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Sample records for epithelium modifications intracellulaires

  1. Epithelium

    MedlinePlus

    The term "epithelium" refers to layers of cells that line hollow organs and glands. It is also those cells that make ... Epithelium. In: Kierszenbaum AL, Tres LL. Histology and Cell Biology - An Introduction to Pathology , 3rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  2. Modification of disodium cromoglycate passage across lung epithelium in vitro via incorporation into polymeric microparticles.

    PubMed

    Haghi, Mehra; Salama, Rania; Traini, Daniela; Bebawy, Mary; Young, Paul M

    2012-03-01

    Two microparticle systems containing disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) alone or with polyvinyl alcohol (DSCG/PVA) were produced via spray drying and compared in terms of their physicochemical characteristics, aerosol performance and drug uptake across a pulmonary epithelial cell line (Calu-3), cultured under air interface conditions. The particle size distribution of DSCG and DSCG/PVA were similar, of spherical geometry, amorphous and suitable for inhalation purposes. Aerosolisation studies using a modified twin-stage impinger showed the DSCG/PVA to have greater aerosol performance than that of DSCG alone. Aerosol particles of DSCG and DSCG/PVA were deposited onto the surface of the Calu-3 air interface epithelium monolayer and the drug uptake from apical to basal directions measured over time. Drug uptake was measured across a range of doses to allow comparison of equivalent drug and powder mass deposition. Analysis of the data indicated that the percentage cumulative drug uptake was independent of the mass of powder deposited, but dependent on the formulation. Specifically, with the formulation containing DSCG, the diffusion rate was observed to change with respect to time (indicative of a concentration-dependent diffusion process), whilst DSCG/PVA showed a time-independent drug uptake (suggesting a zero-order depot release). PMID:22203523

  3. Nitrite Modification of Extracellular Matrix Alters CD46 Expression and VEGF Release in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Mark A.; Cai, Hui; Bowrey, Hannah E.; Moreira, Ernesto F.; Beck Gooz, Monika; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Gong, Jie; Vought, Emma; Del Priore, Lucian V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Loss of CD46 has recently been implicated in choroidal neovascularization in mice. Herein we investigated the effect of nitrite modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM) as an in vitro model of “aging” and its effect on CD46 expression and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release in cocultured human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Methods ARPE-19 cells were plated onto RPE-derived ECM conditions (untreated; nitrite modified; nitrite modified followed by washing with Triton X-100; or nitrite modified followed by washing with Triton X-100 and coated with extracellular matrix ligands). Cells were cultured for 7 days and CD46 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Additionally, CD46 short interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected into ARPE-19 cells, and VEGF levels were determined by ELISA. Finally, in the same ECM conditions, ARPE-19 cells were challenged with normal human serum and VEGF levels determined by ELISA. Results CD46 is expressed on the basolateral surface of ARPE-19 cells on RPE-derived ECM. Nitrite modification of ECM reduced the expression of CD46 on ARPE-19 cells by 0.5-fold (P = 0.003) and increased VEGF release in ARPE-19 cells by 1.7-fold (P < 0.001). CD46 knockdown also increased release of VEGF on the apical and basal sides of ARPE-19 cells in culture by 1.3- (P = 0.012) and 1.2-fold (P = 0.017), respectively. Conclusions Nitrite modification of the ECM decreased CD46 expression and increased the release of VEGF from ARPE-19 cells. Changes in CD46 expression may lead to changes in VEGF and play a pathologic role in the development of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26161984

  4. Syndrome of selective IgM deficiency with severe T cell deficiency associated with disseminated cutaneous mycobacterium avium intracellulaire infection

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Asal; Louis, Ankmalika Gupta; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous non-disseminated, non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections have been reported in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised subjects. Systemic Mycobacterium avium intracellulaire (MAI) have been reported in non-HIV patients with Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia. We report a comprehensive immunological analysis in syndrome of selective IgM deficiency and T lymphocytopenia (both CD4+ and CD8+) with disseminated cutaneous MAI infection. Naïve (TN) and Central memory (TCM) subsets of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were decreased, whereas terminally differentiated effector memory (TEMRA) subset of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were markedly increased. IFN-γ producing T cells were markedly decreased. Although CD14highCD16- proinflammatory monocytes were modestly increased, IFN-γR+ monocytes were markedly decreased. The expression of TLR3, TLR5, TLR7, and TLR9 on monocytes was decreased. Germinal center B cells (CD19+IgD-CD38+CD27lo) and B1 cells (CD20+CD27+CD43+CD70-) were markedly decreased. A role of immune alterations, including B cells and antibodies in disseminated cutaneous MAI infection is discussed. PMID:26550546

  5. Syndrome of selective IgM deficiency with severe T cell deficiency associated with disseminated cutaneous mycobacterium avium intracellulaire infection.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Asal; Louis, Ankmalika Gupta; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous non-disseminated, non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections have been reported in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised subjects. Systemic Mycobacterium avium intracellulaire (MAI) have been reported in non-HIV patients with Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia. We report a comprehensive immunological analysis in syndrome of selective IgM deficiency and T lymphocytopenia (both CD4+ and CD8+) with disseminated cutaneous MAI infection. Naïve (TN) and Central memory (TCM) subsets of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were decreased, whereas terminally differentiated effector memory (TEMRA) subset of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were markedly increased. IFN-γ producing T cells were markedly decreased. Although CD14(high)CD16- proinflammatory monocytes were modestly increased, IFN-γR+ monocytes were markedly decreased. The expression of TLR3, TLR5, TLR7, and TLR9 on monocytes was decreased. Germinal center B cells (CD19+IgD-CD38+CD27(lo)) and B1 cells (CD20+CD27+CD43+CD70-) were markedly decreased. A role of immune alterations, including B cells and antibodies in disseminated cutaneous MAI infection is discussed. PMID:26550546

  6. Progenitor Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Marty-Santos, Leilani

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing β cells within the vertebrate fetal pancreas acquire their fate in a step-wise manner. Whereas the intrinsic factors dictating the transcriptional or epigenetic status of pancreatic lineages have been intensely examined, less is known about cell–cell interactions that might constitute a niche for the developing β cell lineage. It is becoming increasingly clear that understanding and recapitulating these steps may instruct in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells and/or therapeutic regeneration. Indeed, directed differentiation techniques have improved since transitioning from 2D to 3D cultures, suggesting that the 3D microenvironment in which β cells are born is critical. However, to date, it remains unknown whether the changing architecture of the pancreatic epithelium impacts the fate of cells therein. An emerging challenge in the field is to elucidate how progenitors are allocated during key events, such as the stratification and subsequent resolution of the pre-pancreatic epithelium, as well as the formation of lumens and branches. Here, we assess the progenitor epithelium and examine how it might influence the emergence of pancreatic multipotent progenitors (MPCs), which give rise to β cells and other pancreatic lineages. PMID:26216134

  7. [CYSTEAMINE-INDUCED MODIFICATION OF CYTOGENETIC DAMAGES TO THE CORNEAL EPITHELIUM OF MICE EXPOSED TO CORPUSCULAR RADIATION WITH VARYING LINEAR TRANSFER ENERGIES].

    PubMed

    Vorozhtsova, S V; Bulynina, T M; Molokanov, A G; Ivanov, A A

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic damages to cells of the corneal epithelium were studied in mice exposed to protons (10, 25, 50 and 645 MeV), ions of boron, carbon and neon, and X-rays (180 keV) within the dose range from 25 to 750 cGy and injected with a radioprotector. Animals were subjected to a single exposure. The protective effect of β-mercaptoethylamine was tested in the experiment. The radioprotector (0.2 ml) was introduced intraperitoneally 30 minutes before exposure in 350 mI/kg dose. Control animals received the same amount of sodium chloride solution. The animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation in 24 and 72 hrs. after exposure. It was shown that cysteamine effectively protects in vivo corneal epithelium cells of mice exposed to electromagnetic radiation or protons in a broad energy spectrum (10 to 645 MeV), and to a broad range of radiation doses (25 to 750 cGy), as judged from levels of aberrant mitosis and mitotic activity. The radioprotector exhibited the highest effectiveness in animals exposed to the doses of 50 to 300 cGy. These findings prove that cysteamine may potentially be used for pharmacological protection from protons. The radioprotector failed to prevent chromosomal aberrations after exposure to heavy charged particles of boron, carbon and neon, which implies the need to design radioprotectors against this type of corpuscular radiation specifically. PMID:26292425

  8. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  9. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  10. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth

    PubMed Central

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-01-01

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period. PMID:24785116

  11. One-step treatment of proximal hypospadias by the autologous graft of cultured urethral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, G; De Luca, M; Faranda, F; Franzi, A T; Cancedda, R

    1993-10-01

    Surgical management of severe proximal hypospadias or long strictures of the posterior urethra is a difficult clinical task. Often, the therapeutic approach involves the autologous graft of free flaps of bladder or oral mucosa. We recently reported the use of autologous graft of cultured squamous urethral epithelium during urethroplasty in patients with severe proximal hypospadias. The main limitation to the widespread use of cultured epithelium was the long hospitalization due to the requirement of 2 surgical steps. We now report a substantial modification of the surgical procedure which allows for rapid 1-step urethroplasty. Cultured squamous urethral epithelium is tubularized in vitro with the aid of a tubular polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex) support and 1-step urethroplasty is performed within 30 minutes. Results obtained in 8 patients are presented. PMID:8371392

  12. Optimization of silk films as substrate for functional corneal epithelium growth.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liang; Ghezzi, Chiara E; Kaplan, David L

    2016-02-01

    The corneal epithelium is the first cellular barrier to protect the cornea. Thus, functional tissue engineering of the corneal epithelium is a strategy for clinical transplantation. In this study, the optimization of silk films (SFs) as substrates for functional human corneal epithelium growth was investigated with primary human corneal epithelial cells on SFs, poly-D-lysine (PDL) coated SFs, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) modified SFs and PDL blended SFs. PDL coated SFs significantly promoted cell adhesion at early phases in comparison to the other study groups, while PDL blended SF significantly promoted cell migration in a "wound healing" model. All film modifications promoted cell proliferation and viability, and a multi-layered epithelium was achieved in 4 weeks of culture. The epithelia formed were tightly apposed and maintained an intact barrier function against rose bengal dye penetration. The results suggested that a differentiated human corneal epithelium can be established with primary corneal epithelial cells on SFs in vitro, by optimizing SF composition with PDL. PMID:25891207

  13. Electrodeposition of pronectin for titanium to augment gingival epithelium adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Shingo; Asano, Kazunari; Miyazawa, Atsuko; Satoh, Tazuko; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2013-05-01

    This paper is one trial of surface modification of titanium with pronectin F+ (PN) of an artificial protein to enhance gingival adhesion. Titanium plates were electrodeposited in the PN solution to prepare PN-electrodeposited titanium plates. When PN detachment from the PN-electrodeposited titanium plates was investigated, no detachment was observed, in contrast to the case of titanium plates simply coated with PN. A cell culture experiment demonstrated that electrodeposited PN had an inherent ability to enhance the initial attachment of gingival epithelial cells. The PN-electrodeposited titanium plates were implanted between the gingival epithelium and the underlying bone tissue of rabbits to evaluate epithelial growth on the plates and their gingival adhesion. Non-treated and PN-coated titanium plates were used as controls. PN electrodeposition enhanced epithelial growth and adhesion of titanium plates to a significantly great extent compared with PN-coated plates. These findings demonstrate that PN electrodeposition is a promising method to enhance epithelium adhesion onto a titanium surface. PMID:22294437

  14. The skin of fish as a transport epithelium: a review.

    PubMed

    Glover, Chris N; Bucking, Carol; Wood, Chris M

    2013-10-01

    The primary function of fish skin is to act as a barrier. It provides protection against physical damage and assists with the maintenance of homoeostasis by minimising exchange between the animal and the environment. However in some fish, the skin may play a more active physiological role. This is particularly true in species that inhabit specialised environmental niches (e.g. amphibious and air-breathing fish such as the lungfish), those with physiological characteristics that may subvert the need for the integument as a barrier (e.g. the osmoconforming hagfish), and/or fish with anatomical modifications of the epidermis (e.g. reduced epithelial thickness). Using examples from different fish groups (e.g. hagfishes, elasmobranchs and teleosts), the importance of fish skin as a transport epithelium for gases, ions, nitrogenous waste products, and nutrients was reviewed. The role of the skin in larval fish was also examined, with early life stages often utilising the skin as a surrogate gill, prior to the development of a functional branchial epithelium. PMID:23660826

  15. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  16. Retinal pigment epithelium in incontinentia pigmenti.

    PubMed

    Mensheha-Manhart, O; Rodrigues, M M; Shields, J A; Shannon, G M; Mirabelli, R P

    1975-04-01

    An 18-month-old white girl with incontinentia pigmenti presented clinically with leukokoria of the right eye. B-scan ultrasound demonstrated a retrolental mass consistent with a detached retina. Histologic examination of the skin revealed changes compatible with the intermediate verrucous phase of the disease. Microscopic examination of the right eye showed retinal detachment and nodular proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium. The nodules contained macrophages laden with melanin and lipofuscin. An unusually large amount of lipofuscin was present for a child of this age. The basic pigmentary abnormality may affect the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in changes in the overlying neurosensory retina that may lead to the retinal dysplasia or retinal detachemnt often associated with this condition. PMID:1119517

  17. Odors Discrimination by Olfactory Epithelium Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Ye, Weiwei; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Humans are exploring the bionic biological olfaction to sense the various trace components of gas or liquid in many fields. For achieving the goal, we endeavor to establish a bioelectronic nose system for odor detection by combining intact bioactive function units with sensors. The bioelectronic nose is based on the olfactory epithelium of rat and microelectrode array (MEA). The olfactory epithelium biosensor generates extracellular potentials in presence of odor, and presents obvious specificity under different odors condition. The odor response signals can be distinguished with each other effectively by signal sorting. On basis of bioactive MEA hybrid system and the improved signal processing analysis, the bioelectronic nose will realize odor discrimination by the specific feature of signals response to various odors.

  18. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Varner, Victor D; Gleghorn, Jason P; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C; Nelson, Celeste M

    2015-07-28

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  19. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  20. Remodeling of the Fetal Collecting Duct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, Michael J.; Ivanova, Larissa; Toran, Nuria; Tarantal, Alice F.; Matsell, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital urinary tract obstruction induces changes to the renal collecting duct epithelium, including alteration and depletion of intercalated cells. To study the effects of obstruction on the ontogeny of intercalated cell development, we examined normal and obstructed human fetal and postnatal kidneys. In the normal human fetal kidney, intercalated cells originated in the medullary collecting duct at 8 weeks gestation and remained most abundant in the inner medulla throughout gestation. In the cortex, intercalated cells were rare at 18 and 26 weeks gestation and observed at low abundance at 36 weeks gestation. Although early intercalated cells exhibit an immature phenotype, Type A intercalated cells predominated in the inner and outer medullae at 26 and 36 weeks gestation with other intercalated cell subtypes observed rarely. Postnatally, the collecting duct epithelium underwent a remodeling whereby intercalated cells become abundant in the cortex yet absent from the inner medulla. In 18-week obstructed kidneys with mild to moderate injury, the intercalated cells became more abundant and differentiated than the equivalent age-matched normal kidney. In contrast, more severely injured ducts of the late obstructed kidney exhibited a significant reduction in intercalated cells. These studies characterize the normal ontogeny of human intercalated cell development and suggest that obstruction induces premature remodeling and differentiation of the fetal collecting duct epithelium. PMID:20035053

  1. Confocal fluorescence microendoscopy of bronchial epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Pierre M.; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Leriche, Jean C.; Anderson, Marshall W.; Macaulay, Calum E.

    2009-03-01

    Confocal microendoscopy permits the acquisition of high-resolution real-time confocal images of bronchial mucosa via the instrument channel of an endoscope. We report here on the construction and validation of a confocal fluorescence microendoscope and its use to acquire images of bronchial epithelium in vivo. Our objective is to develop an imaging method that can distinguish preneoplastic lesions from normal epithelium to enable us to study the natural history of these lesions and the efficacy of chemopreventive agents without biopsy removal of the lesion that can introduce a spontaneous regression bias. The instrument employs a laser-scanning engine and bronchoscope-compatible confocal probe consisting of a fiber-optic image guide and a graded-index objective lens. We assessed the potential of topical application of physiological pH cresyl violet (CV) as a fluorescence contrast-enhancing agent for the visualization of tissue morphology. Images acquired ex vivo with the confocal microendoscope were first compared with a bench-top confocal fluorescence microscope and conventional histology. Confocal images from five sites topically stained with CV were then acquired in vivo from high-risk smokers and compared to hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of biopsies taken from the same site. Sufficient contrast in the confocal imagery was obtained to identify cells in the bronchial epithelium. However, further improvements in the miniature objective lens are required to provide sufficient axial resolution for accurate classification of preneoplastic lesions.

  2. Development of the ovarian follicular epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Lavranos, T C; van Wezel, I L; Irving-Rodgers, H F

    1999-05-25

    A lot is known about the endocrine control of the development of ovarian follicles, but a key question now facing researchers is which molecular and cellular processes take part in control of follicular growth and development. The growth and development of ovarian follicles occurs postnatally and throughout adult life. In this review, we focus on the follicular epithelium (membrana granulosa) and its basal lamina. We discuss a model of how granulosa cells arise from a population of stem cells and then enter different lineages before differentiation. The structure of the epithelium at the antral stage of development is presented, and the effects that follicle growth has on the behavior of the granulosa cells are discussed. Finally, we discuss the evidence that during follicle development the follicular basal lamina changes in composition. This would be expected if the behavior of the granulosa cells changes, or if the permeability of the basal lamina changes. It will be evident that the follicular epithelium has similarities to other epithelia in the body, but that it is more dynamic, as gross changes occur during the course of follicle development. This basic information will be important for the development of future reproductive technologies in both humans and animals, and possibly for understanding polycystic ovarian syndrome in women. PMID:10411332

  3. Behavior modification.

    PubMed

    Pelham, W E; Fabiano, G A

    2000-07-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic and substantially impairing disorder. This means that treatment must also be chronic and substantial. Behavior Modification, and in many cases, the combination of behavior modification and stimulant medication, is a valid, useful treatment for reducing the pervasive impairment experienced by children with ADHD. Based on the research evidence reviewed, behavior modification should be the first line of treatment for children with ADHD. PMID:10944662

  4. Defective Barrier Function in Neosquamous Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jovov, Biljana; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Orlando, Geraldine S.; Djukic, Zorka; Orlando, Roy C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a common strategy for the prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). After RFA, the ablated esophagus heals on acid suppressive therapy, and is re-populated with a stratified squamous epithelium, referred to as ‘neosquamous epithelium (NSE).’ Because the ability of the NSE to protect the underlying tissue from recurrent insult by reflux is unclear, we assessed the barrier function of NSE by comparing it to that of the native upper squamous epithelium (USE) in subjects having undergone RFA. METHODS At varying intervals following RFA, the barrier function of NSE and USE were assessed in endoscopic biopsies by light and electron microscopy, and by measurement of electrical resistance (RT) and fluorescein flux in mini-Ussing chambers. Chamber results were further compared with results from control biopsies (healthy distal esophagus). A claudin expression profile in the tight junctions (TJ) of NSE and USE was determined using qRT-PCR. Differential expression of claudin 4 between NSE and USE was assayed by immunoblots. RESULTS USE was histologically normal while NSE showed dilated intercellular spaces and marked eosinophilia. NSE was also more permeable than USE and healthy controls, having lower mean RT and higher fluorescein fluxes. Abnormally low RT values for NSE were unrelated to the time period following RFA (or number of prior RFA sessions), being abnormal even 26 months after RFA. Abnormal permeability in NSE was associated with significantly lower values for claudin-4 and claudin-10 than in USE. CONCLUSIONS NSE commonly exhibits defective barrier function. Since this defect will make it vulnerable to injury, inflammation and destruction by acidic and weakly acidic refluxates, it may in part explain incidences of recurrence of BE following ablation. PMID:23318477

  5. Lectin reactivities as intermediate biomarkers in premalignant colorectal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Boland, C R; Martin, M A; Goldstein, I J

    1992-01-01

    Normal colonic epithelial cells undergo maturation as they traverse the crypt to the lumenal surface. The binding of lectins to goblet cell mucins and other glycoconjugates changes as the cells migrate and differentiate. Additional stepwise modifications in glycoconjugate expression occur in premalignant and malignant neoplasms that may be detected by lectin binding studies. The lectins Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and soybean agglutinin (SBA) have been developed as markers of differentiation in normal-appearing colonic epithelium. Using a quantitative biometric system to score tissues, reduced levels of lectin binding have been found in rectal tissue from patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. The lectin Amaranthus caudatus agglutinin (ACA) binds to a cytoplasmic glycoconjugate expressed at the base of the colonic crypt and serves as a possible proliferation marker in the distal, but not proximal, colon. ACA binding increases in tandem with increased levels of proliferation (using BrdU incorporation) in neoplastic tissues. Binding by the peanut lectin (PNA) occurs late in the adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence--in larger adenomas and in cancers--and serves as a marker of advancing neoplasia. Lectins identify the stepwise changes that occur during normal differentiation, proliferation and in advancing neoplasia. By selecting the appropriate probe, biomarkers may be developed for early, intermediate, and late events in colorectal cancer. PMID:1469891

  6. Histatin-1 Expression in Human Lacrimal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Zeeshan; Jaboori, Assraa Jassim; Jassim, Sarmad H.; Jain, Sandeep; Aakalu, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Study of human lacrimal cell biology is limited by poor access to tissue samples, heterogeneous cell composition of tissue and a lack of established lacrimal epithelial markers. In order to further our understanding of lacrimal cell biology, we sought to find a better marker for human lacrimal epithelial cells, compared to what has been reported in the literature. Methods We utilized human Muller’s muscle conjunctival resection (MMCR) specimens containing accessory lacrimal gland (ALG) and cadaveric main lacrimal gland (MLG) as sources of lacrimal tissue. Candidate markers were sought using human ALG tissue from MMCR specimens, isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM). Affymetrix® analysis was performed on total RNA isolated from FFPE samples to profile transcription in ALG. MMCR tissue sections were assessed by immunofluorescence using antibodies for histatin-1, lactoferrin, E-cadherin (E-cad) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was performed to analyze the expression of histatin-1, E-cad and lactoferrin from cadaveric MLG. Results Histatin-1 is expressed in ALG and MLG, localizes to lacrimal epithelium, and to a greater degree than do other putative lacrimal epithelial markers. Conclusions Histatin-1 is a good marker for human lacrimal epithelium in ALG and MLG and can be used to identify lacrimal cells in future studies. PMID:26824896

  7. Human Reconstituted Nasal Epithelium, a promising in vitro model to assess impacts of environmental complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Gaëlle; Mignon, Virginie; Momas, Isabelle; Achard, Sophie; Seta, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Considering the impact of respiratory diseases around the world, appropriate experimental tools to help understand the mechanisms involved in such diseases are becoming essential. Our aim was to investigate the cellular and morphological reactivity of a human Reconstituted Nasal Epithelium (hRNE) to evaluate the impact of environmental complex mixture (ECM), with tobacco smoke as a model, after three weeks of repeated exposures. Staining of hRNE showed a multilayered ciliated epithelium, with a regular cilia beats, and a mucus production. When hRNE was exposed to ECM for 5 min once or twice a week, during 3 weeks, significant changes occurred: IL-8 production significantly increased 24h after the first exposure compared with Air-exposure and only during the first week, without any loss of tissue integrity. Immunostaining of F-actin cytoskeleton showed a modification in cellular morphology (number and diameter). Taken together our results indicate that hRNE is well suited to study the cellular and morphological effects of repeated exposures to an environmental complex mixture. Human reconstituted epithelium models are currently the best in vitro representation of human respiratory tract physiology, and also the most robust for performing repeated exposures to atmospheric pollutants. PMID:26631767

  8. Home Modification

    MedlinePlus

    ... it is important to consider certain safety modifications. Adaptations such as those in the following list can ... The importance of a Consumer Perspective in Home Adaptation of Alzheimer’s Households” (Chapter 6 pp 91-112) ...

  9. Adenocarcinoma of the pigmented ciliary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sukeda, Aoi; Mori, Taisuke; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pigmented ciliary epithelium is an exceptionally rare eye tumour, with only a few cases reported to date. We encountered such a case in a 50-year-old woman who reported seeing floaters in her right eye. Fundus examination and MRI revealed an elevated lesion located in the ciliary body compressing the lens. The ciliary body was resected under the diagnosis of ciliary adenoma. On histological examination, the tumour exhibited epithelial features with glandular formation and moderate nuclear pleomorphism. The tumour invaded the subepithelial stroma of the ciliary body. Immunohistochemical findings were positive for cytokeratin OSCAR, AE1/AE3, CK7, EMA, S100, Melan A, HMB45, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. PMID:25015166

  10. Neuropilins: expression and roles in the epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wild, Jonathan R L; Staton, Carolyn A; Chapple, Keith; Corfe, Bernard M

    2012-04-01

    Initially found expressed in neuronal and then later in endothelial cells, it is well established that the transmembrane glycoproteins neuropilin-1 (NRP1) and neuropilin-2 (NRP2) play essential roles in axonal growth and guidance and in physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Neuropilin expression and function in epithelial cells has received little attention when compared with neuronal and endothelial cells. Overexpression of NRPs is shown to enhance growth, correlate with invasion and is associated with poor prognosis in various tumour types, especially those of epithelial origin. The contribution of NRP and its ligands to tumour growth and metastasis has spurred a strong interest in NRPs as novel chemotherapy drug targets. Given NRP's role as a multifunctional co-receptor with an ability to bind with disparate ligand families, this has sparked new areas of research implicating NRPs in diverse biological functions. Here, we review the growing body of research demonstrating NRP expression and role in the normal and neoplastic epithelium. PMID:22414290

  11. Ultrastructure of gingival epithelium in chronic gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Lushnikova, E L; Nepomnyashchikh, L M; Oskolsky, G I; Jurkevich, N V

    2012-03-01

    We studied ultrastructural reorganization of the gingival mucosa in chronic gingivitis. It was found that chronic inflammation leads to significant intracellular reorganization of epitheliocytes in the basal and prickle cell layers of gingival epithelium and their pronounced structural and functional heterogeneity. The main ultrastructural alterations of epitheliocytes in the basal and prickle cell layers include pronounced vacuolization of the perinuclear zone (partial necrosis), formation of thick tonofilament bundles, focal lysis and sequestration of glycogen, and destruction and reduction of intracellular junctions in some cases accompanied by acantholytic alterations. Chronic inflammation in the gingival mucosa induced extensive remodeling of the lamina propria manifested in multiplication of the basement membrane and obturation of blood vessels with collagen fibrils. PMID:22803154

  12. Velocity fields in a collectively migrating epithelium.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, L; Reffay, M; Grasland-Mongrain, E; Poujade, M; Ladoux, B; Buguin, A; Silberzan, P

    2010-05-19

    We report quantitative measurements of the velocity field of collectively migrating cells in a motile epithelium. The migration is triggered by presenting free surface to an initially confluent monolayer by using a microstencil technique that does not damage the cells. To avoid the technical difficulties inherent in the tracking of single cells, the field is mapped using the technique of particle image velocimetry. The main relevant parameters, such as the velocity module, the order parameter, and the velocity correlation function, are then extracted from this cartography. These quantities are dynamically measured on two types of cells (collectively migrating Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and fibroblastlike normal rat kidney (NRK) cells), first as they approach confluence, and then when the geometrical constraints are released. In particular, for MDCK cells filling up the patterns, we observe a sharp decrease in the average velocity after the point of confluence, whereas the densification of the monolayer is much more regular. After the peeling off of the stencil, a velocity correlation length of approximately 200 microm is measured for MDCK cells versus only approximately 40 microm for the more independent NRK cells. Our conclusions are supported by parallel single-cell tracking experiments. By using the biorthogonal decomposition of the velocity field, we conclude that the velocity field of MDCK cells is very coherent in contrast with the NRK cells. The displacements in the fingers arising from the border of MDCK epithelia are very oriented along their main direction. They influence the velocity field in the epithelium over a distance of approximately 200 microm. PMID:20441742

  13. Ubiquitin modifications

    PubMed Central

    Swatek, Kirby N; Komander, David

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a dynamic multifaceted post-translational modification involved in nearly all aspects of eukaryotic biology. Once attached to a substrate, the 76-amino acid protein ubiquitin is subjected to further modifications, creating a multitude of distinct signals with distinct cellular outcomes, referred to as the 'ubiquitin code'. Ubiquitin can be ubiquitinated on seven lysine (Lys) residues or on the N-terminus, leading to polyubiquitin chains that can encompass complex topologies. Alternatively or in addition, ubiquitin Lys residues can be modified by ubiquitin-like molecules (such as SUMO or NEDD8). Finally, ubiquitin can also be acetylated on Lys, or phosphorylated on Ser, Thr or Tyr residues, and each modification has the potential to dramatically alter the signaling outcome. While the number of distinctly modified ubiquitin species in cells is mind-boggling, much progress has been made to characterize the roles of distinct ubiquitin modifications, and many enzymes and receptors have been identified that create, recognize or remove these ubiquitin modifications. We here provide an overview of the various ubiquitin modifications present in cells, and highlight recent progress on ubiquitin chain biology. We then discuss the recent findings in the field of ubiquitin acetylation and phosphorylation, with a focus on Ser65-phosphorylation and its role in mitophagy and Parkin activation. PMID:27012465

  14. DNA Methylation Dynamics Regulate the Formation of a Regenerative Wound Epithelium during Axolotl Limb Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Cristian; Gardiner, David M

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a blastema during regeneration of an axolotl limb involves important changes in the behavior and function of cells at the site of injury. One of the earliest events is the formation of the wound epithelium and subsequently the apical epidermal cap, which involves in vivo dedifferentiation that is controlled by signaling from the nerve. We have investigated the role of epigenetic modifications to the genome as a possible mechanism for regulating changes in gene expression patterns of keratinocytes of the wound and blastema epithelium that are involved in regeneration. We report a modulation of the expression DNMT3a, a de novo DNA methyltransferase, within the first 72 hours post injury that is dependent on nerve signaling. Treatment of skin wounds on the upper forelimb with decitabine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, induced changes in gene expression and cellular behavior associated with a regenerative response. Furthermore, decitabine-treated wounds were able to participate in regeneration while untreated wounds inhibited a regenerative response. Elucidation of the specific epigenetic modifications that mediate cellular dedifferentiation likely will lead to insights for initiating a regenerative response in organisms that lack this ability. PMID:26308461

  15. Cytolethal Distending Toxin Damages the Oral Epithelium of Gingival Explants

    PubMed Central

    Damek-Poprawa, M.; Haris, M.; Volgina, A.; Korostoff, J.; DiRienzo, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt), expressed by the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, inhibits the proliferation of cultured epithelial cells by arresting the cell cycle. The gingival epithelium is an early line of defense against microbial assault. When damaged, bacteria collectively gain entry into underlying connective tissue where microbial products can affect infiltrating inflammatory cells, leading to the destruction of the attachment apparatus. Histological evaluation of rat and healthy human gingival tissue exposed ex vivo to the Cdt for 36 and 18 hours, respectively, revealed extensive detachment of the keratinized outer layer and distention of spinous and basal cells in the oral epithelium. Treated human tissue also exhibited disruption of rete pegs and dissolution of cell junctions. Cells in the connective tissue appeared unaffected. Primary gingival epithelial cells, but not gingival fibroblasts, isolated from the same healthy human tissue were cell-cycle-arrested when treated with the toxin. These findings provide new evidence that the Cdt severely damages the oral epithelium, ex vivo, by specifically targeting epithelial cells, in situ. The Cdt shows preferential targeting of the epithelium as opposed to connective tissue in animal and human gingival explant models. Abbreviations: cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt), connective tissue (CT), 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC), human gingival explants (HGX), human gingival fibroblasts (HGF), junctional epithelium (JE), oral epithelium (OE), rete pegs (RP), sulcular epithelium (SE) PMID:21471326

  16. Stroma–epithelium crosstalk in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yi-Nong; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2009-01-01

    The critical role played by stroma–epithelium crosstalk in carcinogenesis and progression of prostate cancer has been increasingly recognized. These interactions are mediated by a variety of paracrine factors secreted by cancer cells and/or stromal cells. In human prostate cancer, reactive stroma is characterized by an increase in myofibroblasts and a corresponding amplification of extracellular matrix production and angiogenesis. Permanent genetic mutations have been reported in stromal cells as well as in tumour cells. Transforming growth factor-β, vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor and fibroblast growth factor signalling pathways are involved in the process of angiogenesis, whereas hepatocyte growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, epidermal growth factor, CXC12 and Interleukin-6 play active roles in the progression, androgen-independent conversion and distal metastasis of prostate cancer. Some soluble factors have reciprocal interactions with androgens and the androgen receptor (AR), and can even activate AR in the absence of the androgen ligand. In this article, we review the complex interactions between cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment, and discuss the potential therapeutic targets in the stromal compartment of prostate cancer. PMID:19098934

  17. Human vomeronasal epithelium development: An immunohistochemical overview.

    PubMed

    Dénes, Lóránd; Pap, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, Annamária; Gergely, István; Pop, Tudor Sorin

    2015-06-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is the receptor structure of the vomeronasal system (VNS) in vertebrates. It is found bilaterally in the submucosa of the inferior part of the nasal septum. There are ongoing controversies regarding the functionality of this organ in humans. In this study we propose the immunohistochemical evaluation of changes in components of the human vomeronasal epithelium during foetal development. We used 45 foetuses of different age, which were included in three age groups. After VNO identification immunohistochemical reactions were performed using primary antibodies against the following: neuron specific enolase, calretinin, neurofilament, chromogranin, synaptophysin, cytokeratin 7, pan-cytokeratin and S100 protein. Digital slides were obtained and following colorimetric segmentation, surface area measurements were performed. The VNO was found in less than half of the studied specimens (42.2%). Neuron specific enolase and calretinin immunoexpression showed a decreasing trend with foetal age, while the other neural/neuroendocrine markers were negative in all specimens. Cytokeratin 7 expression increased with age, while Pan-Ctk had no significant variations. S100 protein immunoexpression also decreased around the VNO. The results of the present work uphold the theory of regression of the neuroepithelium that is present during initial stages of foetal development. PMID:26132837

  18. Cell Jamming in the Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Hallmarks of asthma include chronic airway inflammation, progressive airway remodeling, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The initiation and perpetuation of these processes are attributable at least in part to critical events within the airway epithelium, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. New evidence now suggests that epithelial cells derived from donors without asthma versus donors with asthma, even in the absence of inflammatory cells or mediators, express modes of collective migration that innately differ not only in the amount of migration but also in the kind of migration. The maturing cell layer tends to undergo a transition from a hypermobile, fluid-like, unjammed phase in which cells readily rearrange, exchange places, and flow, to a quiescent, solid-like, jammed phase in which cells become virtually frozen in place. Moreover, the unjammed phase defines a phenotype that can be perpetuated by the compressive stresses caused by bronchospasm. Importantly, in cells derived from donors with asthma versus donors without asthma, this jamming transition becomes substantially delayed, thus suggesting an immature or dysmature epithelial phenotype in asthma. PMID:27027955

  19. Glucose metabolism in rat retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2006-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major transport pathway for exchange of metabolites and ions between choroidal blood supply and the neural retina. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling glucose metabolism in RPE and its possible relationship to retinopathy, we studied the influence of different glucose concentrations on glycogen and lactate levels and CO(2) production in RPE from normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Incubation of normal RPE in the absence of glucose caused a decrease in lactate production and glycogen content. In normal RPE, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6 mM to 30 mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO(2) yield, as well as reduction in lactate and glycogen production. In RPE from diabetic rats glucose accumulation did not increase in the presence of high glucose substrate, but it showed a four- and a seven-fold increase in CO(2) production through the mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. We found high glycogen levels in RPE which can be used as an energy reserve for RPE itself and/or neural retina. Findings further show that the RPE possesses a high oxidative capacity. The large increase in glucose shunting to the pentose phosphate pathway in diabetic retina exposed to high glucose suggests a need for reducing capacity, consistent with increased oxidative stress. PMID:16475003

  20. Biochemical studies of the tracheobronchial epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Mass, M.J.; Kaufman, D.G.

    1984-06-01

    Tracheobronchial epithelium has been a focus of intense investigation in the field of chemical carcinogenesis. We have reviewed some biochemical investigations that have evolved through linkage with carcinogenesis research. These areas of investigation have included kinetics of carcinogen metabolism, identification of carcinogen metabolites, levels of carcinogen binding to DNA, and analysis of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Such studies appear to have provided a reasonable explanation for the susceptibilities of the respiratory tracts of rats and hamsters to carcinogenesis by benzo(a)pyrene. Coinciding with the attempts to understand the initiation of carcinogenesis in the respiratory tract has also been a major thrust aimed at effecting its prevention both in humans and in animal models for human bronchogenic carcinoma. These studies have concerned the effects of derivatives of vitamin A (retinoids) and their influence on normal cell biology and biochemistry of this tissue. Recent investigations have included the effects of retinoid deficiency on the synthesis of RNA and the identification of RNA species associated with this biological state, and also have included the effects of retinoids on the synthesis of mucus-related glycoproteins. Tracheal organ cultures from retinoid-deficient hamsters have been used successfully to indicate the potency of synthetic retinoids by monitoring the reversal of squamous metaplasia. Techniques applied to this tissue have also served to elucidate features of the metabolism of retinoic acid using high pressure liquid chromatography. 94 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Changes in the adult vertebrate auditory sensory epithelium after trauma.

    PubMed

    Oesterle, Elizabeth C

    2013-03-01

    Auditory hair cells transduce sound vibrations into membrane potential changes, ultimately leading to changes in neuronal firing and sound perception. This review provides an overview of the characteristics and repair capabilities of traumatized auditory sensory epithelium in the adult vertebrate ear. Injured mammalian auditory epithelium repairs itself by forming permanent scars but is unable to regenerate replacement hair cells. In contrast, injured non-mammalian vertebrate ear generates replacement hair cells to restore hearing functions. Non-sensory support cells within the auditory epithelium play key roles in the repair processes. PMID:23178236

  2. THE ROLE OF EPITHELIUM IN EXPERIMENTAL IMMUNIZATION.

    PubMed

    Sewall, H

    1925-10-01

    When a small amount of blood serum is dropped into the nose of a guinea pig the serum is absorbed by the mucous membrane and, after a definite period of incubation, the animal can be shown to have become profoundly changed. Depending upon the number of instillations, the interval between them and, especially, the quantity of serum instilled, the animal becomes either highly hypersensitive or strongly resistant to a toxic injection given by the vein. This resistance withstands a considerable series of increasing toxic injections and is strengthened with lapse of time,-contrary to the state of tolerance produced by traumatic methods. It is inferred that the absorption of foreign protein by the nose causes the formation of two different antibodies. One of these is allergic and excites to anaphylaxis; the other is protective and leads to true immuuity. The relative amount of either antibody can be regulated by modifying the amount of serum instilled. Added to a state of general allergy it is easy to produce, in the guinea pig, a special sensitization of the respiratory apparatus which leads, under appropriate stimulation, to attacks resembling those of bronchial asthma in man. No conclusion can be drawn at present concerning the nature or mode of action of the protective or immunizing antibody; but the indications are that its relations to the circulation and to tissue fixation resemble those which have been developed by other investigators in regard to the anaphylactic antibody. Evidence has been submitted that the living epithelium mediates between foreign protein and the organism in a way to favor specifically the elaboration of true immunity. PMID:17748743

  3. PDV modifications.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H., III

    2010-09-01

    External modifications can transform a conventional photonic doppler velocimetry (PDV) system to other useful configurations - Non-standard probes and Frequency-conversion measurements. This approach is easier than supporting every conceivable measurement in the core PDV design. Circulator specifications may be important - -30 dB isolation (common) probably not be enough, -50 dB isolation is available, and some bench testing may be needed.

  4. The role of the epithelium in airway remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Davies, Donna E

    2009-12-01

    The bronchial epithelium is the barrier to the external environment and plays a vital role in protection of the internal milieu of the lung. It functions within the epithelial-mesenchymal trophic unit to control the local microenvironment and help maintain tissue homeostasis. However, in asthma, chronic perturbation of these homeostatic mechanisms leads to alterations in the structure of the airways, termed remodeling. Damage to the epithelium is now recognized to play a key role in driving airway remodeling. We have postulated that epithelial susceptibility to environmental stress and injury together with impaired repair responses results in generation of signals that act on the underlying mesenchyme to propagate and amplify inflammatory and remodeling responses in the submucosa. Many types of challenges to the epithelium, including pathogens, allergens, environmental pollutants, cigarette smoke, and even mechanical forces, can elicit production of mediators by the epithelium, which can be translated into remodeling responses by the mesenchyme. Several important mediators of remodeling have been identified, most notably transforming growth factor-beta, which is released from damaged/repairing epithelium or in response to inflammatory mediators, such as IL-13. The cross talk between the epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme to drive remodeling responses is considered in the context of subepithelial fibrosis and potential pathogenetic mechanisms linked to the asthma susceptibility gene, a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)33. PMID:20008875

  5. Characterization of side population cells from human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Tillie-Louise; Shaheen, Furquan; Johnson, Andrew; Wadsworth, Samuel; Pechkovsky, Dmitri V; Jacoby, David B; Kicic, Anthony; Stick, Stephen M; Knight, Darryl A

    2008-10-01

    The airway epithelium is the first line of contact with the inhaled external environment and is continuously exposed to and injured by pollutants, allergens, and viruses. However, little is known about epithelial repair and in particular the identity and role of tissue resident stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to epithelial regeneration. The aims of the present study were to identify, isolate, and characterize side population (SP) cells in human tracheobronchial epithelium. Epithelial cells were obtained from seven nontransplantable healthy lungs and four asthmatic lungs by pronase digestion. SP cells were identified by verapamil-sensitive efflux of the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Using flow cytometry, CD45(-) SP, CD45(+) SP, and non-SP cells were isolated and sorted. CD45(-) SP cells made up 0.12% +/- 0.01% of the total epithelial cell population in normal airway but 4.1% +/- 0.06% of the epithelium in asthmatic airways. All CD45(-) SP cells showed positive staining for epithelial-specific markers cytokeratin-5, E-cadherin, ZO-1, and p63. CD45(-) SP cells exhibited stable telomere length and increased colony-forming and proliferative potential, undergoing population expansion for at least 16 consecutive passages. In contrast with non-SP cells, fewer than 100 CD45(-) SP cells were able to generate a multilayered and differentiated epithelium in air-liquid interface culture. SP cells are present in human tracheobronchial epithelium, exhibit both short- and long-term proliferative potential, and are capable of generation of differentiated epithelium in vitro. The number of SP cells is significantly greater in asthmatic airways, providing evidence of dysregulated resident SP cells in the asthmatic epithelium. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article. PMID:18653771

  6. Defence mechanisms of olfactory neuro-epithelium: mucosa regeneration, metabolising enzymes and transporters.

    PubMed

    Watelet, J B; Strolin-Benedetti, M; Whomsley, R

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory neuro-epithelium is highly sensitive to chemicals and its direct microbiological environment. It also plays a role as an interface between the airways and the nervous system, and so it has developed several defence instruments for rapid regeneration or for the detoxification of the immediate environment. This review illustrates three of these defence mechanisms: regeneration of the epithelium, local production of metabolising enzymes and xenobiotic transporters. Toxicants can inflict damage by a direct toxic response. Alternatively, they may require metabolic activation to produce the proximate toxicant. In addition to detoxifying inhaled and systemically derived xenobiotics, the local olfactory metabolism may fulfil multiple functions such as the modification of inhaled odorant, the modulation of endogenous signalling molecules and the protection of other tissues such as the CNS and lungs from inhaled toxicants. Finally, the permeability of nasal and olfactory mucosa is an important efficacy parameter for some anti-allergic drugs delivered by intranasal administration or inhalation. Efflux or update transporters expressed in these tissues may therefore significantly influence the pharmacokinetics of drugs administered topically. PMID:20084803

  7. Olfactory Epithelium Grafts in the Cerebral Cortex: An Immunohistochemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Eric H.; DiNardo, Laurence J.; Costanzo, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop an alternative model for studying the regenerative capacity of olfactory neurons. Study Design An immunohistochemical analysis of mouse olfactory epithelium transplanted to the cerebral cortex. Methods Strips of olfactory epithelium removed from donor mice at postnatal day 5 to day 20 were inserted into the parietal cortex of adult mice. Recipient animals were allowed to survive for 25 to 120 days and then perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde 1 hour after bromodeoxyuridine injection. The brains were processed, and frozen sections were obtained. Sections through transplant tissue were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and compared with normal olfactory epithelium. Results Graft survival approached 85% with mature olfactory neurons detected in 35% of the transplants stained for olfactory marker protein. Transplant epithelium resembled normal olfactory epithelium containing mature olfactory neurons and axon bundles. Conclusions Studies of olfactory neuron regeneration have been limited by the inability to produce cultures with long-term viability. Olfactory epithelial grafts to the cerebral cortex provide an alternative approach to the study of olfactory neuron regeneration. PMID:11801979

  8. Histopathological study on changes of bronchial epithelium among chromate workers

    SciTech Connect

    Mikami, H.

    1982-09-01

    There have been many reports on lung cancer among chromate workers. Chromate compounds are thought to be a carcinogen and lung cancer among chromate workers is considered one of the occupational lung cancers. Recently, it is debated that metaplastic and hyperplastic changes of bronchial epithelium are revealed or not to the development of bronchogenic carcinoma. Histopathological study on changes of bronchial epithelium among chromate workers was performed in order to clarify the effect of chromate compounds to bronchial epithelium. The subjects were 14 cases of lung cancer among chromate workers. As a control, 18 cases of non cancer among chromate workers. Lung tissue which was obtained at necropsy or surgery was fixed by formalin and was produced cross-sections and was stained on Haematoxylin-Eosin. The results were as follows. 1. Of examined 235 cross-sections, basal cell hyperplasia of bronchial epithelium was found in 13 per cent. Squamous metaplasia was found in 29 per cent, on the contrary, atypical metaplastic changes were observed in 34 per cent. 2. Of four cases of carcinoma in situ and two cases of small invasive carcinoma, four cases revealed development from atypical squamous metaplasia to precancerous changes. 3. These cases developed invasive carcinoma from atypical squamous metaplasia for a long period, of which were found by successive exfoliative cytology of sputum. From these findings, it was concluded that inhalation of chromate dust affected bronchial epithelium and caused highly atypical squamous metaplasia which developed to carcinoma in situ and finally to invasive carcinoma.

  9. Meckel's diverticulum and ectopic epithelium: Evaluation of a complex relationship

    PubMed Central

    Burjonrappa, Sathyaprasad; Khaing, Phue

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, for any incidentally discovered Meckel's diverticulum, the management approach is based on weighing the statistical odds of future complications against the risks of a diverticulectomy. Materials and Methods: The temporal relationship between age at Meckel's diverticulectomy and the presence of ectopic epithelium was evaluated in our series. A meta-analysis of all reported recent literature on this condition was subsequently performed to evaluate the strength of the relationship between ectopic epithelium and symptomatic Meckel's diverticulum. Results: There was a paucity of ectopic epithelium in Meckel's diverticulectomy specimens in infants operated on at less than 1 year of age. Having two or more ectopic epithelia in a diverticulum does not appear to carry an additive risk for complications. The meta-analysis confirmed that ectopic epithelium was the most significant factor that influenced surgical intervention in all series of Meckel's diverticulum. Conclusion: The relationship between ectopic epithelium and the development of symptomatic Meckel's diverticulum is complex. Further understanding of the development of ectopic rests in the diverticulum will facilitate elucidating the pathophysiology in symptomatic cases. PMID:24741211

  10. Correction of F508del CFTR in airway epithelium using nanoparticles delivering triplex-forming PNAs

    PubMed Central

    McNeer, Nicole Ali; Anandalingam, Kavitha; Fields, Rachel J.; Caputo, Christina; Kopic, Sascha; Gupta, Anisha; Quijano, Elias; Polikoff, Lee; Kong, Yong; Bahal, Raman; Geibel, John P; Glazer, Peter M.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Egan, Marie E.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal genetic disorder most commonly caused by the F508del mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. It is not readily amenable to gene therapy because of its systemic nature and challenges including in vivo gene delivery and transient gene expression. Here, we use triplex-forming PNA molecules and donor DNA in biodegradable polymer nanoparticles to correct F508del. We confirm modification with sequencing and a functional chloride efflux assay. In vitro correction of chloride efflux occurs in up to 25% of human cells. Deep sequencing reveals negligible off-target effects in partially homologous sites. Intranasal application of nanoparticles in CF mice produces changes in nasal epithelium potential differences consistent with corrected CFTR, with gene correction also detected in lung tissue. This work represents facile genome engineering in vivo with oligonucleotides using a nanoparticle system to achieve clinically relevant levels of gene editing without off-target effects. PMID:25914116

  11. In vivo survival and stratification of cultured limbal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Anees; Vemuganti, Geeta K; Iftekhar, Ghazala; Rao, Gullapalli N; Sangwan, Virender S

    2007-01-01

    A 6-year-old Bangladeshi girl presented with total limbal stem cell deficiency in the left eye, secondary to a 6-month-old chemical injury. The patient had also previously undergone two limbal transplantation surgeries. At the authors' centre the child underwent autologous cultured limbal epithelium transplantation, on human amniotic membrane, without the use of air-lift technique. Symptomatic relief, re-epithelialization of the ocular surface, regression of corneal pannus and slight improvement in vision were all noted. The corneal button obtained at the time of keratoplasty (performed 4 months later) revealed stratified epithelium with basement membrane. Thirty-seven months post keratoplasty, the best-corrected visual acuity was 6/15 with clear graft and stable ocular surface. Herein, a case of limbal stem cell deficiency successfully managed by monolayer of cultured limbal epithelium is presented. PMID:17300583

  12. Properties of odour-binding glycoproteins from rat olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fesenko, E E; Novoselov, V I; Bystrova, M F

    1988-01-22

    The specific membrane glycoproteins with high affinity for camphor and decanal were isolated from rat olfactory epithelium. Antibodies to these glycoproteins inhibited both the electroolfactogram and the binding of odorants. The enzyme immunoassay has shown these glycoproteins to be present in the olfactory epithelium of rat, mouse, guinea-pig and hamster but not in that of frog and carp. The molecular mass of the odour-binding glycoproteins from rat olfactory epithelium solubilized by Triton X-100 was approx. 140 kDa. They consisted of two subunits (88 and 55 kDa). The 88 kDa subunit was capable of binding odorants. The data obtained suggest that the glycoproteins isolated have some properties that make them plausible candidates for olfactory receptor molecules. PMID:3337807

  13. Glutathione S-transferases in rat olfactory epithelium: purification, molecular properties and odorant biotransformation.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Arie, N; Khen, M; Lancet, D

    1993-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium is exposed to a variety of xenobiotic chemicals, including odorants and airborne toxic compounds. Recently, two novel, highly abundant, olfactory-specific biotransformation enzymes have been identified: cytochrome P-450olf1 and olfactory UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT(olf)). The latter is a phase II biotransformation enzyme which catalyses the glucuronidation of alcohols, thiols, amines and carboxylic acids. Such covalent modification, which markedly affects lipid solubility and agonist potency, may be particularly important in the rapid termination of odorant signals. We report here the identification and characterization of a second olfactory phase II biotransformation enzyme, a glutathione S-transferase (GST). The olfactory epithelial cytosol shows the highest GST activity among the extrahepatic tissues examined. Significantly, olfactory epithelium had an activity 4-7 times higher than in other airway tissues, suggesting a role for this enzyme in chemoreception. The olfactory GST has been affinity-purified to homogeneity, and shown by h.p.l.c. and N-terminal amino acid sequencing to constitute mainly the Yb1 and Yb2 subunits, different from most other tissues that have mixtures of more enzyme classes. The identity of the olfactory enzymes was confirmed by PCR cloning and restriction enzyme analysis. Most importantly, the olfactory GSTs were found to catalyse glutathione conjugation of several odorant classes, including many unsaturated aldehydes and ketones, as well as epoxides. Together with UGT(olf), olfactory GST provides the necessary broad coverage of covalent modification capacity, which may be crucial for the acuity of the olfactory process. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8503873

  14. Abnormal Ion Permeation through Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, M. R.; Stutts, M. J.; Spock, A.; Fischer, N.; Gatzy, J. T.; Boucher, R. C.

    1983-09-01

    The epithelium of nasal tissue excised from subjects with cystic fibrosis exhibited higher voltage and lower conductance than tissue from control subjects. Basal sodium ion absorption by cystic fibrosis and normal nasal epithelia equaled the short-circuit current and was amiloride-sensitive. Amiloride induced chloride ion secretion in normal but not cystic fibrosis tissue and consequently was more effective in inhibiting the short-circuit current in cystic fibrosis epithelia. Chloride ion-free solution induced a smaller hyperpolarization of cystic fibrosis tissue. The increased voltage and amiloride efficacy in cystic fibrosis reflect absorption of sodium ions across an epithelium that is relatively impermeable to chloride ions.

  15. Coelomic epithelium-derived cells in visceral morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Laura; Carmona, Rita; Cañete, Ana; Cano, Elena; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón

    2016-03-01

    Coelomic cavities of vertebrates are lined by a mesothelium which develops from the lateral plate mesoderm. During development, the coelomic epithelium is a highly active cell layer, which locally is able to supply mesenchymal cells that contribute to the mesodermal elements of many organs and provide signals which are necessary for their development. The relevance of this process of mesenchymal cell supply to the developing organs is becoming clearer because genetic lineage tracing techniques have been developed in recent years. Body wall, heart, liver, lungs, gonads, and gastrointestinal tract are populated by cells derived from the coelomic epithelium which contribute to their connective and vascular tissues, and sometimes to specialized cell types such as the stellate cells of the liver, the Cajal interstitial cells of the gut or the Sertoli cells of the testicle. In this review we collect information about the contribution of coelomic epithelium derived cells to visceral development, their developmental fates and signaling functions. The common features displayed by all these processes suggest that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of the embryonic coelomic epithelium is an underestimated but key event of vertebrate development, and probably it is shared by all the coelomate metazoans. PMID:26638186

  16. Examination of the reticular epithelium of the bovine pharyngeal tonsil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nasopharyngeal tonsil (adenoid), located at the posterior of the nasopharynx is ideally positioned to sample antigens entering through the nasal cavity or oral cavity. Entering antigens will first contact tonsilar epithelium. To better understand the cellular composition of this important epithe...

  17. Cigarette smoke inhibition of ion transport in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    To determine the effect of cigarette smoke on airway epithelial ion transport, the electrical properties and transepithelial Na and Cl fluxes were measured in canine tracheal epithelium. In vivo, the inhalation of the smoke from one cigarette acutely and reversibly decreased the electrical potential difference across the tracheal epithelium. In vitro, exposure of the mucosal surface of the epithelium to cigarette smoke decreased the short circuit current and transepithelial resistance. The decrease in short circuit current was due to an inhibition of the rate of Cl secretion with minimal effect on the rate of Na absorption. The effect of cigarette smoke was reversible, was not observed upon exposure of the submucosal surface to smoke, and was most pronounced when secretion was stimulated. The particulate phase of smoke was largely responsible for the inhibitory effect, since filtering the smoke minimized the effect. The effect of cigarette smoke was not prevented by addition of antioxidants to the bathing solutions, suggesting that the inhibition of Cl secretion cannot be entirely attributed to an oxidant mechanism. These results indicate that cigarette smoke acutely inhibits active ion transport by tracheal epithelium, both in vivo and in vitro. This effect may explain, in part, both the abnormal mucociliary clearance and the airway disease observed in cigarette smokers.

  18. Quantum Dot Distribution in the Olfactory Epithelium After Nasal Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzotto, D.; De Marchis, S.

    2010-10-01

    Nanoparticles are used in a wide range of human applications from industrial to bio-medical fields. However, the unique characteristics of nanoparticles, such as the small size, large surface area per mass and high reactivity raises great concern on the adverse effects of these particles on ecological systems and human health. There are several pioneer studies reporting translocation of inhaled particulates to the brain through a potential neuronal uptake mediated by the olfactory nerve (1, 2, 3). However, no direct evidences have been presented up to now on the pathway followed by the nanoparticles from the nose to the brain. In addition to a neuronal pathway, nanoparticles could gain access to the central nervous system through extracellular pathways (perineuronal, perivascular and cerebrospinal fluid paths). In the present study we investigate the localization of intranasally delivered fluorescent nanoparticles in the olfactory epithelium. To this purpose we used quantum dots (QDs), a model of innovative fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals commonly used in cell and animal biology (4). Intranasal treatments with QDs were performed acutely on adult CD1 mice. The olfactory epithelium was collected and analysed by confocal microscopy at different survival time after treatment. Data obtained indicate that the neuronal components of the olfactory epithelium are not preferentially involved in QDs uptake, thus suggesting nanoparticles can cross the olfactory epithelium through extracellular pathways.

  19. Morphological study of fetal nasopharyngeal epithelium in man.

    PubMed

    Gulisano, M; Montella, A; Orlandini, S Z; Pacini, P

    1992-01-01

    In 30 human fetuses between 8 and 13 weeks of intrauterine life the lateral wall of the nasopharynx was examined by light microscopy and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. In the subjects between 8 and 9 weeks in utero the mucosa displays still an immature appearance, being mono- or bistratified and lacking the characteristic structures of the respiratory epithelium. Nevertheless, signs of differentiation are to be noticed, with the presence of two distinct cellular types that, in the later periods, will give rise to ciliated cells and microvillus-provided cells. An almost complete differentiation will be reached at 12-13 weeks in utero, even if goblet cells are still lacking in the examined zone during the considered period. Nonrespiratory types of epithelium, such as transitional or squamous, were never found in the studied subjects. PMID:1514372

  20. Nested expression domains for odorant receptors in zebrafish olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Weth, F; Nadler, W; Korsching, S

    1996-11-12

    The mapping of high-dimensional olfactory stimuli onto the two-dimensional surface of the nasal sensory epithelium constitutes the first step in the neuronal encoding of olfactory input. We have used zebrafish as a model system to analyze the spatial distribution of odorant receptor molecules in the olfactory epithelium by quantitative in situ hybridization. To this end, we have cloned 10 very divergent zebrafish odorant receptor molecules by PCR. Individual genes are expressed in sparse olfactory receptor neurons. Analysis of the position of labeled cells in a simplified coordinate system revealed three concentric, albeit overlapping, expression domains for the four odorant receptors analyzed in detail. Such regionalized expression should result in a corresponding segregation of functional response properties. This might represent the first step of spatial encoding of olfactory input or be essential for the development of the olfactory system. PMID:8917589

  1. Liquid Movement Across the Surface Epithelium of Large Airways

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Lucy A.; Rollins, Brett M.; Tarran, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis conductance regulator CFTR gene is found on chromosome 7 (Kerem et al., 1989; Riordan et al., 1989) and encodes for a 1,480 amino acid protein which is present in the plasma membrane of epithelial cells (Anderson et al., 1992). This protein appears to have many functions, but a unifying theme is that it acts as a protein kinase C- and cyclic AMP-regulated Cl- channel (Winpenny et al., 1995; Jia et al., 1997). In the superficial epithelium of the conducting airways, CFTR is involved in Cl- secretion (Boucher, 2003) and also acts as a regulator of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and hence Na+ absorption (Boucher et al., 1986; Stutts et al., 1995). In this chapter, we will discuss the regulation of these two ion channels, and how they can influence liquid movement across the superficial airway epithelium. PMID:17692578

  2. [Hormone-mediated reactions in the endosalpinx epithelium].

    PubMed

    Glukhovets, B I; Ukhov, Iu I; Lebedev, S S; Plastun, G A; Bulaeva, V P

    1983-07-01

    The epithelium of normal uterine tubes resected in 38 young women of the child-bearing age during the periods of the maximal physiological fluctuations of the ovarian steroid hormones levels has been studied. The correlative dependence between the morphometrical data and the results of quanitative biochemical analysis of the estrogen excretion has been investigated. The morphometric method reliably reflects the hormone-dependent variabilities of the oviduct epithelium and makes it possible to perform an objective morphological evaluation of the ovarian functional activity. The height and specific density of cells in the epithelial layer, portion of the aciliary cells and nuclear volume of the ciliary cells are the most important for diagnosis as compared to the excretory level of the estrogenic hormones. PMID:6625907

  3. Responses of the rat olfactory epithelium to retronasal air flow.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Acevedo, Humberto P; Sherrill, Lisa; Phan, Maggie

    2007-03-01

    Responses of the rat olfactory epithelium were assessed with the electroolfactogram while odorants were presented to the external nares with an artificial sniff or to the internal nares by positive pressure. A series of seven odorants that varied from very polar, hydrophilic odorants to very nonpolar, hydrophobic odorants were used. Although the polar odorants activated the dorsal olfactory epithelium when presented by the external nares (orthonasal presentation), they were not effective when forced through the nasal cavity from the internal nares (retronasal presentation). However, the nonpolar odorants were effective in both stimulus modes. These results were independent of stimulus concentration or of humidity of the carrier air. Similar results were obtained with multiunit recordings from olfactory bulb. These results help to explain why human investigations often report differences in the sensation or ability to discriminate odorants presented orthonasally versus retronasally. The results also strongly support the importance of odorant sorption in normal olfactory processes. PMID:17215498

  4. Odorant-evoked potassium changes in the frog olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Khayari, A; Math, F; Trotier, D

    1991-01-18

    Electroolfactogram (EOG) and extracellular potassium activity (aK) measurements were carried out in frog olfactory epithelia in vivo. Odorant-evoked changes in aK were characterized on the basis of depth profile analysis. Following an olfactory stimulation with butanol vapours, an increase in aK was measured in the mucus and the proximal part of the epithelium; this response started after the beginning of the EOG and was proportional to the amplitude of the latter. In the deeper part of the epithelium, the aK response had complex waveforms showing an initial K decrease which was suppressed by local application of ouabain, suggesting the existence of a pumping mechanism at this level. The results are discussed in terms of extracellular accumulation of K ions following neuroreceptor activation with respect to EOG generation theories. PMID:2015495

  5. Responses of the Rat Olfactory Epithelium to Retronasal Air Flow

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John W.; Acevedo, Humberto P.; Sherrill, Lisa; Phan, Maggie

    2008-01-01

    Responses of the rat olfactory epithelium were assessed with the electroolfactogram while odorants were presented to the external nares with an artificial sniff or to the internal nares by positive pressure. A series of seven odorants that varied from very polar, hydrophilic odorants to very non-polar, hydrophobic odorants were used. While the polar odorants activated the dorsal olfactory epithelium when presented by the external nares (orthonasal presentation), they were not effective when forced through the nasal cavity from the internal nares (retronasal presentation). However, the non-polar odorants were effective in both stimulus modes. These results were independent of stimulus concentration or of humidity of the carrier air. Similar results were obtained with multiunit recording from olfactory bulb. These results help to explain why human investigations often report differences in the sensation or ability to discriminate odorants presented orthonasally vs. retronasally. The results also strongly support the importance of odorant sorption in normal olfactory processes. PMID:17215498

  6. Hydrodynamics of stratified epithelium: Steady state and linearized dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Ting; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical model for stratified epithelium is presented. The viscoelastic properties of the tissue are assumed to be dependent on the spatial distribution of proliferative and differentiated cells. Based on this assumption, a hydrodynamic description of tissue dynamics at the long-wavelength, long-time limit is developed, and the analysis reveals important insights into the dynamics of an epithelium close to its steady state. When the proliferative cells occupy a thin region close to the basal membrane, the relaxation rate towards the steady state is enhanced by cell division and cell apoptosis. On the other hand, when the region where proliferative cells reside becomes sufficiently thick, a flow induced by cell apoptosis close to the apical surface enhances small perturbations. This destabilizing mechanism is general for continuous self-renewal multilayered tissues; it could be related to the origin of certain tissue morphology, tumor growth, and the development pattern.

  7. Primary adenocarcinoma of pigmented ciliary epithelium in a phthisical eye.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jaya B; Proia, Alan D; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi; Sharma, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the pigmented ciliary epithelium arising in a phthisical eye. A 92-year-old man who initially presented with severe ocular pain had calcification extending from the posterior pole to ciliary body on B-scan ultrasonography to a degree not previously reported. We highlight the importance of screening for intraocular neoplasms in adults with a long-standing phthisical eye. PMID:26597037

  8. Cell proliferation in the human gallbladder epithelium: effect of distension.

    PubMed Central

    Putz, P; Willems, G

    1979-01-01

    DNA synthesis activity in the epithelium of the human gallbladder was studied through in vitro labelling of mucosal specimens with 3H-thymidine and autoradiography. The specimens were taken at the time of a surgical operation. Eight 'normal' gallbladders and six distended gallbladders from patients with carcinomatous obstruction of the common bile duct were examined. Proliferative activity was very low in the normal and significantly higher in the distended gallbladders. Images Figure PMID:437558

  9. Intraocular involvement with subretinal pigment epithelium infiltrates by mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed Central

    Erny, B. C.; Egbert, P. R.; Peat, I. M.; Shorrock, K.; Rosenthal, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular mycosis fungoides in a 48-year-old man. The patient presented with decreased visual acuity, white subretinal lesions, and vitritis. Post-mortem histopathology revealed malignant T cell infiltrates consistent with mycosis fungoides in the retina, vitreous, and between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane Focal atrophy of the RPE, along with the sub-RPE infiltrates, correlated with the clinically visible fundus lesions. Images PMID:1751471

  10. Regeneration of tracheal epithelium using mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshie, Susumu; Otsuki, Koshi; Miyake, Masao; Hazama, Akihiro; Wada, Ikuo; Omori, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion The findings demonstrated the potential use of induced pluripotent stem cells for regeneration of tracheal epithelium. Objective Autologous tissue implantation techniques using skin or cartilage are often applied in cases of tracheal defects with laryngeal inflammatory lesions and malignant tumor invasion. However, these techniques are invasive with an unstable clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate regeneration in a tracheal defect site of nude rats after implantation of ciliated epithelium that was differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells. Method Embryoid bodies were formed from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells. They were cultured with growth factors for 5 days, and then cultured at the air-liquid interface. The degree of differentiation achieved prior to implantation was determined by histological findings and the results of real-time polymerase chain reaction. Embryoid bodies including ciliated epithelium were embedded into collagen gel that served as an artificial scaffold, and then implanted into nude rats, creating an 'air-liquid interface model'. Histological evaluation was performed 7 days after implantation. Results The ciliated epithelial structure survived on the lumen side of regenerated tissue. It was demonstrated histologically that the structure was composed of ciliated epithelial cells. PMID:26755348

  11. Cultured lung epithelium: A cellular model for lung preservation.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y; Matsumoto-Pon, J; Widdicombe, J H

    1997-11-01

    Cellular models have helped with the development of conditions needed for hypothermic preservation of kidney, liver, and heart. Recently, highly differentiated cultured lung epithelial cell lines grown with basolateral side feeding technique have become available that can mimic airspace, epithelium, and interstitium of lung parenchyma. Cultured lung epithelium coupled with Ussing's short-circuit current technique was used as a cellular model system for lung preservation. A parametric study was conducted to correlate the effects of luminal fluid composition (University of Wisconsin (UW) solution and phosphate-buffered saline) and storage gas (air vs nitrogen) at 4 degrees C for 24 h on postischemic electrogenic properties (transepithelial ion transport and resistance). The results showed that cells were better preserved with the UW solution on both sides as measured by their transepithelial resistance, an indicator of tight junction integrity (Rte approximately 65% of control values approximately 135 Omega cm2). In addition, they responded better to mediators that stimulate chloride secretion than cells preserved with other conditions. Cells preserved with no additional fluid on the apical side had substantially lowered Rte (<20%) than those preserved with an additional thin layer of fluid ( approximately 35-65%). This cellular model system is a realistic representation of lung epithelium and can provide an accurate assessment of preservation quality through the measurements of tight junction integrity and active ion transport. PMID:9367609

  12. Candida albicans Ultrastructure: Colonization and Invasion of Oral Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Julie A.; Squier, Christopher A.

    1980-01-01

    The colonization and invasion of various animal oral mucosae by Candida albicans were examined in an organ culture model. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the oral epithelium between 12 and 30 h after inoculation with the fungus revealed the morphological relationships between host and parasite. Examination of the fungi in thin sections showed five distinct layers in the cell wall of C. albicans within the epithelium, but changes were evident in the organization and definition of the outer cell wall layers in budding hyphae and in hyphae participating in colonization and invasion of the epithelial cells. Adherence of the fungus to the superficial cells of the oral mucosa appeared to involve intimate contact between the epithelial cell surface and the deeper layers of the fungal cell wall. During invasion a close seal was maintained between the invading hyphae and the surrounding epithelial cell envelope, there being no other evidence of damage to the host cell surface except at the site of entry. Within the epithelial cells there was only occasional loss of cytoplasmic components in the vicinity of the invading hyphae. These findings would suggest that enzymatic lysis associated with the invasive process is localized and that the mechanical support provided by surface adherence and the intimate association between the fungus and the epithelial cell envelope may permit growth of Candida on through the epithelium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6995338

  13. Zinc uptake in vitro by human retinal pigment epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.A.; Rothman, R.J.

    1987-11-01

    Zinc, an essential trace element, is present in unusually high concentrations in the chorioretinal complex relative to most other tissues. Because little has been known about the interactions between the retinal pigment epithelium and free or protein-associated zinc, we studied /sup 65/Zn uptake by human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro. When monolayers were exposed to differing concentrations from 0 to 30 microM /sup 65/Zn in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 5.4 gm/l glucose at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C, we observed a temperature-dependent saturable accumulation of the radiolabel. With 15 microM /sup 65/Zn, we saw a biphasic pattern of uptake with a rapid first phase and a slower second phase over 120 min. Uptake of /sup 65/Zn was inhibited by iodacetate and cold, and reduced approximately 50% by the addition of 2% albumin to the labelling medium. Neither ouabain nor 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake. Cells previously exposed to /sup 65/Zn retained approximately 70% of accumulated /sup 65/Zn 60 min after being changed to radiolabel-free medium. Following removal of cells from the extracellular matrix adherent to the dish bottom, a variable amount of nonspecific binding of /sup 65/Zn to the residual matrix was demonstrated. These observations are consistent with a facilitated type of transport and demonstrate the ability of human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro to accumulate and retain zinc.

  14. Pathohistological changes of tracheal epithelium in laryngectomized patients.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Marinela; Prgomet, Drago; Marjanović, Ksenija; Pušeljić, Silvija; Kraljik, Nikola

    2015-11-01

    Total laryngectomy results in a permanent disconnection of the upper and lower airways. Thus, the upper airways are bypassed and can no longer condition, humidify, and filter the inhaled air, leading to damage of the tracheobronchial epithelium. There is little scientific information available about the effects of tracheostoma breathing and the degree of mucosal damage in laryngectomized patients. The aims of this study were to determine the histopathologic findings and investigate the potential impact of using a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) on the tracheal epithelium in long-term tracheostomy patients. Tracheal mucosal biopsies were taken from a total of 70 patients. Specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined by a light microscope. Normal pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium was found in only 9 (12.9%) cases; while, 17 (24.3%) cases had some degree of basal cell hyperplasia. Squamous metaplasia was the most common finding (50%). Pre-invasive lesions (mild and moderate squamous dysplasia) were found in only one patient who used an HME, and in eight (11.4%) non-users. Although the HME cannot completely restore the physiological functions of the upper respiratory track, it delivers a better quality of air to the lower airways and has a positive effect on tracheal mucosa. PMID:25399353

  15. In vitro biology of corneal epithelium and endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Yanoff, M

    1975-01-01

    Four main areas are explored: (1) the proper culture medium for corneal tissue; (2) the effect of serum on in vitro tissue growth; (3) the in vitro interrelationships between corneal epithelium and endothelium; and (4) the biology of cultures of whole corneas (organ cultures). Modified Eagle's minimal essential medium (MEM) proved to be an excellent culture fluid. Corneal tissue could be grown in MEM without serum or clot, thus providing a defined culture medium. The in vitro biology of outgrowths of multilayered corneal epithelium and monolayered corneal endothelium are discussed. Contact inhibition between epithelium and endothelium is demonstrated in whole corneal (organ) cultures. Images FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 8 A FIGURE 8 B FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 12 A FIGURE 12 B FIGURE 12 C FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 A FIGURE 14 B FIGURE 15 A FIGURE 15 B FIGURE 16 A FIGURE 16 B FIGURE 17 A FIGURE 17 B FIGURE 17 C FIGURE 18 A FIGURE 18 B PMID:1246815

  16. Expression of cytokeratins in the epithelium of canine odontogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; Murphy, B; Nemec, A; Vapniarsky, N; Naydan, D K; Verstraete, F J M

    2011-11-01

    Odontogenic tumours are considered to be relatively rare; however, several histologically distinct types have been identified in dogs. The more common canine odontogenic tumours are peripheral odontogenic fibroma and canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma. The expression of cytokeratins (CKs) has been established for the human dental germ and odontogenic tumours. The aim of the present study was to describe the immunohistochemical expression of a panel of CKs in the epithelium of the canine dental germ, normal gingiva and odontogenic tumours arising in this species. Samples from 20 odontogenic tumours, 12 tooth germs and three normal gingival tissues were obtained. Each sample was stained with haematoxylin and eosin and subjected to immunohistochemistry for CK expression. The typical expression pattern of CKs in the odontogenic epithelium and gingiva of dogs was CK14 and CK5/6. CKs 7, 8, 18 and 20 were generally absent from the canine dental germ, gingiva and odontogenic tumours. Dogs and man therefore exhibit similar CK expression in the odontogenic epithelium. PMID:21511272

  17. Biomechanics of liquid-epithelium interactions in pulmonary airways.

    PubMed

    Ghadiali, Samir N; Gaver, Donald P

    2008-11-30

    The delicate structure of the lung epithelium makes it susceptible to surface tension induced injury. For example, the cyclic reopening of collapsed and/or fluid-filled airways during the ventilation of injured lungs generates hydrodynamic forces that further damage the epithelium and exacerbate lung injury. The interactions responsible for epithelial injury during airway reopening are fundamentally multiscale, since air-liquid interfacial dynamics affect global lung mechanics, while surface tension forces operate at the molecular and cellular scales. This article will review the current state-of-knowledge regarding the effect of surface tension forces on (a) the mechanics of airway reopening and (b) epithelial cell injury. Due to the complex nature of the liquid-epithelium system, a combination of computational and experimental techniques are being used to elucidate the mechanisms of surface-tension induced lung injury. Continued research is leading to an integrated understanding of the biomechanical and biological interactions responsible for cellular injury during airway reopening. This information may lead to novel therapies that minimize ventilation induced lung injury. PMID:18511356

  18. Response of macaque bronchiolar epithelium to ambient concentrations of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R.; Plopper, C.G.; Hyde, D.M.; St. George, J.A.; Wilson, D.W.; Dungworth, D.L. )

    1993-09-01

    Recently, we reported that exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, near the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm), induced significant nasal epithelial lesions in a non-human primate, the bonnet monkey. The present study defines the effects of ambient concentrations of ozone on the surface epithelium lining respiratory bronchioles and on the underlying bronchiolar interstitium in these same monkeys. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to filtered air or to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm ozone 8 hours/day for 6 or 90 days. At the end of exposures, monkeys were anesthetized and killed by exsanguination. Microdissected bronchiolar airways of infusion-fixed lungs were evaluated morphometrically by light microscopy and quantitatively by scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ozone-induced epithelial changes. Hyperplasia of nonciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells and intraluminal accumulation of macrophages characterized ozone-induced lesions in respiratory bronchioles. There were no significant differences in epithelial thickness or cell numbers among ozone-exposed groups. Ozone-exposed epithelium was composed of 80% cuboidal and 20% squamous cells compared with 40% cuboidal and 60% squamous cells in filtered air controls. In addition, the arithmetic mean thickness of the surface epithelium, a measure of tissue mass per unit area of basal lamina, was significantly increased in all of the ozone-exposed groups. The number of cuboidal epithelial cells per surface area of basal lamina was increased above control values by 780% after 6 days exposure to 0.15 ppm, 777% after 90 days to 0.15 ppm, and 996% after 90 days exposure to 0.30 ppm. There was also a significant ozone-induced increase in the thickness of the bronchiolar interstitium that was due to an increase in both cellular and acellular components.

  19. Cell cycle of globose basal cells in rat olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Huard, J M; Schwob, J E

    1995-05-01

    The olfactory epithelium of adult mammals has the unique property of generating olfactory sensory neurons throughout life. Cells of the basal compartment, which include horizontal and globose basal cells, are responsible for the ongoing process of neurogenesis in this system. We report here that the globose basal cells in olfactory epithelium of rats, as in mice, are the predominant type of proliferating cell, and account for 97.6% of the actively dividing cells in the basal compartment of the normal epithelium. Globose basal cells have not been fully characterized in terms of their proliferative properties, and the dynamic aspects of neurogenesis are not well understood. As a consequence, it is uncertain whether cell kinetic properties are under any regulation that could affect the rate of neurogenesis. To address this gap in our knowledge, we have determined the duration of both the synthesis phase (S-phase) and the full cell cycle of globose basal cells in adult rats. The duration of the S-phase was found to be 9 hr in experiments utilizing sequential injections of either IdU followed by BrdU or 3H-thy followed by BrdU. The duration of the cell cycle was determined by varying the time interval between the injections of 3H-thy and BrdU and tracking the set of cells that exit S shortly after the first injection. With this paradigm, the interval required for these cells to traverse G2, M, G1, and a second S-phase, is equivalent to the duration of one mitotic cycle and equals 17 hr. These observations serve as the foundation to assess whether the cell cycle duration is subject to regulation in response to experimental injury, and whether such regulation is partly responsible for changes in the rate of neurogenesis in such settings. PMID:7647371

  20. Lack of Dystrophin Affects Bronchial Epithelium in mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Morici, Giuseppe; Rappa, Francesca; Cappello, Francesco; Pace, Elisabetta; Pace, Andrea; Mudò, Giuseppa; Crescimanno, Grazia; Belluardo, Natale; Bonsignore, Maria R

    2016-10-01

    Mild exercise training may positively affect the course of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Training causes mild bronchial epithelial injury in both humans and mice, but no study assessed the effects of exercise in mdx mice, a well known model of DMD. The airway epithelium was examined in mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmdmdx) mice, and in wild type (WT, C57BL/10ScSc) mice either under sedentary conditions (mdx-SD, WT-SD) or during mild exercise training (mdx-EX, WT-EX). At baseline, and after 30 and 45 days of training (5 d/wk for 6 weeks), epithelial morphology and markers of regeneration, apoptosis, and cellular stress were assessed. The number of goblet cells in bronchial epithelium was much lower in mdx than in WT mice under all conditions. At 30 days, epithelial regeneration (PCNA positive cells) was higher in EX than SD animals in both groups; however, at 45 days, epithelial regeneration decreased in mdx mice irrespective of training, and the percentage of apoptotic (TUNEL positive) cells was higher in mdx-EX than in WT-EX mice. Epithelial expression of HSP60 (marker of stress) progressively decreased, and inversely correlated with epithelial apoptosis (r = -0.66, P = 0.01) only in mdx mice. Lack of dystrophin in mdx mice appears associated with defective epithelial differentiation, and transient epithelial regeneration during mild exercise training. Hence, lack of dystrophin might impair repair in bronchial epithelium, with potential clinical consequences in DMD patients. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2218-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26868633

  1. In vitro reconstruction of human junctional and sulcular epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Dabija-Wolter, G; Bakken, V; Cimpan, M R; Johannessen, A C; Costea, D E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to develop and characterize standardized in vitro three-dimensional organotypic models of human junctional epithelium (JE) and sulcular epithelium (SE). METHODS Organotypic models were constructed by growing human normal gingival keratinocytes on top of collagen matrices populated with gingival fibroblasts (GF) or periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PLF). Tissues obtained were harvested at different time points and assessed for epithelial morphology, proliferation (Ki67), expression of JE-specific markers (ODAM and FDC-SP), cytokeratins (CK), transglutaminase, filaggrin, and basement membrane proteins (collagen IV and laminin1). RESULTS The epithelial component in 3- and 5-day organotypics showed limited differentiation and expressed Ki-67, ODAM, FDC-SP, CK 8, 13, 16, 19, and transglutaminase in a similar fashion to control JE samples. PLF supported better than GF expression of CK19 and suprabasal proliferation, although statistically significant only at day 5. Basement membrane proteins started to be deposited only from day 5. The rate of proliferating cells as well as the percentage of CK19-expressing cells decreased significantly in 7- and 9-day cultures. Day 7 organotypics presented higher number of epithelial cell layers, proliferating cells in suprabasal layers, and CK expression pattern similar to SE. CONCLUSION Both time in culture and fibroblast type had impact on epithelial phenotype. Five-day cultures with PLF are suggested as JE models, 7-day cultures with PLF or GF as SE models, while 9-day cultures with GF as gingival epithelium (GE) models. Such standard, reproducible models represent useful tools to study periodontal bacteria–host interactions in vitro. PMID:22947066

  2. Expression of Signaling Components in Embryonic Eyelid Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qinghang; Jin, Chang; Chen, Yinglei; Chen, Jing; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Closure of an epithelium opening is a critical morphogenetic event for development. An excellent example for this process is the transient closure of embryonic eyelid. Eyelid closure requires shape change and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelids, and is dictated by numerous signaling pathways. Here we evaluated gene expression in epithelial cells isolated from the tip (leading edge, LE) and inner surface epithelium (IE) of the eyelid from E15.5 mouse fetuses by laser capture microdissection (LCM). We showed that the LE and IE cells are different at E15.5, such that IE had higher expression of muscle specific genes, while LE acquired epithelium identities. Despite their distinct destinies, these cells were overall similar in expression of signaling components for the “eyelid closure pathways”. However, while the LE cells had more abundant expression of Fgfr2, Erbb2, Shh, Ptch1 and 2, Smo and Gli2, and Jag1 and Notch1, the IE cells had more abundant expression of Bmp5 and Bmpr1a. In addition, the LE cells had more abundant expression of adenomatosis polyposis coli down-regulated 1 (Apcdd1), but the IE cells had high expression of Dkk2. Our results suggest that the functionally distinct LE and IE cells have also differential expression of signaling molecules that may contribute to the cell-specific responses to morphogenetic signals. The expression pattern suggests that the EGF, Shh and NOTCH pathways are preferentially active in LE cells, the BMP pathways are effective in IE cells, and the Wnt pathway may be repressed in LE and IE cells via different mechanisms. PMID:24498290

  3. Diet, Microbiome, and the Intestinal Epithelium: An Essential Triumvirate?

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Javier Rivera; Conlin, Victoria Susan; Jobin, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium represents a critical barrier protecting the host against diverse luminal noxious agents, as well as preventing the uncontrolled uptake of bacteria that could activate an immune response in a susceptible host. The epithelial monolayer that constitutes this barrier is regulated by a meshwork of proteins that orchestrate complex biological function such as permeability, transepithelial electrical resistance, and movement of various macromolecules. Because of its key role in maintaining host homeostasis, factors regulating barrier function have attracted sustained attention from the research community. This paper will address the role of bacteria, bacterial-derived metabolism, and the interplay of dietary factors in controlling intestinal barrier function. PMID:23586037

  4. Expression of stanniocalcin in the epithelium of human choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Franzén, A M; Zhang, K Z; Westberg, J A; Zhang, W M; Arola, J; Olsen, H S; Andersson, L C

    2000-12-29

    Stanniocalcin (STC) is a 28 kD glycoprotein hormone originally found in bony fish in which it regulates calcium/phosphate homeostasis and protects against hypercalcemia. The recently characterized mammalian STC shows about 70% homology with fish STC. The epithelial cells of proximal tubuli in human and rat kidney and brain neurons have been found to express STC. Here we show that the epithelium of the choroid plexus, already at 16 weeks of fetal age, and of plexus papillomas, synthesize and express STC. Our findings suggest that STC may be of importance for the distribution of calcium and phosphate between the cerebrospinal fluid and blood. PMID:11134638

  5. Microwave effect on camphor binding to rat olfactory epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Philippova, T.M.; Novoselov, V.I.; Bystrova, M.F.; Alekseev, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    Microwave radiation decreased specific camphor binding to a membrane fraction of rat epithelium but not to a Triton X-100 extract of this fraction. Inhibition of the ligand binding did not depend on the modulation frequency of the microwave field in the region 1-100 Hz and was not a linear function of specific absorption rate (SAR). The decreased ligand binding was due to a shedding or release of the specific camphor-binding protein from the membrane into solution. It is highly probable that several other membrane proteins may be shed into solution during microwave exposure.

  6. Immune defense mechanisms in the Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells provide an essential line of defense for Caenorhabditis elegans against ingested pathogens. Because nematodes consume microorganisms as their food source, there has presumably been selection pressure to evolve and maintain immune defense mechanisms within the intestinal epithelium. Here we review recent advances that further define the immune signaling network within these cells and suggest mechanisms used by the nematode to monitor for infection. In reviewing studies of pathogenesis that use this simple model system, we hope to illustrate some of the basic principles of epithelial immunity that may also be of relevance in higher order hosts. PMID:22236697

  7. Bacterial cellulose as a support for the growth of retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Sara; Padrão, Jorge; Rodrigues, Inês Patrício; Silva, João Pedro; Sencadas, Vítor; Lanceros-Mendez, Senentxu; Girão, Henrique; Dourado, Fernando; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2015-04-13

    The feasibility of bacterial cellulose (BC) as a novel substrate for retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) culture was evaluated. Thin (41.6 ± 2.2 μm of average thickness) and heat-dried BC substrates were surface-modified via acetylation and polysaccharide adsorption, using chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose. All substrates were characterized according to their surface chemistry, wettability, energy, topography, and also regarding their permeability, dimensional stability, mechanical properties, and endotoxin content. Then, their ability to promote RPE cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro was assessed. All surface-modified BC substrates presented similar permeation coefficients with solutes of up to 300 kDa. Acetylation of BC decreased it's swelling and the amount of endotoxins. Surface modification of BC greatly enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of RPE cells. All samples showed similar stress-strain behavior; BC and acetylated BC showed the highest elastic modulus, but the latter exhibited a slightly smaller tensile strength and elongation at break as compared to pristine BC. Although similar proliferation rates were observed among the modified substrates, the acetylated ones showed higher initial cell adhesion. This difference may be mainly due to the moderately hydrophilic surface obtained after acetylation. PMID:25748276

  8. Histone deacetylase 1 and 2 regulate Wnt and p53 pathways in the ureteric bud epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaowei; Yao, Xiao; Li, Yuwen; Saifudeen, Zubaida; Bachvarov, Dimcho; El-Dahr, Samir S.

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate a broad range of biological processes through removal of acetyl groups from histones as well as non-histone proteins. Our previous studies showed that Hdac1 and Hdac2 are bound to promoters of key renal developmental regulators and that HDAC activity is required for embryonic kidney gene expression. However, the existence of many HDAC isoforms in embryonic kidneys raises questions concerning the possible specificity or redundancy of their functions. We report here that targeted deletion of both the Hdac1 and Hdac2 genes from the ureteric bud (UB) cell lineage of mice causes bilateral renal hypodysplasia. One copy of either Hdac1 or Hdac2 is sufficient to sustain normal renal development. In addition to defective cell proliferation and survival, genome-wide transcriptional profiling revealed that the canonical Wnt signaling pathway is specifically impaired in UBHdac1,2−/− kidneys. Our results also demonstrate that loss of Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the UB epithelium leads to marked hyperacetylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53 on lysine 370, 379 and 383; these post-translational modifications are known to boost p53 stability and transcriptional activity. Genetic deletion of p53 partially rescues the development of UBHdac1,2−/− kidneys. Together, these data indicate that Hdac1 and Hdac2 are crucial for kidney development. They perform redundant, yet essential, cell lineage-autonomous functions via p53-dependent and -independent pathways. PMID:25758227

  9. Responses of the rabbit tracheal epithelium in vitro to H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Squiban, A; Delcher, L; Kukreti, R; Joly, A C; Guennou, C; Houcine, O; Marano, F

    2000-04-01

    A model of rabbit tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells in primary culture was used to characterize specific and repair responses of airway epithelial cells to oxidative stress. Two well-known reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating systems were used: H(2)O(2) alone or in combination with Fe(2+) to produce the hydroxyl radical. RTE cells exhibited lipid peroxidation when exposed to H(2)O(2) + Fe(2+). Moreover, catalase (CAT) activity decreased after a 1-hour treatment in 3-day-old cultures but increased in 7-day-old cultures which have higher antioxidant enzyme activities. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was never affected. In addition, RTE cells displayed a repair response leading to squamous metaplasia. H(2)O(2) + Fe(2+) treatment resulted in a time-dependent increase in the steady-state level of c-myc mRNA while c-jun and c-fos were not activated. Moreover, a chronic exposure induced the expression of the squamous phenotype characterized by the expression of the cytokeratin 13 confirmed both at the message and protein levels. RTE cells in primary culture react early to H(2)O(2) + Fe(2+) exposure by an increase in c-myc expression and by modifications in CAT activity. Further, a lipid peroxidation occurs and the tracheal epithelium evolves to squamous metaplasia. PMID:10793294

  10. Choline transport in the isolated rabbit corneal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    In the present study, isolated epithelial sheets were obtained by performing two sequential anterior keratectomies, three weeks apart, on rabbit corneas. Light microscopy of the isolated sheets revealed a multilayered epithelium with an intact basal cell layer without contamination from other cell types. The accumulation of ({sup 3}H)choline into the epithelial sheets was studied at substrate concentrations varying from 1 to 100 {mu}Moles with and without the addition of specific metabolic and stereochemical inhibitors. Accumulation of ({sup 3}H)choline into these sheets was saturable. Kinetic analysis, performed by estimation from double-reciprocal plots, revealed a single component system with a K{sub m} of 24.9 {mu}M. The metabolic inhibitors potassium cyanide and ouabain showed no effect on the uptake of ({sup 3}H)choline; however, the stereochemical inhibitor hemicholinium-3 significantly reduced the accumulation of radiolabel at both high and low substrate concentrations. The results suggest a non-energy dependent yet a highly specific transport system for the accumulation of choline into the rabbit epithelium.

  11. Selective gene expression by rat gastric corpus epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, M.; Stengel, A.; Sachs, G.

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is divided into several segments that have distinct functional properties, largely absorptive. The gastric corpus is the only segment thought of as largely secretory. Microarray hybridization of the gastric corpus mucosal epithelial cells was used to compare gene expression with other segments of the columnar GI tract followed by statistical data subtraction to identify genes selectively expressed by the rat gastric corpus mucosa. This provides a means of identifying less obvious specific functions of the corpus in addition to its secretion-related genes. For example, important properties found by this GI tract comparative transcriptome reflect the energy demand of acid secretion, a role in lipid metabolism, the large variety of resident neuroendocrine cells, responses to damaging agents and transcription factors defining differentiation of its epithelium. In terms of overlap of gastric corpus genes with the rest of the GI tract, the distal small bowel appears to express many of the gastric corpus genes in contrast to proximal small and large bowel. This differential map of gene expression by the gastric corpus epithelium will allow a more detailed description of major properties of the gastric corpus and may lead to the discovery of gastric corpus cell differentiation genes and those mis-regulated in gastric carcinomas. PMID:21177383

  12. Coordination of Cellular Dynamics Contributes to Tooth Epithelium Deformations.

    PubMed

    Morita, Ritsuko; Kihira, Miho; Nakatsu, Yousuke; Nomoto, Yohei; Ogawa, Miho; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The morphologies of ectodermal organs are shaped by appropriate combinations of several deformation modes, such as invagination and anisotropic tissue elongation. However, how multicellular dynamics are coordinated during deformation processes remains to be elucidated. Here, we developed a four-dimensional (4D) analysis system for tracking cell movement and division at a single-cell resolution in developing tooth epithelium. The expression patterns of a Fucci probe clarified the region- and stage-specific cell cycle patterns within the tooth germ, which were in good agreement with the pattern of the volume growth rate estimated from tissue-level deformation analysis. Cellular motility was higher in the regions with higher growth rates, while the mitotic orientation was significantly biased along the direction of tissue elongation in the epithelium. Further, these spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics and tissue-level deformation were highly correlated with that of the activity of cofilin, which is an actin depolymerization factor, suggesting that the coordination of cellular dynamics via actin remodeling plays an important role in tooth epithelial morphogenesis. Our system enhances the understanding of how cellular behaviors are coordinated during ectodermal organogenesis, which cannot be observed from histological analyses. PMID:27588418

  13. Acanthamoebae bind to glycolipids of rabbit corneal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Panjwani, N; Zhao, Z; Baum, J; Pereira, M; Zaidi, T

    1992-01-01

    By use of a thin-layer chromatogram (TLC) overlay procedure, 35S-labeled acanthamoebae were shown to bind to seven glycolipids of rabbit corneal epithelium. Corneal epithelial cells were grown in culture and were subjected to Folch extraction to isolate a chloroform-rich lower phase containing neutral glycosphingolipids (NGSL) and an aqueous upper phase containing gangliosides, i.e., sialic acid-containing glycolipids. Thin-layer chromatography of the upper phase revealed the presence of 10 ganglioside components. Acanthamoebae were shown to bind to four of these components, referred to as 2, 3, 6, and 7. On TLC plates, ganglioside components 2 and 3 migrated slightly ahead of the glycolipid standard GD1a, component 7 comigrated with standard GM3, and component 6 migrated a little more slowly than GM3. Likewise, of the 10 NGSL known to be present in the lower phase, acanthamoebae bound to components 1, 5, and 6. NGSL components 1, 5, and 6 migrated on TLC plates with relative mobilities similar to those of standards asialo GM1, asialo GM2, and ceramidetrihexoside, respectively. We propose that one or more of the Acanthamoeba-reactive glycolipids of corneal epithelium identified in this study may play a role in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba keratitis by mediating the adherence of the parasites to the cornea. Images PMID:1639517

  14. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity.

    PubMed

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A; Islam, Mohammad N; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S; Prince, Alice S; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-27

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca(2+) waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca(2+)-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation. PMID:24463523

  15. An Apical-Membrane Chloride Channel in Human Tracheal Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.

    1986-06-01

    The mechanism of chloride transport by airway epithelia has been of substantial interest because airway and sweat gland-duct epithelia are chloride-impermeable in cystic fibrosis. The decreased chloride permeability prevents normal secretion by the airway epithelium, thereby interfering with mucociliary clearance and contributing to the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Because chloride secretion depends on and is regulated by chloride conductance in the apical cell membrane, the patch-clamp technique was used to directly examine single-channel currents in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelium. The cells contained an anion-selective channel that was not strongly voltage-gated or regulated by calcium in cell-free patches. The channel was also blocked by analogs of carboxylic acid that decrease apical chloride conductance in intact epithelia. When attached to the cell, the channel was activated by isoproterenol, although the channel was also observed to open spontaneously. However, in some cases, the channel was only observed after the patch was excised from the cell. These results suggest that this channel is responsible for the apical chloride conductance in airway epithelia.

  16. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  17. Nanotopography follows force in TGF-β1 stimulated epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoelking, Gerold; Reiss, Bjoern; Wegener, Joachim; Oberleithner, Hans; Pavenstaedt, Hermann; Riethmuller, Christoph

    2010-07-01

    Inflammation and cellular fibrosis often imply an involvement of the cytokine TGF-β1. TGF-β1 induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT), a term describing the loss of epithelium-specific function. Indicative for this process are an elongated cell shape parallel to stress fibre formation. Many signalling pathways of TGF-β1 have been discovered, but mechanical aspects have not yet been investigated. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to analyse surface topography and mechanical properties of EMT in proximal kidney tubule epithelium (NRK52E). Elongated cells, an increase of stress fibre formation and a loss of microvillus compatible structures were observed as characteristic signs of EMT. Furthermore, AFM could identify an increase in stiffness by 71% after six days of stimulation with TGF-β1. As a novel topographical phenomenon, nodular protrusions emerged at the cell-cell junctions. They occurred preferentially at sites where stress fibres cross the border. Since these nodular protrusions were sensitive to inhibitors of force generation, they can indicate intracellular tension. The results demonstrate a manifest impact of elevated tension on the cellular topography.

  18. Regulation of gene expression in the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Camilla A; Breault, David T

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium is complex and controlled by various signaling pathways that regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Proliferation is required both to grow and to replace cells lost through apoptosis and attrition, yet in all but a few cells, differentiation must take place to prevent uncontrolled growth (cancer) and to provide essential functions. In this chapter, we review the major signaling pathways underlying regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium, based primarily on data from mouse models, as well as specific morphogens and transcription factor families that have a major role in regulating intestinal gene expression, including the Hedgehog family, Forkhead Box (FOX) factors, Homeobox (HOX) genes, ParaHox genes, GATA transcription factors, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling, EPH/Ephrins, Sox9, BMP signaling, PTEN/PI3K, LKB1, K-RAS, Notch pathway, HNF, and MATH1. We also briefly highlight important emerging areas of gene regulation, including microRNA (miRNA) and epigenetic regulation. PMID:21075346

  19. microRNA-dependent Temporal Gene Expression in the Ureteric Bud Epithelium during Mammalian Kidney Development

    PubMed Central

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K.; Lindner, Volkhard; Wessels, Andy; Yu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Background Our previous study on mouse mutants with the ureteric bud (UB) epithelium-specific Dicer deletion (Dicer UB mutants) demonstrated the significance of UB epithelium-derived miRNAs in UB development. Results Our whole-genome transcriptional profiling showed that the Dicer mutant UB epithelium abnormally retained transcriptional features of the early UB epithelium and failed to express many genes associated with collecting duct differentiation. Further, we identified a temporal expression pattern of early UB genes during UB epithelium development in which gene expression was detected at early developmental stages and became undetectable by E14.5. In contrast, expression of early UB genes persisted at later stages in the Dicer mutant UB epithelium and increased at early stages. Our bioinformatics analysis of the abnormally persistently expressed early genes in the Dicer mutant UB epithelium showed significant enrichment of the let-7 family miRNA targets. We further identified a temporal expression pattern of let-7 miRNAs in the UB epithelium that is anti-parallel to that of some early UB genes during kidney development. Conclusions We propose a model in which the let-7 family miRNAs silence the expression of a subset of early genes in the UB epithelium at later developmental stages in order to promote collecting duct differentiation. PMID:25369991

  20. Cell signaling and ion transport across the fish gill epithelium.

    PubMed

    Evans, David H

    2002-08-01

    A large array of circulating and local signaling agents modulate transport of ions across the gill epithelium of fishes by either affecting transport directly or by altering the size and distribution of transporting cells in the epithelium. In some cases, these transport effects are in addition to cardiovascular effects of the same agents, which may affect the perfusion pathways in the gill vasculature and, in turn, affect epithelial transport indirectly. Prolactin is generally considered to function in freshwater, because it is the only agent that allows survival of some hypophysectomized fish species in freshwater. It appears to function by either reducing branchial permeability, Na,K-activated ATPase activity, or reducing the density of chloride cells. Cortisol was initially considered to produce virtually opposite effects (e.g., stimulation of Na,K-activated ATPase and of chloride cell size and density), but more recent studies have found that this steroid stimulates ionic uptake in freshwater fishes, as well as the activity of H-ATPase, an enzyme thought to be central to ionic uptake. Thus, cortisol may function in both high and low salinities. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor appear to act synergistically to affect ion regulation in seawater fishes, stimulating both Na,K-activated ATPase and Na-K-2Cl co-transporter activity, and chloride cell size, independent of their effects on growth. Some of the effects of the GH-IGF axis may be via stimulation of the number of cortisol receptors. Thyroid hormones appear to affect seawater ion regulation indirectly, by stimulating the GH-IGF axis. Natriuretic peptides were initially thought to stimulate gill ionic extrusion, but recent studies have not corroborated this finding, so it appears that the major mode of action of these peptides may be reduction of salt loading by inhibition of oral ingestion and intestinal ionic uptake. Receptors for both arginine vasotocin and angiotensin have been described in

  1. In goldfish the discriminative ability for odours persists after reduction of the olfactory epithelium, and rapidly returns after olfactory nerve axotomy and crossing bulbs.

    PubMed

    Zippel, H P

    2000-09-29

    Goldfish are ideal vertebrates for the study of regeneration within the peripheral and the central olfactory system. The present behavioural investigations studied the effects of bilateral lesions on the animals' ability to qualitatively discriminate two amino acids (10(-6) M) and their performance in two more difficult tasks: (i) rewarded amino acid applied in a lower concentration, and (ii) rewarded stimulus contaminated. A 50 and 85% reduction of the olfactory epithelium resulted in no recordable behavioural deficit. After axotomy of olfactory nerves and lateral olfactory tractotomy, fishes were anosmic for seven to ten days. Following replacement of sensory cells in the epithelium, and after regeneration of olfactory tract fibres a full functional recovery i.e. a highly specific regeneration, was recorded. After three surgical modifications of the olfactory bulbs' position, (i) crossing olfactory tracts and bulbs, (ii) crossing tracts and turning bulbs, and (iii) turning bulbs upside down, a full functional recovery was recorded for amino-acid discrimination in a similar concentration. A permanent, and similar slight deficit was, however, found during application of different concentrations, and of contaminated stimuli when medial lateral halves of the bulb were in 'incorrect' position (i) and (ii), or olfactory bulbs were positioned in the vicinity of the contralateral epithelium (i) and (ii). PMID:11079402

  2. ATP-sensitive K(+) channels in rat colonic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Pouokam, Ervice; Bader, Sandra; Brück, Brigitta; Schmidt, Bärbel; Diener, Martin

    2013-06-01

    ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels couple the metabolic state of a cell to its electrical activity. They consist of a hetero-octameric complex with pore-forming Kir6.x (Kir6.1, Kir6.2) and regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. Functional data indicate that KATP channels contribute to epithelial K(+) currents at colonic epithelia. However, their molecular identity and their properties are largely unknown. Therefore, changes in short-circuit current (I sc) induced by the KATP channel opener pinacidil (5 10(-4) mol l(-1)) were measured in Ussing chambers under control conditions and in the presence of different blockers of KATP channels. The channel subunits expressed by the colonic epithelium were identified by immunohistochemistry and by RT-PCR. The K(+) channel opener, when administered at the serosal side, induced an increase in I sc consistent with the induction of transepithelial Cl(-) secretion after activation of basolateral K(+) channels, whereas mucosal administration of pinacidil resulted in a negative I sc. The increase in I sc evoked by serosal pinacidil was inhibited by serosal administration of glibenclamide (5 10(-4) mol l(-1)) and gliclazide (10(-6) mol l(-1)), but was resistant even against a high concentration (10(-2) mol l(-1)) of tolbutamide. In contrast, none of these inhibitors (administered at the mucosal side) reduced significantly the negative I sc induced by mucosal pinacidil. Instead, pinacidil inhibited Cl(-) currents across apical Cl(-) channels in basolaterally depolarized epithelia indicating that the negative I sc induced by mucosal pinacidil is due to a transient inhibition of Cl(-) secretion. In mRNA prepared from isolated colonic crypts, messenger RNA for both pore-forming subunits, Kir6.1 and Kir6.2, and two regulatory subunits (SUR1 and SUR2B) was found. Expression within the colonic epithelium was confirmed for these subunits by immunohistochemistry. In consequence, KATP channels are present in the basolateral membrane

  3. Response of macaque bronchiolar epithelium to ambient concentrations of ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, J. R.; Plopper, C. G.; Hyde, D. M.; St George, J. A.; Wilson, D. W.; Dungworth, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we reported that exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, near the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm), induced significant nasal epithelial lesions in a non-human primate, the bonnet monkey. The present study defines the effects of ambient concentrations of ozone on the surface epithelium lining respiratory bronchioles and on the underlying bronchiolar interstitium in these same monkeys. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to filtered air or to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm ozone 8 hours/day for 6 or 90 days. At the end of exposures, monkeys were anesthetized and killed by exsanguination. Microdissected bronchiolar airways of infusion-fixed lungs were evaluated morphometrically by light microscopy and quantitatively by scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ozone-induced epithelial changes. Hyperplasia of nonciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells and intraluminal accumulation of macrophages characterized ozone-induced lesions in respiratory bronchioles. There were no significant differences in epithelial thickness or cell numbers among ozone-exposed groups. Ozone-exposed epithelium was composed of 80% cuboidal and 20% squamous cells compared with 40% cuboidal and 60% squamous cells in filtered air controls. In addition, the arithmetic mean thickness of the surface epithelium, a measure of tissue mass per unit area of basal lamina, was significantly increased in all of the ozone-exposed groups. The number of cuboidal epithelial cells per surface area of basal lamina was increased above control values by 780% after 6 days exposure to 0.15 ppm, 777% after 90 days to 0.15 ppm, and 996% after 90 days exposure to 0.30 ppm. There was also a significant ozone-induced increase in the thickness of the bronchiolar interstitium that was due to an increase in both cellular and acellular components. These results demonstrate that exposure to low ambient concentrations of ozone, near the current. National Ambient Air Quality Standard, induces pulmonary lesions

  4. Retinal pigment epithelium engineering using synthetic biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Yaszemski, M J; Mikos, A G

    2001-12-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays a key role in the maintenance of the normal functions of the retina, especially photoreceptors. Alteration in RPE structure and function is implicated in a variety of ocular disorders. Tissue engineering strategies using synthetic biodegradable polymers as temporary substrates for RPE cell culture and subsequent transplantation may provide a promising new therapy. In this review article, the manufacture of thin biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) films and their degradation behavior in vitro are discussed. RPE cell proliferation and differentiation on these PLGA films are reviewed. The fabrication of model substrates with desired chemical micropatterns in the micrometer scale is discussed and the effects of surface patterning on RPE morphology and function are assessed. Finally. the preparation of biodegradable micropatterns with adhesive PLGA and non-adhesive poly(ethylene glycol)/PLA domains to modulate RPE cell adhesion is presented. PMID:11700807

  5. Electroolfactogram (EOG) Recording in the Mouse Main Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuanmao; Xia, Zhengui; Storm, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) are responsible for detecting odorants and EOG recording is a reliable approach to analyze the peripheral olfactory function. However, recently we revealed that rodent MOE can also detect the air pressure caused by airflow. The sensation of airflow pressure and odorants may function in synergy to facilitate odorant perception during sniffing. We have reported that the pressure-sensitive response in the MOE can also be assayed by EOG recording. Here we describe procedures for pressure-sensitive as well as odorant-stimulated EOG measurement in the mouse MOE. The major difference between the pressure-sensitive EOG response and the odorant-stimulated response was whether to use pure air puff or use an odorized air puff.

  6. Intermediate Filaments and Polarization in the Intestinal Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Coch, Richard A; Leube, Rudolf E

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic intermediate filament cytoskeleton provides a tissue-specific three-dimensional scaffolding with unique context-dependent organizational features. This is particularly apparent in the intestinal epithelium, in which the intermediate filament network is localized below the apical terminal web region and is anchored to the apical junction complex. This arrangement is conserved from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. The review summarizes compositional, morphological and functional features of the polarized intermediate filament cytoskeleton in intestinal cells of nematodes and mammals. We emphasize the cross talk of intermediate filaments with the actin- and tubulin-based cytoskeleton. Possible links of the intermediate filament system to the distribution of apical membrane proteins and the cell polarity complex are highlighted. Finally, we discuss how these properties relate to the establishment and maintenance of polarity in the intestine. PMID:27429003

  7. X-ray microanalysis of hamster tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, A.J.; Roomans, G.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Studies of ion transport across respiratory epithelia are of great interest if we are to understand the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystic fibrosis in which ion transport is abnormal. Concentrations of elements were determined in various subcellular regions of normal or isoproterenol-treated hamster tracheal epithelium, using X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections. Samples of trachea were taken from animals under anesthesia and either frozen in situ or dissected and plunge frozen. Concentrations of Mg, P, S, Cl, K and Ca were higher in cytoplasm and nuclei of control epithelial cells in dissected samples than in cryoneedle samples. Following treatment with isoproterenol, a large decrease in the concentration of Cl was observed. The results confirm that cyclic AMP-regulated chloride secretion is unaffected by anesthesia.

  8. Microfold (M) cells: important immunosurveillance posts in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Mabbott, Neil A.; Donaldson, David S.; Ohno, Hiroshi; Williams, Ifor R.; Mahajan, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The transcytosis of antigens across the gut epithelium by microfold cells (M cells) is important for the induction of efficient immune responses to some mucosal antigens in Peyer’s patches. Recently, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the factors that influence the development and function of M cells. This review highlights these important advances, with particular emphasis on: the host genes which control the functional maturation of M cells; how this knowledge has led to the rapid advance in our understanding of M-cell biology in the steady-state and during aging; molecules expressed on M cells which appear to be used as “immunosurveillance” receptors to sample pathogenic microorganisms in the gut; how certain pathogens appear to exploit M cells to infect the host; and finally how this knowledge has been used to specifically target antigens to M cells to attempt to improve the efficacy of mucosal vaccines. PMID:23695511

  9. Porphyromonas gingivalis invades human pocket epithelium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sandros, J; Papapanou, P N; Nannmark, U; Dahlén, G

    1994-01-01

    The present study examined the adhesive and invasive potential of Porphyromonas gingivalis interacting with human pocket epithelium in vitro. Pocket epithelial tissue, obtained during periodontal surgery of patients with advanced periodontal disease, generated a stratified epithelium in culture. P. gingivalis strains W50 and FDC 381 (laboratory strains), OMGS 712, 1439, 1738, 1739 and 1743 (clinical isolates) as well as Escherichia coli strain HB101 (non-adhering control) were tested with respect to epithelial adhesion and invasion. Adhesion was quantitated by scintillation spectrometry after incubation of radiolabeled bacteria with epithelial cells. The invasive ability of P. gingivalis was measured by means of an antibiotic protection assay. The epithelial multilayers were infected with the test and control strains and subsequently incubated with an antibiotic mixture (metronidazole 0.1 mg/ml and gentamicin 0.5 mg/ml). The number of internalized bacteria surviving the antibiotic treatment was assessed after plating lyzed epithelial cells on culture media. All tested P. gingivalis strains adhered to and entered pocket epithelial cells. However, considerable variation in their adhesive and invasive potential was observed. E. coli strain HB101 did not adhere or invade. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that internalization of P. gingivalis was preceded by formation of microvilli and coated pits on the epithelial cell surfaces. Intracellular bacteria were most frequently surrounded by endosomal membranes; however, bacteria devoid of such membranes were also seen. Release of outer membrane vesicles (blebs) by internalized P. gingivalis was observed. These results support and extend previous work from this laboratory which demonstrated invasion of a human oral epithelial cell-line (KB) by P. gingivalis. PMID:8113953

  10. Alterations in phenotypic biochemical markers in bladder epithelium during tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Rao, J Y; Hemstreet, G P; Hurst, R E; Bonner, R B; Jones, P L; Min, K W; Fradet, Y

    1993-09-01

    Phenotypic biochemical markers of oncogenesis and differentiation were mapped in bladder biopsies to investigate changes that occur in bladder tumorigenesis and to identify markers for increased bladder cancer risk. Touch preparations from biopsy specimens from 30 patients were obtained from tumors, the adjacent bladder epithelium, and random distant bladder epithelium. Markers, including DNA ploidy, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and oncoproteins, were quantified in individual cells by using quantitative fluorescence image analysis. Cluster analysis revealed the markers fell into three independent groups: (i) G-actin and EGFR; (ii) ploidy, cytology, and p185 (HER-2/neu oncoprotein) (ERBB2); and (iii) p300, a low-grade tumor antigen. Each marker displayed a gradient of abnormality from distant field to adjacent field to tumor. Different patterns for each marker suggested a developmental sequence of bladder cancer oncogenesis; G-actin was altered in 58% of distant biopsies (vs. 0/6 normals, P < 0.001), ploidy and cytology were altered in < 20% of distant fields and approximately 80% of tumors, and the other markers were intermediate. Patterns of EGFR and p185 suggest low-and high-grade tracks diverge early (P < 0.05 by Mann-Whitney U test for EGFR and ANOVA for p185). In conclusion, this study shows that a sequence of phenotypic changes accompanies development and progression of bladder cancers. Biochemical alterations in cells of the bladder field are often detectable before abnormal pathology, and markers previously thought to be limited to tumors were found in the field. The hierarchy of expression may be useful in identifying high-risk patients, assessing completeness of response to therapy, and monitoring and predicting recurrence. PMID:8367495

  11. Mechanical strain inhibits repair of airway epithelium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Savla, U; Waters, C M

    1998-06-01

    The repair of airway epithelium after injury is crucial in restoring epithelial barrier integrity. Although the airway epithelium is stretched and compressed due to changes in both circumferential and longitudinal dimensions during respiration and may be overdistended during mechanical ventilation, the effect of cyclic strain on the repair of epithelial wounds is unknown. Human and cat airway epithelial cells were cultured on flexible membranes, wounded by scraping with a metal spatula, and subjected to cyclic strain using the Flexercell Strain Unit. Because the radial strain profile in the wells was nonuniform, we compared closure in regions of elongation and compression within the same well. Both cyclic elongation and cyclic compression significantly slowed repair, with compression having the greatest effect. This attenuation was dependent upon the time of relaxation (TR) during the cycle. When wells were stretched at 10 cycles/min (6 s/cycle) with TR = 5 s, wounds closed similarly to wounds in static wells, whereas in wells with TR = 1 s, significant inhibition was observed. As the TR during cycles increased (higher TR), wounds closed faster. We measured the effect of strain at various TRs on cell area and centroid-centroid distance (CD) as a measure of spreading and migration. While cell area and CD in static wells significantly increased over time, the area and CD of cells in the elongated regions did not change. Cells in compressed regions were significantly smaller, with significantly lower CD. Cell area and CD became progressively larger with increasing TR. These results suggest that mechanical strain inhibits epithelial repair. PMID:9609726

  12. NORMAL GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE F344 RAT NASAL TRANSITIONAL/RESPIRATORY EPITHELIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The nasal epithelium is an important target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity in rodents. Gene expression profiles were determined in order to provide normal baseline data for nasal transitional/respiratory epithelium from healthy rats. Ce...

  13. STUDIES OF NORMAL GENE EXPRESSION IN THE RAT NASAL EPITHELIUM USNG CDNA ARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory


    Studies of Normal Gene Expression in the Rat Nasal Epithelium Using cDNA Array

    The nasal epithelium is an important target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity .Gene expression data are being used increasingly for studies of such conditions. In or...

  14. Respiratory epithelium lined cysts presenting in the orbit without associated mucocele formation.

    PubMed

    James, C R; Lyness, R; Wright, J E

    1986-05-01

    Three patients presented with orbital cysts lined with upper respiratory tract epithelium. In each case there was no evidence of an associated mucocele. Two patients had a past history of orbital trauma, and the third had had preceding sinus surgery. It is postulated that these cysts were caused by traumatic herniation of nasal sinus epithelium cells into the orbit. PMID:3964639

  15. Denervation resulting in dento-alveolar ankylosis associated with decreased Malassez epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fujiyama, K; Yamashiro, T; Fukunaga, T; Balam, T A; Zheng, L; Takano-Yamamoto, T

    2004-08-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve denervation causes appreciable decreases in the distribution of epithelial rests of Malassez. To explore roles of the Malassez epithelium, we attempted to evaluate possible changes in dento-alveolar tissues surrounding this epithelium by experimental denervation. We found that denervation led to dento-alveolar ankylosis with a decrease in the width of the periodontal spaces. Interestingly, with regeneration of the Malassez epithelium 10 weeks after the denervation, the periodontal space width showed a correspondingly significant increase. These findings suggest that the Malassez epithelium may be involved in the maintenance of periodontal space and that sensory innervation might be indirectly associated with it. In addition, it is of interest that denervation activated root resorption of the coronal root surface and that the consequently resorbed lacunae were repaired by cellular cementum. It is suggested that Malassez epithelium may negatively regulate root resorption and induce acellular cementum formation. PMID:15271971

  16. Permit application modifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  17. Environmental Modification: A Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinnell, Richard M., Jr.; Kyte, Nancy S.

    1975-01-01

    This study shows that environmental modification is a surprisingly intricate technique. This may account for its relatively low use and also for its more frequent use by MSW than non-MSW caseworkers. The findings indicate the need for further research on environmental modification. (Author)

  18. Lifestyle modifications for GDM.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, Atul; Ahuja, Kamlesh

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide more so in Southeast Asian countries like India and Pakistan. 1 GDM is associated with various adverse foetal and maternal effects. The management of GDM aims at reducing blood glucose to reduce maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. Various studies have shown that lifestyle modifications are an important tool for reducing blood glucose levels in patients with GDM. Lifestyle modifications consist of dietary modifications and daily physical activity. Dietary modifications aim to achieve glycaemic control by providing adequate calories to the mother and foetus. Exercise is an obvious adjunct to dietary modifications for management of GDM. Therefore the purpose of this review is to summarize the benefits of lifestyle interventions in patients with GDM. PMID:27582149

  19. Spatially organized response zones in rat olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Scott, J W; Shannon, D E; Charpentier, J; Davis, L M; Kaplan, C

    1997-04-01

    Electroolfactogram recordings were made with a four-electrode assembly from the olfactory epithelium overlying the endoturbinate bones facing the nasal septum. In this study we tested whether odors of different chemical structures produce maximal responses along longitudinally oriented regions following the olfactory receptor gene expression zones described in the literature. The distribution of responses along the dorsal-to-ventral direction of this epithelium (i.e., across the expression zones) was tested in two types of experiments. In one, four electrodes were fixed along the dorsal-to-ventral axis of one turbinate bone. In the other, four electrodes were placed in corresponding positions on four turbinate bones and moved together up toward the top of the bone. These experiments compared the odorants limonene and alpha-terpinene, which are simple hydrocarbons, with carvone and menthone, which differ from the hydrocarbons by the presence of ketone groups. All responses were standardized to an amyl acetate or ethyl butyrate standard. The responses to limonene and alpha-terpinene were often larger for the ventral electrodes. The responses to carvone and menthone were largest for the dorsal electrodes. Intermediate electrodes gave responses that were intermediate in amplitude for these odors. The possibility that direction of air flow caused the observed response distributions was directly tested in experiments with odor nozzles placed in two positions. The relatively larger dorsal responses to carvone and relatively larger ventral responses to limonene were present despite odor nozzle position. We conclude that the responses to this set of odors vary systematically in a fashion parallel to the four gene expression zones. The odorant property that governs this response distribution may be related to the presence of oxygen-containing functional groups. Certain odors evoked larger responses at the intermediate electrode sites than at other sites. Cineole was the best

  20. Interactions between trophoblast and uterine epithelium: monitoring of adhesive forces.

    PubMed

    Thie, M; Röspel, R; Dettmann, W; Benoit, M; Ludwig, M; Gaub, H E; Denker, H W

    1998-11-01

    At embryo implantation, it is postulated that the initial contact between blastocyst and maternal tissues is by adhesion of the trophoblast to the uterine epithelium. This cell-to-cell interaction is thought to be critical for implantation, although the actual adhesive forces have never been determined. In the present study, the atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to study the adhesion between human uterine epithelial cell lines (HEC-1-A; RL95-2) and human trophoblast-type cells (JAR). Specific interaction forces of these epithelia via their apical cell poles were determined on the basis of approach-and-separation cycles. For this purpose, the AFM tip was functionalized with JAR cells, then brought to the surface of uterine epithelial monolayers and was kept in contact for different periods of time (ms, 1, 10, 20, 40 min). The approach force curves displayed repulsive interactions for both HEC-1-A and RL95-2 cells. However, RL95-2 cells (with a smooth surface structure and a thin glycocalyx) showed lower values of the repulsive regime than HEC-1-A cells (with a rough surface structure and a thick glycocalyx). After having overcome repulsive interactions, the initial contact was followed by adhesive interactions. For contact times of 20 and 40 min, RL95-2 cells, but not HEC-1-A cells, showed specific JAR binding, i.e. the separation force curves displayed repeated rupture events in the range of 1-3 nN with a distance between 7-15 microm and, thereafter, a final rupture event at a distance of up to 45 microm. These features point to the formation of strong cell-to-cell bonds. Collectively, these studies provide the first definition of interaction forces between the trophoblast and the uterine epithelium, and are consistent with the hypothesis that an RL95-2-like architecture of uterine epithelial cells, i.e. an non-polarized phenotype, is essential for apical adhesiveness for the human trophoblast. PMID:9853883

  1. Transmigration of macrophages across the choroid plexus epithelium in response to the feline immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, Rick B.; Bragg, D. C.; Poulton, Winona; Hudson, Lola

    2013-01-01

    Although lentiviruses such as human, feline and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV, FIV, SIV) rapidly gain access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the mechanisms that control this entry are not well understood. One possibility is that the virus may be carried into the brain by immune cells that traffic across the blood–CSF barrier in the choroid plexus. Since few studies have directly examined macrophage trafficking across the blood–CSF barrier, we established transwell and explant cultures of feline choroid plexus epithelium and measured trafficking in the presence or absence of FIV. Macrophages in co-culture with the epithelium showed significant proliferation and robust trafficking that was dependent on the presence of epithelium. Macrophage migration to the apical surface of the epithelium was particularly robust in the choroid plexus explants where 3-fold increases were seen over the first 24 h. Addition of FIV to the cultures greatly increased the number of surface macrophages without influencing replication. The epithelium in the transwell cultures was also permissive to PBMC trafficking, which increased from 17 to 26% of total cells after exposure to FIV. Thus, the choroid plexus epithelium supports trafficking of both macrophages and PBMCs. FIV significantly enhanced translocation of macrophages and T cells indicating that the choroid plexus epithelium is likely to be an active site of immune cell trafficking in response to infection. PMID:22281685

  2. Chronic alcohol ingestion changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Trac, David; Brewer, Elizabeth M; Brown, Lou Ann; Helms, My N

    2013-01-01

    Similar to effects of alcohol on the heart, liver, and brain, the effects of ethanol (EtOH) on lung injury are preventable. Unlike other vital organ systems, however, the lethal effects of alcohol on the lung are underappreciated, perhaps because there are no signs of overt pulmonary disorder until a secondary insult, such as a bacterial infection or injury, occurs in the lung. This paper provides overview of the complex changes in the alveolar environment known to occur following both chronic and acute alcohol exposures. Contemporary animal and cell culture models for alcohol-induced lung dysfunction are discussed, with emphasis on the effect of alcohol on transepithelial transport processes, namely, epithelial sodium channel activity (ENaC). The cascading effect of tissue and phagocytic Nadph oxidase (Nox) may be triggered by ethanol exposure, and as such, alcohol ingestion and exposure lead to a prooxidative environment; thus impacting alveolar macrophage (AM) function and oxidative stress. A better understanding of how alcohol changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium can lead to improvements in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which hospitalized alcoholics are at an increased risk. PMID:23509726

  3. Transcriptional regulatory network during development in the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Im, SeungYeong; Moon, Cheil

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration, a process of reconstitution of the entire tissue, occurs throughout life in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Regeneration of OE consists of several stages: proliferation of progenitors, cell fate determination between neuronal and non-neuronal lineages, their differentiation and maturation. How the differentiated cell types that comprise the OE are regenerated, is one of the central questions in olfactory developmental neurobiology. The past decade has witnessed considerable progress regarding the regulation of transcription factors (TFs) involved in the remarkable regenerative potential of OE. Here, we review current state of knowledge of the transcriptional regulatory networks that are powerful modulators of the acquisition and maintenance of developmental stages during regeneration in the OE. Advance in our understanding of regeneration will not only shed light on the basic principles of adult plasticity of cell identity, but may also lead to new approaches for using stem cells and reprogramming after injury or degenerative neurological diseases. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(11): 599-608] PMID:26303973

  4. Role of Epithelium Sodium Channel in Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruo-Yu; Yang, Shu-Hua; Xu, Wei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review the recent developments in the mechanisms of epithelium sodium channels (ENaCs) induced bone formation and regulation. Data Sources: Studies written in English or Chinese were searched using Medline, PubMed and the index of Chinese-language literature with time restriction from 2005 to 2014. Keywords included ENaC, bone, bone formation, osteonecrosis, estrogen, and osteoporosis. Data from published articles about the structure of ENaC, mechanism of ENaC in bone formation in recent domestic and foreign literature were selected. Study Selection: Abstract and full text of all studies were required to obtain. Studies those were not accessible and those did not focus on the keywords were excluded. Results: ENaCs are tripolymer ion channels which are assembled from homologous α, β, and γ subunits. Crystal structure of ENaCs suggests that ENaC has a central ion-channel located in the central symmetry axis of the three subunits. ENaCs are protease sensitive channels whose iron-channel activity is regulated by the proteolytic reaction. Channel opening probability of ENaCs is regulated by proteinases, mechanical force, and shear stress. Several molecules are involved in regulation of ENaCs in bone formation, including nitride oxide synthases, voltage-sensitive calcium channels, and cyclooxygenase-2. Conclusion: The pathway of ENaC involved in shear stress has an effect on stimulating osteoblasts even bone formation by estrogen interference. PMID:26904995

  5. Sulfate transport in apical membrane vesicles isolated from tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Elgavish, A.; DiBona, D.R.; Norton, P.; Meezan, E.

    1987-09-01

    Sulfate uptake in apical membrane vesicles isolated from bovine tracheal epithelium is shown to occur into an osmotically sensitive intravesicular space, via a carrier-mediated system. This conclusion is based on three lines of evidence: 1) saturation kinetics: 2) substrate specificity; and 3) inhibition by the anion transport inhibitors SITS and DIDS. The affinity of the transport system is highest in low ionic strength media and decreases in the presence of gluconate. Chloride appears to cis-inhibit sulfate uptake and to trans-stimulate sulfate efflux. Cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation studies with a variety of anions indicate that this exchange system may be shared by HCO/sub 3//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/, SeO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ but not by H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/ or HAsO/sub 4//sup 2/. Studies indicate that protons may play two distinct roles in sulfate transport in this system. These studies show that the carrier-mediated system can function in the absence of chloride. The overshoot observed in the presence of a proton gradient indicates that under those conditions the mechanism of transport may be a SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-OH/sup -/ exchange.

  6. Desmosomes in the uterine epithelium of noninvasive skink placentae.

    PubMed

    Biazik, Joanna M; Thompson, Michael B; Murphy, Christopher R

    2010-03-01

    Australian species of viviparous skinks have noninvasive epitheliochorial placentation where there is no breeching or interruption of the uterine epithelial cell barrier. This is contrary to some African and South American species of skinks which exhibit invading chorionic cells and a localized endotheliochorial placenta. The desmosomes, which maintain the adhesive properties of the junctional complex between uterine epithelial cells, were found to decrease as gestation progressed in the uterus of two highly placentotrophic Australian skinks, but no changes in desmosomal numbers were present in the uterus of two Australian oviparous skinks or viviparous skinks with a simple placenta. In mammals, desmosomes decrease in the uterine epithelium of species with invasive hemochorial placentation, where less chemical and mechanical adhesion between cells assists the invading trophoblast at the time of implantation. However, Australian viviparous skinks do not have an invasive trophoblast; yet, similarities in decreasing lateral cellular adhesion exist in the uterus of both invasive and noninvasive placental types. This similarity in cellular mechanisms suggests a conservation of plasma membrane changes across placentation irrespective of reptilian or mammalian origin. PMID:20169564

  7. Retinal pigment epithelium transplantation: concepts, challenges, and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, P; Thomson, H A J; Luff, A J; Lotery, A J

    2015-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a single layer of cells that supports the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that are essential for retinal function. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment, and the primary pathogenic mechanism is thought to arise in the RPE layer. RPE cell structure and function are well understood, the cells are readily sustainable in laboratory culture and, unlike other cell types within the retina, RPE cells do not require synaptic connections to perform their role. These factors, together with the relative ease of outer retinal imaging, make RPE cells an attractive target for cell transplantation compared with other cell types in the retina or central nervous system. Seminal experiments in rats with an inherited RPE dystrophy have demonstrated that RPE transplantation can prevent photoreceptor loss and maintain visual function. This review provides an update on the progress made so far on RPE transplantation in human eyes, outlines potential sources of donor cells, and describes the technical and surgical challenges faced by the transplanting surgeon. Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cells, combined with novel surgical instrumentation, hold considerable promise, and support the concept of RPE transplantation as a regenerative strategy in AMD. PMID:26043704

  8. Retinal pigment epithelium transplantation: concepts, challenges, and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Alexander, P; Thomson, H A J; Luff, A J; Lotery, A J

    2015-08-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a single layer of cells that supports the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that are essential for retinal function. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment, and the primary pathogenic mechanism is thought to arise in the RPE layer. RPE cell structure and function are well understood, the cells are readily sustainable in laboratory culture and, unlike other cell types within the retina, RPE cells do not require synaptic connections to perform their role. These factors, together with the relative ease of outer retinal imaging, make RPE cells an attractive target for cell transplantation compared with other cell types in the retina or central nervous system. Seminal experiments in rats with an inherited RPE dystrophy have demonstrated that RPE transplantation can prevent photoreceptor loss and maintain visual function. This review provides an update on the progress made so far on RPE transplantation in human eyes, outlines potential sources of donor cells, and describes the technical and surgical challenges faced by the transplanting surgeon. Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cells, combined with novel surgical instrumentation, hold considerable promise, and support the concept of RPE transplantation as a regenerative strategy in AMD. PMID:26043704

  9. Surface characteristics of isopod digestive gland epithelium studied by SEM.

    PubMed

    Millaku, Agron; Leser, Vladka; Drobne, Damjana; Godec, Matjaz; Torkar, Matjaz; Jenko, Monika; Milani, Marziale; Tatti, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The structure of the digestive gland epithelium of a terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber has been investigated by conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), and light microscopy in order to provide evidence on morphology of the gland epithelial surface in animals from a stock culture. We investigated the shape of cells, extrusion of lipid droplets, shape and distribution of microvilli, and the presence of bacteria on the cell surface. A total of 22 animals were investigated and we found some variability in the appearance of the gland epithelial surface. Seventeen of the animals had dome-shaped digestive gland "normal" epithelial cells, which were densely and homogeneously covered by microvilli and varying proportions of which extruded lipid droplets. On the surface of microvilli we routinely observed sparsely distributed bacteria of different shapes. Five of the 22 animals had "abnormal" epithelial cells with a significantly altered shape. In three of these animals, the cells were much smaller, partly or completely flat or sometimes pyramid-like. A thick layer of bacteria was detected on the microvillous border, and in places, the shape and size of microvilli were altered. In two animals, hypertrophic cells containing large vacuoles were observed indicating a characteristic intracellular infection. The potential of SEM in morphological investigations of epithelial surfaces is discussed. PMID:20155290

  10. Expression of homeobox genes in the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Marta; Chang, Isabelle; Degl'Innocenti, Andrea; Omura, Masayo

    2016-10-01

    Homeobox genes constitute a large family of genes widely studied because of their role in the establishment of the body pattern. However, they are also involved in many other events during development and adulthood. The main olfactory epithelium (MOE) is an excellent model to study neurogenesis in the adult nervous system. Analyses of homeobox genes during development show that some of these genes are involved in the formation and establishment of cell diversity in the MOE. Moreover, the mechanisms of expression of odorant receptors (ORs) constitute one of the biggest enigmas in the field. Analyses of OR promoters revealed the presence of homeodomain binding sites in their sequences. Here we characterize the expression patterns of a set of 49 homeobox genes in the MOE with in situ hybridization. We found that seven of them (Dlx3, Dlx5, Dlx6, Msx1, Meis1, Isl1, and Pitx1) are zonally expressed. The homeobox gene Emx1 is expressed in three guanylate cyclase(+) populations, two located in the MOE and the third one in an olfactory subsystem known as Grüneberg ganglion located at the entrance of the nasal cavity. The homeobox gene Tshz1 is expressed in a unique patchy pattern across the MOE. Our findings provide new insights to guide functional studies that aim to understand the complexity of transcription factor expression and gene regulation in the MOE. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2713-2739, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27243442

  11. Kinetics of Lipofuscin Formation in Aging Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2010-03-01

    Lipofuscin is a deposit that is formed over time by aggregation and clustering of incompletely degraded membrane material in various types of cells. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat and is known to be present in age- related macular dgeneration (AMD), Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in adults. The degradation of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE) through accumulation of lipsofuscin is considered a significant pathogenic factor in the development of AMD. We will present the results of a study of the kinetics of lipofuscin growth in RPE cells using Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and scaling theory on a cluster aggregation model. The model captures the essential physics of lipofuscin growth in the cells. A remarkable feature is that small particles may be removed from the cells while the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation. We compare our results with the number of lipofuscin granules in eyes with early age-related degeneration.

  12. Pathways of ion movement in the canine tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Welsh, M J; Widdicombe, J H

    1980-09-01

    The pathways of ion movement across canine tracheal epithelium, a Cl-secreting tissue, were examined by three techniques. First, the measurement of simultaneous, unidirectional fluxes of Na or Cl and mannitol, a large hydrophilic molecule that serves as a marker of the paracellular pathway, indicated that a significant fraction of both the Na flux from submucosa to mucosa (J Na sm) and the flux of Cl from mucosa to submucosa (J Cl ms) traverse the cellular pathway. The ratio of the Na-to-Cl diffusion coefficients through the paracellular pathway was 0.23, in contrast to the free solution ratio of 0.63. Second, in voltage-clamp experiments we examined the effect of transepithelial voltage differences on the unidirectional fluxes of Na and Cl. The results agree with the previous findings, suggesting that there are voltage-independent, or transcellular, backfluxes of Na and Cl, and that the relative permeability of Na to Cl through the voltage-dependent (presumably paracellular) pathway was 0.28. Third, measurement of transepithelial diffusion potentials gave a Na-to-Cl permeability ratio of 0.31 +/- 0.02 (mean +/- SE). These results suggest that there are significant transcellular backfluxes of Na and Cl and that the paracellular pathway in the canine trachea is anion selective. An anion-selective pathway would tend to shunt the secreted Cl back through the paracellular pathway, thus minimizing the net ion and fluid movement across the tissue in the open-circuit condition. PMID:7435560

  13. Characterization of nucleoside transport systems in cultured rat epididymal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Leung, G P; Ward, J L; Wong, P Y; Tse, C M

    2001-05-01

    The nucleoside transport systems in cultured epididymal epithelium were characterized and found to be similar between the proximal (caput and corpus) and distal (cauda) regions of the epididymis. Functional studies revealed that 70% of the total nucleoside uptake was Na(+) dependent, while 30% was Na(+) independent. The Na(+)-independent nucleoside transport was mediated by both the equilibrative nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR)-sensitive system (40%) and the NBMPR-insensitive system (60%), which was supported by a biphasic dose response to NBMPR inhibition. The Na(+)-dependent [(3)H]uridine uptake was selectively inhibited 80% by purine nucleosides, indicating that the purine nucleoside-selective N1 system is predominant. Since Na(+)-dependent [(3)H]guanosine uptake was inhibited by thymidine by 20% and Na(+)-dependent [(3)H]thymidine uptake was broadly inhibited by purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, this suggested the presence of the broadly selective N3 system accounting for 20% of Na(+)-dependent nucleoside uptake. Results of RT-PCR confirmed the presence of mRNA for equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1, ENT2, and concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT) 2 and the absence of CNT1. It is suggested that the nucleoside transporters in epididymis may be important for sperm maturation by regulating the extracellular concentration of adenosine in epididymal plasma. PMID:11287319

  14. The intestinal epithelium as guardian of gut barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaiyi; Hornef, Mathias W; Dupont, Aline

    2015-11-01

    A single layer of epithelial cells separates the intestinal lumen from the underlying sterile tissue. It is exposed to a multitude of nutrients and a large number of commensal bacteria. Although the presence of commensal bacteria significantly contributes to nutrient digestion, vitamin synthesis and tissue maturation, their high number represents a permanent challenge to the integrity of the epithelial surface keeping the local immune system constantly on alert. In addition, the intestinal mucosa is challenged by a variety of enteropathogenic microorganisms. In both circumstances, the epithelium actively contributes to maintaining host-microbial homeostasis and antimicrobial host defence. It deploys a variety of mechanisms to restrict the presence of commensal bacteria to the intestinal lumen and to prevent translocation of commensal and pathogenic microorganisms to the underlying tissue. Enteropathogenic microorganisms in turn have learnt to evade the host's immune system and circumvent the antimicrobial host response. In the present article, we review recent advances that illustrate the intense and intimate host-microbial interaction at the epithelial level and improve our understanding of the mechanisms that maintain the integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier. PMID:26294173

  15. [Morphology of the reproductive age women cervical epithelium under hypothyreosis].

    PubMed

    Beruchashvili, M; Gogiashvili, L; Tsagareli, Z; Topuriya, Z

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to examine the morphological manifestations of hypothyreosis in the reproductive age women cervical mucosa. With clinically verified hypothyreosis in 1524 cases, 538 patients had a different variants of endocervical pathology, accounting for two major research groups: I - (n=259) operated by colloidal goiter treated by L-thyroxin during last 3 years, II - (n=279) with similar diagnosis, without replacement therapy within last 3 years. Therapeutic and diagnostic scrapings from cervix, as well as parallel samples of the operative removal thyroid gland (TG), after staining with hematoxylin and eosin and picrofuchsin by van Gieson were studied morphologically. The different variants of the cervical mucosa reaction from simple hyperplasia in treated group to adenomyosis with stratification of epithelium, and the tendency of sclerosis and atrophy in the group not receiving L-thyroxin were revealed. In all compared cases Spearmen correlation coefficient had high level of relevance (0,00003). We believe that the cervix changes are the consequence of the decrease of sensitivity to estrogen under the low level of T3 and T4 and increase TSH in plasma. Molecular atypia of endocervical cells clearly demon-strates cross-combination of two leading hormonal systems. PMID:23388537

  16. Cytokeratin expression and acetowhite change in cervical epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, P; Szarewski, A; Dyson, J; Cuzick, J

    1994-01-01

    AIM--To investigate the distribution of cytokeratins 10, 13, 14 and 19 in biopsy specimens taken from acetowhite and non-acetowhite areas of the cervix. METHOD--Cervical biopsy specimens were taken from both acetowhite and non-acetowhite areas from 44 patients who presented with abnormal cervical cytology. The specimens were snap frozen in liquid nitrogen and multiple sections taken from each specimen. Staining was performed for cytokeratins 10, 13, 14, 19 and NADPH diaphorase enzyme. The areas of each section positive for the various markers were measured. RESULTS--Cytokeratin 10 positive cells were greatly increased in number in acetowhite biopsy specimens compared with non-acetowhite samples (45.1% v 2.8%; p < 0.0001). Cytokeratin 19 was also increased, but to a lesser extent (17.8% v 5.5%; p < 0.0001). In contrast, the almost universal expression of cytokeratin 13 was reduced in acetowhite biopsy specimens (86.2% v 96.9%; p < 0.0001). Cytokeratin 14 was found diffusely in the basal region of the stratified squamous epithelium and was marginally more apparent in the acetowhite biopsy specimens (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION--It is suggested that the presence of cytokeratin 10 may be an essential requirement for the formation of acetowhite change in association with the cellular swelling caused by acetic acid. Images PMID:7510721

  17. Keratinization of the esophageal epithelium of domesticated mammals.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Wilfried; Schoennagel, Britta; Kacza, Johannes; Busche, Roger; Hornickel, Isabelle Nina; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Schnapper, Anke

    2014-01-01

    We studied the esophageal epithelium for keratinization characteristics from samples of domesticated mammals of three nutrition groups (herbivores: horse, cattle, sheep; omnivores: pig, dog, rat; carnivores: cat) using histochemistry (keratins, disulfides), sulfur measurements, and cryo-SEM. Keratins were found in all esophageal layers of all species, except for the equine Stratum corneum. The positive reaction staining of Pan-keratin was remarkable, but decreased in intensity toward the outer layers, whereas in the pig and cat, staining was confined to the corneal layer. The herbivores revealed positive staining reactions in the upper Stratum spinosum, particularly in the sheep. Regarding single keratins, CK6 immunostating was found in most esophageal layers, but only weakly or negatively in the porcine and equine Stratum corneum. CK13 staining was restricted to the sheep and here was found in all layers. CK14 could be detected in the equine and feline Stratum basale, and upper vital layers of the dog and rat. CK17 appeared only in the Stratum spinosum and Stratum granulosum, but in all layers of the dog and cat. Disulfides reacted strongest in the Stratum corneum of the herbivores, as corroborated by the sulfur concentrations in the esophagus. Our study emphasized that keratins are very important for the mechanical stability of the epithelial cells and cell layers of the mammalian esophagus. The role of these keratins in the esophageal epithelia is of specific interest owing to the varying feed qualities and mechanical loads of different nutrition groups, which have to be countered. PMID:23948668

  18. Morphological integrity of the bronchial epithelium in mild asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Lozewicz, S; Wells, C; Gomez, E; Ferguson, H; Richman, P; Devalia, J; Davies, R J

    1990-01-01

    In severe asthma bronchial epithelial cells are damaged and detached, and it has been proposed that such damage might lead to the bronchial hyperresponsiveness that characterises asthma. To investigate the relation between airway hyperresponsiveness and epithelial damage, biopsy specimens of the bronchial mucus membrane were obtained at fibreoptic bronchoscopy from 11 patients with mild atopic asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness (provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) less than 1.0 mg/ml), and from 17 healthy non-atopic subjects who did not have airway hyperresponsiveness (PC20 methacholine greater than 8.0 mg/ml). Observers who were blind to the presence or absence of asthma examined the biopsy specimens by light and electron microscopy. Epithelial cells, intercellular spaces, and goblet cells were counted. Intercellular junctional complexes were examined, and a semiquantitative assessment was made of ciliary loss, non-parallel central ciliary filaments, and vacuoles in ciliated cells. There were no differences between the asthmatic and healthy groups in any of these measurements. These findings indicate that airway hyperresponsiveness may be present when there is no apparent change in the structure of the bronchial epithelium. PMID:2321171

  19. Cellular and shunt conductances of toad bladder epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gordon, L G

    1978-12-29

    Toad urinary bladders were mounted in Ussing-type chambers and volt-age-clamped. At nonzero voltages only, small fluctuations in current, delta I, and therefore in tissue conductance, delta Gt, were detected. These fluctuations were caused by the smooth muscle of the underlying tissue which could be monitored continuously and simultaneously with the current, I. Inhibition of the smooth muscle contraction with verapamil (2 X 10(-5) M) abolished the fluctuations in I and Gt. Amiloride (10(-4) M) had no significant effect on the magnitude of delta Gt, oxytocin increased Gt without affecting delta Gt, and mucosal hypertonicity produced by mannitol increased delta Gt. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that two parallel pathways exist for passive current flow across the toad urinary bladder: one, the cellular pathway, was not affected by smooth muscle activity; the other, the paracellular pathway, was the route whose conductance was altered by the action of the smooth muscle. Thus the relationship between the cellular and shunt conductances of the epithelium of the toad urinary bladder, under a variety of conditions, can be investigated by utilizing the effects of the movement of the smooth muscle. PMID:110941

  20. Electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules into the corneal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jinsong; Li, S. Kevin; Liu, Chia-Yang; Kao, Winston W.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Electrically assisted delivery is noninvasive and has been investigated in a number of ocular drug delivery studies. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility of electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the corneal epithelium, to optimize the iontophoresis and electroporation methods, and to study the mechanisms of corneal iontophoresis for macromolecules. Anodal and cathodal iontophoresis, electroporation and their combinations were the methods examined with mice in vivo. Cyanine 3 (Cy3) glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenease (GAPDH) siRNA and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran of different molecular weights (4 to 70 kDa) were the macromolecules studied. Microscopy and histology after cryostat sectioning were used to analyze and compare the delivery of the macromolecules to the cornea. Iontophoresis was effective in delivering siRNA and dextran up to 70 kDa into the cornea. The electroporation method studied was less effective than that of iontophoresis. Although both iontophoresis and electroporation alone can deliver the macromolecules into the cornea, these methods alone were not as effective as the combination of iontophoresis and electroporation (iontophoresis followed by electroporation). The significant enhancement of dextran delivery in anodal iontophoresis suggests that electroosmosis can be a significant flux enhancing mechanism during corneal iontophoresis. These results illustrate the feasibility of electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules such as siRNA into the cornea. PMID:19682448

  1. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Restores Retinal Pigment Epithelium Function in Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Danielle; Liu, Yueying; Crosson, Craig E; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    In diabetic individuals, macular edema is a major cause of vision loss. This condition is refractory to insulin therapy and has been attributed to metabolic memory. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is central to maintaining fluid balance in the retina, and this function is compromised by the activation of advanced glycation end-product receptors (RAGE). Here we provide evidence that acute administration of the RAGE agonist, glycated-albumin (gAlb) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in RPE cells. The administration of the class I/II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin-A (TSA), suppressed gAlb-induced reductions in RPE transepithelial resistance (in vitro) and fluid transport (in vivo). Systemic TSA also restored normal RPE fluid transport in rats with subchronic hyperglycemia. Both gAlb and VEGF increased HDAC activity and reduced acetyl-α-tubulin levels. Tubastatin-A, a relatively specific antagonist of HDAC6, inhibited gAlb-induced changes in RPE cell resistance. These data are consistent with the idea that RPE dysfunction following exposure to gAlb, VEGF, or hyperglycemia is associated with increased HDAC6 activity and decreased acetyl-α-tubulin. Therefore, we propose inhibiting HDAC6 in the RPE as a potential therapy for preserving normal fluid homeostasis in the hyperglycemic retina. PMID:27617745

  2. Effect of ammonium on bacterial adherence to bladder transitional epithelium.

    PubMed

    Parsons, C L; Stauffer, C; Mulholland, S G; Griffith, D P

    1984-08-01

    The virulence of urease-producing bacteria depends on the ability of urease to degrade urea into ammonia and thereby to alkalinize the urine. Infections caused by urease-producing organisms such as Proteus mirabilis are particularly difficult to manage clinically. We have shown that the layer of glycosaminoglycans at the bladder surface protects against infection by blocking the adherence of bacteria to the epithelium. To determine whether urease-producing urinary pathogens owe their virulence in part to an ability to inactivate the protective effect of the glycosaminoglycan layer, we tested the ability of ammonium chloride to alter bacterial adherence to the normal vesical mucosa. We used an in vivo adherence assay that we have described previously in rabbits. Control animals received sodium chloride adjusted to the same pH as the ammonium chloride. We found that 0.25 M ammonium chloride significantly increases bacterial adherence to normal vesical mucosa as compared to adherence in controls receiving 0.25 M sodium chloride (p less than 0.05). These data suggest that urease plays a hitherto undescribed role in bacterial virulence by altering the antiadherence activity of the glycosaminoglycan layer present at the transitional cell surface. PMID:6376829

  3. Identification of transcripts overexpressed during airway epithelium differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chhin, B; Pham, J T; El Zein, L; Kaiser, K; Merrot, O; Bouvagnet, P

    2008-07-01

    Human airway epithelium, the defence at the forefront of protecting the respiratory tract, evacuates inhaled particles by a permanent beating of epithelial cell cilia. When deficient, this organelle causes primary ciliary dyskinesia, and, despite numerous studies, data regarding ciliated cell gene expression remain incomplete. The aim of the present study was to identify genes specifically expressed in human ciliated respiratory cells via transcriptional analysis. The transcriptome of dedifferentiated epithelial cells was subtracted from that of fully redifferentiated cells using complementary DNA representational difference analysis. In order to validate the results, gene overexpression in ciliated cells was confirmed by real-time PCR, and by comparing the present list of genes overexpressed in ciliated cells to lists obtained in previous studies. A total of 53 known and 12 unknown genes overexpressed in ciliated cells were identified. The majority (66%) of known genes had never previously been reported as being involved in ciliogenesis, and the unknown genes represent hypothetical novel transcript isoforms or new genes not yet reported in databases. Finally, several genes identified here were located in genomic regions involved in primary ciliary dyskinesia by linkage analysis. In conclusion, the present study revealed sequences of new cilia-related genes, new transcript isoforms and novel genes which should be further characterised to aid understanding of their function(s) and their probable disorder-related involvement. PMID:18321927

  4. Molecular mechanism of ocular surface damage: Application to an in vitro dry eye model on human corneal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    De Servi, Barbara; Marasco, Daniela; Del Prete, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The present study was concerned with the development of a new experimental model of dry eye using human reconstructed in vitro corneal epithelium (HCE). The model is based on the use of adapted culture conditions that induce relevant modifications at the cellular and molecular level thus mimicking dry eye. Methods The HCE model was maintained in a controlled environmental setting (relative humidity <40% and 40 °C temperature) for 24 h and up to 72 h to induce dry eye. The evolution of the dry eye condition was assessed by histology, immunohistochemistry staining, scanning electron microscopy, and gene expression by using TaqMan gene assay technology (mucin-4 [MUC4], matrix metallopeptidase-9 [MMP9], tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], and defensin β-2 [DEFB2). The effects of different commercially available tear substitutes on the induced dry eye condition were tested. Results This in vitro dry eye HCE model, that was well established within 24 h, has the characteristic features of a dry eye epithelium and could be satisfactorily used for preliminary assessment of the protective activity of some artificial tears. The transcriptional study of selected biomarkers showed an increase in MUC4, MMP9, TNF-α, and hBD-2 (DEFB2) gene expression. Conclusions By using a dynamic approach, we were able to define a biomarker gene signature of dry eye-induced effects that could be predictive of corneal damage in vivo and to discriminate the efficacy among different commercial artificial tears. PMID:21245952

  5. Effects of female sex hormones on adhesion of Candida albicans yeast-like fungi to the buccal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, E G; Anokhina, I V; Rybas, Ya A; Sachivkina, N P; Ermolaev, A V; Brodskaya, S B

    2014-06-01

    Hormonal regulation of receptor expression and glycogen concentrations in the epithelial cells of the oral cavity remains poorly studied. Adhesion of microorganisms to the vaginal epithelium correlates with their adhesion to the buccal epithelium. Analysis of the correlation between Candida adhesion to the vaginal and buccal epithelium depending on the hormonal status has demonstrated that activity of Candida albicans strains in the buccal epithelium correlates with their adhesion activity in the vaginal epithelium, with the coefficient of correlations (r) reaching 0.76. PMID:24958376

  6. Enzymatic modification of schizophyllan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An enzymatic method was developed for the progressive modification of the polysaccharide schizophyllan. Fungal strains Hypocrea nigricans NRRL 62555, Penicillium crustosum NRRL 62558, and Penicillium simplicissimum NRRL 62550 were previously identified as novel sources of ß-endoglucanase with specif...

  7. Study Faults Behavior Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reports on the analysis of 27 behavior modification programs for delinquents. Findings reveal that a low percentage of the programs have followup mechanisms and that the behavior which is modified is often not that which caused the problem. (CP)

  8. Modified Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vockell, Edward

    1982-01-01

    Argues that major behavior modification techniques can be easily and usefully integrated into a classroom management strategy. Focuses on the need for teachers to consider the internal perceptions of students when employing the techniques. (FL)

  9. Histone Modifications and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Audia, James E; Campbell, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYHistone posttranslational modifications represent a versatile set of epigenetic marks involved not only in dynamic cellular processes, such as transcription and DNA repair, but also in the stable maintenance of repressive chromatin. In this article, we review many of the key and newly identified histone modifications known to be deregulated in cancer and how this impacts function. The latter part of the article addresses the challenges and current status of the epigenetic drug development process as it applies to cancer therapeutics. PMID:27037415

  10. Thyroid hormone responsive protein Spot14 enhances catalysis of fatty acid synthase in lactating mammary epithelium[S

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Michael C.; Wellberg, Elizabeth A.; Lewis, Andrew S.; Terrell, Kristina L.; Merz, Andrea L.; Maluf, N. Karl; Serkova, Natalie J.; Anderson, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone responsive protein Spot 14 has been consistently associated with de novo fatty acid synthesis activity in multiple tissues, including the lactating mammary gland, which synthesizes large quantities of medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) exclusively via FASN. However, the molecular function of Spot14 remains undefined during lactation. Spot14-null mice produce milk deficient in total triglyceride and de novo MCFA that does not sustain optimal neonatal growth. The lactation defect was rescued by provision of a high fat diet to the lactating dam. Transgenic mice overexpressing Spot14 in mammary epithelium produced total milk fat equivalent to controls, but with significantly greater MCFA. Spot14-null dams have no diminution of metabolic gene expression, enzyme protein levels, or intermediate metabolites that accounts for impaired de novo MCFA. When [13C] fatty acid products were quantified in vitro using crude cytosolic lysates, native FASN activity was 1.6-fold greater in control relative to Spot14-null lysates, and add back of Spot14 partially restored activity. Recombinant FASN catalysis increased 1.4-fold and C = 14:0 yield was enhanced 4-fold in vitro following addition of Spot14. These findings implicate Spot14 as a direct protein enhancer of FASN catalysis in the mammary gland during lactation when maximal MCFA production is needed. PMID:24771867

  11. Nose-to-Brain Delivery: Investigation of the Transport of Nanoparticles with Different Surface Characteristics and Sizes in Excised Porcine Olfactory Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Alpesh; Stolnik, Snjezana; Illum, Lisbeth

    2015-08-01

    The ability to deliver therapeutically relevant amounts of drugs directly from the nasal cavity to the central nervous system to treat neurological diseases is dependent on the availability of efficient drug delivery systems. Increased delivery and/or therapeutic effect has been shown for drugs encapsulated in nanoparticles; however, the factors governing the transport of the drugs and/or the nanoparticles from the nasal cavity to the brain are not clear. The present study evaluates the potential transport of nanoparticles across the olfactory epithelium in relation to nanoparticle characteristics. Model systems, 20, 100, and 200 nm fluorescent carboxylated polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles that were nonmodified or surface modified with polysorbate 80 (P80-PS) or chitosan (C-PS), were assessed for transport across excised porcine olfactory epithelium mounted in a vertical Franz diffusion cell. Assessment of the nanoparticle content in the donor chamber of the diffusion cell, accompanied by fluorescence microscopy of dismounted tissues, revealed a loss of nanoparticle content from the donor suspension and their association with the excised tissue, depending on the surface properties and particle size. Chitosan surface modification of PS nanoparticles resulted in the highest tissue association among the tested systems, with the associated nanoparticles primarily located in the mucus, whereas the polysorbate 80-modified nanoparticles showed some penetration into the epithelial cell layer. Assessment of the bioelectrical properties, metabolic activity, and histology of the excised olfactory epithelium showed that C-PS nanoparticles applied in pH 6.0 buffer produced a damaging effect on the epithelial cell layer in a size-dependent manner, with fine 20 nm sized nanoparticles causing substantial tissue damage relative to that with the 100 and 200 nm counterparts. Although histology showed that the olfactory tissue was affected by the application of citrate buffer that was

  12. Human Rights and Behavior Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roos, Philip

    1974-01-01

    Criticisms of behavior modification, which charge that it violates ethical and legal principles, are discussed and reasons are presented to explain behavior modification's susceptibility to attack. (GW)

  13. A morphological study of the tracheal epithelium of the snake Natrix maura.

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, L M

    1990-01-01

    The epithelium of the trachea of the Natrix maura snake was studied by conventional light microscopy and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The epithelium is formed of basal, ciliated, endocrine and secretory cells. It shows different thickness and distribution of the cells, depending on the area (covering the cartilaginous or the membranous zone). Secretory cells show a morphology similar to that found in lizards but it is different from the mucous cells reported in the extrapulmonary airways of turtles, birds and mammals. The ultrastructure of the secretory cells is similar to that reported for serous cells in the airways of mammals. Intra-epithelial plasma cells are also found within the epithelium. The present results show that there are marked morphological differences between the tracheal epithelium of lizards and snakes and that of turtles, birds and mammals. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:2272908

  14. MORPHOMETRIC ASPECTS OF CILIARY DISTRIBUTION AND CILIOGENESIS IN HUMAN NASAL EPITHELIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Observations of freeze-fracture preparations of human nasal epithelium have provided a unique perspective of the spatial distribution of epithelial cell cilia unattainable by more conventional ultrastructural techniques. The initial stages of ciliogenesis were characterized ultra...

  15. The ureteric bud epithelium: Morphogenesis and roles in metanephric kidney patterning

    PubMed Central

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K.; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian metanephric kidney is composed of two epithelial components –the collecting duct system and the nephron epithelium– that differentiate from two different tissues –the ureteric bud epithelium and the nephron progenitors, respectively– of intermediate mesoderm origin. The collecting duct system is generated through reiterative ureteric bud branching morphogenesis whereas the nephron epithelium is formed in a process termed nephrogenesis, which is initiated with the mesenchymal-epithelial transition of the nephron progenitors. Ureteric bud branching morphogenesis is regulated by nephron progenitors, and in return the ureteric bud epithelium regulates nephrogenesis. The metanephric kidney is also physiologically divided along the cortico-medullary axis into subcompartments that are enriched with specific segments of these two epithelial structures. Here we provide an overview of the major molecular and cellular processes underlying the morphogenesis and patterning of the ureteric bud epithelium and its roles in the cortical-medullary patterning of the metanephric kidney. PMID:25783232

  16. Homeostatic capabilities of the choroid plexus epithelium in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Conrad; McMillan, Paul; Tavares, Rosemarie; Spangenberger, Anthony; Duncan, John; Silverberg, Gerald; Stopa, Edward

    2004-01-01

    As the secretory source of vitamins, peptides and hormones for neurons, the choroid plexus (CP) epithelium critically provides substances for brain homeostasis. This distributive process of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume transmission reaches many cellular targets in the CNS. In ageing and ageing-related dementias, the CP-CSF system is less able to regulate brain interstitial fluid. CP primarily generates CSF bulk flow, and so its malfunctioning exacerbates Alzheimers disease (AD). Considerable attention has been devoted to the blood-brain barrier in AD, but more insight is needed on regulatory systems at the human blood-CSF barrier in order to improve epithelial function in severe disease. Using autopsied CP specimens from AD patients, we immunocytochemically examined expression of heat shock proteins (HSP90 and GRP94), fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFr) and a fluid-regulatory protein (NaK2Cl cotransporter isoform 1 or NKCC1). CP upregulated HSP90, FGFr and NKCC1, even in end-stage AD. These CP adjustments involve growth factors and neuropeptides that help to buffer perturbations in CNS water balance and metabolism. They shed light on CP-CSF system responses to ventriculomegaly and the altered intracranial pressure that occurs in AD and normal pressure hydrocephalus. The ability of injured CP to express key regulatory proteins even at Braak stage V/VI, points to plasticity and function that may be boosted by drug treatment to expedite CSF dynamics. The enhanced expression of human CP 'homeostatic proteins' in AD dementia is discussed in relation to brain deficits and pharmacology. PMID:15679944

  17. Human milk hyaluronan enhances innate defense of the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hill, David R; Rho, Hyunjin K; Kessler, Sean P; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K; de la Motte, Carol A

    2013-10-01

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn. PMID:23950179

  18. Transcriptome analysis and molecular signature of human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Strunnikova, N.V.; Maminishkis, A.; Barb, J.J.; Wang, F.; Zhi, C.; Sergeev, Y.; Chen, W.; Edwards, A.O.; Stambolian, D.; Abecasis, G.; Swaroop, A.; Munson, P.J.; Miller, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a polarized cell layer critical for photoreceptor function and survival. The unique physiology and relationship to the photoreceptors make the RPE a critical determinant of human vision. Therefore, we performed a global expression profiling of native and cultured human fetal and adult RPE and determined a set of highly expressed ‘signature’ genes by comparing the observed RPE gene profiles to the Novartis expression database (SymAtlas: http://wombat.gnf.org/index.html) of 78 tissues. Using stringent selection criteria of at least 10-fold higher expression in three distinct preparations, we identified 154 RPE signature genes, which were validated by qRT-PCR analysis in RPE and in an independent set of 11 tissues. Several of the highly expressed signature genes encode proteins involved in visual cycle, melanogenesis and cell adhesion and Gene ontology analysis enabled the assignment of RPE signature genes to epithelial channels and transporters (ClCN4, BEST1, SLCA20) or matrix remodeling (TIMP3, COL8A2). Fifteen RPE signature genes were associated with known ophthalmic diseases, and 25 others were mapped to regions of disease loci. An evaluation of the RPE signature genes in a recently completed AMD genomewide association (GWA) data set revealed that TIMP3, GRAMD3, PITPNA and CHRNA3 signature genes may have potential roles in AMD pathogenesis and deserve further examination. We propose that RPE signature genes are excellent candidates for retinal diseases and for physiological investigations (e.g. dopachrome tautomerase in melanogenesis). The RPE signature gene set should allow the validation of RPE-like cells derived from human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells for cell-based therapies of degenerative retinal diseases. PMID:20360305

  19. Transcriptional regionalization of the fruit fly's airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Muhammad N; Hoffmann, Julia; El-Kholy, Samar; Kallsen, Kimberley; Wagner, Christina; Bruchhaus, Iris; Fink, Christine; Roeder, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Although airway epithelia are primarily devoted to gas exchange, they have to fulfil a number of different tasks including organ maintenance and the epithelial immune response to fight airborne pathogens. These different tasks are at least partially accomplished by specialized cell types in the epithelium. In addition, a proximal to distal gradient mirroring the transition from airflow conduction to real gas exchange, is also operative. We analysed the airway system of larval Drosophila melanogaster with respect to region-specific expression in the proximal to distal axis. The larval airway system is made of epithelial cells only. We found differential expression between major trunks of the airways and more distal ones comprising primary, secondary and terminal ones. A more detailed analysis was performed using DNA-microarray analysis to identify cohorts of genes that are either predominantly expressed in the dorsal trunks or in the primary/secondary/terminal branches of the airways. Among these differentially expressed genes are especially those involved in signal transduction. Wnt-signalling associated genes for example are predominantly found in secondary/terminal airways. In addition, some G-protein coupled receptors are differentially expressed between both regions of the airways, exemplified by those activated by octopamine or tyramine, the invertebrate counterparts of epinephrine and norepinephrine. Whereas the OAMB is predominantly found in terminal airway regions, the oct3βR has higher expression levels in dorsal trunks. In addition, we observed a significant association of both, genes predominantly expressed in dorsal trunks or in primary to terminal branches branches with those regulated by hypoxia. Taken together, this observed differential expression is indicative for a proximal to distal transcriptional regionalization presumably reflecting functional differences in these parts of the fly's airway system. PMID:25020150

  20. Protective responses to sublytic complement in the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li Xuan; Toops, Kimberly A; Lakkaraju, Aparna

    2016-08-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key site of injury in inherited and age-related macular degenerations. Abnormal activation of the complement system is a feature of these blinding diseases, yet how the RPE combats complement attack is poorly understood. The complement cascade terminates in the cell-surface assembly of membrane attack complexes (MACs), which promote inflammation by causing aberrant signal transduction. Here, we investigated mechanisms crucial for limiting MAC assembly and preserving cellular integrity in the RPE and asked how these are compromised in models of macular degeneration. Using polarized primary RPE and the pigmented Abca4(-/-) Stargardt disease mouse model, we provide evidence for two protective responses occurring within minutes of complement attack, which are essential for maintaining mitochondrial health in the RPE. First, accelerated recycling of the membrane-bound complement regulator CD59 to the RPE cell surface inhibits MAC formation. Second, fusion of lysosomes with the RPE plasma membrane immediately after complement attack limits sustained elevations in intracellular calcium and prevents mitochondrial injury. Cholesterol accumulation in the RPE, induced by vitamin A dimers or oxidized LDL, inhibits these defense mechanisms by activating acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), which increases tubulin acetylation and derails organelle traffic. Defective CD59 recycling and lysosome exocytosis after complement attack lead to mitochondrial fragmentation and oxidative stress in the RPE. Drugs that stimulate cholesterol efflux or inhibit ASMase restore both these critical safeguards in the RPE and avert complement-induced mitochondrial injury in vitro and in Abca4(-/-) mice, indicating that they could be effective therapeutic approaches for macular degenerations. PMID:27432952

  1. Optical modulation of transgene expression in retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Lavinsky, D.; Chalberg, T.; Mandel, Y.; Huie, P.; Dalal, R.; Marmor, M.

    2013-03-01

    Over a million people in US alone are visually impaired due to the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The current treatment is monthly intravitreal injections of a protein which inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, thereby slowing progression of the disease. The immense financial and logistical burden of millions of intravitreal injections signifies an urgent need to develop more long-lasting and cost-effective treatments for this and other retinal diseases. Viral transfection of ocular cells allows creation of a "biofactory" that secretes therapeutic proteins. This technique has been proven successful in non-human primates, and is now being evaluated in clinical trials for wet AMD. However, there is a critical need to down-regulate gene expression in the case of total resolution of retinal condition, or if patient has adverse reaction to the trans-gene products. The site for genetic therapy of AMD and many other retinal diseases is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We developed and tested in pigmented rabbits, an optical method to down-regulate transgene expression in RPE following vector delivery, without retinal damage. Microsecond exposures produced by a rapidly scanning laser vaporize melanosomes and destroy a predetermined fraction of the RPE cells selectively. RPE continuity is restored within days by migration and proliferation of adjacent RPE, but since the transgene is not integrated into the nucleus it is not replicated. Thus, the decrease in transgene expression can be precisely determined by the laser pattern density and further reduced by repeated treatment without affecting retinal structure and function.

  2. Cigarette Smoke Delays Regeneration of the Olfactory Epithelium in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ueha, Rumi; Ueha, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Takashi; Kanaya, Kaori; Suzukawa, Keigo; Nishijima, Hironobu; Kikuta, Shu; Kondo, Kenji; Matsushima, Kouji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-08-01

    The olfactory system is a unique part of the mammalian nervous system due to its capacity for neurogenesis and the replacement of degenerating receptor neurons. Cigarette smoking is a major cause of olfactory dysfunction. However, the mechanisms by which cigarette smoke impairs the regenerative olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) remain unclear. Here, we investigated the influence of cigarette smoke on ORN regeneration following methimazole-induced ORN injury. Administration of methimazole caused detachment of the olfactory epithelium from the basement membrane and induced olfactory dysfunction, thus enabling us to analyze the process of ORN regeneration. We found that intranasal administration of cigarette smoke solution (CSS) suppressed the recovery of ORNs and olfaction following ORN injury. Defective ORN recovery in CSS-treated mice was not associated with any change in the number of SOX2(+) ORN progenitor cells in the basal layer of the OE, but was associated with impaired recovery of GAP43(+) immature ORNs. In the nasal mucosa, mRNA expression levels of neurotrophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3, neurotrophin-5, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were increased following OE injury, whereas CSS administration decreased the ORN injury-induced IGF-1 expression. Administration of recombinant human IGF-1 prevented the CSS-induced suppression of ORN recovery following injury. These results suggest that CSS impairs regeneration of ORNs by suppressing the development of immature ORNs from ORN progenitors, at least partly by reducing IGF-1 in the nasal mucosa. PMID:27003941

  3. Transcriptional Regionalization of the Fruit Fly’s Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Muhammad N.; Hoffmann, Julia; El-Kholy, Samar; Kallsen, Kimberley; Wagner, Christina; Bruchhaus, Iris; Fink, Christine; Roeder, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Although airway epithelia are primarily devoted to gas exchange, they have to fulfil a number of different tasks including organ maintenance and the epithelial immune response to fight airborne pathogens. These different tasks are at least partially accomplished by specialized cell types in the epithelium. In addition, a proximal to distal gradient mirroring the transition from airflow conduction to real gas exchange, is also operative. We analysed the airway system of larval Drosophila melanogaster with respect to region-specific expression in the proximal to distal axis. The larval airway system is made of epithelial cells only. We found differential expression between major trunks of the airways and more distal ones comprising primary, secondary and terminal ones. A more detailed analysis was performed using DNA-microarray analysis to identify cohorts of genes that are either predominantly expressed in the dorsal trunks or in the primary/secondary/terminal branches of the airways. Among these differentially expressed genes are especially those involved in signal transduction. Wnt-signalling associated genes for example are predominantly found in secondary/terminal airways. In addition, some G-protein coupled receptors are differentially expressed between both regions of the airways, exemplified by those activated by octopamine or tyramine, the invertebrate counterparts of epinephrine and norepinephrine. Whereas the OAMB is predominantly found in terminal airway regions, the oct3βR has higher expression levels in dorsal trunks. In addition, we observed a significant association of both, genes predominantly expressed in dorsal trunks or in primary to terminal branches branches with those regulated by hypoxia. Taken together, this observed differential expression is indicative for a proximal to distal transcriptional regionalization presumably reflecting functional differences in these parts of the fly’s airway system. PMID:25020150

  4. Mechanisms of neuronal chloride accumulation in intact mouse olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, William T; Kleene, Nancy K; Kleene, Steven J

    2007-01-01

    When olfactory receptor neurons respond to odours, a depolarizing Cl− efflux is a substantial part of the response. This requires that the resting neuron accumulate Cl− against an electrochemical gradient. In isolated olfactory receptor neurons, the Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter NKCC1 is essential for Cl− accumulation. However, in intact epithelium, a robust electrical olfactory response persists in mice lacking NKCC1. This response is largely due to a neuronal Cl− efflux. It thus appears that NKCC1 is an important part of a more complex system of Cl− accumulation. To identify the remaining transport proteins, we first screened by RT-PCR for 21 Cl− transporters in mouse nasal tissue containing olfactory mucosa. For most of the Cl− transporters, the presence of mRNA was demonstrated. We also investigated the effects of pharmacological block or genetic ablation of Cl− transporters on the olfactory field potential, the electroolfactogram (EOG). Mice lacking the common Cl−/HCO3− exchanger AE2 had normal EOGs. Block of NKCC cotransport with bumetanide reduced the EOG in epithelia from wild-type mice but had no effect in mice lacking NKCC1. Hydrochlorothiazide, a blocker of the Na+–Cl− cotransporter, had only a small effect. DIDS, a blocker of some KCC cotransporters and Cl−/HCO3− exchangers, reduced the EOG in epithelia from both wild-type and NKCC1 knockout mice. A combination of bumetanide and DIDS decreased the response more than either drug alone. However, no combination of drugs completely abolished the Cl− component of the response. These results support the involvement of both NKCC1 and one or more DIDS-sensitive transporters in Cl− accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:17656441

  5. Mechanisms of neuronal chloride accumulation in intact mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Nickell, William T; Kleene, Nancy K; Kleene, Steven J

    2007-09-15

    When olfactory receptor neurons respond to odours, a depolarizing Cl(-) efflux is a substantial part of the response. This requires that the resting neuron accumulate Cl(-) against an electrochemical gradient. In isolated olfactory receptor neurons, the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC1 is essential for Cl(-) accumulation. However, in intact epithelium, a robust electrical olfactory response persists in mice lacking NKCC1. This response is largely due to a neuronal Cl(-) efflux. It thus appears that NKCC1 is an important part of a more complex system of Cl(-) accumulation. To identify the remaining transport proteins, we first screened by RT-PCR for 21 Cl(-) transporters in mouse nasal tissue containing olfactory mucosa. For most of the Cl(-) transporters, the presence of mRNA was demonstrated. We also investigated the effects of pharmacological block or genetic ablation of Cl(-) transporters on the olfactory field potential, the electroolfactogram (EOG). Mice lacking the common Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger AE2 had normal EOGs. Block of NKCC cotransport with bumetanide reduced the EOG in epithelia from wild-type mice but had no effect in mice lacking NKCC1. Hydrochlorothiazide, a blocker of the Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter, had only a small effect. DIDS, a blocker of some KCC cotransporters and Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchangers, reduced the EOG in epithelia from both wild-type and NKCC1 knockout mice. A combination of bumetanide and DIDS decreased the response more than either drug alone. However, no combination of drugs completely abolished the Cl(-) component of the response. These results support the involvement of both NKCC1 and one or more DIDS-sensitive transporters in Cl(-) accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:17656441

  6. Human Milk Hyaluronan Enhances Innate Defense of the Intestinal Epithelium*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David R.; Rho, Hyunjin K.; Kessler, Sean P.; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R.; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K.; de la Motte, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn. PMID:23950179

  7. [Lamellar Inclusion Bodies in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium of Diurnal Rodents].

    PubMed

    Samosudova, N V; Orlov, O U; Golyshev, S A

    2015-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the retinal pigment epithelium of a diurnal rodent (Brandt's vole) was described taking into account 1) the functions of the pigment epithelium as a participant in the renewal of photoreceptor outer segment and. 2) digestion of outer segment membranes into phagosomes of the retinal pigment epithelium. The myeloid bodies were observed after exposure of the pigment epithelium to light (200 lux, 4 hours) and darkness (0,1 lux, 1,5-hour). In the cytoplasm of the pigment epithelium of the vole no myeloid bodies were observed. Instead of it small lamellar bodies, which have the spiral form and size (from - 200 to 400 nm) were found. The structure of these lamellar bodies was described. Furthermore, the structures, which were presumably responsible for the transport of the digested material, were revealed. The evidence of it is the presence of 1) dense precipitate in the apical domain of the pigment epithelium and 2) microtubules which participate in transport of this precipitate. PMID:26591606

  8. Squamous Metaplasia Is Increased in the Bronchial Epithelium of Smokers with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rigden, Helen M.; Alias, Ahmad; Havelock, Thomas; O'Donnell, Rory; Djukanovic, Ratko; Davies, Donna E.; Wilson, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To quantify the extent of squamous metaplasia in bronchial biopsies and relate it to the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a smoking-related pathology. Methods Bronchial biopsies (n = 15 in each group) from smokers with COPD GOLD stage1 and GOLD stage2, smokers without COPD and healthy non-smokers were stained immunohistochemically with a panel of antibodies that facilitated the identification of pseudostratified epithelium and distinction of squamous metaplasia and squamous epithelium from tangentially cut epithelium. The percentage length of each of these epithelial phenotypes was measured as a percent of total epithelial length using computerised image analysis. Sections were also stained for carcinoembryonic antigen and p53, early markers of carcinogenesis, and Ki67, and the percentage epithelial expression measured. Results The extent of squamous metaplasia was significantly increased in both COPD1 and COPD2 compared to healthy smokers and healthy non-smokers. The amount of fully differentiated squamous epithelium was also increased in COPD1 and COPD2 compared to healthy non-smokers, as was the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen. These features correlated with one other. Conclusion In subjects with COPD there is a loss of pseudostratified epithelium accompanied by an increase in squamous metaplasia with transition into a fully squamous epithelium and expression of early markers of carcinogenesis. PMID:27228128

  9. Cultivated Oral Mucosa Epithelium in Ocular Surface Reconstruction in Aniridia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Orzechowska-Wylegala, Boguslawa; Wowra, Bogumil; Wroblewska-Czajka, Ewa; Grolik, Maria; Szczubialka, Krzysztof; Nowakowska, Maria; Puzzolo, Domenico; Wylegala, Edward A.; Micali, Antonio; Aragona, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Efficacy of cultivated oral mucosa epithelial transplantation (COMET) procedure in corneal epithelium restoration of aniridia patients. Methods. Study subjects were aniridia patients (13 patients; 17 eyes) with irregular, vascular conjunctival pannus involving visual axis who underwent autologous transplantation of cultivated epithelium. For the procedure oral mucosa epithelial cells were obtained from buccal mucosa with further enzymatic treatment. Suspension of single cells was seeded on previously prepared denuded amniotic membrane. Cultures were carried on culture dishes inserts in the presence of the inactivated with Mitomycin C monolayer of 3T3 fibroblasts. Cultures were carried for seven days. Stratified oral mucosa epithelium with its amniotic membrane carrier was transplanted on the surgically denuded corneal surface of aniridia patients with total or subtotal limbal stem cell deficiency. Outcome Measures. Corneal surface, epithelial regularity, and visual acuity improvement were evaluated. Results. At the end of the observation period, 76.4% of the eyes had regular transparent epithelium and 23.5% had developed epithelial defects or central corneal haze; in 88.2% of cases visual acuity had increased. VA range was from HM 0.05 before the surgery to HM up to 0.1 after surgery. Conclusion. Application of cultivated oral mucosa epithelium restores regular epithelium on the corneal surface with moderate improvement in quality of vision. PMID:26451366

  10. Modifications of gravity.

    PubMed

    Skordis, Constantinos

    2011-12-28

    General relativity (GR) is a phenomenologically successful theory that rests on firm foundations, but has not been tested on cosmological scales. The deep mystery of dark energy (and possibly even the requirement of cold dark matter (CDM)) has increased the need for testing modifications to GR, as the inference of such otherwise undetected fluids depends crucially on the theory of gravity. Here, I discuss a general scheme for constructing consistent and covariant modifications to the Einstein equations. This framework is such that there is a clear connection between the modification and the underlying field content that produces it. I argue that this is mandatory for distinguishing modifications of gravity from conventional fluids. I give a non-trivial example, a simple metric-based modification of the fluctuation equations for which the background is exact ΛCDM, but differs from it in the perturbations. I show how this can be generalized and solved in terms of two arbitrary functions. Finally, I discuss future prospects and directions of research. PMID:22084286

  11. Readers of PCNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Helle D; Takahashi, Tomio

    2013-08-01

    The eukaryotic sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), acts as a central coordinator of DNA transactions by providing a multivalent interaction surface for factors involved in DNA replication, repair, chromatin dynamics and cell cycle regulation. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs), such as mono- and polyubiquitylation, sumoylation, phosphorylation and acetylation, further expand the repertoire of PCNA's binding partners. These modifications affect PCNA's activity in the bypass of lesions during DNA replication, the regulation of alternative damage processing pathways such as homologous recombination and DNA interstrand cross-link repair, or impact on the stability of PCNA itself. In this review, we summarise our current knowledge about how the PTMs are "read" by downstream effector proteins that mediate the appropriate action. Given the variety of interaction partners responding to PCNA's modified forms, the ensemble of PCNA modifications serves as an instructive model for the study of biological signalling through PTMs in general. PMID:23580141

  12. Muscarinic cholinergic and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the epithelium and muscularis of the human ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Lepor, H.; Rigaud, G.; Shapiro, E.; Baumann, M.; Kodner, I.J.; Fleshman, J.W. )

    1990-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the binding and functional properties of muscarinic cholinergic (MCh) and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the human ileum to provide insight into pharmacologic strategies for managing urinary and fecal incontinence after bladder and rectal replacement with intestinal segments. MCh and alpha 2-adrenergic binding sites were characterized in the epithelium and muscularis of eight human ileal segments with 3H-N-methylscopolamine and 3H-rauwolscine, respectively. The dissociation constant for 3H-N-methylscopolamine in the epithelium and muscularis was 0.32 +/- 0.07 nmol/L and 0.45 +/- 0.10 nmol/L, respectively (p = 0.32). The MCh receptor content was approximately eightfold greater in the muscularis compared with the epithelium (p = 0.008). The dissociation constant for 3H-rauwolscine in the muscularis and epithelium was 2.55 +/- 0.42 nmol/L and 2.03 +/- 0.19 nmol/L, respectively (p = 0.29). The alpha 2-adrenoceptor density was twofold greater in the epithelium compared with the muscularis (p = 0.05). Noncumulative concentration-response experiments were performed with carbachol, an MCh agonist, and UK-14304, a selective alpha 2-adrenergic agonist. The epithelium did not contract in the presence of high concentrations of carbachol and UK-14304. The muscularis preparations were responsive only to carbachol. The muscularis contains primarily MCh receptors mediating smooth muscle contraction. The alpha 2-adrenoceptors are localized primarily to the epithelium and may regulate water secretion in the intestine. The distribution and functional properties of ileal MCh and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors provide a theoretic basis for the treatment of incontinence after bladder and rectal replacement with intestinal segments.

  13. Identification of Distinct Layers Within the Stratified Squamous Epithelium of the Adult Human True Vocal Fold

    PubMed Central

    Dowdall, Jayme R.; Sadow, Peter M.; Hartnick, Christopher; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Mou, Hongmei; Zhao, Rui; Song, Phillip C.; Franco, Ramon A.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis A precise molecular schema for classifying the different cell types of the normal human vocal fold epithelium is lacking. We hypothesize that the true vocal fold epithelium has a cellular architecture and organization similar to that of other stratified squamous epithelia including the skin, cornea, oral mucosa, and esophagus. In analogy to disorders of the skin and gastrointestinal tract, a molecular definition of the normal cell types within the human vocal fold epithelium and a description of their geometric relationships should serve as a foundation for characterizing cellular changes associated with metaplasia, dysplasia, and cancer. Study Design Qualitative study with adult human larynges. Methods Histologic sections of normal human laryngeal tissue were analyzed for morphology (hematoxylin and eosin) and immunohistochemical protein expression profile, including cytokeratins (CK13 and CK14), cornified envelope proteins (involucrin), basal cells (NGFR/p75), and proliferation markers (Ki67). Results We demonstrated that three distinct cell strata with unique marker profiles are present within the stratified squamous epithelium of the true vocal fold. We used these definitions to establish that cell proliferation is restricted to certain cell types and layers within the epithelium. These distinct cell types are reproducible across five normal adult larynges. Conclusion We have established that three layers of cells are present within the normal adult stratified squamous epithelium of the true vocal fold. Furthermore, replicating cell populations are largely restricted to the parabasal strata within the epithelium. This delineation of distinct cell populations will facilitate future studies of vocal fold regeneration and cancer. Level of Evidence N/A. PMID:25988619

  14. Personalizing Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Debra G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Process reinforcement is proposed as a reinforcement method that is more comfortable, personal, comprehensive, and interactive than traditional behavior modification. Process reinforcement strengthens desired behaviors by engaging learners in a one-on-one examination of how they achieved correct responses and by practicing comfortable eye contact…

  15. Behavior Modification with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Daniel G.

    1972-01-01

    The author urges wider use of positive reinforcement theories in helping emotionally disturbed and mentally handicapped children. Underlining the influence of environment on behavior, he also notes that behavior modification programs utilize fewer trained personnel more effectively and, like Tennessee's Re-Education Treatment, allow for therapy in…

  16. Instructional Improvement: Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haring, Norris G.; Hayden, Alice H.

    Sixteen papers are provided. B. F. Skinner discusses the arrangement of contingencies for learning: Lloyd Homme describes behavioral engineering; and Frank Hewett considers behavior modification in special education. Also treated are experimental education by Norris Haring, program evaluation by Arthur Lumsdaine, and administration of special…

  17. Defining Behavior Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christoplos, Florence; Valletutti, Peter

    1969-01-01

    Discusses the proposition that: "The educational problem involved in behavior modification, in the evaluationand measurement of learning, is the integration and coordination of three types of information affecting the achievement of specific behavioral goals: (1) information about the child, (2) information about the task, and (3) information…

  18. Toy Modification Note. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderheiden, Gregg C.; And Others

    Described are toy modifications which enable handicapped individuals to operate battery-powered toys. A battery interrupter is explained as a device which fits between the batteries in a toy and provides the ability to have a separate on-off switch which can be custom designed to fit a handicapped user's needs. Construction and use of three types…

  19. Behavior Modification: Education's Watergate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrison, Muriel Paskin

    Several of the theoretical and experimental assumptions relating to behavior modification are examined and criticized: (1) the human mind can only be understood by observing and measuring the functional behavior it causes, (2) performance can be equated with learning, (3) reward systems and token economies improve intrinsic learning, and (4) all…

  20. Expression of semaphorin 3A in the rat corneal epithelium during wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Morishige, Naoyuki; Ko, Ji-Ae; Morita, Yukiko; Nishida, Teruo

    2010-05-14

    The neural guidance protein semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is expressed in corneal epithelial cells of the adult rat. We have now further investigated the localization of Sema3A in the normal rat corneal epithelium as well as changes in its expression pattern during wound healing after central corneal epithelial debridement. The expression pattern of Sema3A was compared with that of the tight-junction protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), the gap-junction protein connexin43 (Cx43), or the cell proliferation marker Ki67. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that Sema3A was present predominantly in the membrane of basal and wing cells of the intact corneal epithelium. The expression of Sema3A at the basal side of basal cells was increased in the peripheral epithelium compared with that in the central region. Sema3A was detected in all layers at the leading edge of the migrating corneal epithelium at 6 h after central epithelial debridement. The expression of Sema3A was markedly up-regulated in the basal and lateral membranes of columnar basal cells apparent in the thickened, newly healed epithelium at 1 day after debridement, but it had largely returned to the normal pattern at 3 days after debridement. The expression of ZO-1 was restricted to superficial epithelial cells and remained mostly unchanged during the wound healing process. The expression of Cx43 in basal cells was down-regulated at the leading edge of the migrating epithelium but was stable in the remaining portion of the epithelium. Ki67 was not detected in basal cells of the central epithelium at 1 day after epithelial debridement, when Sema3A was prominently expressed. Immunoblot analysis showed that the abundance of Sema3A in the central cornea was increased 1 day after epithelial debridement, whereas that of ZO-1 or Cx43 remained largely unchanged. This increase in Sema3A expression was accompanied by up-regulation of the Sema3A coreceptor neuropilin-1. Our observations have thus shown that the expression of

  1. Insulin Restores an Altered Corneal Epithelium Circadian Rhythm in Mice with Streptozotocin-induced Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Song, Fang; Xue, Yunxia; Dong, Dong; Liu, Jun; Fu, Ting; Xiao, Chengju; Wang, Hanqing; Lin, Cuipei; Liu, Peng; Zhong, Jiajun; Yang, Yabing; Wang, Zhaorui; Pan, Hongwei; Chen, Jiansu; Li, Yangqiu; Cai, Dongqing; Li, Zhijie

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of corneal epithelial lesions and delayed wound repair, as well as their association with diabetes mellitus, are critical issues for clinical ophthalmologists. To test whether the diabetic condition alters the circadian rhythm in a mouse cornea and whether insulin can synchronise the corneal clock, we studied the effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the mitosis of epithelial cells, the recruitment of leukocytes to the cornea, and the expression of main core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Rev-erbα) in the corneal epithelium. We also assessed the possible effect of insulin on these modifications. Diabetes downregulated Clock, Bmal1, and Per2 expression, upregulated Cry1 and Rev-erbα expression, reduced corneal epithelial mitosis, and increased leukocyte (neutrophils and γδ T-cells) recruitment to the cornea. Early treatments with insulin partially restored the altered rhythmicity in the diabetic cornea. In conclusion, insulin-dependent diabetes altered the normal rhythmicity of the cornea, and insulin administration had a beneficial effect on restoring normal rhythmicity in the diabetic cornea. PMID:27611469

  2. Insulin Restores an Altered Corneal Epithelium Circadian Rhythm in Mice with Streptozotocin-induced Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fang; Xue, Yunxia; Dong, Dong; Liu, Jun; Fu, Ting; Xiao, Chengju; Wang, Hanqing; Lin, Cuipei; Liu, Peng; Zhong, Jiajun; Yang, Yabing; Wang, Zhaorui; Pan, Hongwei; Chen, Jiansu; Li, Yangqiu; Cai, Dongqing; Li, Zhijie

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of corneal epithelial lesions and delayed wound repair, as well as their association with diabetes mellitus, are critical issues for clinical ophthalmologists. To test whether the diabetic condition alters the circadian rhythm in a mouse cornea and whether insulin can synchronise the corneal clock, we studied the effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the mitosis of epithelial cells, the recruitment of leukocytes to the cornea, and the expression of main core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Rev-erbα) in the corneal epithelium. We also assessed the possible effect of insulin on these modifications. Diabetes downregulated Clock, Bmal1, and Per2 expression, upregulated Cry1 and Rev-erbα expression, reduced corneal epithelial mitosis, and increased leukocyte (neutrophils and γδ T-cells) recruitment to the cornea. Early treatments with insulin partially restored the altered rhythmicity in the diabetic cornea. In conclusion, insulin-dependent diabetes altered the normal rhythmicity of the cornea, and insulin administration had a beneficial effect on restoring normal rhythmicity in the diabetic cornea. PMID:27611469

  3. Nanoparticles that deliver triplex-forming peptide nucleic acid molecules correct F508del CFTR in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    McNeer, Nicole Ali; Anandalingam, Kavitha; Fields, Rachel J; Caputo, Christina; Kopic, Sascha; Gupta, Anisha; Quijano, Elias; Polikoff, Lee; Kong, Yong; Bahal, Raman; Geibel, John P; Glazer, Peter M; Saltzman, W Mark; Egan, Marie E

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal genetic disorder most commonly caused by the F508del mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. It is not readily amenable to gene therapy because of its systemic nature and challenges including in vivo gene delivery and transient gene expression. Here we use triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids and donor DNA in biodegradable polymer nanoparticles to correct F508del. We confirm modification with sequencing and a functional chloride efflux assay. In vitro correction of chloride efflux occurs in up to 25% of human cells. Deep-sequencing reveals negligible off-target effects in partially homologous sites. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticles in CF mice produces changes in the nasal epithelium potential difference assay, consistent with corrected CFTR function. Also, gene correction is detected in the nasal and lung tissue. This work represents facile genome engineering in vivo with oligonucleotides using a nanoparticle system to achieve clinically relevant levels of gene editing without off-target effects. PMID:25914116

  4. Pigment-epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) occurs at a physiologically relevant concentration in human blood: purification and characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Steen V; Valnickova, Zuzana; Enghild, Jan J

    2003-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) inhibits the formation of blood vessels in the eye by inducing apotosis in actively dividing endothelial cells. The activity of PEDF equals or supersedes that of other anti-angiogenic factors, including angiostatin, endostatin and thrombospondin-1. In addition, PEDF has the potential to promote the survival of neurons and affect their differentiation. Here we show that PEDF is present in plasma at a concentration of approx. 100 nM (5 microg/ml) or twice the level required to inhibit aberrant blood-vessel growth in the eye. Thus the systemic delivery of PEDF has the potential to affect angiogenesis or neurotrophic processes throughout the body, significantly expanding the putative physiological role of the protein. A complete map of all post-translational modifications revealed that authentic plasma PEDF carries an N-terminal pyroglutamate blocking group and an N-linked glycan at position Asn266. The pyroglutamate residue may regulate the activity of PEDF analogously to the manner in which it regulates thyrotropin-releasing hormone. PMID:12737624

  5. Cystic fibrosis growth retardation is not correlated with loss of Cftr in the intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Brian R.; Mishra, Kirtishri; Cotton, Calvin U.; Drumm, Mitchell L.

    2011-01-01

    Maldigestion due to exocrine pancreatic insufficiency leads to intestinal malabsorption and consequent malnutrition, a mechanism proposed to cause growth retardation associated with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, although enzyme replacement therapy combined with increased caloric intake improves weight gain, the effect on stature is not significant, suggesting that growth retardation has a more complex etiology. Mouse models of CF support this, since these animals do not experience exocrine pancreatic insufficiency yet are growth impaired. Cftr absence from the intestinal epithelium has been suggested as a primary source of growth retardation in CF mice, a concept we directly tested by generating mouse models with Cftr selectively inactivated or restored in intestinal epithelium. The relationship between growth and functional characteristics of the intestines, including transepithelial electrophysiology, incidence of intestinal obstruction, and histopathology, were assessed. Absence of Cftr exclusively from intestinal epithelium resulted in loss of cAMP-stimulated short-circuit current, goblet cell hyperplasia, and occurrence of intestinal obstructions but only slight and transient impaired growth. In contrast, specifically restoring Cftr to the intestinal epithelium resulted in restoration of ion transport and completely protected against obstruction and histopathological anomalies, but growth was indistinguishable from CF mice. These results indicate that absence of Cftr in the intestinal epithelium is an important contributor to the intestinal obstruction phenotype in CF but does not correlate with the observed growth reduction in CF. PMID:21659619

  6. Content of trans fatty acids in human cheek epithelium: comparison with serum and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Ransi A; Bahl, Vinay K; Parshad, Rajinder; Seenu, V; Roy, Ambuj; Golandaz, Smita; Dorairaj, Prabhakaran; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmy

    2013-01-01

    Studies pertaining to trans fatty acids (TFA), which have been implicated in development of chronic diseases, are more relevant in developing countries where nutrition transition is changing traditional habits and practices. Measuring TFA is an arduous task because of the need for fat biopsies. This study identifies a tissue, which can be easily accessed for analytical measurement of trans fatty acid. In this cross-sectional study, fatty acid in adipose tissue, cheek epithelium, and blood samples were assessed by gas chromatography. Spearman correlation coefficient was computed to study the correlation of fatty acid distribution among the three tissues. The correlation coefficient of total trans fatty acid between cheek epithelium and serum was 0.30 (P < 0.02) and between cheek epithelium and adipose tissue was 0.33 (P < 0.019). This study is the first to report trans fatty acid profile in cheek epithelium giving scope for utilizing the cheek epithelium as a tissue for objective assessment of trans fatty acid intake. PMID:24222900

  7. Intrachoroidal Neovascularization in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schwesinger, Catherine; Yee, Charles; Rohan, Richard M.; Joussen, Antonia M.; Fernandez, Antonio; Meyer, Tobias N.; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Ma, Joseph J. K.; Redmond, T. Michael; Liu, Suyan; Adamis, Anthony P.; D’Amato, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration is a frequent and poorly treatable cause of vision loss in elderly Caucasians. This choroidal neovascularization has been associated with the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In current animal models choroidal neovascularization is induced by subretinal injection of growth factors or vectors encoding growth factors such as VEGF, or by disruption of the Bruch’s membrane/retinal pigment epithelium complex with laser treatment. We wished to establish a transgenic murine model of age-related macular degeneration, in which the overexpression of VEGF by the retinal pigment epithelium induces choroidal neovascularization. A construct consisting of a tissue-specific murine retinal pigment epithelium promoter (RPE65 promoter) coupled to murine VEGF164 cDNA with a rabbit β-globin-3′ UTR was introduced into the genome of albino mice. Transgene mRNA was expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium at all ages peaking at 4 months. The expression of VEGF protein was increased in both the retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. An increase of intravascular adherent leukocytes and vessel leakage was observed. Histopathology revealed intrachoroidal neovascularization that did not penetrate through an intact Bruch’s membrane. These results support the hypothesis that additional insults to the integrity of Bruch’s membrane are required to induce growth of choroidal vessels into the subretinal space as seen in age-related macular degeneration. This model may be useful to screen for inhibitors of choroidal vessel growth. PMID:11238064

  8. Phagocytosis of Giardia muris by macrophages in Peyer's patch epithelium in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, R L; Allen, C L; Stevens, D P

    1981-01-01

    No mechanism for the initiation of immunological clearance of Giardia from the mammalian intestinal tract has been identified. In normal and nude mice experimentally infected with G. muris, we examined antigen-sampling epithelium over Peyer's patch follicles by electron microscopy for evidence of interaction between G. muris and lymphoid cells. Invading G. muris were found in the epithelium near dying or desquamating columnar cells. Macrophages beneath the basal lamina extended pseudopods into the epithelium, trapping invading G. muris and enclosing them in phagolysosomes. In normal mice, which clear G. muris in 4 to 6 weeks, macrophages containing digested G. muris were surrounded by rosettes of lymphoblasts in the epithelium. In nude mice deficient in lymphocytes, there was apparent hyperplasia of macrophages, which filled the follicle domes, resulting in more frequent entrapment of G. muris but no contact between macrophages and lymphoblasts in the epithelium. In nude mice, which require 6 months to control G. muris infection, lymphoblast contact with macrophages containing distinctive microtubular remnants of G. muris was only identified in the follicle dome. This close physical association of lymphoblasts and macrophages containing G. muris remnants suggests that this macrophage activity represents intraepithelial antigen processing as well as a defense against the effects of the uncontrolled entrance of microorganisms and other antigenic particles into Peyer's patch lymphoid follicles. Images PMID:7275318

  9. Differential Expression Patterns of EGF, EGFR, and ERBB4 in Nasal Polyp Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Subramaniam, Somasundaram; Yu, Xue Min; Li, Ying Ying; Chen, De Hua; Li, Tian Ying; Shen, Liang; Shi, Li; Wang, De Yun

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors play an important role in airway epithelial cell growth and differentiation. The current study investigates the expression profiles of EGF, EGFR and ERBB4 in patients with nasal polyps (NP), and their response to glucocorticosteroid (GC) treatment. Fifty patients with NP (40 without GC treatment and 10 with oral GC) and 20 control subjects with septal deviation were recruited into the study. Protein levels of EGF, EGFR, and ERBB4 were evaluated by immune-staining. In healthy nasal epithelium, EGF and EGFR localized within p63+ basal cells, while ERBB4 localized within ciliated cells. GC-naïve NP epithelium showed weak expression of EGF in 90% of samples versus 5% of controls. EGFR was significantly increased in the epithelium with basal cell hyperplasia from GC-naïve NPs (78%, 31/40) compared to controls (23%, 4/17). EGFR was also found in some degranulating goblet cells. ERBB4 expression was significantly higher in hyperplastic epithelium from GC-naïve NPs (65%, 26/40) than in controls (6%, 1/17). GC treatment restored the EGF expression and normalized the EGFR and ERBB4 expression in NPs. Differential expression patterns of EGF, EGFR, and ERBB4 are essential in epithelial restitution and remodeling in nasal epithelium. PMID:27285994

  10. Dynamic relationship of the epithelium and mesenchyme during salivary gland initiation: the role of Fgf10

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Kirsty L.; Gaete, Marcia; Matalova, Eva; Deutsch, Danny; Rice, David; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Salivary glands provide an excellent model for the study of epithelial–mesenchymal interactions. We have looked at the interactions involved in the early initiation and development of murine salivary glands using classic recombination experiments and knockout mice. We show that salivary gland epithelium, at thickening and initial bud stages, is able to direct salivary gland development in non-gland pharyngeal arch mesenchyme at early stages. The early salivary gland epithelium is therefore able to induce gland development in non-gland tissue. This ability later shifts to the mesenchyme, with non-gland epithelium, such as from the limb bud, able to form a branching gland when combined with pseudoglandular stage gland mesenchyme. This shift appears to involve Fgf signalling, with signals from the epithelium inducing Fgf10 in the mesenchyme. Fgf10 then signals back to the epithelium to direct gland down-growth and bud development. These experiments highlight the importance of epithelial–mesenchymal signalling in gland initiation, controlling where, when and how many salivary glands form. PMID:24167707

  11. Dynamic relationship of the epithelium and mesenchyme during salivary gland initiation: the role of Fgf10.

    PubMed

    Wells, Kirsty L; Gaete, Marcia; Matalova, Eva; Deutsch, Danny; Rice, David; Tucker, Abigail S

    2013-01-01

    Salivary glands provide an excellent model for the study of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. We have looked at the interactions involved in the early initiation and development of murine salivary glands using classic recombination experiments and knockout mice. We show that salivary gland epithelium, at thickening and initial bud stages, is able to direct salivary gland development in non-gland pharyngeal arch mesenchyme at early stages. The early salivary gland epithelium is therefore able to induce gland development in non-gland tissue. This ability later shifts to the mesenchyme, with non-gland epithelium, such as from the limb bud, able to form a branching gland when combined with pseudoglandular stage gland mesenchyme. This shift appears to involve Fgf signalling, with signals from the epithelium inducing Fgf10 in the mesenchyme. Fgf10 then signals back to the epithelium to direct gland down-growth and bud development. These experiments highlight the importance of epithelial-mesenchymal signalling in gland initiation, controlling where, when and how many salivary glands form. PMID:24167707

  12. Postnatal epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells in bioengineered amelogenesis and dentinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Zhou, Jian; Chen, Mo; Schiff, Michael D; Lee, Chang H; Kong, Kimi; Embree, Mildred C; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J

    2014-02-01

    Rodent incisors provide a classic model for studying epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in development. However, postnatal stem/progenitor cells in rodent incisors have not been exploited for tooth regeneration. Here, we characterized postnatal rat incisor epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells and found that they formed enamel- and dentin-like tissues in vivo. Epithelium and mesenchyme cells were harvested separately from the apical region of postnatal 4-5 day rat incisors. Epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes were confirmed by immunocytochemistry, CFU assay and/or multi-lineage differentiation. CK14+, Sox2+ and Lgr5+ epithelium stem cells from the cervical loop enhanced amelogenin and ameloblastin expression upon BMP4 or FGF3 stimulation, signifying their differentiation towards ameloblast-like cells, whereas mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells upon BMP4, BMP7 and Wnt3a treatment robustly expressed Dspp, a hallmark of odontoblastic differentiation. We then control-released microencapsulated BMP4, BMP7 and Wnt3a in transplants of epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells in the renal capsule of athymic mice in vivo. Enamel and dentin-like tissues were generated in two integrated layers with specific expression of amelogenin and ameloblastin in the newly formed, de novo enamel-like tissue, and DSP in dentin-like tissue. These findings suggest that postnatal epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells can be primed towards bioengineered tooth regeneration. PMID:24345734

  13. Pectin modifications: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Liu, Wei; Liu, Cheng-Mei; Li, Ti; Liang, Rui-Hong; Luo, Shun-Jing

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in studying modification of pectin has increased. A number of hydroxyl and carboxyl groups distributed along the backbone as well as a certain amount of neutral sugars presented as side chains make pectin capable of preparing a broad spectrum of derivatives. By forming pectin derivatives, their properties may be modified and some other new functional properties may be created. This article attempts to review the information about various methods used for pectin modification, including substitution (alkylation, amidation, quaternization, thiolation, sulfation, oxidation, etc.), chain elongation (cross-linking and grafting) and depolymerization (chemical, physical, and enzymatic degradation). Characteristics and applications of some pectin derivatives are also presented. In addition, the safety and regulatory status of pectin and its derivatives were reviewed. PMID:24798790

  14. PES fabric plasma modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatuňa, T.; Špatenka, P.; Píchal, J.; Koller, J.; Aubrecht, L.; Wiener, J.

    2004-03-01

    Polyester ranks the upper position in the world fiber production — nearly 54% of the total production of synthetic fibers. Troubles connected with minimizing of the textile hydrophobicity are usually being solved by the textile fibers’ surface chemical modification, but from ecological point of view modification of fabric with low temperature plasma is superior to classical chemical wet processes. Application of various plasmas for PES treatment has been already described. To compare the effectiveness of different plasma sources we performed a series of experiment both in RF and MW plasmas. For working gas nitrogen, oxygen and their mixtures were employed. Internal plasma control was provided by measurement of optical emission spectra. The hydrophilicity degree was determined by the drop test. Paper discusses optimal conditions of the PES fabric plasma treatment.

  15. When Insult Is Added to Injury: Cross Talk between ILCs and Intestinal Epithelium in IBD.

    PubMed

    van der Gracht, Esmé; Zahner, Sonja; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by an impairment of the integrity of the mucosal epithelial barrier, which causes exacerbated inflammation of the intestine. The intestinal barrier is formed by different specialized epithelial cells, which separate the intestinal lumen from the lamina propria. In addition to its crucial role in protecting the body from invading pathogens, the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal homeostasis by its biochemical properties and communication to underlying immune cells. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently described population of lymphocytes that have been implicated in both mucosal homeostasis and inflammation. Recent findings indicate a critical feedback loop in which damaged epithelium activates these innate immune cells to restore epithelial barrier function. This review will focus on the signalling pathways between damaged epithelium and ILCs involved in repair of the epithelial barrier and tissue homeostasis and the relationship of these processes with the control of IBD. PMID:27578924

  16. Tracheal organ cultures as a useful tool to study Felid herpesvirus 1 infection in respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Leeming, Gail; Meli, Marina L; Cripps, Peter; Vaughan-Thomas, Anne; Lutz, Hans; Gaskell, Rosalind; Kipar, Anja

    2006-12-01

    Felid herpesvirus 1 (FeHV-1) is an important feline pathogen of the upper respiratory tract which can be identified in clinical cases by virus isolation and PCR. Studies on the effect and mode of spread of FeHV-1 in the respiratory epithelium, however, have previously only been performed in infected cats. Feline tracheal organ cultures which were inoculated with FeHV-1 at varying multiplicity of infection (MOI) were established. A dose-dependent response was observed. Low MOIs induced multifocal infection in the otherwise viable respiratory epithelium, which allowed monitoring of viral growth over several days. Therefore, tracheal organ cultures represent a suitable model for further study of the morphological and functional effects of FeHV-1 on respiratory epithelium, mimicking the in vivo situation. PMID:16926054

  17. When Insult Is Added to Injury: Cross Talk between ILCs and Intestinal Epithelium in IBD

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by an impairment of the integrity of the mucosal epithelial barrier, which causes exacerbated inflammation of the intestine. The intestinal barrier is formed by different specialized epithelial cells, which separate the intestinal lumen from the lamina propria. In addition to its crucial role in protecting the body from invading pathogens, the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal homeostasis by its biochemical properties and communication to underlying immune cells. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently described population of lymphocytes that have been implicated in both mucosal homeostasis and inflammation. Recent findings indicate a critical feedback loop in which damaged epithelium activates these innate immune cells to restore epithelial barrier function. This review will focus on the signalling pathways between damaged epithelium and ILCs involved in repair of the epithelial barrier and tissue homeostasis and the relationship of these processes with the control of IBD. PMID:27578924

  18. Chronic inflammatory airway diseases: the central role of the epithelium revisited.

    PubMed

    Gohy, S T; Hupin, C; Pilette, C; Ladjemi, M Z

    2016-04-01

    The respiratory epithelium plays a critical role for the maintenance of airway integrity and defense against inhaled particles. Physical barrier provided by apical junctions and mucociliary clearance clears inhaled pathogens, allergens or toxics, to prevent continuous stimulation of adaptive immune responses. The "chemical barrier", consisting of several anti-microbial factors such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, constitutes another protective mechanism of the mucosae against external aggressions before adaptive immune response starts. The reconstruction of damaged respiratory epithelium is crucial to restore this barrier. This review examines the role of the airway epithelium through recent advances in health and chronic inflammatory diseases in the lower conducting airways (in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Better understanding of normal and altered epithelial functions continuously provides new insights into the physiopathology of chronic airway diseases and should help to identify new epithelial-targeted therapies. PMID:27021118

  19. Role of GATA factors in development, differentiation, and homeostasis of the small intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Boaz E.; Stapleton, Kelly A.

    2014-01-01

    The small intestinal epithelium develops from embryonic endoderm into a highly specialized layer of cells perfectly suited for the digestion and absorption of nutrients. The development, differentiation, and regeneration of the small intestinal epithelium require complex gene regulatory networks involving multiple context-specific transcription factors. The evolutionarily conserved GATA family of transcription factors, well known for its role in hematopoiesis, is essential for the development of endoderm during embryogenesis and the renewal of the differentiated epithelium in the mature gut. We review the role of GATA factors in the evolution and development of endoderm and summarize our current understanding of the function of GATA factors in the mature small intestine. We offer perspective on the application of epigenetics approaches to define the mechanisms underlying context-specific GATA gene regulation during intestinal development. PMID:24436352

  20. Calcium inhibits the damaging and compensatory proliferative effects of fatty acids on mouse colon epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wargovich, M J; Eng, V W; Newmark, H L

    1984-07-01

    Intrarectal instillations of the fatty acids (FA), lauric, linoleic or oleic acids induce inflammation and superficial lysis of the colon epithelium. This reaction is followed by increases in colonic mitotic activity and the number of cells engaged in DNA synthesis in compensatory regeneration for the cells that were lost. This explains, in part, the promotional effect of dietary fat in carcinogenesis. Concomitant oral administration of calcium salts, as CaCO3, largely reduced the mitogenic effects of fatty acids on colon epithelium, presumably by forming biologically inert calcium soaps. Calcium soap formation of dietary fatty acids may be one natural mechanism by which colon epithelium cells are protected hence reducing the impact of dietary fat on carcinogenesis for this organ. PMID:6744249

  1. Effect of ozone treatment on airway reactivity and epithelium-derived relaxing factor in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Fedan, J S; Millecchia, L L; Johnston, R A; Rengasamy, A; Hubbs, A; Dey, R D; Yuan, L X; Watson, D; Goldsmith, W T; Reynolds, J S; Orsini, L; Dortch-Carnes, J; Cutler, D; Frazer, D G

    2000-06-01

    Ozone (O(3)) is toxic to respiratory epithelium and causes airway inflammation and hyperreactivity. To evaluate the role of the epithelium in the development of hyperreactivity, we examined in guinea pigs the effects of inhaled O(3) (3 ppm for 1 h; 0-24 h after exposure) on 1) reactivity to inhaled methacholine (MCh), 2) reactivity of the isolated, perfused trachea (IPT) to MCh, 3) epithelium-derived relaxing factor (EpDRF)-mediated relaxations of IPT induced by mucosal hyperosmolar solutions, 4) neurogenic contraction and relaxation responses, 5) transepithelial potential difference, and 6) microscopic analysis of nitrotyrosine immunofluorescence, substance P fiber density, and tracheal morphology. At 0 h, O(3) caused hyperreactivity to inhaled MCh and mucosally but not serosally applied MCh in IPT (only in the presence of the epithelium) and a decrease in transepithelial potential difference. Inhibition of EpDRF-induced relaxation responses occurred at 2 h. All of these changes returned to control by 12 to 18 h. O(3) had no effect on neurogenic responses. Nitrotyrosine immunofluorescence appeared in the trachea at 0 h in detached epithelial cell ghosts and in intrapulmonary airways by 6 h. Substance P fiber density was elevated in smooth muscle at 0 and 18 h but not in epithelium or lamina propria of intrapulmonary and extrapulmonary bronchi. Loss of cilia and mucosubstances in the mucosa occurred at 0 h; the epithelium became markedly attenuated over 12 to 24 h. A reversible increase in epithelial permeability and a decrease in EpDRF production may contribute to O(3)-induced hyperreactivity to MCh. PMID:10869370

  2. Influence of amphotericin B on the sodium pump of porcine lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Delamere, N A; Dean, W L; Stidam, J M; Moseley, A E

    1996-02-01

    Active transport by Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in the monolayer of lens epithelium is vital for the regulation of sodium and potassium levels within the mass of fiber cells that make up the bulk of the lens. In this study, experiments were conducted using porcine lenses to test whether Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in the epithelium is altered when the permeability of lens cell plasma membranes is increased by the ionophore amphotericin B. After 24 h, sodium was significantly (P < 0.01) elevated in lenses exposed to 5 or 10 microM amphotericin B. Amphotericin B stimulated 86Rb uptake, probably through an increase of cytoplasmic sodium concentration due to increased inward sodium leak; the rate of ouabain-sensitive potassium (86Rb) uptake by intact lenses was significantly increased by amphotericin B at 5 microM (P < 0.05) and 10 microM (P < 0.01). After 24 h, the epithelium from lenses exposed to amphotericin B had an Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity that was more than twofold higher (P < 0.01) than the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in control lenses. By immunoblot, there was an increase in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase catalytic (alpha) subunit immunoreactive polypeptide in the epithelium of lenses exposed to amphotericin B. The increase stemmed from a marked increase of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha 2-immunoreactive polypeptide but little change in the amount of alpha 1-immunoreactive protein. As judged by immunoblot experiments, the amount of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase beta 1-immunoreactive polypeptide also appeared to be higher in the epithelium of amphotericin B-treated lenses compared with control lenses. In summary, these results suggest that in response to a permeability challenge with amphotericin B, the porcine lens epithelium is able to increase the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. The same permeability challenge also appears to stimulate the biosynthesis of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase catalytic subunit as well as glycoprotein subunit polypeptides. PMID:8779908

  3. The cervico-vaginal epithelium during 20 cycles' use of a combined contraceptive vaginal ring.

    PubMed

    Roumen, F J; Boon, M E; van Velzen, D; Dieben, T O; Coelingh Bennink, H J

    1996-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of a combined contraceptive vaginal ring (CCVR) made of Silastic on the cervico-vaginal epithelium during 20 cycles of use. A total of 76 volunteers used the CCVR releasing 0.120 mg etonogestrel and 0.015 mg ethinyloestradiol daily. Cytological samples were taken of the vaginal epithelium, the ectocervix and the endocervix before the start, at 4 and 12 months, and at the end of the study. Cytology, hormonal profiles, human papilloma virus (HPV) status, DNA-flow cytometry, bacterial flora, and morphometry was performed on these samples. Colposcopy and histopathology of biopsy specimens were performed at the end. No cytological changes of the squamous epithelium or the columnar epithelium were found. HPV was detected in three samples of three different women. At least two of them reverted to HPV negative during the rest of the study period. Aneuploidy was diagnosed in 11 women before the study. Seven of them changed to diploid during the study. No changes from diploid to aneuploid were seen. Aneuploidy was not seen in any of the HPV positive samples. Although bacterial flora showed considerable variation during the study, no significant influence of the CCVR could be established. Morphometrical analysis showed an increasing nucleus:cytoplasm ratio of the squamous cells during the study. Mild dysplasia was detected in one woman at the end of the study. It was concluded that no unfavourable cytological or bacteriological changes of the cervico-vaginal epithelium were demonstrated during 20 cycles of CCVR use. The vaginal epithelium became more progestogenic during the study. PMID:8981130

  4. [Cytological study of gum epithelium in connection with diabetes mellitus compensation stage].

    PubMed

    Ashurov, G G; Dzhuraeva, Sh F

    2009-01-01

    The structure of interphased nuclei of gum's epithelium and inflammation of periodontal structure in patients with glycolitic disorders in coonection of degree compensation of diabetes mellitus were studied. In patients with diabetes mellitus and inflammation of gum mucosa 67,33+/-0,05% of gum's cells epithelium had morphology changes nuclei from the date of control group (50,99+/-0,05%) patients. This difference were more essential at deterioration of compensation (62,03+/-0,08%), sub - (67,05+/-0,05%), decompensate (75,11+/-0,07%) diabetes mellitus. PMID:19491782

  5. Cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases in olfactory epithelium of dogs: possible role in tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, A.R.; Hadley, W.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Benson, J.M.; McClellan, R.O.

    1982-04-02

    The respiratory tract epithelium of dogs, from the nose to the lungs, was examined for cytochrome P-450 and associated biotransformation activities. In the ethmoturbinates, where olfactory epithelium is located, the amount of cytochrome P-450 was comparable to that in the liver, when measured on the basis of activity per milligram of microsomal protein. The rest of the nasal region also contained large quantities of cytochrome P-450. The presence of these enzymes in the nose may be important in chemical-induced tumorigenesis. The nasal carcinogen hexamethylphosphoramide was shown to be metabolized by nasal microsomal enzymes to another nasal carcinogen, formaldehyde.

  6. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  7. Dual modification of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Maruani, Antoine; Richards, Daniel A; Chudasama, Vijay

    2016-07-14

    With the advent of novel bioorthogonal reactions and "click" chemistry, an increasing number of strategies for the single labelling of proteins and oligonucleotides have emerged. Whilst several methods exist for the site-selective introduction of a single chemical moiety, site-selective and bioorthogonal dual modification of biomolecules remains a challenge. The introduction of multiple modules enables a plethora of permutations and combinations and can generate a variety of bioconjuguates with many potential applications. From de novo approaches on oligomers to the post-translational functionalisation of proteins, this review will highlight the main strategies to dually modify biomolecules. PMID:27278999

  8. Solitons and ionospheric modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Nicholson, D. R.; Payne, G. L.; Hansen, P. J.; Weatherall, J. C.; Goldman, M. V.

    1982-01-01

    The possibility of Langmuir soliton formation and collapse during ionospheric modification is investigated. Parameters characterizing former facilities, existing facilities, and planned facilities are considered, using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques. At a spatial location corresponding to the exact classical reflection point of the modifier wave, the Langmuir wave evolution is found to be dominated by modulational instability followed by soliton formation and three-dimensional collapse. The earth's magnetic field is found to affect the shape of the collapsing soliton. These results provide an alternative explanation for some recent observations.

  9. In vivo antioxidant gene expression in human airway epithelium of normal individuals exposed to 100% O2.

    PubMed

    Erzurum, S C; Danel, C; Gillissen, A; Chu, C S; Trapnell, B C; Crystal, R G

    1993-09-01

    Human bronchial epithelium is exquisitely sensitive to high O2 levels, with tracheobronchitis usually developing after 12 h of exposure to 100% O2. To evaluate whether this vulnerability results from inability of the bronchial epithelium to provide adequate antioxidant protection, we quantified antioxidant gene expression in bronchial epithelium of normal volunteers at baseline and after exposure to 100% O2 in vivo. After 14.8 +/- 0.2 h of 100% O2, 24 of 33 individuals had evidence of tracheobronchitis. Baseline gene expression of CuZn superoxide dismutase (SOD), MnSOD, and catalase in bronchial epithelium was very low (CuZnSOD 4.1 +/- 0.8 transcripts/cell, MnSOD 5.1 +/- 0.9, catalase 1.3 +/- 0.2), with control gamma-actin expression relatively abundant (50 +/- 6 transcripts/cell). Importantly, despite 100% O2 exposure sufficient to cause tracheobronchitis in most individuals, antioxidant mRNA transcripts/cell in bronchial epithelium did not increase (P > 0.5). Catalase activity in bronchial epithelium did not change after exposure to hyperoxia (P > 0.05). Total SOD activity increased mildly (P < 0.01) but not sufficiently to protect the epithelium. Together, the very low levels of expression of intracellular antioxidant enzymes and the inability to upregulate expression at the mRNA level with oxidant stress likely have a role in human airway epithelium susceptibility to hyperoxia. PMID:8226538

  10. Histology, Immunohistochemistry and Ultrastructure of the Bovine Palatine Tonsil with Special Emphasis on Reticular Epithelium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The paired palatine tonsils are located at the junction of the nasopharynx and oropharynx; ideally positioned to sample antigens entering through either the nasal cavity or oral cavity. Entering antigens will first contact tonsilar epithelium. To better understand the cellular and functional composi...

  11. A COMPARISON BETWEEN MDV PRODUCTION IN FEATHER PULP VERSUS FEATHER FOLLICLE EPITHELIUM (FFE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease is a lymphoproliferative disease in chickens caused by the alphaherpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV). After a cytolytic phase in lymphoid tissue (i.e. thymus, spleen and bursa) the virus travels to the feather follicle epithelium (FFE). The FFE is the only known location that sh...

  12. Clearance of lead-212 ions from rabbit bronchial epithelium to blood.

    PubMed

    James, A C; Greenhalgh, J R; Smith, H

    1977-09-01

    The absorption of 212Pb ions from bronchial epithelium to blood has been investigated in anaesthetized rabbits. The 212Pb ions were introduced by intubation either into the trachea or into smaller, more distal bronchi. Removal from lung was followed by external gamma-counting. Mucociliary clearance to the GI tract was blocked by tracheostomy. Two distinct phases of clearance from bronchial epithelium to blood were observed. Approximately 20% of deposited 212Pb is rapidly absorbed with a half-time of about 4 min, the remainder with a biological half-time of about 9 h, irrespective of the site of instillation in the bronchial tree. Two hours after deposition, the 212Pb remaining in lung was found to be partitioned between mucus and the bronchial epithelium, with a substantial but minor fraction in the epithelium. Uptake of 212Pb in the skeleton was estimated to be about 20% of the 212Pb entering the blood circulation. Removal by the kidneys, at 25%, was comparable with skeletal uptake. These results are compared with previously published work using rodents, dogs and man which demonstrated either rapid or slow absorption but not both phases occuring together. PMID:909929

  13. Quantification of transcriptome responses of the rumen epithelium to butyrate infusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyrate, produced by gut microorganisms play an important role in energy metabolism and physiology in ruminants as well as in human health. Butyrate is a preferred substrate in the rumen epithelium where approximately 90% of butyrate is metabolized. Additi...

  14. [Ciliary epithelium and topical decongestants: how to minimize the undesirable events?].

    PubMed

    Laberko, E L; Zlobina, N V; Radtsig, E Yu; Bogomil'sky, M R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of the combination of 0.1% xylometazoline with seawater (Rinomaris, "Jadran", Croatia) on the state and functional activity of the ciliary epithelium of the nasal cavity. The results of the study confirm the safety of this treatment and the possibility of its application in routine clinical practice. PMID:25588494

  15. FORMALDEHYDE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN F344 RAT NASAL RESPIRATORY EPITHELIUM.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde-induced gene expression in F344 rat nasal respiratory epithelium

    ABSTRACT

    Formaldehyde, an occupational and environmental toxicant used extensively in the manufacturing of many household and personal use products, is known to induce squamous cell carci...

  16. Digital histologic analysis reveals morphometric patterns of age-related involution in breast epithelium and stroma.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Rupninder; Chollet-Hinton, Lynn; Kirk, Erin L; Midkiff, Bentley; Troester, Melissa A

    2016-02-01

    Complete age-related regression of mammary epithelium, often termed postmenopausal involution, is associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, most studies have qualitatively assessed involution. We quantitatively analyzed epithelium, stroma, and adipose tissue from histologically normal breast tissue of 454 patients in the Normal Breast Study. High-resolution digital images of normal breast hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were partitioned into epithelium, adipose tissue, and nonfatty stroma. Percentage area and nuclei per unit area (nuclear density) were calculated for each component. Quantitative data were evaluated in association with age using linear regression and cubic spline models. Stromal area decreased (P = 0.0002), and adipose tissue area increased (P < 0.0001), with an approximate 0.7% change in area for each component, until age 55 years when these area measures reached a steady state. Although epithelial area did not show linear changes with age, epithelial nuclear density decreased linearly beginning in the third decade of life. No significant age-related trends were observed for stromal or adipose nuclear density. Digital image analysis offers a high-throughput method for quantitatively measuring tissue morphometry and for objectively assessing age-related changes in adipose tissue, stroma, and epithelium. Epithelial nuclear density is a quantitative measure of age-related breast involution that begins to decline in the early premenopausal period. PMID:26772400

  17. In vitro absorption of γ-globulin by neonatal intestinal epithelium of the pig

    PubMed Central

    Lecce, James G.

    1966-01-01

    1. An in vitro method, using fluorescent γ-globulin and everted neonatal pig's intestinal slices, for the study of the active transport of large molecules is described. 2. Uptake of γ-globulin occurred within 15 min and required no exogenous substrates. 3. In vitro absorption of γ-globulin by intestinal epithelium was limited to the neonatal pig and 5-day-old mouse. No uptake was seen in intestines from a mature mouse, a pig with diarrhoea, a normal pig, a mature rabbit, a guinea-pig, a chick, and a chick embryo. Chick embryo yolk sac readily took up γ-globulin. 4. Rings of everted intestinal epithelium remained active (still absorbed γ-globulin) after incubating for 4-6 hr in balanced salt solution (BSS). 5. Uptake of γ-globulin required oxygen and sodium and was reversibly inhibited by metabolic antagonists such as iodoacetate, arsenate, fluoride, 4,6-dinitro-ϕ-cresol, phlorrhizin, anaerobiosis and cold. Under the conditions of the test, large colloidal molecules did not inhibit uptake of γ-globulin. 6. Similar results (although not as clear-cut) with metabolic inhibitors were obtained with preparations of chick embryo yolk sacs. 7. Injuring mature pig's intestinal epithelium with surface-active agents did not produce non-specific absorption artifacts that resembled the specific absorption found in immature pig's intestinal epithelium. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4164327

  18. Aspiration cytology of radiation-induced changes of normal breast epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Bondeson, L.

    1987-05-01

    From a case illustrated, it appears that irradiation may induce changes in normal breast epithelium indistinguishable from malignancy by means of aspiration cytology. This fact must be considered in the choice of diagnostic methods for the evaluation of lesions in irradiated breast tissue.

  19. Luminal Microbes Promote Monocyte–Stem Cell Interactions Across a Healthy Colonic Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Skoczek, Dagmara A.; Walczysko, Petr; Horn, Nikki; Parris, Alyson; Clare, Simon; Williams, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms a vital barrier between luminal microbes and the underlying mucosal immune system. Epithelial barrier function is maintained by continuous renewal of the epithelium and is pivotal for gut homeostasis. Breaching of the barrier causes mobilization of immune cells to promote epithelial restitution. However, it is not known whether microbes at the luminal surface of a healthy epithelial barrier influence immune cell mobilization to modulate tissue homeostasis. Using a mouse colonic mucosal explant model, we demonstrate that close proximity of luminal microbes to a healthy, intact epithelium results in rapid mucus secretion and movement of Ly6C+7/4+ monocytes closer to epithelial stem cells. These early events are driven by the epithelial MyD88-signaling pathway and result in increased crypt cell proliferation and intestinal stem cell number. Over time, stem cell number and monocyte–crypt stem cell juxtapositioning return to homeostatic levels observed in vivo. We also demonstrate that reduced numbers of tissue Ly6C+ monocytes can suppress Lgr5EGFP+ stem cell expression in vivo and abrogate the response to luminal microbes ex vivo. The functional link between monocyte recruitment and increased crypt cell proliferation was further confirmed using a crypt–monocyte coculture model. This work demonstrates that the healthy gut epithelium mediates communication between luminal bacteria and monocytes, and monocytes can modulate crypt stem cell number and promote crypt cell proliferation to help maintain gut homeostasis. PMID:24907348

  20. A new, albino-beige mouse: giant granules in retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Robison, W G; Kuwabara, T

    1978-04-01

    Albino-beige mice were produced in order to combine two experimentally useful characteristics, albinism and lysosomal dysfunction, in the same animal. The retinal pigment epithelium of albino-beige mice formed giant intracellular granules. Exposure of albino-beige mice to white light of 150 foot-candles for 3 to 10 hr induced marked phagocytosis of rod outer segment fragments by the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in intracellular accumulations of undigested disk membranes within the giant granules. Additional, incompletely processed membranes accumulated as the mice aged or were exposed to 150 foot-candle light for longer periods. Such accumulations of ingested membranes were not observed in the pigment epithelium of exposed or aging albino mice heterozygous for the beige gene. Because of its altered processing of ingested outer segment membranes, this new albino mouse should be useful for studying the possible roles of the retinal pigment epithelium in the maintenance of photoreceptor cells and in their recovery from light damage and other insults. PMID:640784

  1. [Regulatory elements in the skin epithelium of Saccoglossus mereschkowskii (Enteropneusta, Hemichordata): electron microscopic and immunocytochemical study].

    PubMed

    Stoliarova, M V; Val'kovich, E I

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to demonstrate the regulatory elements in the skin epithelium of Enteropneusta which are supposed to be related to the chordate ancestors. Using electron microscopy, it was found that in the skin epithelium of a representative of enteropneusts Saccoglossus mereschkowskii, the basal parts of some epitheliocytes took part in formation of a nerve layer. These cells were considered as receptor ciliated cells. The granular epithelial cells were shown to release secretion according to both exocrine and endocrine mechanism; these cells were characterized as endocrine-like regulatory cells. Fine granular cells possibly represent special receptor-endocrine-like cell type. The immunocytochemical detection of FMRFamid neuropeptide localization in histological sections confirmed the electron microscopic data on the presence of receptor and endocrine-like cells in the epithelium. It is suggested that the skin epithelium of Enteropneusta contains a peculiar neuro-endocrine regulatory system that is represented by receptor cells, receptor-endocrine-like cells of an open type and nerve elements of the nerve layer. PMID:24707736

  2. ADENOCARCINOMA OF THE RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM IN THE GUPPY POECILIA RETICULATA PETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single case of adenocarcinoma of the retinal pigment epithelium occurred in a guppy, Poecilia reticulata Peters. his is the first such tumor reported from fishes. he left eye of the affected fish was severely exophthalmic because of a large intraocular tumor mass. he tumor, whi...

  3. Cycle and duration of the seminiferous epithelium in puma (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Leite, Flaviana Lima Guião; de Paula, Tarcízio Antônio Rego; da Matta, Sérgio Luis Pinto; Fonseca, Cláudio Cesar; das Neves, Marco Túlio David; de Barros, João Bosco Gonçalves

    2006-02-01

    Puma or sussuarana (Puma concolor) is the second largest feline in the American continent and has an ample latitudinal distribution in very diverse habitats. In relation to its conservation status, the puma is considered an extinction-threatened species. The study of the testis morphology and the spermatogenic process in a species is fundamental for establishing the physiologic patterns that will make possible the selection of the protocols for assisted reproduction. A number of peculiarities associated with the reproductive biology of specific species such as the duration of spermatogenic process can be used to determine the frequency of sperm collection. Nine adult male pumas maintained in captivity were used to determine the relative frequency of stages in the seminiferous epithelium cycle. Three of them received intra-testicular injections of 0.1ml tritiated thymidine to determine the duration of the seminiferous epithelium cycle, and were subjected to biopsy 7 days later. The cycle of the seminiferous epithelium in puma was didactically described into eight stages by the tubular morphology method. The total duration of one seminiferous epithelium cycle in puma was calculated to be 9.89 days, and approximately 44.5 days are required for development of spermatozoon from spermatogonia. The duration of spermiogenesis, prophase and other events of meiosis were 14.08, 15.20 and 1.79 days, respectively. The relative frequency of the pre-meiotic, meiotic and post-meiotic phases were 3.98, 1.79 and 4.12 days, respectively. PMID:15923093

  4. Co-culture of rat trigeminal ganglion neurons and corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Forbes, D J; Pozos, R S; Nelson, J D

    1987-03-01

    Corneal epithelium and the trigeminal ganglion neurons which normally innervate the epithelium have been grown in adjacent chambers of a 35 mm tissue culture plate. Dissociated nerve cells from late embryonic rats were plated inside an 8 mm cloning cylinder attached to the center of the culture plate by silicone grease. In 7-10 days neurites extended out of this inner chamber by growing through the grease seal and along parallel scratches in the collagen coating of the tissue culture plate. Once this occurred, pure corneal epithelial explants were isolated from young adult rats and plated in the area surrounding the cloning cylinder, i.e. in the outer chamber. Cultures were monitored regularly with phase microscopy and, at various times, were fixed for ultrastructural examination. Within 24-48 hours of the epithelial plating, there were both individual neurites and bundles of neurites in contact with the epithelium. This interaction increased substantially over the next few days. Growth cones of the neurites could be seen to approach the microvilli-covered surface of the epithelium, travel over the surface and penetrate between the epithelial cells. This tissue culture model of the innervated ocular surface may prove valuable in the study of a variety of ocular conditions or diseases, as well as provide a means to study functional relationships and mechanisms of cellular interaction between neurons and their target cells. PMID:3556022

  5. Snai1 regulates cell lineage allocation and stem cell maintenance in the mouse intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Horvay, Katja; Jardé, Thierry; Casagranda, Franca; Perreau, Victoria M; Haigh, Katharina; Nefzger, Christian M; Akhtar, Reyhan; Gridley, Thomas; Berx, Geert; Haigh, Jody J; Barker, Nick; Polo, Jose M; Hime, Gary R; Abud, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Snail family members regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during invasion of intestinal tumours, but their role in normal intestinal homeostasis is unknown. Studies in breast and skin epithelia indicate that Snail proteins promote an undifferentiated state. Here, we demonstrate that conditional knockout of Snai1 in the intestinal epithelium results in apoptotic loss of crypt base columnar stem cells and bias towards differentiation of secretory lineages. In vitro organoid cultures derived from Snai1 conditional knockout mice also undergo apoptosis when Snai1 is deleted. Conversely, ectopic expression of Snai1 in the intestinal epithelium in vivo results in the expansion of the crypt base columnar cell pool and a decrease in secretory enteroendocrine and Paneth cells. Following conditional deletion of Snai1, the intestinal epithelium fails to produce a proliferative response following radiation-induced damage indicating a fundamental requirement for Snai1 in epithelial regeneration. These results demonstrate that Snai1 is required for regulation of lineage choice, maintenance of CBC stem cells and regeneration of the intestinal epithelium following damage. PMID:25759216

  6. CD36 is expressed in a defined subpopulation of neurons in the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Xavier, André Machado; Ludwig, Raissa Guimarães; Nagai, Maíra Harume; de Almeida, Tiago Jonas; Watanabe, Hebe Mizuno; Hirata, Marcio Yukio; Rosenstock, Tatiana Rosado; Papes, Fabio; Malnic, Bettina; Glezer, Isaias

    2016-01-01

    The sensory neurons in the olfactory epithelium (OSNs) are equipped with a large repertoire of olfactory receptors and the associated signal transduction machinery. In addition to the canonical OSNs, which express odorant receptors (ORs), the epithelium contains specialized subpopulations of sensory neurons that can detect specific information from environmental cues and relay it to relevant neuronal circuitries. Here we describe a subpopulation of mature OSNs in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) which expresses CD36, a multifunctional receptor involved in a series of biological processes, including sensory perception of lipid ligands. The Cd36 expressing neurons coexpress markers of mature OSNs and are dispersed throughout the MOE. Unlike several ORs analyzed in our study, we found frequent coexpression of the OR Olfr287 in these neurons, suggesting that only a specific set of ORs may be coexpressed with CD36 in OSNs. We also show that CD36 is expressed in the cilia of OSNs, indicating a possible role in odorant detection. CD36-deficient mice display no signs of gross changes in the organization of the olfactory epithelium, but show impaired preference for a lipid mixture odor. Our results show that CD36-expressing neurons represent a distinct population of OSNs, which may have specific functions in olfaction. PMID:27145700

  7. CD36 is expressed in a defined subpopulation of neurons in the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, André Machado; Ludwig, Raissa Guimarães; Nagai, Maíra Harume; de Almeida, Tiago Jonas; Watanabe, Hebe Mizuno; Hirata, Marcio Yukio; Rosenstock, Tatiana Rosado; Papes, Fabio; Malnic, Bettina; Glezer, Isaias

    2016-01-01

    The sensory neurons in the olfactory epithelium (OSNs) are equipped with a large repertoire of olfactory receptors and the associated signal transduction machinery. In addition to the canonical OSNs, which express odorant receptors (ORs), the epithelium contains specialized subpopulations of sensory neurons that can detect specific information from environmental cues and relay it to relevant neuronal circuitries. Here we describe a subpopulation of mature OSNs in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) which expresses CD36, a multifunctional receptor involved in a series of biological processes, including sensory perception of lipid ligands. The Cd36 expressing neurons coexpress markers of mature OSNs and are dispersed throughout the MOE. Unlike several ORs analyzed in our study, we found frequent coexpression of the OR Olfr287 in these neurons, suggesting that only a specific set of ORs may be coexpressed with CD36 in OSNs. We also show that CD36 is expressed in the cilia of OSNs, indicating a possible role in odorant detection. CD36-deficient mice display no signs of gross changes in the organization of the olfactory epithelium, but show impaired preference for a lipid mixture odor. Our results show that CD36-expressing neurons represent a distinct population of OSNs, which may have specific functions in olfaction. PMID:27145700

  8. Th2-type cytokine-induced mucus metaplasia decreases susceptibility of human bronchial epithelium to rhinovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Jakiela, Bogdan; Gielicz, Anna; Plutecka, Hanna; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Mastalerz, Lucyna; Bochenek, Grazyna; Soja, Jerzy; Januszek, Rafal; Aab, Alar; Musial, Jacek; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A; Sanak, Marek

    2014-08-01

    Human rhinoviruses (RVs) are a major cause of exacerbations in asthma and other chronic airway diseases. A characteristic feature of asthmatic epithelium is goblet cell metaplasia and mucus hypersecretion. Bronchial epithelium is also an important source of lipid mediators, including pro- and antiinflammatory eicosanoids. By using air-liquid interface cultures of airway epithelium from patients with asthma and nonasthmatic control subjects, we compared RV16 replication-induced changes in mRNA expression of asthma candidate genes and eicosanoid production in the epithelium with or without IL-13-induced mucus metaplasia. Mucus metaplastic epithelium was characterized by a 20-fold less effective replication of RV16 and blunted changes in gene expression; this effect was seen to the same extent in patients with asthma and control subjects. We identified ciliary cells as the main target for RV16 by immunofluorescence imaging and demonstrated that the numbers of ciliary cells decreased in RV16-infected epithelium. RV16 infection of mucociliary epithelium resulted in overexpression of genes associated with bronchial remodeling (e.g., MUC5AC, FGF2, and HBEGF), induction of cyclooxygenase-2, and increased secretion of prostaglandins. These responses were similar in both studied groups. These data indicate that structural changes associated with mucus metaplasia renders airway epithelium less susceptible to RV infection. Thus, exacerbations of the lung disease caused by RV may result from severe impairment in mucociliary clearance or activation of immune defense rather than from preferential infection of mucus metaplastic epithelium. Repeated rhinoviral infections of compromised epithelium may contribute to the remodeling of the airways. PMID:24588727

  9. Conserved form and function of the germinal epithelium through 500 million years of vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Grier, Harry J; Uribe, Mari Carmen; Lo Nostro, Fabiana L; Mims, Steven D; Parenti, Lynne R

    2016-08-01

    The germinal epithelium, i.e., the site of germ cell production in males and females, has maintained a constant form and function throughout 500 million years of vertebrate evolution. The distinguishing characteristic of germinal epithelia among all vertebrates, males, and females, is the presence of germ cells among somatic epithelial cells. The somatic epithelial cells, Sertoli cells in males or follicle (granulosa) cells in females, encompass and isolate germ cells. Morphology of all vertebrate germinal epithelia conforms to the standard definition of an epithelium: epithelial cells are interconnected, border a body surface or lumen, are avascular and are supported by a basement membrane. Variation in morphology of gonads, which develop from the germinal epithelium, is correlated with the evolution of reproductive modes. In hagfishes, lampreys, and elasmobranchs, the germinal epithelia of males produce spermatocysts. A major rearrangement of testis morphology diagnoses osteichthyans: the spermatocysts are arranged in tubules or lobules. In protogynous (female to male) sex reversal in teleost fishes, female germinal epithelial cells (prefollicle cells) and oogonia transform into the first male somatic cells (Sertoli cells) and spermatogonia in the developing testis lobules. This common origin of cell types from the germinal epithelium in fishes with protogynous sex reversal supports the homology of Sertoli cells and follicle cells. Spermatogenesis in amphibians develops within spermatocysts in testis lobules. In amniotes vertebrates, the testis is composed of seminiferous tubules wherein spermatogenesis occurs radially. Emerging research indicates that some mammals do not have lifetime determinate fecundity. The fact emerged that germinal epithelia occur in the gonads of all vertebrates examined herein of both sexes and has the same form and function across all vertebrate taxa. Continued study of the form and function of the germinal epithelium in vertebrates

  10. Primary nasal epithelium exposed to house dust mite extract shows activated expression in allergic individuals.

    PubMed

    Vroling, Aram B; Jonker, Martijs J; Luiten, Silvia; Breit, Timo M; Fokkens, Wytske J; van Drunen, Cornelis M

    2008-03-01

    Nasal epithelial cells form the outermost protective layer against environmental factors. However, this defense is not just physical; it has been shown that epithelial cells respond by the production of inflammatory mediators that may affect local immune responses. In this research we set out to characterize potential differences between the responses of nasal epithelium from healthy and allergic individuals to house dust mite (HDM) allergen. These differences will help us to define local mechanisms that could contribute to allergic disease expression. Epithelial cells were cultured from nasal biopsies taken from five healthy and five allergic individuals. These cultures were exposed for 24 hours to culture medium containing HDM allergen, or to culture medium alone. Isolated RNA was used for microarray analysis. Gene-ontology of the response in healthy epithelium revealed mainly up-regulation of chemokines, growth factors, and structural proteins. Moreover, we saw increased expression of two transcription factors (NF-kappaB and AP-1) and their regulatory members. The expression pattern of epithelium from allergic individuals in the absence of the HDM stimulus suggests that it is already in an activated state. Most striking is that, while the already activated NF-kappaB regulatory pathway remained unchanged in allergic epithelium, the AP-1 pathway is down-regulated upon exposure to HDM allergen; this is contrary to what we see in healthy epithelium. Clear differences in the expression pattern exist between epithelial cells isolated from healthy and allergic individuals at baseline and between their responses to allergen exposure; these differences may contribute to the inflammatory response. PMID:17901406

  11. Enterocyte-lymphocyte interactions in the follicle-associated epithelium of the mouse Peyer's patch.

    PubMed Central

    Cremaschi, D; James, P S; Rossetti, C; Smith, M W

    1989-01-01

    1. Measurements of membrane potential (Vm) have been carried out in the follicle-associated epithelium of the mouse Peyer's patch to investigate possible site-dependent anomalies in enterocyte development. Initial heterogeneity in Vm values obtained from carrying out random impalements in the upper third of the follicle-associated epithelium could be described as arising from the presence of three different cell populations. 2. The predominant cell type in this epithelium (T1) had a mean Vm of -35.3 mV which was partly depolarized by increasing concentrations of K+. These cells were not stained with the vital dye Neutral Red. Two other types of cell (T2L and T2H) were recorded together as consecutive negative jumps in Vm, but only in areas of the epithelium previously stained with Neutral Red. T2L behaved like T1 cells to K+ but with a low Vm of -23.3 mV. T2H cells had a high mean Vm of -47.5 mV showing transient hyperpolarization to increasing K+ concentration. 3. The electrophysiological and non-staining properties of T1 cells are similar to those expected from mature enterocytes. The anatomical size, site, staining properties and Vm of T2H cells correspond to those expected for intraepithelial lymphocytes. The low Vm, K+ depolarization and close association of T2L with T2H cells are typical of properties predicted for an immature-type of antigen-transporting enterocyte known to be present in this type of epithelium. 4. The possibility that intraepithelial lymphocytes either slow or reverse a more normal process of development of enterocytes in their immediate vicinity is discussed along with wider aspects of enterocyte-lymphocyte interactions leading to the transfer to enteric antigens across these modified cells. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2778741

  12. Progressive effects of N-myc deficiency on proliferation, neurogenesis, and morphogenesis in the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Walter; Schimmang, Thomas; Gunhaga, Lena

    2014-06-01

    N-myc belongs to the myc proto-oncogene family, which is involved in numerous cellular processes such as proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and differentiation. Conditional deletion of N-myc in the mouse nervous system disrupted brain development, indicating that N-myc plays an essential role during neural development. How the development of the olfactory epithelium and neurogenesis within are affected by the loss of N-myc has, however, not been determined. To address these issues, we examined an N-myc(Foxg1Cre) conditional mouse line, in which N-myc is depleted in the olfactory epithelium. First changes in N-myc mutants were detected at E11.5, with reduced proliferation and neurogenesis in a slightly smaller olfactory epithelium. The phenotype was more pronounced at E13.5, with a complete lack of Hes5-positive progenitor cells, decreased proliferation, and neurogenesis. In addition, stereological analyses revealed reduced cell size of post-mitotic neurons in the olfactory epithelium, which contributed to a smaller olfactory pit. Furthermore, we observed diminished proliferation and neurogenesis also in the vomeronasal organ, which likewise was reduced in size. In addition, the generation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons was severely reduced in N-myc mutants. Thus, diminished neurogenesis and proliferation in combination with smaller neurons might explain the morphological defects in the N-myc depleted olfactory structures. Moreover, our results suggest an important role for N-myc in regulating ongoing neurogenesis, in part by maintaining the Hes5-positive progenitor pool. In summary, our results provide evidence that N-myc deficiency in the olfactory epithelium progressively diminishes proliferation and neurogenesis with negative consequences at structural and cellular levels. PMID:24376126

  13. Relation of chemical structure to spatial distribution of sensory responses in rat olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Scott, J W; Davis, L M; Shannon, D; Kaplan, C

    1996-05-01

    1. Electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings were made in three configurations from the rat olfactory epithelium. Each configuration compared recordings in the dorsomedial recess of the epithelium with recordings in ventral or lateral parts of the epithelium. Most comparisons were made with simultaneous recordings. The exception was a series in which the dorsal recess and lateral space between the base of two turbinate bones were directly exposed for odor application and recording. The spatial distributions of maximal responses were largely independent of recording configuration. 2. Simultaneous recordings compared dorsomedial and lateral sites in the epithelium during stimulation with a series of 50 odorants. The odorants that evoked larger responses in the lateral sites were usually compounds that lacked oxygen containing functional groups (such as the carbonyl group). This was true for straight chain and cyclic alkanes, for terpine compounds, and for aromatic compounds. The major exception was cineole, a bicyclic compound. All compounds containing ketone groups evoked larger dorsomedial responses. The responses of aldehydes and esters depended upon whether they were attached to aliphatic or aromatic chains. 3. In the three types of preparation, the sites responding best to ketones were in the same expression zone of the epithelium according to published maps for the rat and mouse. The sites responding best to odors without functional groups were in the far lateral or ventral region and corresponded to one of the two most lateral and ventral expression zones. This fact suggests that the receptors in these regions have a preference for particular chemical properties. This level of analysis cannot determine whether all receptors in each zone have a stronger response to certain properties of these odorants or whether each zone contains different proportions of receptors with these properties. PMID:8734602

  14. Morphological Alterations of the Palpebral Conjunctival Epithelium in a Dry Eye Model

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Johanna Tukler; De Paiva, Cintia S.; Farley, William; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Burns, Alan R.; Bergmanson, Jan P.G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the normal palpebral conjunctival histology in C57BL/6 mice, and the structural changes that occur in a dry eye model. Methods 24 male and female C57BL/6 mice, 8 untreated (UT) and 16 exposed to experimental ocular surface desiccating stress (DS). Ocular dryness was induced by administration of scopolamine hydrobromide (0.5 mg/0.2 ml) QID for 5 (DS5) or 10 (DS10) days. Counts and measurements were obtained using anatomical reference points and goblet cell density was investigated with a variety of stains. Results Near the junction between the lid margin and the normal palpebral conjunctiva, the epithelium had an average thickness of 45.6±10.5μm, 8.8±2.0 cell layers, versus 37.7±5.6μm, 7.4±1.3 layers in DS10 (P<0.05). In the goblet cell populated palpebral region the normal epithelium was thicker (P<0.05) than in DS5 and DS10. In the control, 43% of the goblet cells were covered by squamous epithelium, compared to 58% (DS5) and 63% (DS10) (P<0.05). A decreased number of Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) and Alcian blue stained goblet cells was observed in the dry eye. Not all goblet cells stained with PAS and Alcian blue. Conclusions The mouse palpebral conjunctival epithelium was structurally similar to the human. After DS the palpebral conjunctival epithelium decreased in thickness and goblet cell access to the surface appeared to be inhibited by surrounding epithelial cells, potentially slowing down their migration to the surface. Differential staining with PAS and Alcian blue suggests there may be different subtypes of conjunctival goblet cells. PMID:23146932

  15. In vitro culture of embryonic mouse intestinal epithelium: cell differentiation and introduction of reporter genes

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Jonathan M; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Hornsey, Mark A; Tosh, David; Slack, Jonathan MW

    2006-01-01

    Background Study of the normal development of the intestinal epithelium has been hampered by a lack of suitable model systems, in particular ones that enable the introduction of exogenous genes. Production of such a system would advance our understanding of normal epithelial development and help to shed light on the pathogenesis of intestinal neoplasia. The criteria for a reliable culture system include the ability to perform real time observations and manipulations in vitro, the preparation of wholemounts for immunostaining and the potential for introducing genes. Results The new culture system involves growing mouse embryo intestinal explants on fibronectin-coated coverslips in basal Eagle's medium+20% fetal bovine serum. Initially the cultures maintain expression of the intestinal transcription factor Cdx2 together with columnar epithelial (cytokeratin 8) and mesenchymal (smooth muscle actin) markers. Over a few days of culture, differentiation markers appear characteristic of absorptive epithelium (sucrase-isomaltase), goblet cells (Periodic Acid Schiff positive), enteroendocrine cells (chromogranin A) and Paneth cells (lysozyme). Three different approaches were tested to express genes in the developing cultures: transfection, electroporation and adenoviral infection. All could introduce genes into the mesenchyme, but only to a small extent into the epithelium. However the efficiency of adenovirus infection can be greatly improved by a limited enzyme digestion, which makes accessible the lateral faces of cells bearing the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor. This enables reliable delivery of genes into epithelial cells. Conclusion We describe a new in vitro culture system for the small intestine of the mouse embryo that recapitulates its normal development. The system both provides a model for studying normal development of the intestinal epithelium and also allows for the manipulation of gene expression. The explants can be cultured for up to two weeks, they

  16. Feline Tritrichomonas foetus adhere to intestinal epithelium by receptor-ligand-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, M K; Stauffer, S H; Gookin, J L

    2013-02-18

    Tritrichomonas foetus (TF) is a protozoan that infects the feline ileum and colon resulting in chronic diarrhea. Up to 30% of young purebred cats are infected with TF and the infection is recognized as pandemic. Only a single drug, characterized by a narrow margin of safety and emerging development of resistance, is effective for treatment. While the venereal pathogenicity of bovine TF is attributed to adherence to uterovaginal epithelium, the pathogenesis of diarrhea in feline TF infection is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro model of feline TF adhesion to intestinal epithelium. Confluent monolayers of porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) were infected with axenic cultures of feline TF that were labeled with [(3)H] thymidine or CFSE and harvested at log-phase. The effect of multiplicity and duration of infection, viability of TF, binding competition, formalin fixation and cytoskeletal inhibitors on adherence of feline TF to IPEC-J2 monolayers was quantified by liquid scintillation counting and immunofluorescence. [(3)H] thymidine and CFSE-labeled TF reproducibly adhered to IPEC-J2 monolayers. Clinical isolates of feline TF adhered to the intestinal epithelium in significantly greater numbers than Pentatrichomonas hominis, the latter of which is a presumably nonpathogenic trichomonad. Adhesion of TF required viable trophozoites but was independent of cytoskeletal activity. Based on saturation and competition binding experiments, adherence of feline TF to the epithelium occurred via specific receptor-ligand interactions. The developed model provides a valuable resource for assessing pathogenic mechanisms of feline TF and developing novel pharmacologic therapies for blocking the adhesion of feline TF to the intestinal epithelium. PMID:23182300

  17. FELINE TRITRICHOMONAS FOETUS ADHERE TO INTESTINAL EPITHELIUM BY RECEPTOR-LIGAND-DEPENDENT MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, M.K.; Stauffer, S.H.; Gookin, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus (TF) is a protozoan that infects the feline ileum and colon resulting in chronic diarrhea. Up to 30% of young purebred cats are infected with TF and the infection is recognized as pandemic. Only a single drug, characterized by a narrow margin of safety and emerging development of resistance, is effective for treatment. While the venereal pathogenicity of bovine TF is attributed to adherence to uterovaginal epithelium, the pathogenesis of diarrhea in feline TF infection is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro model of feline TF adhesion to intestinal epithelium. Confluent monolayers of porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) were infected with axenic cultures of feline TF that were labeled with [3H] thymidine or CFSE and harvested at log-phase. The effect of multiplicity and duration of infection, viability of TF, binding competition, formalin fixation and cytoskeletal inhibitors on adherence of feline TF to IPEC-J2 monolayers was quantified by liquid scintillation counting and immunofluorescence. [3H] thymidine and CFSE-labeled TF reproducibly adhered to IPEC-J2 monolayers. Clinical isolates of feline TF adhered to the intestinal epithelium in significantly greater numbers than Pentatrichomonas hominis, the latter of which is a presumably nonpathogenic trichomonad. Adhesion of TF required viable trophozoites but was independent of cytoskeletal activity. Based on saturation and competition binding experiments, adherence of feline TF to the epithelium occurred via specific receptor-ligand interactions. The developed model provides a valuable resource for assessing pathogenic mechanisms of feline TF and developing novel pharmacologic therapies for blocking the adhesion of feline TF to the intestinal epithelium. PMID:23182300

  18. WNT7A and PAX6 define corneal epithelium homeostasis and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Hong; Xue, Yuanchao; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xi, Lei; Patel, Sherrina; Cai, Huimin; Luo, Jing; Zhang, Meixia; Zhang, Ming; Yang, Yang; Li, Gen; Li, Hairi; Jiang, Wei; Yeh, Emily; Lin, Jonathan; Pei, Michelle; Zhu, Jin; Cao, Guiqun; Zhang, Liangfang; Yu, Benjamin; Chen, Shaochen; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Yizhi; Zhang, Kang

    2014-07-17

    The surface of the cornea consists of a unique type of non-keratinized epithelial cells arranged in an orderly fashion, and this is essential for vision by maintaining transparency for light transmission. Cornea epithelial cells (CECs) undergo continuous renewal from limbal stem or progenitor cells (LSCs), and deficiency in LSCs or corneal epithelium--which turns cornea into a non-transparent, keratinized skin-like epithelium--causes corneal surface disease that leads to blindness in millions of people worldwide. How LSCs are maintained and differentiated into corneal epithelium in healthy individuals and which key molecular events are defective in patients have been largely unknown. Here we report establishment of an in vitro feeder-cell-free LSC expansion and three-dimensional corneal differentiation protocol in which we found that the transcription factors p63 (tumour protein 63) and PAX6 (paired box protein PAX6) act together to specify LSCs, and WNT7A controls corneal epithelium differentiation through PAX6. Loss of WNT7A or PAX6 induces LSCs into skin-like epithelium, a critical defect tightly linked to common human corneal diseases. Notably, transduction of PAX6 in skin epithelial stem cells is sufficient to convert them to LSC-like cells, and upon transplantation onto eyes in a rabbit corneal injury model, these reprogrammed cells are able to replenish CECs and repair damaged corneal surface. These findings suggest a central role of the WNT7A-PAX6 axis in corneal epithelial cell fate determination, and point to a new strategy for treating corneal surface diseases. PMID:25030175

  19. TRANSCRIPTOMIC ANALYSIS OF F344 RAT NASAL EPITHELIUM SUGGESTS THAT THE LACK OF CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO GLUTARALDEHYDE IS DUE TO ITS GREATER TOXICITY COMPARED TO FORMALDEHYDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde is cytotoxic and carcinogenic to the rat nasal respiratory epithelium inducing tumors after 12 months. Glutaraldehyde is also cytotoxic but is not carcinogenic to nasal epithelium even after 24 months. Both aldehydes induce similar acute and subchronic histopathology...

  20. Membrane carbonic anhydrase (IV) and ciliary epithelium. Carbonic anhydrase activity is present in the basolateral membranes of the non-pigmented ciliary epithelium of rabbit eyes.

    PubMed

    Matsui, H; Murakami, M; Wynns, G C; Conroy, C W; Mead, A; Maren, T H; Sears, M L

    1996-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) lower intraocular pressure by reducing aqueous flow. It has been thought that this pharmacologic reduction of aqueous flow is mediated by the ciliary epithelium, but it is not known whether this cellular action is effected by inhibition of the membranal (CA IV) and/or cytosolic (CA II) carbonic anhydrases of the ciliary epithelium. The isolated ciliary epithelial bilayer maintains its anatomic and functional polarity and generates a transepithelial potential difference (TEP) in an Ussing type chamber. Depletion of HCO3-, accomplished either with an HCO3(-)-free solution bathing the epithelial bilayer, or, with addition of freely permeant CAIs to HCO3(-)-containing media, (from either the PE or NPE side of the bilayer) depolarizes the preparation. Addition of CAIs to an HCO3(-)-depleted preparation has no further effect, indicating the specific action of the CAIs. The CAI, 2-p-NH2 benzenesulfonamido-1,3,4,-thiadiazole-5-SO2NH2, linked to polybutadiene maleic acid yields an impermeant polymer of 20000 Da with no loss of activity. At 45 microM this impermeant polymer caused a 60% increase in the SCC, seen only when the compound was applied to the NPE side of the bilayer. This latter result indicates an effect from inhibition of CA IV in the basolateral membranes of the NPE. Thus there are probably two different cellular actions of CAIs upon the ciliary epithelium to reduce aqueous inflow, cytoplasmic and membranal. The action of NPE basolateral membranal CA IV is probably linked to the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger. PMID:8795459

  1. Enzymatic modification of schizophyllan.

    PubMed

    Leathers, Timothy D; Sutivisedsak, Nongnuch; Nunnally, Melinda S; Price, Neil P J; Stanley, April M

    2015-03-01

    An enzymatic method was developed for the progressive modification of the polysaccharide schizophyllan. Fungal strains Hypocrea nigricans NRRL 62555, Penicillium crustosum NRRL 62558, and Penicillium simplicissimum NRRL 62550 were previously identified as novel sources of β-endoglucanase with specificity towards schizophyllan. Concentrated enzyme preparations from these strains showed specific activities of 1.7-4.3 U β-glucanase/mg protein. Using dilutions of these enzymes in time course digestions, schizophyllan was progressively modified to reduced molecular weight species. Glucose and oligosaccharides were found only in the more complete digestions, and thus modified schizophyllan can be produced quantitatively, without loss, to small molecules. Permethylation analysis confirmed that modified schizophyllan retains the fundamental linkage structure of native schizophyllan. Modified schizophyllan species showed progressively reduced viscosity profiles, and all exhibited pseudoplasticity in response to shear thinning. PMID:25335747

  2. Perioperative period: immunological modifications.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, F; Chinellato, I; Caimmi, S; Peroni, D G; Franceschini, F; Miraglia Del Giudice, M; Bernardini, R

    2011-01-01

    Surgical stress induces complex modifications in the hemodynamic, metabolic, neuro-hormonal and immune response of the individual. The magnitude of these alterations depends on preoperative events leading to surgery, the severity of surgical trauma, and also on post-operative/post-traumatic complications (multiple hit hypothesis). As in other conditions of tissue damage, surgery trauma is followed by an immune-inflammatory response, initiated at the site of injury by the innate immune system, followed by a compensatory anti-inflammatory (or immunosuppressive) response (CARS), involving mainly cells of the adaptive immune system, which predispose the host to septic complications. The up-regulated inflammatory response, together with a profound impairment of macrophage and cell-mediated immunity, appear to be the cause for patients' increased susceptibility in developing subsequent sepsis after major surgery. PMID:22014920

  3. β3GnT2 Maintains Adenylyl Cyclase-3 Signaling and Axon Guidance Molecule Expression in the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Faden, Ashley A.; Knott, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), odorant receptor stimulation generates cAMP signals that function in both odor detection and the regulation of axon guidance molecule expression. The enzyme that synthesizes cAMP, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), is coexpressed in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) with poly-N-acetyllactosamine (PLN) oligosaccharides determined by the glycosyltransferase β3GnT2. The loss of either enzyme results in similar defects in olfactory bulb (OB) innervation and OSN survival, suggesting that glycosylation may be important for AC3 function. We show here that AC3 is extensively modified with N-linked PLN, which is essential for AC3 activity and localization. On Western blots, AC3 from the wild-type OE migrates diffusely as a heavily glycosylated 200 kDa band that interacts with the PLN-binding lectin LEA. AC3 from the β3GnT2−/− OE loses these PLN modifications, migrating instead as a 140 kDa glycoprotein. Furthermore, basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production is reduced 80–90% in the β3GnT2−/− OE. Although AC3 traffics normally to null OSN cilia, it is absent from axon projections that aberrantly target the OB. The cAMP-dependent guidance receptor neuropilin-1 is also lost from β3GnT2−/− OSNs and axons, while semaphorin-3A ligand expression is upregulated. In addition, kirrel2, a mosaically expressed adhesion molecule that functions in axon sorting, is absent from β3GnT2−/− OB projections. These results demonstrate that PLN glycans are essential in OSNs for proper AC3 localization and function. We propose that the loss of cAMP-dependent guidance cues is also a critical factor in the severe axon guidance defects observed in β3GnT2−/− mice. PMID:21525298

  4. Differences in cellular glycoconjugates of quiescent, inflamed, and neoplastic colonic epithelium in colitis and cancer-prone tamarins.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R.; King, N.; Alroy, J.

    1988-01-01

    In the preceding paper the authors demonstrated that the lectin staining patterns of normal colonic epithelium obtained from colitis and carcinoma-prone cotton top tamarins (CTTs), Saguinus oedipus, a New World primate, differs from colitis- and carcinoma-resistant primate species. In this study they determined the usefulness of cytochemical features in inflamed epithelium as indicators for malignant change. They compared the lectin staining pattern in inflamed mucosa and adjacent mucosa with colonic carcinoma from 8 CTTs with that of 9 clinically healthy CTTs with no histologic evidence of colitis. Deparaffinized sections were labeled with ten biotinylated lectins and stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method. Numerous significant differences were demonstrated in the lectin staining pattern between normal epithelium and colonic carcinoma; fewer between normal and chronic inflamed epithelium. However, between chronic inflamed epithelium and colonic carcinoma significant staining differences were observed with only two lectins, peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I). These findings suggest that there is a progression in alteration of lectin staining pattern from normal epithelium, via chronic colitis, to colonic carcinoma. Furthermore, the differences between chronic colitis and colonic carcinoma are expressed only with those lectins that are associated with malignant transformation of human colonic epithelium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3132858

  5. Differences in cellular glycoconjugates of quiescent, inflamed, and neoplastic colonic epithelium in colitis and cancer-prone tamarins.

    PubMed

    Moore, R; King, N; Alroy, J

    1988-06-01

    In the preceding paper the authors demonstrated that the lectin staining patterns of normal colonic epithelium obtained from colitis and carcinoma-prone cotton top tamarins (CTTs), Saguinus oedipus, a New World primate, differs from colitis- and carcinoma-resistant primate species. In this study they determined the usefulness of cytochemical features in inflamed epithelium as indicators for malignant change. They compared the lectin staining pattern in inflamed mucosa and adjacent mucosa with colonic carcinoma from 8 CTTs with that of 9 clinically healthy CTTs with no histologic evidence of colitis. Deparaffinized sections were labeled with ten biotinylated lectins and stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method. Numerous significant differences were demonstrated in the lectin staining pattern between normal epithelium and colonic carcinoma; fewer between normal and chronic inflamed epithelium. However, between chronic inflamed epithelium and colonic carcinoma significant staining differences were observed with only two lectins, peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I). These findings suggest that there is a progression in alteration of lectin staining pattern from normal epithelium, via chronic colitis, to colonic carcinoma. Furthermore, the differences between chronic colitis and colonic carcinoma are expressed only with those lectins that are associated with malignant transformation of human colonic epithelium. PMID:3132858

  6. EFFECT OF DEATH-TO-PRESERVATION TIME ON DONOR CORNEAL EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Van Meter, Woodford S; Katz, Douglas G; White, Harrison; Gayheart, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Surface disease is one of multiple variables affecting the quality of the postkeratoplasty donor cornea. Trauma to Bowman’s layer before and during harvesting can denude the donor epithelium and result in epithelial defects in the donor following penetrating keratoplasty. Eye banks use death-to-preservation (DP) time intervals as long as 18 hours. This study evaluates the effects of higher DP time on the donor epithelium in storage medium and immediately following keratoplasty. Methods Eighty-one consecutive corneas were procured by the University of Kentucky Eye Bank, rated by one technician (H.W.), and used by one surgeon (W.S.V.) for elective penetrating keratoplasty. Donor records were retrospectively reviewed for age, DP time, and epithelial condition. All corneas were harvested and evaluated according to Eye Bank Association of America standards. Donor charts were reviewed for DP time and for condition of the epithelium in storage. Recipient charts were reviewed for epithelial defects following keratoplasty. Results Average DP time of all 81 donor corneas was 6:18 hours (ie, 6 hours, 18 minutes). Average DP time of 13 corneas with epithelial sloughing was 7:02 (range, 2:01 to 12:25) hours, and nine (69%) had DP time longer than 6 hours. Average DP time of 68 corneas with no sloughing was 6:09 (range, 1:59 to 11:03) hours (P < .32). Average DP of 28 recipients with epithelial defect on day 1 was 8:01 (range, 3:41 to 12:49), and average DP in 53 patients with an intact epithelium on day 1 was 5:23 (range, 1:59 to 9:46) (P < .001). The percentage of postoperative patients with epithelial defects in the graft on day 1 rose from 14% when DP was less than 4 hours to 100% when DP was greater than 10 hours. Average DP in 13 donors under age 30 was 8.3 hours. Conclusion DP time longer than 6 hours was more likely to result in sloughing of the donor epithelium. Care of donor epithelium prior to harvesting becomes increasingly important with DP times longer

  7. Site-specific population dynamics and variable olfactory marker protein expression in the postnatal canine olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Patricia; Rohn, Karl; Beineke, Andreas; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Wewetzer, Konstantin

    2009-01-01

    The main olfactory epithelium is a pseudostratified columnar epithelium that displays neurogenesis over the course of a lifetime. New olfactory neurons arise basally and are transferred to the middle third of the epithelium during maturation. It is generally believed that this pattern is present throughout the olfactory area. In the present study, we show that the postnatal canine olfactory epithelium is composed of two distinct types of epithelium, designated A and B, which not only differ in olfactory neuron morphology, marker expression and basal cell proliferation but also display a patchy distribution and preferential localization within the nasal cavity. Type A epithelium, abundant in the caudal part of the olfactory area, contains well-differentiated olfactory neurons positive for olfactory marker protein but low numbers of immature neurons and proliferating basal cells, as visualized by TrkB/Human Natural Killer-1 (HNK-1) glyco-epitope and Ki-67 immunostaining, respectively. In contrast, type B epithelium is mainly found in the rostral part and contains smaller and elongated neurons that display increased levels of TrkB/Human Natural Killer-1 (HNK-1) glyco-epitope immunoreactivity and a higher number of Ki-67-positive basal cells but lower and variable levels of olfactory marker protein. The vomeronasal organ displays a uniform distribution of molecular markers and proliferating basal cells. The observation that olfactory marker protein in type A and B epithelium is preferentially localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively, implies correlation between subcellular localization and olfactory neuron maturation and may indicate distinct functional roles of olfactory marker protein. Whether the site-specific population dynamics in the postnatal canine olfactory epithelium revealed in the present study are modulated by physiological parameters, such as airflow, has to be clarified in future studies. PMID:19788548

  8. Readout of Epigenetic Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dinshaw J.; Wang, Zhanxin

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on a structure-based analysis of histone posttranslational modification (PTM) readout, where the PTMs serve as docking sites for reader modules as part of larger complexes displaying chromatin modifier and remodeling activities, with the capacity to alter chromatin architecture and templated processes. Individual topics addressed include the diversity of reader-binding pocket architectures and common principles underlying readout of methyl-lysine and methyl-arginine marks, their unmodified counterparts, as well as acetyl-lysine and phosphoserine marks. The review also discusses the impact of multivalent readout of combinations of PTMs localized at specific genomic sites by linked binding modules on processes ranging from gene transcription to repair. Additional topics include cross talk between histone PTMs, histone mimics, epigenetic-based diseases, and drug-based therapeutic intervention. The review ends by highlighting new initiatives and advances, as well as future challenges, toward the promise of enhancing our structural and mechanistic understanding of the readout of histone PTMs at the nucleosomal level. PMID:23642229

  9. [Fine structure of the fundic gland zone epithelium in various eastern African ruminants].

    PubMed

    Weyrauch, K D; Saber, A S

    1985-01-01

    Light- and electron microscopic investigations were conducted on the epithelium of the area glandulae gastricae propriae of the abomasum, using material of 12 East African game ruminants of nine species. The members of the main feeding categories (Hofmann, Stewart 1972): concentrate selector, roughage eater and intermediate feeder did not differ much in the ultrastructure of the fundic stomach epithelium but showed greater differences with respect to the height and shape of the glandular tubules and the arrangement of the epithelial cell types. Specifically the following cell types were observed: mucoid cells, chief cells, parietal cells, seven different endocrine cells, tuft cells and two types of migrating cells. In some epithelial celltypes of the concentrate selector dikdik, cristalloid cytoplasmic inclusions were found. PMID:4014717

  10. Chemodetection and Destruction of Host Urea Allows Helicobacter pylori to Locate the Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Julie Y.; Sweeney, Emily Goers; Sigal, Michael; Zhang, Hai C.; Remington, S. James; Cantrell, Michael A.; Kuo, Calvin J.; Guillemin, Karen; Amieva, Manuel R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori interacts intimately with the gastric mucosa to avoid the microbicidal acid in the stomach lumen. The cues H. pylori senses to locate and colonize the gastric epithelium have not been well defined. We show that metabolites emanating from human gastric organoids rapidly attract H. pylori. This response is largely controlled by the bacterial chemoreceptor TlpB, and the main attractant emanating from epithelia is urea. Our previous structural analyses show that TlpB binds urea with high affinity. Here we demonstrate that this tight binding controls highly sensitive responses, allowing detection of urea concentrations as low as 50 nanomolar. Attraction to urea requires that H. pylori urease simultaneously destroys the signal. We propose that H. pylori has evolved a sensitive urea chemodetection and destruction system that allows the bacterium to dynamically and locally modify the host environment to locate the epithelium. PMID:26269952