. Substantial normal tissue sparing was seen with any form of proton therapy as compared with IMRT. The use of IMPT may yield additional sparing of the brain and temporal lobes. Conclusions: Preliminary disease control with proton therapy compares favorably to the literature. Dosimetric comparisons demonstrate the advantage of proton radiation over IMRT for whole-ventricle radiation. Superior dose distributions were accomplished with fewer beam angles utilizing 3D-CPT and scanned protons. Intensity-modulated proton therapy with pencil beam scanning may improve dose distribution as compared with 3D-CPT for this treatment.

  16. Visual Outcome and Tumor Control After Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Lessell, Simmons; Bussiere, Marc; Beaudette, Kevin; Rizzo, Joseph F.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumor that almost uniformly leads to visual dysfunction and even blindness without intervention. Because surgical extirpation carries a high risk of postoperative blindness, vision-sparing treatment strategies are desirable. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 25 patients (25 optic nerves) with ONSM, treated at a single institution with conformal fractionated radiotherapy by either stereotactic photon or proton radiation. Primary endpoints were local control and visual acuity. Results: The patients presented with symptoms of visual loss (21) or orbital pain (3) or were incidentally diagnosed by imaging (3). The mean age was 44 years, and 64% were female patients. The indication for treatment was the development or progression of symptoms. Of the patients, 13 were treated with photons, 9 were treated with protons, and 3 received a combination of photons and protons. The median dose delivered was 50.4 gray equivalents (range, 45-59.4 gray equivalents). Median follow-up after radiotherapy was 30 months (range, 3-168 months), with 3 patients lost to follow-up. At most recent follow-up, 21 of 22 patients (95%) had improved (14) or stable (7) visual acuity. One patient had worsened visual acuity after initial postirradiation improvement. Of the 22 patients, 20 (95%) had no radiographic progression. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic, limited retinopathy on ophthalmologic examination, and one had recurrent ONSM 11 years after treatment. Conclusions: Highly conformal, fractionated radiation therapy for symptomatic primary ONSM provides tumor control and improvement in visual function in most cases, with minimal treatment-induced morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess the durability of tumor control and treatment-related late effects.

  17. BI 5700, a Selective Chemical Inhibitor of IκB Kinase 2, Specifically Suppresses Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Metastasis in Mouse Models of Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Margit A.; Maier, Harald J.; Alacakaptan, Memetcan; Wiedemann, Eva; Braunger, Jürgen; Boehmelt, Guido; Madwed, Jeffrey B.; Young, Erick R.R.; Marshall, Daniel R.; Pehamberger, Hubert; Wirth, Thomas; Kraut, Norbert; Beug, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that processes termed epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) play a key role in therapeutic resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastatic progression. NF-κB signaling has been previously identified as an important pathway in the regulation of EMT in a mouse model of tumor progression. However, it remains unclear whether there is a broad requirement for this pathway to govern EMT and what the relative contribution of IKK family members acting as upstream NF-κB activators is toward promoting EMT and metastasis. To address this question, we have used a novel, small-molecule inhibitor of IκB kinase 2 (IKK2/IKKβ), termed BI 5700. We investigated the role of IKK2 in a number of mouse models of EMT, including TGFβ-induced EMT in the mammary epithelial cell line EpRas, CT26 colon carcinoma cells, and 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells. The latter model was also used to evaluate in vivo activities of BI 5700.We found that BI 5700 inhibits IKK2 with an IC50 of 9 nM and was highly selective as compared to other IKK family members (IKK1, IKKε, and TBK1) and other kinases. BI 5700 effectively blocks NF-κB activity in EpRas cells and prevents TGFβ-induced EMT. In addition, BI 5700 reverts EMT in mesenchymal CT26 cells and prevents EMT in the 4T1 model. Oral application of BI 5700 significantly interferes with metastasis after mammary fat-pad injection of 4T1 cells, yielding fewer, smaller, and more differentiated metastases as compared to vehicle-treated control animals. We conclude that IKK2 is a key regulator of both the induction and maintenance of EMT in a panel of mouse tumor progression models and that the IKK2 inhibitor BI 5700 constitutes a promising candidate for the treatment of metastatic cancers. PMID:21779445

  18. Mucinous borderline ovarian tumor with ascites.

    PubMed

    Batool, Tahira; Ullah, Nasreen Rehmat

    2014-11-01

    Borderline mucinous tumors are epithelial ovarian tumors with low rate of growth and low potential to invade or metastasize and associated with significantly better prognosis and excellent disease-free survival after surgical removal than other epithelial ovarian cancers. The accepted initial treatment is surgical removal of the tumor. Fertility-sparing surgery may suffice in young patients with tumors confined to the ovary. Radical surgery is recommended in patients with advanced disease and advanced age. Long-term surveillance is recommended to document and treat late recurrences. We report a case of a 59 years old postmenopausal patient with complex ovarian mucinous tumor and gross ascites; she had received three lines of chemotherapeutic agents pre-operatively, without any favorable outcome. Then, she went for staging laparotomy and histopathology showed borderline ovarian mucinous tumor required no further treatment and is fine till date. PMID:25518783

  19. Surgical Outcomes in Patients with High Spinal Instability Neoplasm Score Secondary to Spinal Giant Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Benjamin D.; Sankey, Eric W.; Goodwin, C. Rory; Kosztowski, Thomas A.; Lo, Sheng-Fu L.; Bydon, Ali; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Witham, Timothy F.; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Objective To describe the surgical outcomes in patients with high preoperative Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) secondary to spinal giant cell tumors (GCT) and evaluate the impact of en bloc versus intralesional resection and preoperative embolization on postoperative outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 14 patients with GCTs of the spine who underwent surgical treatment prior to the use of denosumab. A univariate analysis was performed comparing the patient demographics, perioperative characteristics, and surgical outcomes between patients who underwent en bloc marginal (n = 6) compared with those who had intralesional (n = 8) resection. Results Six patients underwent en bloc resections and eight underwent intralesional resection. Preoperative embolization was performed in eight patients. All patients were alive at last follow-up, with a mean follow-up length of 43 months. Patients who underwent en bloc resection had longer average operative times (p = 0.0251), higher rates of early (p = 0.0182) and late (p = 0.0389) complications, and a higher rate of surgical revision (p = 0.0120). There was a 25% (2/8 patients) local recurrence rate for intralesional resection and a 0% (0/6 patients) local recurrence rate for en bloc resection (p = 0.0929). Conclusions Surgical excision of spinal GCTs causing significant instability, assessed by SINS, is associated with high intraoperative blood loss despite embolization and independent of resection method. En bloc resection requires a longer operative duration and is associated with a higher risk of complications when compared with intralesional resection. However, the increased morbidity associated with en bloc resection may be justified as it may minimize the risk of local recurrence. PMID:26835198

  20. Assessment of surgical outcomes of limbal transplantation using simple limbal epithelial transplantation technique in patients with total unilateral limbal deficiency.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Ana Gabriela; Barbosa, Martina Maria Oiticica; Santos, Myrna Serapião; Barreiro, Telma Pereira; Gomes, José Álvaro Pereira

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the novel simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET) technique, which reduces the risk of iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency in the donor eye. Four patients with total unilateral limbal stem cell deficiency received a limbal graft, measuring 4 mm × 2 mm, from the contralateral healthy eye in a single surgical procedure. The graft was divided into 10-20 pieces and distributed on the corneal surface. At 6-month follow-up, a completely avascular corneal epithelial surface was obtained in two patients, and there was improvement in visual acuity in one patient. The limbal grafts did not adhere to the cornea in one patient. No serious complications related to the surgery were observed in this study. PMID:27224077

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: Effect of Tumor Volume on Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lok, Benjamin H.; Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Park, Jeffery; Rowan, Nicholas; Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Ho, Alan; Pfister, David G.; Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Zhang, Zhigang; Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary gross tumor volume (pGTV) and nodal gross tumor volume (nGTV) on treatment outcomes in patients treated with definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, a total of 442 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx were treated with IMRT with curative intent at our center. Thirty patients treated postoperatively and 2 additional patients who started treatment more than 6 months after diagnosis were excluded. A total of 340 patients with restorable treatment plans were included in this present study. The majority of the patients underwent concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The pGTV and nGTV were calculated using the original clinical treatment plans. Cox proportional hazards models and log-rank tests were used to evaluate the correlation between tumor volumes and overall survival (OS), and competing risks analysis tools were used to evaluate the correlation between local failure (LF), regional failure (RF), distant metastatic failure (DMF) vs. tumor volumes with death as a competing risk. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 34 months (range, 5-67). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LF, RF and DF in this cohort of patients was 6.1%, 5.2%, and 12.2%, respectively. The 2-year OS rate was 88.6%. Univariate analysis determined pGTV and T-stage correlated with LF (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.004, respectively), whereas nGTV was not associated with RF. On multivariate analysis, pGTV and N-stage were independent risk factors for overall survival (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0073, respectively) and distant control (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions: In this cohort of patients with OPC treated with IMRT, pGTV was found to be associated with overall survival, local failure, and distant metastatic failure.

  2. Postradiation Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James D.; La, Trang H.; Chu, Karen; Quon, Andrew; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Maxim, Peter G.; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To explore the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume measured on postradiation {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with head-and-neck cancer who received pretreatment and posttreatment PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging along with definitive chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. The PET/CT parameters evaluated include the maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub 2.0}-MTV{sub 4.0}; where MTV{sub 2.0} refers to the volume above a standardized uptake value threshold of 2.0), and integrated tumor volume. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models were used to test for association between PET endpoints and disease-free survival and overall survival. Results: Multiple postradiation PET endpoints correlated significantly with outcome; however, the most robust predictor of disease progression and death was MTV{sub 2.0}. An increase in MTV{sub 2.0} of 21cm{sup 3} (difference between 75th and 25th percentiles) was associated with an increased risk of disease progression (hazard ratio [HR]= 2.5, p = 0.0001) and death (HR = 2.0, p = 0.003). In patients with nonnasopharyngeal carcinoma histology (n = 34), MTV{sub 2.0} <18 cm{sup 3} and MTV{sub 2.0} {>=}18 cm{sup 3} yielded 2-year disease-free survival rates of 100% and 63%, respectively (p = 0.006) and 2-year overall survival rates of 100% and 81%, respectively (p = 0.009). There was no correlation between MTV{sub 2.0} and disease-free survival or overall survival with nasopharyngeal carcinoma histology (n = 13). On multivariate analysis, only postradiation MTV{sub 2.0} was predictive of disease-free survival (HR = 2.47, p = 0.0001) and overall survival (HR = 1.98, p = 0.003). Conclusions: Postradiation metabolic tumor volume is an adverse prognostic factor in head-and-neck cancer. Biomarkers such as MTV are important for risk stratification and will be valuable in

  3. Surgical treatment pattern and outcomes in epithelial ovarian cancer patients from a cancer institute in Kerala, India

    PubMed Central

    Georgeena, P; Rajanbabu, Anupama; Vijaykumar, DK; Pavithran, K; Sundaram, KR; Deepak, KS; Sanal, MR

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the treatment and survival pattern of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods and results Retrospective study of all advanced epithelial ovarian cancer patients treated in the department of gynaecologic oncology from an academic centre, in a four year period from 1 January 2008–31 December 2011. Selection criteria All patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (stage III and IV) who underwent surgery from 2008–2011and had a follow-up of at least three months after completion of treatment were included. The decision on whether primary surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in advanced ovarian cancer was based on age, performance status, clinical and imaging findings. Results A total of 178 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer were operated on during this four year period. Among them 28 patients were recurrent cases, 22 had early stages of ovarian cancer, and the rest 128 had stage III and IV ovarian cancer. In these 128 patients, 50(39.1%) underwent primary surgery and 78(60.9%) had NACT followed by surgery. In the primary surgery group 36(72.0%) patients had optimal debulking while in the NACT group 59(75.6%) patient had optimal debulking. With a median follow-up of 34 months, the median overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) was 53 and 49 months respectively. Patients who underwent primary surgery had better median PFS than patients who had NACT (56 months versus 39 months, p = 0.002). In stage III C the difference median PFS was significant for those treated with primary surgery when compared with NACT (55 months versus 39 months, p = 0.012). In patients who had optimal debulking to no residual disease (n = 90), primary surgery gave a significant improved PFS (59 months versus 38 months, p = 0.001) when compared with NACT. In univariate analysis, NACT was associated with increased risk of death (HR: 0.350; CI: 0.177–0.693). Conclusion In advanced epithelial ovarian cancer, primary surgery

  4. Small renal masses: The molecular markers associated with outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirina, L. V.; Usynin, Y. A.; Kondakova, I. V.; Yurmazov, Z. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Pikalova, L. V.

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of molecular mechanisms of tumor cell behavior in small renal masses is required to achieve the better cancer survival. The aim of the study is to find molecular markers associated with outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less. A homogenous group of 20 patients T1N0M0-1 (mean age 57.6 ± 2.2 years) with kidney cancer was selected for the present analysis. The content of transcription and growth factors was determined by ELISA. The levels of AKT-mTOR signaling pathway components were measured by Western blotting analysis. The molecular markers associated with unfavorable outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less were high levels of NF-kB p50, NF-kB p65, HIF-1, HIF-2, VEGF and CAIX. AKT activation with PTEN loss also correlated with the unfavorable outcome of kidney cancer patients with tumor size 7 cm or less. It is observed that the biological features of kidney cancer could predict the outcome of patients.

  5. Role of Tertiary Lymphoid Structures (TLS) in Anti-Tumor Immunity: Potential Tumor-Induced Cytokines/Chemokines that Regulate TLS Formation in Epithelial-Derived Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, Erica M.; Barnes, Betsy J.

    2014-01-01

    Following the successes of monoclonal antibody immunotherapies (trastuzumab (Herceptin®) and rituximab (Rituxan®)) and the first approved cancer vaccine, Provenge® (sipuleucel-T), investigations into the immune system and how it can be modified by a tumor has become an exciting and promising new field of cancer research. Dozens of clinical trials for new antibodies, cancer and adjuvant vaccines, and autologous T and dendritic cell transfers are ongoing in hopes of identifying ways to re-awaken the immune system and force an anti-tumor response. To date, however, few consistent, reproducible, or clinically-relevant effects have been shown using vaccine or autologous cell transfers due in part to the fact that the immunosuppressive mechanisms of the tumor have not been overcome. Much of the research focus has been on re-activating or priming cytotoxic T cells to recognize tumor, in some cases completely disregarding the potential roles that B cells play in immune surveillance or how a solid tumor should be treated to maximize immunogenicity. Here, we will summarize what is currently known about the induction or evasion of humoral immunity via tumor-induced cytokine/chemokine expression and how formation of tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) within the tumor microenvironment may be used to enhance immunotherapy response. PMID:24762633

  6. Recurrent patterns of DNA methylation in the ZNF154, CASP8, and VHL promoters across a wide spectrum of human solid epithelial tumors and cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Vega, Francisco; Gotea, Valer; Petrykowska, Hanna M; Margolin, Gennady; Krivak, Thomas C; DeLoia, Julie A; Bell, Daphne W; Elnitski, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The study of aberrant DNA methylation in cancer holds the key to the discovery of novel biological markers for diagnostics and can help to delineate important mechanisms of disease. We have identified 12 loci that are differentially methylated in serous ovarian cancers and endometrioid ovarian and endometrial cancers with respect to normal control samples. The strongest signal showed hypermethylation in tumors at a CpG island within the ZNF154 promoter. We show that hypermethylation of this locus is recurrent across solid human epithelial tumor samples for 15 of 16 distinct cancer types from TCGA. Furthermore, ZNF154 hypermethylation is strikingly present across a diverse panel of ENCODE cell lines, but only in those derived from tumor cells. By extending our analysis from the Illumina 27K Infinium platform to the 450K platform, to sequencing of PCR amplicons from bisulfite treated DNA, we demonstrate that hypermethylation extends across the breadth of the ZNF154 CpG island. We have also identified recurrent hypomethylation in two genomic regions associated with CASP8 and VHL. These three genes exhibit significant negative correlation between methylation and gene expression across many cancer types, as well as patterns of DNaseI hypersensitivity and histone marks that reflect different chromatin accessibility in cancer vs. normal cell lines. Our findings emphasize hypermethylation of ZNF154 as a biological marker of relevance for tumor identification. Epigenetic modifications affecting the promoters of ZNF154, CASP8, and VHL are shared across a vast array of tumor types and may therefore be important for understanding the genomic landscape of cancer. PMID:24149212

  7. Endogenous androgens and risk of epithelial invasive ovarian cancer by tumor characteristics in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ose, Jennifer; Fortner, Renée T; Rinaldi, Sabina; Schock, Helena; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Dossus, Laure; Fournier, Agnes; Baglietto, Laura; Romieu, Isabelle; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Palli, Domenico; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; Ramon Quiros, Jose; Obón-Santacana, Mireia; Larrañaga, Nerea; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Sánchez, María-José; Barricarte, Aurelio; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Brändstedt, Jenny; Lundin, Eva; Idahl, Annika; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger T; Lund, Eiliv; Kaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth C; Merritt, Melissa A; Gunther, Marc J; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2015-01-15

    The role of endogenous androgens and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in ovarian carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Epithelial invasive ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous disease and there are no prospective data on endogenous androgens and EOC risk by tumor characteristics (histology, grade, stage) or the dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis (i.e. type I vs. type II, leading to less or more aggressive tumors). We conducted a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort evaluating androgens and SHBG and invasive EOC risk by tumor characteristics. Female participants who provided a blood sample and were not using exogenous hormones at blood donation were eligible (n = 183,257). A total of 565 eligible women developed EOC; two controls (n = 1,097) were matched per case. We used multivariable conditional logistic regression models. We observed no association between androgens, SHBG and EOC overall. A doubling of androstenedione reduced risk of serous carcinomas by 21% (odds ratio (OR)log2 = 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.64-0.97]). Moreover, associations differed for low-grade and high-grade carcinomas, with positive associations for low-grade and inverse associations for high-grade carcinomas (e.g. androstenedione: low grade: ORlog2 = 1.99 [0.98-4.06]; high grade: ORlog2 = 0.75 [0.61-0.93], phet ≤ 0.01), similar associations were observed for type I/II tumors. This is the first prospective study to evaluate androgens, SHBG and EOC risk by tumor characteristics and type I/II status. Our findings support a possible role of androgens in ovarian carcinogenesis. Additional studies exploring this association are needed. PMID:24890047

  8. ING-1(heMAb), a Monoclonal Antibody to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule, Inhibits Tumor Metastases in a Murine Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Harry H.; Scott, Kristen R.; Bautista, Eddie; Ammons, W. Steve

    2003-01-01

    Abstract ING-1(heMAb), a human-engineered monoclonal antibody (MAb) that specifically targets the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM), kills adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of ING-1(heMAb) in a murine model of cancer metastases. Mice received intravenous dosing of 1 mg/kg ING-1(heMAb), twice a week, starting on day 2 or day 5. A negative control group received 1 mg/kg human immunoglobulin G with the same dose frequency starting on day 2. A positive control group received weekly 100 mg/kg 5-flurouracil/leucovorin starting on day 2. ING-1(heMAb)/day 2 treatment significantly reduced both the number of visible tumor nodules in body cavities (P < .01) and the number of metastases on lung surfaces (P < .005). The treatment also resulted in a 91% reduction of micrometastases in lung tissues (P < .0001). Delaying ING-1(heMAb) treatment until day 5 caused 54% reduction in micrometastases (P < .005). Our results indicate that a number of parameters, including treatment starting day, dose level, and dose frequency, are critical in achieving the optimal efficacy of ING-1(heMAb). We conclude that ING-1(heMAb) effectively reduced tumor metastases in a murine cancer model. Immunotherapy with ING-1(heMAb) may be beneficial in treating human metastatic diseases. PMID:14965442

  9. CCL20/macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha production by primary uterine epithelial cells in response to treatment with lipopolysaccharide or Pam3Cys.

    PubMed

    Crane-Godreau, Mardi A; Wira, Charles R

    2005-01-01

    Having previously shown that CCL20/macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) are released by polarized primary rat uterine epithelial cells (UEC) in response to Escherichia coli but not to Lactobacillus rhamnosus, we sought to determine if epithelial cells are responsive to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP), including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and Pam(3)Cys, a bacterial lipoprotein analog. Epithelial cells were grown to confluence on Nunc cell culture inserts prior to apical treatment with PAMPs. In response to LPS, LTA, and Pam(3)Cys (EMC Microcollection GmbH, Tubingen, Germany), CCL20 levels increased (4- to 10-fold) while PAMPs caused increased TNF-alpha (1- to 4-fold) in the medium collected after 24 h of incubation. Both apical and basolateral secretion of CCL20 and TNF-alpha increased in response to PAMPs, but treatments had no effect on cell viability and integrity, as measured by transepithelial resistance. Time course studies of CCL20 and TNF-alpha release in response to Pam(3)Cys and LPS indicated that CCL20 release peaked between 2 and 4 h after treatment, whereas TNF-alpha release was gradual over the length of the incubation. Freeze-thaw and cell lysis experiments, along with actinomycin D studies, suggested that CCL20 and TNF-alpha are synthesized in response to PAMP stimulation. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that E. coli and selected PAMPs have direct effects on the production of CCL20 and TNF-alpha without affecting cell integrity. Since CCL20 is known to be both chemotactic and antimicrobial, the increase in apical and basolateral release by UEC in response to PAMPs suggests a new mechanism of innate immune protection in the female reproductive tract. PMID:15618187

  10. Apical Membrane Localization of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Tumor Suppressor Protein and Subcellular Distribution of the β-Catenin Destruction Complex in Polarized Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein is implicated in the majority of hereditary and sporadic colon cancers. APC is known to function as a tumor suppressor through downregulation of β-catenin as part of a high molecular weight complex known as the β-catenin destruction complex. The molecular composition of the intact complex and its site of action in the cell are still not well understood. Reports on the subcellular localization of APC in various cell systems have differed significantly and have been consistent with an association with a cytosolic complex, with microtubules, with the nucleus, or with the cortical actin cytoskeleton. To better understand the role of APC and the destruction complex in colorectal cancer, we have begun to characterize and isolate these complexes from confluent polarized human colon epithelial cell monolayers and other epithelial cell types. Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy reveal that a predominant fraction of APC associates tightly with the apical plasma membrane in a variety of epithelial cell types. This apical membrane association is not dependent on the mutational status of either APC or β-catenin. An additional pool of APC is cytosolic and fractionates into two distinct high molecular weight complexes, 20S and 60S in size. Only the 20S fraction contains an appreciable portion of the cellular axin and small but detectable amounts of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and β-catenin. Therefore, it is likely to correspond to the previously characterized β-catenin destruction complex. Dishevelled is almost entirely cytosolic, but does not significantly cofractionate with the 20S complex. The disproportionate amount of APC in the apical membrane and the lack of other destruction complex components in the 60S fraction of APC raise questions about whether these pools of APC take part in the degradation of β-catenin, or alternatively, whether they could be involved in other functions of the protein that

  11. Outcome and Prognostic Factors in Endometrial Stromal Tumors: A Rare Cancer Network Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schick, Ulrike; Bolukbasi, Yasmin; Thariat, Juliette; Abdah-Bortnyak, Roxolyana; Kuten, Abraham; Igdem, Sefik; Caglar, Hale; Ozsaran, Zeynep; Loessl, Kristina; Schleicher, Ursula; Zwahlen, Daniel; Villette, Sylviane; Vees, Hansjoerg

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To provide further understanding regarding outcome and prognostic factors of endometrial stromal tumors (EST). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on the records of 59 women diagnosed with EST and treated with curative intent between 1983 and 2007 in the framework of the Rare Cancer Network. Results: Endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESS) were found in 44% and undifferentiated ESS (UES) in 49% of the cases. In 7% the grading was unclear. Of the total number of patients, 33 had Stage I, 4 Stage II, 20 Stage III, and 1 presented with Stage IVB disease. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 12 patients, all with UES. External-beam radiotherapy (RT) was administered postoperatively to 48 women. The median follow-up was 41.4 months. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 96.2% and 64.8% for ESS and UES, respectively, with a corresponding 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate of 49.4% and 43.4%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT was an independent prognostic factor for OS (p = 0.007) and DFS (p = 0.013). Locoregional control, DFS, and OS were significantly associated with age ({<=}60 vs. >60 years), grade (ESS vs. UES), and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (I-II vs. III-IV). Positive lymph node staging had an impact on OS (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The prognosis of ESS differed from that of UES. Endometrial stromal sarcomas had an excellent 5-year OS, whereas the OS in UES was rather low. However, half of ESS patients had a relapse. For this reason, adjuvant treatment such as RT should be considered even in low-grade tumors. Multicenter randomized studies are still warranted to establish clear guidelines.

  12. Clinical outcomes and prognostic factors of adult's Ewing sarcoma family of tumors: single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Helvaci, Kaan; Demirci, Ayse; Sonmez, Ozlem Uysal; Turker, Ibrahim; Afsar, Cigdem Usul; Budakoglu, Burcin; Arslan, Ulku Yalcintas; Oksuzoglu, Omur Berna; Zengin, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Aim of the study was to investigate the demographics of Ewing sarcoma family of tumours (ESTF) patients, treatment alternatives, clinical outcomes, and prognostic factors for survival. Material and methods We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients with ESFT who were admitted to our institute between September 2008 and September 2012. Results The patients included 32 (82.1%) males and seven (17.9%) females of median age 24 (range, 18–66) years. Among the 27 patients with a primary osseous localization, 17 (43.5%) had a central axis localization. Fifteen patients (38.5%) had metastases at the time of diagnosis. Patients were followed up for a median period of 18 (range, 2–134) months. The median event-free survival (EFS) was 23 (range, 1–64) months, and the 1- and 4-year EFS were 60% and 48%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) was 91 (range, 1–188) months, and the 1- and 4-year OS were 78% and 54%, respectively. Gender, age, primary tumor site, and local treatment modalities, either alone or in combination, did not have a significant effect on OS (p = 0.210, p = 0.617, p = 0.644, and p = 0.417, respectively). In contrast, osseous site of peripheral localization, limited stage, and metastasis to the bone significantly affected OS (p = 0.015, p < 0.001, and p = 0.042, respectively). Conclusions ESFTs are aggressive tumors with a high rate of relapse and metastatic potential. Patients with peripheral bone involvement and limited stage had a good prognosis. Appropriate surgical resection, radiotherapy, and aggressive chemotherapy regimens are recommended. PMID:27358593

  13. Deregulated miR-296/S100A4 axis promotes tumor invasion by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wang; Chen, Jiaqi; Chen, Zhaoying; Chen, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    S100A4 represents an important member of the S100 family of small calcium-binding proteins. Increased expression of S100A4 has been observed in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, such as idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. The majority of studies of S100A4 are focused on cancer research; however, the oncogenic roles of S100A4 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remain largely unexplored. In this study, S100A4 expression is significantly up-regulated in ovarian cancer and associated with the clinical stage of EOC patients. Attenuation of S100A4 expression results in decreased cell mobility and metastatic capacity, whereas overexpression of S100A4 enhanced the invasive ability of EOC cells. Then by an integrated informatics analysis and luciferase reporter assay, we identify that miR-296 is a critical upstream regulator of S100A4. In addition, deregulated miR-296/S100A4 axis facilitates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process as demonstrated by altered expression of EMT-related markers. In conclusion, our study reveals that deregulated miR-296/S100A4 promotes tumor progression in EOC, and provides evidence that miR-296/S100A4 axis-related signaling may represent a potential target for EOC therapy. PMID:27186401

  14. Impact of metabolic heterogeneity on tumor growth, invasion, and treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Robertson-Tessi, Mark; Gillies, Robert J; Gatenby, Robert A; Anderson, Alexander RA

    2015-01-01

    Histopathological knowledge that extensive heterogeneity exists between and within tumors has been confirmed and deepened recently by molecular studies. However, the impact of tumor heterogeneity on prognosis and treatment remains as poorly understood as ever. Using a hybrid multi-scale mathematical model of tumor growth in vascularized tissue, we investigated the selection pressures exerted by spatial and temporal variations in tumor microenvironment and the resulting phenotypic adaptations. A key component of this model is normal and tumor metabolism and its interaction with microenvironmental factors. The metabolic phenotype of tumor cells is plastic, and microenvironmental selection leads to increased tumor glycolysis and decreased pH. Once this phenotype emerges, the tumor dramatically changes its behavior due to acid-mediated invasion, an effect that depends on both variations in the tumor cell phenotypes and their spatial distribution within the tumor. In early stages of growth, tumors are stratified, with the most aggressive cells developing within the interior of the tumor. These cells then grow to the edge of the tumor and invade into the normal tissue using acidosis. Simulations suggest that diffusible cytotoxic treatments such as chemotherapy may increase the metabolic aggressiveness of a tumor due to drug-mediated selection. Chemotherapy removes the metabolic stratification of the tumor and allows more aggressive cells to grow towards blood vessels and normal tissue. Anti-angiogenic therapy also selects for aggressive phenotypes due to degradation of the tumor microenvironment, ultimately resulting in a more invasive tumor. In contrast, pH buffer therapy slows down the development of aggressive tumors, but only if administered when the tumor is still stratified. Overall, findings from this model highlight the risks of cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic treatments in the context of tumor heterogeneity resulting from a selection for more aggressive behaviors

  15. The Tumor-Suppressive and Potential Therapeutic Functions of miR-34a in Epithelial Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Brian D.; Parsons, Christine; Slack, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many RNA species have been identified as important players in the development of chronic diseases including cancer. Certain classes of regulatory RNAs such as miRNAs have been investigated in such detail that bona fide tumor suppressive and oncogenic miRNAs have been identified. Because of this, there has been a major effort to therapeutically target these small RNAs. One in particular, a liposomal formulation of miR-34a (MRX34), has entered Phase I trials. Areas Covered This review aims to summarize miRNA biology, its regulation within normal versus disease states, and how it can be targeted therapeutically, with a particular emphasis on miR-34a. Understanding the complexity of a single miRNA will aid in the development of future RNA-based therapeutics for a broader range of chronic diseases. Expert Opinion The potential of miRNAs to be developed into anti-cancer therapeutics has become an increasingly important area of research. miR-34a is a tumor suppressive miRNA across many tumor types through its ability to inhibit cellular proliferation, invasion, and tumor sphere formation. miR-34a also shows promise within certain in vivo solid tumor models. Finally, as miR-34a moves into clinical trials it will be important to determine if it can further sensitize tumors to certain chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26652031

  16. Optimal tumor shrinkage predicts long-term outcome in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with target therapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yang; Ma, Yuxiang; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Jianwei; Hong, Shaodong; Sheng, Jin; Zhang, Zhonghan; Yang, Yunpeng; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Hongyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are used as standard therapies for advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR mutation positive. Because these targeted therapies could cause tumor necrosis and shrinkage, the purpose of the study is to search for a value of optimal tumor shrinkage as an appropriate indicator of outcome for advanced NSCLC. A total of 88 NSCLC enrollees of 3 clinical trials (IRESSA registration clinical trial, TRUST study and ZD6474 study), who received Gefitinib (250 mg, QD), Erlotinib (150 mg, QD), and ZD6474 (100 mg, QD), respectively, during December 2003 and October 2007, were retrospectively analyzed. The response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) were used to identify responders, who had complete response (CR) or partial responses (PR) and nonresponders who had stable disease (SD) or progressive disease (PD). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to find the optimal tumor shrinkage as an indicator for tumor therapeutic outcome. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to compare the progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) between responders and nonresponders stratified based on radiologic criteria. Among the 88 NSCLC patients, 26 were responders and 62 were nonresponders based on RECIST 1.0. ROC indicated that 8.32% tumor diameter shrinkage in the sum of the longest tumor diameter (SLD) was the cutoff point of tumor shrinkage outcomes, resulting in 46 responders (≤8.32%) and 42 nonresponders (≥8.32%). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses indicated that (1) the responders (≤8.32%) and nonresponders (≥ −8.32%) were significantly different in median PFS (13.40 vs 1.17 months, P < 0.001) and OS (19.80 vs 7.90 months, P < 0.001) and (2) –8.32% in SLD could be used as the optimal threshold for PFS (hazard ratio [HR], 8.11, 95% CI, 3.75 to 17.51, P < 0.001) and OS

  17. Cognitive outcomes among survivors of focal low-grade brainstem tumors diagnosed in childhood.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kellie N; Ashford, Jason M; Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S; Klimo, Paul; Merchant, Thomas E; Billups, Catherine A; Conklin, Heather M

    2016-09-01

    Pediatric focal low-grade brainstem tumors are associated with excellent prognosis. Surgical resection and conformal radiation therapy are front-line treatment options; radiation therapy (RT) serves as an excellent treatment for disease progression. Given high survival rates and limited research regarding functional outcomes, the current study examined neurocognitive outcomes in a group of low-grade brainstem glioma survivors. Forty-three survivors of focal low-grade brainstem gliomas underwent neurocognitive assessment (58 % male; median = 6.9 years at diagnosis; median = 14.9 years at latest assessment). Treatment included combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and RT with 70 % ultimately receiving RT. Neurocognitive outcomes were evaluated through retrospective chart review. Intellectual and academic performance were significantly different from normative expectations (full scale IQ = 86.5 ± 16.8; reading comprehension = 91.3 ± 16.4; math reasoning = 88.2 ± 18.9; reference group = 100 ± 15). Further, the percentage performing below average exceeded the expected 16 % in the normative sample (full scale IQ = 43 %; reading comprehension = 37 %; math reasoning = 50 %). Mean parent ratings did not reflect concerns regarding internalizing and externalizing behaviors or executive functioning (internalizing = 54.9 ± 12.7; externalizing = 51.6 ± 14.6, global executive composite = 57.1 ± 16.0; reference group = 50 ± 10); however, the proportion with clinically elevated scores was higher than the expected 16 % (internalizing = 42 %; externalizing = 26 %; global executive composite = 38 %). Mean performance fell below average for visual-motor coordination (81.8 ± 13.2) and parent ratings of adaptive functioning (73.4 ± 24.2), with 65 and 62 % falling outside the average range, respectively. There were no significant differences between

  18. Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Patterns of Failure and Disease-Related Outcomes With or Without Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zagar, Timothy M.; White, Rebekah R.; Willett, Christopher G.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Papavassiliou, Paulie; Papalezova, Katia T.; Guy, Cynthia D.; Broadwater, Gloria; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare and have better disease-related outcomes compared with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although many patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Little is known regarding the use of radiotherapy in the prevention of local recurrence after resection. To better define the role of radiotherapy, we performed an analysis of resected patients at our institution. Methods: Between 1994 and 2009, 33 patients with NET of the pancreatic head and neck underwent treatment with curative intent at Duke University Medical Center. Sixteen patients were treated with surgical resection alone while an additional 17 underwent resection with adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiation therapy, usually with concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CMT). Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy and median follow-up 28 months. Results: Thirteen patients (39%) experienced treatment failure. Eleven of the initial failures were distant, one was local only and one was local and distant. Two-year overall survival was 77% for all patients. Two-year local control for all patients was 87%: 85% for the CMT group and 90% for the surgery alone group (p = 0.38). Two-year distant metastasis-free survival was 56% for all patients: 46% and 69% for the CMT and surgery patients, respectively (p = 0.10). Conclusions: The primary mode of failure is distant which often results in mortality, with local failure occurring much less commonly. The role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant management of NET remains unclear.

  19. Feto-maternal outcomes of pregnancy complicated by ovarian malignant germ cell tumor: a systematic review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Michiko; Grubbs, Brendan H; Blake, Erin A; Cahoon, Sigita S; Murakami, Ryusuke; Kimura, Tadashi; Matsuo, Koji

    2014-10-01

    Malignant germ cell tumors (MGCT) are a rare type of ovarian cancer with poorly understood behavior during pregnancy. This systematic review evaluated feto-maternal outcomes and management patterns of 102 ovarian MGCT-complicated pregnancies identified in PubMed/MEDLINE. Mean age was 25.8. The most common histology type was dysgerminoma (38.2%) followed by yolk sac tumor (30.4%). Abdomino-pelvic pain (35.3%) was the most common symptom. The majority were stage I disease (76.4%) with a mean tumor size of 17.9cm. Most cases had live births (77.5%) at term (56.6%). Tumor surgery without fetal conservation took place in 22 (21.6%) cases (Group 1). This group was characterized by the first trimester tumor detection and intervention, non-viable pregnancy, and frequent concurrent hysterectomy. There were 59 (57.8%) cases which underwent expectant management of pregnancy: mean delay 16.4 weeks for 46 (45.1%) cases with tumor surgery and fetal conservation (Group 2); and 7.8 weeks for 13 (12.7%) cases with tumor surgery after delivery (Group 3). The live birth rate in Groups 2 and 3 was 98.3%. There were 21 (20.6%) cases in which the tumor was incidentally found intra/postpartum (Group 4). Group 2 showed the highest 5-year overall survival rate (92.8%) followed by Group 4 (79.5%), Group 3 (71.4%), and Group 1 (56.2%, p=0.028). Group 1 had more advanced-stage disease when compared to Group 2 (proportion of stages II-IV disease, 36.4% versus 11.4%, p=0.023). In multivariate analysis, age ≤20 (p=0.032) and stages II-IV (p=0.02) remained independent prognosticators for decreased overall survival in all cases. Expectant management of pregnancy was not associated with poor survival outcome in multivariate analysis (p=0.43). In conclusion, our analysis demonstrated that timing of tumor intervention and delivery significantly impacted feto-maternal outcome of ovarian MGCT-complicated pregnancies. It is suggested that early detection and tumor intervention with expectant

  20. Oct4 Mediates Tumor Initiating Properties in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas through the Regulation of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Lo-Lin; Hu, Fang-Wei; Lee, Shiuan-Shinn; Yu, Chuan-Hang; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of Oct4, an important transcription factor of embryonic stem cells (ESC), has been reported in several cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the emerging role of Oct4 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) both in vitro and in vivo. Methodology/Principal Finding Tumourigenic activity and molecular mechanisms of Oct4 overexpression or knockdown by lentiviral infection in OSCC was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Initially, we demonstrated that Oct4 expression was increased in OSCC cell lines as compared to a normal oral epithelial cell line SG. Overexpression of Oct4 was demonstrated to enhance cell proliferation, invasiveness, anchorage-independent growth and xenotransplantation tumourigenicity. These findings were coupled with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transformation in OSCCs. In contrast, the silence of Oct4 significantly blocked the xenograft tumorigenesis of OSCC-derived cancer stem cells (OSCC-CSCs) and significantly improved the recipient survival. Clinically, the level of Oct4 expression was higher in recurrent and metastatic OSCC specimens but lower in primary OSCC specimens. Conclusion/Significance Our results suggest that Oct4-mediated tumorigenecity is associated with the regulation of EMT. Oct4 might be a therapeutic target for OSCC. PMID:24475251

  1. Growth Factor–dependent Activation of αvβ3 Integrin in Normal Epithelial Cells: Implications for Tumor Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Trusolino, Livio; Serini, Guido; Cecchini, Germana; Besati, Cristina; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Marchisio, Pier Carlo; De Filippi, Rosaria

    1998-01-01

    Integrin activation is a multifaceted phenomenon leading to increased affinity and avidity for matrix ligands. To investigate whether cytokines produced during stromal infiltration of carcinoma cells activate nonfunctional epithelial integrins, a cellular system of human thyroid clones derived from normal glands (HTU-5) and papillary carcinomas (HTU-34) was employed. In HTU-5 cells, αvβ3 integrin was diffused all over the membrane, disconnected from the cytoskeleton, and unable to mediate adhesion. Conversely, in HTU-34 cells, αvβ3 was clustered at focal contacts (FCs) and mediated firm attachment and spreading. αvβ3 recruitment at FCs and ligand-binding activity, essentially identical to those of HTU-34, occurred in HTU-5 cells upon treatment with hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF). The HTU-34 clone secreted HGF/SF and its receptor was constitutively tyrosine phosphorylated suggesting an autocrine loop responsible for αvβ3 activated state. Antibody-mediated inhibition of HGF/SF function in HTU-34 cells disrupted αvβ3 enrichment at FCs and impaired adhesion. Accordingly, activation of αvβ3 in normal cells was produced by HTU-34 conditioned medium on the basis of its content of HGF/SF. These results provide the first example of a growth factor–driven integrin activation mechanism in normal epithelial cells and uncover the importance of cytokine-based autocrine loops for the physiological control of integrin activation. PMID:9722624

  2. Reduction in membranous immunohistochemical staining for the intracellular domain of epithelial cell adhesion molecule correlates with poor patient outcome in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, A.; Ramjeesingh, R.; Chen, C.H.; Hurlbut, D.; Hammad, N.; Mulligan, L.M.; Nicol, C.; Feilotter, H.E.; Davey, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (epcam) is a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on both normal epithelium and epithelial neoplasms such as gastric, breast, and renal carcinomas. Recent studies have proposed that the proteolytic cleavage of the intracellular domain of epcam (epcam-icd) can trigger signalling cascades leading to aggressive tumour behavior. The expression profile of epcam-icd has not been elucidated for primary colorectal carcinoma. In the present study, we examined epcam-icd immunohistochemical staining in a large cohort of patients with primary colorectal adenocarcinoma and assessed its performance as a potential prognostic marker. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for epcam-icd was assessed on tissue microarrays consisting of 137 primary colorectal adenocarcinoma samples. Intensity of staining for each core was scored by 3 independent pathologists. The membranous epcam-icd staining score was calculated as a weighted average from 3 core samples per tumour. Univariate analysis of the average scores and clinical outcome measures was performed. Results The level of membranous epcam-icd staining was positively associated with well-differentiated tumours (p = 0.01); low preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (p = 0.001); and several measures of survival, including 2-year (p = 0.02) and 5-year survival (p = 0.05), and length of time post-diagnosis (p = 0.03). A number of other variables—including stage, grade, and lymph node status—showed correlations with epcam staining and markers of poor outcome, but did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Low membranous epcam-icd staining might be a useful marker to identify tumours with aggressive clinical behavior and potential poor prognosis and might help to select candidates who could potentially benefit from treatment targeting epcam. PMID:27330354

  3. Clinical and pathological outcomes after resection of intramedullary spinal cord tumors: a single-institution case series.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Nardin; Tetreault, Lindsay; Santaguida, Carlo; Nater, Anick; Moayeri, Nizar; Massicotte, Eric M; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to identify clinically relevant predictors of progression-free survival and functional outcomes in patients who underwent surgery for intramedullary spinal cord tumors (ISCTs). METHODS An institutional spinal tumor registry and billing records were reviewed to identify adult patients who underwent resection of ISCTs between 1993 and 2014. Extensive data were collected from patient charts and operative notes, including demographic information, extent of resection, tumor pathology, and functional and oncological outcomes. Survival analysis was used to determine important predictors of progression-free survival. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between an "optimal" functional outcome on the Frankel or McCormick scale at 1-year follow-up and various clinical and surgical characteristics. RESULTS The consecutive case series consisted of 63 patients (50.79% female) who underwent resection of ISCTs. The mean age of patients was 41.92 ± 14.36 years (range 17.60-75.40 years). Complete microsurgical resection, defined as no evidence of tumor on initial postoperative imaging, was achieved in 34 cases (54.84%) of the 62 patients for whom this information was available. On univariate analysis, the most significant predictor of progression-free survival was tumor histology (p = 0.0027). Patients with Grade I/II astrocytomas were more likely to have tumor progression than patients with WHO Grade II ependymomas (HR 8.03, 95% CI 2.07-31.11, p = 0.0026) and myxopapillary ependymomas (HR 8.01, 95% CI 1.44-44.34, p = 0.017). Furthermore, patients who underwent radical or subtotal resection were more likely to have tumor progression than those who underwent complete resection (HR 3.46, 95% CI 1.23-9.73, p = 0.018). Multivariate analysis revealed that tumor pathology was the only significant predictor of tumor progression. On univariate analysis, the most significant predictors of an "optimal" outcome on the

  4. Outcomes of Children With Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor and Peritoneal Implants Treated in National Wilms Tumor Studies-4 and -5

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Green, Daniel M.; Haase, Gerald; Anderson, James R.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Grundy, Paul E.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: There are no published reports on the optimal management and survival rates of children with Wilms tumor (WT) and peritoneal implants (PIs). Methods and Materials: Among favorable histology WT patients enrolled in the National Wilms Tumor Study (NWTS)-4 and NWTS-5, 57 children had PIs at the time of nephrectomy. The median age was 3 years 5 months (range, 3 months to 14 years). The majority of children (42 of 57 [74%)] had Stage III tumors; 15 had Stage IV disease. All patients received multimodality therapy. Of 56 children who underwent primary surgery, 48 (84%) had gross total resection of all tumors. All patients received 3-drug chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, and doxorubicin. Whole-abdomen radiotherapy (RT) was used in 47 patients (82%), and in 50 patients (88%) the RT dose was 10.5 Gy. Results: After a median follow-up of 7.5 years, the overall abdominal and systemic tumor control rates were 97% and 93%, respectively. A comparative analysis between children with PIs and those without PIs showed no significant differences in the clinical characteristics between the two groups. The 5-year event-free survival rates with and without PIs were 90% (95% confidence interval, 78-96%) and 83% (95% confidence interval, 81-85%) respectively (p = 0.20). Conclusions: Multimodality therapy with surgery, whole-abdomen RT, and three-drug chemotherapy delivered according to the NWTS-4 and -5 protocols resulted in excellent abdominal and systemic tumor control rates. All children should be monitored in long-term surveillance programs for the early detection and management of therapy-related toxicities.

  5. Immunohistochemical detection of p53 in Wilms' tumors correlates with unfavorable outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Lahoti, C.; Thorner, P.; Malkin, D.; Yeger, H.

    1996-01-01

    The role of p53 in the pathogenesis and progression of Wilms' tumors is only partly understood. Although p53 mutations were initially reported only in anaplastic Wilms' tumors, we had reported that, of two of twenty-one cases that had a p53 mutation, one tumor showed no evidence of anaplasia. To determine the significance of p53 expression in all clinical stages of Wilms' tumor, twenty-eight cases were analyzed for p53 immunoreactivity. Paraffin sections were immunolabeled with two different monoclonal antibodies, recognizing both mutant and wild-type p53. Fifteen of sixteen tumors in the recurrent/metastatic group and three of twelve tumors in the nonmetastatic/nonrecurrent group showed p53 immunopositivity. Only one of three positive tumors in the latter group showed moderate to strong positivity, whereas twelve of sixteen metastatic/recurrent tumors revealed a similar degree of p53 positivity. The positivity was stronger in the metastasis/recurrences as compared with the corresponding primary tumor. Western blot analysis revealed p53 expression in all of the Wilms' tumors tested, suggesting its involvement in the development of Wilms' tumors. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis performed on twenty-three of these tumors revealed p53 mutations in four of fourteen recurrent/metastatic tumors and none in the nonmetastatic/nonrecurrent group. Our results show that, whereas 60% of cases were immunopositive for p53 protein, mutations were detected in only 16% of tumors, indicating that wild-type p53 protein is retained in the other tumors. We conclude that p53 immunopositivity strongly correlates with recurrence/metastasis in Wilms' tumors. Furthermore, the accumulation of p53 in these tumors is not only due to mutations but may also involve stabilization of normal p53 with other proteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8623926

  6. Wilms' tumor after treatment.

    PubMed

    Brisigotti, M; Cozzutto, C; Fabbretti, G; Caliendo, L; Haupt, R; Cornaglia-Ferraris, P; Callea, F

    1992-01-01

    Sixty-one Wilms' tumors (WTs) from 59 patients who received preoperative therapy were studied. Twenty-seven WTs from 26 patients who did not receive preoperative treatment were also reviewed as controls. Marked and diffuse morphological changes occurred in treated cases. Necrosis affected mostly undifferentiated and replicating elements and was extensive, up to 90% of tumor mass. Minimal residual tumor, permitting recognition as Wilms', was always spared. Epithelial and rhabdomyoblastic components were more resistant to treatment; moreover, they appeared to be susceptible to differentiation and maturation. Necrosis and muscle cell differentiation seemed to have prognostic implications. Cases with extensive necrosis (greater than 90%) had a better outcome, although the difference was not statistically significant. The rhabdomyoblast/tumor mass ratio, after treatment, appears to carry prognostic meaning. Chemotherapy had no apparent effect on anaplasia. PMID:1329055

  7. Detection rate and outcome of colonic serrated epithelial changes in patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s colitis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. H.; Khanna, S.; Smyrk, T. C.; Loftus, E. V.; Anderson, K. S.; Mahoney, D. W.; Ahlquist, D. A.; Kisiel, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Chronic ulcerative colitis (CUC) and colonic Crohn’s disease (CD) increase colorectal neoplasia (CRN) risk. While sessile serrated polyp (SSP) is a known cancer precursor, serrated epithelial changes (SEC) are of uncertain prevalence and neoplastic risk. Aim To assess the serrated lesion detection rates in CUC and CD and documented incidence of subsequent CRN in a retrospective, single-centre cohort study. Methods Patients were identified by a central diagnostic index and pathology review confirmed SEC, SSP, CUC and CD diagnoses from 2006–12. Matched controls were identified from among all CUC and CD patients having colonoscopy during the second half of the time period. All were followed for incident CRN, estimated by the Kaplan–Meier method. Results Between 2006 and 2012, 79 SEC and 10 SSP cases were identified. Detection rates were estimated to be 10/1000 and 2/1000 patients, for SEC and SSP respectively, among 4208 unique CUC or CD patients having colonoscopy from 2010–12. With only 10 cases, SSP patients were not further analysed. Cumulative incidence of subsequent CRN at 1 and 3 years was 12% (95% CI, 0–30%) and 30% (3–57%), respectively, in SEC patients compared to 4% (0–12%) and 9% (0–23%), respectively, in CUC or CD controls (P = 0.047, log-rank). However, this statistical difference was not significant after patients were stratified for history of prior or synchronous dysplasia (P = 0.09). Conclusions Serrated epithelial changes and sessile serrated polyps are uncommonly detected by colonoscopy in chronic ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease patients. Histology with changes of serrated epithelium may be associated with risk of subsequent colorectal neoplasia, however further studies are needed to explore this relationship. PMID:24779703

  8. Treatment Outcomes, Growth Height, and Neuroendocrine Functions in Patients With Intracranial Germ Cell Tumors Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Odagiri, Kazumasa; Omura, Motoko; Hata, Masaharu; Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu; Ogino, Ichiro; Kigasawa, Hisato; Adachi, Masataka; Inoue, Tomio

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: We carried out a retrospective review of patients receiving chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for intracranial germ cell tumor (GCT) using a lower dose than those previously reported. To identify an optimal GCT treatment strategy, we evaluated treatment outcomes, growth height, and neuroendocrine functions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GCT, including 4 patients with nongerminomatous GCT (NGGCT) were treated with CRT. The median age at initial diagnosis was 11.5 years (range, 6-19 years). Seventeen patients initially received whole brain irradiation (median dose, 19.8 Gy), and 5 patients, including 4 with NGGCT, received craniospinal irradiation (median dose, 30.6 Gy). The median radiation doses delivered to the primary site were 36 Gy for pure germinoma and 45 Gy for NGGCT. Seventeen patients had tumors adjacent to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA), and 5 had tumors away from the HPA. Results: The median follow-up time was 72 months (range, 18-203 months). The rates of both disease-free survival and overall survival were 100%. The standard deviation scores (SDSs) of final heights recorded at the last assessment tended to be lower than those at initial diagnosis. Even in all 5 patients with tumors located away from the HPA, final height SDSs decreased (p = 0.018). In 16 patients with tumors adjacent to the HPA, 8 showed metabolic changes suggestive of hypothalamic obesity and/or growth hormone deficiency, and 13 had other pituitary hormone deficiencies. In contrast, 4 of 5 patients with tumors away from the HPA did not show any neuroendocrine dysfunctions except for a tendency to short stature. Conclusions: CRT for GCT using limited radiation doses resulted in excellent treatment outcomes. Even after limited radiation doses, insufficient growth height was often observed that was independent of tumor location. Our study suggests that close follow-up of neuroendocrine functions, including growth hormone, is essential for all patients with

  9. Feto-maternal outcomes of pregnancy complicated by ovarian sex-cord stromal tumor: a systematic review of literature.

    PubMed

    Blake, Erin A; Carter, Charelle M; Kashani, Banafsheh N; Kodama, Michiko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsuo, Koji

    2014-04-01

    Sex-cord stromal tumors (SCSTs) are rare ovarian cancers and their behavior during pregnancy is not well understood. To evaluate the maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancy complicated by ovarian SCST, a systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE using entry key words "pregnancy" and each type of ovarian SCST ("sex cord stromal tumor," "granulosa cell tumor," "thecoma," "Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor," or "gynandroblastoma") between 1955 and 2012 that identified 46 cases eligible for the analysis. Clinical characteristics, pregnancy outcome, tumor characteristics, and survival outcomes were evaluated. Serious adverse events were defined as complications related to the SCST that resulted in severe morbidity or mortality for mother, fetus, or both. The most common histology was granulosa cell tumor (22.0%), followed by thecoma (18.6%) and Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (8.5%). Abdomino-pelvic pain (45.7%), palpable mass (30.4%), and virilization (26.1%) were the three most common symptoms. The majority were stage I (76.1%), tumor size <15cm (64.9%), and underwent unilateral adnexectomy (80.4%). Fetal conservation surgery was seen in 54.3%. Most cases had live births (78.3%) at full term (60.9%). Among cases proceeded expectant delay of delivery (45.7%), most cases resulted in live birth (95.2%) with median expectant interval of 20.7 weeks. Maternal and/or fetal serious adverse events (SAEs) were observed in 41.3% with maternal shock/hemoperitoneum being the most common complication (13.0%). Logistic regression test identified younger age (<30 versus ≥30, 73.3% versus 26.7%, odds ratio [OR] 11.7, 95%CI 1.35-101, p=0.026), large tumor (size ≥15cm versus <15cm, 64.9% versus 35.1%, OR 10.0, 95%CI 1.29-26.2, p=0.004), and advanced-stage (stages II-IV versus I, 76.1% versus 23.9%, OR 5.82, 95%CI 2.05-48.9, p=0.022) as risk factors of increased SAE. Overall survival of patients diagnosed with ovarian SCST during pregnancy was comparable to ovarian SCST not

  10. Fusion of CCL21 Non-Migratory Active Breast Epithelial and Breast Cancer Cells Give Rise to CCL21 Migratory Active Tumor Hybrid Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Reith, Georg; Keil, Silvia; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S.; Dittmar, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The biological phenomenon of cell fusion has been linked to tumor progression because several data provided evidence that fusion of tumor cells and normal cells gave rise to hybrid cell lines exhibiting novel properties, such as increased metastatogenic capacity and an enhanced drug resistance. Here we investigated M13HS hybrid cell lines, derived from spontaneous fusion events between M13SV1-EGFP-Neo breast epithelial cells exhibiting stem cell characteristics and HS578T-Hyg breast cancer cells, concerning CCL21/CCR7 signaling. Western Blot analysis showed that all cell lines varied in their CCR7 expression levels as well as differed in the induction and kinetics of CCR7 specific signal transduction cascades. Flow cytometry-based calcium measurements revealed that a CCL21 induced calcium influx was solely detected in M13HS hybrid cell lines. Cell migration demonstrated that only M13HS hybrid cell lines, but not parental derivatives, responded to CCL21 stimulation with an increased migratory activity. Knockdown of CCR7 expression by siRNA completely abrogated the CCL21 induced migration of hybrid cell lines indicating the necessity of CCL21/CCR7 signaling. Because the CCL21/CCR7 axis has been linked to metastatic spreading of breast cancer to lymph nodes we conclude from our data that cell fusion could be a mechanism explaining the origin of metastatic cancer (hybrid) cells. PMID:23667660

  11. Blocking M2 muscarinic receptor signaling inhibits tumor growth and reverses epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qingnan; Gu, Xiajing; Zhang, Chun; Lu, Qin; Chen, Hongzhuan; Xu, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancers express non-neuronal, cholinergic autoparacrine loop, which facilitates tumor growth. Interruption of M3 muscarinic cholinergic signaling has been reported to inhibit small cell lung cancer (SCLC) growth. The purpose of this study is to investigate if blocking autoparacrine muscarinic cholinergic signaling could inhibit non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth and possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that PC9 and A549 cells expressed all 5 subtypes of muscarinic receptor (mAChR) and blocking M2 mAChR (M2R) signaling using selective antagonist methoctramine or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Consistent with AChR agonists stimulating p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) and Akt phosphorylation, blocking M2R signaling decreased MAPK and Akt phosphorylation, indicating that non-neuronal ACh functions as an autoparacrine growth factor signaling in part through activation of M2R and downstream MAPK and Akt pathways. Importantly, further studies revealed that blocking M2R signaling also reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in vitro and in vivo, indicating that non-neuronal ACh promotes EMT partially through activation of M2R. These findings demonstrate that M2R plays a role in the growth and progression of NSCLC and suggest M2R antagonists may be an efficacious adjuvant therapy for NSCLC. PMID:25778781

  12. Combinatorial treatment using targeted MEK and SRC inhibitors synergistically abrogates tumor cell growth and induces mesenchymal-epithelial transition in non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Hsien Chun; Ong, Weijie Richard; Thiery, Jean Paul; Huynh, Hung; Goh, Boon Cher

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is regulated by a complex signal transduction network. Single-agent targeted therapy fails frequently due to treatment insensitivity and acquired resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that co-inhibition of the MAPK and SRC pathways using a PD0325901 and Saracatinib kinase inhibitor combination can abrogate tumor growth in NSCLC. PD0325901/Saracatinib at 0.25:1 combination was screened against a panel of 28 NSCLC cell lines and 68% of cell lines were found to be sensitive (IC50 < 2 μM) to this combination. In Snail1 positive NSCLC lines, the drug combination complementarily enhanced mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET), increasing both E-cadherin and Plakoglobin expression, and reducing Snail1, FAK and PXN expression. In addition, the drug combination abrogated cell migration and matrigel invasion. The co-inhibition of MAPK and SRC induced strong G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in the NSCLC lines, inhibited anchorage independent growth and delayed tumor growth in H460 and H358 mouse xenografts. These data provide rationale for further investigating the combination of MAPK and SRC pathway inhibitors in advanced stage NSCLC. PMID:26358373

  13. Pediatric choroid plexus tumors: epidemiology, treatments, and outcome analysis on 202 children from the SEER database.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Roy W R; Torok, Michelle R; Gallegos, Danielle; Liu, Arthur K; Handler, Michael H; Hankinson, Todd C

    2015-01-01

    Choroid plexus papillomas (CPPs) and carcinomas (CPCs) are rare neoplasms that affect mostly children. Due to their rarity, their epidemiology and outcomes are incompletely understood. The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program is a well-established population-based group of registries that collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data representing approximately 28 % of the US population. SEER-STAT v8.1.2 was used to identify patients with ICD-O-3 codes for choroid plexus tumors in patients aged 0-19. Demographics, initial treatment, and follow-up data were collected. Statistical methods including Kaplan-Meier curves, log rank tests, and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to estimate associations between independent variables and survival. The SEER registries contained 107 CPPs (2004-2010) and 95 CPCs (1978-2010). Median follow-up was 38 and 40 months, respectively. More than 75 % of CPCs were diagnosed before the age of 5 years, versus 48 % for CPPs. Sixty-five percent of CPCs and 57 % of CPPs occurred in males. In both groups at least 90 % of children underwent surgical resection. Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 67.0 % of CPCs and 63.6 % of CPPs. Almost 17 % of CPCs were treated with radiation versus only 0.9 % of CPPs. More than 98 % of patients with CPP were alive at the last follow-up, versus 62 % of CPC patients. For CPC, surgery was significantly associated with increased overall survival, but contrary to previous reports, extent of surgical resection was not associated with survival. Age, sex, race, and radiation treatment also had no effect on survival. This report, using the SEER datasets, corroborates many findings of previous smaller studies on CPTs. CPC occurs in younger children, with a male predominance, and a much worse prognosis than CPP. As such, these tumors have been treated aggressively with high rates of GTR and radiation treatment. Despite these treatments

  14. Activation of muscarinic cholinoceptor ameliorates tumor necrosis factor-α-induced barrier dysfunction in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Rafiqul Islam; Uwada, Junsuke; Yazawa, Takashi; Islam, Md Tariqul; Krug, Susanne M; Fromm, Michael; Karaki, Shin-ichiro; Suzuki, Yuichi; Kuwahara, Atsukazu; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Sada, Kiyonao; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Anisuzzaman, Abu Syed Md; Taniguchi, Takanobu

    2015-11-30

    Impaired intestinal barrier function is one of the critical issues in inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate muscarinic cholinoceptor (mAChR)-mediated signaling for the amelioration of cytokine-induced barrier dysfunction in intestinal epithelium. Rat colon challenged with TNF-α and interferon γ reduced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). This barrier injury was attenuated by muscarinic stimulation. In HT-29/B6 intestinal epithelial cells, muscarinic stimulation suppressed TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB signaling and barrier disruption. Finally, muscarinic stimulation promoted the shedding of TNFR1, which would be a mechanism for the attenuation of TNF-α/NF-κB signaling and barrier disruption via mAChR. PMID:26519558

  15. P11: 18FDG-PET/CT for early prediction of response to first line platinum chemotherapy in advanced thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Giovannella; Ottaviano, Margaret; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Segreto, Sabrina; Tucci, Irene; Damiano, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the value of the metabolic tumor response assessed with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), compared with clinicobiological markers, to predict the response disease to first line platinum based chemotherapy in advanced thymic epithelial tumors (TETs). Methods Twenty patients with diagnosis of TET and stage of disease III and IV sec, Masaoka-Koga, were retrospectively included in this monocentric study. Different pre-treatment clinical, biological and pathological parameters, including histotype sec, WHO 2004 and stage of disease sec, Masaoka-Koga were assessed. Tumor glucose metabolism at baseline and its change after the first line platinum based chemotherapy (from 4 to 6 cycles) were assessed using FDG-PET, moreover the response disease was assessed using total body CT scan for the evaluation of RECIST criteria 1.1. Results Twelve patients had an objective response to the first line platinum based chemotherapy according RECIST criteria 1.1 and all of them started with a SUVmax at baseline major than 5, indeed the other eight patients, non-responders to chemotherapy, had a SUVmax at baseline minor than 5. Conclusions It is important to define the chemosensitivity of advanced TETs early. Combining bio-pathological parameters with the metabolism at baseline assessed with FDG-PET can help the physician to early predict the probability of obtaining a disease response to first line platinum based chemotherapy. The SUVmax cut off of 5 at 18FDG-PET/CT performed at baseline treatment might be a new parameter for choosing the most powerful first line of chemotherapy. Given these results, further prospective studies are needed to establish a new first line therapy in advanced TETs with a low SUVmax at baseline, non-responders to conventional chemotherapy.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-α induces a biphasic change in claudin-2 expression in tubular epithelial cells: role in barrier functions

    PubMed Central

    Amoozadeh, Yasaman; Dan, Qinghong; Xiao, Jenny; Waheed, Faiza

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a pathogenic factor in acute and chronic kidney disease. TNF-α is known to alter expression of epithelial tight junction (TJ) proteins; however, the underlying mechanisms and the impact of this effect on epithelial functions remain poorly defined. Here we describe a novel biphasic effect of TNF-α on TJ protein expression. In LLC-PK1 tubular cells, short-term (1–6 h) TNF-α treatment selectively elevated the expression of the channel-forming TJ protein claudin-2. In contrast, prolonged (>8 h) TNF-α treatment caused a marked downregulation in claudin-2 and an increase in claudin-1, -4, and -7. The early increase and the late decrease in claudin-2 expression involved distinct mechanisms. TNF-α slowed claudin-2 degradation through ERK, causing the early increase. This increase was also mediated by the EGF receptor and RhoA and Rho kinase. In contrast, prolonged TNF-α treatment reduced claudin-2 mRNA levels and promoter activity independent from these signaling pathways. Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing measurements revealed that TNF-α also exerted a biphasic effect on transepithelial resistance (TER) with an initial decrease and a late increase. Thus there was a good temporal correlation between TNF-α-induced claudin-2 protein and TER changes. Indeed, silencing experiments showed that the late TER increase was at least in part caused by reduced claudin-2 expression. Surprisingly, however, claudin-2 silencing did not prevent the early TER drop. Taken together, the TNF-α-induced changes in claudin-2 levels might contribute to TER changes and could also play a role in newly described functions of claudin-2 such as proliferation regulation. PMID:25948735

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-α induces a biphasic change in claudin-2 expression in tubular epithelial cells: role in barrier functions.

    PubMed

    Amoozadeh, Yasaman; Dan, Qinghong; Xiao, Jenny; Waheed, Faiza; Szászi, Katalin

    2015-07-01

    The inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a pathogenic factor in acute and chronic kidney disease. TNF-α is known to alter expression of epithelial tight junction (TJ) proteins; however, the underlying mechanisms and the impact of this effect on epithelial functions remain poorly defined. Here we describe a novel biphasic effect of TNF-α on TJ protein expression. In LLC-PK1 tubular cells, short-term (1-6 h) TNF-α treatment selectively elevated the expression of the channel-forming TJ protein claudin-2. In contrast, prolonged (>8 h) TNF-α treatment caused a marked downregulation in claudin-2 and an increase in claudin-1, -4, and -7. The early increase and the late decrease in claudin-2 expression involved distinct mechanisms. TNF-α slowed claudin-2 degradation through ERK, causing the early increase. This increase was also mediated by the EGF receptor and RhoA and Rho kinase. In contrast, prolonged TNF-α treatment reduced claudin-2 mRNA levels and promoter activity independent from these signaling pathways. Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing measurements revealed that TNF-α also exerted a biphasic effect on transepithelial resistance (TER) with an initial decrease and a late increase. Thus there was a good temporal correlation between TNF-α-induced claudin-2 protein and TER changes. Indeed, silencing experiments showed that the late TER increase was at least in part caused by reduced claudin-2 expression. Surprisingly, however, claudin-2 silencing did not prevent the early TER drop. Taken together, the TNF-α-induced changes in claudin-2 levels might contribute to TER changes and could also play a role in newly described functions of claudin-2 such as proliferation regulation. PMID:25948735

  18. MGMT Promoter Methylation Is Prognostic but Not Predictive for Outcome to Adjuvant PCV Chemotherapy in Anaplastic Oligodendroglial Tumors: A Report From EORTC Brain Tumor Group Study 26951

    PubMed Central

    van den Bent, Martin J.; Dubbink, Hendrikus J.; Sanson, Marc; van der Lee-Haarloo, Cathleen R.; Hegi, Monika; Jeuken, Judith W.M.; Ibdaih, Ahmed; Brandes, Alba A.; Taphoorn, Martin J.B.; Frenay, Marc; Lacombe, Denis; Gorlia, Thierry; Dinjens, Winand N.M.; Kros, Johan M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose O6-methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation has been shown to predict survival of patients with glioblastomas if temozolomide is added to radiotherapy (RT). It is unknown if MGMT promoter methylation is also predictive to outcome to RT followed by adjuvant procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy in patients with anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors (AOT). Patients and Methods In the European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer study 26951, 368 patients with AOT were randomly assigned to either RT alone or to RT followed by adjuvant PCV. From 165 patients of this study, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissue was available for MGMT promoter methylation analysis. This was investigated with methylation specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Results In 152 cases, an MGMT result was obtained, in 121 (80%) cases MGMT promoter methylation was observed. Methylation strongly correlated with combined loss of chromosome 1p and 19q loss (P = .00043). In multivariate analysis, MGMT promoter methylation, 1p/19q codeletion, tumor necrosis, and extent of resection were independent prognostic factors. The prognostic significance of MGMT promoter methylation was equally strong in the RT arm and the RT/PCV arm for both progression-free survival and overall survival. In tumors diagnosed at central pathology review as glioblastoma, no prognostic effect of MGMT promoter methylation was observed. Conclusion In this study, on patients with AOT MGMT promoter methylation was of prognostic significance and did not have predictive significance for outcome to adjuvant PCV chemotherapy. The biologic effect of MGMT promoter methylation or pathogenetic features associated with MGMT promoter methylation may be different for AOT compared with glioblastoma. PMID:19901104

  19. Identification of Cyclin B1 as a Shared Human Epithelial Tumor-Associated Antigen Recognized by T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Henry; Marto, Jarrod A.; Hoffmann, Thomas K.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Finkelstein, Sydney D.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Hunt, Donald F.; Finn, Olivera J.

    2001-01-01

    We eluted peptides from class I molecules of HLA-A2.1+ breast adenocarcinoma and loaded reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractions onto dendritic cells to prime naive CD8+ T cells. Fractions that supported growth of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes were analyzed by nano-HPLC micro-ESI tandem mass spectrometry. Six HLA-A2.1-binding peptides, four 9-mers (P1-P4) differing in the COOH-terminal residue, and two 10-mers (P5 and P6) with an additional COOH-terminal alanine, were identified in one fraction. Peptide sequences were homologous to cyclin B1. We primed CD8+ T cells from another HLA-A2.1+ healthy donor with synthetic peptides and generated P4-specific responses. We also detected memory T cells specific for one or more of these peptides in patients with breast cancer and squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN). T cells from one patient, restimulated once in vitro, could kill the tumor cell line from which the peptides were derived. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor lines and tissue sections showed cyclin B1 overexpression and aberrant localization in the cytoplasm instead of the nucleus. Sequencing genomic DNA and cDNA corresponding to P1–P6 region showed that differences in COOH-terminal residues were not due to either DNA mutations or errors in transcription, suggesting a high error rate in translation of cyclin B1 protein in tumors. PMID:11696596

  20. Reversible Human TGF-β Signal Shifting between Tumor Suppression and Fibro-Carcinogenesis: Implications of Smad Phospho-Isoforms for Hepatic Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transitions.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Katsunori; Murata, Miki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) are observed during both physiological liver wound healing and the pathological fibrotic/carcinogenic (fibro-carcinogenetic) process. TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokine are considered to be the major factors accelerating liver fibrosis and promoting liver carcinogenesis. Smads, consisting of intermediate linker regions connecting Mad homology domains, act as the intracellular mediators of the TGF-β signal transduction pathway. As the TGF-β receptors, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase, differentially phosphorylate Smad2/3, we have generated numerous antibodies against linker (L) and C-terminal (C) phosphorylation sites in Smad2/3 and identified four types of phosphorylated forms: cytostatic COOH-terminally-phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C), mitogenic pSmad3L (Ser-213) signaling, fibrogenic pSmad2L (Ser-245/250/255)/C signaling and migratory pSmad2/3L (Thr-220/179)/C signaling. After acute liver injury, TGF-β upregulates pSmad3C signaling and terminates pSmad3L (Ser-213)-mediated hepatocyte proliferation. TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines cooperatively enhance collagen synthesis by upregulating pSmad2L (Thr-220)/C and pSmad3L (Thr-179)/C pathways in activated hepatic stellate cells. During chronic liver injuries, hepatocytes persistently affected by TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines eventually become pre-neoplastic hepatocytes. Both myofibroblasts and pre-neoplastic hepatocyte exhibit the same carcinogenic (mitogenic) pSmad3L (Ser-213) and fibrogenic pSmad2L (Ser-245/250/255)/C signaling, with acquisition of fibro-carcinogenic properties and increasing risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Firstly, we review phospho-Smad-isoform signalings in epithelial and mesenchymal cells in physiological and pathological conditions and then consider Smad linker phosphorylation as a potential target for pathological EMT during human fibro-carcinogenesis, because human

  1. Reversible Human TGF-β Signal Shifting between Tumor Suppression and Fibro-Carcinogenesis: Implications of Smad Phospho-Isoforms for Hepatic Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Katsunori; Murata, Miki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) are observed during both physiological liver wound healing and the pathological fibrotic/carcinogenic (fibro-carcinogenetic) process. TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokine are considered to be the major factors accelerating liver fibrosis and promoting liver carcinogenesis. Smads, consisting of intermediate linker regions connecting Mad homology domains, act as the intracellular mediators of the TGF-β signal transduction pathway. As the TGF-β receptors, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase, differentially phosphorylate Smad2/3, we have generated numerous antibodies against linker (L) and C-terminal (C) phosphorylation sites in Smad2/3 and identified four types of phosphorylated forms: cytostatic COOH-terminally-phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C), mitogenic pSmad3L (Ser-213) signaling, fibrogenic pSmad2L (Ser-245/250/255)/C signaling and migratory pSmad2/3L (Thr-220/179)/C signaling. After acute liver injury, TGF-β upregulates pSmad3C signaling and terminates pSmad3L (Ser-213)-mediated hepatocyte proliferation. TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines cooperatively enhance collagen synthesis by upregulating pSmad2L (Thr-220)/C and pSmad3L (Thr-179)/C pathways in activated hepatic stellate cells. During chronic liver injuries, hepatocytes persistently affected by TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines eventually become pre-neoplastic hepatocytes. Both myofibroblasts and pre-neoplastic hepatocyte exhibit the same carcinogenic (mitogenic) pSmad3L (Ser-213) and fibrogenic pSmad2L (Ser-245/250/255)/C signaling, with acquisition of fibro-carcinogenic properties and increasing risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Firstly, we review phospho-Smad-isoform signalings in epithelial and mesenchymal cells in physiological and pathological conditions and then consider Smad linker phosphorylation as a potential target for pathological EMT during human fibro-carcinogenesis, because human

  2. Pigment epithelial-derived factor gene loaded novel COOH-PEG-PLGA-COOH nanoparticles promoted tumor suppression by systemic administration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ting; Xu, Bei; He, Lili; Xia, Shan; Chen, Yan; Zeng, Jun; Liu, Yongmei; Li, Shuangzhi; Tan, Xiaoyue; Ren, Ke; Yao, Shaohua; Song, Xiangrong

    2016-01-01

    Anti-angiogenesis has been proposed as an effective therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is one of the most powerful endogenous anti-angiogenic reagents discovered to date and PEDF gene therapy has been recognized as a promising treatment option for various tumors. There is an urgent need to develop a safe and valid vector for its systemic delivery. Herein, a novel gene delivery system based on the newly synthesized copolymer COOH-PEG-PLGA-COOH (CPPC) was developed in this study, which was probably capable of overcoming the disadvantages of viral vectors and cationic lipids/polymers-based nonviral carriers. PEDF gene loaded CPPC nanoparticles (D-NPs) were fabricated by a modified double-emulsion water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) solvent evaporation method. D-NPs with uniform spherical shape had relatively high drug loading (~1.6%), probably because the introduced carboxyl group in poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) terminal enhanced the interaction of copolymer with the PEDF gene complexes. An excellent in vitro antitumor effect was found in both C26 and A549 cells treated by D-NPs, in which PEDF levels were dramatically elevated due to the successful transfection of PEDF gene. D-NPs also showed a strong inhibitory effect on proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro and inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis in vivo by an alginate-encapsulated tumor cell assay. Further in vivo antitumor investigation, carried out in a C26 subcutaneous tumor model by intravenous injection, demonstrated that D-NPs could achieve a significant antitumor activity with sharply reduced microvessel density and significantly promoted tumor cell apoptosis. Additionally, the in vitro hemolysis analysis and in vivo serological and biochemical analysis revealed that D-NPs had no obvious toxicity. All the data indicated that the novel CPPC nanoparticles were ideal vectors for the systemic delivery of PEDF gene and might be widely

  3. Angiomyolipoma With Epithelial Cysts.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, Michael A; Rao, Priya

    2016-06-01

    Angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts is a rare mesenchymal tumor of the kidney that enters in the differential diagnosis of adult cystic renal neoplasms. These tumors demonstrate a slight female predominance and can present either incidentally or with symptoms, commonly flank pain and hematuria. Unlike conventional angiomyolipoma, this variant is characterized grossly by both solid and cystic areas, and histologically by the presence of single or multiple cysts lined by epithelial cells, a subepithelial "cambium-like" layer of small stromal cells with a prominent capillary vasculature, and a thick exterior wall composed of poorly formed fascicles of smooth muscle and thick-walled dysplastic blood vessels. Tumors show a distinct immunohistochemical profile and are often reactive for melanocytic markers (HMB-45 and Melan-A), as well as estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor. These tumors have an indolent clinical course, with no reports of progression or metastasis in reported cases thus far. PMID:27232352

  4. Prognostic Significance of Tumor Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1{alpha} Expression for Outcome After Radiotherapy in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Priyamal; Slevin, Nick J.; Sloan, Philip; Valentine, Helen; Cresswell, Jo; Ryder, David; Price, Patricia; Homer, Jarrod J.; West, Catharine

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a heterogeneous group of patients in terms of subsite, treatment, and biology. Currently most management decisions are based on clinical parameters with little appreciation of patient differences in underlying tumor biology. We investigated the prognostic significance of clinicopathologic features and tumor hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) expression in a homogeneous series of patients who underwent radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: An audit identified 133 consecutive patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil or tongue base. All patients received primary radiotherapy between 1996 and 2001. Tumor HIF-1{alpha} expression was examined in 79 patients. Results: Features associated with poor locoregional control were low Hb level (p = 0.05) and advancing T (p = 0.008), N (p = 0.03), and disease (p = 0.008) stage. HIF-1{alpha} expression was a more significant adverse prognostic factor in the tonsil (hazard ratio [HR], 23.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]. 3.04-176.7) than the tongue-base tumor (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.14-7.19) group (p = 0.03, test for interaction). High tumor HIF-1{alpha} expression was associated with low blood Hb levels (p = 0.03). In a multivariate analysis HIF-1{alpha} expression retained prognostic significance for locoregional control (HR, 7.10; 95% CI, 3.07-16.43) and cancer-specific survival (HR, 9.19; 95% CI, 3.90-21.6). Conclusions: There are significant differences in radiation therapy outcome within a homogeneous subsite of the oropharynx related to molecular marker expression. The work highlights the importance of studying homogeneous groups of patients in HNSCC, and the complex interrelationships between tumor biology and clinicopathologic factors. The establishment of tumor-type specific markers would represent a major advance in this area.

  5. Neutrophil alveolitis in bronchioloalveolar carcinoma: induction by tumor-derived interleukin-8 and relation to clinical outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Bellocq, A.; Antoine, M.; Flahault, A.; Philippe, C.; Crestani, B.; Bernaudin, J. F.; Mayaud, C.; Milleron, B.; Baud, L.; Cadranel, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tumor infiltrate, predominantly constituted by lymphocytes, may represent an important prognostic factor in bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), in addition to tumor extension and histological type. In the present study, we determined the presence, the origin, and the prognostic importance of neutrophils that also participate in leukocyte infiltrates of BAC. Neutrophil alveolitis was determined immunohistochemically in both lung biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples from 29 patients with histologically proved BAC. The local expression of interleukin (IL)-8 was determined by immunohistochemical and immunoenzymatic techniques. Neutrophil counts were analyzed in relation to the clinical outcome of patients by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox's univariate and stepwise multivariate models. Lymphocytes and neutrophils dominated the inflammatory cell population in the lower respiratory tract of patients with BAC. Neutrophils were located mainly in the alveolar lumen and seldom in alveolar wall whereas lymphocytes were exclusively present in alveolar wall. A relationship was observed between the number of neutrophils and the level of IL-8 in BAL fluid suggesting the involvement of that chemokine in neutrophil recruitment. The tumor cells were the predominant cells that appeared to express IL-8 by immunolocalization. The presence of increased numbers of neutrophils was significantly associated with a poorer outcome in patients with BAC (P = 0.02). In a multivariate analysis, the neutrophil percentage in BAL fluid was an independent predictor of clinical outcome. The risk of death was increased substantially (rate ratio, 5.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 24.7) among patients with BAL neutrophil percentage of > or = 39% (median of the distribution) as compared with the others. In BAC, neutrophils accumulate in the alveolar lumen. Elaboration of IL-8 by tumor cells may be responsible for this event, which is associated with a significantly higher risk of

  6. Gallium-67 imaging: A predictor of residual tumor viability and clinical outcome in patients with diffuse large-cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, W.D.; Jochelson, M.S.; Herman, T.S.; Nadler, L.M.; Stomper, P.C.; Takvorian, T.; Andersen, J.W.; Canellos, G.P. )

    1990-12-01

    Durable complete remissions (CRs) can be achieved in patients with diffuse large-cell lymphoma (DLCL) with multidrug chemotherapy. The length of time to reach CR may be predictive of treatment outcome. However, defining CR by chest radiograph or computed tomography (CT) is often difficult since residual abnormalities do not always indicate residual disease. We have prospectively evaluated the ability of gallium-67 citrate (Ga-67) imaging to define residual disease and predict outcome in 37 consecutive patients with DLCL. Patients received 296 to 370 megabecquerels (MBq) Ga-67 and were imaged prior to, following cycles 4 to 6, and at completion of intensive chemotherapy. Ga-67 scan results were correlated with radiographic studies. Seventeen of 37 patients (46%) showed persistent, abnormal Ga-67 uptake halfway through chemotherapy. Of these, four were in CR, 11 were in partial remission (PR), and two showed no change in tumor size. At follow-up, 10 (59%) have died (three who were scored as CR and seven who were in PR halfway through therapy), two are alive with active tumor, one relapsed and survives following bone marrow transplant, and four (three in PR and one in CR at the therapeutic halfway point) are without disease at a median of 28 months from presentation. Of the 20 patients who were Ga-67-negative halfway through therapy, 11 were in CR and nine were in PR. Five of 20 patients (25%) have died. Three, in radiographic CR died at 11, 26, and 28 months, and two in radiographic PR died at 15 and 17 months. One patient is alive with active tumor, and 14 patients (70%) are alive without disease at a median of 34 months from presentation. Ga-67 imaging proved to be an excellent indicator of residual viable tumor; a positive scan halfway through therapy predicted for a poor outcome and may well justify a change in treatment.

  7. Systemic Inflammation, Nutritional Status and Tumor Immune Microenvironment Determine Outcome of Resected Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alifano, Marco; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Lococo, Filippo; Roche, Nicolas; Bobbio, Antonio; Canny, Emelyne; Schussler, Olivier; Dermine, Hervé; Régnard, Jean-François; Burroni, Barbara; Goc, Jérémy; Biton, Jérôme; Ouakrim, Hanane; Cremer, Isabelle; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Damotte, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypothesizing that nutritional status, systemic inflammation and tumoral immune microenvironment play a role as determinants of lung cancer evolution, the purpose of this study was to assess their respective impact on long-term survival in resected non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). Methods and Findings Clinical, pathological and laboratory data of 303 patients surgically treated for NSCLC were retrospectively analyzed. C-reactive protein (CRP) and prealbumin levels were recorded, and tumoral infiltration by CD8+ lymphocytes and mature dendritic cells was assessed. We observed that factors related to nutritional status, systemic inflammation and tumoral immune microenvironment were correlated; significant correlations were also found between these factors and other relevant clinical-pathological parameters. With respect to outcome, at univariate analysis we found statistically significant associations between survival and the following variables: Karnofsky index, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, CRP levels, prealbumin concentrations, extent of resection, pathologic stage, pT and pN parameters, presence of vascular emboli, and tumoral infiltration by either CD8+ lymphocytes or mature dendritic cells and, among adenocarcinoma type, tumor grade (all p<0.05). In multivariate analysis, prealbumin levels (Relative Risk (RR): 0.34 [0.16–0.73], p = 0.0056), CD8+ cell count in tumor tissue (RR = 0.37 [0.16–0.83], p = 0.0162), and disease stage (RR 1.73 [1.03–2.89]; 2.99[1.07–8.37], p = 0.0374- stage I vs II vs III-IV) were independent prognostic markers. When taken together, parameters related to systemic inflammation, nutrition and tumoral immune microenvironment allowed robust prognostic discrimination; indeed patients with undetectable CRP, high (>285 mg/L) prealbumin levels and high (>96/mm2) CD8+ cell count had a 5-year survival rate of 80% [60.9–91.1] as compared to 18% [7.9–35.6] in patients with an opposite

  8. A Phase I/II Trial of Belinostat in Combination with Cisplatin, Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide in Thymic Epithelial Tumors: A Clinical And Translational Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anish; Rajan, Arun; Szabo, Eva; Tomita, Yusuke; Carter, Corey A.; Scepura, Barbara; Lopez-Chavez, Ariel; Lee, Min-Jung; Redon, Christophe E.; Frosch, Ari; Peer, Cody J.; Chen, Yuanbin; Piekarz, Richard; Steinberg, Seth M.; Trepel, Jane B.; Figg, William D.; Schrump, David S.; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This phase I/II study sought to determine the safety and maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of a novel schedule of belinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor administered prior to and in combination with cisplatin (P), doxorubicin (A) and cyclophosphamide (C) in thymic epithelial tumors (TET). Anti-tumor activity, pharmacokinetics, and biomarkers of response were also assessed. Patients and methods Patients with advanced, unresectable TET received increasing doses of belinostat as a continuous intravenous infusion over 48-hours with chemotherapy in 3-week cycles. In phase II, belinostat at the MTD was used. Results 26 patients were enrolled (thymoma: 12; thymic carcinoma: 14). Dose-limiting toxicities at 2000 mg/m2 belinostat were grade 3 nausea and diarrhea and grade 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, respectively, in two patients. 24 patients were treated at the MTD of 1000 mg/m2 with chemotherapy (P 50 mg/m2 on day 2; A 25 mg/m2 on days 2, 3; C 500 mg/m2 on day 3). Objective response rates in thymoma and thymic carcinoma were 64% [95% confidence interval: 30.8%–89.1%] and 21% (4.7%–50.8%) respectively. Modulation of pharmacodynamic markers of HDAC-inhibition and declines in regulatory T cell (Tregs) and exhausted CD8+ T cell populations were observed. Decline in Tregs was associated with response (p=0.0041) and progression-free survival (p=0.021). Declines in TIM-3+ CD8+T cells were larger in responders than non-responders (p=0.049). Conclusion This study identified the MTD of belinostat in combination with PAC and indicates that the combination is active and feasible in TETs. Immunomodulatory effects on regulatory T cells and TIM3+ CD8+ T cells warrant further study. PMID:25189481

  9. Withaferin A inhibits experimental epithelial-mesenchymal transition in MCF-10A cells and suppresses vimentin protein level in vivo in breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joomin; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Marcus, Adam I; Singh, Shivendra V

    2015-06-01

    We have shown previously that withaferin A (WA), a bioactive component of the medicinal plant Withania somnifera, inhibits growth of cultured and xenografted human breast cancer cells and prevents breast cancer development and pulmonary metastasis incidence in a transgenic mouse model. The present study was undertaken to determine if the anticancer effect of WA involved inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Experimental EMT induced by exposure of MCF-10A cells to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β) was partially reversed by treatment with WA but not by its structural analogs withanone or withanolide A. Combined TNF-α and TGF-β treatments conferred partial protection against MCF-10A cell migration inhibition by WA. Inhibition of TNF-α and TGF-β-induced MCF-10A cell migration by WA exposure was modestly attenuated by knockdown of E-cadherin protein. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells exposed to WA exhibited sustained (MCF-7) or transient (MDA-MB-231) induction of E-cadherin protein. On the other hand, the level of vimentin protein was increased markedly after 24 h treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with WA. WA-induced apoptosis was not affected by vimentin protein knockdown in MDA-MB-231 cells. Protein level of vimentin was significantly lower in the MDA-MB-231 xenografts as well as in MMTV-neu tumors from WA-treated mice compared with controls. The major conclusions of the present study are that (a) WA treatment inhibits experimental EMT in MCF-10A cells, and (b) mammary cancer growth inhibition by WA administration is associated with suppression of vimentin protein expression in vivo. PMID:24293234

  10. Quick chip assay using locked nucleic acid modified epithelial cell adhesion molecule and nucleolin aptamers for the capture of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Maremanda, Nihal G; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-09-01

    The role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in disease diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring of the therapeutic efficacy, and clinical decision making is immense and has attracted tremendous focus in the last decade. We designed and fabricated simple, flat channel microfluidic devices polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS based) functionalized with locked nucleic acid (LNA) modified aptamers (targeting epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and nucleolin expression) for quick and efficient capture of CTCs and cancer cells. With optimized flow rates (10 μl/min), it was revealed that the aptamer modified devices offered reusability for up to six times while retaining optimal capture efficiency (>90%) and specificity. High capture sensitivity (92%) and specificity (100%) was observed in whole blood samples spiked with Caco-2 cells (10-100 cells/ml). Analysis of blood samples obtained from 25 head and neck cancer patients on the EpCAM LNA aptamer functionalized chip revealed that an average count of 5 ± 3 CTCs/ml of blood were captured from 22/25 samples (88%). EpCAM intracellular domain (EpICD) immunohistochemistry on 9 oral squamous cell carcinomas showed the EpICD positivity in the tumor cells, confirming the EpCAM expression in CTCs from head and neck cancers. These microfluidic devices also maintained viability for in vitro culture and characterization. Use of LNA modified aptamers provided added benefits in terms of cost effectiveness due to increased reusability and sustainability of the devices. Our results present a robust, quick, and efficient CTC capture platform with the use of simple PDMS based devices that are easy to fabricate at low cost and have an immense potential in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic planning. PMID:26487896

  11. Radiofrequency ablation for lung tumors: outcomes, effects on survival, and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Akhan, Okan; Güler, Ezgi; Akıncı, Devrim; Çiftçi, Türkmen; Köse, Ilgaz Çağatay

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the survival benefit achieved with radiofrequency (RF) ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors and determine significant prognostic factors for recurrence-free survival. METHODS Forty-nine patients with lung cancer (10 primary and 39 metastatic) underwent computed tomography-guided percutaneous RF ablation between June 2005 and October 2013. A total of 112 tumors (101 metastatic and 11 primary non-small cell lung cancer) were treated with RF ablation. Tumor diameter ranged from 0.6 to 4 cm (median 1.5 cm). Effectiveness of treatment, complications, and survival were analyzed. RESULTS Primary success rate was 79.5% and local tumor progression occurred in 23 tumors. Among tumors showing progression, 10 were re-treated with RF ablation and secondary success rate was 87.5%. One-, two-, and three-year overall survival rates of 10 patients with primary lung cancer were 100%, 86%, and 43%, respectively. One-, two-, three-, four-, and five-year overall survival rates for 39 patients with metastatic lung tumors were 90%, 73%, 59%, 55%, and 38%, respectively. One-, two-, three-, and four-year overall survival rates for 16 patients with colorectal pulmonary metastases were 94%, 80%, 68%, and 23%, respectively. Complications occurred in 30 sessions (24.6%). Pneumothorax occurred in 19 sessions with seven requiring image-guided percutaneous chest tube drainage. Tumor status (solitary or multiple) and presence of extrapulmonary metastasis at initial RF ablation were significant prognostic factors in terms of recurrence-free survival. CONCLUSION RF ablation is a safe and effective treatment with a survival benefit for selected patients with primary and secondary lung tumors. PMID:26611111

  12. Tumor necrosis factor α induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and promotes metastasis via NF-κB signaling pathway-mediated TWIST expression in hypopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liang; Mu, Yakui; Sa, Na; Wang, Haibo; Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important mechanism in cancer metastasis. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) can induce cancer invasion and metastasis associated with EMT. However, the underlying mechanisms are not entirely clear. Therefore, we investigated whether TNFα has an effect on EMT and invasion and metastasis in human hypopharyngeal cancer FaDu cells, and further explored the potential mechanisms. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNFα induced EMT in FaDu cells and promoted FaDu cell migration and invasion. TNFα-induced EMT was characterized by a change from well organized cell-cell adhesion and cell polarity to loss of cell-cell contacts, cell scattering and increased expression of vimentin and N-cadherin accompanied by a decrease in E-cadherin. Furthermore, we found that p65 translocated to the nucleus after TNFα stimulation and increased the nuclear expression of TWIST. We demonstrated that TNFα treatment also increased the expression of TWIST by activating the NF-κB signaling pathway. While p65 was inhibited by siRNA-65 or BAY11-7082 (inhibitor of NF-κB), TWIST expression was also decreased. Therefore, we conclude that TNFα induces EMT and promotes metastasis via NF-κB signaling pathway-mediated TWIST expression in hypopharyngeal cancer. PMID:24220622

  13. Decreased expression of the type I isozyme of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in tumor cell lines of lung epithelial origin.

    PubMed

    Lange-Carter, C A; Fossli, T; Jahnsen, T; Malkinson, A M

    1990-05-15

    A spontaneous transformant derived from a mouse lung epithelial cell line exhibited decreased cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity. DEAE column chromatography demonstrated that this was caused by specific loss of the type I PKA isozyme (PKA I). Western immunoblot analysis indicated that indeed several mouse lung tumor-derived cell lines and spontaneous transformants of immortalized, nontumorigenic lung cell lines contained less PKA I regulatory subunit (RI) protein than normal cell lines. PKA II regulatory subunit protein differed only slightly among cell lines and showed no conspicuous trend between normal and neoplastic cells. The decrease in RI was apparently concomitant with decreased catalytic (C) subunit levels in neoplastic cells since no free catalytic subunit activity was detected by DEAE chromatography. Northern blot analysis using RI alpha and C alpha cDNA probes showed that the levels of RI alpha and C alpha mRNAs paralleled their intracellular protein concentrations; neoplastic cell lines contained significantly less RI alpha and C alpha mRNAs than the normal cell line. The decreased expression of both RI and C subunits therefore results in a net decrease of PKA I in neoplastic lung cells, an isozymic difference which may account for the differential effects of cAMP analogs on cell growth and differentiation in normal and neoplastic cells. PMID:2159459

  14. Long Non Coding RNA MALAT1 Promotes Tumor Growth and Metastasis by inducing Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Su; Cai, Guoshuai; Kong, Lingping; Zhang, Tingting; Ren, Yu; Wu, Yansheng; Mei, Mei; Zhang, Lun; Wang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients remains dismal, and a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms is critical for identifying effective targets with therapeutic potential to improve the survival of patients with OSCC. This study aims to clarify the clinical and biological significance of metastasis-associated long non-coding RNA, metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) in OSCC. We found that MALAT1 is overexpressed in OSCC tissues compared to normal oral mucosa by real-time PCR. MALAT1 served as a new prognostic factor in OSCC patients. When knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in OSCC cell lines TSCCA and Tca8113, MALAT1 was shown to be required for maintaining epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) mediated cell migration and invasion. Western blot and immunofluorescence staining showed that MALAT1 knockdown significantly suppressed N-cadherin and Vimentin expression but induced E-cadherin expression in vitro. Meanwhile, both nucleus and cytoplasm levels of β-catenin and NF-κB were attenuated, while elevated MALAT1 level triggered the expression of β-catenin and NF-κB. More importantly, targeting MALAT1 inhibited TSCCA cell-induced xenograft tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, these findings provide mechanistic insight into the role of MALAT1 in regulating OSCC metastasis, suggesting that MALAT1 is an important prognostic factor and therapeutic target for OSCC. PMID:26522444

  15. Comparing the clinical outcomes in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors between Ray-Tracing and Monte-Carlo algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin Ho; Kang, Ki Mun; Choi, Hoon-Sik; Jeong, Hojin; Ha, In Bong; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Ho Cheol; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Cho, Yu Ji; Lee, Seung Jun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Jang, In-Seok; Jeong, Bae Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes between the groups using Ray-Tracing (RAT) and Monte-Carlo (MC) calculation algorithms for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumors. Materials and Methods Thirty-five patients received SBRT with CyberKnife for 47 primary or metastatic lung tumors. RAT was used for 22 targets in 12 patients, and MC for 25 targets in 23 patients. Total dose of 48 to 60 Gy was prescribed in 3 to 5 fractions on median 80% isodose line. The response rate, local control rate, and toxicities were compared between RAT and MC groups. Results The response rate was lower in the RAT group (77.3%) compared to the MC group (100%) (p = 0.008). The response rates showed an association with the mean dose to the gross tumor volume, which the doses were re-calculated with MC algorithm in both groups. However, the local control rate and toxicities did not differ between the groups. Conclusions The clinical outcome and toxicity of lung SBRT between the RAT and MC groups were similar except for the response rate when the same apparent doses were prescribed. The lower response rate in the RAT group, however, did not compromise the local control rates. As such, reducing the prescription dose for MC algorithm may be performed but done with caution. PMID:26544622

  16. Glucose-regulated protein 94 deficiency induces squamous cell metaplasia and suppresses PTEN-null driven endometrial epithelial tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jieli; Yao, Lijing; Lin, Yvonne G.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.; Dubeau, Louis; Lee, Amy S.

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most prevalent gynecologic cancer in the United States. The tumor suppressor gene Pten (phosphatase and tensin homolog) is commonly mutated in the more common type 1 (endometrioid) subtype. The glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) is emerging as a novel regulator for cancer development. Here we report that expression profiles from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) showed significantly increased Grp94 mRNA levels in endometrial tumor versus normal tissues, correlating with highly elevated GRP94 protein expression in patient samples and the requirement of GRP94 for maintaining viability of human endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EAC) cell lines. Through generation of uterus-specific knockout mouse models with deletion of Grp94 alone (c94f/f) or in combination with Pten (cPf/f94f/f), we discovered that c94f/f uteri induced squamous cell metaplasia (SCM) and reduced active nuclear β-catenin. The cPf/f94f/f uteri showed accelerated SCM and suppression of PTEN-null driven EAC, with reduced cellular proliferation, attenuated β-catenin signaling and decreased AKT/S6 activation in the SCM. In contrast to single PTEN knockout uteri (cPf/f), cPf/f94f/f uteri showed no decrease in E-cadherin level and no invasive lesion. Collectively, our study implies that GRP94 downregulation induces SCM in EAC and suppresses AKT/S6 signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppressing EAC progression. PMID:26910913

  17. Glucose-regulated protein 94 deficiency induces squamous cell metaplasia and suppresses PTEN-null driven endometrial epithelial tumor development.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jieli; Yao, Lijing; Lin, Yvonne G; DeMayo, Francesco J; Lydon, John P; Dubeau, Louis; Lee, Amy S

    2016-03-22

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most prevalent gynecologic cancer in the United States. The tumor suppressor gene Pten (phosphatase and tensin homolog) is commonly mutated in the more common type 1 (endometrioid) subtype. The glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) is emerging as a novel regulator for cancer development. Here we report that expression profiles from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) showed significantly increased Grp94 mRNA levels in endometrial tumor versus normal tissues, correlating with highly elevated GRP94 protein expression in patient samples and the requirement of GRP94 for maintaining viability of human endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EAC) cell lines. Through generation of uterus-specific knockout mouse models with deletion of Grp94 alone (c94f/f) or in combination with Pten (cPf/f94f/f), we discovered that c94f/f uteri induced squamous cell metaplasia (SCM) and reduced active nuclear β-catenin. The cPf/f94f/f uteri showed accelerated SCM and suppression of PTEN-null driven EAC, with reduced cellular proliferation, attenuated β-catenin signaling and decreased AKT/S6 activation in the SCM. In contrast to single PTEN knockout uteri (cPf/f), cPf/f94f/f uteri showed no decrease in E-cadherin level and no invasive lesion. Collectively, our study implies that GRP94 downregulation induces SCM in EAC and suppresses AKT/S6 signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppressing EAC progression. PMID:26910913

  18. Tumor Budding: The Name is EMT. Partial EMT.

    PubMed Central

    Grigore, Alexandru Dan; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Jia, Dongya; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Levine, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Tumor budding is a histological phenomenon encountered in various cancers, whereby individual malignant cells and/or small clusters of malignant cells are seen in the tumor stroma. Postulated to be mirror epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor budding has been associated with poor cancer outcomes. However, the vast heterogeneity in its exact definition, methodology of assessment, and patient stratification need to be resolved before it can be routinely used as a standardized prognostic feature. Here, we discuss the heterogeneity in defining and assessing tumor budding, its clinical significance across multiple cancer types, and its prospective implementation in clinical practice. Next, we review the emerging evidence about partial, rather than complete, epithelial-mesenchymal phenotype at the tumor bud level, and its connection with tumor proliferation, quiescence, and stemness. Finally, based on recent literature, indicating a co-expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers in many tumor buds, we posit tumor budding to be a manifestation of this hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype displaying collective cell migration. PMID:27136592

  19. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, René; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.

    2001-05-12

    The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may indeed have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer different clinical outcomes. The aim of this commentary is to describe some of the inherent complexities in defining cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment of breast cancer and to expand wherever possible on the implications for tumor suppression and progression.

  20. Clinical Outcomes of Surgically Managed Spontaneous Tumors in 114 Client-owned Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji-Won; Yoon, Hun-Young

    2016-01-01

    Medical records of 139 tumors from 114 dogs that underwent surgery from May 2010 through March 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Among 114 dogs, females (64.9%) were significantly more common than males (35.1%) (p<0.05). Dogs aged 6 to 10 years were more presented than non-tumor patients, however, there was no significant difference. The mean age (±SD) was 10.3±3.0 years. Although we found no significant difference of breed predisposition, the most common breed was Maltese (19.3%), followed by Shih-Tzu (14.0%), and Yorkshire terrier (13.2%). Proportional morbidity ratios (PMRs) of mammary gland, oral cavity, and skin tumors were high in Poodles, Yorkshire terriers, and Golden retrievers, respectively. Mammary gland (36.0%) was the most common site, followed by skin and soft tissues (12.2%), oral cavity (10.8%), and digestive organs (8.6%), but there was no significant difference. The objectives of surgery were curative surgery (86.2%), biopsy (4.9%), and palliative surgery (6.5%). In this study, 123 of 139 tumors had histopathological diagnoses. Adenocarcinoma was the most common type (n=24), followed by adenoma (n=17), soft tissue sarcoma (n=13), benign mixed tumor (n=5), and others (n=64). Recurrence or suspected metastasis was identified in 26 dogs. Median survival times of malignant mammary gland tumors, skin and subcutaneous tumors, and splenic tumors were 1,563.0±1,201.7, 469, and 128 days, respectively. PMID:27162528

  1. KISS1 Methylation and Expression as Tumor Stratification Biomarkers and Clinical Outcome Prognosticators for Bladder Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cebrian, Virginia; Fierro, Marta; Orenes-Piñero, Esteban; Grau, Laura; Moya, Patricia; Ecke, Thorsten; Alvarez, Miguel; Gil, Marta; Algaba, Ferran; Bellmunt, Joaquin; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Catto, James; López-Beltrán, Antonio; Sánchez-Carbayo, Marta

    2011-01-01

    KISS1 is a metastasis suppressor gene that is lost in several malignancies, including bladder cancer. We tested the epigenetic silencing hypothesis and evaluated the biological influence of KISS1 methylation on its expression and clinical relevance in bladder cancer. KISS1 hypermethylation was frequent in bladder cancer cells analyzed by methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing and was associated with low gene expression, being restored in vitro by demethylating azacytidine. Hypermethylation was also frequently observed in a large series of bladder tumors (83.1%, n = 804). KISS1 methylation was associated with increasing stage (P = 0.001) and tumor grade (P = 0.010). KISS1 methylation was associated with low KISS1 transcript expression by quantitative RT-PCR (P = 0.037). KISS1 transcript expression was also associated with histopathological tumor stage (P < 0.0005). Low transcript expression alone (P = 0.003) or combined with methylation (P = 0.019) was associated with poor disease-specific survival (n = 205). KISS1 transcript expression remained an independent prognosticator in multivariate analyses (P = 0.017). KISS1 hypermethylation was identified in bladder cancer, providing a potential mechanistic explanation (epigenetic silencing) for the observed loss of KISS1 in uroepithelial malignancies. Associations of KISS1 methylation and its expression with histopathological variables and poor survival suggest the utility of incorporating KISS1 measurement using paraffin-embedded material for tumor stratification and clinical outcome prognosis of patients with uroepithelial neoplasias. PMID:21683672

  2. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... be removed because of their location or harmful effect on the surrounding normal brain tissue. If a tumor is cancer , possible treatments may include: Chemotherapy Radiation Surgery Targeted cancer therapy Biologic therapy Other treatment options

  3. Comparative hyperthermia effects of silica-gold nanoshells with different surface coverage of gold clusters on epithelial tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Eun; Lee, Jaewon; Lee, Taeksu; Bae, Saet-Byeol; Kang, Byunghoon; Huh, Yong-Min; Lee, Sang-Wha; Haam, Seungjoo

    2015-01-01

    Silica-gold nanoshell (SGNS), which is a silica core surrounded by a gold layer, was synthesized by seed-mediated coalescence of gold clusters in an electroless plating solution. SGNS variations with different surface coverage of gold clusters were prepared by adjusting the amounts of gold salts in the presence of formaldehyde-reducing agents. Fully covered SGNS (f-SGNS) with connected gold clusters exhibited stronger intensity and more redshift of plasmon bands located around 820 nm than those of partially covered SGNS (p-SGNS) with disconnected gold clusters. Upon irradiation with near-infrared light (30 W/cm(2), 700-800 nm), f-SGNS caused a larger hyperthermia effect, generating a large temperature change (ΔT =42°C), as compared to the relatively small temperature change (ΔT =24°C) caused by p-SGNS. The therapeutic antibody, Erbitux™ (ERB), was further conjugated to SGNS for specific tumor cell targeting. The f-ERB-SGNS showed excellent therapeutic efficacy based on the combined effect of both the therapeutic antibody and the full hyperthermia dose under near-infrared irradiation. Thus, SGNS with well-controlled surface morphology of gold shells may be applicable for near-infrared-induced hyperthermia therapy with tunable optical properties. PMID:26425093

  4. Comparative hyperthermia effects of silica–gold nanoshells with different surface coverage of gold clusters on epithelial tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Eun; Lee, Jaewon; Lee, Taeksu; Bae, Saet-Byeol; Kang, Byunghoon; Huh, Yong-Min; Lee, Sang-Wha; Haam, Seungjoo

    2015-01-01

    Silica–gold nanoshell (SGNS), which is a silica core surrounded by a gold layer, was synthesized by seed-mediated coalescence of gold clusters in an electroless plating solution. SGNS variations with different surface coverage of gold clusters were prepared by adjusting the amounts of gold salts in the presence of formaldehyde-reducing agents. Fully covered SGNS (f-SGNS) with connected gold clusters exhibited stronger intensity and more redshift of plasmon bands located around 820 nm than those of partially covered SGNS (p-SGNS) with disconnected gold clusters. Upon irradiation with near-infrared light (30 W/cm2, 700–800 nm), f-SGNS caused a larger hyperthermia effect, generating a large temperature change (ΔT =42°C), as compared to the relatively small temperature change (ΔT =24°C) caused by p-SGNS. The therapeutic antibody, Erbitux™ (ERB), was further conjugated to SGNS for specific tumor cell targeting. The f-ERB-SGNS showed excellent therapeutic efficacy based on the combined effect of both the therapeutic antibody and the full hyperthermia dose under near-infrared irradiation. Thus, SGNS with well-controlled surface morphology of gold shells may be applicable for near-infrared-induced hyperthermia therapy with tunable optical properties. PMID:26425093

  5. Outcomes and Acute Toxicities of Proton Therapy for Pediatric Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor of the Central Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    McGovern, Susan L.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Munsell, Mark F.; Kumbalasseriyil, Nancy; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary F.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Khatua, Soumen; Mahajan, Anita

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) of the central nervous system is a rare cancer primarily affecting children younger than 5 years old. Because patients are young and receive intensive chemotherapy, there is concern regarding late radiation toxicity, particularly as survival rates improve. Therefore, there is interest in using proton therapy to treat these tumors. This study was undertaken to investigate outcomes and acute toxicities associated with proton therapy for AT/RT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with AT/RT treated with proton radiation from October 2008 to August 2013 were reviewed. Demographics, treatment characteristics, and outcomes were recorded and analyzed. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 19 months (range, 4-55 months), with a median age at radiation start of 24 months (range, 6-62 months). Seventeen patients received local radiation with a median dose of 50.4 GyRBE (range, 9-54 GyRBE). Fourteen patients received craniospinal radiation; half received 24 GyRBE or less, and half received 30.6 GyRBE or more. For patients receiving craniospinal radiation, the median tumor dose was 54 GyRBE (range, 43.2-55.8 GyRBE). Twenty-seven patients (87%) completed the planned radiation. With median follow-up of 24 months for all patients (range, 3-53 months), median progression-free survival was 20.8 months and median overall survival was 34.3 months. Five patients (16%) developed clinical findings and imaging changes in the brainstem 1 to 4 months after radiation, consistent with radiation reaction; all cases resolved with steroids or bevacizumab. Conclusions: This is the largest report of children with AT/RT treated with proton therapy. Preliminary survival outcomes in this young pediatric population are encouraging compared to historic results, but further study is warranted.

  6. Pathology of eyelid tumors.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  7. Pathology of eyelid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pe’er, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  8. Hyperactivated FRS2α-mediated signaling in prostate cancer cells promotes tumor angiogenesis and predicts poor clinical outcome of patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junchen; You, Pan; Chen, Guo; Fu, Xin; Zeng, Xiangfeng; Wang, Cong; Huang, Yanqing; An, Lei; Wan, Xinhai; Navone, Nora; Wu, Chin-Lee; McKeehan, Wallace L.; Zhang, Zhongying; Zhong, Weide; Wang, Fen

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of tumors requires angiogenesis, which is comprised of multiple biological processes that are regulated by angiogenic factors. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) is a potent angiogenic factor and aberrant FGF signaling is a common property of tumors. Yet, how the aberration in cancer cells contributes to angiogenesis in the tumor is not well understood. Most studies of its angiogenic signaling mechanisms have been in endothelial cells. FRS2α is an FGF receptor (FGFR)-associated protein required for activation of downstream signaling molecules that include those in the MAP and AKT kinase pathways. Herein we demonstrated that overactivation and hyperactivity of FRS2α, as well as overexpression of cJUN and HIF1α, were positively correlated with vessel density and progression of human prostate cancer (PCa) toward malignancy. We also demonstrate that FGF upregulated production of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) mainly through increasing expression of cJUN and HIF1α. This then promoted recruitment of endothelial cells and vessel formation for the tumor. Tumor angiogenesis in mouse PCa tissues was compromised by tissue specific ablation of Frs2α in prostate epithelial cells. Depletion of Frs2α expression in human PCa cells and in a preclinical xenograft model, MDA PCa 118b, also significantly suppressed tumor angiogenesis accompanied with decreased tumor growth in the bone. The results underscore the angiogenic role of FRS2α-mediated signaling in tumor epithelial cells in angiogenesis. They provide a rationale for treating PCa with inhibitors of FGF signaling. They also demonstrate the potential of overexpressed FRS2α as a biomarker for PCa diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapies. PMID:26096936

  9. Exploiting Laboratory Insights to Improve Outcomes of Pediatric Central Nervous System Tumors.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Giles W; Witt, Hendrik; Resnick, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Over a relatively short period of time, owing to improvements in biotechnology, our ability to identify the molecular mechanisms within pediatric brain tumors has dramatically increased. These findings have reshaped the way that we describe these diseases and have provided insights into how to better treat these often devastating diseases. Although still far from reaching the full therapeutic potential these advancements hold, the impact of these findings is steadily taking hold of pediatric brain tumor management. In this article, we summarize the major discoveries within three common pediatric brain tumor categories; medulloblastoma, ependymoma, and low-grade glioma. We discuss the current impact of these findings on treatment and the direction these findings may take the field of pediatric neuro-oncology. PMID:27249765

  10. A novel metric for quantification of homogeneous and heterogeneous tumors in PET for enhanced clinical outcome prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmim, Arman; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Jackson, Andrew; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Marcus, Charles; Ashrafinia, Saeed; Soltani, Madjid; Subramaniam, Rathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Oncologic PET images provide valuable information that can enable enhanced prognosis of disease. Nonetheless, such information is simplified significantly in routine clinical assessment to meet workflow constraints. Examples of typical FDG PET metrics include: (i) SUVmax, (2) total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and (3) metabolic tumor volume (MTV). We have derived and implemented a novel metric for tumor quantification, inspired in essence by a model of generalized equivalent uniform dose as used in radiation therapy. The proposed metric, denoted generalized effective total uptake (gETU), is attractive as it encompasses the abovementioned commonly invoked metrics, and generalizes them, for both homogeneous and heterogeneous tumors, using a single parameter a. We evaluated this new metric for improved overall survival (OS) prediction on two different baseline FDG PET/CT datasets: (a) 113 patients with squamous cell cancer of the oropharynx, and (b) 72 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed, where the subjects were subdivided into two groups using the median threshold, from which the hazard ratios (HR) were computed in Cox proportional hazards regression. For the oropharyngeal cancer dataset, MTV, TLG, SUVmax, SUVmean and SUVpeak produced HR values of 1.86, 3.02, 1.34, 1.36 and 1.62, while the proposed gETU metric for a  = 0.25 (greater emphasis on volume information) enabled significantly enhanced OS prediction with HR  =  3.94. For the pancreatic cancer dataset, MTV, TLG, SUVmax, SUVmean and SUVpeak resulted in HR values of 1.05, 1.25, 1.42, 1.45 and 1.52, while gETU at a  = 3.2 (greater emphasis on SUV information) arrived at an improved HR value of 1.61. Overall, the proposed methodology allows placement of differing degrees of emphasis on tumor volume versus uptake for different types of tumors to enable enhanced clinical outcome prediction.

  11. Expression of the FGFR2 mesenchymal splicing variant in epithelial cells drives epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri, Danilo; Rosato, Benedetta; Nanni, Monica; Magenta, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The FGFRs are receptor tyrosine kinases expressed by tissue-specific alternative splicing in epithelial IIIb or mesenchymal IIIc isoforms. Deregulation of FGF/FGFR signaling unbalances the epithelial-stromal homeostasis and may lead to cancer development. In the epithelial-context, while FGFR2b/KGFR acts as tumor suppressor, FGFR2c appears to play an oncogenic role. Based on our recent observation that the switching of FGFR2b versus FGFR2c induces EMT, here we investigated the biological outcome of the ectopic expression of FGFR2c in normal human keratinocytes. Morphological analysis showed that, differently from FGFR2b overexpression, the forced expression and activation of FGFR2c drive the epithelial cells to acquire a mesenchymal-like shape and actin reorganization. Moreover, the appearance of invasiveness and anchorage-independent growth ability in FGFR2c transfected keratinocytes was consistent with the potential tumorigenic role proposed for this receptor variant. Biochemical and molecular approaches revealed that the observed phenotypic changes were accompanied by modulation of EMT biomarkers and indicated the involvement of EMT transcription factors and miRs. Finally, the analysis of the expression pattern of discriminating markers strongly suggested that activation of FGFR2c triggers a process corresponding to the initiation of the pathological type III EMT, but not to the more physiological type II EMT occurring during FGFR2b-mediated wound healing. PMID:26713601

  12. Outcome and prognostic indicators in 20 cats with surgically treated primary lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Maritato, Karl C; Schertel, Eric R; Kennedy, Shawn C; Dudley, Robert; Lamm, Catherine; Barnhart, Matthew; Kass, Phillip

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study of 20 client-owned cats was to describe the clinical signs, surgical interventions, histological features, stage and treatments of primary lung tumors removed by surgical excision, and to determine which factors significantly influence survival. Any cat that underwent surgical resection of a primary lung tumor between 2000 and 2007 was included in the study. Patient records were reviewed and signalment, clinical signs, preoperative diagnostics, surgical findings and histopathological results recorded. Histological reports were reviewed and scored using World Health Organization criteria. The Kaplan-Meier test was used to evaluate each potential prognostic factor with survival. Twenty cats met the inclusion criteria. The presence of clinical signs (such as dyspnea) at the time of diagnosis (P = 0.032), pleural effusion (P = 0.046), stage M1 (P = 0.015), and moderately and poorly differentiated tumors on histopathology (P = 0.011) were factors that were significantly correlated with reduced survival times. The median survival time of the 20 cats was 11 days. Cats presenting with no clinical signs had a median survival time of 578 days post-surgery vs 4 days post-surgery when presented with clinical signs. Cats staged T1N0M0 lived longer than cats at other stages (P = 0.044). Of the cats that survived to the time of suture removal, median survival time was 64 days. The results indicate that the presence of clinical signs, pleural effusion, moderately and poorly differentiated tumors on histopathology, evidence of metastasis and any stage beyond T1N0M0 are negative prognostic indicators for cats with primary lung tumors. The findings demonstrate that cats that presented with clinical signs, pleural effusion, any stage other than T1N0M0, or moderately and poorly differentiated tumors on histopathology had a poor prognosis. Therefore, extensive preoperative diagnostics, including computed tomography scans, should be performed

  13. CAVEOLIN-1 expression in brain metastasis from lung cancer predicts worse outcome and radioresistance, irrespective of tumor histotype

    PubMed Central

    Pittaro, Alessandra; Verdun di Cantogno, Ludovica; Stella, Giulia; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Zorzetto, Michele; Mantovani, Cristina; Papotti, Mauro; Cassoni, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases develop in one-third of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and are associated with a dismal prognosis, irrespective of surgery or chemo-radiotherapy. Pathological markers for predicting outcomes after surgical resection and radiotherapy responsiveness are still lacking. Caveolin 1 has been associated with chemo- and radioresistance in various tumors, including non-small-cell lung cancer. Here, caveolin 1 expression was assessed in a series of 69 brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer and matched primary tumors to determine its role in predicting survival and radiotherapy responsiveness. Only caveolin 1 expression in brain metastasis was associated with poor prognosis and an increased risk of death (log rank test, p = 0.015). Moreover, in the younger patients (median age of <54 years), caveolin 1 expression neutralized the favorable effect of young age on survival compared with the older patients. Among the radiotherapy-treated patients, an increased risk of death was detected in the group with caveolin 1-positive brain metastasis (14 out of 22 patients, HR=6.839, 95% CI 1.849 to 25.301, Wald test p = 0.004). Overall, caveolin 1 expression in brain metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer is independently predictive of worse outcome and radioresistance and could become an additional tool for personalized therapy in the critical subset of brain-metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer patients. PMID:26315660

  14. Outcomes of 50 Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treated at a Single Institution in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Ying; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Yen, Hsiu-Ju; Shiau, Cheng-Ying; Chao, Ta-Chung; Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Chen, Paul Chih-Hsueh; Wu, Hung-Ta Hondar; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chen, Chao-Chun; Hung, Giun-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2016-05-01

    To identify the prognostic factors and long-term outcome of the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT), data on 50 patients with ESFT treated at Taipei Veterans General Hospital between February 1991 and March 2014 were retrospectively considered. The influence of patient demographics, tumor features, and clinical and therapeutic parameters on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were assessed. The results revealed that 21 of the 50 patients (42%) were metastatic at diagnosis. The median follow-up time was 1.8 years. The 5-year OS and PFS for patients who were nonmetastatic were 61.6% and 55.5%, respectively, and 18.8% and 15.4% for patients who were metastatic, respectively. The key adverse prognostic factor was metastasis at diagnosis. Radiotherapy for local control was associated with improved PFS. The high rate of primary metastasis and poorer outcomes of nonmetastatic ESFT compared with results from Western studies, along with previously reported low rates of ESFT in Taiwanese people, suggest that genetic factors play a role in the pathogenesis of ESFT and chemotherapy pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Radiotherapy in local treatment should be considered more aggressively in Taiwanese patients with ESFT. PMID:27258529

  15. Outcomes of 50 Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treated at a Single Institution in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Ying; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Yen, Hsiu-Ju; Shiau, Cheng-Ying; Chao, Ta-Chung; Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Chen, Paul Chih-Hsueh; Wu, Hung-Ta Hondar; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chen, Chao-Chun; Hung, Giun-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify the prognostic factors and long-term outcome of the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT), data on 50 patients with ESFT treated at Taipei Veterans General Hospital between February 1991 and March 2014 were retrospectively considered. The influence of patient demographics, tumor features, and clinical and therapeutic parameters on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were assessed. The results revealed that 21 of the 50 patients (42%) were metastatic at diagnosis. The median follow-up time was 1.8 years. The 5-year OS and PFS for patients who were nonmetastatic were 61.6% and 55.5%, respectively, and 18.8% and 15.4% for patients who were metastatic, respectively. The key adverse prognostic factor was metastasis at diagnosis. Radiotherapy for local control was associated with improved PFS. The high rate of primary metastasis and poorer outcomes of nonmetastatic ESFT compared with results from Western studies, along with previously reported low rates of ESFT in Taiwanese people, suggest that genetic factors play a role in the pathogenesis of ESFT and chemotherapy pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Radiotherapy in local treatment should be considered more aggressively in Taiwanese patients with ESFT. PMID:27258529

  16. Metformin inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition in prostate cancer cells: involvement of the tumor suppressor miR30a and its target gene SOX4.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Chengwu; Wang, Lin; Ma, Quanping; Xia, Pingtian; Qi, Mei; Yang, Muyi; Han, Bo

    2014-09-26

    Tumor metastasis is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in cancer progression and metastasis. Recent evidence suggested that diabetic patients treated with metformin have lower PCa risk and better prognosis. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of metformin on EMT in PCa cells and the possible microRNA (miRNA)-based mechanisms. MiRNAs have been shown to regulate various processes of cancer metastasis. We herein showed that metformin significantly inhibits proliferation of Vcap and PC-3 cells, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits invasiveness and motility capacity of Vcap cells. Metformin could inhibit TGF-β-induced EMT in Vcap cells, as manifested by inhibition of the increase of N-cadherin (p=0.013), Vimentin (p=0.002) and the decrease of E-cadherin (p=0.0023) and β-catenin (p=0.034) at mRNA and protein levels. Notably, we demonstrated significant upregulation of miR30a levels by metformin (P<0.05) and further experiments indicated that miR30a significantly inhibits proliferation and EMT process of Vcap cells. Interestingly, we identified that SOX4, a previously reported oncogenic transcriptional factor and modulator of EMT, is a direct target gene of miR30a. Finally, we screened the expression of miR30a and SOX4 in 84 PCa cases with radical prostatectomy. Of note, SOX4 overexpression is significantly associated with decreased levels of miR30a in PCa cases. In all, our study suggested that inhibition of EMT by metformin in PCa cells may involve upregulation of miR30a and downregulation of SOX4. PMID:25201727

  17. Benzo[a]pyrene and tumor necrosis factor-α coordinately increase genotoxic damage and the production of proinflammatory mediators in alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Umannová, Lenka; Machala, Miroslav; Topinka, Jan; Schmuczerová, Jana; Krčmář, Pavel; Neča, Jiří; Šujanová, Klára; Kozubík, Alois; Vondráček, Jan

    2011-10-10

    Alveolar type II epithelial (AEII) cells regulate lung inflammatory response and, simultaneously, they are a target of environmental carcinogenic factors. We employed an in vitro model of rat AEII cells, the RLE-6TN cell line, in order to analyze the interactive effects of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a cytokine which plays a key role in the initiation of inflammatory responses in the lung, and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a highly carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. TNF-α strongly augmented the formation of stable BaP diol epoxide-DNA adducts in AEII cells, which was associated with enhanced p53-Ser15 phosphorylation and decreased cell survival. The increased genotoxicity of BaP was associated with altered expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes involved in its bioactivation, a simultaneous suppression of CYP1A1 and enhancement of CYP1B1 expression. Importantly, BaP and TNF-α acted synergistically to upregulate key inflammatory regulators in AEII cells, including the expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and enhanced prostaglandin E2 production and expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6. We observed that BaP and TNF-α together strongly activated p38 kinase, a principal regulator of inflammatory response. SB202190, a specific p38 inhibitor, prevented induction of both COX-2 and proinflammatory cytokines, thus confirming that p38 activity was crucial for the observed inflammatory reaction. Taken together, our data demonstrated, for the first time, that a proinflammatory cytokine and an environmental PAH may interact to potentiate both DNA damage and the inflammatory response in AEII cells, which may occur through coordinated upregulation of p38 activity. PMID:21745554

  18. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; Daly, Megan E.; Murphy, James D.; Abelson, Jonathan; Chapman, Chris H.; Chung, Melody; Yu, Yao; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for tumors of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity (PNS/NC). Methods/Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2009, 52 patients with tumors of the PNS/NC underwent postoperative or definitive radiation with IMRT. Twenty-eight (54%) patients had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Twenty-nine patients (56%) received chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 26.6 months (range, 2.9-118.4) for all patients and 30.9 months for living patients. Results: Eighteen patients (35%) developed local-regional failure (LRF) at median time of 7.2 months. Thirteen local failures (25%) were observed, 12 in-field and 1 marginal. Six regional failures were observed, two in-field and four out-of-field. No patients treated with elective nodal radiation had nodal regional failure. Two-year local-regional control (LRC), in-field LRC, freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), and overall survival (OS) were 64%, 74%, 71%, and 66% among all patients, respectively, and 43%, 61%, 61%, and 53% among patients with SCC, respectively. On multivariate analysis, SCC and >1 subsite involved had worse LRC (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.046, respectively) and OS (p = 0.003 and p = 0.046, respectively). Cribriform plate invasion (p = 0.005) and residual disease (p = 0.047) also had worse LRC. Acute toxicities included Grade {>=}3 mucositis in 19 patients (37%), and Grade 3 dermatitis in 8 patients (15%). Six patients had Grade {>=}3 late toxicity including one optic toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT for patients with PNS/NC tumors has good outcomes compared with historical series and is well tolerated. Patients with SCC have worse LRC and OS. LRF is the predominant pattern of failure.

  19. Long-Term Clinical and Functional Outcomes After Treatment for Localized Ewing's Tumor of the Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R. Shahlaee, Amir H.; Gibbs, Charles P.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: Retrospective review describing the 35-year University of Florida experience with Ewing's tumors of the lower extremity. Patients and Methods: Fifty-three patients were treated between 1971 and 2006. Thirty patients were treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 23 patients were treated with surgery {+-} RT. Larger tumors and tumors of the femur were treated more often with definitive RT. Median potential follow-up was 19.2 years. Functional outcome was assessed using the Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS). Results: Before 1985, 24% of patients were treated with surgery; since then, the rate has increased to 61%. The 15-year actuarial overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), freedom from relapse, and limb preservation rates were 68% vs. 47% (p = 0.21), 73% vs. 47% (p = 0.13), 73% vs. 40% (p = 0.03), and 43% vs. 40% (p = 0.52), respectively, for patients treated with surgery {+-} RT vs. RT alone. Excluding 8 patients who underwent amputation or rotationplasty, the 15-year actuarial local control rate was 100% for the surgery {+-} RT group and 68% for the definitive RT group (p = 0.03). The ranges of the TESS for surgery {+-} RT vs. RT alone were 70-100 (mean, 94) and 97-100 (mean, 99), respectively. Twenty-six percent (6/23) of patients had complications related to surgery requiring amputation or reoperation. Conclusions: Overall survival and CSS were not statistically compromised, but we observed an increased risk of relapse and local failure in patients treated with RT alone, thereby justifying a transition toward primary surgical management in suitable patients. However, despite an adverse risk profile, patients treated with RT alone had similar long-term amputation-free survival and demonstrated comparable functional outcomes. Poor results observed in Ewing's of the femur mandate innovative surgical and RT strategies.

  20. Validation of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Predicting Outcomes of Antiangiogenic Therapy for Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lassau, Nathalie; Bonastre, Julia; Kind, Michèle; Vilgrain, Valérie; Lacroix, Joëlle; Cuinet, Marie; Taieb, Sophie; Aziza, Richard; Sarran, Antony; Labbe-Devilliers, Catherine; Gallix, Benoit; Lucidarme, Olivier; Ptak, Yvette; Rocher, Laurence; Caquot, Louis-Michel; Chagnon, Sophie; Marion, Denis; Luciani, Alain; Feutray, Sylvaine; Uzan-Augui, Joëlle; Coiffier, Benedicte; Benastou, Baya; Koscielny, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) has been used in single-center studies to evaluate tumor response to antiangiogenic treatments: the change of area under the perfusion curve (AUC), a criterion linked to blood volume, was consistently correlated with the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors response. The main objective here was to do a multicentric validation of the use of DCE-US to evaluate tumor response in different solid tumor types treated by several antiangiogenic agents. A secondary objective was to evaluate the costs of the procedure. Materials and Methods This prospective study included patients from 2007 to 2010 in 19 centers (8 teaching hospitals and 11 comprehensive cancer centers). All patients treated with antiangiogenic therapy were eligible. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations were performed at baseline as well as on days 7, 15, 30, and 60. For each examination, a perfusion curve was recorded during 3 minutes after injection of a contrast agent. Change from baseline at each time point was estimated for each of 7 fitted criteria. The main end point was freedom from progression (FFP). Criterion/time-point combinations with the strongest correlation with FFP were analyzed further to estimate an optimal cutoff point. Results A total of 1968 DCE-US examinations in 539 patients were analyzed. The median follow-up was 1.65 years. Variations from baseline were significant at day 30 for several criteria, with AUC having the most significant association with FFP (P = 0.00002). Patients with a greater than 40% decrease in AUC at day 30 had better FFP (P = 0.005) and overall survival (P = 0.05). The mean cost of each DCE-US was 180€, which corresponds to $250 using the current exchange rate. Conclusions Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a new functional imaging technique that provides a validated criterion, namely, the change of AUC from baseline to day 30, which is predictive of tumor progression in a large

  1. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype Is Associated with Clinicopathological Factors That Indicate Aggressive Biological Behavior and Poor Clinical Outcomes in Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung Eun; Kang, Su Hwan; Lee, Soo Jung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cancer tissue may display a wide spectrum of expression phenotypes of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related proteins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of EMT phenotypes in breast cancer. Methods We evaluated the expression pattern of the EMT-related proteins E-cadherin and fibronectin in samples from 1,495 patients with invasive breast carcinoma (IBC) on tissue microarrays using immunohistochemistry to investigate the clinical significance of EMT phenotypes in IBC. EMT phenotypes were divided into complete type (E-cadherin-negative/fibronectin-positive), incomplete type (hybrid type, E-cadherinpositive/fibronectin-positive; null type, E-cadherin-negative/fibronectin-negative), and wild-type (E-cadherin-positive/fibronectin-negative). We analyzed the correlation of EMT phenotype with clinicopathological factors and patient survival. Results Loss of E-cadherin was observed in 302 patients (20.2%), and fibronectin was expressed in the cancer cells of 354 patients (23.7%). In total, 64 (4.3%), 290 (19.4%), 238 (15.9%), and 903 (60.4%) samples were categorized as complete, hybrid, null, and wild-type, respectively. The complete EMT phenotype exhibited significant associations with young age (p=0.017), advanced pT (p<0.001) and pN (p<0.001) stages, higher histological grade (p<0.001), lymphovascular invasion (p<0.001), and triple negativity (p<0.001). Patients with complete and hybrid EMT phenotypes had poorer overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) than those with the wild-type phenotype (OS, p=0.001; DFS, p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, the hybrid EMT phenotype was an independent prognostic factor for DFS in patients with IBC (p=0.032). Conclusion EMT phenotypes exhibited significant associations with clinicopathological factors indicating aggressive biologic behavior and poor outcome in patients with IBC. PMID:26472976

  2. Mode of Action Profiles for Pesticide Compounds with Rodent Liver Tumor Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mode of action (MOA) provides a central framework for assessing human relevance of adverse health outcomes observed in nonclinical safety studies. The goal of this study was to characterize MOA profiles for known rodent liver tumorigens identified from a database of pesticides as...

  3. Tumor-associated B cells in cutaneous primary melanoma and improved clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Garg, Kanika; Maurer, Margarita; Griss, Johannes; Brüggen, Marie-Charlotte; Wolf, Ingrid H; Wagner, Christine; Willi, Niels; Mertz, Kirsten D; Wagner, Stephan N

    2016-08-01

    B cells often infiltrate the microenvironment of human tumors. B cells can both positively and negatively regulate antitumor immune responses. In several human cancers, higher numbers of CD20(+) TAB are associated with a favorable prognosis, whereas in human primary melanomas, this association is contentious. In this study, we determined the association of TAB numbers in cutaneous primary melanoma tissue samples and patients' overall survival. The CD20 immunohistochemistry on archival nonmetastasized and metastasized cutaneous primary melanoma tissues from 2 independent patient cohorts was performed. One cohort was used in class comparison for metastasis, the most important prognostic factor for overall survival, and the other cohort for a subsequent survival analysis. Survival association was further validated with RNA data from a third independent cohort. Whole tissue sections were read automatically via quantitative digital imaging and analysis. Survival data were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard modeling. We discovered that cutaneous primary melanomas without metastasis contain significantly more TAB than primary melanomas that had metastasized. At time of first diagnosis, a higher number of TAB is associated with a significantly better overall survival in patients with cutaneous primary melanomas of >1 mm Breslow depth. Also, higher CD20/CD19 tumor mRNA levels are correlated with a significantly better overall survival. Thus, our data support TAB numbers as a prognostic biomarker in cutaneous primary melanoma patients with a tumor of >1 mm Breslow depth. For a survey in larger studies, whole tissue section analysis seems to be key to accurate assessment of TAB numbers. PMID:27107457

  4. Translating Response During Therapy into Ultimate Treatment Outcome: A Personalized 4-Dimensional MRI Tumor Volumetric Regression Approach in Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Nina A.; Wang, Jian Z.; Lo, Simon S.; Zhang Dongqing; Grecula, John C.; Lu Lanchun; Montebello, Joseph F.; Fowler, Jeffrey M.; Yuh, William T.C.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To assess individual volumetric tumor regression pattern in cervical cancer during therapy using serial four-dimensional MRI and to define the regression parameters' prognostic value validated with local control and survival correlation. Methods and Materials: One hundred and fifteen patients with Stage IB{sub 2}-IVA cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT) underwent serial MRI before (MRI 1) and during RT, at 2-2.5 weeks (MRI 2, at 20-25 Gy), and at 4-5 weeks (MRI 3, at 40-50 Gy). Eighty patients had a fourth MRI 1-2 months post-RT. Mean follow-up was 5.3 years. Tumor volume was measured by MRI-based three-dimensional volumetry, and plotted as dose(time)/volume regression curves. Volume regression parameters were correlated with local control, disease-specific, and overall survival. Results: Residual tumor volume, slope, and area under the regression curve correlated significantly with local control and survival. Residual volumes >=20% at 40-50 Gy were independently associated with inferior 5-year local control (53% vs. 97%, p <0.001) and disease-specific survival rates (50% vs. 72%, p = 0.009) than smaller volumes. Patients with post-RT residual volumes >=10% had 0% local control and 17% disease-specific survival, compared with 91% and 72% for <10% volume (p <0.001). Conclusion: Using more accurate four-dimensional volumetric regression analysis, tumor response can now be directly translated into individual patients' outcome for clinical application. Our results define two temporal thresholds critically influencing local control and survival. In patients with >=20% residual volume at 40-50 Gy and >=10% post-RT, the risk for local failure and death are so high that aggressive intervention may be warranted.

  5. A Multimodal Approach Including Craniospinal Irradiation Improves the Treatment Outcome of High-risk Intracranial Nongerminomatous Germ Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong-Seok; Shim, Kyu-Won; Lyu, Chul Joo; Won, Sung Chul; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether a multimodal approach including craniospinal irradiation (CSI) improves treatment outcome in nongerminomatous germ cell tumor (NGGCT) patients. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 32 patients with NGGCTs. Fourteen patients belonged to the intermediate prognosis group (immature teratoma, teratoma with malignant transformation, and mixed tumors mainly composed of germinoma or teratoma), and 18 patients belonged to the poor prognosis group (other highly malignant tumors). Patients with pure germinoma or mature teratoma were excluded from this study. Nineteen patients were treated with a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy (RT); 9 patients received chemotherapy plus RT; 3 patients received surgery plus RT; and 1 patient received RT alone. Twenty-seven patients received CSI with a median of 36 Gy (range, 20-41 Gy) plus focal boost of 18-30.6 Gy, and 5 patients received whole-brain RT (WBRT) (20-36 Gy) or focal RT (50.4-54 Gy). The rate of total and subtotal resection was 71.9%. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 121 months. Results: Treatment failed in 7 patients. Three of the 5 patients who received focal RT or WBRT had local failure. Four cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) failures occurred after CSI. No failure occurred in the intermediate prognosis group. Ten-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 77.6% and 74.6%, respectively. Ten-year RFS for the intermediate and poor prognosis groups were 100% and 61.1%, respectively (p = 0.012). OS for the two groups were 85.1% and 66.7%, respectively (p = 0.215). Tumor histology and CSI were significant prognostic factors for RFS, and CSI was significantly associated with OS. Conclusions: A multimodal approach was effective for treating NGGCTs. CSI should be considered for patients with poor prognostic histology.

  6. Immunosuppressive cells in tumor immune escape and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-05-01

    Tumor immune escape and the initiation of metastasis are critical steps in malignant progression of tumors and have been implicated in the failure of some clinical cancer immunotherapy. Tumors develop numerous strategies to escape immune surveillance or metastasize: Tumors not only modulate the recruitment and expansion of immunosuppressive cell populations to develop the tumor microenvironment or pre-metastatic niche but also switch the phenotype and function of normal immune cells from a potentially tumor-reactive state to a tumor-promoting state. Immunosuppressive cells facilitate tumor immune escape by inhibiting antitumor immune responses and furthermore promote tumor metastasis by inducing immunosuppression, promoting tumor cell invasion and intravasation, establishing a pre-metastatic niche, facilitating epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and inducing angiogenesis at primary tumor or metastatic sites. Numerous translational studies indicate that it is possible to inhibit tumor immune escape and prevent tumor metastasis by blocking immunosuppressive cells and eliminating immunosuppressive mechanisms that are induced by either immunosuppressive cells or tumor cells. Furthermore, many clinical trials targeting immunosuppressive cells have also achieved good outcome. In this review, we focus on the underlying mechanisms of immunosuppressive cells in promoting tumor immune escape and metastasis, discuss our current understanding of the interactions between immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment, and suggest future research directions as well as potential clinical strategies in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26689709

  7. Bovine myocardial epithelial inclusions.

    PubMed

    Baker, D C; Schmidt, S P; Langheinrich, K A; Cannon, L; Smart, R A

    1993-01-01

    Light microscopic, histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural methods were used to examine myocardial epithelial masses in the hearts of ten cattle. The tissues consisted of paraffin-embedded or formalin-fixed samples from eight hearts that were being inspected in slaughter houses and from two hearts from calves that died of septicemia. The ages of the cattle ranged from 4 days to 12 years; the breeds were unspecified for all but one Hereford female and the two Holstein calves; and there were three males, four females, and three steers. The masses in these cases were compared with similar appearing lesions found in other animal species. The lesions in the bovine hearts were single to multiple, well circumscribed, found in the left ventricle wall, and composed of squamous to cuboidal epithelial cells that formed tubular, ductular, and acinar structures with lumens that were void or filled with amorphous protein globules. Electron microscopic examination revealed epithelial cells that had sparse apical microvilli, tight apical intercellular junctions, perinuclear bundles of filaments, and rare cilia. Almost half of the bovine epithelial masses (4/9) had occasional diastase-resistant periodic acid-Schiff-positive granules in their cytoplasm, and few had hyaluronidase-resistant alcian blue-positive granules (2/9) or colloidal iron-positive granules (1/9). All myocardial masses had abundant collagen surrounding the tubular and acinar structures, and 2/9 had elastin fibers as well. None of the myocardial masses had Churukian-Schenk or Fontana Masson's silver staining granules in epithelial cells. Immunohistochemically, all bovine myocardial tumors stained positively for cytokeratin (8/8), and occasional masses stained positively for vimentin (3/8) or carcinoembryonic antigen (3/8). None of the masses stained positively for desmin. The myocardial epithelial tumors most likely represent endodermal rests of tissue misplaced during organogenesis. PMID:7680178

  8. The adverse outcome pathway for rodent liver tumor promotion by sustained activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Becker, Richard A; Patlewicz, Grace; Simon, Ted W; Rowlands, J Craig; Budinsky, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    An Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) represents the existing knowledge of a biological pathway leading from initial molecular interactions of a toxicant and progressing through a series of key events (KEs), culminating with an apical adverse outcome (AO) that has to be of regulatory relevance. An AOP based on the mode of action (MOA) of rodent liver tumor promotion by dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) has been developed and the weight of evidence (WoE) of key event relationships (KERs) evaluated using evolved Bradford Hill considerations. Dioxins and DLCs are potent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands that cause a range of species-specific adverse outcomes. The occurrence of KEs is necessary for inducing downstream biological responses and KEs may occur at the molecular, cellular, tissue and organ levels. The common convention is that an AOP begins with the toxicant interaction with a biological response element; for this AOP, this initial event is binding of a DLC ligand to the AHR. Data from mechanistic studies, lifetime bioassays and approximately thirty initiation-promotion studies have established dioxin and DLCs as rat liver tumor promoters. Such studies clearly show that sustained AHR activation, weeks or months in duration, is necessary to induce rodent liver tumor promotion--hence, sustained AHR activation is deemed the molecular initiating event (MIE). After this MIE, subsequent KEs are 1) changes in cellular growth homeostasis likely associated with expression changes in a number of genes and observed as development of hepatic foci and decreases in apoptosis within foci; 2) extensive liver toxicity observed as the constellation of effects called toxic hepatopathy; 3) cellular proliferation and hyperplasia in several hepatic cell types. This progression of KEs culminates in the AO, the development of hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas and cholangiolar carcinomas. A rich data set provides both qualitative and quantitative knowledge of the progression of

  9. Disruption of White Matter Integrity in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors: Correlates with Long-Term Intellectual Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Although chemotherapy and radiation treatment have contributed to increased survivorship, treatment-induced brain injury has been a concern when examining long-term intellectual outcomes of survivors. Specifically, disruption of brain white matter integrity and its relationship to intellectual outcomes in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors needs to be better understood. Methods Fifty-four participants underwent diffusion tensor imaging in addition to structural MRI and an intelligence test (IQ). Voxel-wise group comparisons of fractional anisotropy calculated from DTI data were performed using Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) on 27 survivors (14 treated with radiation with and without chemotherapy and 13 treated without radiation treatment on average over 13 years since diagnosis) and 27 healthy comparison participants. Whole brain white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) differences were explored between each group. The relationships between IQ and FA in the regions where statistically lower FA values were found in survivors were examined, as well as the role of cumulative neurological factors. Results The group of survivors treated with radiation with and without chemotherapy had lower IQ relative to the group of survivors without radiation treatment and the healthy comparison group. TBSS identified white matter regions with significantly different mean fractional anisotropy between the three different groups. A lower level of white matter integrity was found in the radiation with or without chemotherapy treated group compared to the group without radiation treatment and also the healthy control group. The group without radiation treatment had a lower mean FA relative to healthy controls. The white matter disruption of the radiation with or without chemotherapy treated survivors was positively correlated with IQ and cumulative neurological factors. Conclusions Lower long-term intellectual outcomes of childhood brain tumor survivors are

  10. In vivo electrical conductivity measurements during and after tumor electroporation: conductivity changes reflect the treatment outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivorra, Antoni; Al-Sakere, Bassim; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2009-10-01

    Electroporation is the phenomenon in which cell membrane permeability is increased by exposing the cell to short high-electric-field pulses. Reversible electroporation treatments are used in vivo for gene therapy and drug therapy while irreversible electroporation is used for tissue ablation. Tissue conductivity changes induced by electroporation could provide real-time feedback of the treatment outcome. Here we describe the results from a study in which fibrosarcomas (n = 39) inoculated in mice were treated according to different electroporation protocols, some of them known to cause irreversible damage. Conductivity was measured before, within the pulses, in between the pulses and for up to 30 min after treatment. Conductivity increased pulse after pulse. Depending on the applied electroporation protocol, the conductivity increase after treatment ranged from 10% to 180%. The most significant conclusion from this study is the fact that post-treatment conductivity seems to be correlated with treatment outcome in terms of reversibility.

  11. Altered MicroRNA Expression Is Associated with Tumor Grade, Molecular Background and Outcome in Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewska, Magdalena; Fendler, Wojciech; Zakrzewski, Krzysztof; Sikorska, Beata; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Dembowska-Bagińska, Bożenna; Filipek, Iwona; Stefańczyk, Łukasz; Liberski, Paweł P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ependymal tumors are the third most common group of brain tumors in children, accounting for about 10% of all primary brain neoplasms. According to the current WHO classification, they comprise four entities with the most frequent ependymoma and anaplastic ependymoma. The most of pediatric tumors are located within the posterior fossa, with a tendency to infiltrate the vital brain structures. This limits surgical resection and poses a considerable clinical problem. Moreover, there are no appropriate outcome prognostic factors besides the extent of surgical resection. Despite definition of molecular subgroups, the majority of childhood ependymomas present a balanced genome, which makes it difficult to establish molecular prognostic factors. Methods The purpose of our study was to explore whether miRNA expression could be used as prognostic markers in pediatric infratentorial ependymomas. We also performed a mRNA expression pattern analysis of NELL2 and LAMA2 genes, with immunohistochemical illustrations of representative cases. The miRNA and mRNA expression was measured in 53 pediatric infratentorial ependymomas using a real-time quantitative PCR. Results Three miRNAs were shown to efficiently differentiate between grade II and III ependymomas: miR-17-5p, miR-19a-3p, and miR-106b-5p. Survival analysis showed that the probabilities of overall (p = 0.036) and event-free survival (p = 0.002) were reduced with higher than median miRNA expression levels of miR-17-5p. Using multivariate analysis adjusted for patient's age, sex, tumor grade and localization, we showed statistically significant associations with event-free survival (p = 0004) and borderline statistical significance with overall survival (p = 0.057) for miR-17-5p. Correlation analysis of miR-19a, miR-17-5p, miR-106b revealed that their expression levels were significantly correlated with EZH2 expression, suggested marker of PFA ependymomas. Furthermore, lower expression level of LAMA2 mRNA was

  12. Chest Wall Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors: Long-Term Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Lagmay, Joanne P.; Morris, Christopher G.; Gibbs, C. Parker; Scarborough, Mark T.; Islam, Saleem; Marcus, Robert B.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To review the 40-year University of Florida experience treating Ewing sarcoma family of tumors of the chest wall. Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine patients were treated from 1966 to 2006. Of the patients, 22 were treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone, and 17 patients were treated with surgery with or without RT. Of 9 patients with metastatic disease, 8 were treated with RT alone. The risk profiles of each group were otherwise similar. The median age was 16.6 years, and the most frequent primary site was the rib (n = 17). The median potential follow-up was 19.2 years. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and local control (LC) rates were 34%, 34%, and 72%, respectively. For the nonmetastatic subset (n = 30), the 5-year OS, CSS, and LC rates were 44%, 44%, and 79%, respectively. LC was not statistically significantly different between patients treated with RT alone (61%) vs. surgery + RT (75%). None of the 4 patients treated with surgery alone experienced local failure. No patient or treatment variable was significantly associated with local failure. Of the patients, 26% experienced Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) Grade 3+ toxicity, including 2 pulmonary deaths. Modern intensive systemic therapy helped increase the 5-year CSS from 7% to 49% in patients treated after 1984 (p = 0.03). Conclusions: This is the largest single-institution series describing the treatment of chest wall Ewing tumors. Despite improvements in survival, obtaining local control is challenging and often accompanied by morbidity. Effort should be focused on identifying tumors amenable to combined-modality local therapy and to improving RT techniques.

  13. Pregnancy Outcome After Treatment for Wilms Tumor: A Report From the National Wilms Tumor Long-Term Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel M.; Lange, Jane M.; Peabody, Eve M.; Grigorieva, Natalia N.; Peterson, Susan M.; Kalapurakal, John A.; Breslow, Norman E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of prior treatment with radiation therapy or chemotherapy for unilateral Wilms tumor (WT) diagnosed during childhood on pregnancy complications, birth weight, and the frequency of congenital malformations in live-born offspring. Patients and Methods We reviewed pregnancy outcomes among female survivors and partners of male survivors of WT treated on National Wilms Tumor Studies 1, 2, 3, and 4 by using a maternal questionnaire and a review of both maternal and offspring medical records. Results We received reports of 1,021 pregnancies with duration of 20 weeks or longer, including 955 live-born singletons, for whom 700 sets of maternal and offspring medical records were reviewed. Rates of hypertension complicating pregnancy (International Classification of Diseases [ICD] code 642), early or threatened labor (ICD-644) and malposition of the fetus (ICD-652) increased with increasing radiation dose in female patients. The percentages of offspring weighing less than 2,500 g at birth and of those having less than 37 weeks of gestation also increased with dose. There was no significant trend with radiation dose in the number of congenital anomalies recorded in offspring of female patients. Conclusion Women who receive flank radiation therapy as part of the treatment for unilateral WT are at increased risk of hypertension complicating pregnancy, fetal malposition, and premature labor. The offspring of these women are at risk for low birth weight and premature (ie, < 37 weeks gestation) birth. These risks must be considered in the obstetrical management of female survivors of WT. PMID:20458053

  14. The Impact of Tumor Size on Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Bezjak, Andrea; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew J.; Sun, Alexander; Cho, B.C. John

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) offers excellent control rates. Most published series deal mainly with small (usually <4 cm), peripheral, solitary tumors. Larger tumors are associated with poorer outcomes (ie, lower control rates, higher toxicity) when treated with conventional RT. It is unclear whether SBRT is sufficiently potent to control these larger tumors. We therefore evaluated and examined the influence of tumor size on treatment outcomes after SBRT. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and October 2010, 185 medically inoperable patients with early (T1-T2N0M0) NSCLC were treated on a prospective research ethics board-approved single-institution protocol. Prescription doses were risk-adapted based on tumor size and location. Follow-up included prospective assessment of toxicity (as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and serial computed tomography scans. Patterns of failure, toxicity, and survival outcomes were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method, and the significance of tumor size (diameter, volume) with respect to patient, treatment, and tumor factors was tested. Results: Median follow-up was 15.2 months. Tumor size was not associated with local failure but was associated with regional failure (P=.011) and distant failure (P=.021). Poorer overall survival (P=.001), disease-free survival (P=.001), and cause-specific survival (P=.005) were also significantly associated with tumor size (with tumor volume more significant than diameter). Gross tumor volume and planning target volume were significantly associated with grade 2 or worse radiation pneumonitis. However, overall rates of grade ≥3 pneumonitis were low and not significantly affected by tumor or target size. Conclusions: Currently employed stereotactic body radiation therapy dose regimens can provide safe effective local therapy even for larger solitary NSCLC tumors (up to 5.7 cm

  15. Modeling radiation dosimetry to predict cognitive outcomes in pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors including medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E. . E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org; Kiehna, Erin N.; Li Chenghong; Shukla, Hemant; Sengupta, Saikat; Xiong Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Model the effects of radiation dosimetry on IQ among pediatric patients with central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors (n = 39) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before and after treatment with postoperative, risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation (CSI) and conformal primary-site irradiation, followed by chemotherapy. Differential dose-volume data for 5 brain volumes (total brain, supratentorial brain, infratentorial brain, and left and right temporal lobes) were correlated with IQ after surgery and at follow-up by use of linear regression. Results: When the dose distribution was partitioned into 2 levels, both had a significantly negative effect on longitudinal IQ across all 5 brain volumes. When the dose distribution was partitioned into 3 levels (low, medium, and high), exposure to the supratentorial brain appeared to have the most significant impact. For most models, each Gy of exposure had a similar effect on IQ decline, regardless of dose level. Conclusions: Our results suggest that radiation dosimetry data from 5 brain volumes can be used to predict decline in longitudinal IQ. Despite measures to reduce radiation dose and treatment volume, the volume that receives the highest dose continues to have the greatest effect, which supports current volume-reduction efforts.

  16. Disseminated glioneuronal tumors occurring in childhood: treatment outcomes and BRAF alterations including V600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Dodgshun, Andrew J; SantaCruz, Nadine; Hwang, Jaeho; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Malkin, Hayley; Bergthold, Guillaume; Manley, Peter; Chi, Susan; MacGregor, Duncan; Goumnerova, Liliana; Sullivan, Michael; Ligon, Keith; Beroukhim, Rameen; Herrington, Betty; Kieran, Mark W; Hansford, Jordan R; Bandopadhayay, Pratiti

    2016-06-01

    Disseminated glioneuronal tumors of childhood are rare. We present a retrospective IRB-approved review of the clinical course and frequency of BRAF mutations in disseminated glioneuronal tumors at two institutions. Defining features of our cohort include diffuse leptomeningeal-spread, often with a discrete spinal cord nodule and oligodendroglioma-like histologic features. Patients were identified through a pathology database search of all cases with disseminated low-grade neoplasms with an oligodendroglioma-like component. De-identified clinical information was collected by chart review and all imaging was reviewed. We retrieved the results of targeted genomic analyses for alterations in BRAF. Ten patients (aged 2-14 years) were identified from the Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Hospital and the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne pathology databases. Nine patients received chemotherapy. Eight patients are alive, although three have had episodes of progressive disease. We identified genomic alterations affecting the MAPK pathway in six patients. One patient had a germline RAF1 mutation and a clinical diagnosis of cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome. BRAF duplications were identified in four and BRAF V600E mutation was identified in one. These data support the presence of targetable genomic alterations in this disease. PMID:26994902

  17. Tumor Factors Associated with Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Siripongsakun, Surachate; Stanford-Moore, Gaelen; Hsu, Leeyen; Chang, Patrick Weijen; Blatt, Lawrence Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a common cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the United States. This study evaluated the impact of surveillance and treatment on HBV-infected HCC patients and identified factors associated with survival. Methods: From 1981 to 2010, 166 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive HCC patients were evaluated. Fifty-eight patients had HCC detected by surveillance, while 108 patients presented with HCC. Results: Compared to patients detected by surveillance, those presenting with HCC had more symptoms (65.7% vs 41.4%; P=.002), were more frequently outside of Milan criteria (73.7% vs 29.6%; P<.001), more often presented with diffuse tumors (23.2% vs 1.9%; P<.001), and had a shortened median survival time (9.5 months vs 18.7 months; P=.003). Patients who presented with diffuse tumors were younger and more often male (P=.002-.007), had a higher alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level (P=.023), and had a median survival time of only 1.68 months. By multivariate analysis, factors that were significantly associated with mortality included diffuse tumors (hazard ratio [HR], 6.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.14-12.66; P<.001), being outside of Milan criteria (HR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.26-3.23; P=.005), albumin level (HR per 1 standard deviation decrease, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.15-1.72; P=.001), AFP level (HR per 1 log standard deviation increase, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.13-1.67; P=.001), and receiving liver transplantation versus other treatments (HR, 0.08-0.38; 95% CI, 0.03-0.87; P<.001 to P=.022). Conclusion: In the United States, HBV-related HCC is a common malignancy, especially among Asian immigrants. Identification of HBsAgpositive subjects and routine HCC surveillance are essential for improving survival in these patients. PMID:24693270

  18. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Ovarian Brenner Tumors and Associated Mucinous Epithelial Neoplasms: High Variant Concordance and Identification of Mutually Exclusive RAS Driver Mutations and MYC Amplification.

    PubMed

    Tafe, Laura J; Muller, Kristen E; Ananda, Guruprasad; Mitchell, Talia; Spotlow, Vanessa; Patterson, Sara E; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Mockus, Susan M

    2016-03-01

    Benign ovarian Brenner tumors often are associated with mucinous cystic neoplasms, which are hypothesized to share a histogenic origin and progression, however, supporting molecular characterization is limited. Our goal was to identify molecular mechanisms linking these tumors. DNA from six Brenner tumors with paired mucinous tumors, two Brenner tumors not associated with a mucinous neoplasm, and two atypical proliferative (borderline) Brenner tumors was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples and sequenced using a 358-gene next-generation sequencing assay. Variant calls were compared within tumor groups to assess somatic mutation profiles. There was high concordance of the variants between paired samples (40% to 75%; P < 0.0001). Four of the six tumor pairs showed KRAS hotspot driver mutations specifically in the mucinous tumor. In the two paired samples that lacked KRAS mutations, MYC amplification was detected in both of the mucinous and the Brenner components; MYC amplification also was detected in a third Brenner tumor. Five of the Brenner tumors had no reportable potential driver alterations. The two atypical proliferative (borderline) Brenner tumors both had RAS mutations. The high degree of coordinate variants between paired Brenner and mucinous tumors supports a shared origin or progression. Differences observed in affected genes and pathways, particularly involving RAS and MYC, may point to molecular drivers of a divergent phenotype and progression of these tumors. PMID:26797085

  19. Surgical treatment and clinical outcome of nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a 14-year experience from one single center.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Su, An-Ping; Yue, Peng-Ju; Tian, Bo-le

    2014-11-01

    Our primary aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical characteristics and surgical outcome of nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (non-F-P-NETs), with an emphasis on evaluating the prognostic value of the newly updated 2010 grading classification of the World Health Organization (WHO).Data of 55 consecutive patients who were surgically treated and pathologically diagnosed as non-F-P-NETs in our single institution from January 2000 to December 2013 were retrospectively collected.This entirety comprised of 55 patients (31 males and 24 females), with a mean age of 51.24 ± 12.95 years. Manifestations of non-F-P-NETs were nonspecific. Distal pancreatectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy, and local resection of pancreatic tumor were the most frequent surgical procedures, while pancreatic fistula was the most common but acceptable complication (30.3%). The overall 5-year survival rate of this entire cohort was 41.0%, with a median survival time of 60.4 months. Patients who underwent R0 resections obtained a better survival than those who did not (P < 0.005). As for the prognostic analysis, tumor size and lymph invasion were only statistically significant in univariate analysis (P = 0.046 and P < 0.05, respectively), whereas the newly updated 2010 grading classification of WHO (G1 and G2 vs G3), distant metastasis, and surgical margin were all meaningful in both univariate and multivariate analysis (P = 0.045, 0.001, and 0.042, respectively).Non-F-P-NETs are a kind of rare neoplasm, with mostly indolent malignancy. Patients with non-F-P-NETs could benefit from the radical resections. The new WHO criteria, distant metastasis and surgical margin, might be independent predictors for the prognosis of non-F-P-NETs. PMID:25396335

  20. The Impact of Tumor Expression of Erythropoietin Receptors and Erythropoietin on Clinical Outcome of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Golke, Helmut; Schild, Steven E.; Kilic, Ergin

    2008-05-01

    Background: To investigate the impact of tumor erythropoietin receptors (Epo-R) and erythropoietin (Epo) expression in 64 patients with Stage III esophageal cancer receiving or not receiving erythropoietin during chemoradiation. Materials and Methods: The impact of tumor Epo-R expression, Epo expression, and 10 additional factors (age, Karnofsky-Performance-Score [KPS], tumor length, T and N stage, histology and grading, hemoglobin during radiotherapy, erythropoietin administration, surgery) on overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LC) was evaluated. Results: Improved OS was associated with low ({<=}20%) Epo expression (p = 0.049), KPS >80 (p 0.008), T3 stage (p = 0.010), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (p < 0.001), and surgery (p = 0.010). Erythropoietin receptor expression showed a trend (p = 0.09). Locoregional control was associated with T stage (p = 0.005) and hemoglobin (p < 0.001), almost with erythropoietin administration (p = 0.06). On multivariate analyses, OS was associated with KPS (p = 0.045) and hemoglobin (p = 0.032), LC with hemoglobin (p < 0.001). Patients having low expression of both Epo-R and Epo had better OS (p = 0.003) and LC (p = 0.043) than others. Two-year OS was nonsignificantly better (p = 0.25) in patients with low Epo-R expression receiving erythropoietin (50%) than in those with higher Epo-R expression receiving erythropoietin (21%), low Epo-R expression/no erythropoietin administration (29%), or higher Epo-R expression/no erythropoietin administration (18%). Two-year LC rates were, respectively, 65%, 31%, 26%, and 29% (p = 0.20). Results for Epo expression were similar. Conclusions: Higher Epo-R expression or Epo expression seemed to be associated with poorer outcomes. Patients with low expression levels receiving erythropoietin seemed to do better than patients with higher expression levels or not receiving erythropoietin. The data need to be confirmed in a larger series of patients.

  1. Social and biological factors influencing the outcomes of children with Wilms tumors in Kenya and other Sub-Saharan countries.

    PubMed

    Kumon, Kazuko; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is a common pediatric solid tumor, and the 5-year event-free survival rate of patients with this tumor has reached 85-90% in developed countries, whereas those in developing countries were reported to be less than 50%. To overcome these disparities, physicians and investigators in developed and developing countries are currently performing research with the aim of the better management of children with WT in Kenya and other Sub-Saharan countries. Axt and colleagues published a study that increased understanding of clinicopathology of WT in Kenya on the basis of a comprehensive web-based WT registry. The study revealed that patients enrolled in the National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF) showed better completion rate of therapy and better event-free survival than those not enrolled, indicating insufficient health coverage for those not enrolled in the NHIF. Approximately 20-30% of Kenyan population is estimated to be covered by some forms of health insurance, mostly by the NHIF. This could be improved through various approaches. The report described that 2-year event-free survival rate was 52.7% for all patients, although loss to follow up was 50%; the findings indicate large problems both in the study results and also in the completion of treatment. It is crucial to determine at which point patients stopped their treatment and why. The development of standardized treatment protocol for WT is an urgent agenda. We hope that researchers in developed countries and health providers in Kenya can work together in future to conquer disparities in the outcomes of children with WT. PMID:26835323

  2. Primary Tumor Site as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome for Definitive Radiotherapy of Advanced-Stage Oral Cavity Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for oral cavity cancers and to assess prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Definitive RT was performed on 115 patients with oral cavity cancers at Stages III, IVA, and IVB, with a distribution of 6%, 47%, and 47%, respectively. The median dose of RT was 72Gy (range, 62-76Gy). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to 95% of the patients. Eleven patients underwent salvage surgery after RT failure. Results: Eight-eight (76.5%) patients responded partially and 23 (20%) completely; of the patients who responded, 18% and 57%, respectively, experienced a durable effect of treatment. The 3-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and progression-free survival were 22%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. The 3-year PFS rates based on the primary tumor sites were as follows: Group I (buccal, mouth floor, and gum) 51%, Group II (retromolar and hard palate) 18%, and Group III (tongue and lip) 6% (p < 0.0001). The 3-year progression-free survival was 41% for N0 patients and 19% for patients with N+ disease (p = 0.012). The T stage and RT technique did not affect survival. The patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated better 3-year overall survival and disease-specific survival (53% vs. 19%, p = 0.015 and 53% vs. 24%, p = 0.029, respectively). Subsite group, N+, and salvage surgery were the only significant prognostic factors for survival after multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The primary tumor site and neck stage are prognostic predictors in advanced-stage oral cancer patients who received radical RT. The primary tumor extension and RT technique did not influence survival.

  3. Hypoxia, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, and TET-Mediated Epigenetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Shih-Han; Wu, Kou-Juey; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a pathophysiologic outcome of disrupted microcirculation with inadequate supply of oxygen, leading to enhanced proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), metastasis, and chemo-resistance. Epigenetic changes induced by hypoxia are well documented, and they lead to tumor progression. Recent advances show that DNA demethylation mediated by the Ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins induces major epigenetic changes and controls key steps of cancer development. TET enzymes serve as 5mC (5-methylcytosine)-specific dioxygenases and cause DNA demethylation. Hypoxia activates the expression of TET1, which also serves as a co-activator of HIF-1α transcriptional regulation to modulate HIF-1α downstream target genes and promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition. As HIF is a negative prognostic factor for tumor progression, hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAPs) may provide a favorable therapeutic approach to lessen hypoxia-induced malignancy. PMID:26861406

  4. Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Medulloblastoma and Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors: Outcomes for Very Young Children Treated With Upfront Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Rachel B.; Sethi, Roshan; Depauw, Nicolas; Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Adams, Judith; McBride, Sean M.; Ebb, David; Fullerton, Barbara C.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; MacDonald, Shannon M.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the early outcomes for very young children with medulloblastoma or supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (SPNET) treated with upfront chemotherapy followed by 3-dimensional proton radiation therapy (3D-CPT). Methods and Materials: All patients aged <60 months with medulloblastoma or SPNET treated with chemotherapy before 3D-CPT from 2002 to 2010 at our institution were included. All patients underwent maximal surgical resection, chemotherapy, and adjuvant 3D-CPT with either craniospinal irradiation followed by involved-field radiation therapy or involved-field radiation therapy alone. Results: Fifteen patients (median age at diagnosis, 35 months) were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and 3D-CPT. Twelve of 15 patients had medulloblastoma; 3 of 15 patients had SPNET. Median time from surgery to initiation of radiation was 219 days. Median craniospinal irradiation dose was 21.6 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness); median boost dose was 54.0 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness). At a median of 39 months from completion of radiation, 1 of 15 was deceased after a local failure, 1 of 15 had died from a non-disease-related cause, and the remaining 13 of 15 patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence. Ototoxicity and endocrinopathies were the most common long-term toxicities, with 2 of 15 children requiring hearing aids and 3 of 15 requiring exogenous hormones. Conclusions: Proton radiation after chemotherapy resulted in good disease outcomes for a small cohort of very young patients with medulloblastoma and SPNET. Longer follow-up and larger numbers of patients are needed to assess long-term outcomes and late toxicity.

  5. Outcomes by Tumor Histology and KRAS Mutation Status After Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Raymond H.; Hermann, Gretchen; Lewis, John H.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Chen, Aileen B.; Colson, Yolonda L.; Hacker, Fred H.; Kozono, David; Wee, Jon O.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Catalano, Paul J.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sher, David J.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed outcomes after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage non–small-cell lung carcinoma in patients by histology and KRAS mutation status. Histology was not associated with outcomes, but KRAS mutation was associated with lower freedom from recurrence on univariable analysis and decreased cancer-specific survival on multivariable analysis. Given the small sample sizes, these results are hypothesis generating, and further study of SBRT outcomes by tumor genotype in larger data sets is needed. Background We analyzed outcomes after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage non–small cell lung-carcinoma (NSCLC) by histology and KRAS genotype. Patients and Methods We included 75 patients with 79 peripheral tumors treated with SBRT (18 Gy × 3 or 10 to 12 Gy × 5) at our institution from 2009 to 2012. Genotyping for KRAS mutations was performed in 10 patients. Outcomes were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method/Cox regression, or cumulative incidence method/Fine-Gray analysis. Results The median patient age was 74 (range, 46 to 93) years, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 0 to 1 in 63%. Tumor histology included adenocarcinoma (44%), squamous cell carcinoma (25%), and NSCLC (18%). Most tumors were T1a (54%). Seven patients had KRAS-mutant tumors (9%). With a median follow-up of 18.8 months among survivors, the 1-year estimate of overall survival was 88%, cancer-specific survival (CSS) 92%, primary tumor control 94%, and freedom from recurrence (FFR) 67%. In patients with KRAS-mutant tumors, there was a significantly lower tumor control (67% vs. 96%; P = .04), FFR (48% vs. 69%; P = .03), and CSS (75% vs. 93%; P = .05). On multivariable analysis, histology was not associated with outcomes, but KRAS mutation (hazard ratio, 10.3; 95% confidence interval, 2.3–45.6; P = .0022) was associated with decreased CSS after adjusting for age. Conclusion In this SBRT series, histology was not associated with

  6. Primary Tumor Volume Is an Important Predictor of Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strongin, Anna; Yovino, Susannah; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Cullen, Kevin; Zimrin, Ann; Strome, Scott; Regine, William; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The tumor volume has been established as a significant predictor of outcomes among patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy alone. The present study attempted to add to the existing data on tumor volume as a prognostic factor among patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients who had undergone definitive chemoradiotherapy for Stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and larynx were identified. The primary tumor volumes were calculated from the treatment planning computed tomography scans, and these were correlated to the survival and tumor control data obtained from the retrospective analysis. Results: The interval to progression correlated with the primary tumor volume (p = .007). The critical cutoff point for the tumor volume was identified as 35 cm{sup 3}, and patients with a tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a significantly better prognosis than those with a tumor volume >35 cm{sup 3} at 5 years (43% vs. 71%, p = .010). Longer survival was also correlated with smaller primary tumor volumes (p = .022). Similarly, patients with a primary tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a better prognosis in terms of both progression-free survival (61% vs. 33%, p = .004) and overall survival (84% vs. 41%, p = < .001). On multivariate analysis, the primary tumor volume was the best predictor of recurrence (hazard ratio 4.7, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11.6; p = .001) and survival (hazard ratio 10.0, 95% confidence interval 2.9-35.1; p = < .001). In contrast, the T stage and N stage were not significant factors. Analysis of variance revealed that tumors with locoregional failure were on average 21.6 cm{sup 3} larger than tumors without locoregional failure (p = .028) and 27.1-cm{sup 3} larger than tumors that recurred as distant metastases (p = .020). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the primary tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in patients with advanced cancer

  7. Downstaging of Hepatocellular Cancer before Liver Transplant: Long-term Outcome compared to Tumors within Milan Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Francis Y.; Mehta, Neil; Flemming, Jennifer; Dodge, Jennifer; Hameed, Bilal; Fix, Oren; Hirose, Ryutaro; Fidelman, Nicholas; Kerlan, Robert K.; Roberts, John P.

    2016-01-01

    We report long-term intention-to-treat outcome of 118 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) undergoing down-staging to within Milan/UNOS T2 criteria before liver transplantation (LT) since 2002, and compare the results with 488 patients listed for LT with HCC meeting T2 criteria at listing in the same period. The down-staging subgroups include 1 lesion >5 cm and ≤8 cm (n=43), 2 or 3 lesions at least one >3 cm and ≤5 cm with total tumor diameter ≤8 cm (n=61), or 4 to 5 lesions each ≤3 cm with total tumor diameter ≤8 cm (n=14). In the down-staging group, 64 patients (54.2%) had received LT, and 5 (7.5%) developed HCC recurrence. Two of the 5 patients with HCC recurrence had 4–5 tumors at presentation. The 1- and 2-year cumulative probabilities for dropout (competing risk) were 24.1% and 34.2% in the down-staging group, versus 20.3% and 25.6% in the T2 group (p=0.04). The Kaplan-Meier 5-year post-transplant survival and recurrence-free probabilities were 77.8% and 90.8%, respectively, in the down-staging group, versus 81% and 88%, respectively, in the T2 group (p=0.69 and p=0.66, respectively). The 5-year intention-to-treat survival was 56.1% in the down-staging group, versus 63.3% in the T2 group (p=0.29). Factors predicting dropout in the down-staging group included pre-treatment alpha-fetoprotein ≥1000 ng/mL (multivariate HR 2.42, p=0.02) and Child’s B versus Child’s A cirrhosis (multivariate HR 2.19, p=0.04). Conclusion: Successful down-staging of HCC to within T2 criteria was associated with a low rate of HCC recurrence and excellent post-transplant survival, comparable to those meeting T2 criteria without down-staging. Due to the small number of patients with 4–5 tumors, further investigations are needed to confirm the efficacy of down-staging in this subgroup. PMID:25689978

  8. Outcomes of Locoregional Tumor Therapy for Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

    SciTech Connect

    Padia, Siddharth A. Chewning, Rush H. Kogut, Matthew J. Ingraham, Christopher R. Johnson, Guy E.; Bhattacharya, Renuka; Kwan, Sharon W. Monsky, Wayne L. Vaidya, Sandeep; Hippe, Daniel S.; Valji, Karim

    2015-08-15

    PurposeLocoregional therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be challenging in patients with a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). This study compares safety and imaging response of ablation, chemoembolization, radioembolization, and supportive care in patients with both TIPS and HCC.MethodsThis retrospective study included 48 patients who had both a TIPS and a diagnosis of HCC. Twenty-nine of 48 (60 %) underwent treatment for HCC, and 19/48 (40 %) received best supportive care (i.e., symptomatic management only). While etiology of cirrhosis and indication for TIPS were similar between the two groups, treated patients had better baseline liver function (34 vs. 67 % Child-Pugh class C). Tumor characteristics were similar between the two groups. A total of 39 ablations, 17 chemoembolizations, and 10 yttrium-90 radioembolizations were performed on 29 patients.ResultsAblation procedures resulted in low rates of hepatotoxicity and clinical toxicity. Post-embolization/ablation syndrome occurred more frequently in patients undergoing chemoembolization than ablation (47 vs. 15 %). Significant hepatic dysfunction occurred more frequently in the chemoembolization group than the ablation group. Follow-up imaging response showed objective response in 100 % of ablation procedures, 67 % of radioembolization procedures, and 50 % of chemoembolization procedures (p = 0.001). When censored for OLT, patients undergoing treatment survived longer than patients receiving supportive care (2273 v. 439 days, p = 0.001).ConclusionsAblation appears to be safe and efficacious for HCC in patients with TIPS. Catheter-based approaches are associated with potential increased toxicity in this patient population. Chemoembolization appears to be associated with increased toxicity compared to radioembolization.

  9. [Oncological outcomes of laparoscopic and open treatment (nephroureterectomy) for urothelial tumors of the upper urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Lotrecchiano, Giuseppe; Delle Cave, Aldo; Tripodi, Vincenzo; De Fortuna, Enrico; Quaranta, Antonio; Attanasi, Franco; Salzano, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the treatment of choice in urothelial tumors of the upper urinary tract is nephroureterectomy (NU) as an Open procedure (ONU), though the laparoscopic treatment is now routinely performed as a minimally invasive therapy (LNU). LNU has demonstrated oncologic safety at least equivalent to open, but some issues dealing with cancer still remain. We retrospectively analyzed data from 36 LNU performed between 2006 and 2010, compared with data of 32 ONU performed in 2002-2005 (pre-laparoscopy era). The mean follow-up was 23 months in patients undergoing LNU and 42 months for those treated with ONU. In particular, we evaluated cancer recurrence, the site of recurrence and survival rates. We had local recurrence in 3 patients (8.3%) after LNU and 2 after ONU (6.25%). 2 patients who underwent LNU (5.5%) died of metastatic disease at 9 and 12 months; 3 patients who underwent ONU (9.3%) died of metastasis at 12, 16 and 23 months, respectively. Bladder recurrence was observed in 3 patients after ONU and in 4 after LNU. The most frequent sites of cancer recurrence were: local recurrence (3 LUN, 2 ONU), 1 laparoscopic port recurrence, 3 regional lymph node recurrences (2 LNU, 1ONU), bladder recurrences (3 LNU, 4 ONU). There were no significant differences in disease recurrence and even survival rates at 1 and 3 years were not very different between the two techniques. The grade and stage of cancer affecting the incidence of metastatic disease, as well as the localization of early disease (pelvis-ureter-both) is a negative prognostic factor, rather than the surgical technique used. Therefore, there is no evidence that the control is compromised in cancer patients treated with LNU rather than with ONU. PMID:23371279

  10. Macrophages promote benzopyrene-induced tumor transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells by activation of NF-κB and STAT3 signaling in a bionic airway chip culture and in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhao; Wang, Lei; Guo, Zhe; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Zhancheng; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of macrophages in promoting benzopyrene (BaP)-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells using a BaP-induced tumor transformation model with a bionic airway chip in vitro and in animal models. The bionic airway chip culture data showed that macrophages promoted BaP-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells, which was mediated by nuclear factor (NF)-κB and STAT3 pathways to induce cell proliferation, colony formation in chip culture, and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Blockage of interleukin (IL)-6 or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α signaling or inhibition of NF-κB, STAT3, or cyclinD1 expression abrogated the effect of macrophages on malignant transformation in the bionic airway chip culture. In vivo, macrophages promoted lung tumorigenesis in a carcinogen-induced animal model. Similarly, blockage of NF-κB, STAT3, or cyclinD1 using siRNA transfection decreased the carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis in rats. We demonstrated that macrophages are critical in promoting lung tumorigenesis and that the macrophage-initiated TNF-α/NF-κB/cyclinD1 and IL-6/STAT3/cyclinD1 pathways are primarily responsible for promoting lung tumorigenesis. PMID:25823926

  11. Prognostic impact of KI67, p53, human epithelial growth factor receptor 2, topoisomerase IIalpha, epidermal growth factor receptor, and nm23 expression of ovarian carcinomas and disseminated tumor cells in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Schindlbeck, C; Hantschmann, P; Zerzer, M; Jahns, B; Rjosk, D; Janni, W; Rack, B; Sommer, H; Friese, K

    2007-01-01

    Examination of tumor biological factors for prognostic and predictive indicators is not part of routine testing in ovarian cancer. As in other tumors, the detection of hematogenous tumor spread could help to estimate the risk of metastatic disease. We examined the expression of p53, KI67, topoisomerase IIalpha (Top IIa), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and nm23 in tumor tissues from 90 patients with ovarian cancer. All underwent bone marrow (BM) aspiration and screening for disseminated tumor cells in the bone marrow (DTC-BM) at primary diagnosis. BM aspiration, cytospin preparation, and immunocytochemical staining with the anticytokeratin antibody (A45-B/B3) were done following a standardized protocol. The expression of p53, KI67, Top IIa, EGFR, HER2, and nm23 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissue samples and classified by percentage of stained cells or immunoreactive score (IRS). The prognostic impact of the individual factors together with standard histologic parameters was calculated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Expression rates for HER2 (2+/3+: 34.5%), KI67 (median 30%), p53 (median IRS 5), and Top IIa (median IRS 4) were relatively high, whereas nm23 (median IRS 2) and EGFR (IRS 0: 61%) showed weak staining. In 21/90 patients (23.3%), DTC-BM (>/=1/2 x 10(6) cells) could be detected. The presence of DTC-BM was inversely related to nodal status (P = .015) but not to the other factors examined. Tumor stage (P = .02), lymph node involvement (P = .003), grade (P = .046), postoperative tumor residue (P < .001), peritoneal seeding (P = .02), and KI67 (P = .046) significantly correlated with overall survival (OS) after a median observation time of 28 months (2-105). The finding of ascites was borderline significant (P = .050). The presence of DTC-BM (P = .04) and KI67 positivity (P = .02) predicted reduced distant disease-free survival. By multivariate analysis

  12. Targeted Exome Sequencing Outcome Variations of Colorectal Tumors within and across Two Sequencing Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Azimi, Hamed; Nickerson, Michael L.; Bass, Sara; Varma, Sudhir; Brim, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Next generation sequencing (NGS) has quickly the tool of choice for genome and exome data generation. The multitude of sequencing platforms as well as the variabilities within each platform need to be assessed. In this paper we used two platforms (ION TORRENT AND ILLUMINA) to assess single nucleotides variants in colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens. Methods CRC specimens (n = 13) collected from 6 CRC (cancer and matched normal) patients were used to establish the mutational profile using ION TORRENT AND ILLUMINA sequencing platforms. We analyzed a set of samples from Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded and FF (FF) samples on both platforms to assess the effect of sample nature (FFPE vs. FF) on sequencing outcome and to evaluate the similarity/differences of SNVs across the two platforms. In addition, duplicates of FF samples were sequenced on each platform to assess variability within platform. Results The comparison of FF replicates to each other gave a concordance of 77% (± 15.3%) in Ion Torrent and 70% (± 3.7%) in Illumina. FFPE vs. FF replicates gave a concordance of 40% (± 32%) in Ion Torrent and 49% (± 19%) in Illumina. For the cross platform concordance were FFPE compared to FF (Average of 75% (± 9.8%) for FFPE samples and 67% (± 32%) for FF and 70% (± 26.8%) overall average). Conclusion Our data show a significant variability within and across platforms. Also the number of detected variants depend on the nature of the specimen; FF vs. FFPE. Validation of NGS discovered mutations is a must to rule-out false positive mutants. This validation might either be performed through a second NGS platform or through Sanger sequencing.

  13. Altered self-perception in adult survivors treated for a CNS tumor in childhood or adolescence: population-based outcomes compared with the general population

    PubMed Central

    Hörnquist, Lina; Rickardsson, Jenny; Lannering, Birgitta; Gustafsson, Göran; Boman, Krister K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Survivors of pediatric CNS tumors are at risk for persistent tumor/treatment-related morbidity, physical disability and social consequences that may alter self-perception, vital for self-identity, mental health and quality of survival. We studied the long-term impact of childhood CNS tumors and their treatment on the self-perception of adult survivors and compared outcomes with those of the general population. Methods The cohort included 697 Swedish survivors diagnosed with a primary CNS tumor during 1982–2001. Comparison data were randomly collected from a stratified general population sample. Survivors and general population individuals were compared as regards self-perception in 5 domains: body image, sports/physical activities, peers, work, and family, and with a global self-esteem index. Within the survivor group, determinants of impact on self-perception were identified. Results The final analyzed sample included 528 survivors, 75.8% of the entire national cohort. The control sample consisted of 995, 41% of 2500 addressed. Survivors had significantly poorer self-perception outcomes in domains of peers, work, body image, and sports/physical activities, and in the global self-perception measure, compared with those of the general population (all P < .001). Within the survivor group, female gender and persistent visible physical sequelae predicted poorer outcomes in several of the studied domains. Tumor type and a history of cranial radiation therapy were associated with outcomes. Conclusion An altered self-perception is a potential late effect in adult survivors of pediatric CNS tumors. Self-perception and self-esteem are significant elements of identity, mental health and quality of survival. Therefore, care and psychosocial follow-up of survivors should include measures for identifying disturbances and for assessing the need for psychosocial intervention. PMID:25332406

  14. Clinical outcome of hypofractionated breath-hold image-guided SABR of primary lung tumors and lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Stereotactic Ablative RadioTherapy (SABR) of lung tumors/metastases has been shown to be an effective treatment modality with low toxicity. Outcome and toxicity were retrospectively evaluated in a unique single-institution cohort treated with intensity-modulated image-guided breath-hold SABR (igSABR) without external immobilization. The dose–response relationship is analyzed based on Biologically Equivalent Dose (BED). Patients and methods 50 lesions in 43 patients with primary NSCLC (n = 27) or lung-metastases of various primaries (n = 16) were consecutively treated with igSABR with Active-Breathing-Coordinator (ABC®) and repeat-breath-hold cone-beam-CT. After an initial dose-finding/-escalation period, 5x12 Gy for peripheral lesions and single doses of 5 Gy to varying dose levels for central lesions were applied. Overall-survival (OS), progression-free-survival (PFS), progression pattern, local control (LC) and toxicity were analyzed. Results The median BED2 was 83 Gy. 12 lesions were treated with a BED2 of <80 Gy, and 38 lesions with a BED2 of >80 Gy. Median follow-up was 15 months. Actuarial 1- and 2-year OS were 67% and 43%; respectively. Cause of death was non-disease-related in 27%. Actuarial 1- and 2-year PFS was 42% and 28%. Progression site was predominantly distant. Actuarial 1- and 2 year LC was 90% and 85%. LC showed a trend for a correlation to BED2 (p = 0.1167). Pneumonitis requiring conservative treatment occurred in 23%. Conclusion Intensity-modulated breath-hold igSABR results in high LC-rates and low toxicity in this unfavorable patient cohort with inoperable lung tumors or metastases. A BED2 of <80 Gy was associated with reduced local control. PMID:24401323

  15. Factors Influencing Neurocognitive Outcomes in Young Patients With Benign and Low-Grade Brain Tumors Treated With Stereotactic Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jalali, Rakesh; Mallick, Indranil; Dutta, Debnarayan

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To present the effect of radiotherapy doses to different volumes of normal structures on neurocognitive outcomes in young patients with benign and low-grade brain tumors treated prospectively with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients (median age, 13 years) with residual/progressive brain tumors (10 craniopharyngioma, 8 cerebellar astrocytoma, 6 optic pathway glioma and 4 cerebral low-grade glioma) were treated with SCRT to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks. Prospective neuropsychological assessments were done at baseline before RT and at subsequent follow-up examinations. The change in intelligence quotient (IQ) scores was correlated with various factors, including dose-volume to normal structures. Results: Although the overall mean full-scale IQ (FSIQ) at baseline before RT remained unchanged at 2-year follow-up after SCRT, one third of patients did show a >10% decline in FSIQ as compared with baseline. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that patients aged <15 years had a significantly higher chance of developing a >10% drop in FSIQ than older patients (53% vs. 10%, p = 0.03). Dosimetric comparison in patients showing a >10% decline vs. patients showing a <10% decline in IQ revealed that patients receiving >43.2 Gy to >13% of volume of the left temporal lobe were the ones to show a significant drop in FSIQ (p = 0.048). Radiotherapy doses to other normal structures, including supratentorial brain, right temporal lobe, and frontal lobes, did not reveal any significant correlation. Conclusion: Our prospectively collected dosimetric data show younger age and radiotherapy doses to left temporal lobe to be predictors of neurocognitive decline, and may well be used as possible dose constraints for high-precision radiotherapy planning.

  16. Prognostic factors for outcomes after whole-brain irradiation of brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study investigated potential prognostic factors in patients treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI) alone for brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and colorectal cancer. Additionally, a potential benefit from escalating the radiation dose was investigated. Methods Data from 220 patients were retrospectively analyzed for overall survival and local control. Nine potential prognostic factors were evaluated: tumor type, WBI schedule, age, gender, Karnofsky performance score, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, interval from diagnosis of cancer to WBI, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results Survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 32% and 19%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, WBI doses >30 Gy (p = 0.038), KPS ≥70 (p < 0.001), only 1-3 brain metastases (p = 0.007), no extracerebral metastases (p < 0.001), and RPA class 1 (p < 0.001) were associated with improved survival. Local control rates at 6 and 12 months were 37% and 15%, respectively. In the multivariate analyses, KPS ≥70 (p < 0.001), only 1-3 brain metastases (p < 0.001), and RPA class 1 (p < 0.001) were associated with improved local control. In RPA class 3 patients, survival rates at 6 months were 10% (35 of 39 patients) after 10 × 3 Gy and 9% (2 of 23 patients) after greater doses, respectively (p = 0.98). Conclusions Improved outcomes were associated with WBI doses >30 Gy, better performance status, fewer brain metastases, lack of extracerebral metastases, and lower RPA class. Patients receiving WBI alone appear to benefit from WBI doses >30 Gy. However, such a benefit is limited to RPA class 1 or 2 patients. PMID:20977700

  17. Early Clinical Response after 2 Weeks of Sorafenib Therapy Predicts Outcomes and Anti-Tumor Response in Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuzuya, Teiji; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Ishizu, Yoji; Honda, Takashi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Katano, Yoshiaki; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nakano, Isao; Goto, Hidemi

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims We evaluated the relationship between the early clinical response after 2 weeks of sorafenib therapy and the outcomes and anti-tumor response in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods Fifty-seven patients who had intrahepatic hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma and Child-Pugh (CP) class A disease at baseline were enrolled in this prospective, multicenter, observational, non-interventional study. As an early clinical response after 2 weeks of sorafenib therapy, changes in intra-tumor blood flow on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, and remnant liver function were investigated. Results After 2 weeks of sorafenib therapy, there were 26 patients (45.6%) without disappearance of arterial tumor enhancement on CE-CT, 15 patients (26.3%) with an AFP ratio of >1.2, and seven patients (12.3%) with two or more increments in the CP score. Multivariate analysis showed that the absence of disappearance of arterial tumor enhancement on CE-CT, AFP ratio of >1.2, and two or more increments in the CP score after 2 weeks of sorafenib therapy were significant and independent predictors of worse survival. Upon scoring these three variables as "poor prognostic factors", patients with poor prognostic score 4, 3 or 2 (n = 17) had significantly worse outcomes and a significantly higher progressive disease (PD) rate based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors at 6 weeks after sorafenib therapy than those with poor prognostic score 1 or 0 (n = 40) (median overall survival: 194 days vs. 378 days; p = 0.0010, PD rate: 70.6% vs. 20.0%; p = 0.0003, respectively). Conclusions Changes in intra-tumor blood flow on CE-CT, AFP levels, and remnant liver function after 2 weeks of sorafenib therapy may be useful for predicting the outcomes and anti-tumor response to sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26421430

  18. Real-life outcome of anti-tumor necrosis factor α in the ambulatory treatment of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Baki, Enayatullah; Zwickel, Philipp; Zawierucha, Anna; Ehehalt, Robert; Gotthardt, Daniel; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gauss, Annika

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the outcome of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFα) therapy in outpatients with ulcerative colitis at a tertiary referral center. METHODS: All patients with a confirmed diagnosis of ulcerative colitis undergoing therapy with infliximab and/or adalimumab at the outpatient clinic for inflammatory bowel diseases at the University Hospital Heidelberg between January 2011 and February 2014 were retrospectively enrolled. Patients with a follow-up period of less than 6 mo from start of anti-TNFα therapy were excluded. Medical records of all eligible individuals were carefully reviewed. Steroid-free clinical remission of a duration of at least 3 mo, colectomy rate, duration of anti-TNFα therapy, need for anti-TNFα dose escalation, and the occurrence of adverse events were evaluated as the main outcome parameters. RESULTS: Seventy-two patients were included (35 treated with infliximab, 17 with adalimumab, 20 with both consecutively). Median follow-up was 27 mo (range: 6-87 mo). Steroid-free clinical remission was achieved by 22.2% of the patients (median duration: 21 mo until end of follow-up; range: 3-66 mo). Patients attaining steroid-free clinical remission displayed lower hemoglobin and albumin blood levels at the start of treatment than those who did not achieve remission. The overall colectomy rate was 20.8%. Nearly 50% of the patients underwent anti-TNFα dose escalation during the follow-up period. For both the infliximab and the adalimumab treated patients, non-response to anti-TNFα therapy was the major reason for treatment discontinuation. 18.2% of the infliximab-treated patients and 13.5% of the adalimumab-treated patients had to discontinue their therapy due to adverse events. CONCLUSION: Real-life remission rates of ulcerative colitis under anti-TNFα are overall low, but some patients have a clear long-term benefit. PMID:25805935

  19. Survival outcomes of hepatic resection compared with transarterial chemoembolization or sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Min; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Lee, Yoo Jin; Choi, Wang Yong; Choi, Sei Myong; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Kang, Koo Jeong; Kim, Young Hwan; Chauhan, Anil Kumar; Park, Soo Young; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Treating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) remains controversial. We compared the outcomes of hepatic resection (HR), transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and sorafenib therapy as treatments for HCC with PVTT. Methods: Patients diagnosed as HCC with PVTT between January 2000 and December 2011 who received treatment with sorafenib, HR, or TACE were included. Patients with main PVTT, superior mesenteric vein tumor thrombosis, or Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class C were excluded. The records of 172 patients were analyzed retrospectively. HR, TACE, and sorafenib treatment were performed is 40, 80, and 52 patients respectively. PVTT was classified as either involving the segmental branch (type I) or extending to involve the right or left portal vein (type II). Results: The median survival time was significantly longer in the HR group (19.9 months) than in the TACE and sorafenib groups (6.6 and 6.2 months, respectively; both p<0.001), and did not differ significantly between the latter two groups (p=0.698). Among patients with CTP class A, type I PVTT or unilobar-involved HCC, the median survival time was longer in the HR group than in the TACE and sorafenib groups (p=0.006). In univariate analyses, the initial treatment method, tumor size, PVTT type, involved lobe, CTP class, and presence of cirrhosis or ascites were correlated with overall survival. The significant prognostic factors for overall survival in Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis were initial treatment method (HR vs. TACE: hazard ratio=1.750, p=0.036; HR vs. sorafenib: hazard ratio=2.262, p=0.006), involved lobe (hazard ratio=1.705, p=0.008), PVTT type (hazard ratio=1.617, p=0.013), and CTP class (hazard ratio=1.712, p=0.012). Conclusions: Compared with TACE or sorafenib, HR may prolong the survival of patients with HCC in cases of CTP class A, type I PVTT or unilobar-involved HCC. PMID:27044767

  20. Long-term outcome of giant cell tumor of bone involving sacroiliac joint treated with selective arterial embolization and curettage: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Giant cell tumor of the sacrum, especially involving the sacroiliac joint, is rare, but is particularly challenging to treat. The long term outcome of a patient was studied with giant cell tumor involving the sacroiliac joint treated with selective arterial embolization and curretage. Method One patient with giant cell tumor involving the sacroiliac joint was treated with selective arterial embolization and curettage in our hospital in October 2002. The curettage and bone grafting was done after two times of selective arterial embolization;1600 ml of blood were transfused and no complications developed during the operation. Results At the final follow-up of 9 years after the operation, no local recurrence and metastasis developed and she retained normal activity in daily life. Conclusion We think it is an optimal treatment for giant cell tumor involving the sacroiliac joint, with repeated selective arterial embolization and curettage, which has the advantage of less injury, less blood loss and fewer complications. PMID:23497322

  1. Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Julie A; Li, Fu; Balakrishnan, Subhasree; Cantemir-Stone, Carmen Z; Pecot, Thierry; Martin, Chelsea; Kladney, Raleigh D; Sharma, Sudarshana M; Trimboli, Anthony J; Fernandez, Soledad A; Yu, Lianbo; Rosol, Thomas J; Stromberg, Paul C; Lesurf, Robert; Hallett, Michael; Park, Morag; Leone, Gustavo; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Tumor fibroblasts are active partners in tumor progression, but the genes and pathways that mediate this collaboration are ill-defined. Previous work demonstrates that Ets2 function in stromal cells significantly contributes to breast tumor progression. Conditional mouse models were used to study the function of Ets2 in both mammary stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Conditional inactivation of Ets2 in stromal fibroblasts in PyMT and ErbB2 driven tumors significantly reduced tumor growth, however deletion of Ets2 in epithelial cells in the PyMT model had no significant effect. Analysis of gene expression in fibroblasts revealed a tumor- and Ets2-dependent gene signature that was enriched in genes important for ECM remodeling, cell migration, and angiogenesis in both PyMT and ErbB2 driven-tumors. Consistent with these results, PyMT and ErbB2 tumors lacking Ets2 in fibroblasts had fewer functional blood vessels, and Ets2 in fibroblasts elicited changes in gene expression in tumor endothelial cells consistent with this phenotype. An in vivo angiogenesis assay revealed the ability of Ets2 in fibroblasts to promote blood vessel formation in the absence of tumor cells. Importantly, the Ets2-dependent gene expression signatures from both mouse models were able to distinguish human breast tumor stroma from normal stroma, and correlated with patient outcomes in two whole tumor breast cancer data sets. The data reveals a key function for Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts in signaling to endothelial cells to promote tumor angiogenesis. The results highlight the collaborative networks that orchestrate communication between stromal cells and tumor cells, and suggest that targeting tumor fibroblasts may be an effective strategy for developing novel anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:23977064

  2. Epithelial cell-derived periostin functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer through stabilizing p53 and E-cadherin proteins via the Rb/E2F1/p14ARF/Mdm2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hongjun; Liu, Rui; Fu, Jiao; Yang, Qi; Shi, Jing; Chen, Pu; Ji, Meiju; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Periostin is usually considered as an oncogene in diverse human cancers, including breast, prostate, colon, esophagus, and pancreas cancers, whereas it acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer. In gastric cancer, it has been demonstrated that periglandular periostin expression is decreased whereas stromal periostin expression is significantly increased as compared with normal gastric tissues. Moreover, periostin produced by stromal myofibroblasts markedly promotes gastric cancer cell growth. These observations suggest that periostin derived from different types of cells may play distinct biological roles in gastric tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to explore the biological functions and related molecular mechanisms of epithelial cell-derived periostin in gastric cancer. Our data showed that periglandular periostin was significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer tissues as compared with matched normal gastric mucosa. In addition, its expression in metastatic lymph nodes was significantly lower than that in their primary cancer tissues. Our data also demonstrated that periglandular periostin expression was negatively associated with tumor stage. More importantly, restoration of periostin expression in gastric cancer cells dramatically suppressed cell growth and invasiveness. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved revealed that periostin restoration enhanced Rb phosphorylation and sequentially activated the transcription of E2F1 target gene p14(ARF), leading to Mdm2 inactivation and the stabilization of p53 and E-cadherin proteins. Strikingly, these effects of periostin were abolished upon Rb deletion. Collectively, we have for the first time demonstrated that epithelial cell-derived periostin exerts tumor-suppressor activities in gastric cancer through stabilizing p53 and E-cadherin proteins via the Rb/E2F1/p14(ARF)/Mdm2 signaling pathway. PMID:25486483

  3. Symptomatic Outcomes in Relation to Tumor Expansion After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: Single-Institutional Long-Term Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Hidefumi; Onodera, Shunsuke; Takeichi, Norihito; Onimaru, Rikiya; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: The effect of transient tumor expansion after conventionally fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) on the symptomatic outcomes is not well-known. Methods and Materials: This study enrolled 201 consecutive patients who received SRT for vestibular schwannoma. A conventional fractionation schedule was applied in 194 patients (97%), and 142 (71%) received a total dose of 50 Gy. The median follow-up time was 72 months. Results: The maximum diameter was 9 mm or less in 13 patients, 10-19 mm in 79 patients, 20-29 mm in 87 patients, and 30 mm or greater in 22 patients. At presentation, tumor size of 20 mm or greater was significantly associated with loss of serviceable hearing and trigeminal neuropathy. After SRT, tumor expansion was observed in 42 patients (21%). By tumor size, tumor expansion was observed in 0%, 11.4%, 25.6%, and 50% of patients with tumors of 9 mm or less, 10-19 mm, 20-29 mm, and 30 mm or greater, respectively, in diameter. The tumor expansion was significantly associated with an increased risk of hydrocephalus requiring shunt placement (P=.004), loss of serviceable hearing (P=.0064), and worsening of facial (P<.0001) and trigeminal nerve (P<.0001) functions. Spontaneous tumor shrinkage was observed in 29 of those 42 patients, mostly within 2 years after the expansion, and the majority of the worsened symptoms except for hearing resolved once the tumor had shrunk. As a result, salvage surgical resection for symptomatic relief was required in only 5% of patients. Conclusions: Fractionated SRT could be safely applied even for medium- to large-sized ({>=}20 mm) tumors. However, greater knowledge of the risks and consequences, including transient symptomatic worsening, and the time span of expansion will be required for the follow-up of patients after SRT to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention.

  4. Brain metastases from solid tumors: disease outcome according to type of treatment and therapeutic resources of the treating center

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To evaluate the therapeutic strategies commonly employed in the clinic for the management of brain metastases (BMs) and to correlate disease outcome with type of treatment and therapeutic resources available at the treating center. Methods Four Cancer centres participated to the survey. Data were collected through a questionnaire filled in by one physician for each centre. Results Clinical data regarding 290 cancer patients with BMs from solid tumors were collected. Median age was 59 and 59% of patients had ≤ 3 brain metastases. A local approach (surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery) was adopted in 31% of patients. The local approach demonstrated to be superior in terms of survival compared to the regional/systemic approach (whole brain radiotherapy and chemotherapy, p = <.0001 for survival at 2 years). In the multivariate analysis local treatment was an independent prognostic factor for survival. When patients were divided into 2 groups whether they were treated in centers where local approaches were available or not (group A vs group B respectively, 58% of patients with ≤ 3 BMs in both cohorts), more patients in group A received local strategies although no difference in time to brain progression at 1 year was observed between the two groups of patients. Conclusions In clinical practice, local strategies should be integrated in the management of brain metastases. Proper selection of patients who are candidate to local treatments is of crucial importance. PMID:21244695

  5. OUTCOMES AND PROGNOSTIC FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH CANINE SINONASAL TUMORS TREATED WITH CURATIVE INTENT CONE-BASED STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY (1999-2013).

    PubMed

    Kubicek, Lyndsay; Milner, Rowan; An, Qi; Kow, Kelvin; Chang, Myron; Cooke, Kristen; Fox, Leslie; Farese, James; Bacon, Nicholas; Lurie, David

    2016-05-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a relatively new therapeutic option in veterinary oncology. The role of this modality has not been extensively evaluated for the use in canine nasal tumors. The objective of this retrospective, observational study was to describe the clinical outcome and prognostic factors associated with survival times in a sample of canine patients treated with SRS for sinonasal tumors. Fifty-seven dogs with sinonasal tumors met inclusion criteria. Histologic diagnoses included sarcoma (SA) (n = 9), carcinoma (CA) (n = 40), osteosarcoma (OSA) (n = 7), and round cell (n = 1). Four of 57 cases were treated twice with SRS. For these, the median and mean doses delivered were 30Gy and 33Gy, respectively (range 18.75Gy-56Gy). Late effects occurred in 23 cases and ranged from grades I-III. The median overall survival time was 8.5 months. The median overall survival times in dogs with tumor type of CA, SA, and OSA were 10.4, 10.7, and 3.1 months, respectively. Dogs with the tumor type of OSA had shorter overall survival time than that in dogs with tumor type of CA and SA. Findings from this retrospective study indicated that SRS may be beneficial for canine patients with sinonasal tumors, however a controlled clinical trial would be needed to confirm this. Prospective studies are also needed to better define the role of SRS as palliative or curative, and to further investigate the risk of clinically significant toxicity. PMID:26880676

  6. Worse outcomes for patients undergoing brain tumor and cerebrovascular procedures following the ACGME resident duty-hour restrictions

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Ranjith; Thomas, Steven; Hazzard, Matthew A.; Friedman, Allan H.; Sampson, John H.; Adamson, Cory; Zomorodi, Ali R.; Haglund, Michael M.; Patil, Chirag G.; Boakye, Maxwell; Lad, Shivanand P.

    2015-01-01

    Object On July 1, 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented duty-hour restrictions for resident physicians due to concerns for patient and resident safety. Though duty-hour restrictions have increased resident quality of life, studies have shown mixed results with respect to patient outcomes. In this study, the authors have evaluated the effect of duty-hour restrictions on morbidity, mortality, length of stay, and charges in patients who underwent brain tumor and cerebrovascular procedures. Methods The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to evaluate the effect of duty-hour restrictions on complications, mortality, length of stay, and charges by comparing the pre-reform (2000–2002) and post-reform (2005–2008) periods. Outcomes were compared between nonteaching and teaching hospitals using a difference-in-differences (DID) method. Results A total of 90,648 patients were included in the analysis. The overall complication rate was 11.7%, with the rates not significantly differing between the pre –and post–duty hour eras (p = 0.26). Examination of hospital teaching status revealed that complication rates decreased in nonteaching hospitals (12.1% vs 10.4%, p = 0.0004) and remained stable in teaching institutions (11.8% vs 11.9%, p = 0.73) in the post-reform era. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significantly higher complication risk in teaching institutions (OR 1.33 [95% CI 1.11–1.59], p = 0.0022), with no significant change in nonteaching hospitals (OR 1.11 [95% CI 0.91–1.37], p = 0.31). A DID analysis to compare the magnitude in change between teaching and nonteaching institutions revealed that teaching hospitals had a significantly greater increase in complications during the post-reform era than nonteaching hospitals (p = 0.040). The overall mortality rate was 3.0%, with a significant decrease occurring in the post-reform era in both nonteaching (5.0% vs 3.2%, p < 0.0001) and teaching (3.2% vs 2.3%, p < 0

  7. Trends and Outcomes in the Treatment of Gliomas Based on Data during 2001–2004 from the Brain Tumor Registry of Japan

    PubMed Central

    NARITA, Yoshitaka; SHIBUI, Soichiro

    2015-01-01

    The committee of Brain Tumor Registry of Japan (BTRJ) was founded in 1973 and conducts surveys and analyses of incidence, therapeutic methods, and treatment outcomes of primary and metastatic brain tumors with the cooperation of the Japan Neurosurgical Society members. Newly diagnosed 3,000–4,000 primary brain tumors and 600–1,000 brain metastases patients were enrolled in each year. This report describes the trends and treatment outcomes of gliomas from BTRJ volume 13, including 13,431 patients with primary brain tumors who newly started treatment from 2001 to 2004. Data from 382 diffuse astrocytomas (DAs), 121 oligodendrogliomas (OLs), 90 oligoastrocytomas (OAs), 513 anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs), 126 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs), 106 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas (AOAs), and 1,489 glioblastomas (GBMs) were analyzed for overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) depending on age, symptoms, Karnofsky performance status, location of the tumor, extent of resection (EOR), initial radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The 5-year PFS rates of the patients with DA, OL + OA, AA, AO + AOA, and GBM were 57.0%, 74.6%, 28.7%, 54.0%, and 9.2%, and the 5-year OS rates were 75.0%, 90.0%, 41.1%, 68.2%, and 10.1%, respectively. Higher EOR ≥ 75% in DA and OL + OA and that ≥ 50% in AA, AO + AOA, and GBM significantly prolonged OS. Complications and cause of death were also reported. BTRJ had been edited for all the patients, researchers, and especially for clinicians at bedside to give useful information about brain tumors and to contribute to the advances in brain tumor treatment. This report revealed various clinical problematic issues pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of gliomas. PMID:25797780

  8. Outcome Prediction After Surgery and Chemoradiation of Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Oral Cavity, Oropharynx, and Hypopharynx: Use of Baseline Perfusion CT Microcirculatory Parameters vs. Tumor Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Nguyen, Shaun A.; Anand, Sharma K.; Glavina, Gordana; Day, Terry; Rumboldt, Zoran

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether pretreatment perfusion computed tomography (PCT) may predict outcome in chemoradiated patients with oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) after surgical excision. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with SCCA were examined before treatment. The primary site was oral cavity in 6, oropharynx in 7, and hypopharynx in 8 patients; there were 11 T2, 6 T3, and 4 T4 tumors. PCT was performed at the level of largest tumor diameter based on standard neck CT. The data were processed to obtain blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability surface area product (PS). Regions of interest were free-hand positioned on the lesions to obtain PCT measurements. Tumor volume was also calculated. Follow-up was performed with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and endoscopy. Pearson correlation coefficient was used for comparison between the subgroups. A regression model was constructed to predict recurrence based on the following predictors: age, gender, tumor (T) and nodal (N) stage, tumor volume, and PCT parameters. Results: BF{sub mean}, BF{sub max}, BV{sub mean}, BV{sub max}, MTT{sub mean}, PS{sub mean}, and PS{sub max} were significantly different between patients with and without tumor recurrence (0.0001, p < 0.04). T stage, tumor volume, N stage, BF{sub max}, BV{sub max}, MTT{sub mean}, and radiation dose (p < 0.001) were independent predictors for recurrence. Cox proportional hazards model for tumor recurrence revealed significantly increased risk with high tumor volume (p = 0.00001, relative risk [RR] 7.4), low PS{sub mean} (p = 0.0001, RR 14.3), and low BF{sub max} (p = 0.002, RR 5.9). Conclusions: Our data suggest that PCT parameters have a prognostic role in patients with SCCA.

  9. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in a Human HEp-2 Established Laryngeal Xenografted Tumor Are Not Derived from Cancer Cells through Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Phenotypically Activated but Karyotypically Normal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei; Wu, Chun-Ping; Pan, Jun-Yan; Zheng, Wen-Wei; Cao, Xiao-Juan; Fan, Guo-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a crucial role in cancer progression and even initiation. However, the origins of CAFs in various cancer types remain controversial, and one of the important hypothesized origins is through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) from cancer cells. In this study, we investigated whether the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells are able to generate CAFs via EMT during tumor formation, which is now still unknown. The laryngeal xenografted tumor model was established by inoculating the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cell line in nude mice. Primary cultured CAFs from the tumor nodules and matched normal fibroblasts (NFs) from the adjacent connective tissues were subcultured, purified, and verified by immunofluorescence. Migration, invasion, and proliferation potentials were compared between the CAFs and NFs. A co-culture of CAFs with HEp-2 cells and a co-injection of CAFs with HEp-2 cells in nude mice were performed to examine the cancer-promoting potential of CAFs to further verify their identity. Karyotypic analyses of the CAFs, NFs, and HEp-2 cells were conducted. A co-culture of NFs with HEp-2 cells was also performed to examine the expression of activated markers of CAFs. A pathological examination confirmed that the laryngeal xenografted tumor model was successfully established, containing abundant CAFs. Immunocytochemical staining verified the purities and identities of the CAFs and NFs. Although the CAFs manifested higher migration, invasion, proliferation, and cancer-promoting capacities compared with the NFs, an analysis of chromosomes revealed that both the CAFs and NFs showed typical normal mouse karyotypes. In addition, the NFs co-cultured with HEp-2 cells did not show induced expressions of activated markers of CAFs. Our findings reveal that the CAFs in the HEp-2 established laryngeal xenografted tumor are not of laryngeal cancer origin but of mouse origin, indicating that the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells cannot generate their

  10. Humoral Immune Response against Nontargeted Tumor Antigens after Treatment with Sipuleucel-T and Its Association with Improved Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    GuhaThakurta, Debraj; Sheikh, Nadeem A.; Fan, Li-Qun; Kandadi, Harini; Meagher, T. Craig; Hall, Simon J.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Higano, Celestia S.; Small, Eric J.; Gardner, Thomas A.; Bailey, Kate; Vu, Tuyen; DeVries, Todd; Whitmore, James B.; Frohlich, Mark W.; Trager, James B.; Drake, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Antitumor activity of cancer immunotherapies may elicit immune responses to nontargeted (secondary) tumor antigens, or antigen spread. We evaluated humoral antigen spread after treatment with sipuleucel-T, an immunotherapy for asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), designed to target prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP; primary antigen). Experimental Design Serum samples from patients with mCRPC enrolled in the placebo-controlled phase III IMPACT study (evaluable n = 142) were used to assess humoral antigen spread after treatment with sipuleucel-T. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to self-antigens (including tumor antigens) were surveyed using protein microarrays and confirmed using Luminex xMAP. IgG responses were subsequently validated in ProACT (n = 33), an independent phase II study of sipuleucel-T. Association of IgG responses with overall survival (OS) was assessed using multivariate Cox models adjusted for baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and lactate dehydrogenase levels. Results In patients from IMPACT and ProACT, levels of IgG against multiple secondary antigens, including PSA, KLK2/hK2, K-Ras, E-Ras, LGALS8/PCTA-1/galectin-8, and LGALS3/galectin-3, were elevated after treatment with sipuleucel-T (P < 0.01), but not control. IgG responses (≥2-fold elevation post-treatment) occurred in ≥25% of patients, appeared by 2 weeks after sipuleucel-T treatment, and persisted for up to 6 months. IgG responses to PSA and LGALS3 were associated with improved OS in sipuleucel-T–treated patients from IMPACT (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusions Sipuleucel-T induced humoral antigen spread in patients with mCRPC. IgG responses were associated with improved OS in IMPACT. The methods and results reported may identify pharmacodynamic biomarkers of clinical outcome after sipuleucel-T treatment, and help in clinical assessments of other cancer immunotherapies. PMID:25649018

  11. Impact of Pretreatment Tumor Growth Rate on Outcome of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Atallah, Soha; Cho, B.C. John; Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Giuliani, Meredith; Le, Lisa W.; Brade, Anthony; Sun, Alexander; Bezjak, Andrea; Hope, Andrew J.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of pretreatment tumor growth rate on outcomes in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A review was conducted on 160 patients with T1-T2N0M0 NSCLC treated with SBRT at single institution. The patient's demographic and clinical data, time interval (t) between diagnostic and planning computed tomography (CT), vital status, disease status, and cause of death were extracted from a prospectively kept database. Differences in gross tumor volume between diagnostic CT (GTV1) and planning CT (GTV2) were recorded, and growth rate was calculated by use of specific growth rate (SGR). Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for overall survival (OS). Differences between groups were compared with a log-rank test. Multivariate analyses were performed by use of the Cox proportional hazard model with SGR and other relevant clinical factors. Cumulative incidence was calculated for local, regional, and distant failures by use of the competing risk approach and was compared with Gray's test. Results: The median time interval between diagnostic and planning CT was 82 days. The patients were divided into 2 groups, and the median SGR was used as a cut-off. The median survival times were 38.6 and 27.7 months for the low and high SGR groups, respectively (P=.03). Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (P=.01), sex (P=.04), SGR (P=.03), and GTV2 (P=.002) were predictive for OS in multivariable Cox regression analysis and, except sex, were similarly predictive for failure-free survival (FFS). The 3-year cumulative incidences of regional failure were 19.2% and 6.0% for the high and low SGR groups, respectively (P=.047). Conclusion: High SGR was correlated with both poorer OS and FFS in patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT. If validated, this measurement may be useful in identifying patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant

  12. Breast cancer epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition: examining the functional consequences of plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical developmental process that has recently come to the forefront of cancer biology. In breast carcinomas, acquisition of a mesenchymal-like phenotype that is reminiscent of an EMT, termed oncogenic EMT, is associated with pro-metastatic properties, including increased motility, invasion, anoikis resistance, immunosuppression and cancer stem cell characteristics. This oncogenic EMT is a consequence of cellular plasticity, which allows for interconversion between epithelial and mesenchymal-like states, and is thought to enable tumor cells not only to escape from the primary tumor, but also to colonize a secondary site. Indeed, the plasticity of cancer cells may explain the range of pro-metastatic traits conferred by oncogenic EMT, such as the recently described link between EMT and cancer stem cells and/or therapeutic resistance. Continued research into this relationship will be critical in developing drugs that block mechanisms of breast cancer progression, ultimately improving patient outcomes. PMID:22078097

  13. A comparison of clinical and surgical outcomes between laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery and traditional multiport laparoscopic surgery for adnexal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Ok; Yoon, Jung Won; Chung, Dawn; Yim, Ga Won; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and surgical outcomes between laparo-endoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery and traditional multiport laparoscopic (TML) surgery for treatment of adnexal tumors. Methods Medical records were reviewed for patients undergoing surgery for benign adnexal tumors between January 2008 and April 2012 at our institution. All procedures were performed by the same surgeon. Clinical and surgical outcomes for patients undergoing LESS surgery using Glove port were compared with those patients undergoing TML surgery. Results A review of 129 patient cases undergoing LESS surgery using Glove port and 100 patient cases undergoing TML surgery revealed no significant differences in the baseline characteristics of the two groups. The median operative time was shorter in the LESS group using Glove port at 44 minutes (range, 19-126 minutes) than the TML group at 49 minutes (range, 20-196 minutes) (P=0.0007). There were no significant differences between in the duration of postoperative hospital stay, change in hemoglobin levels, pain score or the rate of complications between the LESS and TML groups. Conclusion LESS surgery showed comparable clinical and surgical outcomes to TML surgery, and required less operative time. Future prospective trials are warranted to further define the benefits of LESS surgery for adnexal tumor treatment. PMID:25264529

  14. Glioneuronal tumors and medically intractable epilepsy: a clinical study with long-term follow-up of seizure outcome after surgery.

    PubMed

    Aronica, E; Leenstra, S; van Veelen, C W; van Rijen, P C; Hulsebos, T J; Tersmette, A C; Yankaya, B; Troost, D

    2001-03-01

    The present study intends to identify factors that predict postoperative clinical outcome in patients with gangliogliomas (GG) and dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNT). We evaluated the medical records of 45 patients with GG and 13 patients with DNT, treated surgically between 1985 and 1995. We assessed several clinical and histopathological features and analyzed the data statistically. At 5 years postoperatively, 63% of patients with GG and 58% of patients with DNT were seizure-free (Engel's class I). Younger age at surgery (P<0.01 for GG and P<0.05 for DNT), total resection (P<0.01 for GG), shorter duration of epilepsy (P<0.01), absence of generalized seizures (P<0.01 for GG; P<0.05 for DNT) and absence of epileptiform discharge in the post-operative EEG (P<0.01 for GG; P=0.01 for DNT) predicted a better postoperative seizure outcome. Tumor recurrence with malignant progression occurred in eight histologically benign GG and two anaplastic GG and was associated which older age at surgery (P=0.01) and subtotal resection of the tumor (P<0.01). Our results indicate that a prompt diagnosis, relatively soon after seizure onset, followed by complete resection of glioneuronal tumors provides the best chance for curing epilepsy and preventing their malignant transformation. PMID:11248530

  15. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Trzpis, Monika; McLaughlin, Pamela M.J.; de Leij, Lou M.F.H.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2007-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, CD326) is a glycoprotein of ∼40 kd that was originally identified as a marker for carcinoma, attributable to its high expression on rapidly proliferating tumors of epithelial origin. Normal epithelia express EpCAM at a variable but generally lower level than carcinoma cells. In early studies, EpCAM was proposed to be a cell-cell adhesion molecule. However, recent insights revealed a more versatile role for EpCAM that is not limited only to cell adhesion but includes diverse processes such as signaling, cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Cell surface expression of EpCAM may actually prevent cell-cell adhesion. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on EpCAM biology in relation to other cell adhesion molecules. We discuss the implications of the newly identified functions of EpCAM in view of its prognostic relevance in carcinoma, inflammatory pathophysiology, and tissue development and regeneration as well as its role in normal epithelial homeostasis. PMID:17600130

  16. Multiple epithelial and nonepithelial tumors in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: characterization of germline and somatic mutations of the MSH2 gene and heterogeneity of replication error phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui-Len; Chao, Chung-Faye; Ding, Dah-Ching; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Chang, Cheng-Chang; Lai, Hung-Chen; Yu, Mu-Hsien; Liu, Hang-Seng; Chu, Tang-Yuan

    2004-09-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal inherited cancer syndrome characterized by germline plus somatic mutations of DNA mismatch repair genes and familial clustering of cancers of colorectum and other visceral organs. So far, to our knowledge, there has been no proof of nonepithelial tumors in association with HNPCC. Here we report on a MSH2 frameshift HNPCC family with a carrier found to have multiple primary tumors, including endometrial hyperplasia, ovarian adenocarcinoma, skin cavernous hemangioma, and skin dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP). We studied the replication error (RER) phenotype in noncoding (Bat-26, Bat-25, D2S123, D5S346, and D17S250) and coding (MSH3, MSH6, BAX, and TGFBR2 genes) DNA sequences, and characterized the germline and somatic mutations of the MSH2 gene in the tumors described above and in endometrial carcinomas from two of her affected siblings. RER was observed in an order of hyperplasic endometrium (6/10 markers), ovarian carcinoma (5/10 markers), endometrial carcinomas (4/9 and 3/10), DFSP (2/9 markers), and cavernous hemangioma (2/10 markers). All the tumors showed the same germline mutation of G5-->G6 frameshift at 183-187 and polymorphism of C1168T in a heterozygous pattern. In an endometrial carcinoma, deletion of the second allele of MSH2 was evident. Heterogeneous RER patterns were noted in multiple primary tumors of the same individual and in premalignant and malignant endometrial tumors from different individuals. The study demonstrated the two hits of the hMSH(2) gene as well as intra- and interindividual variations of RER phenotypes in HNPCC. The first characterized nonepithelial tumors in HNPCC seem to carry a limited panel of RER, including a framesift at the (A)(10) tract of TGFBR2. PMID:15350299

  17. Iron chelation: inhibition of key signaling pathways in the induction of the epithelial mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer and other tumors.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Alexander; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide in both men and women. It presents late with non-specific symptoms, which makes it difficult to diagnose until the cancer has progressed and metastasized. Metastasis is facilitated by the epithelial-to-mes-enchymal transition (EMT), which is promoted via the oncogenic transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), Wnt, and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling pathways. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the EMT can be inhibited by novel anti-cancer agents known as thiosemicarbazone iron chelators. These novel agents also up-regulate the metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), which can restore normal signaling to the cell and suppresses metastasis via inhibition of the EMT. Through the ability of iron chelators to up-regulate NDRG1 expression and affect multiple molecular targets, these agents have the potential to maintain the epithelial phenotype of cancer cells and may lead to improved survival rates for patients with late-stage disease. PMID:23879587

  18. The OPCML Tumor Suppressor Functions as a Cell Surface Repressor-Adaptor, Negatively Regulating Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McKie, Arthur B.; Vaughan, Sebastian; Zanini, Elisa; Okon, Imoh S.; Louis, Louay; de Sousa, Camila; Greene, Mark I.; Wang, Qiang; Agarwal, Roshan; Shaposhnikov, Dmitry; Wong, Joshua LC; Gungor, Hatice; Janczar, Szymon; El-Bahrawy, Mona; Lam, Eric W-F; Chayen, Naomi E.; Gabra, Hani

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy and its molecular basis is poorly understood. We previously showed that OPCML was frequently epigenetically inactivated in EOC, with suppressor function in-vitro and in-vivo. Here, we further show the clinical relevance of OPCML and demonstrate that OPCML functions by a novel mechanism, regulating a specific repertoire of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) EPHA2, FGFR1, FGFR3, HER2 and HER4 in EOC cell lines and normal ovarian surface epithelial cells. OPCML negatively regulates RTKs by binding their extracellular domains, altering trafficking via non-clathrin dependent endocytosis, and promoting their degradation via a polyubiquitination-associated proteasomal mechanism leading to signalling and growth inhibition. Exogenous recombinant OPCML domain 1-3 protein inhibited EOC cell growth in-vitro and in-vivo (in two murine ovarian cancer intra-peritoneal models) utilising an identical mechanism. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism for OPCML, and proof-of-concept for rOPCML protein therapy in EOC. PMID:22585860

  19. The cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 transactivates epithelial membrane protein 2, a potential tumor suppressor in the urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Feng; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Wu, Wen-Ren; Liao, Yu-Jing; Chen, Lih-Ren; Huang, Chun-Nung; Li, Ching-Chia; Li, Wei-Ming; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ling; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chow, Nan-Haw; Shiue, Yow-Ling

    2015-04-20

    In this study, we report that EMP2 plays a tumor suppressor role by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest, suppressing cell viability, proliferation, colony formation/anchorage-independent cell growth via regulation of G2/M checkpoints in distinct urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UBUC)-derived cell lines. Genistein treatment or exogenous expression of the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) gene in different UBUC-derived cell lines induced EMP2 transcription and subsequent translation. Mutagenesis on either or both cAMP-responsive element(s) dramatically decreased the EMP2 promoter activity with, without genistein treatment or exogenous CREB1 expression, respectively. Significantly correlation between the EMP2 immunointensity and primary tumor, nodal status, histological grade, vascular invasion and mitotic activity was identified. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that low EMP2 immunoexpression is an independent prognostic factor for poor disease-specific survival. Genistein treatments, knockdown of EMP2 gene and double knockdown of CREB1 and EMP2 genes significantly inhibited tumor growth and notably downregulated CREB1 and EMP2 protein levels in the mice xenograft models. Therefore, genistein induced CREB1 transcription, translation and upregulated pCREB1(S133) protein level. Afterward, pCREB1(S133) transactivated the tumor suppressor gene, EMP2, in vitro and in vivo. Our study identified a novel transcriptional target, which plays a tumor suppressor role, of CREB1. PMID:25940704

  20. The cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 transactivates epithelial membrane protein 2, a potential tumor suppressor in the urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Ren; Liao, Yu-Jing; Chen, Lih-Ren; Huang, Chun-Nung; Li, Ching-Chia; Li, Wei-Ming; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ling; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chow, Nan-Haw; Shiue, Yow-Ling

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report that EMP2 plays a tumor suppressor role by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest, suppressing cell viability, proliferation, colony formation/anchorage-independent cell growth via regulation of G2/M checkpoints in distinct urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UBUC)-derived cell lines. Genistein treatment or exogenous expression of the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) gene in different UBUC-derived cell lines induced EMP2 transcription and subsequent translation. Mutagenesis on either or both cAMP-responsive element(s) dramatically decreased the EMP2 promoter activity with, without genistein treatment or exogenous CREB1 expression, respectively. Significantly correlation between the EMP2 immunointensity and primary tumor, nodal status, histological grade, vascular invasion and mitotic activity was identified. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that low EMP2 immunoexpression is an independent prognostic factor for poor disease-specific survival. Genistein treatments, knockdown of EMP2 gene and double knockdown of CREB1 and EMP2 genes significantly inhibited tumor growth and notably downregulated CREB1 and EMP2 protein levels in the mice xenograft models. Therefore, genistein induced CREB1 transcription, translation and upregulated pCREB1(S133) protein level. Afterward, pCREB1(S133) transactivated the tumor suppressor gene, EMP2, in vitro and in vivo. Our study identified a novel transcriptional target, which plays a tumor suppressor role, of CREB1. PMID:25940704

  1. Preoperative Embolization of Hypervascular Thoracic, Lumbar, and Sacral Spinal Column Tumors: Technique and Outcomes from a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sreejit; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Leng, Lewis Z.; Marcus, Joshua D.; Bilsky, Mark; Laufer, Ilya; Patsalides, Athos

    2013-01-01

    Summary The existing literature on preoperative spine tumor embolization is limited in size of patient cohorts and diversity of tumor histologies. This report presents our experience with preoperative embolization of hypervascular thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spinal column tumors in the largest series to date. We conducted a retrospective review of 228 angiograms and 188 pre-operative embolizations for tumors involving thoracic, lumbar and sacral spinal column. Tumor vascularity was evaluated with conventional spinal angiography and was graded from 0 (same as normal adjacent vertebral body) to 3 (severe tumor blush with arteriovenous shunting). Embolic materials included poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) particles and detachable platinum coils and rarely, liquid embolics. The degree of embolization was graded as complete, near-complete, or partial. Anesthesia records were reviewed to document blood loss during surgery. Renal cell carcinoma (44.2%), thyroid carcinoma (9.2%), and leiomyosarcoma (6.6%) were the most common tumors out of a total of 40 tumor histologies. Hemangiopericytoma had the highest mean vascularity (2.6) of all tumor types with at least five representative cases followed by renal cell carcinoma (2.0) and thyroid carcinoma (2.0). PVA particles were used in 100% of cases. Detachable platinum coils were used in 51.6% of cases. Complete, near-complete, and partial embolizations were achieved in 86.1%, 12.7%, and 1.2% of all cases, respectively. There were no new post-procedure neurologic deficits or other complications with long-term morbidity. The mean intra-operative blood loss for the hypervascular tumors treated with pre-operative embolization was 1745 cc. Preoperative embolization of hypervascular thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spine tumors can be performed with high success rates and a high degree of safety at high volume centers. PMID:24070089

  2. Pathologic and Molecular Features Correlate With Long-Term Outcome After Adjuvant Therapy of Resected Primary GI Stromal Tumor: The ACOSOG Z9001 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Corless, Christopher L.; Ballman, Karla V.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Kolesnikova, Violetta; Maki, Robert G.; Pisters, Peter W.T.; Blackstein, Martin E.; Blanke, Charles D.; Demetri, George D.; Heinrich, Michael C.; von Mehren, Margaret; Patel, Shreyaskumar; McCarter, Martin D.; Owzar, Kouros; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The ACOSOG (American College of Surgeons Oncology Group) Z9001 (Alliance) study, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, demonstrated that 1 year of adjuvant imatinib prolonged recurrence-free survival (RFS) after resection of primary GI stromal tumor (GIST). We sought to determine the pathologic and molecular factors associated with patient outcome. Patients and Methods There were 328 patients assigned to the placebo arm and 317 to the imatinib arm. Median patient follow-up was 74 months. There were 645 tumor specimens available for mitotic rate or mutation analysis. Results RFS remained superior in the imatinib arm (hazard ratio, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.75; Cox model–adjusted P < .001). On multivariable analysis of patients in the placebo arm, large tumor size, small bowel location, and high mitotic rate were associated with lower RFS, whereas tumor genotype was not significantly associated with RFS. Multivariable analysis of patients in the imatinib arm yielded similar findings. When comparing the two arms, imatinib therapy was associated with higher RFS in patients with a KIT exon 11 deletion of any type, but not a KIT exon 11 insertion or point mutation, KIT exon 9 mutation, PDGFRA mutation, or wild-type tumor, although some of these patient groups were small. Adjuvant imatinib did not seem to alter overall survival. Conclusion Our findings show that tumor size, location, and mitotic rate, but not tumor genotype, are associated with the natural history of GIST. Patients with KIT exon 11 deletions assigned to 1 year of adjuvant imatinib had a longer RFS. PMID:24638003

  3. Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Topotecan With or Without Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  4. The Clinicopathologic Characteristics and 5-year Survival Rate of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Yazd, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Mortazavizadeh, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Bashardust, Nasrollah; Zakerian, Neda; Zaidabadi, Mahbube; Yazdian-Anari, Pouria; Teimoori, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ovarian cancer is the second most common malignancy in women, the most common cause of gynecologic cancer deaths, and most patients have advanced stage disease at the time of diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to estimate the 5-year survival of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer based on age, tumor histology, stage of disease, and type of treatment. Methods This study was conducted on 120 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer referred to Shahid Sadoughi hospital and Shah Vali oncology clinic of Yazd from 2006 to 2012. Demographic data and patient records were studied to evaluate the treatment outcome, pathology of the tumor, and stage of disease. Finally, the overall survival rate and tumor-free survival of patients was assessed. Results The mean patient age was 53.87± 14.11 years. Most participants had stage I (36.7%) or stage II (35%) disease. Serous adenocarcinoma (57.6%) was the most common pathology found in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. The overall survival of patients in this study was significantly associated with the histological tumor type (p = 0.000) and disease stage (p = 0.0377). Stage I (84.18%) and serous adenocarcinoma (72.81%) demonstrated the best survival. The tumor-free survival rates were not associated with histology types (p = 0.079), surgical procedure (p = 0.18), or chemotherapy (p = 0.18). Conclusion The survival of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer was significantly associated with disease stage. Serous adenocarcinoma also had the best prognosis among the pathologies studied. Therefore, early detection of ovarian cancer can substantially increase the survival rate. PMID:26516450

  5. Tumor suppressor pten signaling is up-regulated in mammary epithelial cells by soy isoflavone genistein: implications for breast cancer protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological studies have shown lower occurrence of breast cancer in Asian women whose early intake of soy products is higher than their American counterparts. In a previous work, we showed protection against NMU-induced mammary tumors in rats exposed to dietary soy protein isolate (SPI) or casei...

  6. The soybean peptide lunasin promotes apoptosis of mammary epithelial cells via induction of tumor suppressor PTEN: similarities and distinct actions from soy isoflavone genistein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women. Diet and lifestyle are major contributing factors to increased breast cancer risk. While mechanisms underlying dietary protection of mammary tumor formation are increasingly elucidated, there remains a dearth of knowledge on the nature an...

  7. A Common Region of Deletion on Chromosome 17q in Both Sporadic and Familial Epithelial Ovarian Tumors Distal to BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, Andrew K.; Vanderveer, Lisa; Schultz, David C.; Lynch, Henry T.; Altomare, Deborah A.; Buetow, Kenneth H.; Daly, Mary; Getts, Lori A.; Masny, Agnes; Rosenblum, Norman; Hogan, Michael; Ozols, Robert F.; Hamilton, Thomas C.

    1994-01-01

    Linkage analysis in familial breast and ovarian cancer and studies of allelic deletion in sporadic ovarian tumors have identified a region on chromosome 17q containing a candidate tumor-suppressor gene (referred to as BRCA1) of likely importance in ovarian carcinogenesis. We have examined normal and tumor DNA samples from 32 patients with sporadic and 8 patients with familial forms of the disease, for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 21 loci on chromosome 17 (7 on 17p and 14 on 17q). LOH on 17p was 55% (22/40) for informative 17pl3.1 and 17pl3.3 markers. When six polymorphic markers flanking the familial breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility locus on 17ql2-q21 were used, LOH was 58% (23/40), with one tumor showing telomeric retention. Evaluation of a set of markers positioned telomeric to BRCA1 resulted in the highest degree of LOH, 73% (29/40), indicating that a candidate locus involved in ovarian cancer may reside distal to BRCA1. Five of the tumors demonstrating allelic loss for 17q markers were from individuals with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancer. More important, two of these tumors (unique patient number [UPN] 57 and UPN 79) retained heterozygosity for all informative markers spanning the BRCA1 locus but showed LOH at loci distal to but not including the anonymous markers CMM86 (D17S74) and 42D6 (D17S588), respectively. Deletion mapping of seven cases (two familial and five sporadic) showing limited LOH on 17q revealed a common region of deletion, distal to GH and proximal to D17S4, that spans −25 cM. These results suggest that a potential tumor-suppressor gene involved in both sporadic and familial ovarian cancer may reside on the distal portion of chromosome 17q and is distinct from the BRCA1 gene. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3 PMID:7942844

  8. MCAM and LAMA4 Are Highly Enriched in Tumor Blood Vessels of Renal Cell Carcinoma and Predict Patient Outcome.

    PubMed

    Wragg, Joseph W; Finnity, Jonathan P; Anderson, Jane A; Ferguson, Henry J M; Porfiri, Emilio; Bhatt, Rupesh I; Murray, Paul G; Heath, Victoria L; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-04-15

    The structure and molecular signature of tumor-associated vasculature are distinct from those of the host tissue, offering an opportunity to selectively target the tumor blood vessels. To identify tumor-specific endothelial markers, we performed a microarray on tumor-associated and nonmalignant endothelium collected from patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), colorectal carcinoma, or colorectal liver metastasis. We identified a panel of genes consistently upregulated by tumor blood vessels, of which melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) and its extracellular matrix interaction partner laminin alpha 4 (LAMA4) emerged as the most consistently expressed genes. This result was subsequently confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis of MCAM and LAMA4 expression in RCC and colorectal carcinoma blood vessels. Strong MCAM and LAMA4 expression was also shown to predict poor survival in RCC, but not in colorectal carcinoma. Notably, MCAM and LAMA4 were enhanced in locally advanced tumors as well as both the primary tumor and secondary metastases. Expression analysis in 18 different cancers and matched healthy tissues revealed vascular MCAM as highly specific in RCC, where it was induced strongly by VEGF, which is highly abundant in this disease. Lastly, MCAM monoclonal antibodies specifically localized to vessels in a murine model of RCC, offering an opportunity for endothelial-specific targeting of anticancer agents. Overall, our findings highlight MCAM and LAMA4 as prime candidates for RCC prognosis and therapeutic targeting. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2314-26. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26921326

  9. Bcl-B Expression in Human Epithelial and Nonepithelial Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska, Maryla; Kitada, Shinichi; Winter, Jane N.; Variakojis, Daina; Lichtenstein, Alan; Zhai, Dayong; Cuddy, Michael; Huang, Xianshu; Luciano, Frederic; Baker, Cheryl H.; Kim, Hoguen; Shin, Eunah; Kennedy, Susan; Olson, Allen H.; Badzio, Andrzej; Jassem, Jacek; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Duffy, Michael J.; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Tsao, Ming; Brown, Ewan; Sawyers, Anne; Andreeff, Michael; Mercola, Dan; Krajewski, Stan; Reed, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Apoptosis plays an important role in neoplastic processes. Bcl-B is an antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, which is known to change its phenotype upon binding to Nur77/TR3. The expression pattern of this protein in human malignancies has not been reported. Experimental Design We investigated Bcl-B expression in normal human tissues and several types of human epithelial and nonepithelial malignancy by immunohistochemistry, correlating results with tumor stage, histologic grade, and patient survival. Results Bcl-B protein was strongly expressed in all normal plasma cells but found in only18%of multiple myelomas (n = 133). Bcl-B immunostaining was also present in normal germinal center centroblasts and centrocytes and in approximately half of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n =48) specimens, whereas follicular lymphomas (n = 57) did not contain Bcl-B. In breast (n = 119), prostate (n = 66), gastric (n = 180), and colorectal (n = 106) adenocarcinomas, as well as in non – small cell lung cancers (n = 82), tumor-specific overexpression of Bcl-B was observed. Bcl-B expression was associated with variables of poor prognosis, such as high tumor grade in breast cancer (P = 0.009), microsatellite stability (P = 0.0002), and left-sided anatomic location (P = 0.02) of colorectal cancers, as well as with greater incidence of death from prostate cancer (P = 0.005) and shorter survival of patients with small cell lung cancer (P = 0.009). Conversely, although overexpressed in many gastric cancers, Bcl-B tended to correlate with better outcome (P = 0.01) and more differentiated tumor histology (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Tumor-specific alterations in Bcl-B expressionmay define subsets of nonepithelial and epithelial neoplasms with distinct clinical behaviors. PMID:18483366

  10. Temsirolimus, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Pregnancy outcome in women with inflammatory bowel disease treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor and/or thiopurine therapy: a multicenter study from Japan

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Shunsuke; Motoya, Satoshi; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Kunisaki, Reiko; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Naoki; Kagaya, Takashi; Naganuma, Makoto; Hida, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Mamoru; Hibi, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Yasuo; Miura, Soichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs (anti-TNF) and thiopurines are important treatment options in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including during pregnancy. However, there are limited data on the benefit/risk profile of anti-TNF and thiopurines during pregnancy in Asia. The aim of this study was to analyze pregnancy outcomes of female Japanese IBD patients treated with anti-TNF and/or thiopurines. Methods This cross-sectional study assessed pregnancy outcomes in 72 women with IBD. Pregnancy outcomes were compared among 31 pregnancies without exposure to infliximab (IFX), adalimumab (ADA), or thiopurines; 24 pregnancies with exposure to anti-TNF treatment (23 IFX, 1 ADA); 7 pregnancies with exposure to thiopurines alone; and 10 pregnancies with exposure to both IFX and thiopurines. Results Thirty-five of the 41 pregnancies (85.3%) that were exposed to anti-TNF treatment and/or thiopurines resulted in live births after a median gestational period of 38 weeks. Of the 35 live births, 3 involved premature deliveries; 7, low birth weight; and 1, a congenital abnormality. There were 6 spontaneous abortions in pregnancies that were exposed to anti-TNF treatment (17.7%). Pregnancy outcomes among the 4 groups were similar, except for the rate of spontaneous abortions (P =0.037). Conclusions Exposure to anti-TNF treatment or thiopurines during pregnancy was not related to a higher incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes in Japanese IBD patients except for spontaneous abortion. PMID:27175114

  12. The Tumor Microenvironment in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Peddareddigari, Vijay G.; Wang, Dingzhi

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Therapeutic developments in the past decade have extended life expectancy in patients with metastatic disease. However, metastatic colorectal cancers remain incurable. Numerous agents that were demonstrated to have significant antitumor activity in experimental models translated into disappointing results in extending patient survival. This has resulted in more attention being focused on the contribution of tumor microenvironment to the progression of a number of solid tumors including colorectal cancer. A more complete understanding of interactions between tumor epithelial cells and their stromal elements will enhance therapeutic options and improve clinical outcome. Here we will review the role of various stromal components in colorectal carcinogenesis and discuss the potential of targeting these components for the development of future therapeutic agents. PMID:21209781

  13. Primary bone tumors of the spine revisited: A 10-year single-center experience of the management and outcome in a neurosurgical department

    PubMed Central

    Munoz-Bendix, Christopher; Slotty, Phillip Jorg; Ahmadi, Sebastian Alexander; Bostelmann, Richard; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Cornelius, Jan Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report a large clinical series of primary bone tumors of the spine (PBTS) and review the current concepts of management. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed a clinical series of PBTS treated over the last decade (2004-2014) in the spine unit of a large European tertiary care center. Every PBTS was identified from an electronic medical-record system. Analysis comprised medical records and clinical imaging. Overall survival and outcome was measured using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) at six weeks, six months and one year postoperatively. Surgical management and adjuvant/neoadjuvant strategies were analyzed. A thorough review of the current literature was performed. Results: A total of 79 patients were included. Of these, 44 (55.7%) were male. The age ranged from 9 to 90 years (mean 55), and most patients were adults (93.6%). Local pain was the most common symptom and was present in 91.1% of the patients. The majority of the tumors occurred in the thoracic spine (52 patients, 65.8%). Overall 86% (68 patients) of PBTS were classified as malignant and at the time of diagnosis, 7 patients (8.9%) presented with non-spinal metastasis. The most common histologic types were hematopoietic tumors (72.2%), followed by chondrogenic ones (12.7%). Within hematopoietic tumors, plasmacytoma was the most frequent type (49 patients, 62%). In 12 patients (15.2%) recurrences were seen during the follow-up period. Overall mean survival of benign PBTS was 100%, malignant non-hematopoietic PBTS 50% and, malignant hematopoietic PBTS 84% at one year, respectively. At six weeks and one year after the initial surgery, 79% and 54% of the patients presented a GOS >3, respectively. Conclusion: PBTS were almost exclusively seen in adults. Malignant tumors were markedly more frequent than benign tumors, with hematopoietic tumors being the most common type. For PBTS, early surgery is important in order to restore spinal stability and decompress the spinal cord. This

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Gynecologic Cancer : Prognostic Factors in Local Treatment Failure and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Do Heui; Cho, Young Hyun; Roh, Sung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain metastases in gynecologic cancer (ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancer) patients are rare, and the efficacy of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS) to treat these had not been evaluated. We assessed the efficacy of GKRS and prognostic factors for tumor control and survival in brain metastasis from gynecologic cancers. Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. From May 1995 to October 2012, 26 women (mean age 51.3 years, range 27–70 years) with metastatic brain tumors from gynecologic cancer were treated with GKRS. We reviewed their outcomes, radiological responses, and clinical status. Results In total 24 patients (59 lesions) were available for follow-up imaging. The median follow-up time was 9 months. The mean treated tumor volume at the time of GKRS was 8185 mm3 (range 10–19500 mm3), and the median dose delivered to the tumor margin was 25 Gy (range, 10–30 Gy). A local tumor control rate was 89.8% (53 of 59 tumors). The median overall survival was 9.5 months after GKRS (range, 1–102 months). Age-associated multivariate analysis indicated that the Karnofsky performance status (KPS), the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification, and the number of treated lesions were significant prognostic factors for overall survival (HR=0.162, p=0.008, HR=0.107, p=0.038, and HR=2.897, p=0.045, respectively). Conclusion GKRS is safe and effective for the management of brain metastasis from gynecologic cancers. The clinical status of the patient is important in determining the overall survival time. PMID:27446522

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Latent Membrane Protein 2A Promotes the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma via Metastatic Tumor Antigen 1 and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Signaling Induction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhe; Wan, Xin; Jiang, Runqiu; Deng, Lei; Gao, Yun; Tang, Junwei; Yang, Yu; Zhao, Wei; Yan, Xin; Yao, Kun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus-encoded latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) promotes the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), thereby increasing tumor invasion. Recently, the dysregulation of metastatic tumor antigen 1 (MTA1) was found to enhance tumor metastasis in a variety of cancers. A molecular connection between these two proteins has been proposed but not firmly established. In this study, we reported the overexpression of MTA1 in 29/60 (48.3%) NPC patients, and the overexpression of MTA1 significantly correlated with tumor metastasis. The overexpression of MTA1 promoted EMT via the Wnt1 pathway and β-catenin activation. We demonstrated that LMP2A reinforces the expression of MTA1 via the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway to promote EMT in NPC. Furthermore, by knocking down 4EBP1 in combination with the new mTOR inhibitor INK-128 treatment, we discovered that LMP2A expression activates the 4EBP1-eIF4E axis and increases the expression of MTA1 at the translational level partially independent of c-myc. These findings provided novel insights into the correlation between the LMP2A and MTA1 proteins and reveal a novel function of the 4EBP1-eIF4E axis in EMT of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. IMPORTANCE Prevention of the recurrence and metastasis of NPC is critical to achieving a successful NPC treatment. As we all know, EMT has a vital role in metastasis of malignancies. LMP2A, an oncoprotein of Epstein-Barr virus, a well-known NPC activator, induces EMT and has been proved to exert a promoting effect in tumor metastasis. Our study demonstrated that LMP2A could induce EMT by activating MTA1 at the translational level via activating mTOR signaling and the 4EBP1-eIF4E axis. Taken together, our findings bridge the gap between the NPC-specific cell surface molecule and the final phenotype of the NPC cells. Additionally, our findings indicate that LMP2A and mTOR will serve as targets for NPC therapy in the future. PMID:25100829

  16. Neurocognitive Outcomes and School Performance in Solid Tumor Cancer Survivors Lacking Therapy to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Mohrmann, Caroline; Henry, Jennifer; Hauff, Marnie; Hayashi, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    School performance in patients who have received therapy for childhood cancers has been studied in depth. Risk factors have historically included cranial radiation, intrathecal chemotherapy, and high doses of chemotherapy, including methotrexate and cytarabine. Leukemia and brain tumor survivors who receive such therapy have been the primary focus of this area of investigation. Extracranial solid tumor cancer patients lacking such risk factors have historically been expected to have normal school performance. We examined the medical records of 58 young pediatric extracranial solid tumor patients who lacked CNS-directed therapy or other known risk factors for cognitive impairment to evaluate the incidence of reported difficulties or abnormalities in neuropsychological testing. Thirty-one percent of patients were found to have at least one reported difficulty or abnormality. Of note, 34% of patients with Wilms tumor possessed difficulties compared to 23% of patients with other extracranial solid tumors. Extracranial solid tumor cancer survivors without known risk factors for school performance difficulties appear to have a higher incidence of problems than expected. PMID:25867598

  17. Downregulation of tumor suppressing STF cDNA 3 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor metastasis of osteosarcoma by the Wnt/GSK-3β/β-catenin/Snail signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yang-fan; Dai, Huanzi; Yan, Guang-ning; Meng, Gang; Zhang, Xi; Guo, Qiao-nan

    2016-04-10

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has received considerable attention as a conceptual paradigm for explaining the invasive and metastatic behavior of cells during cancer progression. Our previous study showed that loss of expression of TSSC3 is positively associated with osteosarcoma malignancy and progression. However, whether TSSC3 mediates EMT in osteosarcoma is poorly understood. In the present study, we determined that TSSC3 downregulation induced cell migration and invasion ability and promoted mesenchymal transition of osteosarcoma cells by upregulating mesenchymal markers and inhibiting the epithelial markers. Furthermore, TSSC3 downregulation elicited a signaling cascade that included increased levels of Wnt3a and LRP5, inactivation of GSK-3β, accumulation of nuclear β-catenin and Snail, the augmented binding of β-catenin to TCF-4, and accordingly increased the expression of Wnt target genes (CD44, MMP7). The gene knockdown of these signaling proteins could inhibit TSSC3 downregulation-promoted EMT, migration, and invasion in osteosarcoma. Finally, TSSC3 overexpression obviously inhibited cell migration, invasion, and repressed mesenchymal phenotypes, reducing lung metastasis through GSK-3β activation. Collectively, TSSC3 downregulation promotes the EMT of osteosarcoma cells by regulating EMT markers via a signal transduction pathway that involves Snail, Wnt-β-catenin/TCF, and GSK-3β. PMID:26845447

  18. Basal and copper-induced expression of metallothionein isoform 1,2 and 3 genes in epithelial cancer cells: The role of tumor suppressor p53.

    PubMed

    Ostrakhovitch, E A; Song, Y P; Cherian, M G

    2016-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a ubiquitous low-molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins with a high affinity for metal ions. The expression and induction of MTs have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Our past research had shown that p53 is an important factor in metal regulation of MTs. The present study was undertaken to explore further the interrelationship between p53 and MTs. We investigated whether silencing of p53 could affect expression pattern of basal and copper induced metallothioneins. The silencing of wild-type p53 (wt-p53) in epithelial breast cancer MCF7 cells affected the basal level of MT-2A RNA, whereas the levels of MT-1A and MT-1X RNA remained largely unchanged. The expression of MT-3 was undetectable in MCF7 with either functional or silenced p53. MCF7 cells with silenced wt-p53 failed to upregulate MT-2A in response to copper and showed a reduced sensitivity toward copper induced cell apoptotic death. Similarly in MCF7-E6 and MDA-MB-231 cells, the presence of inactive/mutated p53 halted MT-1A and MT-2A gene expression in response to copper. Constitutive expression of MT-3 RNA was detectable in the presence of mutated p53 (mtp53). Transient transfection of MDA-MB-231 cells with wt-p53 enabled copper induced upregulation of both MT-1A and MT-2A but not basal level of MT-2A, MT-1E, MT-1X and MT-3. Inactivation of p53 in HepG2 cells amplified the basal expression of studied MT isoforms, including MT-3, as well as copper-induced mRNA expression of MTs except MT-1H and MT-3. Presented data demonstrate a direct relation between p53 and MT-1A and MT-2A and they also indicate that wt-p53 might be a negative regulator of MT-3 in epithelial cancer cells. PMID:27049123

  19. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conservation therapy: Outcomes of salvage mastectomy vs. salvage breast-conserving surgery and prognostic factors for salvage breast preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Tracy E.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes of salvage mastectomy (SM) and salvage breast-conserving surgery (SBCS) and study the feasibility of SBCS. Methods and Materials: Of 2,038 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1999, 166 sustained an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Outcomes and prognostic factors of patients treated with SM or SBCS were compared. Patients were considered amenable to SBCS if the recurrence was localized on mammogram and physical examination, and had pathologic size <3 cm, confined to the biopsy site, without skin or lymphovascular invasion, and with {<=}3 positive nodes. Results: Of the 146 patients definitively managed at IBTR, surgery was SM (n = 116) or SBCS (n 30). The median length of follow-up after IBTR was 13.8 years. The SM and SBCS cohorts had no significant differences, except at IBTR the SM cohort had a greater tumor size (p = 0.049). Of the SM cohort, 65.5% were considered appropriate for SBCS, and a localized relapse was predicted by estrogen-receptor positive, diploid, and detection of recurrence by mammogram. Multicentric disease correlated with BRCA1/2 mutation, estrogen-receptor negative, lymph node positive at relapse, and detection of recurrence by physical examination. Survival after IBTR was 64.5% at 10 years, with no significant difference between SM (65.7%) and SBCS (58.0%). Only 2 patients in the SBCS cohort subsequently had a second IBTR, and were salvaged with mastectomy. Conclusions: While mastectomy is considered the standard surgical salvage of IBTR, SBCS is feasible and prognostic factors are related to favorable tumor biology and early detection. Patients with BRCA1/2 germline mutations may be less appropriate for SBCS, as multicentric disease was more prevalent. Patients who underwent SBCS had comparable outcomes as those who underwent SM, but remain at continued risk for IBTR. A prospective trial evaluating repeat lumpectomy and partial breast reirradiation is

  20. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER-2/neu)-Directed Therapy for Rare Metastatic Epithelial Tumors with HER-2 Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Sherry, Timothy; Kallen, Michael E.; Wong, Steven; Drakaki, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Case 1 A 67-year-old Asian female was diagnosed with locally advanced high-grade salivary duct carcinoma in June 2011. Molecular analysis revealed human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) amplification. She received adjuvant therapy with carboplatin/paclitaxel/ trastuzumab and maintenance of trastuzumab. Upon disease progression, trastuzumab could not be continued due to lack of financial coverage. Instead, she was treated with compassionate use of lapatinib from April 2013 and standard 5-fluorouracil. Her disease ultimately progressed and she expired later in 2013. Case 2 A 68-year-old Asian male was diagnosed with extramammary Paget's disease of the scrotum with HER-2 amplification in May 2011. He received 6 cycles of adjuvant trastuzumab/docetaxel/carboplatin followed by maintenance trastuzumab, which was changed to compassionate use of lapatinib as his insurance did not cover further administration of trastuzumab. He showed clinical benefits from single-agent lapatinib and a combination of lapatinib/capecitabine upon progression to the single-agent lapatinib. Ultimately, he was started on ado-trastuzumab emtansine, which was approved at that time by the FDA for HER-2-positive breast cancer progressed on trastuzumab. He is having clinical and radiographic complete response based on current imaging and normalization of his tumor markers. Conclusion HER-2-targeted therapy should be considered for tumors with HER-2 amplification. In our case series, we would like to emphasize this approach in other rare histologies. Specifically, our patient with extramammary Paget's disease of the scrotum represents the first reported case of a non-breast, non-gastric tumor with HER-2 overexpression with complete clinical and radiographic response to HER-2-targeted therapy PMID:27403128

  1. Epithelial Inclusion Cyst in Conjunctival Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Evangelina; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Mastromonaco, Christina; Morales, Melina C; Belfort Neto, Rubens; Burnier, Miguel

    2016-09-01

    Conjunctival melanoma is the second most common conjunctival malignancy. Its differential diagnosis with other conjunctival melanocytic neoplasms is inherently difficult. The presence of epithelial cysts is a useful feature in conjunctival tumors and favors a benign lesion. Herein 2 cases of conjunctival melanoma with cysts are presented. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first series of conjunctival melanoma with epithelial inclusion cysts. This series emphasizes the importance of considering several malignant features when reviewing conjunctival melanocytic lesions, as malignancy can exist even in the presence of epithelial inclusion cysts. PMID:27160434

  2. Loss of Stromal Caveolin-1 Expression: A Novel Tumor Microenvironment Biomarker That Can Predict Poor Clinical Outcomes for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Tao; Lu, Hongwei; Ji, Hong; Li, Yiming; Guo, Jian; Chen, Xi; Wu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Aims Cancer development and progression is not only associated with the tumor cell proliferation but also depends on the interaction between tumor cells and the stromal microenvironment. A new understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment suggests that the loss of stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1) as a key regulator may become a potential therapy target. This study aims to elucidate whether stromal Cav-1 expression in pancreatic cancer can be a strong prognosis biomarker. Methods Tissue samples from 45 pancreatic cancer patients were studied. Parenchyma and stroma were separated and purified using laser capture microdissection. Stromal Cav-1 expression was measured from pancreatic cancer, paraneoplastic, and normal tissue using immunohistochemistry. We analyzed the correlation of stromal Cav-1 expression with clinicopathologic features and prognostic indicators, such as tumor marker HER-2/neu gene. Results Specimens from six patients (13.3%) showed high levels of stromal Cav-1 staining, those from eight patients (17.8%) showed a lower, intermediate level of staining, whereas those from 31 patients (68.9%) showed an absence of staining. Cav-1 expression in cancer-associated fibroblasts was lower than that in paracancer-associated and in normal fibroblasts. Stromal Cav-1 loss was associated with TNM stage (P = 0.018), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.014), distant metastasis (P = 0.027), and HER-2/neu amplification (P = 0.007). The relationships of age, sex, histological grade, and tumor size with stromal Cav-1 expression were not significant (P>0.05). A negative correlation was found between circulating tumor cells and stromal Cav-1 expression (P<0.05). Conclusion The loss of stromal Cav-1 in pancreatic cancer was an independent prognostic indicator, thus suggesting that stromal Cav-1 may be an effective therapeutic target for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:24949874

  3. Fractionated Conformal Radiotherapy in the Management of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas: Long-Term Functional Outcome and Tumor Control at a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Metellus, Philippe; Batra, Sachin; Karkar, Siddharth; Kapoor, Sumit; Weiss, Stephanie; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Danielle

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcome of cavernous sinus meningioma (CSM) treated with fractionated conformal radiotherapy (FCR). Patients and Methods: Fifty-three patients with CSMs (16 men [30.2%], 37 women [69.8%], aged 53 {+-} 13.0 years [mean {+-} SD]) were treated by FCR. In 28 patients (52.8%) FCR was performed as fir