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Sample records for epitopes preferentially recognized

  1. Major role for carbohydrate epitopes preferentially recognized by chronically infected mice in the determination of Schistosoma mansoni schistosomulum surface antigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Omer-ali, P.; Magee, A.I.; Kelly, C.; Simpson, A.J.G.

    1986-12-01

    A radioimmunoassay that makes use of whole Schistosomula and /sup 125/I-labeled protein A has been used to characterize and to quantify the binding of antisera to the surface of 3 hr mechanically transformed schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni. This technique facilitates the determination of epitopes on the schistosomula in addition to those detected by surface labeling and immunoprecipitation. By using this technique, it has been demonstrated that there is a much greater binding to the parasite surface of antibodies from chronically infected mice (CMS) than of antibodies from mice infected with highly irradiated cercariae (VMS), and CMS recognizes epitopes that VMS does not. Treatment of the surface of the schistosomula with trifluoromethanesulphonic acid and sodium metaperiodate has suggested that the discrepancy of the binding between the two sera is due to the recognition of a large number of additional epitopes by CMS, which are carbohydrate in nature. Some of the carbohydrate epitopes are expressed on the previously described surface glycoprotein antigens of M/sub r/ 200,000, 38,000, and 17,000.

  2. Key epitopes on the ESAT-6 antigen recognized in mice during the recall of protective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Brandt, L; Oettinger, T; Holm, A; Andersen, A B; Andersen, P

    1996-10-15

    The recall of long-lived immunity in a mouse model of tuberculosis (TB) is defined as an accelerated accumulation of reactive T cells in the target organs. We have recently identified Ag 85B and a 6-kilodalton early secretory antigenic target, designated ESAT-6, as key antigenic targets recognized by these cells. In the present study, preferential recognition of the ESAT-6 Ag during the recall of immunity was found to be shared by five of six genetically different strains of mice. Overlapping peptides spanning the sequence of ESAT-6 were used to map two T cell epitopes on this molecule. One epitope recognized in the context of H-2b,d was located in the N-terminal part of the molecule, whereas an epitope recognized in the context of H-2a,k covered amino acids 51 to 60. Shorter versions of the N-terminal epitope allowed the precise definition of a 13-amino acid core sequence recognized in the context of H-2b. The peptide covering the N-terminal epitope was immunogenic, and a T cell response with the same fine specificity as that induced during TB infection was generated by immunization with the peptide in IFA. In the C57BL/6j strain, this single epitope was recognized by an exceedingly high frequency of splenic T cells (approximately 1:1000), representing 25 to 35% of the total culture filtrate-reactive T cells recruited to the site of infection during the first phase of the recall response. These findings emphasize the relevance of this Ag in the immune response to TB and suggest that immunologic recognition in the first phase of infection is a highly restricted event dominated by a limited number of T cell clones. PMID:8871652

  3. Characterization of Two Novel mAbs Recognizing Different Epitopes on CD43

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soseul; Hong, Jeong won; Cho, Woon-Dong; Moon, Yoo Ri; Yoon, Sang Soon; Kim, Min-Young; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yi, Jae Hyuk; Ham, Young Jun; Rah, Hyung Chul; Kim, Seung Ryul

    2014-01-01

    JL1, a specific epitope on CD43, is a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of acute leukemia. Although qualitative assays for detecting leukemia-specific CD43 exist, there is a need to develop quantitative assays for the same. Here, we developed two novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 2C8 and 8E10, recognizing different epitopes on CD43. These clones are capable of pairing with YG5, another mAb against JL1 epitope, because they were selectively obtained using sandwich ELISA. Antigens recognized by 2C8 and 8E10 were confirmed as CD43 by western blotting using the CD43-hFC recombinant protein. When expression on various leukemic cell lines was investigated, 2C8 and 8E10 displayed a disparity in the distribution of the epitope. Enzyme assays revealed that these mAbs recognized a sialic acid-dependent epitope on CD43. Using normal thymus and lymph node paraffin-embedded tissues, we confirmed a difference in the epitopes recognized by the two mAbs that was predicted based on the maturity of the cells in the tissue. In summary, we developed and characterized two mAbs, 2C8 and 8E10, which can be used with YG5 in a sandwich ELISA for detecting leukemia-specific CD43. PMID:24999313

  4. The epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody in the myelin-associated protein CNP.

    PubMed

    Stricker, R; Kalbacher, H; Reiser, G

    1997-08-18

    The epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody (MAb-46-1) directed against the myelin-associated protein CNP (2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase; EC 3.1.4.37) from several species was characterized. MAb-46-1 can be employed for immunoprecipitation, immunostaining in Western blots and in immunohistochemistry. Short peptides derived from the human CNP1 peptide sequence were synthesized and used in enzyme linked immunosorbent assays to test the reactivity of MAb-46-1. Coarse screening experiments enabled us to localize the epitope recognized by MAb-46-1 to the amino acid residues 9 to 19 close to the N-terminus. Further investigations using shorter peptides comprising this part of the protein allowed us to identify a 9 amino acid residue long peptide (amino acids 11 to 19: ELQFPFLQD) which represents the minimal epitope recognized by MAb-46-1, probably through a 3-dimensional structure and less likely a straight linear peptide. The epitope seems to be stabilized also by the attached amino acids 7 to 10 (KDKP). The peptide sequence 9-19 is conserved in all CNP sequences described so far. Thus, MAb-46-1 might be of general usefulness for further studies of the not yet identified function of the myelin-associated protein CNP. PMID:9268698

  5. Pathogenic CD4 T cells in type 1 diabetes recognize epitopes formed by peptide fusion.

    PubMed

    Delong, Thomas; Wiles, Timothy A; Baker, Rocky L; Bradley, Brenda; Barbour, Gene; Reisdorph, Richard; Armstrong, Michael; Powell, Roger L; Reisdorph, Nichole; Kumar, Nitesh; Elso, Colleen M; DeNicola, Megan; Bottino, Rita; Powers, Alvin C; Harlan, David M; Kent, Sally C; Mannering, Stuart I; Haskins, Kathryn

    2016-02-12

    T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas causes type 1 diabetes (T1D). CD4 T cell responses play a central role in β cell destruction, but the identity of the epitopes recognized by pathogenic CD4 T cells remains unknown. We found that diabetes-inducing CD4 T cell clones isolated from nonobese diabetic mice recognize epitopes formed by covalent cross-linking of proinsulin peptides to other peptides present in β cell secretory granules. These hybrid insulin peptides (HIPs) are antigenic for CD4 T cells and can be detected by mass spectrometry in β cells. CD4 T cells from the residual pancreatic islets of two organ donors who had T1D also recognize HIPs. Autoreactive T cells targeting hybrid peptides may explain how immune tolerance is broken in T1D. PMID:26912858

  6. Preferential recognition of epitopes on AGE-IgG by the autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saman; Habib, Safia; Moinuddin; Ali, Asif

    2013-01-01

    Incubation of proteins with glucose lead to their non-enzymatic glycation ultimately resulting in the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in vivo. AGEs alter unique three dimensional structures of various plasma proteins such as IgG. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, is well established. In view of this, commercially available human IgG was glycated in vitro with physiological concentration of glucose (5mM) and the possible involvement of glycated IgG (AGE-IgG) in RA was evaluated. The RA patients were divided into two groups on the basis of disease onset with respect to age: group I (early onset: 20-32 years) and group II (late onset: 36-54 years). AGE-IgG and oxidative stress levels were detected in RA patients and normal healthy individuals by nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) assay and carbonyl content estimation respectively. Binding characteristics and specificity of RA antibodies were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We observed preferential binding of RA antibodies to AGE-IgG in comparison to native IgG. Band shift assay further substantiated the enhanced recognition of AGE-IgG by RA antibodies. The results suggest that glycation of IgG results in the generation of neo-epitopes, making it a potential immunogen. Our findings project AGE-IgG as one of the factors for induction of circulating RA autoantibodies. PMID:23073292

  7. HIV-1 epitope-specific CD8+ T cell responses strongly associated with delayed disease progression cross-recognize epitope variants efficiently.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Emma L; Lopes, A Ross; Jones, Nicola A; Cornforth, David; Newton, Phillipa; Aldam, Diana; Pellegrino, Pierre; Turner, Jo; Williams, Ian; Wilson, Craig M; Goepfert, Paul A; Maini, Mala K; Borrow, Persephone

    2006-05-15

    The ability of HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to recognize epitope variants resulting from viral sequence variation in vivo may affect the ease with which HIV-1 can escape T cell control and impact on the rate of disease progression in HIV-1-infected humans. Here, we studied the functional cross-reactivity of CD8 responses to HIV-1 epitopes restricted by HLA class I alleles associated with differential prognosis of infection. We show that the epitope-specific responses exhibiting the most efficient cross-recognition of amino acid-substituted variants were those strongly associated with delayed progression to disease. Not all epitopes restricted by the same HLA class I allele showed similar variant cross-recognition efficiency, consistent with the hypothesis that the reported associations between particular HLA class I alleles and rate of disease progression may be due to the quality of responses to certain "critical" epitopes. Irrespective of their efficiency of functional cross-recognition, CD8(+) T cells of all HIV-1 epitope specificities examined showed focused TCR usage. Furthermore, interpatient variability in variant cross-reactivity correlated well with use of different dominant TCR Vbeta families, suggesting that flexibility is not conferred by the overall clonal breadth of the response but instead by properties of the dominant TCR(s) used for epitope recognition. A better understanding of the features of T cell responses associated with long-term control of viral replication should facilitate rational vaccine design. PMID:16670322

  8. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the eastern equine encephalitis virus E2 protein recognized by avian antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Encheng; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Liang; Xu, Qingyuan; Yang, Tao; Qin, Yongli; Wang, Wenshi; Wei, Peng; Sun, Jing; Wu, Donglai

    2013-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne virus that can cause both human and equine encephalitis with high case fatality rates. EEEV can also be widespread among birds, including pheasants, ostriches, emu, turkeys, whooping cranes and chickens. The E2 protein of EEEV and other Alphaviruses is an important immunogenic protein that elicits antibodies of diagnostic value. While many therapeutic and diagnostic applications of E2 protein-specific antibodies have been reported, the specific epitopes on E2 protein recognized by the antibody responses of different susceptible hosts, including avian species, remain poorly defined. In the present study, the avian E2-reactive polyclonal antibody (PAb) response was mapped to linear peptide epitopes using PAbs elicited in chickens and ducks following immunization with recombinant EEEV E2 protein and a series of 42 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire EEEV E2 protein. We identified 12 and 13 peptides recognized by the chicken and duck PAb response, respectively. Six of these linear peptides were commonly recognized by PAbs elicited in both avian species. Among them five epitopes recognized by both avian, the epitopes located at amino acids 211-226 and 331-352 were conserved among the EEEV antigenic complex, but not other associated alphaviruses, whereas the epitopes at amino acids 11-26, 30-45 and 151-166 were specific to EEEV subtype I. The five common peptide epitopes were not recognized by avian PAbs against Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) and Duck Plague Virus (DPV). The identification and characterization of EEEV E2 antibody epitopes may be aid the development of diagnostic tools and facilitate the design of epitope-based vaccines for EEEV. These results also offer information with which to study the structure of EEEV E2 protein. PMID:23922704

  9. Comprehensive Mapping of Common Immunodominant Epitopes in the Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus E2 Protein Recognized by Avian Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, EnCheng; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Liang; Xu, QingYuan; Yang, Tao; Qin, YongLi; Wang, WenShi; Wei, Peng; Sun, Jing; Wu, DongLai

    2013-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne virus that can cause both human and equine encephalitis with high case fatality rates. EEEV can also be widespread among birds, including pheasants, ostriches, emu, turkeys, whooping cranes and chickens. The E2 protein of EEEV and other Alphaviruses is an important immunogenic protein that elicits antibodies of diagnostic value. While many therapeutic and diagnostic applications of E2 protein-specific antibodies have been reported, the specific epitopes on E2 protein recognized by the antibody responses of different susceptible hosts, including avian species, remain poorly defined. In the present study, the avian E2-reactive polyclonal antibody (PAb) response was mapped to linear peptide epitopes using PAbs elicited in chickens and ducks following immunization with recombinant EEEV E2 protein and a series of 42 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire EEEV E2 protein. We identified 12 and 13 peptides recognized by the chicken and duck PAb response, respectively. Six of these linear peptides were commonly recognized by PAbs elicited in both avian species. Among them five epitopes recognized by both avian, the epitopes located at amino acids 211–226 and 331–352 were conserved among the EEEV antigenic complex, but not other associated alphaviruses, whereas the epitopes at amino acids 11–26, 30–45 and 151–166 were specific to EEEV subtype I. The five common peptide epitopes were not recognized by avian PAbs against Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) and Duck Plague Virus (DPV). The identification and characterization of EEEV E2 antibody epitopes may be aid the development of diagnostic tools and facilitate the design of epitope-based vaccines for EEEV. These results also offer information with which to study the structure of EEEV E2 protein. PMID:23922704

  10. Identification of broadly recognized, T helper 1 lymphocyte epitopes in an equine lentivirus

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Darrilyn G; Oaks, J Lindsay; Brown, Wendy C; McGuire, Travis C

    2002-01-01

    Equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) is a horse lentivirus causing lifelong, persistent infection. During acute infection, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are probably involved in terminating plasma viraemia. However, only a few EIAV CTL epitopes, restricted to fewer horse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I alleles, are known. As interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-secreting CD4+, T helper 1 (Th1) lymphocytes promote CTL activity and help maintain memory CTL, identifying broadly recognized EIAV Th1 epitopes would contribute significantly to vaccine strategies seeking to promote strong CTL responses among horses with varying class I haplotypes. To this end, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 10 MHC disparate, EIAV-infected horses were tested in T-lymphocyte proliferation assays for recognition of peptides from the Gag p26 capsid region and a portion of Pol. Both regions are highly conserved among EIAV isolates, and this Pol region is 51–63% homologueous to other lentiviral Pol proteins. Seven of 10 horses recognized peptide Gag 221–245, and peptides Gag 242–261 and Pol 323–344 were recognized by five and four horses, respectively. Furthermore, the Gag peptides were recognized by two additional horses after resolving their initial plasma viraemia, indicating that these two peptides can be immunodominant early in infection. Gag peptide-responsive PBMC produced only IFN-γ, indicating a Th1 response, while Pol 323–344-responsive PBMC produced IFN-γ both with and without interleukin-4. PBMC from uninfected horses failed to either proliferate or secrete cytokines in response to peptide stimulation. Finally, CD4+ T lymphocytes were required for proliferation responses, as shown by assays using CD4- versus CD8-depleted PBMC. PMID:11918691

  11. Pathogenic CD4 T cells in type 1 diabetes recognize epitopes formed by peptide fusion

    PubMed Central

    Delong, Thomas; Wiles, Timothy A.; Baker, Rocky L.; Bradley, Brenda; Barbour, Gene; Reisdorph, Richard; Kumar, Nitesh; Elso, Colleen M.; Armstrong, Michael; Powell, Roger L.; Reisdorph, Nichole; DeNicola, Megan; Bottino, Rita; Powers, Alvin C.; Harlan, David M.; Kent, Sally C.; Mannering, Stuart I.; Haskins, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by T cell mediated destruction of the insulin-producing β cells. CD4 T cell responses play a central role in β-cell destruction but the identity of the epitopes recognized by pathogenic CD4 T cells remains unknown. To address this we used a panel of diabetes triggering CD4 T cell clones isolated from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Here we show that these pathogenic CD4 T cells target peptide ligands that are formed by covalent crosslinking of proinsulin peptides to other peptides present in β-cell secretory granules. These hybrid insulin peptides (HIPs) are highly antigenic for CD4 T cells and can be detected by mass spectrometry in β-cells. CD4 T cells from the residual pancreatic islets of two organ donors who had T1D also recognize HIPs. The discovery that autoreactive T cells target hybrid peptides may explain how immune tolerance is broken in T1D. PMID:26912858

  12. Melanoma-specific CD4+ T cells recognize nonmutated HLA-DR-restricted tyrosinase epitopes.

    PubMed

    Topalian, S L; Gonzales, M I; Parkhurst, M; Li, Y F; Southwood, S; Sette, A; Rosenberg, S A; Robbins, P F

    1996-05-01

    Tyrosinase was the first melanoma-associated antigen shown to be recognized by CD4+ T cells. In this study, we have identified two HLA-DRB1*0401-restricted peptides recognized by these T cells: Ty 56-70 and Ty 448-462. As with many of the MHC class I-restricted melanoma epitopes, both are nonmutated self peptides that have intermediate and weak MHC binding affinities, respectively. Mutated and truncated versions of these peptides were used to define their MHC binding anchor residues. Anchor residues were then modified to derive peptides with increased MHC binding affinities and T cell stimulatory properties. Ty 56-70 and Ty 448-462 enhance the list of immunogenic HLA-A2-, A24-, and B44-restricted tyrosinase peptides already described. Thus, tyrosinase provides a model for anti-melanoma vaccines in which a single molecule can generate multivalent immunization incorporating both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:8642306

  13. A novel keratan sulphate domain preferentially expressed on the large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage is recognized by the monoclonal antibody 3D12/H7.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D C; Haubeck, H D; Eich, K; Kolbe-Busch, S; Stöcker, G; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H

    1996-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were prepared against aggrecan which has been isolated from human articular cartilage and purified by several chromatographic steps. One of these mAbs, the aggrecan-specific mAb 3D12/H7, was selected for further characterization. The data presented indicate that this mAb recognizes a novel domain of keratan sulphate chains from aggrecan: (1) immunochemical staining of aggrecan is abolished by treatment with keratanase/keratanase II, but not with keratanase or chondroitin sulphate lyase AC/ABC; (2) after chemical deglycosylation of aggrecan no staining of the core-protein was observed; (3) different immunochemical reactivity was observed against keratan sulphates from articular cartilage, intervertebral disc and cornea for the mAbs 3D12/H7 and 5D4. For further characterization of the epitope, reduced and 3H-labelled keratan sulphate chains were prepared. In an IEF-gel-shift assay it was shown that the 3H-labelled oligosaccharides obtained after keratanase digestion of reduced and 3H-labelled keratan sulphate chains were recognized by the mAb 3D12/H7. Thus it can be concluded that the mAb 3D12/H7 recognizes an epitope in the linkage region present in, at least some, keratan sulphate chains of the large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage. Moreover, this domain seems to be expressed preferentially on those keratan sulphate chains which occur in the chondroitin sulphate-rich region of aggrecan, since the antibody does not recognize the keratan sulphate-rich region obtained after combined chondroitinase AC/ABC and trypsin digestion of aggrecan. PMID:8836155

  14. A novel keratan sulphate domain preferentially expressed on the large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage is recognized by the monoclonal antibody 3D12/H7.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D C; Haubeck, H D; Eich, K; Kolbe-Busch, S; Stöcker, G; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H

    1996-09-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were prepared against aggrecan which has been isolated from human articular cartilage and purified by several chromatographic steps. One of these mAbs, the aggrecan-specific mAb 3D12/H7, was selected for further characterization. The data presented indicate that this mAb recognizes a novel domain of keratan sulphate chains from aggrecan: (1) immunochemical staining of aggrecan is abolished by treatment with keratanase/keratanase II, but not with keratanase or chondroitin sulphate lyase AC/ABC; (2) after chemical deglycosylation of aggrecan no staining of the core-protein was observed; (3) different immunochemical reactivity was observed against keratan sulphates from articular cartilage, intervertebral disc and cornea for the mAbs 3D12/H7 and 5D4. For further characterization of the epitope, reduced and 3H-labelled keratan sulphate chains were prepared. In an IEF-gel-shift assay it was shown that the 3H-labelled oligosaccharides obtained after keratanase digestion of reduced and 3H-labelled keratan sulphate chains were recognized by the mAb 3D12/H7. Thus it can be concluded that the mAb 3D12/H7 recognizes an epitope in the linkage region present in, at least some, keratan sulphate chains of the large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage. Moreover, this domain seems to be expressed preferentially on those keratan sulphate chains which occur in the chondroitin sulphate-rich region of aggrecan, since the antibody does not recognize the keratan sulphate-rich region obtained after combined chondroitinase AC/ABC and trypsin digestion of aggrecan. PMID:8836155

  15. Mapping of epitopes recognized by antibodies induced by immunization of mice with PspA and PspC.

    PubMed

    Vadesilho, Cintia F M; Ferreira, Daniela M; Gordon, Stephen B; Briles, David E; Moreno, Adriana T; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Ho, Paulo L; Miyaji, Eliane N

    2014-07-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) and pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) are important candidates for an alternative vaccine against pneumococcal infections. Since these antigens show variability, the use of variants that do not afford broad protection may lead to the selection of vaccine escape bacteria. Epitopes capable of inducing antibodies with broad cross-reactivities should thus be the preferred antigens. In this work, experiments using peptide arrays show that most linear epitopes recognized by antibodies induced in mice against different PspAs were located at the initial 44 amino acids of the mature protein and that antibodies against these linear epitopes did not confer protection against a lethal challenge. Conversely, linear epitopes recognized by antibodies to PspC included the consensus sequences involved in the interaction with human factor H and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). Since linear epitopes of PspA were not protective, larger overlapping fragments containing 100 amino acids of PspA of strain Rx1 were constructed (fragments 1 to 7, numbered from the N terminus) to permit the mapping of antibodies with conformational epitopes not represented in the peptide arrays. Antibodies from mice immunized with fragments 1, 2, 4, and 5 were capable of binding onto the surface of pneumococci and mediating protection against a lethal challenge. The fact that immunization of mice with 100-amino-acid fragments located at the more conserved N-terminal region of PspA (fragments 1 and 2) induced protection against a pneumococcal challenge indicates that the induction of antibodies against conformational epitopes present at this region may be important in strategies for inducing broad protection against pneumococci. PMID:24807052

  16. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the West Nile virus nonstructural protein 1 recognized by avian antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Encheng; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Nihong; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Qin, Yongli; Bu, Zhigao; Yang, Yinhui; Lunt, Ross A; Wang, Linfa; Wu, Donglai

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for serological diagnostic reagents. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the antigenic sites in NS1 that are targeted by host immune responses need to be identified and the potential diagnostic value of individual antigenic sites also needs to be defined. The present study describes comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes in the WNV NS1 using avian WNV NS1 antisera. We screened antisera from chickens, ducks and geese immunized with purified NS1 for reactivity against 35 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire WNV NS1. This study identified twelve, nine and six peptide epitopes recognized by chicken, duck and goose antibody responses, respectively. Three epitopes (NS1-3, 14 and 24) were recognized by antibodies elicited by immunization in all three avian species tested. We also found that NS1-3 and 24 were WNV-specific epitopes, whereas the NS1-14 epitope was conserved among the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) serocomplex viruses based on the reactivity of avian WNV NS1 antisera against polypeptides derived from the NS1 sequences of viruses of the JEV serocomplex. Further analysis showed that the three common polypeptide epitopes were not recognized by antibodies in Avian Influenza Virus (AIV), Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), Duck Plague Virus (DPV) and Goose Parvovirus (GPV) antisera. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study have potential applications in differential diagnostic approaches and subunit vaccines

  17. Common epitope on the lipopolysaccharide of Legionella pneumophila recognized by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Barthe, C; Joly, J R; Ramsay, D; Boissinot, M; Benhamou, N

    1988-01-01

    Serogroup-specificity of Legionella pneumophila is related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and few cross-reactions between serogroups have been observed with rabbit or monkey antisera. C57BL/6 mice were sequentially immunized with crude outer membrane fractions of L. pneumophila serogroups 1, 5, and 7, Legionella bozemanii, and Legionella micdadei. Spleen cells from these mice were then fused with the Sp2-0/Ag14 mouse myeloma cell line. Outer membrane-rich fractions and LPS were prepared from L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 8 and other Legionella and non-Legionella species. Immunoblots of these extracts were performed with monoclonal antibody obtained from these fusions. One of these monoclonal antibodies recognized an epitope common to all tested serogroups of L. pneumophila and attached to the major constituent of the outer membrane, LPS. This antibody did not react with other Legionella species and numerous gram-negative rods other than Pseudomonas fluorescens CDC93. This monoclonal antibody may be useful in preliminary identification of L. pneumophila as an alternative to direct fluorescent-antibody testing. Images PMID:2454935

  18. Human Antibodies that Recognize Novel Immunodominant Quaternary Epitopes on the HIV-1 Env Protein.

    PubMed

    Hicar, Mark D; Chen, Xuemin; Sulli, Chidananda; Barnes, Trevor; Goodman, Jason; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Briney, Bryan; Willis, Jordan; Chukwuma, Valentine U; Kalams, Spyros A; Doranz, Benjamin J; Spearman, Paul; Crowe, James E

    2016-01-01

    Numerous broadly neutralizing antibodies (Abs) target epitopes that are formed or enhanced during mature HIV envelope formation (i.e. quaternary epitopes). Generally, it is thought that Env epitopes that induce broadly neutralizing Abs are difficult to access and poorly immunogenic because of the characteristic oligomerization, conformational flexibility, sequence diversity and extensive glycosylation of Env protein. To enhance for isolation of quaternary epitope-targeting Abs (QtAbs), we previously used HIV virus-like particles (VLPs) to bind B cells from long-term non-progressor subjects to identify a panel of monoclonal Abs. When expressed as recombinant full-length Abs, a subset of these novel Abs exhibited the binding profiles of QtAbs, as they either failed to bind to monomeric Env protein or showed much higher affinity for Env trimers and VLPs. These QtAbs represented a significant proportion of the B-cell response identified with VLPs. The Ab genes of these clones were highly mutated, but they did not neutralize common HIV strains. We sought to further define the epitopes targeted by these QtAbs. Competition-binding and mapping studies revealed these Abs targeted four separate epitopes; they also failed to compete for binding by Abs to known major neutralizing epitopes. Detailed epitope mapping studies revealed that two of the four epitopes were located in the gp41 subunit of Env. These QtAbs bound pre-fusion forms of antigen and showed differential binding kinetics depending on whether oligomers were produced as recombinant gp140 trimers or as full-length Env incorporated into VLPs. Antigenic regions within gp41 present unexpectedly diverse structural epitopes, including these QtAb epitopes, which may be targeted by the naturally occurring Ab response to HIV infection. PMID:27411063

  19. Human Antibodies that Recognize Novel Immunodominant Quaternary Epitopes on the HIV-1 Env Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hicar, Mark D.; Chen, Xuemin; Sulli, Chidananda; Barnes, Trevor; Goodman, Jason; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Briney, Bryan; Willis, Jordan; Chukwuma, Valentine U.; Kalams, Spyros A.; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Spearman, Paul; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous broadly neutralizing antibodies (Abs) target epitopes that are formed or enhanced during mature HIV envelope formation (i.e. quaternary epitopes). Generally, it is thought that Env epitopes that induce broadly neutralizing Abs are difficult to access and poorly immunogenic because of the characteristic oligomerization, conformational flexibility, sequence diversity and extensive glycosylation of Env protein. To enhance for isolation of quaternary epitope-targeting Abs (QtAbs), we previously used HIV virus-like particles (VLPs) to bind B cells from long-term non-progressor subjects to identify a panel of monoclonal Abs. When expressed as recombinant full-length Abs, a subset of these novel Abs exhibited the binding profiles of QtAbs, as they either failed to bind to monomeric Env protein or showed much higher affinity for Env trimers and VLPs. These QtAbs represented a significant proportion of the B-cell response identified with VLPs. The Ab genes of these clones were highly mutated, but they did not neutralize common HIV strains. We sought to further define the epitopes targeted by these QtAbs. Competition-binding and mapping studies revealed these Abs targeted four separate epitopes; they also failed to compete for binding by Abs to known major neutralizing epitopes. Detailed epitope mapping studies revealed that two of the four epitopes were located in the gp41 subunit of Env. These QtAbs bound pre-fusion forms of antigen and showed differential binding kinetics depending on whether oligomers were produced as recombinant gp140 trimers or as full-length Env incorporated into VLPs. Antigenic regions within gp41 present unexpectedly diverse structural epitopes, including these QtAb epitopes, which may be targeted by the naturally occurring Ab response to HIV infection. PMID:27411063

  20. Gag Protein Epitopes Recognized by CD4+ T-Helper Lymphocytes from Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Infected Carrier Horses

    PubMed Central

    Lonning, S. M.; Zhang, W.; McGuire, T. C.

    1999-01-01

    Antigen-specific T-helper (Th) lymphocytes are critical for the development of antiviral humoral responses and the expansion of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Identification of relevant Th lymphocyte epitopes remains an important step in the development of an efficacious subunit peptide vaccine against equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a naturally occurring lentivirus of horses. This study describes Th lymphocyte reactivity in EIAV carrier horses to two proteins, p26 and p15, encoded by the relatively conserved EIAV gag gene. Using partially overlapping peptides, multideterminant and possibly promiscuous epitopes were identified within p26. One peptide was identified which reacted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from all five EIAV-infected horses, and three other peptides were identified which reacted with PBMC from four of five EIAV-infected horses. Four additional peptides containing both CTL and Th lymphocyte epitopes were also identified. Multiple epitopes were recognized in a region corresponding to the major homology region of the human immunodeficiency virus, a region with significant sequence similarity to other lentiviruses including simian immunodeficiency virus, puma lentivirus, feline immunodeficiency virus, Jembrana disease virus, visna virus, and caprine arthritis encephalitis virus. PBMC reactivity to p15 peptides from EIAV carrier horses also occurred. Multiple p15 peptides were shown to be reactive, but not all infected horses had Th lymphocytes recognizing p15 epitopes. The identification of peptides reactive with PBMC from outbred horses, some of which encoded both CTL and Th lymphocyte epitopes, should contribute to the design of synthetic peptide or recombinant vector vaccines for EIAV. PMID:10196322

  1. An epitope in hepatitis C virus core region recognized by cytotoxic T cells in mice and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, M; Okada, H; Nishioka, M; Akatsuka, T; Wychowski, C; Houghten, R; Pendleton, C D; Feinstone, S M; Berzofsky, J A

    1994-01-01

    Several cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes have been defined in hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins. CTL may play an important role in the control of infection by HCV. Here, we identify a highly conserved antigenic site in the HCV core recognized by both murine and human CTL. Spleen cells from mice immunized with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the HCV core gene were restimulated in vitro with 11 peptides from the core protein. CTL from H-2d mice responded to a single 16-residue synthetic peptide (HCV 129-144). This conserved epitope was presented by a murine class I major histocompatibility molecule (H-2Dd) to conventional CD4- CD8+ CTL mapped by using transfectants expressing Dd, Ld, or Kd, but was not seen by CTL restricted by H-2b. The murine epitope was mapped to the decapeptide LMGYIPLVGA. The same 16-residue peptide was recognized by CTL from two HCV-seropositive patients but not by CTL from any seronegative donors. CTL from two HLA-A2-positive patients with acute and chronic hepatitides C recognized a 9-residue fragment (DLMGYIPLV) of the peptide presented by HLA-A2 and containing an HLA-A2-binding motif, extending only 1 residue beyond the murine epitope. Therefore, this conserved peptide, seen with murine CTL and human CTL with a very prevalent HLA class I molecule, may be a valuable component of an HCV vaccine against a broad range of HCV isolates. This study demonstrates that the screening for CTL epitopes in mice prior to human study may be useful. PMID:7512163

  2. Critical Epitopes in the Nucleocapsid Protein of SFTS Virus Recognized by a Panel of SFTS Patients Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Zhang, Li; Sun, Lina; Lu, Jing; Wu, Wei; Li, Chuan; Zhang, Quanfu; Zhang, Fushun; Jin, Cong; Wang, Xianjun; Bi, Zhenqiang; Li, Dexin; Liang, Mifang

    2012-01-01

    Background SFTS virus (SFTSV) is a newly discovered pathogen to cause severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) in human. Successful control of SFTSV epidemic requires better understanding of the antigen target in humoral immune responses to the new bunyavirus infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We have generated a combinatorial Fab antibody phage library from two SFTS patients recovered from SFTSV infection. To date, 94 unique human antibodies have been generated and characterized from over 1200 Fab antibody clones obtained by screening the library with SFTS purified virions. All those monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) recognized the nucleocapsid (N) protein of SFTSV while none of them were reactive to the viral glycoproteins Gn or Gc. Furthermore, over screening 1000 mouse monoclonal antibody clones derived from SFTSV virions immunization, 462 clones reacted with N protein, while only 16 clones were reactive to glycoprotein. Furthermore, epitope mapping of SFTSV N protein was performed through molecular simulation, site mutation and competitive ELISA, and we found that at least 4 distinct antigenic epitopes within N protein were recognized by those human and mouse MAbs, in particular mutation of Glu10 to Ala10 abolished or significantly reduced the binding activity of nearly most SFTS patients derived MAbs. Conclusions/Significance The large number of human recombinant MAbs derived from SFTS patients recognized the viral N protein indicated the important role of the N protein in humoral responses to SFTSV infection, and the critical epitopes we defined in this study provided molecular basis for detection and diagnosis of SFTSV infection. PMID:22719874

  3. Conserved epitopes on HIV-1, FIV and SIV p24 proteins are recognized by HIV-1 infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Roff, Shannon R; Sanou, Missa P; Rathore, Mobeen H; Levy, Jay A; Yamamoto, Janet K

    2015-01-01

    Cross-reactive peptides on HIV-1 and FIV p24 protein sequences were studied using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from untreated HIV-1-infected long-term survivors (LTS; >10 y of infection without antiretroviral therapy, ART), short-term HIV-1 infected subjects not on ART, and ART-treated HIV-1 infected subjects. IFNγ-ELISpot and CFSE-proliferation analyses were performed with PBMC using overlapping HIV-1 and FIV p24 peptides. Over half of the HIV-1 infected subjects tested (22/31 or 71%) responded to one or more FIV p24 peptide pools by either IFNγ or T-cell proliferation analysis. PBMC and T cells from infected subjects in all 3 HIV+ groups predominantly recognized one FIV p24 peptide pool (Fp14) by IFNγ production and one additional FIV p24 peptide pool (Fp9) by T-cell proliferation analysis. Furthermore, evaluation of overlapping SIV p24 peptide sequences identified conserved epitope(s) on the Fp14/Hp15-counterpart of SIV, Sp14, but none on Fp9-counterpart of SIV, Sp9. The responses to these FIV peptide pools were highly reproducible and persisted throughout 2–4 y of monitoring. Intracellular staining analysis for cytotoxins and phenotyping for CD107a determined that peptide epitopes from Fp9 and Fp14 pools induced cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated molecules including perforin, granzyme B, granzyme A, and/or expression of CD107a. Selected FIV and corresponding SIV epitopes recognized by HIV-1 infected patients indicate that these protein sequences are evolutionarily conserved on both SIV and HIV-1 (e.g., Hp15:Fp14:Sp14). These studies demonstrate that comparative immunogenicity analysis of HIV-1, FIV, and SIV can identify evolutionarily-conserved T cell-associated lentiviral epitopes, which could be used as a vaccine for prophylaxis or immunotherapy. PMID:25844718

  4. Analysis of Epitopes on Dengue Virus Envelope Protein Recognized by Monoclonal Antibodies and Polyclonal Human Sera by a High Throughput Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong-En; Tsai, Wen-Yang; Liu, I-Ju; Li, Pi-Chun; Liao, Mei-Ying; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Lai, Chih-Yun; Lu, Chih-Hsuan; Huang, Jyh-Hsiung; Chang, Gwong-Jen; Wu, Han-Chung; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2012-01-01

    Background The envelope (E) protein of dengue virus (DENV) is the major target of neutralizing antibodies and vaccine development. While previous studies on domain III or domain I/II alone have reported several epitopes of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against DENV E protein, the possibility of interdomain epitopes and the relationship between epitopes and neutralizing potency remain largely unexplored. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a dot blot assay by using 67 alanine mutants of predicted surface-exposed E residues as a systematic approach to identify epitopes recognized by mAbs and polyclonal sera, and confirmed our findings using a capture-ELISA assay. Of the 12 mouse mAbs tested, three recognized a novel epitope involving residues (Q211, D215, P217) at the central interface of domain II, and three recognized residues at both domain III and the lateral ridge of domain II, suggesting a more frequent presence of interdomain epitopes than previously appreciated. Compared with mAbs generated by traditional protocols, the potent neutralizing mAbs generated by a new protocol recognized multiple residues in A strand or residues in C strand/CC′ loop of DENV2 and DENV1, and multiple residues in BC loop and residues in DE loop, EF loop/F strand or G strand of DENV1. The predominant epitopes of anti-E antibodies in polyclonal sera were found to include both fusion loop and non-fusion residues in the same or adjacent monomer. Conclusions/Significance Our analyses have implications for epitope-specific diagnostics and epitope-based dengue vaccines. This high throughput method has tremendous application for mapping both intra and interdomain epitopes recognized by human mAbs and polyclonal sera, which would further our understanding of humoral immune responses to DENV at the epitope level. PMID:22235356

  5. Characterization of a Prefusion-Specific Antibody That Recognizes a Quaternary, Cleavage-Dependent Epitope on the RSV Fusion Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Morgan S. A.; Moin, Syed M.; Mas, Vicente; Chen, Man; Patel, Nita K.; Kramer, Kari; Zhu, Qing; Kabeche, Stephanie C.; Kumar, Azad; Palomo, Concepción; Beaumont, Tim; Baxa, Ulrich; Ulbrandt, Nancy D.; Melero, José A.; Graham, Barney S.; McLellan, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Prevention efforts for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have been advanced due to the recent isolation and characterization of antibodies that specifically recognize the prefusion conformation of the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein. These potently neutralizing antibodies are in clinical development for passive prophylaxis and have also aided the design of vaccine antigens that display prefusion-specific epitopes. To date, prefusion-specific antibodies have been shown to target two antigenic sites on RSV F, but both of these sites are also present on monomeric forms of F. Here we present a structural and functional characterization of human antibody AM14, which potently neutralized laboratory strains and clinical isolates of RSV from both A and B subtypes. The crystal structure and location of escape mutations revealed that AM14 recognizes a quaternary epitope that spans two protomers and includes a region that undergoes extensive conformational changes in the pre- to postfusion F transition. Binding assays demonstrated that AM14 is unique in its specific recognition of trimeric furin-cleaved prefusion F, which is the mature form of F on infectious virions. These results demonstrate that the prefusion F trimer contains potent neutralizing epitopes not present on monomers and that AM14 should be particularly useful for characterizing the conformational state of RSV F-based vaccine antigens. PMID:26161532

  6. Characterization of a Prefusion-Specific Antibody That Recognizes a Quaternary, Cleavage-Dependent Epitope on the RSV Fusion Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Morgan S A; Moin, Syed M; Mas, Vicente; Chen, Man; Patel, Nita K; Kramer, Kari; Zhu, Qing; Kabeche, Stephanie C; Kumar, Azad; Palomo, Concepción; Beaumont, Tim; Baxa, Ulrich; Ulbrandt, Nancy D; Melero, José A; Graham, Barney S; McLellan, Jason S

    2015-07-01

    Prevention efforts for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have been advanced due to the recent isolation and characterization of antibodies that specifically recognize the prefusion conformation of the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein. These potently neutralizing antibodies are in clinical development for passive prophylaxis and have also aided the design of vaccine antigens that display prefusion-specific epitopes. To date, prefusion-specific antibodies have been shown to target two antigenic sites on RSV F, but both of these sites are also present on monomeric forms of F. Here we present a structural and functional characterization of human antibody AM14, which potently neutralized laboratory strains and clinical isolates of RSV from both A and B subtypes. The crystal structure and location of escape mutations revealed that AM14 recognizes a quaternary epitope that spans two protomers and includes a region that undergoes extensive conformational changes in the pre- to postfusion F transition. Binding assays demonstrated that AM14 is unique in its specific recognition of trimeric furin-cleaved prefusion F, which is the mature form of F on infectious virions. These results demonstrate that the prefusion F trimer contains potent neutralizing epitopes not present on monomers and that AM14 should be particularly useful for characterizing the conformational state of RSV F-based vaccine antigens. PMID:26161532

  7. Identification of a novel linear epitope in tetanus toxin recognized by a protective monoclonal antibody: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ping; Qin, Liyan; Mao, Xuhu; Chen, Li; Yu, Shu; Li, Qian; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Weijun; Gu, Jiang; Zou, Quanming

    2012-10-01

    Tetanus, a severe infectious disease, is caused by tetanus toxin (TT) from Clostridium tetani, which remains one of the most critical unsolved health problems despite preventive strategies. The carboxyl terminal of TT (TTC) is responsible for the binding of TT to neurons and for its toxicity and has been proven to be immunogenic and protective in various forms. It would therefore be extremely interesting to identify the epitope on TTC at a molecular level. In this study, we generated a neutralizing monoclonal antibody, 5C4, which inhibited TT binding to its receptor and was efficiently protective at 73.7 IU/mg. Moreover, 5C4 recognized a novel linear epitope on TT, namely TC((1155-1171)), which spans from Lys1155 to Val1171. In addition, TC((1155-1171)) was shown to elicit the production of a serum IgG that protected mice against a challenge with TT. These results suggested that TC((1155-1171)) and the monoclonal antibody 5C4 are good candidates for the development of epitope-based vaccines and therapeutic antibodies against tetanus. PMID:22889825

  8. Structural Basis of Differential Neutralization of DENV-1 Genotypes by an Antibody that Recognizes a Cryptic Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Austin, S. Kyle; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Shrestha, Bimmi; Nelson, Christopher A.; Edeling, Melissa A.; Johnson, Syd; Pierson, Theodore C.; Diamond, Michael S.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2012-01-01

    We previously developed a panel of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Dengue virus (DENV)-1, of which few exhibited inhibitory activity against all DENV-1 genotypes. This finding is consistent with reports observing variable neutralization of different DENV strains and genotypes using serum from individuals that experienced natural infection or immunization. Herein, we describe the crystal structures of DENV1-E111 bound to a novel CC′ loop epitope on domain III (DIII) of the E protein from two different DENV-1 genotypes. Docking of our structure onto the available cryo-electron microscopy models of DENV virions revealed that the DENV1-E111 epitope was inaccessible, suggesting that this antibody recognizes an uncharacterized virus conformation. While the affinity of binding between DENV1-E111 and DIII varied by genotype, we observed limited correlation with inhibitory activity. Instead, our results support the conclusion that potent neutralization depends on genotype-dependent exposure of the CC′ loop epitope. These findings establish new structural complexity of the DENV virion, which may be relevant for the choice of DENV strain for induction or analysis of neutralizing antibodies in the context of vaccine development. PMID:23055922

  9. Circulating microparticles carry oxidation-specific epitopes and are recognized by natural IgM antibodies1[S

    PubMed Central

    Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Perkmann, Thomas; Afonyushkin, Taras; Mangold, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas A.; Papac-Milicevic, Nikolina; Millischer, Vincent; Bartel, Caroline; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Fischer, Michael B.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Lang, Irene M.; Binder, Christoph J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation-specific epitopes (OSEs) present on apoptotic cells and oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL) represent danger-associated molecular patterns that are recognized by different arcs of innate immunity, including natural IgM antibodies. Here, we investigated whether circulating microparticles (MPs), which are small membrane vesicles released by apoptotic or activated cells, are physiological carriers of OSEs. OSEs on circulating MPs isolated from healthy donors and patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STE-MI) were characterized by flow cytometry using a panel of OSE-specific monoclonal antibodies. We found that a subset of MPs carry OSEs on their surface, predominantly malondialdehyde (MDA) epitopes. Consistent with this, a majority of IgM antibodies bound on the surface of circulating MPs were found to have specificity for MDA-modified LDL. Moreover, we show that MPs can stimulate THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia cell line) and human primary monocytes to produce interleukin 8, which can be inhibited by a monoclonal IgM with specificity for MDA epitopes. Finally, we show that MDA+ MPs are elevated at the culprit lesion site of patients with STE-MI. Our results identify a subset of OSE+ MPs that are bound by OxLDL-specific IgM. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism by which anti-OxLDL IgM antibodies could mediate protective functions in CVD. PMID:25525116

  10. Characterization of structurally defined epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies produced by chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Till; Woelfle, Manuela; Yancopoulos, Sophia; Catera, Rosa; Li, Wentian; Hatzi, Katerina; Moreno, Carol; Torres, Marcela; Paul, Santanu; Dohner, Hartmut; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Kaufman, Matthew S.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.; Chu, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    Despite a wealth of information about the structure of surface membrane immunoglobulin (smIg) on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells, little is known about epitopes reacting with their binding sites. Probing phage-displayed peptide libraries, we identified and characterized mimetopes for Igs of 4 patients with IGHV mutated CLL (M-CLL) and 4 with IGHV unmutated CLL (U-CLL). Six of these mAbs were representatives of stereotyped B-cell receptors characteristic of CLL. We found that mimetic epitopes for U- and M-CLL Igs differed significantly. M-CLL–derived peptides exhibited better amino acid motifs, were more similar to each other, aligned more easily, and formed tighter clusters than U-CLL–derived peptides. Mono-, oligo-, and polyreactivity of peptides correlated with structural changes within antigen-binding sites of selecting M-CLL mAbs. Although M-CLL–isolated peptides and certain U-CLL mAbs bound more effectively to the selecting mAb, others were not as specific, reacting with M-CLL and U-CLL mAbs; these data suggest that in vivo structurally diverse epitopes could bind smIgs of distinct CLL clones, thereby altering survival and growth. Finally, an M-CLL–derived peptide inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, binding of its homologous mAb to human B lymphocytes; therefore peptides that inhibit or alter the consequences of antigen-smIg interactions may represent therapeutic modalities in CLL. PMID:19690339

  11. CMV-Specific T-cells Generated From Naïve T-cells Recognize Atypical Epitopes And May Be Protective in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Scheinberg, Phillip; Blaney, James W.; Demmler-Harrison, Gail; Cruz, C. Russell; Lam, Sharon; Krance, Robert A.; Leung, Kathryn S.; Martinez, Caridad A.; Liu, Hao; Heslop, Helen E.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Barrett, A. John; Rodgers, John R.; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of adult-seropositive, cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific T-cells can effectively restore antiviral immunity after transplantation. Lack of CMV-specific memory T-cells in blood from CMV-seronegative adult and cord blood (CB) donors restricts the availability of donor-derived virus-specific T-cells for immunoprophylaxis. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of naïve-donor-derived CMV-specific T-cell therapy for transplant recipients. Primed naïve T-cells recognized only atypical epitopes and with a similar avidity to CMV-seropositive-derived T-cells recognizing typical epitopes, but T-cells from CMV-seropositive donors recognizing atypical epitopes had a lower avidity suggesting the loss of high-avidity T-cells over time. Clonotypic analysis revealed T-cells recognizing atypical CMVpp65 epitopes in the peripheral blood of recipients of CB grafts who did not develop CMV. T-cell receptors from atypical epitopes were most common in unmanipulated CB units explaining why these T-cells expanded. When infused to recipients, naïve donor-derived virus specific T-cells that recognized atypical epitopes were associated with prolonged periods of CMV-free survival and complete remission. PMID:25925682

  12. Novel Rabies Virus-Neutralizing Epitope Recognized by Human Monoclonal Antibody: Fine Mapping and Escape Mutant Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Marissen, Wilfred E.; Kramer, R. Arjen; Rice, Amy; Weldon, William C.; Niezgoda, Michael; Faber, Milosz; Slootstra, Jerry W.; Meloen, Rob H.; Clijsters-van der Horst, Marieke; Visser, Therese J.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Thijsse, Sandra; Throsby, Mark; de Kruif, John; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Goudsmit, Jaap; Bakker, Alexander B. H.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-rabies virus immunoglobulin combined with rabies vaccine protects humans from lethal rabies infections. For cost and safety reasons, replacement of the human or equine polyclonal immunoglobulin is advocated, and the use of rabies virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is recommended. We produced two previously described potent rabies virus-neutralizing human MAbs, CR57 and CRJB, in human PER.C6 cells. The two MAbs competed for binding to rabies virus glycoprotein. Using CR57 and a set of 15-mer overlapping peptides covering the glycoprotein ectodomain, a neutralization domain was identified between amino acids (aa) 218 and 240. The minimal binding region was identified as KLCGVL (aa 226 to 231), with key residues K-CGV- identified by alanine replacement scanning. The critical binding region of this novel nonconformational rabies virus epitope is highly conserved within rabies viruses of genotype 1. Subsequently, we generated six rabies virus variants escaping neutralization by CR57 and six variants escaping CRJB. The CR57 escape mutants were only partially covered by CRJB, and all CRJB-resistant variants completely escaped neutralization by CR57. Without exception, the CR57-resistant variants showed a mutation at key residues within the defined minimal binding region, while the CRJB escape viruses showed a single mutation distant from the CR57 epitope (N182D) combined with mutations in the CR57 epitope. The competition between CR57 and CRJB, the in vitro escape profile, and the apparent overlap between the recognized epitopes argues against including both CR57 and CRJB in a MAb cocktail aimed at replacing classical immunoglobulin preparations. PMID:15795253

  13. Identification of a highly immunoreactive epitope of Brugia malayi TPx recognized by the endemic sera.

    PubMed

    Madhumathi, Jayaprakasam; Prince, Prabhu Rajaiah; Gayatri, Subash Chellam; Aparnaa, Ramanathan; Kaliraj, Perumal

    2010-12-01

    Filarial thiordoxin peroxidase is a major antioxidant that plays a crucial role in parasite survival. Although Brugia malayi TPx has been shown to be a potential vaccine candidate, it shares 63% homology with its mammalian counterpart, limiting its use as a vaccine or drug target. In silico analysis of TPx sequence revealed a linear B epitope in the host's nonhomologous region. The peptide sequence (TPx peptide(27-48)) was synthesized, and its reactivity with clinical sera from an endemic region was analyzed. The peptide showed significantly high reactivity (P < 0.05) against the sera of putatively immune individuals compared to the nonendemic control sera. It also showed high reactivity against the sera of patients with chronic pathology and patent infection. The high reactivity of the peptide with endemic immune sera equivalent to that of whole protein shows that it forms a dominant B epitope of TPx protein and thus could be utilized for incorporation into a multiepitope vaccine construct for filariasis. PMID:21158641

  14. A unique phenotype of skin-associated lymphocytes in humans. Preferential expression of the HECA-452 epitope by benign and malignant T cells at cutaneous sites.

    PubMed Central

    Picker, L. J.; Michie, S. A.; Rott, L. S.; Butcher, E. C.

    1990-01-01

    It has been proposed that the skin is a functionally unique compartment of the immune system, although little direct evidence supporting this hypothesis has been presented. Here we show that lymphocyte populations at cutaneous sites can be differentiated from otherwise similar populations at noncutaneous sites by their preferential expression of an epitope defined by the MAb HECA-452. This MAb recognizes a predominantly 200-kd cell-surface glycoprotein present on about 16% of peripheral blood T cells, including both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (17% and 11% HECA-452+, respectively), as well as TCR-delta-bearing T cells (32%+). Most thymocytes (99%) lacked HECA-452 antigen expression, and essentially all the HECA-452+ peripheral blood T cells were found in the adhesion molecule high, CD45R low putative memory cell subset, findings suggesting that HECA-452 expression develops peripherally as a consequence of antigenic stimulation. However, the HECA-452 antigen is not a conventional activation antigen because it was not upregulated with mitogen stimulation of peripheral blood T cells. Most significantly, among 54 diverse specimens of normal/reactive lymphoid tissues and sites of chronic inflammation, there was a clear association of lymphocyte HECA-452 expression and cutaneous location. In extracutaneous sites (n = 38) only about 5% of lymphocytes within the T-cell areas of these tissues expressed this antigen, whereas in inflammatory skin lesions (n = 16), 85% were HECA-452+. The association of HECA-452 expression and cutaneous location was also seen in a series of T-cell lymphomas. The malignant cells of 16 of 18 cases of epidermotropic (patch/plaque) stage mycosis fungoides were HECA-452+, as well as 2 of 7 nonmycosis fungoides peripheral T-cell lymphomas in skin. In contrast, this antigen was not expressed in thymic (lymphoblastic) lymphomas (n = 14), nonepidermotropic (tumor) stage mycosis fungoides (n = 5), and noncutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphomas (n = 15). Among

  15. Astrocytes and microglia in human brain share an epitope recognized by a B-lymphocyte-specific monoclonal antibody (LN-1).

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, D. W.; Mattiace, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    A B-lymphocyte-specific mouse monoclonal antibody, LN-1, recognizes two morphologic classes of glial cells in human brain. The nature and duration of tissue fixation and processing are critical in the detection of the two cell types. In tissue that is lightly fixed, LN-1 recognizes astrocytes. The astrocytic nature of the LN-1 reactive glial cell was confirmed by cytologic features, tissue distribution, immunoelectron microscopy, double labeling immunofluorescent microscopy, and staining of serial sections with antibodies to glial fibrillary acidic protein. In tissue that is fixed for longer periods or in Bouin's fixative, two glial cell types are recognized: astrocytes and microglia. The identity of the latter cell type as microglia was confirmed by morphologic features, tissue distribution, immunoelectron microscopy, and double staining with monoclonal antibodies or lectins to macrophage markers, including class II major histocompatibility antigens. The two cell types had different disposition in senile plaques of elderly individuals and of those with Alzheimer's disease. Astrocytes were present at the periphery of the plaques, whereas microglial cells were centrally placed, often in juxtaposition to amyloid. The results are discussed with respect to ontogeny of glial cells and the ability of monoclonal antibodies to recognize epitopes on unrelated proteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2476034

  16. Epitope mapping of monoclonal antibody 4C8 recognizing the protein huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Cong, Shu-Yan; Pepers, Barry A; Roos, Raymund A C; Van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Dorsman, Josephine C

    2005-10-01

    Huntington's disease is a dominantly inherited, devastating neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a polyglutamine expansion (>37) in the N-terminal region of huntingtin, a protein of unknown function. In patients and normal individuals, N-terminal fragments of huntingtin are found, and the N-terminal fragments of mutant huntingtin are cytotoxic. The functions of wild-type huntingtin and the mechanisms underlying the toxic effects of mutant huntingtin are still ill defined. To get more insight into these topics, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are indispensable tools. Antibodies raised against the N-terminus are especially important. Among these, the 4C8 mouse MAb has been extensively used in various approaches. In this study, we have mapped the epitope of 4C8 to a 15-amino acid (aa) region spanning from aa 443 to 457 of the human protein, and found that mutation of three consecutive glutamic acids present in this region disrupts the recognition by 4C8. These results allow a more accurate interpretation of the results obtained by usage of the 4C8 antibody and broaden the utility of this antibody. PMID:16225422

  17. Structural Characterization of Viral Epitopes Recognized by Broadly Cross-Reactive Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Peter S.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is the major surface glycoprotein on influenza viruses and mediates viral attachment and subsequent fusion with host cells. The HA is the major target of the immune response, but due to its high level of variability, as evidenced by substantial antigenic diversity, it had been historically considered to elicit only a narrow, strain-specific antibody response. However, a recent explosion in the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) to influenza virus has identified two major supersites of vulnerability on the HA through structural characterization of HA-antibody complexes. These commonly targeted epitopes are involved with receptor binding as well as the fusion machinery and, hence, are functionally conserved and less prone to mutation. These bnAbs can neutralize viruses by blocking infection or the spread of infection by preventing progeny release. Structural analyses of these bnAbs show they exhibit striking similarities and trends in recognition of the HA and use recurring recognition motifs, despite substantial differences in their germline genes. This information can be utilized in design of novel therapeutics as well as in immunogens for improved vaccines with greater breadth and efficacy. PMID:25037260

  18. Antibodies that neutralize human beta interferon biologic activity recognize a linear epitope: analysis by synthetic peptide mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Redlich, P N; Hoeprich, P D; Colby, C B; Grossberg, S E

    1991-01-01

    The location of biologically relevant epitopes on recombinant human beta interferon in which Ser-17 replaces Cys-17 (rh[Ser17]IFN-beta) was evaluated by testing the immunoreactivity of antibodies against 159 sequential, overlapping octamer peptides. Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize rh[Ser17]IFN-beta biologic activity, designated A1, A5, and A7, bound to peptides spanning only residues 39-48, whereas nonneutralizing mAb bound less specifically at multiple sites near the amino terminus. The immunoreactivity of peptides spanning residues 40-47 that contained a series of single amino acid substitutions suggested that residues 41-43 (Pro-Glu-Glu) and 46 (Gln) are important for the binding of neutralizing mAbs. The reactivity of mAbs to larger synthetic peptides containing rh[Ser17]IFN-beta sequences from residue 32 through residue 56 was evaluated. All mAbs except A7 reacted with synthetic peptides representing rh[Ser17]IFN-beta residues 32-47, 40-56, and 32-56, but only mAbs A1 and A5 bound to the core peptide composed of residues 40-47. Peptide 32-56 effectively blocked the binding of mAbs A1 and A5 to rh[Ser17]IFN-beta and markedly inhibited their neutralizing activity. Biologic activity of the peptides was undetectable. Rabbit antisera raised against peptides 32-47 and 40-56 recognized rh[Ser17]IFN-beta but did not neutralize its antiviral activity. Thus, structure-function analysis by peptide mapping has permitted the identification of a linear epitope recognized by neutralizing antibody on a biologically active cytokine. We conclude that the region spanning residues 32-56 is of major importance in the expression of the biologic activity of human IFN-beta. Images PMID:1708891

  19. A human monoclonal antibody against HPV16 recognizes an immunodominant and neutralizing epitope partially overlapping with that of H16.V5

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Lin; Xian, Yangfei; Wang, Daning; Chen, Yuanzhi; Huang, Xiaofen; Bi, Xingjian; Yu, Hai; Fu, Zheng; Liu, Xinlin; Li, Shaowei; An, Zhiqiang; Luo, Wenxin; Zhao, Qinjian; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    The presence of neutralizing epitopes in human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) is the structural basis of prophylactic vaccines. An anti-HPV16 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (N-mAb) 26D1 was isolated from a memory B cell of a human vaccinee. The pre-binding of heparan sulfate to VLPs inhibited the binding of both N-mAbs to the antigen, indicating that the epitopes are critical for viral cell attachment/entry. Hybrid VLP binding with surface loop swapping between types indicated the essential roles of the DE and FG loops for both 26D1 (DEa in particular) and H16.V5 binding. Specifically, Tyr135 and Val141 on the DEa loop were shown to be critical residues for 26D1 binding via site-directed mutagenesis. Partially overlap between the epitopes between 26D1 and H16.V5 was shown using pairwise epitope mapping, and their binding difference is demonstrated to be predominantly in DE loop region. In addition, 26D1 epitope is immunodominant epitope recognized by both antibodies elicited by the authentic virus from infected individuals and polyclonal antibodies from vaccinees. Overall, a partially overlapping but distinct neutralizing epitope from that of H16.V5 was identified using a human N-mAb, shedding lights to the antibody arrays as part of human immune response to vaccination and infection. PMID:26750243

  20. A human monoclonal antibody against HPV16 recognizes an immunodominant and neutralizing epitope partially overlapping with that of H16.V5.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lin; Xian, Yangfei; Wang, Daning; Chen, Yuanzhi; Huang, Xiaofen; Bi, Xingjian; Yu, Hai; Fu, Zheng; Liu, Xinlin; Li, Shaowei; An, Zhiqiang; Luo, Wenxin; Zhao, Qinjian; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    The presence of neutralizing epitopes in human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) is the structural basis of prophylactic vaccines. An anti-HPV16 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (N-mAb) 26D1 was isolated from a memory B cell of a human vaccinee. The pre-binding of heparan sulfate to VLPs inhibited the binding of both N-mAbs to the antigen, indicating that the epitopes are critical for viral cell attachment/entry. Hybrid VLP binding with surface loop swapping between types indicated the essential roles of the DE and FG loops for both 26D1 (DEa in particular) and H16.V5 binding. Specifically, Tyr(135) and Val(141) on the DEa loop were shown to be critical residues for 26D1 binding via site-directed mutagenesis. Partially overlap between the epitopes between 26D1 and H16.V5 was shown using pairwise epitope mapping, and their binding difference is demonstrated to be predominantly in DE loop region. In addition, 26D1 epitope is immunodominant epitope recognized by both antibodies elicited by the authentic virus from infected individuals and polyclonal antibodies from vaccinees. Overall, a partially overlapping but distinct neutralizing epitope from that of H16.V5 was identified using a human N-mAb, shedding lights to the antibody arrays as part of human immune response to vaccination and infection. PMID:26750243

  1. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody recognizing an epitope designated as canine leukocyte-associated antigen.

    PubMed

    Yang, W C; Esquenazi, V; Carreno, M; Vallone, T; Fuller, L; Roth, D; Nery, J; Burke, G; Miller, J

    1994-07-27

    An IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated as 15F1.5, was generated against surface determinants of a dog peripheral blood-derived PHA-induced IL-2-dependent T cell line. It reacted with 65-80% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), 90-95% of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs), 65-70% of thymocytes, 85-95% of Thy-1 positive cells and 85-95% of IL-2-dependent T lymphoid cells in flow cytometry. It was nonreactive with peripheral blood red cells and platelets. It immunoprecipitated 95 and 150 Kd proteins derived from detergent solubilized lymphocyte membranes. Indirect immunofluorescent and immunoperoxidase staining of frozen tissue sections demonstrated positive reactivity to cells in lymphoid but not nonlymphoid tissues. The 15F1.5 antibody was not directly mitogenic for PBMC's. It caused significant decrease (P < or = 0.05) in the lymphoproliferative response to T-dependent B cell mitogens, such as pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and staphage lysate (SPL), without significant effects on responses to the T cell mitogens, phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and concanavalin A (Con A). The mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response and both the proliferative and effector arms of the cell-mediated cytotoxicity reactions (CMC) were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. The mAb also inhibited the auto- and allolymphoproliferative reactivity of mixed lymphocyte kidney or islet cell cultures (MLKC and MLIC), and the adhesion of T lymphoblasts and PMA-treated PMNs to endothelial cells. In vivo administration of the 15F1.5 (20 mg/day for 5 days) caused an immediate and prolonged reduction in MLC responses, associated with cell binding of the mAb to PBMC and epitope modulation during the course of treatment, as indicated by flow cytometry. These results suggest that 15F1.5 is an immunomodulating antibody reacting with canine LFA-1. Thus, this mAb would be useful in studying the role of LFA-1/ICAM-1 in graft rejection as well as other inflammatory responses. It would also allow the use of

  2. Gluten-specific antibodies of celiac disease gut plasma cells recognize long proteolytic fragments that typically harbor T-cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Dørum, Siri; Steinsbø, Øyvind; Bergseng, Elin; Arntzen, Magnus Ø; de Souza, Gustavo A; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify proteolytic fragments of gluten proteins recognized by recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibodies generated from single IgA plasma cells of celiac disease lesions. Peptides bound by monoclonal antibodies in complex gut-enzyme digests of gluten treated with the deamidating enzyme transglutaminase 2, were identified by mass spectrometry after antibody pull-down with protein G beads. The antibody bound peptides were long deamidated peptide fragments that contained the substrate recognition sequence of transglutaminase 2. Characteristically, the fragments contained epitopes with the sequence QPEQPFP and variants thereof in multiple copies, and they typically also harbored many different gluten T-cell epitopes. In the pull-down setting where antibodies were immobilized on a solid phase, peptide fragments with multivalent display of epitopes were targeted. This scenario resembles the situation of the B-cell receptor on the surface of B cells. Conceivably, B cells of celiac disease patients select gluten epitopes that are repeated multiple times in long peptide fragments generated by gut digestive enzymes. As the fragments also contain many different T-cell epitopes, this will lead to generation of strong antibody responses by effective presentation of several distinct T-cell epitopes and establishment of T-cell help to B cells. PMID:27146306

  3. Gluten-specific antibodies of celiac disease gut plasma cells recognize long proteolytic fragments that typically harbor T-cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Dørum, Siri; Steinsbø, Øyvind; Bergseng, Elin; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; de Souza, Gustavo A.; Sollid, Ludvig M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify proteolytic fragments of gluten proteins recognized by recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibodies generated from single IgA plasma cells of celiac disease lesions. Peptides bound by monoclonal antibodies in complex gut-enzyme digests of gluten treated with the deamidating enzyme transglutaminase 2, were identified by mass spectrometry after antibody pull-down with protein G beads. The antibody bound peptides were long deamidated peptide fragments that contained the substrate recognition sequence of transglutaminase 2. Characteristically, the fragments contained epitopes with the sequence QPEQPFP and variants thereof in multiple copies, and they typically also harbored many different gluten T-cell epitopes. In the pull-down setting where antibodies were immobilized on a solid phase, peptide fragments with multivalent display of epitopes were targeted. This scenario resembles the situation of the B-cell receptor on the surface of B cells. Conceivably, B cells of celiac disease patients select gluten epitopes that are repeated multiple times in long peptide fragments generated by gut digestive enzymes. As the fragments also contain many different T-cell epitopes, this will lead to generation of strong antibody responses by effective presentation of several distinct T-cell epitopes and establishment of T-cell help to B cells. PMID:27146306

  4. Antibodies Recognizing Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis Epitopes Cross-React with the Beta-Cell Antigen ZnT8 in Sardinian Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Masala, Speranza; Paccagnini, Daniela; Cossu, Davide; Brezar, Vedran; Pacifico, Adolfo; Ahmed, Niyaz; Mallone, Roberto; Sechi, Leonardo A.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental factors at play in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) remain enigmatic. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is transmitted from dairy herds to humans through food contamination. MAP causes an asymptomatic infection that is highly prevalent in Sardinian T1D patients compared with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and healthy controls. Moreover, MAP elicits humoral responses against several mycobacterial proteins. We asked whether antibodies (Abs) against one of these proteins, namely MAP3865c, which displays a sequence homology with the β-cell protein zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) could be cross-reactive with ZnT8 epitopes. To this end, Ab responses against MAP3865c were analyzed in Sardinian T1D, T2D and healthy subjects using an enzymatic immunoassay. Abs against MAP3865c recognized two immunodominant transmembrane epitopes in 52–65% of T1D patients, but only in 5–7% of T2D and 3–5% of healthy controls. There was a linear correlation between titers of anti-MAP3865c and anti-ZnT8 Abs targeting these two homologous epitopes, and pre-incubation of sera with ZnT8 epitope peptides blocked binding to the corresponding MAP3865c peptides. These results demonstrate that Abs recognizing MAP3865c epitopes cross-react with ZnT8, possibly underlying a molecular mimicry mechanism, which may precipitate T1D in MAP-infected individuals. PMID:22046415

  5. Identification of a conserved linear neutralizing epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody 9A9 against serotype A foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Weifeng; Zhou, Guohui; Liu, Wenming; Yang, Baolin; Li, Chaosi; Wang, Haiwei; Yang, Decheng; Ma, Wenge; Yu, Li

    2016-10-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), is a highly contagious infectious disease that affects domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animals worldwide. In recent years, a series of outbreaks of serotype A FMD have occurred in many countries. High-affinity neutralizing antibodies against a conserved epitope have the potential to provide protective immunity against diverse subtypes of FMDV serotype A and to protect against future pandemics. In this study, we produced an A serotype FMDV-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the viral capsid protein VP1, designated 9A9, that potently neutralized FMDV A/JLYS/CHA/2014 with a 50 % neutralization titer (NT50) of 4,096. GST-fusion proteins expressing truncated peptides of VP1 were subjected to Western blot analysis using MAb 9A9, and it was found that the peptide (143)RGDLGPLAARL(153) of VP1 was the minimal epitope for MAb 9A9 binding. Western blot analysis also revealed that the epitope peptide could be recognized by positive sera from serotype A FMDV-infected pigs and cattle. Subsequent alanine-scanning mutagenesis analysis revealed that residues Gly(147) and Leu(149) of the 9A9-recognized epitope are crucial for MAb 9A9 binding. Furthermore, under immunological pressure selected by MAb 9A9, a single amino acid residue replacement (L149P) occurred in a viral neutralization-escape mutant, which verified the location of a critical residue of this epitope at Leu(149). Importantly, the epitope (143)RGDLGPLAARL(153) was highly conserved among different topotypes of serotype A FMDV strains in sequence alignment analysis. Thus, the results of this study could have application potential in the development of epitope-based vaccines and a suitable MAb-based diagnostic method for detection of type A FMDV as well as quantitation of antibodies against FMDV serotype A. PMID:27422396

  6. The novel cuticular collagen Ovcol-1 of Onchocerca volvulus is preferentially recognized by immunoglobulin G3 from putatively immune individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, G R; Zhu, Y; Parredes, W; Tree, T I; Guderian, R; Bradley, J E

    1997-01-01

    The cDNA sequence encoding an Onchocerca volvulus collagen, Ovcol-1, has been isolated and the corresponding native antigen has been identified. The cDNA encodes an open reading frame of 96 amino acid residues containing an uninterrupted 66-residue Gly-X-Y repeat triple-helical (TH) domain (where X and Y may be any amino acids) flanked by a 26-residue amino non-TH domain and a 4-residue carboxyl non-TH domain. The size (9.7 kDa) and structure of the deduced molecule are unique among previously identified collagen chains. This novel collagen type has been designated "mini-chain collagen." Native Ovcol-1 is aqueous soluble and resolves by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at 14.2 kDa under reducing conditions. Immunoelectron microscopy of adult female O. volvulus localized Ovcol-1 to the cuticles of both the adult worm and uterine microfilaria. A group of individuals from an area in Ecuador where O. volvulus is hyperendemic have been classified as putatively immune (PI) to O. volvulus infection. Analysis of the humoral immune responses to Ovcol-1 demonstrated that immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3) of PI individuals preferentially recognized this antigen in comparison to IgG3 of infected individuals. PMID:8975907

  7. A human antibody recognizing a conserved epitope of H5 hemagglutinin broadly neutralizes highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongxing; Voss, Jarrod; Zhang, Guoliang; Buchy, Philippi; Zuo, Teng; Wang, Lulan; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Fan; Wang, Guiqing; Tsai, Cheguo; Calder, Lesley; Gamblin, Steve J; Zhang, Linqi; Deubel, Vincent; Zhou, Boping; Skehel, John J; Zhou, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Influenza A virus infection is a persistent threat to public health worldwide due to its ability to evade immune surveillance through rapid genetic drift and shift. Current vaccines against influenza A virus provide immunity to viral isolates that are similar to vaccine strains. High-affinity neutralizing antibodies against conserved epitopes could provide immunity to diverse influenza virus strains and protection against future pandemic viruses. In this study, by using a highly sensitive H5N1 pseudotype-based neutralization assay to screen human monoclonal antibodies produced by memory B cells from an H5N1-infected individual and molecular cloning techniques, we developed three fully human monoclonal antibodies. Among them, antibody 65C6 exhibited potent neutralization activity against all H5 clades and subclades except for subclade 7.2 and prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy against highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses in mice. Studies on hemagglutinin (HA)-antibody complexes by electron microscopy and epitope mapping indicate that antibody 65C6 binds to a conformational epitope comprising amino acid residues at positions 118, 121, 161, 164, and 167 (according to mature H5 numbering) on the tip of the membrane-distal globular domain of HA. Thus, we conclude that antibody 65C6 recognizes a neutralization epitope in the globular head of HA that is conserved among almost all divergent H5N1 influenza stains. PMID:22238297

  8. Characterization of a key neutralizing epitope on pertussis toxin recognized by the monoclonal antibody 1B7

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jamie N; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2009-01-01

    Despite over five decades of research and vaccination, infection by Bordetella pertussis remains a serious disease with no specific treatments or validated correlates of protective immunity. Of the numerous monoclonal antibodies binding pertussis toxin (PTx) that have been produced and characterized, the murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody 1B7 is uniquely neutralizing in all in vitro assays and in vivo murine models of infection. 1B7 binds an epitope on the enzymatically active S1-subunit of PTx (PTx-S1) with some linear elements but previous work with S1 scanning peptides, phage displayed peptide libraries, and S1 truncation/deletion variants were unable to more precisely define the epitope. Using computational docking algorithms, alanine scanning mutagenesis, and surface plasmon resonance, we characterize the epitope bound by 1B7 on PTx-S1 in molecular detail and define energetically important interactions between residues at the interface. Six residues on PTx-S1 and six residues on 1B7 were identified which, when altered to alanine, resulted in variants with significantly reduced affinity for the native partner. Using this information, a model of the 1B7-S1 interaction was developed, indicating a predominantly conformational epitope located on the base of S1 near S4. The location of this epitope is consistent with previous data and is shown to be conserved across several naturally occurring strain variants including PTx-S1A, B (Tohama-I), D, and E (18-323) in addition to the catalytically inactive 9K/129G variant. This highly neutralizing but poorly immunogenic epitope may represent an important target for next generation vaccine development, identification of immune correlates and passive immunization strategies in pertussis. PMID:19899804

  9. Repertoire of Epitopes Recognized by Serum IgG from Humans Vaccinated with Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Glycoprotein D

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhen-Yu; Cairns, Tina M.; Gallagher, John R.; Lou, Huan; Ponce-de-Leon, Manuel; Belshe, Robert B.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The results of a clinical trial of a subunit vaccine against genital herpes were recently reported (R. B. Belshe, P. A. Leone, D. I. Bernstein, A. Wald, M. J. Levin, J. T. Stapleton, I. Gorfinkel, R. L. Morrow, M. G. Ewell, A. Stokes-Riner, G. Dubin, T. C. Heineman, J. M. Schulte, C. D. Deal, N. Engl. J. Med. 366:34–43, 2012, doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1103151). The vaccine consisted of a soluble form of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD2) with adjuvant. The goal of the current study was to examine the composition of the humoral response to gD2 within a selected subset of vaccinated individuals. Serum samples from 30 vaccine recipients were selected based upon relative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titers against gD2; 10 samples had high titers, 10 had medium titers, and the remaining 10 had low ELISA titers. We employed a novel, biosensor-based monoclonal antibody (MAb)-blocking assay to determine whether gD2 vaccination elicited IgG responses against epitopes overlapping those of well-characterized MAbs. Importantly, IgGs from the majority of gD2-immunized subjects competed for gD binding with four antigenically distinct virus-neutralizing MAbs (MC2, MC5, MC23, and DL11). Screening of patient IgGs against overlapping peptides spanning the gD2 ectodomain revealed that about half of the samples contained antibodies against linear epitopes within the N and C termini of gD2. We found that the virus-neutralizing abilities of the 10 most potent samples correlated with overall gD-binding activity and to an even greater extent with the combined content of IgGs against the epitopes of MAbs MC2, MC5, MC23, and DL11. This suggests that optimal virus-neutralizing activity is achieved by strong and balanced responses to the four major discontinuous neutralizing epitopes of gD2. IMPORTANCE Several herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) subunit vaccine studies have been conducted in human subjects using a recombinant form of HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD2

  10. Proteomic Characterization of Helicobacter pylori CagA Antigen Recognized by Child Serum Antibodies and Its Epitope Mapping by Peptide Array

    PubMed Central

    Akada, Junko; Okuda, Masumi; Hiramoto, Narumi; Kitagawa, Takao; Zhang, Xiulian; Kamei, Shuichi; Ito, Akane; Nakamura, Mikiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hiwatani, Tomoko; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Teruko; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Serum antibodies against pathogenic bacteria play immunologically protective roles, and can be utilized as diagnostic markers of infection. This study focused on Japanese child serum antibodies against Helicobacter pylori, a chronically-infected gastric bacterium which causes gastric cancer in adults. Serological diagnosis for H. pylori infection is well established for adults, but it needs to be improved for children. Serum samples from 24 children, 22 H. pylori (Hp)-positive and 2 Hp-negative children, were used to catalogue antigenic proteins of a Japanese strain CPY2052 by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by immunoblot and LC-MS/MS analysis. In total, 24 proteins were identified as candidate antigen proteins. Among these, the major virulence factor, cytotoxin-associated gene A protein (CagA) was the most reactive antigen recognized by all the Hp-positive sera even from children under the age of 3 years. The major antigenic part of CagA was identified in the middle region, and two peptides containing CagA epitopes were identified using a newly developed peptide/protein-combined array chip method, modified from our previous protein chip method. Each of the epitopes was found to contain amino acid residue(s) unique to East Asian CagA. Epitope analysis of CagA indicated importance of the regional CagA antigens for serodiagnosis of H. pylori infection in children. PMID:25141238

  11. Pr1E11, a novel anti-TROP-2 antibody isolated by adenovirus-based antibody screening, recognizes a unique epitope.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Miki; Kato, Kazunori; Nakamura, Kiminori; Shiina, Sagano; Ichikawa-Ando, Takako; Misaka, Hirofumi; Myojo, Kensuke; Nakamura, Kazuyasu; Sugimoto, Yoshiyuki; Hamada, Hirofumi

    2015-03-20

    TROP-2 is a type Ⅰ transmembrane glycoprotein that is highly expressed in various epithelial cancer cells, and its increased expression correlates with poor prognosis. Although several anti-TROP-2 antibodies have been described, they were found unsuitable for antitumor therapy use in vivo as naked antibodies. In this study, we established a novel anti-TROP-2 antibody, designated Pr1E11, from mice immunized with primary prostate cancer cells. Antibody screening was based on the infection activity of Adv-LacZ-FZ33, which displays an immunoglobulin G binding domain in the adenoviral fiber protein. We found that Pr1E11 specifically binds to TROP-2 with high affinity and recognizes diverse epithelial cancer cell lines and primary pancreatic cancer tissues. Epitope analysis using TROP-2 deletion mutants revealed that binding site of Pr1E11 is a cysteine-rich domain, a unique epitope compared with other available anti-TROP-2 antibodies. In addition, Pr1E11 exhibited low internalization activity, which may make it suitable for naked antibody therapeutics. Our results suggest that Pr1E11 may stimulate different biological activities from other anti-TROP-2 antibodies based on its unique binding epitope, and is a potential candidate for naked antibody therapeutics for various epithelial cancer treatments. PMID:25701778

  12. Characterization of B-cell epitopes on IpaB, an invasion-associated antigen of Shigella flexneri: identification of an immunodominant domain recognized during natural infection.

    PubMed

    Barzu, S; Nato, F; Rouyre, S; Mazie, J C; Sansonetti, P; Phalipon, A

    1993-09-01

    The invasion plasmid antigen B (IpaB), a 62-kDa plasmid-encoded protein associated with the ability of shigellae to invade epithelial cells, is the bacterial antigen most strongly and consistently recognized by the host during infection. The strong systemic and mucosal immune responses observed against this invasin prompted us to map its B-cell epitopes. For this purpose, IpaB was first overexpressed in Shigella flexneri and used to raise rabbit polyclonal antiserum and murine monoclonal antibodies, which were subsequently used to screen a lambda gt11 ipaB library. Inserts of recombinant DNA clones that were specifically recognized by the antisera and antibodies were sequenced, and three distinct determinants were identified. Further characterization of these determinants showed that they were recognized by sera from patients convalescent from shigellosis, suggesting that they are relevant to the humoral response during natural infection. Moreover, the IpaB region comprising the three determinants was systematically recognized by all sera from infected patients that we tested, whereas other regions of the protein were not. These data suggest that this region, located between amino acid residues 147 and 258, is the major immunogenic domain of the invasin in the course of natural infection. PMID:7689541

  13. Epitopes on the beta subunit of human muscle acetylcholine receptor recognized by CD4+ cells of myasthenia gravis patients and healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Moiola, L; Karachunski, P; Protti, M P; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the sequence regions of the human muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) beta subunit forming epitopes recognized by T helper cells in myasthenia gravis (MG), using overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, which screened the sequence of the AChR beta subunit. Since CD4+ lymphocytes from MG patients' blood did not respond to the peptides, we attempted propagation of beta subunit-specific T lines from six MG patients and seven healthy controls by cycles of stimulation of blood lymphocytes with the pooled peptides corresponding to the beta subunit sequence. CD4+ T lines were obtained from four patients and three controls. They secreted IL-2, not IL-4, suggesting that they comprised T helper type 1 cells. The T lines from MG patients could be propagated for several months. Three lines were tested with purified bovine muscle AChR and cross-reacted well with this antigen. All T lines were tested with the individual synthetic peptides present in the pool corresponding to the beta subunit sequence. Several beta subunit peptide sequences were recognized. Each line had an individual pattern of peptides recognition, but three sequence regions (peptides beta 181-200, beta 271-290, and the overlapping peptides beta 316-335 and beta 331-350) were recognized by most MG lines. The beta subunit-specific T lines from controls could be propagated for < 5 wk. Each line recognized several peptides, which frequently included the immunodominant regions listed above. Images PMID:7510715

  14. Mapping an epitope in EBNA‐1 that is recognized by monoclonal antibodies to EBNA‐1 that cross‐react with dsDNA

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pragya; Carr, Matthew T.; Yu, Ruby; Mumbey‐Wafula, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) has been associated with the autoimmune disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). EBV nuclear antigen‐I (EBNA‐1) is the major nuclear protein of EBV. We previously generated an IgG monoclonal antibody (MAb) to EBNA‐1, 3D4, and demonstrated that it cross‐reacts with double stranded DNA (dsDNA) and binds the 148 amino acid viral binding site (VBS) in the carboxyl region of EBNA‐1. The aim of the present study was to characterize another antibody to EBNA‐1 that cross‐reacts with dsDNA, compare its immunoglobulin genes to 3D4, and finely map the epitope in EBNA‐1 that is recognized by these cross‐reactive antibodies. Methods We generated an IgM MAb to EBNA‐1, 16D2, from EBNA‐1 injected mice and demonstrated by ELISA that it cross‐reacts with dsDNA and binds the 148 amino acid VBS. We sequenced the variable heavy and light chain genes of 3D4 and 16D2 and compared V gene usage. To more finely map the epitope in EBNA‐1 recognized by these MAbs, we examined their binding by ELISA to 15 overlapping peptides spanning the 148 amino acid domain. Results Sequence analysis revealed that 3D4 and 16D2 utilize different VH and VL genes but identical JH and Jk regions with minimal junctional diversity. This accounts for similarities in their CDR3 regions and may explain their similar dual binding specificity. Epitope mapping revealed 3D4 and 16D2 bind the same peptide in the VBS. Based on the crystal structure of EBNA‐1, we observed that this peptide resides at the base of an exposed proline rich loop in EBNA‐1. Conclusion We have demonstrated that two MAbs that bind EBNA‐1 and cross‐react with dsDNA, recognize the same peptide in the VBS. This peptide may serve as a mimetope for dsDNA and may be of diagnostic and therapeutic value in SLE. PMID:27621818

  15. Novel HLA-A2-restricted human metapneumovirus epitopes reduce viral titers in mice and are recognized by human T cells.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Andrew K; Gilchuk, Pavlo; Joyce, Sebastian; Williams, John V

    2016-05-23

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality from acute lower respiratory tract illness, with most individuals seropositive by age five. Despite the presence of neutralizing antibodies, secondary infections are common and can be severe in young, elderly, and immunocompromised persons. Preclinical vaccine studies for HMPV have suggested a need for a balanced antibody and T cell immune response to enhance protection and avoid lung immunopathology. We infected transgenic mice expressing human HLA-A*0201 with HMPV and used ELISPOT to screen overlapping and predicted epitope peptides. We identified six novel HLA-A2 restricted CD8(+) T cell (TCD8) epitopes, with M39-47 (M39) immunodominant. Tetramer staining detected M39-specific TCD8 in lungs and spleen of HMPV-immune mice. Immunization with adjuvant-formulated M39 peptide reduced lung virus titers upon challenge. Finally, we show that TCD8 from HLA-A*0201 positive humans recognize M39 by IFNγ ELISPOT and tetramer staining. These results will facilitate HMPV vaccine development and human studies. PMID:27105560

  16. Canine and feline parvoviruses preferentially recognize the non-human cell surface sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Löfling, Jonas; Michael Lyi, Sangbom; Parrish, Colin R.; Varki, Ajit

    2013-05-25

    Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) is a pathogen whose canine-adapted form (canine parvovirus (CPV)) emerged in 1978. These viruses infect by binding host transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR), but also hemagglutinate erythrocytes. We show that hemagglutination involves selective recognition of the non-human sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) but not N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), which differs by only one oxygen atom from Neu5Gc. Overexpression of α2-6 sialyltransferase did not change binding, indicating that both α2-3 and α2-6 linkages are recognized. However, Neu5Gc expression on target cells did not enhance CPV or FPV infection in vitro. Thus, the conserved Neu5Gc-binding preference of these viruses likely plays a role in the natural history of the virus in vivo. Further studies must clarify relationships between virus infection and host Neu5Gc expression. As a first step, we show that transcripts of CMAH (which generates Neu5Gc from Neu5Ac) are at very low levels in Western dog breed cells. - Highlights: ► Feline and canine parvoviruses recognize Neu5Gc but not Neu5Ac, which differ by one oxygen atom. ► The underlying linkage of these sialic acids does not affect recognition. ► Induced Neu5Gc expression on target cells that normally express Neu5Ac did not enhance infection. ► Thus, the conserved binding preference plays an important yet unknown role in in vivo infections. ► Population and breed variations in Neu5Gc expression occur, likely by regulating the gene CMAH.

  17. A Broadly Flavivirus Cross-Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody that Recognizes a Novel Epitope within the Fusion Loop of E Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Wang, Hua-Jing; Yang, Hai-ou; Tan, Weng-Long; Liu, Ran; Yu, Man; Ge, Bao-Xue; Zhu, Qing-Yu; Qin, E-De; Guo, Ya-Jun; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Flaviviruses are a group of human pathogenic, enveloped RNA viruses that includes dengue (DENV), yellow fever (YFV), West Nile (WNV), and Japanese encephalitis (JEV) viruses. Cross-reactive antibodies against Flavivirus have been described, but most of them are generally weakly neutralizing. In this study, a novel monoclonal antibody, designated mAb 2A10G6, was determined to have broad cross-reactivity with DENV 1–4, YFV, WNV, JEV, and TBEV. Phage-display biopanning and structure modeling mapped 2A10G6 to a new epitope within the highly conserved flavivirus fusion loop peptide, the 98DRXW101 motif. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that 2A10G6 potently neutralizes DENV 1–4, YFV, and WNV and confers protection from lethal challenge with DENV 1–4 and WNV in murine model. Furthermore, functional studies revealed that 2A10G6 blocks infection at a step after viral attachment. These results define a novel broadly flavivirus cross-reactive mAb with highly neutralizing activity that can be further developed as a therapeutic agent against severe flavivirus infections in humans. PMID:21264311

  18. The 3' portion of the gene for a Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface antigen encodes the epitope recognized by a protective monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, J M; Daly, T M; Vaidya, A B; Long, C A

    1988-01-01

    The 230-kDa merozoite antigen of the murine malarial parasite Plasmodium yoelii provides a potential model system for the development of a protective erythrocytic stage vaccine. To characterize this antigen at the molecular level, isolated P. yoelii 17XL DNA was used to construct a genomic library in the expression vector lambda gt11. A monoclonal antibody, mAb 302, which passively protected mice against P. yoelii challenge infection, was used to identify a lambda gt11 recombinant clone encoding a portion of the 230-kDa antigen of this parasite. Using this clone as a probe, we identified an mRNA of 7.6 kilobases by RNA blot analysis. Nucleic acid sequence analysis of the clone showed that the epitope recognized by the protective mAb 302 is encoded by the 3' portion of the gene for the 230-kDa antigen. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed that this antigen also contains the tandemly repeated tetrapeptide Gly-Ala-Val-Pro, a series of 10 cysteine residues located within the terminal 110 amino acids, and a potential membrane anchor of 18 hydrophobic residues. Comparison of this C-terminal sequence with the carboxyl segment of the 195-kDa merozoite antigen of Plasmodium falciparum revealed nucleic acid and amino acid sequence similarities ranging from 40% to 70%. The localization of a B-cell epitope recognized by the protective mAb 302 to this carboxyl region of the P. yoelii antigen, combined with the limited strain variability in this region of the homologous 195-kDa antigen of P. falciparum, has implications for the development of an effective erythrocytic stage malarial vaccine. Images PMID:2448778

  19. Canine and feline parvoviruses preferentially recognize the non-human cell surface sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid.

    PubMed

    Löfling, Jonas; Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Parrish, Colin R; Varki, Ajit

    2013-05-25

    Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) is a pathogen whose canine-adapted form (canine parvovirus (CPV)) emerged in 1978. These viruses infect by binding host transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR), but also hemagglutinate erythrocytes. We show that hemagglutination involves selective recognition of the non-human sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) but not N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), which differs by only one oxygen atom from Neu5Gc. Overexpression of α2-6 sialyltransferase did not change binding, indicating that both α2-3 and α2-6 linkages are recognized. However, Neu5Gc expression on target cells did not enhance CPV or FPV infection in vitro. Thus, the conserved Neu5Gc-binding preference of these viruses likely plays a role in the natural history of the virus in vivo. Further studies must clarify relationships between virus infection and host Neu5Gc expression. As a first step, we show that transcripts of CMAH (which generates Neu5Gc from Neu5Ac) are at very low levels in Western dog breed cells. PMID:23497940

  20. The Thai Phase III Trial (RV144) Vaccine Regimen Induces T Cell Responses that Preferentially Target Epitopes within the V2 Region of HIV-1 Envelope

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Mark S.; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Chuenarom, Weerawan; Schuetz, Alexandra; Chantakulkij, Somsak; Nuntapinit, Bessara; Valencia-Micolta, Anais; Thelian, Doris; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Paris, Robert M.; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Michael, Nelson L.; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Mathieson, Bonnie; Marovich, Mary; Currier, Jeffrey R.; Kim, Jerome H.

    2012-01-01

    The Thai HIV phase III prime-boost trial (RV144) using ALVAC-HIV® (vCP1521) and AIDSVAX B/E® was, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate acquisition efficacy. Vaccine-induced, cell-mediated immune responses were assessed. T cell epitope mapping studies using IFN-γ ELISPOT were performed on PBMC from HIV-1 uninfected vaccine (N=61) and placebo (N=10) recipients using HIV-1 Env peptides. Positive responses were measured in 25 (41%) vaccinees and were predominantly CD4+ T cell mediated. Responses were targeted within the HIV Env region, with 15/25 (60%) of vaccinees recognizing peptides derived from the V2 region of HIV-1 Env, which includes the α4β7 integrin binding site. Intracellular cytokine staining confirmed that Env responses predominated (19/30; 63% of vaccine recipients) and were mediated by polyfunctional effector memory CD4+ T cells, with the majority of responders producing both IL-2 and IFN-γ (12/19; 63%). HIV-Env Ab titers were higher in subjects with IL-2 compared to those without IL-2 secreting HIV-Env specific effector memory T cells. Proliferation assays revealed that HIV Ag-specific T cells were CD4+ with the majority (80%) expressing CD107a. HIV-specific T cell lines obtained from vaccine recipients confirmed V2 specificity, polyfunctionality and functional cytolytic capacity. While the RV144 T cell responses were modest in frequency compared to humoral immune responses, the CD4+ T cell response was directed to HIV-1 Env and more particularly the V2 region. PMID:22529301

  1. Two cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies recognize overlapping epitopes on Neisseria meningitidis factor H binding protein but have different functional properties.

    PubMed

    Faleri, Agnese; Santini, Laura; Brier, Sébastien; Pansegrau, Werner; Lo Surdo, Paola; Scarselli, Maria; Buricchi, Francesca; Volpini, Gianfranco; Genovese, Alessia; van der Veen, Stijn; Lea, Susan; Tang, Christoph M; Savino, Silvana; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Finco, Oretta; Norais, Nathalie; Masignani, Vega

    2014-04-01

    Factor H binding protein (fHbp) is one of the main antigens of the 4-component meningococcus B (4CMenB) multicomponent vaccine against disease caused by serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB). fHbp binds the complement down-regulating protein human factor H (hfH), thus resulting in immune evasion. fHbp exists in 3 variant groups with limited cross-protective responses. Previous studies have described the generation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting variant-specific regions of fHbp. Here we report for the first time the functional characterization of two mAbs that recognize a wide panel of fHbp variants and subvariants on the MenB surface and that are able to inhibit fHbp binding to hfH. The antigenic regions targeted by the two mAbs were accurately mapped by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS), revealing partially overlapping epitopes on the N terminus of fHbp. Furthermore, while none of the mAbs had bactericidal activity on its own, a synergistic effect was observed for each of them when tested by the human complement serum bactericidal activity (hSBA) assay in combination with a second nonbactericidal mAb. The bases underlying fHbp variant cross-reactivity, as well as inhibition of hfH binding and cooperativity effect observed for the two mAbs, are discussed in light of the mapped epitopes. PMID:24371123

  2. New high affinity monoclonal antibodies recognize non-overlapping epitopes on mesothelin for monitoring and treating mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Phung, Yen; Gao, Wei; Kawa, Seiji; Hassan, Raffit; Pastan, Ira; Ho, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Mesothelin is an emerging cell surface target in mesothelioma and other solid tumors. Most antibody drug candidates recognize highly immunogenic Region I (296-390) on mesothelin. Here, we report a group of high-affinity non-Region I rabbit monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies do not compete for mesothelin binding with the immunotoxin SS1P that binds Region I of mesothelin. One pair of antibodies (YP218 and YP223) is suitable to detect soluble mesothelin in a sandwich ELISA with high sensitivity. The new assay can also be used to measure serum mesothelin concentration in mesothelioma patients, indicating its potential use for monitoring patients treated with current antibody therapies targeting Region I. The antibodies are highly specific and sensitive in immunostaining of mesothelioma. To explore their use in tumor therapy, we have generated the immunotoxins based on the Fv of these antibodies. One immunotoxin (YP218 Fv-PE38) exhibits potent anti-tumor cytotoxicity towards primary mesothelioma cell lines in vitro and an NCI-H226 xenograft tumor in mice. Furthermore, we have engineered a humanized YP218 Fv that retains full binding affinity for mesothelin-expressing cancer cells. In conclusion, with their unique binding properties, these antibodies may be promising candidates for monitoring and treating mesothelioma and other mesothelin-expressing cancers. PMID:25996440

  3. New High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Recognize Non-Overlapping Epitopes On Mesothelin For Monitoring And Treating Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Phung, Yen; Gao, Wei; Kawa, Seiji; Hassan, Raffit; Pastan, Ira; Ho, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Mesothelin is an emerging cell surface target in mesothelioma and other solid tumors. Most antibody drug candidates recognize highly immunogenic Region I (296–390) on mesothelin. Here, we report a group of high-affinity non-Region I rabbit monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies do not compete for mesothelin binding with the immunotoxin SS1P that binds Region I of mesothelin. One pair of antibodies (YP218 and YP223) is suitable to detect soluble mesothelin in a sandwich ELISA with high sensitivity. The new assay can also be used to measure serum mesothelin concentration in mesothelioma patients, indicating its potential use for monitoring patients treated with current antibody therapies targeting Region I. The antibodies are highly specific and sensitive in immunostaining of mesothelioma. To explore their use in tumor therapy, we have generated the immunotoxins based on the Fv of these antibodies. One immunotoxin (YP218 Fv-PE38) exhibits potent anti-tumor cytotoxicity towards primary mesothelioma cell lines in vitro and an NCI-H226 xenograft tumor in mice. Furthermore, we have engineered a humanized YP218 Fv that retains full binding affinity for mesothelin-expressing cancer cells. In conclusion, with their unique binding properties, these antibodies may be promising candidates for monitoring and treating mesothelioma and other mesothelin-expressing cancers. PMID:25996440

  4. B-Cell Epitopes in NTS-DBL1α of PfEMP1 Recognized by Human Antibodies in Rosetting Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Letusa; Blomqvist, Karin; Valentini, Davide; D'Alexandri, Fabio Luiz; Maurer, Markus; Wahlgren, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the most lethal of the human malaria parasites. The virulence is associated with the capacity of the infected red blood cell (iRBC) to sequester inside the deep microvasculature where it may cause obstruction of the blood-flow when binding is excessive. Rosetting, the adherence of the iRBC to uninfected erythrocytes, has been found associated with severe malaria and found to be mediated by the NTS-DBL1α-domain of Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1). Here we show that the reactivity of plasma of Cameroonian children with the surface of the FCR3S1.2-iRBC correlated with the capacity to disrupt rosettes and with the antibody reactivity with a recombinant PfEMP1 (NTS-DBL1α of IT4var60) expressed by parasite FCR3S1.2. The plasma-reactivity in a microarray, consisting of 96 overlapping 15-mer long peptides covering the NTS-DBL1α domain from IT4var60 sequence, was compared with their capacity to disrupt rosettes and we identified five peptides where the reactivity were correlated. Three of the peptides were localized in subdomain-1 and 2. The other two peptide-sequences were localized in the NTS-domain and in subdomain-3. Further, principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least square analysis generated a model that supported these findings. In conclusion, human antibody reactivity with short linear-peptides of NTS-DBL1α of PfEMP1 suggests subdomains 1 and 2 to hold anti-rosetting epitopes recognized by anti-rosetting antibodies. The data suggest rosetting to be mediated by the variable areas of PfEMP1 but also to involve structurally relatively conserved areas of the molecule that may induce biologically active antibodies. PMID:25438249

  5. Linear B-cell epitopes in BthTX-1, BthTX-II and BthA-1, phospholipase A₂'s from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom, recognized by therapeutically neutralizing commercial horse antivenom.

    PubMed

    De-Simone, Salvatore G; Napoleão-Pego, Paloma; Teixeira-Pinto, Luiz A L; Santos, Jonathas D L; De-Simone, Thatiane S; Melgarejo, Anibal R; Aguiar, Aniesse S; Marchi-Salvador, Daniela P

    2013-09-01

    The benefits from treatment with antivenom sera are indubitable. However, the mechanism for toxin neutralization has not been completely elucidated. A mixture of anti-bothropic and anti-crotalic horse antivenom has been reported to be more effective in neutralizing the effects of Bothrops jararacussu snake venom than anti-bothropic antivenom alone. This study determined which regions in the three PLA₂s from B. jararacussu snake venom are bound by antibodies in tetravalent anti-bothropic and monovalent anti-crotalic commercial horse antivenom. Mapping experiments of BthTX-I, BthTX-II and BthA-I using two small libraries of 69 peptides each revealed six major IgG-binding epitopes that were recognized by both anti-bothropic and anti-crotalic horse antivenom. Two epitopes in BthTX-I were only recognized by the anti-bothropic horse antivenom, while anti-crotalic horse antivenom recognized four unique epitopes across the three PLA₂s. Our studies suggest that the harmful activities of the PLA₂s present in the venom of B. jararacussu are neutralized by the combinatorial treatment with both antivenom sera through their complementary binding sites, which provides a wide coverage on the PLA₂s. This is the first peptide microarray of PLA₂s from B. jararacussu snake venom to survey the performance of commercial horse antiophidic antivenom. Regions recognized by the protective antivenom sera are prime candidates for improved venom cocktails or a chimeric protein encoding the multiple epitopes to immunize animals as well as for designing future synthetic vaccines. PMID:23792452

  6. Chemical Characterization of N-Linked Oligosaccharide As the Antigen Epitope Recognized by an Anti-Sperm Auto-Monoclonal Antibody, Ts4

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana; Endo, Shuichiro; Takamori, Kenji; Hasegawa, Akiko; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Araki, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Ts4, an anti-sperm auto-monoclonal antibody, possesses immunoreactivity to the acrosomal region of mouse epididymal spermatozoa. In addition, the mAb shows specific immunoreactivity to reproduction-related regions such as testicular germ cells and early embryo. Our qualitative study previously showed that the antigen epitope for Ts4 contained a N-linked common oligosaccharide (OS) chain on testicular glycoproteins as determined by Western blotting for testicular glycoproteins after treatment with several glycohydrolases. Since the distribution of the Ts4-epitope is unique, the OS chain in Ts4-epitope may have role(s) in the reproductive process. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular structure of the Ts4-epitope, particularly its OS moiety. Using Ts4 immunoprecipitation combined with liquid chromatography and multiple-stage mass spectrometry, the candidate carbohydrate structure in the Ts4-epitope is proposed to be N-linked fucosylated agalacto-biantennary with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) or with N-acetylgalactosamine-GlcNAc motif. Further binding analyses using various lectins against the mouse testicular Ts4-immunoprecipitants revealed that Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin and Pisum sativum agglutinin showed positive staining of the bands corresponding to Ts4 reactive proteins. Moreover, the immunoreactivity of Ts4 against the testicular extract was completely abrogated after digestion with β-N-acetylglucosaminidase. These results show that the Ts4-epitope contains agalacto-biantennary N-glycan with bisecting GlcNAc carrying fucose residues. PMID:26222427

  7. The identification and characterization of epitopes in the 30-34 kDa Trypanosoma cruzi proteins recognized by antibodies in the serum samples of chagasic patients.

    PubMed

    Verissimo da Costa, Giovani Carlo; Lery, Leticia Miranda Santos; da Silva, Manuela Leal; Moura, Hércules; Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago; von Krüger, Wanda Maria Almeida; Bisch, Paulo Mascarello; Barr, John R; Peralta, José Mauro

    2013-03-27

    Trypanosoma cruzi proteins with molecular weight between 30 and 34 kDa have shown high reactivity in western blot assays with serum samples from chagasic individuals. However, in-depth analysis of the constituents of these protein fractions has not been performed. This is the first report of an immunoaffinity proteomic approach to identify the immunodominant 30-34 kDa proteins of T. cruzi that could eventually be used for the diagnosis of Chagas disease. We used two different sample preparation protocols for protein digestion coupled to mass spectrometry to identify proteins in the protein fraction. The immunodominant proteins and their respective epitopes were then identified by co-immunoprecipitation and excision-epitope mapping/mass spectrometry, using human sera followed by the prediction and three-dimensional structural modeling of reactive epitopes. The use of different sample preparation methods allowed the identification of a relatively high number of proteins, some of which were only identified after one or multiple sample preparation and digestion protocols. Seven immunodominant proteins were identified by co-immunoprecipitation with purified IgGs from chagasic serum samples. Moreover, six reactive peptide epitopes were detected in four of these proteins by excision-epitope mapping/mass spectrometry. Three-dimensional structural models were obtained for the immunoreactive peptides, which correlated well with the linear B-cell epitope prediction tools. PMID:23159400

  8. Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies from an HIV-1 Vaccine Efficacy Trial Target Multiple Epitopes and Preferentially Use the VH1 Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Pollara, Justin; Moody, M. Anthony; Alpert, Michael D.; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gilbert, Peter B.; Huang, Ying; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Kozink, Daniel M.; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Montefiori, David C.; Lewis, George K.; DeVico, Anthony; Evans, David T.; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2012-01-01

    The ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX-B/E RV144 vaccine trial showed an estimated efficacy of 31%. RV144 secondary immune correlate analysis demonstrated that the combination of low plasma anti-HIV-1 Env IgA antibodies and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) inversely correlate with infection risk. One hypothesis is that the observed protection in RV144 is partially due to ADCC-mediating antibodies. We found that the majority (73 to 90%) of a representative group of vaccinees displayed plasma ADCC activity, usually (96.2%) blocked by competition with the C1 region-specific A32 Fab fragment. Using memory B-cell cultures and antigen-specific B-cell sorting, we isolated 23 ADCC-mediating nonclonally related antibodies from 6 vaccine recipients. These antibodies targeted A32-blockable conformational epitopes (n = 19), a non-A32-blockable conformational epitope (n = 1), and the gp120 Env variable loops (n = 3). Fourteen antibodies mediated cross-clade target cell killing. ADCC-mediating antibodies displayed modest levels of V-heavy (VH) chain somatic mutation (0.5 to 1.5%) and also displayed a disproportionate usage of VH1 family genes (74%), a phenomenon recently described for CD4-binding site broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Maximal ADCC activity of VH1 antibodies correlated with mutation frequency. The polyclonality and low mutation frequency of these VH1 antibodies reveal fundamental differences in the regulation and maturation of these ADCC-mediating responses compared to VH1 bNAbs. PMID:22896626

  9. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-mediating antibodies from an HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial target multiple epitopes and preferentially use the VH1 gene family.

    PubMed

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Pollara, Justin; Moody, M Anthony; Alpert, Michael D; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gilbert, Peter B; Huang, Ying; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Kozink, Daniel M; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Lewis, George K; DeVico, Anthony; Evans, David T; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2012-11-01

    The ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX-B/E RV144 vaccine trial showed an estimated efficacy of 31%. RV144 secondary immune correlate analysis demonstrated that the combination of low plasma anti-HIV-1 Env IgA antibodies and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) inversely correlate with infection risk. One hypothesis is that the observed protection in RV144 is partially due to ADCC-mediating antibodies. We found that the majority (73 to 90%) of a representative group of vaccinees displayed plasma ADCC activity, usually (96.2%) blocked by competition with the C1 region-specific A32 Fab fragment. Using memory B-cell cultures and antigen-specific B-cell sorting, we isolated 23 ADCC-mediating nonclonally related antibodies from 6 vaccine recipients. These antibodies targeted A32-blockable conformational epitopes (n = 19), a non-A32-blockable conformational epitope (n = 1), and the gp120 Env variable loops (n = 3). Fourteen antibodies mediated cross-clade target cell killing. ADCC-mediating antibodies displayed modest levels of V-heavy (VH) chain somatic mutation (0.5 to 1.5%) and also displayed a disproportionate usage of VH1 family genes (74%), a phenomenon recently described for CD4-binding site broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Maximal ADCC activity of VH1 antibodies correlated with mutation frequency. The polyclonality and low mutation frequency of these VH1 antibodies reveal fundamental differences in the regulation and maturation of these ADCC-mediating responses compared to VH1 bNAbs. PMID:22896626

  10. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Prachasupap, Apichai; Yasugi, Mayo; Ono, Ken-ichiro; and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. • The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. • The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). • The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. • Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses.

  11. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat; Koksunan, Sarawut; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Prachasupap, Apichai; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Yasugi, Mayo; Ono, Ken-Ichiro; Arai, Yasuha; Kurosu, Takeshi; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Yohei

    2014-09-26

    Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses. PMID:25204499

  12. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-04-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  13. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  14. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27067900

  15. Shigella flexneri 3a Outer Membrane Protein C Epitope Is Recognized by Human Umbilical Cord Sera and Associated with Protective Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jarząb, Anna; Witkowska, Danuta; Ziomek, Edmund; Dąbrowska, Anna; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Gamian, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Shigella flexneri 3a is one of the five major strains of the Shigella genus responsible for dysentery, especially among children, in regions of high poverty and poor sanitation. The outer membrane proteins (OMP) of this bacterium elicit immunological responses and are considered a prime target for vaccine development. When injected into mice they elicit a protective immunological response against a lethal dose of the pathogen. The OMPs from S. flexneri 3a were isolated and resolved by two-dimension-SDS-PAGE. Two 38-kDa spots were of particular interest since in our earlier studies OMPs of such molecular mass were found to interact with umbilical cord sera. These two spots were identified as OmpC by ESI-MS/MS spectrometry. By DNA sequencing, the ompC gene from S. flexneri 3a was identical to ompC from S. flexneri 2a [Gene Bank: 24113600]. A 3D model of OmpC was built and used to predict B-cell type (discontinuous) antigenic epitopes. Six epitopes bearing the highest score were selected and the corresponding peptides were synthesized. Only the peptides representing loop V of OmpC reacted strongly with the umbilical cord serum immunoglobulins. To determine which amino acids are essential for the antigenic activity of the epitope, the loop V was scanned with a series of dodecapeptides. The peptide RYDERY was identified as a minimal sequence for the loop V epitope. Truncation at either the C- or N-terminus rendered this peptide inactive. Apart from C-terminal tyrosine, substitution of each of the remaining five amino acids with glycine, led to a precipitous loss of immunological activity. This peptide may serve as a ligand in affinity chromatography of OmpC-specific antibodies and as a component of a vaccine designed to boost human immune defenses against enterobacterial infections. PMID:23940590

  16. Shigella flexneri 3a outer membrane protein C epitope is recognized by human umbilical cord sera and associated with protective activity.

    PubMed

    Jarząb, Anna; Witkowska, Danuta; Ziomek, Edmund; Dąbrowska, Anna; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Gamian, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Shigella flexneri 3a is one of the five major strains of the Shigella genus responsible for dysentery, especially among children, in regions of high poverty and poor sanitation. The outer membrane proteins (OMP) of this bacterium elicit immunological responses and are considered a prime target for vaccine development. When injected into mice they elicit a protective immunological response against a lethal dose of the pathogen. The OMPs from S. flexneri 3a were isolated and resolved by two-dimension-SDS-PAGE. Two 38-kDa spots were of particular interest since in our earlier studies OMPs of such molecular mass were found to interact with umbilical cord sera. These two spots were identified as OmpC by ESI-MS/MS spectrometry. By DNA sequencing, the ompC gene from S. flexneri 3a was identical to ompC from S. flexneri 2a [Gene Bank: 24113600]. A 3D model of OmpC was built and used to predict B-cell type (discontinuous) antigenic epitopes. Six epitopes bearing the highest score were selected and the corresponding peptides were synthesized. Only the peptides representing loop V of OmpC reacted strongly with the umbilical cord serum immunoglobulins. To determine which amino acids are essential for the antigenic activity of the epitope, the loop V was scanned with a series of dodecapeptides. The peptide RYDERY was identified as a minimal sequence for the loop V epitope. Truncation at either the C- or N-terminus rendered this peptide inactive. Apart from C-terminal tyrosine, substitution of each of the remaining five amino acids with glycine, led to a precipitous loss of immunological activity. This peptide may serve as a ligand in affinity chromatography of OmpC-specific antibodies and as a component of a vaccine designed to boost human immune defenses against enterobacterial infections. PMID:23940590

  17. Type 1 Diabetes at-risk children highly recognize Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis epitopes homologous to human Znt8 and Proinsulin

    PubMed Central

    Niegowska, Magdalena; Rapini, Novella; Piccinini, Simona; Mameli, Giuseppe; Caggiu, Elisa; Manca Bitti, Maria Luisa; Sechi, Leonardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) has been previously associated to T1D as a putative environmental agent triggering or accelerating the disease in Sardinian and Italian populations. Our aim was to investigate the role of MAP in T1D development by evaluating levels of antibodies directed against MAP epitopes and their human homologs corresponding to ZnT8 and proinsulin (PI) in 54 T1D at-risk children from mainland Italy and 42 healthy controls (HCs). A higher prevalence was detected for MAP/ZnT8 pairs (62,96% T1D vs. 7,14% HCs; p < 0.0001) compared to MAP/PI epitopes (22,22% T1D vs. 9,52% HCs) and decreasing trends were observed upon time-point analyses for most peptides. Similarly, classical ZnT8 Abs and GADA decreased in a time-dependent manner, whereas IAA titers increased by 12%. Responses in 0–9 year-old children were stronger than in 10–18 age group (75% vs. 69,1%; p < 0.04). Younger age, female sex and concomitant autoimmune disorders contributed to a stronger seroreactivity suggesting a possible implication of MAP in multiple autoimmune syndrome. Cross-reactivity of the homologous epitopes was reflected by a high correlation coefficient (r2 > 0.8) and a pairwise overlap of positivity (>83% for MAP/ZnT8). PMID:26923214

  18. Characterization of a natural mouse monoclonal antibody recognizing epitopes shared by oxidized low-density lipoprotein and chaperonin 60 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunguang; Kankaanpää, Jari; Kummu, Outi; Turunen, S Pauliina; Akhi, Ramin; Bergmann, Ulrich; Pussinen, Pirkko; Remes, Anne M; Hörkkö, Sohvi

    2016-06-01

    Natural antibodies are predominantly antibodies of the IgM isotype present in the circulation of all vertebrates that have not been previously exposed to exogenous antigens. They are often directed against highly conserved epitopes and bind to ligands of varying chemical composition with low affinity. In this study we cloned and characterized a natural mouse monoclonal IgM antibody selected by binding to malondialdehyde acetaldehyde epitopes on low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Interestingly, the IgM antibody cross-reacted with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) bacteria, a key pathogenic microbe in periodontitis reported to be associated with risk factor for atherosclerosis, thus being named as Aa_Mab. It is more intriguing that the binding molecule of Aa to Aa_Mab IgM was found to be Aa chaperonin 60 or HSP60, a member of heat-shock protein family, behaving not only as a chaperone for correct protein folding but also as a powerful virulence factor of the bacteria for inducing bone resorption and as a putative pathogenic factor in atherosclerosis. The findings will highlight the question of whether molecular mimicry between pathogen components and oxidized LDL could lead to atheroprotective immune activity, and also would be of great importance in potential application of immune response-based preventive and therapeutic strategies against atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. PMID:26786003

  19. A Conformational Switch in Human Immunodeficiency Virus gp41 Revealed by the Structures of Overlapping Epitopes Recognized by Neutralizing Antibodies ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S.; Brunel, Florence M.; Cardoso, Rosa M.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Dawson, Philip E.; Burton, Dennis R.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-01-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein (gp41) is critical for viral fusion and infectivity and is the target of three of the five known broadly neutralizing HIV type 1 (HIV-1) antibodies, 2F5, Z13, and 4E10. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Fab fragment of Z13e1, an affinity-enhanced variant of monoclonal antibody Z13, in complex with a 12-residue peptide corresponding to the core epitope (W670NWFDITN677) at 1.8-Å resolution. The bound peptide adopts an S-shaped conformation composed of two tandem, perpendicular helical turns. This conformation differs strikingly from the α-helical structure adopted by an overlapping MPER peptide bound to 4E10. Z13e1 binds to an elbow in the MPER at the membrane interface, making relatively few interactions with conserved aromatics (Trp672 and Phe673) that are critical for 4E10 recognition. The comparison of the Z13e1 and 4E10 epitope structures reveals a conformational switch such that neutralization can occur by the recognition of the different conformations and faces of the largely amphipathic MPER. The Z13e1 structure provides significant new insights into the dynamic nature of the MPER, which likely is critical for membrane fusion, and it has significant implications for mechanisms of HIV-1 neutralization by MPER antibodies and for the design of HIV-1 immunogens. PMID:19515770

  20. Identification of Mono- and Disulfated N-Acetyl-lactosaminyl Oligosaccharide Structures as Epitopes Specifically Recognized by Humanized Monoclonal Antibody HMOCC-1 Raised against Ovarian Cancer*♦

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Toshiaki K.; Matsumura, Fumiko; Wang, Ping; Yu, ShinYi; Chou, Chi-Chi; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Kitayama, Kazuko; Akama, Tomoya O.; Sugihara, Kazuhiro; Kanayama, Naohiro; Kojima-Aikawa, Kyoko; Seeberger, Peter H.; Fukuda, Minoru; Suzuki, Atsushi; Aoki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Michiko N.

    2012-01-01

    A humanized monoclonal antibody raised against human ovarian cancer RMG-I cells and designated as HMOCC-1 (Suzuki, N., Aoki, D., Tamada, Y., Susumu, N., Orikawa, K., Tsukazaki, K., Sakayori, M., Suzuki, A., Fukuchi, T., Mukai, M., Kojima-Aikawa, K., Ishida, I., and Nozawa, S. (2004) Gynecol. Oncol. 95, 290–298) was characterized for its carbohydrate epitope structure. Specifically, a series of co-transfections was performed using mammalian expression vectors encoding specific glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases. These experiments identified one sulfotransferase, GAL3ST3, and one glycosyltransferase, B3GNT7, as required for HMOCC-1 antigen formation. They also suggested that the sulfotransferase CHST1 regulates the abundance and intensity of HMOCC-1 antigen. When HEK293T cells were co-transfected with GAL3ST3 and B3GNT7 expression vectors, transfected cells weakly expressed HMOCC-1 antigen. When cells were first co-transfected with GAL3ST3 and B3GNT7 and then with CHST1, the resulting cells strongly expressed HMOCC-1 antigen. However, when cells were transfected with a mixture of GAL3ST3 and CHST1 before or after transfection with B3GNT7, the number of antigen-positive cells decreased relative to the number seen with only GAL3ST3 and B3GNT7, suggesting that CHST1 plays a regulatory role in HMOCC-1 antigen formation. Because these results predicted that HMOCC-1 antigens are SO3→3Galβ1→4GlcNAcβ1→3(±SO3→6)Galβ1→4GlcNAc, we chemically synthesized mono- and disulfated and unsulfated oligosaccharides. Immunoassays using these oligosaccharides as inhibitors showed the strongest activity by disulfated tetrasaccharide, weak but positive activity by monosulfated tetrasaccharide at the terminal galactose, and no activity by nonsulfated tetrasaccharides. These results establish the HMOCC-1 epitope, which should serve as a useful reagent to further characterize ovarian cancer. PMID:22194598

  1. CD8(+) T cells remove cysts of Toxoplasma gondii from the brain mostly by recognizing epitopes commonly expressed by or cross-reactive between type II and type III strains of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Eri; Sa, Qila; Perkins, Sara; Grigg, Michael E; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells remove cysts of Toxoplasma gondii from the brain through perforin-mediated mechanisms. We here show that a transfer of CD8(+) immune T cells primed with a type II or a type III strain of T. gondii both efficiently removed cysts of a type II strain from infected SCID mice, although the former tended to be slightly more efficient than the latter. Similarly, a transfer of type II-primed CD8(+) T cells removed cysts of a type III strain. Therefore, CD8(+) T cells are capable of removing T. gondii cysts by recognizing epitopes commonly expressed in types II and III strains or cross-reactive between these two genotypes. PMID:27083473

  2. A galactosyl(alpha 1-3)mannose epitope on phospholipids of Leishmania mexicana and L. braziliensis is recognized by trypanosomatid-infected human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J L; Rojas, M

    1990-01-01

    An immunoglobulin M antibody reactive with galactosyl(alpha 1-3)mannose [Gal(alpha 1-3)Man] residues present on phospholipids extracted from Leishmania mexicana and L. braziliensis was found to be present in high titer in the serum of every normal individual studied. Periodate oxidation, acid hydrolysis, or acetylation suppressed immunoreactivity, suggesting that an oligosaccharide chain was responsible for antibody binding. Interaction occurs only with alpha-Gal terminal residues, since treatment of purified glycophospholipids with alpha-galactosidase but not with beta-galactosidase abolished it. Antibody bound to galactosyl(alpha 1-3)galactose-linked synthetic antigens but did not bind to the same residues present in rabbit, rat, and guinea pig erythrocytes or in murine laminin. Antigen-antibody binding was strongly blocked with Gal(alpha 1-3)Man and Gal(beta 1-4)Man. These results plus inhibition studies with several oligosaccharides suggest that they are indeed different from antibodies against the galactosyl(alpha 1-3)galactose residue. Anti-Gal(alpha 1-3)Man antibody values were significantly elevated in 89% of patients with diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, 84% of patients with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, 69% of patients with mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, and 44 and 62% of patients with Trypanosoma cruzi or T. rangeli infection, respectively, but not in patients with 15 other different infectious and inflammatory diseases. Anti-Gal(alpha 1-3)Man antibody readily absorbed to American Leishmania and Trypanosoma culture forms, suggesting a surface membrane localization of reactive epitope. Gal(alpha 1-3)Man-bearing glycophospholipid was easily extracted from American Leishmania promastigotes and T. cruzi trypomastigotes as well as from American Trypanosoma culture forms. The possibility that this antibody arises against parasitic glycophospholipid-linked Gal(alpha 1-3)Man terminal residues is proposed. PMID:1696285

  3. Specificity of antinuclear autoantibodies recognizing the dense fine speckled nuclear pattern: Preferential targeting of DFS70/LEDGFp75 over its interacting partner MeCP2.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anamika; Woods-Burnham, Leanne; Ortiz, Greisha; Rios-Colon, Leslimar; Figueroa, Johnny; Albesa, Roger; Andrade, Luis E; Mahler, Michael; Casiano, Carlos A

    2015-12-01

    Human antinuclear autoantibodies (ANAs) targeting the dense fine speckled (DFS) nuclear protein DFS70, commonly known as lens epithelium derived growth factor p75 (LEDGFp75), present a clinical puzzle since their significance remains elusive. While their frequencies are low in ANA-positive autoimmune rheumatic diseases, they are relatively elevated in clinical laboratory referrals, diverse inflammatory conditions, and 'apparently' healthy individuals. We reported previously that DFS70/LEDGFp75 is an autoantigen in prostate cancer that closely interacts with another 70kD DFS nuclear protein, methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). This led us to investigate if anti-DFS sera exclusively target DFS70/LEDGFp75 or also recognize MeCP2. Using several complementary autoantibody detection platforms and cellular/molecular approaches we evaluated 65 human sera producing anti-DFS autoantibodies. Our results show that these antibodies are highly specific for DFS70/LEDGFp75 and do not target MeCP2. Establishing the specificity of anti-DFS autoantibodies has implications for increasing our understanding of their biological significance and clinical utility. PMID:26235378

  4. Antibodies to envelope glycoprotein of dengue virus during the natural course of infection are predominantly cross-reactive and recognize epitopes containing highly conserved residues at the fusion loop of domain II.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Yun; Tsai, Wen-Yang; Lin, Su-Ru; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Hu, Hsien-Ping; King, Chwan-Chuen; Wu, Han-Chung; Chang, Gwong-Jen; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2008-07-01

    The antibody response to the envelope (E) glycoprotein of dengue virus (DENV) is known to play a critical role in both protection from and enhancement of disease, especially after primary infection. However, the relative amounts of homologous and heterologous anti-E antibodies and their epitopes remain unclear. In this study, we examined the antibody responses to E protein as well as to precursor membrane (PrM), capsid, and nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of four serotypes of DENV by Western blot analysis of DENV serotype 2-infected patients with different disease severity and immune status during an outbreak in southern Taiwan in 2002. Based on the early-convalescent-phase sera tested, the rates of antibody responses to PrM and NS1 proteins were significantly higher in patients with secondary infection than in those with primary infection. A blocking experiment and neutralization assay showed that more than 90% of anti-E antibodies after primary infection were cross-reactive and nonneutralizing against heterologous serotypes and that only a minor proportion were type specific, which may account for the type-specific neutralization activity. Moreover, the E-binding activity in sera of 10 patients with primary infection was greatly reduced by amino acid replacements of three fusion loop residues, tryptophan at position 101, leucine at position 107, and phenylalanine at position 108, but not by replacements of those outside the fusion loop of domain II, suggesting that the predominantly cross-reactive anti-E antibodies recognized epitopes involving the highly conserved residues at the fusion loop of domain II. These findings have implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of dengue and for the future design of subunit vaccine against DENV as well. PMID:18448542

  5. The sclerostin-neutralizing antibody AbD09097 recognizes an epitope adjacent to sclerostin's binding site for the Wnt co-receptor LRP6.

    PubMed

    Boschert, V; Frisch, C; Back, J W; van Pee, K; Weidauer, S E; Muth, E-M; Schmieder, P; Beerbaum, M; Knappik, A; Timmerman, P; Mueller, T D

    2016-08-01

    The glycoprotein sclerostin has been identified as a negative regulator of bone growth. It exerts its function by interacting with the Wnt co-receptor LRP5/6, blocks the binding of Wnt factors and thereby inhibits Wnt signalling. Neutralizing anti-sclerostin antibodies are able to restore Wnt activity and enhance bone growth thereby presenting a new osteoanabolic therapy approach for diseases such as osteoporosis. We have generated various Fab antibodies against human and murine sclerostin using a phage display set-up. Biochemical analyses have identified one Fab developed against murine sclerostin, AbD09097 that efficiently neutralizes sclerostin's Wnt inhibitory activity. In vitro interaction analysis using sclerostin variants revealed that this neutralizing Fab binds to sclerostin's flexible second loop, which has been shown to harbour the LRP5/6 binding motif. Affinity maturation was then applied to AbD09097, providing a set of improved neutralizing Fab antibodies which particularly bind human sclerostin with enhanced affinity. Determining the crystal structure of AbD09097 provides first insights into how this antibody might recognize and neutralize sclerostin. Together with the structure-function relationship derived from affinity maturation these new data will foster the rational design of new and highly efficient anti-sclerostin antibodies for the therapy of bone loss diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27558933

  6. The sclerostin-neutralizing antibody AbD09097 recognizes an epitope adjacent to sclerostin's binding site for the Wnt co-receptor LRP6

    PubMed Central

    Boschert, V.; Frisch, C.; Back, J. W.; van Pee, K.; Weidauer, S. E.; Muth, E.-M.; Schmieder, P.; Beerbaum, M.; Knappik, A.; Timmerman, P.

    2016-01-01

    The glycoprotein sclerostin has been identified as a negative regulator of bone growth. It exerts its function by interacting with the Wnt co-receptor LRP5/6, blocks the binding of Wnt factors and thereby inhibits Wnt signalling. Neutralizing anti-sclerostin antibodies are able to restore Wnt activity and enhance bone growth thereby presenting a new osteoanabolic therapy approach for diseases such as osteoporosis. We have generated various Fab antibodies against human and murine sclerostin using a phage display set-up. Biochemical analyses have identified one Fab developed against murine sclerostin, AbD09097 that efficiently neutralizes sclerostin's Wnt inhibitory activity. In vitro interaction analysis using sclerostin variants revealed that this neutralizing Fab binds to sclerostin's flexible second loop, which has been shown to harbour the LRP5/6 binding motif. Affinity maturation was then applied to AbD09097, providing a set of improved neutralizing Fab antibodies which particularly bind human sclerostin with enhanced affinity. Determining the crystal structure of AbD09097 provides first insights into how this antibody might recognize and neutralize sclerostin. Together with the structure–function relationship derived from affinity maturation these new data will foster the rational design of new and highly efficient anti-sclerostin antibodies for the therapy of bone loss diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27558933

  7. Asymptomatic HLA-A*02:01–Restricted Epitopes from Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein B Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional CD8+ T Cells from Seropositive Asymptomatic Individuals and Protect HLA Transgenic Mice against Ocular Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Dervillez, Xavier; Qureshi, Huma; Chentoufi, Aziz A.; Khan, Arif A.; Kritzer, Elizabeth; Yu, David C.; Diaz, Oscar R.; Gottimukkala, Chetan; Kalantari, Mina; Villacres, Maria C.; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; McKinney, Denise M.; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from C57BL/6 mice suggests that CD8+ T cells, specific to the immunodominant HSV-1 glycoprotein B (gB) H-2b–restricted epitope (gB498–505), protect against ocular herpes infection and disease. However, the possible role of CD8+ T cells, specific to HLA-restricted gB epitopes, in protective immunity seen in HSV-1–seropositive asymptomatic (ASYMP) healthy individuals (who have never had clinical herpes) remains to be determined. In this study, we used multiple prediction algorithms to identify 10 potential HLA-A*02:01–restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes from the HSV-1 gB amino acid sequence. Six of these epitopes exhibited high-affinity binding to HLA-A*02:01 molecules. In 10 sequentially studied HLA-A*02:01–positive, HSV-1–seropositive ASYMP individuals, the most frequent, robust, and polyfunctional CD8+ T cell responses, as assessed by a combination of tetramer, IFN-γ-ELISPOT, CFSE proliferation, CD107a/b cytotoxic degranulation, and multiplex cytokine assays, were directed mainly against epitopes gB342–350 and gB561–569. In contrast, in 10 HLA-A*02:01–positive, HSV-1–seropositive symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent clinical herpes disease) frequent, but less robust, CD8+ T cell responses were directed mainly against nonoverlapping epitopes (gB183–191 and gB441–449). ASYMP individuals had a significantly higher proportion of HSV-gB–specific CD8+ T cells expressing CD107a/b degranulation marker and producing effector cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α than did SYMP individuals. Moreover, immunization of a novel herpes-susceptible HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mouse model with ASYMP epitopes, but not with SYMP epitopes, induced strong CD8+ T cell–dependent protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. These findings should guide the development of a safe and effective T cell–based herpes vaccine. PMID:24101547

  8. T Cell Epitopes and Post-Translationally Modified Epitopes in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    McGinty, John W.; Marré, Meghan L.; Bajzik, Veronique; Piganelli, Jon D.; James, Eddie A.

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which progressive loss of self-tolerance, evidenced by accumulation of auto-antibodies and auto-reactive T cells that recognize diverse self-proteins, leads to immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic beta cells and loss of insulin secretion. In this review, we discuss antigens and epitopes in T1D and the role that post-translational modifications play in circumventing tolerance mechanisms and increasing antigenic diversity. Emerging data suggest that, analogous to other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and celiac disease, enzymatically modified epitopes are preferentially recognized in T1D. Modifying enzymes such as peptidyl deiminases and tissue transglutaminase are activated in response to beta cell stress, providing a mechanistic link between post-translational modification and interactions with the environment. Although studies of such responses in the at-risk population have been limited, current data suggests that breakdown in tolerance through post-translational modification represents an important checkpoint in the development of T1D. PMID:26370701

  9. Brain alpha-dystroglycan displays unique glycoepitopes and preferential binding to laminin-10/11.

    PubMed

    McDearmon, Erin L; Combs, Ariana C; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Ervasti, James M

    2006-06-12

    alpha-Dystroglycan was quantitatively enriched from mammalian brain based on its uniform reactivity with Vicia villosa agglutinin and resolved into sub-populations possessing or lacking the sulfated glucuronic acid epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody HNK-1. We generated a new monoclonal antibody specific for a glycoepitope on brain alpha-dystroglycan but absent from alpha-dystroglycan expressed in all other tissues examined. Finally, we found that laminin-10/11 preferentially bound to brain alpha-dystroglycan compared to skeletal muscle alpha-dystroglycan. Our results suggest that tissue-specific glycosylation modifies the laminin binding specificity of alpha-dystroglycan. PMID:16709410

  10. Epitope mapping by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, M; Livoti, E; Simonelli, L; Pedotti, M; Moraes, A; Valente, A P; Varani, L

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies play an ever more prominent role in basic research as well as in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors. Characterizing their epitopes, that is, the region that they recognize on their target molecule, is useful for purposes ranging from molecular biology research to vaccine design and intellectual property protection. Solution NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited to the atomic level characterization of intermolecular interfaces and, as a consequence, to epitope discovery. Here, we illustrate how NMR epitope mapping can be used to rapidly and accurately determine protein antigen epitopes. The basic concept is that differences in the NMR signal of an antigen free or bound by an antibody will identify epitope residues. NMR epitope mapping provides more detailed information than mutagenesis or peptide mapping and can be much more rapid than X-ray crystallography. Advantages and drawbacks of this technique are discussed together with practical considerations. PMID:25726811

  11. Immune recognition of citrullinated epitopes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai; James, Eddie A

    2016-10-01

    Conversion of arginine into citrulline is a post-translational modification that is observed in normal physiological processes. However, abnormal citrullination can provoke autoimmunity by generating altered self-epitopes that are specifically targeted by autoantibodies and T cells. In this review we discuss the recognition of citrullinated antigens in human autoimmune diseases and the role that this modification plays in increasing antigenic diversity and circumventing tolerance mechanisms. Early published work demonstrated that citrullinated proteins are specifically targeted by autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis and that citrullinated peptides are more readily presented to T cells by arthritis-susceptible HLA class II 'shared epitope' proteins. Emerging data support the relevance of citrullinated epitopes in other autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis, whose susceptible HLA haplotypes also preferentially present citrullinated peptides. In these settings, autoimmune patients have been shown to have elevated responses to citrullinated epitopes derived from tissue-specific antigens. Contrasting evidence implicates autophagy or perforin and complement-mediated membrane attack as inducers of ectopic citrullination. In either case, the peptidyl deiminases responsible for citrullination are activated in response to inflammation or insult, providing a mechanistic link between this post-translational modification and interactions with the environment and infection. As such, it is likely that immune recognition of citrullinated epitopes also plays a role in pathogen clearance. Indeed, our recent data suggest that responses to citrullinated peptides facilitate recognition of novel influenza strains. Therefore, increased understanding of responses to citrullinated epitopes may provide important insights about the initiation of autoimmunity and recognition of heterologous viruses. PMID:27531825

  12. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies recognize their cognate antigens in a precise and effective way. In order to do so, they target regions of the antigenic molecules that have specific features such as large exposed areas, presence of charged or polar atoms, specific secondary structure elements, and lack of similarity to self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin. Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody epitopes from the sequence and/or the three-dimensional structure of a target protein. PMID:26424260

  13. Functional characterization of a monoclonal antibody epitope using a lambda phage display-deep sequencing platform.

    PubMed

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described a method, named PROFILER, for the identification of antigenic regions preferentially targeted by polyclonal antibody responses after vaccination. To test the ability of the technique to provide insights into the functional properties of monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes, we used here a well-characterized epitope of meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp), which is recognized by mAb 12C1. An fHbp library, engineered on a lambda phage vector enabling surface expression of polypeptides of widely different length, was subjected to massive parallel sequencing of the phage inserts after affinity selection with the 12C1 mAb. We detected dozens of unique antibody-selected sequences, the most enriched of which (designated as FrC) could largely recapitulate the ability of fHbp to bind mAb 12C1. Computational analysis of the cumulative enrichment of single amino acids in the antibody-selected fragments identified two overrepresented stretches of residues (H248-K254 and S140-G154), whose presence was subsequently found to be required for binding of FrC to mAb 12C1. Collectively, these results suggest that the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify, in the context of complex conformational epitopes, discrete "hot spots" with a crucial role in antigen-antibody interactions, thereby providing useful clues for the functional characterization of the epitope. PMID:27530334

  14. Functional characterization of a monoclonal antibody epitope using a lambda phage display-deep sequencing platform

    PubMed Central

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described a method, named PROFILER, for the identification of antigenic regions preferentially targeted by polyclonal antibody responses after vaccination. To test the ability of the technique to provide insights into the functional properties of monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes, we used here a well-characterized epitope of meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp), which is recognized by mAb 12C1. An fHbp library, engineered on a lambda phage vector enabling surface expression of polypeptides of widely different length, was subjected to massive parallel sequencing of the phage inserts after affinity selection with the 12C1 mAb. We detected dozens of unique antibody-selected sequences, the most enriched of which (designated as FrC) could largely recapitulate the ability of fHbp to bind mAb 12C1. Computational analysis of the cumulative enrichment of single amino acids in the antibody-selected fragments identified two overrepresented stretches of residues (H248-K254 and S140-G154), whose presence was subsequently found to be required for binding of FrC to mAb 12C1. Collectively, these results suggest that the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify, in the context of complex conformational epitopes, discrete “hot spots” with a crucial role in antigen-antibody interactions, thereby providing useful clues for the functional characterization of the epitope. PMID:27530334

  15. The Immune Epitope Database 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Vita, Randi; Zarebski, Laura; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Emami, Hussein; Hoof, Ilka; Salimi, Nima; Damle, Rohini; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB, www.iedb.org) provides a catalog of experimentally characterized B and T cell epitopes, as well as data on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) binding and MHC ligand elution experiments. The database represents the molecular structures recognized by adaptive immune receptors and the experimental contexts in which these molecules were determined to be immune epitopes. Epitopes recognized in humans, nonhuman primates, rodents, pigs, cats and all other tested species are included. Both positive and negative experimental results are captured. Over the course of 4 years, the data from 180 978 experiments were curated manually from the literature, which covers ∼99% of all publicly available information on peptide epitopes mapped in infectious agents (excluding HIV) and 93% of those mapped in allergens. In addition, data that would otherwise be unavailable to the public from 129 186 experiments were submitted directly by investigators. The curation of epitopes related to autoimmunity is expected to be completed by the end of 2010. The database can be queried by epitope structure, source organism, MHC restriction, assay type or host organism, among other criteria. The database structure, as well as its querying, browsing and reporting interfaces, was completely redesigned for the IEDB 2.0 release, which became publicly available in early 2009. PMID:19906713

  16. Measles Virus Hemagglutinin Protein Epitopes: The Basis of Antigenic Stability.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Maino; Bürckert, Jean-Philippe; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; Muller, Claude P; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Globally eliminating measles using available vaccines is biologically feasible because the measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (H) protein is antigenically stable. The H protein is responsible for receptor binding, and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. The immunodominant epitope, known as the hemagglutinating and noose epitope, is located near the receptor-binding site (RBS). The RBS also contains an immunodominant epitope. Loss of receptor binding correlates with an escape from the neutralization by antibodies that target the epitope at RBS. Another neutralizing epitope is located near RBS and is shielded by an N-linked sugar in certain genotype strains. However, human sera from vaccinees and measles patients neutralized all MV strains with similar efficiencies, regardless of the N-linked sugar modification or mutations at these epitopes. Two other major epitopes exist at a distance from RBS. One has an unstructured flexible domain with a linear neutralizing epitope. When MV-H forms a tetramer (dimer of dimers), these epitopes may form the dimer-dimer interface, and one of the two epitopes may also interact with the F protein. The neutralization mechanisms of antibodies that recognize these epitopes may involve inhibiting the H-F interaction or blocking the fusion cascade after MV-H binds to its receptors. PMID:27490564

  17. Measles Virus Hemagglutinin Protein Epitopes: The Basis of Antigenic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Maino; Bürckert, Jean-Philippe; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; Muller, Claude P.; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Globally eliminating measles using available vaccines is biologically feasible because the measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (H) protein is antigenically stable. The H protein is responsible for receptor binding, and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. The immunodominant epitope, known as the hemagglutinating and noose epitope, is located near the receptor-binding site (RBS). The RBS also contains an immunodominant epitope. Loss of receptor binding correlates with an escape from the neutralization by antibodies that target the epitope at RBS. Another neutralizing epitope is located near RBS and is shielded by an N-linked sugar in certain genotype strains. However, human sera from vaccinees and measles patients neutralized all MV strains with similar efficiencies, regardless of the N-linked sugar modification or mutations at these epitopes. Two other major epitopes exist at a distance from RBS. One has an unstructured flexible domain with a linear neutralizing epitope. When MV-H forms a tetramer (dimer of dimers), these epitopes may form the dimer-dimer interface, and one of the two epitopes may also interact with the F protein. The neutralization mechanisms of antibodies that recognize these epitopes may involve inhibiting the H-F interaction or blocking the fusion cascade after MV-H binds to its receptors. PMID:27490564

  18. Recognizing Cataracts

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Recognizing Cataracts Watch for Vision Changes as You Age As ... cause of impaired eyesight later in life is cataracts. A cataract is a clouding of the lens ...

  19. Extensive HLA class I allele promiscuity among viral CTL epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Nicole; Yusim, Karina; Suscovich, Todd J.; Adams, Sharon; Sidney, John; Hraber, Peter; Hewitt, Hannah S.; Linde, Caitlyn H.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Woodberry, Tonia; Henry, Leah M.; Faircloth, Kellie; Listgarten, Jennifer; Kadie, Carl; Jojic, Nebojsa; Sango, Kaori; Brown, Nancy V.; Pae, Eunice; Zaman, M. Tauheed; Bihl, Florian; Khatri, Ashok; John, Mina; Mallal, Simon; Marincola, Francesco M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Sette, Alessandro; Heckerman, David; Korber, Bette T.; Brander, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Summary Promiscuous binding of T helper epitopes to MHC class II molecules has been well established, but few examples of promiscuous class I restricted epitopes exist. To address the extent of promiscuity of HLA class I peptides, responses to 242 well-defined viral epitopes were tested in 100 subjects regardless of the individuals’ HLA type. Surprisingly, half of all detected responses were seen in the absence of the originally reported restricting HLA class I allele, and only 3% of epitopes were recognized exclusively in the presence of their original allele. Functional assays confirmed the frequent recognition of HLA class I-restricted T cell epitopes on several alternative alleles across HLA class I supertypes and encoded on different class I loci. These data have significant implications for the understanding of MHC class I restricted antigen presentation and vaccine development. PMID:17705138

  20. A novel linear neutralizing epitope of hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zi-Min; Tang, Ming; Zhao, Min; Wen, Gui-Ping; Yang, Fan; Cai, Wei; Wang, Si-Ling; Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2015-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a serious public health problem that causes acute hepatitis in humans and is primarily transmitted through fecal and oral routes. The major anti-HEV antibody responses are against conformational epitopes located in a.a. 459-606 of HEV pORF2. All reported neutralization epitopes are present on the dimer domain constructed by this peptide. While looking for a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb)-recognized linear epitope, we found a novel neutralizing linear epitope (L2) located in a.a. 423-437 of pORF2. Moreover, epitope L2 is proved non-immunodominant in the HEV-infection process. Using the hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) as a carrier to display this novel linear epitope, we show herein that this epitope could induce a neutralizing antibody response against HEV in mice and could protect rhesus monkeys from HEV infection. Collectively, our results showed a novel non-immunodominant linear neutralizing epitope of hepatitis E virus, which provided additional insight of HEV vaccine. PMID:26051517

  1. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, M.A.; Hoch, M.M.

    1997-06-10

    Method is described for controlling the supply of air to a PROX (PReferential OXidation for CO cleanup) reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference there between correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference. 2 figs.

  2. HLA-A02:01-restricted epitopes identified from the herpes simplex virus tegument protein VP11/12 preferentially recall polyfunctional effector memory CD8+ T cells from seropositive asymptomatic individuals and protect humanized HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice against ocular herpes.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Spencer, Doran; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Wang, Christine; Pham, Thanh T; Huang, Jiawei; Scarfone, Vanessa M; Nesburn, Anthony B; Wechsler, Steven L; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2015-03-01

    The HSV type 1 tegument virion phosphoprotein (VP) 11/12 (VP11/12) is a major Ag targeted by CD8(+) T cells from HSV-seropositive individuals. However, whether and which VP11/12 epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells play a role in the "natural" protection seen in seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we used multiple prediction computer-assisted algorithms to identify 10 potential HLA-A*02:01-restricted CD8(+) T cell epitopes from the 718-aa sequence of VP11/12. Three of 10 epitopes exhibited high-to-moderate binding affinity to HLA-A*02:01 molecules. In 10 sequentially studied HLA-A*02:01-positive and HSV-1-seropositive ASYMP individuals, the most frequent, robust, and polyfunctional effector CD8(+) T cell responses, as assessed by a combination of tetramer frequency, granzyme B, granzyme K, perforin, CD107(a/b) cytotoxic degranulation, IFN-γ, and multiplex cytokines assays, were predominantly directed against three epitopes: VP11/1266-74, VP11/12220-228, and VP11/12702-710. Interestingly, ASYMP individuals had a significantly higher proportion of CD45RA(low)CCR7(low)CD44(high)CD62L(low)CD27(low)CD28(low)CD8(+) effector memory CD8(+) T cells (TEMs) specific to the three epitopes, compared with symptomatic individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpetic disease). Moreover, immunization of HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice with the three ASYMP CD8(+) TEM cell epitopes induced robust and polyfunctional epitope-specific CD8(+) TEM cells that were associated with a strong protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings outline phenotypic and functional features of protective HSV-specific CD8(+) T cells that should guide the development of an effective T cell-based herpes vaccine. PMID:25617474

  3. HLA-A02:01-Restricted Epitopes Identified from the Herpes Simplex Virus Tegument Protein VP11/12 Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional Effector Memory CD8+ T Cells from Seropositive Asymptomatic Individuals and Protect “Humanized” HLA-A*02:01 Transgenic Mice Against Ocular Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Spencer, Doran; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P.; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Wang, Christine; Pham, Thanh T.; Huang, Jiawei; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 virion tegument phosphoprotein 11/12 (HSV-1 VP11/12) is a major antigen targeted by CD8+ T cells from HSV-seropositive individuals. However, whether and which VP11/12-epitope-specific CD8+ T cells play a role in the “natural” protection seen in seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we used multiple prediction computer-assisted algorithms to identify 10 potential HLA-A*02:01-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes from the 716 amino acids sequence of VP11/12. Three out of ten epitopes exhibited high to moderate binding affinity to HLA-A*02:01 molecules. In ten sequentially studied HLA-A*02:01 positive and HSV-1-seropositive ASYMP individuals, the most frequent, robust and polyfunctional effector CD8+ T-cell responses, as assessed by a combination of tetramer frequency, granzyme B, granzyme K, perforin, CD107a/b cytotoxic degranulation, IFN-γ and multiplex cytokines assays, were predominantly directed against three epitopes: VP11/1266–74, VP11/12220–228 and VP11/12702–710. Interestingly, ASYMP individuals had significantly higher proportion of CD45RAlowCCR7lowCD44highCD62LlowCD27lowCD28lowCD8+ effector memory T cells (TEM) specific to the three epitopes, compared to symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpetic disease). Moreover, immunization of HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice with the three ASYMP CD8+ TEM cell epitopes induced robust and polyfunctional epitope-specific CD8+ TEM cells that were associated with a strong protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings outline phenotypic and functional features of protective HSV-specific CD8+ T cells that should guide the development of an effective T-cell-based herpes vaccine. PMID:25617474

  4. Induction of Antibodies in Rhesus Macaques That Recognize a Fusion-Intermediate Conformation of HIV-1 gp41

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, S. Moses; Sutherland, Laura L.; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Anasti, Kara M.; Parks, Robert; Stewart, Shelley; Bowman, Cindy; Xia, Shi-Mao; Zhang, Ruijun; Shen, Xiaoying; Scearce, Richard M.; Ofek, Gilad; Yang, Yongping; Kwong, Peter D.; Santra, Sampa; Liao, Hua-Xin; Tomaras, Georgia; Letvin, Norman L.; Chen, Bing; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.

    2011-01-01

    A component to the problem of inducing broad neutralizing HIV-1 gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER) antibodies is the need to focus the antibody response to the transiently exposed MPER pre-hairpin intermediate neutralization epitope. Here we describe a HIV-1 envelope (Env) gp140 oligomer prime followed by MPER peptide-liposomes boost strategy for eliciting serum antibody responses in rhesus macaques that bind to a gp41 fusion intermediate protein. This Env-liposome immunization strategy induced antibodies to the 2F5 neutralizing epitope 664DKW residues, and these antibodies preferentially bound to a gp41 fusion intermediate construct as well as to MPER scaffolds stabilized in the 2F5-bound conformation. However, no serum lipid binding activity was observed nor was serum neutralizing activity for HIV-1 pseudoviruses present. Nonetheless, the Env-liposome prime-boost immunization strategy induced antibodies that recognized a gp41 fusion intermediate protein and was successful in focusing the antibody response to the desired epitope. PMID:22140469

  5. Variable expression of epitopes on the surface of Mycoplasma gallisepticum demonstrated with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bencina, D; Kleven, S H; Elfaki, M G; Snoj, A; Dovc, P; Dorrer, D; Russ, I

    1994-03-01

    Twelve monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against Mycoplasma gallisepticum (Mg) strains F, R, S6(208) and PET2 were used for analysis of epitopes of 22 Mg strains. Six Mabs recognized surface epitopes in the majority of strains, but did not react with variant strains like K 503 and K 703. Two Mabs reacted with epitopes on about 56 kilodalton (kDa) proteins and showing consistent expression on Mg colonies. Three Mabs recognized three different variable surface epitopes associated with about 67 kDa proteins and one Mab variable epitope on about 33 and 80 kDa proteins. Two-dimensional immunoblotting showed considerable differences in the charge of proteins bearing variable surface epitopes in different Mg strains. Subcloning of four low passage Mg strains using Mabs for screening populations that derived from a single colony with defined surface epitopes showed that some colonies may switch surface epitopes associated with 67 and 80 kDa proteins. This switching was reversible and generated subpopulations of Mg expressing different combinations of surface epitopes. Phenotypic switching of epitopes probably occurs also in vivo and may be the mechanism enabling Mg to evade the host immune response. PMID:18671069

  6. Dissecting antibodies with regards to linear and conformational epitopes.

    PubMed

    Forsström, Björn; Axnäs, Barbara Bisławska; Rockberg, Johan; Danielsson, Hanna; Bohlin, Anna; Uhlen, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    An important issue for the performance and specificity of an antibody is the nature of the binding to its protein target, including if the recognition involves linear or conformational epitopes. Here, we dissect polyclonal sera by creating epitope-specific antibody fractions using a combination of epitope mapping and an affinity capture approach involving both synthesized peptides and recombinant protein fragments. This allowed us to study the relative amounts of antibodies to linear and conformational epitopes in the polyclonal sera as well as the ability of each antibody-fraction to detect its target protein in Western blot assays. The majority of the analyzed polyclonal sera were found to have most of the target-specific antibodies directed towards linear epitopes and these were in many cases giving Western blot bands of correct molecular weight. In contrast, many of the antibodies towards conformational epitopes did not bind their target proteins in the Western blot assays. The results from this work have given us insights regarding the nature of the antibody response generated by immunization with recombinant protein fragments and has demonstrated the advantage of using antibodies recognizing linear epitopes for immunoassay involving wholly or partially denatured protein targets. PMID:25816293

  7. Elicitation of structure-specific antibodies by epitope scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Ofek, Gilad; Guenaga, F. Javier; Schief, William R.; Skinner, Jeff; Baker, David; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Elicitation of antibodies against targets that are immunorecessive, cryptic, or transient in their native context has been a challenge for vaccine design. Here we demonstrate the elicitation of structure-specific antibodies against the HIV-1 gp41 epitope of the broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5. This conformationally flexible region of gp41 assumes mostly helical conformations but adopts a kinked, extended structure when bound by antibody 2F5. Computational techniques were employed to transplant the 2F5 epitope into select acceptor scaffolds. The resultant “2F5-epitope scaffolds” possessed nanomolar affinity for antibody 2F5 and a range of epitope flexibilities and antigenic specificities. Crystallographic characterization of the epitope scaffold with highest affinity and antigenic discrimination confirmed good to near perfect attainment of the target conformation for the gp41 molecular graft in free and 2F5-bound states, respectively. Animals immunized with 2F5-epitope scaffolds showed levels of graft-specific immune responses that correlated with graft flexibility (p < 0.04), while antibody responses against the graft—as dissected residue-by-residue with alanine substitutions—resembled more closely those of 2F5 than sera elicited with flexible or cyclized peptides, a resemblance heightened by heterologous prime-boost. Lastly, crystal structures of a gp41 peptide in complex with monoclonal antibodies elicited by the 2F5-epitope scaffolds revealed that the elicited antibodies induce gp41 to assume its 2F5-recognized shape. Epitope scaffolds thus provide a means to elicit antibodies that recognize a predetermined target shape and sequence, even if that shape is transient in nature, and a means by which to dissect factors influencing such elicitation. PMID:20876137

  8. Vaccine Focusing to Cross-Subtype HIV-1 gp120 Variable Loop Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Timothy; Wang, Shixia; Jiang, Xunqing; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Hioe, Catarina; Krachmarov, Chavdar

    2014-01-01

    We designed synthetic, epitope-focused immunogens that preferentially display individual neutralization epitopes targeted by cross-subtype anti-HIV V3 loop neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Vaccination of rabbits with these immunogens resulted in the elicitation of distinct polyclonal serum Abs that exhibit cross-subtype neutralization specificities mimicking the mAbs that guided the design. Our results prove the principle that a predictable range of epitope-specific polyclonal cross-subtype HIV-1 neutralizing Abs can be intentionally elicited in mammals by vaccination. The precise boundaries of the epitopes and conformational flexibility in the presentation of the epitopes in the immunogen appeared to be important for successful elicitation. This work may serve as a starting point for translating the activities of human broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) into matched immunogens that can contribute to an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:25045827

  9. Characterization of a cashew allergen, 11S globulin (Ana o 2), conformational epitope.

    PubMed

    Robotham, Jason M; Xia, Lixin; Willison, LeAnna N; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H

    2010-05-01

    Both linear and conformational epitopes likely contribute to the allergenicity of tree nut allergens, yet, due largely to technical issues, few conformational epitopes have been characterized. Using the well studied recombinant cashew allergen, Ana o 2, an 11S globulin or legumin, we identified a murine monoclonal antibody which recognizes a conformational epitope and competes with patient IgE Ana o 2-reactive antibodies. This epitope is expressed on the large subunit of Ana o 2, but only when associated with an 11S globulin small subunit. Both Ana o 2 and the homologous soybean Gly m 6 small subunits can foster epitope expression, even when the natural N-terminal to C-terminal subunit order is reversed in chimeric molecules. The epitope, which is also expressed on native Ana o 2, is readily susceptible to destruction by physical and chemical denaturants. PMID:20362336

  10. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark A.; Hoch, Martin M.

    1997-01-01

    Method for controlling the supply of air to a PROX reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference therebetween correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference.

  11. Immunochemical characterization of two thyroid-stimulating hormone beta-subunit epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Fairlie, W D; Stanton, P G; Hearn, M T

    1995-01-01

    The epitopes of human thyroid-stimulating hormone (hTSH) recognized by two murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), designated MAb 279 and MAb 299, have been characterized. These MAbs are highly specific for the beta-subunit of TSH. The epitope recognized by MAb 279 appears to be completely conserved between bovine and human TSH and partially conserved in the porcine species. The TSH beta-subunit epitope recognized by MAb 299 is only partially conserved between the human, bovine and porcine species. Both MAbs are capable of inhibiting the binding of TSH to its receptor in a TSH radioreceptor assay, indicating that the epitopes either coincide or are located close to the TSH beta-subunit receptor-binding sites. The carbohydrate moieties of the TSH beta-subunit appear to play little or no role in the epitope recognition by MAb 279 or MAb 299 while the integrity of the disulphide bonds are essential. The epitopic recognition may also involve lysine residues, as determined by the immunoreactivity with both MAbs following citraconylation of TSH. In addition, the amino acid sequence region between residues bTSH beta 34-44 could be excised by trypsin digestion of bovine TSH beta (bTSH beta) without eliminating epitopic recognition by either MAb. These results provide further insight into the relationship between the structure of the TSH beta-subunit epitopes and location of the receptor-binding sites. Images Figure 2 PMID:7538754

  12. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J.; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  13. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  14. Confirmation of a new conserved linear epitope of Lyssavirus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Xinjun, Lv; Xuejun, Ma; Lihua, Wang; Hao, Li; Xinxin, Shen; Pengcheng, Yu; Qing, Tang; Guodong, Liang

    2012-05-01

    Bioinformatics analysis was used to predict potential epitopes of Lyssavirus nucleoprotein and highlighted some distinct differences in the quantity and localization of the epitopes disclosed by epitope analysis of monoclonal antibodies against Lyssavirus nucleoprotein. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the domain containing residues 152-164 of Lyssavirus nucleoprotein was a conserved linear epitope that had not been reported previously. Immunization of two rabbits with the corresponding synthetic peptide conjugated to the Keyhole Limpe hemocyanin (KLH) macromolecule resulted in a titer of anti-peptide antibody above 1:200,000 in rabbit sera as detected by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Western blot analysis demonstrated that the anti-peptide antibody recognized denatured Lyssavirus nucleoprotein in sodium dodecylsulfonate-polyacrylate gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Affinity chromatography purification and FITC-labeling of the anti-peptide antibody in rabbit sera was performed. FITC-labeled anti-peptide antibody could recognize Lyssavirus nucleoprotein in BSR cells and canine brain tissues even at a 1:200 dilution. Residues 152-164 of Lyssavirus nucleoprotein were verified as a conserved linear epitope in Lyssavirus. PMID:22405880

  15. Focusing the immune response on the V3 loop, a neutralizing epitope of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Zolla-Pazner, Susan Cohen, Sandra Sharpe; Krachmarov, Chavdar; Wang, Shixia; Pinter, Abraham; Lu, Shan

    2008-03-15

    Rabbits were immunized with a novel regimen designed to focus the immune response on a single neutralizing epitope of HIV-1 gp120 and thereby preferentially induce neutralizing antibodies (Abs). Animals were primed with gp120 DNA from a clade A Env bearing the GPGR V3 motif and/or a clade C Env bearing the GPGQ V3 motif, and boosted with one or more fusion proteins containing V3 sequences from clades A, B and/or C. Immune sera neutralized three of four Tier 1 primary isolates, including strains heterologous to the immunizing strains, and potent cross-clade-neutralizing activity was demonstrated against V3 chimeric pseudoviruses carrying in a Tier 1 Env, the consensus V3 sequences from clades A1, AG, B, AE, or F. The broadest and most potent neutralizing responses were elicited with the clade C gp120 DNA and a combination of V3-fusion proteins from clades A, B and C. Neutralizing activity was primarily due to V3-specific Abs. The results demonstrate that the immune response can be focused on a neutralizing epitope and show that the anti-V3 Abs induced recognize a diverse set of V3 loops.

  16. Determination of B-Cell Epitopes in Patients with Celiac Disease: Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Choung, Rok Seon; Marietta, Eric V.; Van Dyke, Carol T.; Brantner, Tricia L.; Rajasekaran, John; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Wang, Tianhao; Bei, Kang; Krishna, Karthik; Krishnamurthy, Hari K.; Snyder, Melissa R.; Jayaraman, Vasanth; Murray, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most antibodies recognize conformational or discontinuous epitopes that have a specific 3-dimensional shape; however, determination of discontinuous B-cell epitopes is a major challenge in bioscience. Moreover, the current methods for identifying peptide epitopes often involve laborious, high-cost peptide screening programs. Here, we present a novel microarray method for identifying discontinuous B-cell epitopes in celiac disease (CD) by using a silicon-based peptide array and computational methods. Methods Using a novel silicon-based microarray platform with a multi-pillar chip, overlapping 12-mer peptide sequences of all native and deamidated gliadins, which are known to trigger CD, were synthesized in situ and used to identify peptide epitopes. Results Using a computational algorithm that considered disease specificity of peptide sequences, 2 distinct epitope sets were identified. Further, by combining the most discriminative 3-mer gliadin sequences with randomly interpolated3- or 6-mer peptide sequences, novel discontinuous epitopes were identified and further optimized to maximize disease discrimination. The final discontinuous epitope sets were tested in a confirmatory cohort of CD patients and controls, yielding 99% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Conclusions These novel sets of epitopes derived from gliadin have a high degree of accuracy in differentiating CD from controls, compared with standard serologic tests. The method of ultra-high-density peptide microarray described here would be broadly useful to develop high-fidelity diagnostic tests and explore pathogenesis. PMID:26824466

  17. Characterization of epitopes involved in the neutralization of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 leukotoxin.

    PubMed

    Lainson, F A; Murray, J; Davies, R C; Donachie, W

    1996-09-01

    Defined segments of the leukotoxin A gene (lktA) from an A1 serotype of Pasteurella haemolytica were cloned into a plasmid vector and expressed as LacZ alpha fusion proteins. These fusion proteins were electrophoresed in SDS-PAGE gels and their immunoblotting reactivities with several monoclonal antibodies characterized. The epitope recognized by a strongly neutralizing monoclonal antibody was localized to a 32 amino acid region near the C terminus of the leukotoxin A (LktA) molecule. The epitope recognized by a non-neutralizing antibody was localized to a 33 amino acid region immediately adjacent. Smaller recombinant peptides containing these epitopes were not antigenic, but a polypeptide encompassing 229 amino acids at the C terminus evoked neutralizing antibodies when used to immunize specific-pathogen-free lambs. The distributions of linear epitopes recognized by this antiserum and by antisera raised to full-length recombinant LktA and to native LktA produced by P. haemolytica serotype A1 were determined by their reactivities with a set of overlapping 10 amino acid synthetic peptides. This revealed a complex distribution of linear epitopes at the C-terminal end of LktA. Toxin-neutralizing antibodies in convalescent sheep serum were shown to be directed against conformational epitopes by selective absorption of antibodies directed against linear epitopes. PMID:8828217

  18. A sequence pattern common to T cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Rothbard, J B; Taylor, W R

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the known cytotoxic and helper T cell epitopes has revealed similarity within their primary sequences. These similar motifs, characteristic of the known determinants, have been incorporated into predictive templates that have been used successfully to define eight helper and three cytotoxic epitopes in four different proteins. When the defined epitopes are segregated by restriction element, allele specific subpatterns emerge centering around the general pattern. The presence of similarities argues that the binding of peptide antigens to class I and class II is similar in nature. In addition, these motifs can be used to predict accurately areas within proteins capable of being recognized by individual MHC class I and class II molecules. PMID:2452085

  19. Hepatitis C virus mutation affects proteasomal epitope processing

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Ulrike; Liermann, Heike; Racanelli, Vito; Halenius, Anne; Wiese, Manfred; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Ruppert, Thomas; Rispeter, Kay; Henklein, Peter; Sijts, Alice; Hengel, Hartmut; Kloetzel, Peter-M.; Rehermann, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The high incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) persistence raises the question of how HCV interferes with host immune responses. Studying a single-source HCV outbreak, we identified an HCV mutation that impaired correct carboxyterminal cleavage of an immunodominant HLA-A2–restricted CD8 cell epitope that is frequently recognized by recovered patients. The mutation, a conservative HCV nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) tyrosine to phenylalanine substitution, was absent in 54 clones of the infectious source, but present in 15/21 (71%) HLA-A2–positive and in 11/24 (46%) HLA-A2–negative patients with chronic hepatitis C. In order to analyze whether the mutation affected the processing of the HLA-A2–restricted CD8 cell epitope, mutant and wild-type NS3 polypeptides were digested in vitro with 20S constitutive proteasomes and with immunoproteasomes. The presence of the mutation resulted in impaired carboxyterminal cleavage of the epitope. In order to analyze whether impaired epitope processing affected T cell priming in vivo, HLA-A2–transgenic mice were infected with vaccinia viruses encoding either wild-type or mutant HCV NS3. The mutant induced fewer epitope-specific, IFN-γ;–producing and fewer tetramer+ cells than the wild type. These data demonstrate how a conservative mutation in the flanking region of an HCV epitope impairs the induction of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells and reveal a mechanism that may contribute to viral sequence evolution in infected patients. PMID:15254592

  20. Preferentially Expressed Antigen in Melanoma (PRAME) and the PRAME Family of Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Nora; Kewitz, Stefanie; Staege, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) is the best characterized member of the PRAME family of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins. Mammalian genomes contain multiple members of the PRAME family whereas in other vertebrate genomes only one PRAME-like LRR protein was identified. PRAME is a cancer/testis antigen that is expressed at very low levels in normal adult tissues except testis but at high levels in a variety of cancer cells. In contrast to most other cancer/testis antigens, PRAME is expressed not only in solid tumors but also in leukemia cells. Expression of PRAME and other members of the PRAME family is regulated epigenetically. PRAME interacts with varying pathways that might be directly involved in the malignant phenotype of cancer cells. For instance, PRAME is able to dominantly repress retinoic acid signaling in these cells. On the other hand, PRAME-derived peptides can be recognized as epitopes by cytotoxic T cells and PRAME represents an attractive target for immunological treatment strategies. PMID:26694250

  1. Conservation of G-Protein Epitopes in Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Group A) Despite Broad Genetic Diversity: Is Antibody Selection Involved in Virus Evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Trento, Alfonsina; Ábrego, Leyda; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Rosa; González-Sánchez, Maria Isabel; González-Martínez, Felipe; Delfraro, Adriana; Pascale, Juan M.; Arbiza, Juan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Worldwide G-glycoprotein phylogeny of human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) group A sequences revealed diversification in major clades and genotypes over more than 50 years of recorded history. Multiple genotypes cocirculated during prolonged periods of time, but recent dominance of the GA2 genotype was noticed in several studies, and it is highlighted here with sequences from viruses circulating recently in Spain and Panama. Reactivity of group A viruses with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize strain-variable epitopes of the G glycoprotein failed to correlate genotype diversification with antibody reactivity. Additionally, no clear correlation was found between changes in strain-variable epitopes and predicted sites of positive selection, despite both traits being associated with the C-terminal third of the G glycoprotein. Hence, our data do not lend support to the proposed antibody-driven selection of variants as a major determinant of hRSV evolution. Other alternative mechanisms are considered to account for the high degree of hRSV G-protein variability. IMPORTANCE An unusual characteristic of the G glycoprotein of human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the accumulation of nonsynonymous (N) changes at higher rates than synonymous (S) changes, reaching dN/dS values at certain sites predictive of positive selection. Since these sites cluster preferentially in the C-terminal third of the G protein, like certain epitopes recognized by murine antibodies, it was proposed that immune (antibody) selection might be driving the apparent positive selection, analogous to the antigenic drift observed in the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA). However, careful antigenic and genetic comparison of the G glycoprotein does not provide evidence of antigenic drift in the G molecule, in agreement with recently published data which did not indicate antigenic drift in the G protein with human sera. Alternative explanations to the immune-driven selection

  2. Analysis of murine B-cell epitopes on bluetongue virus 12 nonstructural protein 1.

    PubMed

    HaiXiu, Wang; EnCheng, Sun; QingYuan, Xu; Tao, Yang; Qin, Zhang; YuFei, Feng; JunPing, Li; Shuang, Lv; Liang, Sun; Jing, Sun; DongLai, Wu

    2015-02-01

    The bluetongue virus (BTV) NS1 protein is one of the major proteins synthesized during BTV infection and is responsible for the generation of virus-specific tubules. Although some functional and structural studies on the BTV NS1 protein have been reported, there have been no reports describing the linear B-cell epitopes recognized by humoral immune responses published to date. In this study, 25 BTV12 NS1-reactive monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and polyclonal antisera (polyclonal antibodies, PAbs) were generated and analyzed. We identified 14 linear NS1 epitopes recognized by the PAbs and MAbs using NS1-derived peptides in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, we predicted 23 linear B-cell epitopes using the ABCpred online server which employs an artificial neural network. Analysis of the predicted and identified epitopes of NS1 demonstrated the feasibility of B-cell epitope prediction. Sequence alignments indicated that the epitopes recognized by MAbs are highly conserved among BTV serotypes, but not among the other members of the genus Orbivirus, such as the African horse sickness virus (AHSV), epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), and Chuzan disease virus (CV). Importantly, we identified specific MAbs that recognized all BTV serotypes tested as well as MAbs that recognized only BTV12, suggesting that these NS1-specific MAbs could serve as a basis for BTV diagnostic approaches. The generation and identification of NS1 protein epitopes will provide the foundation for further studies about the function and structure of NS1 and novel epitope-based vaccines. PMID:25343975

  3. Effects of vector fusion peptides on the conformation and immune reactivity of epitope-shuffled, recombinant multi-epitope antigens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Lin, Yahui; Cai, Pengfei; Wang, Heng

    2011-01-01

    The use of multi-epitopes has been considered as a promising strategy to overcome the obstacle of antigenic variation in malarial vaccine development. Previously, we constructed a multi-epitope artificial antigen, Malaria Random Constructed Antigen-1(M.RCAg-1), to optimize expression of the antigen, and we subcloned the gene into three prokaryotic expression vectors that contain different fusion tags at the N-terminus. Three recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors, named M.RCAg-1/Exp.V-1, V-2, and V-3, were purified after the cleavage of the fusion tag. All three recombinant proteins were able to induce similar levels of antigenicity in BALB/c murine models. However, the antibody responses against the individual epitope peptides of the recombinant products were dramatically different. Additionally, the different epitopes elicited various CD4(+) T-cell responses, as shown by the resulting lymphocyte proliferation and varied IFN-γ and IL-4 levels determined by EILSPOT; however, each could be distinctly recognized by sera derived from malaria patients. Additionally, the rabbit antibody induced by these proteins showed diverse efficacy in malaria parasite growth inhibition assays in vitro. Furthermore, analysis via circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the secondary structure was different among these recombinant proteins. These results suggest that the expressed multi-epitope artificial antigens originating from the different vector fusion peptides indeed affect the protein folding and, subsequently, the epitope exposure. Thus, these proteins are able to induce both distinct humoral and cellular immune responses in animal models, and they affect the efficacy of immune inhibition against the parasite. This work should lead to a further understanding of the impact of vector fusion peptides on the conformation and immune reactivity of recombinant proteins and could provide a useful reference for the development of artificial multi-epitope vaccines. PMID

  4. Allergen structures and epitopes.

    PubMed

    Meno, K H

    2011-07-01

    Human type 1 hypersensitivity diseases such as allergic rhinoconjunctivitis are characterized by allergen-specific IgE antibodies produced in allergic individuals after allergen exposure. IgE antibodies bound to receptors on the surface of effector cells trigger an allergic response by interacting with three-dimensional (conformational) epitopes on the allergen surface. Crystal structures are available for complexes of antibody specifically bound to five allergens, from birch pollen, bee venom, cockroach, cow's milk and timothy grass pollen. The details of the antibody-allergen interaction extending all the way to atomic resolution are available from such complexes. In vitro investigations using recombinant monoclonal antibodies and human basophils show that binding affinity is a key to triggering the allergic response. Continued molecular characterization of antibody-allergen interactions is paving the way for the use of recombinant allergens in allergen-specific diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:21668845

  5. Epitope Mapping of Avian Influenza M2e Protein: Different Species Recognise Various Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Noor Haliza; Ignjatovic, Jagoda; Tarigan, Simson; Peaston, Anne; Hemmatzadeh, Farhid

    2016-01-01

    A common approach for developing diagnostic tests for influenza virus detection is the use of mouse or rabbit monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies against a target antigen of the virus. However, comparative mapping of the target antigen using antibodies from different animal sources has not been evaluated before. This is important because identification of antigenic determinants of the target antigen in different species plays a central role to ensure the efficiency of a diagnostic test, such as competitive ELISA or immunohistochemistry-based tests. Interest in the matrix 2 ectodomain (M2e) protein of avian influenza virus (AIV) as a candidate for a universal vaccine and also as a marker for detection of virus infection in vaccinated animals (DIVA) is the rationale for the selection of this protein for comparative mapping evaluation. This study aimed to map the epitopes of the M2e protein of avian influenza virus H5N1 using chicken, mouse and rabbit monoclonal or monospecific antibodies. Our findings revealed that rabbit antibodies (rAbs) recognized epitope 6EVETPTRN13 of the M2e, located at the N-terminal of the protein, while mouse (mAb) and chicken antibodies (cAbs) recognized epitope 10PTRNEWECK18, located at the centre region of the protein. The findings highlighted the difference between the M2e antigenic determinants recognized by different species that emphasized the importance of comparative mapping of antibody reactivity from different animals to the same antigen, especially in the case of multi-host infectious agents such as influenza. The findings are of importance for antigenic mapping, as well as diagnostic test and vaccine development. PMID:27362795

  6. Structural basis for epitope sharing between group 1 allergens of cedar pollen.

    PubMed

    Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Schein, Catherine H; Mathura, Venkatarajan; Braun, Werner; Czerwinski, Edmund W; Togawa, Akihisa; Kondo, Yasuto; Oka, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Masanao; Goldblum, Randall M

    2006-02-01

    The group 1 allergens are a major cause of cedar pollen hypersensitivity in several geographic areas. Allergens from several taxa have been shown to cross-react. The goal of these studies was to compare the structural features of the shared and unique epitopes of the group 1 allergen from mountain cedar (Jun a 1) and Japanese cedar (Cry j 1). An array of overlapping peptides from the sequence of Jun a 1 and a panel of monoclonal anti-Cry j 1 antibodies were used to identify the IgE epitopes recognized by cedar-sensitive patients from Texas and Japan. IgE from Japanese patients reacted with peptides representing one of the two linear epitopes within the highly conserved beta-helical core structure and both epitopes within less ordered loops and turns near the N- and C-termini of Jun a 1. A three-dimensional (3D) model of the Cry j 1, based on the crystal structure of Jun a 1, indicated a similar surface exposure for the four described epitopes of Jun a 1 and the homologous regions of Cry j 1. The monoclonal antibodies identified another shared epitope, which is most likely conformational and a unique Cry j 1 epitope that may be the previously recognized glycopeptide IgE epitope. Defining the structural basis for shared and unique epitopes will help to identify critical features of IgE epitopes that can be used to develop mimotopes or identify allergen homologues for vaccine development. PMID:15975657

  7. Structural basis for epitope sharing between group 1 allergens of cedar pollen

    PubMed Central

    Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Schein, Catherine H.; Mathura, Venkatarajan; Braun, Werner; Czerwinski, Edmund W.; Togawa, Akihisa; Kondo, Yasuto; Oka, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Masanao; Goldblum, Randall M.

    2008-01-01

    The group 1 allergens are a major cause of cedar pollen hypersensitivity in several geographic areas. Allergens from several taxa have been shown to cross-react. The goal of these studies was to compare the structural features of the shared and unique epitopes of the group 1 allergen from mountain cedar (Jun a 1) and Japanese cedar (Cry j 1). An array of overlapping peptides from the sequence of Jun a 1 and a panel of monoclonal anti-Cry j 1 antibodies were used to identify the IgE epitopes recognized by cedar-sensitive patients from Texas and Japan. IgE from Japanese patients reacted with peptides representing one of the two linear epitopes within the highly conserved β-helical core structure and both epitopes within less ordered loops and turns near the N- and C-termini of Jun a 1. A three-dimensional (3D) model of the Cry j 1, based on the crystal structure of Jun a 1, indicated a similar surface exposure for the four described epitopes of Jun a 1 and the homologous regions of Cry j 1. The monoclonal antibodies identified another shared epitope, which is most likely conformational and a unique Cry j 1 epitope that may be the previously recognized glycopeptide IgE epitope. Defining the structural basis for shared and unique epitopes will help to identify critical features of IgE epitopes that can be used to develop mimotopes or identify allergen homologues for vaccine development. PMID:15975657

  8. [Study on the B cell linear epitopes of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein].

    PubMed

    Lv, Xin-Jun; Shen, Xin-Xin; Yu, Peng-Cheng; Li, Hao; Wang, Li-Hua; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guo-Dong

    2014-05-01

    To study the B cell linear epitopes of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein, peptides were synthesized according to the amino acid sequences of B cell linear epitopes. Linear epitopes predicted by bioinformatics analysis were evaluated with immunological techniques. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that titers of antibodies to peptides (355-369 and 385-400 residues of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein) were above 1:12 800 in mouse sera. The antibodies recognized denatured rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein in Western blot analysis. Purified anti-peptide antibodies recognized natural rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein in BHK-21 cells in indirect fluorescent antibody test. The 355-369 and 385-400 residues of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein were validated as B cell linear epitopes. PMID:25118379

  9. Plasmodium vivax Promiscuous T-Helper Epitopes Defined and Evaluated as Linear Peptide Chimera Immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Aguilar, Ivette; Rodríguez, Alexandra; Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio; Guzmán, Fanny; De la Vega, Patricia; Elkin Patarroyo, Manuel; Galinski, Mary R.; Moreno, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Clinical trials of malaria vaccines have confirmed that parasite-derived T-cell epitopes are required to elicit consistent and long-lasting immune responses. We report here the identification and functional characterization of six T-cell epitopes that are present in the merozoite surface protein-1 of Plasmodium vivax (PvMSP-1) and bind promiscuously to four different HLA-DRB1∗ alleles. Each of these peptides induced lymphoproliferative responses in cells from individuals with previous P. vivax infections. Furthermore, linear-peptide chimeras containing the promiscuous PvMSP-1 T-cell epitopes, synthesized in tandem with the Plasmodium falciparum immunodominant circumsporozoite protein (CSP) B-cell epitope, induced high specific antibody titers, cytokine production, long-lasting immune responses, and immunoglobulin G isotype class switching in BALB/c mice. A linear-peptide chimera containing an allele-restricted P. falciparum T-cell epitope with the CSP B-cell epitope was not effective. Two out of the six promiscuous T-cell epitopes exhibiting the highest anti-peptide response also contain B-cell epitopes. Antisera generated against these B-cell epitopes recognize P. vivax merozoites in immunofluorescence assays. Importantly, the anti-peptide antibodies generated to the CSP B-cell epitope inhibited the invasion of P. falciparum sporozoites into human hepatocytes. These data and the simplicity of design of the chimeric constructs highlight the potential of multimeric, multistage, and multispecies linear-peptide chimeras containing parasite promiscuous T-cell epitopes for malaria vaccine development. PMID:12065487

  10. Epitope specific T-cell responses against influenza A in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Savic, Miloje; Dembinski, Jennifer L; Kim, Yohan; Tunheim, Gro; Cox, Rebecca J; Oftung, Fredrik; Peters, Bjoern; Mjaaland, Siri

    2016-02-01

    Pre-existing human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity may be a useful correlate of protection against severe influenza disease. Identification and evaluation of common epitopes recognized by T cells with broad cross-reactivity is therefore important to guide universal influenza vaccine development, and to monitor immunological preparedness against pandemics. We have retrieved an optimal combination of MHC class I and class II restricted epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database (www.iedb.org), by defining a fitness score function depending on prevalence, sequence conservancy and HLA super-type coverage. Optimized libraries of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell epitopes were selected from influenza antigens commonly present in seasonal and pandemic influenza strains from 1934 to 2009. These epitope pools were used to characterize human T-cell responses in healthy donors using interferon-γ ELISPOT assays. Upon stimulation, significant CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were induced, primarily recognizing epitopes from the conserved viral core proteins. Furthermore, the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were phenotypically characterized regarding functionality, cytotoxic potential and memory phenotype using flow cytometry. Optimized sets of T-cell peptide epitopes may be a useful tool to monitor the efficacy of clinical trials, the immune status of a population to predict immunological preparedness against pandemics, as well as being candidates for universal influenza vaccines. PMID:26489873

  11. Palivizumab epitope-displaying virus-like particles protect rodents from RSV challenge.

    PubMed

    Schickli, Jeanne H; Whitacre, David C; Tang, Roderick S; Kaur, Jasmine; Lawlor, Heather; Peters, Cory J; Jones, Joyce E; Peterson, Darrell L; McCarthy, Michael P; Van Nest, Gary; Milich, David R

    2015-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of serious viral bronchiolitis in infants, young children, and the elderly. Currently, there is not an FDA-approved vaccine available for RSV, though the mAb palivizumab is licensed to reduce the incidence of RSV disease in premature or at-risk infants. The palivizumab epitope is a well-characterized, approximately 24-aa helix-loop-helix structure on the RSV fusion (F) protein (F254-277). Here, we genetically inserted this epitope and multiple site variants of this epitope within a versatile woodchuck hepadnavirus core-based virus-like particle (WHcAg-VLP) to generate hybrid VLPs that each bears 240 copies of the RSV epitope in a highly immunogenic arrayed format. A challenge of such an epitope-focused approach is that to be effective, the conformational F254-277 epitope must elicit antibodies that recognize the intact virus. A number of hybrid VLPs containing RSV F254-277 were recognized by palivizumab in vitro and elicited high-titer and protective neutralizing antibody in rodents. Together, the results from this proof-of-principle study suggest that the WHcAg-VLP technology may be an applicable approach to eliciting a response to other structural epitopes. PMID:25751145

  12. Preferential Remedies for Employment Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry T.; Zaretsky, Barry L.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of the problem of preferential remedies to achieve equal employment opportunities for women and minority groups. Contends that "color blindness" will not end discrimination but that some form of "color conscious" affirmative action program must be employed. Temporary preferential treatment is justified, according to the author, by the…

  13. GAD65 epitope mapping and search for novel autoantibodies in GAD-associated neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Fouka, P; Alexopoulos, H; Akrivou, S; Trohatou, O; Politis, P K; Dalakas, M C

    2015-04-15

    Antibodies against Glutamic-acid-decarboxylase (GAD65) are seen in various CNS excitability disorders including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, encephalitis and epilepsy. To explore pathogenicity, we examined whether distinct epitope specificities or other co-existing antibodies may account for each disorder. The epitope recognized by all 27 tested patients, irrespective of clinical phenotype, corresponded to the catalytic core of GAD. No autoantibodies against known GABAergic antigens were found. In a screen for novel specificities using live hippocampal neurons, three epilepsy patients, but no other, were positive. We conclude that no GAD-specific epitope defines any neurological syndrome but other antibody specificities may account for certain phenotypes. PMID:25867471

  14. Epitope located N-glycans impair the MHC-I epitope generation and presentation.

    PubMed

    Chiritoiu, Gabriela N; Jandus, Camilla; Munteanu, Cristian V A; Ghenea, Simona; Gannon, Philippe O; Romero, Pedro; Petrescu, Stefana M

    2016-06-01

    The degradation process of the antigens specific to MHC-I presentation depends mainly on the proteasomal proteases in the cytosol. However, since many antigens are glycoproteins, including tumor antigens or viruses envelope proteins, their glycosylation status could also affect their processing and presentation. Here, we investigate the processing of tyrosinase, a multiple glycosylated tumor antigen overexpressed in human malignant melanoma. By LC-MS/MS analysis of human tyrosinase expressed in a melanoma cell, we show that all seven sites of tyrosinase are at least partially N-glycosylated. Using human CD8+ T-cell clones specific for the tyrosinase epitope YMDGTMSQV (369-377), including an N-glycosylation site, we found that transfectants of single and triple N-glycosylation mutants are recognized by specific T cells. Importantly, single, triple, and the aglycosylated tyrosinase mutants lacking the epitope located N-glycosylation site (N371D) were able to trigger higher CD8+ T-cell activation. The LC/MS analysis showed significant increase of the amount of YMDGTMSQV peptide resulted from accelerated oligomerization and degradation of aglycosylated mutants. The generation of the antigenic peptide by the antigen processing machinery is therefore largely independent of tyrosinase N-glycosylation. However, while distal N-glycans had no effect on the epitope generation, the mutants lacking the N371 glycan generated the antigenic peptide more efficiently. We conclude that epitope located N-glycans limit the ability of human tyrosinase to provide HLA-A2-restricted antigen for recognition by specific CD8+ T cells. PMID:26701645

  15. HLA-DQ molecules as affinity matrix for identification of gluten T cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Dørum, Siri; Bodd, Michael; Fallang, Lars-Egil; Bergseng, Elin; Christophersen, Asbjørn; Johannesen, Marie K; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Stamnaes, Jorunn; de Souza, Gustavo A; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2014-11-01

    Even though MHC class II is a dominant susceptibility factor for many diseases, culprit T cell epitopes presented by disease-associated MHC molecules remain largely elusive. T cells of celiac disease lesions recognize cereal gluten epitopes presented by the disease-associated HLA molecules DQ2.5, DQ2.2, or DQ8. Employing celiac disease and complex gluten Ag digests as a model, we tested the feasibility of using DQ2.5 and DQ2.2 as an affinity matrix for identification of disease-relevant T cell epitopes. Known gluten T cell epitope peptides were enriched by DQ2.5, whereas a different set of peptides was enriched by DQ2.2. Of 86 DQ2.2-enriched peptides, four core sequences dominated. One of these core sequences is a previously known epitope and two others are novel epitopes. The study provides insight into the selection of gluten epitopes by DQ2.2. Furthermore, the approach presented is relevant for epitope identification in other MHC class II-associated disorders. PMID:25261484

  16. Neo-epitopes on methylglyoxal modified human serum albumin lead to aggressive autoimmune response in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jyoti; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Habib, Safia; Siddiqui, Sheelu Shafiq; Ali, Asif; Moinuddin

    2016-05-01

    Glyco-oxidation of proteins has implications in the progression of diabetes type 2. Human serum albumin is prone to glyco-oxidative attack by sugars and methylglyoxal being a strong glycating agent may have severe impact on its structure and consequent role in diabetes. This study has probed the methylglyoxal mediated modifications of HSA, the alterations in its immunological characteristics and possible role in autoantibody induction. We observed an exposure of chromophoric groups, loss in the fluorescence intensity, generation of AGEs, formation of cross-linked products, decrease in α-helical content, increase in hydrophobic clusters, FTIR band shift, attachment of methylglyoxal to HSA and the formation of N(ε)-(carboxyethyl) lysine in the modified HSA, when compared to the native albumin. MG-HSA was found to be highly immunogenic with additional immunogenicity invoking a highly specific immune response than its native counterpart. The binding characteristics of circulating autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients showed the generation of anti-MG-HSA auto-antibodies in the these patients, that are preferentially recognized by the modified albumin. We propose that MG induced structural perturbations in HSA, result in the generation of neo-epitopes leading to an aggressive auto-immune response and may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of diabetes type 2 associated complications. PMID:26861824

  17. Identification and Phylogeny of the First T Cell Epitope Identified from a Human Gut Bacteroides Species

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Muñoz, Maria Elisa; Joglekar, Payal; Shen, Yi-Ji; Chang, Kuan Y.; Peterson, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Host T cell reactivity toward gut bacterial epitopes has been recognized as part of disease pathogenesis. However, the specificity of T cells that recognize this vast number of epitopes has not yet been well described. After colonizing a C57BL/6J germ-free mouse with the human gut symbiotic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, we isolated a T cell that recognized these bacteria in vitro. Using this T cell, we mapped the first known non-carbohydrate T cell epitope within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The T cell also reacted to two other additional Bacteroides species. We identified the peptide that stimulated the T cell by using a genetic approach. Genomic data from the epitope-positive and epitope-negative bacteria explain the cross-reactivity of the T cell to multiple species. This epitope degeneracy should shape our understanding of the T cell repertoire stimulated by the complex microbiome residing in the gastrointestinal tract in both healthy and disease states. PMID:26637014

  18. Unconventional T-cell recognition of an arthritogenic epitope of proteoglycan aggrecan released from degrading cartilage.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Jane; Mahida, Rahul; Venkatesh, Divya; Pearson, Jeffrey; Robinson, John H

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that peptide epitopes bind to MHC class II molecules to form distinct structural conformers of the same MHC II-peptide complex termed type A and type B, and that the two conformers of the same peptide-MHC II complex are recognized by distinct CD4 T cells, termed type A and type B T cells. Both types recognize short synthetic peptides but only type A recognize endosomally processed intact antigen. Type B T cells that recognize self peptides from exogenously degraded proteins have been shown to escape negative selection during thymic development and so have the potential to contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We generated and characterized mouse CD4 T cells specific for an arthritogenic epitope of the candidate joint autoantigen proteoglycan aggrecan. Cloned T-cell hybridomas specific for a synthetic peptide containing the aggrecan epitope showed two distinct response patterns based on whether they could recognize processed intact aggrecan. Fine mapping demonstrated that both types of T-cell recognized the same core epitope. The results are consistent with the generation of aggrecan-specific type A and type B T cells. Type B T cells were activated by supernatants released from degrading cartilage, indicating the presence of antigenic extracellular peptides or fragments of aggrecan. Type B T cells could play a role in the pathogenesis of proteoglycan-induced arthritis in mice, a model for rheumatoid arthritis, by recognizing extracellular peptides or protein fragments of joint autoantigens released by inflamed cartilage. PMID:26581676

  19. The relationship between colonization and haemagglutination inhibiting and B cell epitopes of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    KELLY, C G; BOOTH, V; KENDAL, H; SLANEY, J M; CURTIS, M A; LEHNER, T

    1997-01-01

    Passive immunization with the monoclonal antibody 61BG1.3 selectively prevents colonization by Porphyromonas gingivalis in humans (Booth V, Ashley FP, Lehner T. Infect Immun 1996; 64:422-7). The protective MoAb recognizes the j3 component of the RI protease of P. gingivalis which is formed by proteolytic processing of a polyprotein precursor termed PrpRl. This subunit is both a haemagglutinin and an antigen which is recognized by sera from patients with periodontitis. In this study the relationship was investigated between a colonization epitope which is recognized by the MoAb 61BG1.3, a haemagglutinating and B cell epitope which are recognized by sera from patients with periodontitis. B cell epitopes were mapped by Western blotting with a series of truncated recombinant polypeptides spanning the adhesion domain within residues 784–1130 of PrpRl and by ELISA using a panel of synthetic peptides spanning the same sequence. The epitope which is recognized by the protective MoAb was mapped within residues 907–931 of PrpRl, while serum responses of patients were directed predominantly to the adjacent carboxy-terminal sequence within residues 934–1042. The haemagglutinating epitope was mapped to residues 1073–1112. In view of our previous findings that the MoAb 61BG1.3 prevents colonization of P. gingivalis in vivo and inhibits haemagglutination, these two epitopes may be in proximity in the native protein. Active or passive immunization strategies which target the protective or haemagglutinating epitopes of the adhesion domain of PrpRl may provide a means of preventing infection with P. gingivalis. PMID:9367414

  20. Recognition of Porphyromonas gingivalis Gingipain Epitopes by Natural IgM Binding to Malondialdehyde Modified Low-Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Turunen, S. Pauliina; Kummu, Outi; Harila, Kirsi; Veneskoski, Marja; Soliymani, Rabah; Baumann, Marc; Pussinen, Pirkko J.; Hörkkö, Sohvi

    2012-01-01

    Objective Increased risk for atherosclerosis is associated with infectious diseases including periodontitis. Natural IgM antibodies recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns on bacteria, and oxidized lipid and protein epitopes on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and apoptotic cells. We aimed to identify epitopes on periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis recognized by natural IgM binding to malondialdehyde (MDA) modified LDL. Methods and Results Mouse monoclonal IgM (MDmAb) specific for MDA-LDL recognized epitopes on P. gingivalis on flow cytometry and chemiluminescence immunoassays. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with P. gingivalis induced IgM, but not IgG, immune response to MDA-LDL and apoptotic cells. Immunization of LDLR−/− mice with P. gingivalis induced IgM, but not IgG, immune response to MDA-LDL and diminished aortic lipid deposition. On Western blot MDmAb bound to P. gingivalis fragments identified as arginine-specific gingipain (Rgp) by mass spectrometry. Recombinant domains of Rgp produced in E. coli were devoid of phosphocholine epitopes but contained epitopes recognized by MDmAb and human serum IgM. Serum IgM levels to P. gingivalis were associated with anti-MDA-LDL levels in humans. Conclusion Gingipain of P. gingivalis is recognized by natural IgM and shares molecular identity with epitopes on MDA-LDL. These findings suggest a role for natural antibodies in the pathogenesis of two related inflammatory diseases, atherosclerosis and periodontitis. PMID:22496875

  1. Neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to conformational epitopes of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 gp46.

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, K G; Rowe, J; Perkins, S; Bradshaw, P; Song, G Y; Cheng, C; Yang, J; Gascon, R; Halmos, J; Rehman, S M; McGrath, M S; Foung, S K

    1997-01-01

    Ten human monoclonal antibodies derived from peripheral B cells of a patient with human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-associated myelopathy are described. One monoclonal antibody recognized a linear epitope within the carboxy-terminal 43 amino acids of HTLV gp21, and two monoclonal antibodies recognized linear epitopes within HTLV type 1 (HTLV-1) gp46. The remaining seven monoclonal antibodies recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 that were expressed on the surfaces of infected cells. Two of these antibodies also bound to viable HTLV-2 infected cells and immunoprecipitated HTLV-2 gp46. Virus neutralization was determined by syncytium inhibition assays. Eight monoclonal antibodies, including all seven that recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46, possessed significant virus neutralization activity. By competitive inhibition analysis it was determined that these antibodies recognized at least four distinct conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46. These findings indicate the importance of conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 in mediating a neutralizing antibody response to HTLV infection. PMID:9223472

  2. Human self protein CD8+ T cell epitopes are both positively and negatively selected

    PubMed Central

    almani, Michal; Raffaeli, Shai; Vider-Shalit, Tal; Tsaban, Lea; Fishbain, Vered; Louzoun, Yoram

    2009-01-01

    The cellular immune system recognizes self epitopes in the context of MHC-I molecules. The immunological general view presumes that these self epitopes are just a background, both positively and negatively selecting T cells. We here estimate the number of epitopes in each human protein for many frequent HLA alleles, and a score representing over or under presentation of epitopes on these proteins. We further show that there is a clear selection for the presentation of specific self proteins types. Proteins presenting many epitopes include for example AIRE upregulated Tissue specific antigens, immune system receptors and proteins with a high expression level. On the other hand, proteins that may be considered less “useful” for the immune system, such as low expression level proteins, are under presented. We combine our epitope estimate with SNP measures to show that this selection can be directly observed through the fraction of non-synonymous SNPs (replacement fraction), which is significantly higher inside epitopes than outside PMID:19291702

  3. Human self-protein CD8+ T-cell epitopes are both positively and negatively selected.

    PubMed

    Almani, Michal; Raffaeli, Shai; Vider-Shalit, Tal; Tsaban, Lea; Fishbain, Vered; Louzoun, Yoram

    2009-04-01

    The cellular immune system recognizes self-epitopes in the context of MHC-I molecules. The immunological general view presumes that these self-epitopes are just a background, both positively and negatively selecting T cells. We here estimate the number of epitopes in each human protein for many frequent HLA alleles, and a score representing over or under presentation of epitopes on these proteins. We further show that there is a clear selection for the presentation of specific self-protein types. Proteins presenting many epitopes include, for example, autoimmune regulator (AIRE) upregulated tissue-specific antigens, immune system receptors and proteins with a high expression level. On the other hand, proteins that may be considered less "useful" for the immune system, such as low expression level proteins, are under-presented. We combine our epitope estimate with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) measures to show that this selection can be directly observed through the fraction of non-synonymous SNP (replacement fraction), which is significantly higher inside epitopes than outside. PMID:19291702

  4. Insights into the biological features of the antigenic determinants recognized by four monoclonal antibodies in redia and adult stages of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Alba, Annia; Sánchez, Jorge; Hernández, Hilda; Mosqueda, Maryani; Rodríguez, Suanel Y; Capó, Virginia; Otero, Oscar; Alfonso, Carlos; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a digenean trematode which infects a wide variety of domestic animals and also humans. Previous studies have demonstrated that four monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against the total extract of F. hepatica redia (named as 1E4, 6G11, 4E5 and 4G11) also recognized the excretion - secretion antigens (ES Ag) of adult parasites, which is a biologically-relevant mixture of molecules with functional roles during infection and immune evasion on definitive hosts. In the present report we describe the partial characterization of the epitopes recognized by these Mabs by heat treatment, mercaptoethanol reduction, pronase proteolysis and sodium peryodate oxidation, which suggested their predominant protein and conformational nature. Also, a comparative study using immunodetection assays on crude extracts and on histological sections of both rediae and adults of F. hepatica were performed to explore the expression pattern of the antigenic determinants in these developmental stages. From these experiments it was found that the Mabs reacted most likely with the same proteins of approximately 64 and 105 kDa present on both rediae and adult's extracts. However, the 1E4, 6G11 and 4E5 Mabs also recognized other molecules of the total extract of F. hepatica adults, a fact that constitutes an evidence of the antigenic variation between both stages and points at a certain biological relevance of the recognized antigenic determinants. Immunolocalization studies on histological sections revealed that all Mabs reacted with the tegument of F. hepatica in both rediae and adults stages, while the epitopes recognized by 1E4, 6G11 and 4E5 antibodies were also preferentially localized in the intestinal caeca and in different organs of the reproductive system of adult specimens. The immunogenicity of these antigenic determinants, their conserved status among different stages of the life cycle of F. hepatica and their presence in both tegument and ES Ag of adult parasites

  5. Functional Antagonism of Human CD40 Achieved by Targeting a Unique Species-Specific Epitope.

    PubMed

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Suri, Anish; Krystek, Stanley R; Tamura, James; Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar; Kuhn, Robert; Carroll, Karen; Fleener, Catherine; Ryseck, Rolf; Cheng, Lin; An, Yongmi; Drew, Philip; Grant, Steven; Suchard, Suzanne J; Nadler, Steven G; Bryson, James W; Sheriff, Steven

    2016-07-17

    Current clinical anti-CD40 biologic agents include both antagonist molecules for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and agonist molecules for immuno-oncology, yet the relationship between CD40 epitope and these opposing biological outcomes is not well defined. This report describes the identification of potent antagonist domain antibodies (dAbs) that bind to a novel human CD40-specific epitope that is divergent in the CD40 of nonhuman primates. A similarly selected anti-cynomolgus CD40 dAb recognizing the homologous epitope is also a potent antagonist. Mutagenesis, biochemical, and X-ray crystallography studies demonstrate that the epitope is distinct from that of CD40 agonists. Both the human-specific and cynomolgus-specific molecules remain pure antagonists even when formatted as bivalent Fc-fusion proteins, making this an attractive therapeutic format for targeting hCD40 in autoimmune indications. PMID:27216500

  6. Selection of SARS-Coronavirus-specific B cell epitopes by phage peptide library screening and evaluation of the immunological effect of epitope-based peptides on mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hua; Jiang Lifang . E-mail: jianglf909@yahoo.com.cn; Fang Danyun; Yan Huijun; Zhou Jingjiao; Zhou Junmei; Liang Yu; Gao Yang; Zhao, Wei; Long Beiguo

    2007-03-15

    Antibodies to SARS-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-specific B cell epitopes might recognize the pathogen and interrupt its adherence to and penetration of host cells. Hence, these epitopes could be useful for diagnosis and as vaccine constituents. Using the phage-displayed peptide library screening method and purified Fab fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG Fab) from normal human sera and convalescent sera from SARS-CoV-infected patients as targets, 11 B cell epitopes of SARS-CoV spike glycoprotein (S protein) and membrane protein (M protein) were screened. After a bioinformatics tool was used to analyze these epitopes, four epitope-based S protein dodecapeptides corresponding to the predominant epitopes were chosen for synthesis. Their antigenic specificities and immunogenicities were studied in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry and ELISPOT analysis of lymphocytes as well as a serologic analysis of antibody showed that these peptides could trigger a rapid, highly effective, and relatively safe immune response in BALB/c mice. These findings might aid development of SARS diagnostics and vaccines. Moreover, the role of S and M proteins as important surface antigens is confirmed.

  7. CD8(+) T cells of Listeria monocytogenes-infected mice recognize both linear and spliced proteasome products.

    PubMed

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Mishto, Michele; Textoris-Taube, Kathrin; Keller, Christin; Liepe, Juliane; Busch, Dirk H; Kloetzel, Peter M; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2016-05-01

    CD8(+) T cells responding to infection recognize pathogen-derived epitopes presented by MHC class-I molecules. While most of such epitopes are generated by proteasome-mediated antigen cleavage, analysis of tumor antigen processing has revealed that epitopes may also derive from proteasome-catalyzed peptide splicing (PCPS). To determine whether PCPS contributes to epitope processing during infection, we analyzed the fragments produced by purified proteasomes from a Listeria monocytogenes polypeptide. Mass spectrometry identified a known H-2K(b) -presented linear epitope (LLO296-304 ) in the digests, as well as four spliced peptides that were trimmed by ERAP into peptides with in silico predicted H-2K(b) binding affinity. These spliced peptides, which displayed sequence similarity with LLO296-304 , bound to H-2K(b) molecules in cellular assays and one of the peptides was recognized by CD8(+) T cells of infected mice. This spliced epitope differed by one amino acid from LLO296-304 and double staining with LLO296-304 - and spliced peptide-folded MHC multimers showed that LLO296-304 and its spliced variant were recognized by the same CD8(+) T cells. Thus, PCPS multiplies the variety of peptides that is processed from an antigen and leads to the production of epitope variants that can be recognized by cross-reacting pathogen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Such mechanism may reduce the chances for pathogen immune evasion. PMID:26909514

  8. Identification of novel B cell epitopes within Toxoplasma gondii GRA1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Zhang, Delin; Yin, Hong; Wang, Meng

    2013-11-01

    Newly synthesized epitopes are one of the most promising antigens for the development of diagnostic kits and peptide vaccines. Very little is known about the B cell epitopes on GRA1 of Toxoplasma gondii, which are recognized by the humoral immune response in pigs. In this study, epitopes derived from GRA1 of T. gondii were identified using synthetic peptide techniques and bioinformatics. Three (PG10, PG13 and PG18) out of the eighteen peptides tested were recognized by all pig sera from different time points after infection, and the other peptides were recognized by select sera from various time points after infection. Our data indicate that many regions of GRA1, and in particular, the regions represented by the peptides PG10, PG13 and PG18, are involved in the pig antibody response. The identification of specific epitopes targeted by the host antibody response is important both for understanding the natural response to infection and for the development of epitope-based marker vaccines and diagnostic tools for toxoplasmosis. PMID:24090568

  9. Inadequate Reference Datasets Biased toward Short Non-epitopes Confound B-cell Epitope Prediction.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Kh Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan Ullah; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    X-ray crystallography has shown that an antibody paratope typically binds 15-22 amino acids (aa) of an epitope, of which 2-5 randomly distributed amino acids contribute most of the binding energy. In contrast, researchers typically choose for B-cell epitope mapping short peptide antigens in antibody binding assays. Furthermore, short 6-11-aa epitopes, and in particular non-epitopes, are over-represented in published B-cell epitope datasets that are commonly used for development of B-cell epitope prediction approaches from protein antigen sequences. We hypothesized that such suboptimal length peptides result in weak antibody binding and cause false-negative results. We tested the influence of peptide antigen length on antibody binding by analyzing data on more than 900 peptides used for B-cell epitope mapping of immunodominant proteins of Chlamydia spp. We demonstrate that short 7-12-aa peptides of B-cell epitopes bind antibodies poorly; thus, epitope mapping with short peptide antigens falsely classifies many B-cell epitopes as non-epitopes. We also show in published datasets of confirmed epitopes and non-epitopes a direct correlation between length of peptide antigens and antibody binding. Elimination of short, ≤11-aa epitope/non-epitope sequences improved datasets for evaluation of in silico B-cell epitope prediction. Achieving up to 86% accuracy, protein disorder tendency is the best indicator of B-cell epitope regions for chlamydial and published datasets. For B-cell epitope prediction, the most effective approach is plotting disorder of protein sequences with the IUPred-L scale, followed by antibody reactivity testing of 16-30-aa peptides from peak regions. This strategy overcomes the well known inaccuracy of in silico B-cell epitope prediction from primary protein sequences. PMID:27189949

  10. Comprehensive Mapping Antigenic Epitopes of NS1 Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hua, Rong-Hong; Liu, Li-Ke; Chen, Zhen-Shi; Li, Ye-Nan; Bu, Zhi-Gao

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) contributes to virus replication and elicits protective immune responses during infection. JEV NS1-specific antibody responses could be a target in the differential diagnosis of different flavivirus infections. However, the epitopes on JEV NS1 are poorly characterized. The present study describes the full mapping of linear B-cell epitopes in JEV NS1. We generated eleven NS1-specific monoclonal antibodies from mice immunized with recombinant NS1. For epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies, a set of 51 partially-overlapping peptides covering the entire NS1 protein were expressed with a GST-tag and then screened using monoclonal antibodies. Through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), five linear epitope-containing peptides were identified. By sequentially removing amino acid residues from the carboxy and amino terminal of peptides, the minimal units of the five linear epitopes were identified and confirmed using monoclonal antibodies. Five linear epitopes are located in amino acids residues (5)AIDITRK(11), (72)RDELNVL(78), (251)KSKHNRREGY(260), (269)DENGIVLD(276), and (341)DETTLVRS(348). Furthermore, it was found that the epitopes are highly conserved among JEV strains through sequence alignment. Notably, none of the homologous regions on NS1 proteins from other flaviviruses reacted with the MAbs when they were tested for cross-reactivity, and all five epitope peptides were not recognized by sera against West Nile virus or Dengue virus. These novel virus-specific linear B-cell epitopes of JEV NS1 would benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays. PMID:23825668

  11. Computationally predicted IgE epitopes of walnut allergens contribute to cross-reactivity with peanuts

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Soheila J.; Teuber, Suzanne S.; Cheng, Hsiaopo; Chen, Deliang; Comstock, Sarah S.; Ruan, Sanbao; Schein, Catherine H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cross reactivity between peanuts and tree nuts implies that similar IgE epitopes are present in their proteins. Objective To determine whether walnut sequences similar to known peanut IgE binding sequences, according to the property distance (PD) scale implemented in the Structural Database of Allergenic Proteins (SDAP), react with IgE from sera of patients with allergy to walnut and/or peanut. Methods Patient sera were characterized by Western blotting for IgE-binding to nut protein extracts, and to peptides from walnut and peanut allergens, similar to known peanut epitopes as defined by low PD values, synthesized on membranes. Competitive ELISA was used to show that peanut and predicted walnut epitope sequences compete with purified Ara h 2 for binding to IgE in serum from a cross-reactive patient. Results Sequences from the vicilin walnut allergen Jug r 2 which had low PD values to epitopes of the peanut allergen Ara h 2, a 2s-albumin, bound IgE in sera from five patients who reacted to either walnut, peanut or both. A walnut epitope recognized by 6 patients mapped to a surface-exposed region on a model of the N-terminal pro-region of Jug r 2. A predicted walnut epitope competed for IgE binding to Ara h 2 in serum as well as the known IgE epitope from Ara h 2. Conclusions Sequences with low PD value (<8.5) to known IgE epitopes could contribute to cross-reactivity between allergens. This further validates the PD scoring method for predicting cross-reactive epitopes in allergens. PMID:21883278

  12. Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Novel Conserved Epitopes within Filovirus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Enterlein, Sven G.; Howell, Katie A.; Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L.; Froude, Jeffrey W.; Araghi, Nazli; Douglas, Robin; Biggins, Julia; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Lau, Patrick; Wang, Yong; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Glass, Pamela J.; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses cause highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Current immunotherapeutic options for filoviruses are mostly specific to Ebola virus (EBOV), although other members of Filoviridae such as Sudan virus (SUDV), Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), and Marburg virus (MARV) have also caused sizeable human outbreaks. Here we report a set of pan-ebolavirus and pan-filovirus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) derived from cynomolgus macaques immunized repeatedly with a mixture of engineered glycoproteins (GPs) and virus-like particles (VLPs) for three different filovirus species. The antibodies recognize novel neutralizing and nonneutralizing epitopes on the filovirus glycoprotein, including conserved conformational epitopes within the core regions of the GP1 subunit and a novel linear epitope within the glycan cap. We further report the first filovirus antibody binding to a highly conserved epitope within the fusion loop of ebolavirus and marburgvirus species. One of the antibodies binding to the core GP1 region of all ebolavirus species and with lower affinity to MARV GP cross neutralized both SUDV and EBOV, the most divergent ebolavirus species. In a mouse model of EBOV infection, this antibody provided 100% protection when administered in two doses and partial, but significant, protection when given once at the peak of viremia 3 days postinfection. Furthermore, we describe novel cocktails of antibodies with enhanced protective efficacy compared to individual MAbs. In summary, the present work describes multiple novel, cross-reactive filovirus epitopes and innovative combination concepts that challenge the current therapeutic models. IMPORTANCE Filoviruses are among the most deadly human pathogens. The 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) led to more than 27,000 cases and 11,000 fatalities. While there are five species of Ebolavirus and several strains of marburgvirus, the current immunotherapeutics primarily target Ebola virus

  13. Epitope Mapping of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies to Human Interferon-γ Using Human-Bovine Interferon-γ Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Bartek; Rudström, Karin; Ehrnfelt, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to identify conformational epitopes, recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) made against human (h) interferon (IFN)-γ. Based on the mAbs' (n = 12) ability to simultaneously bind hIFN-γ in ELISA, 2 epitope clusters with 5 mAbs in each were defined; 2 mAbs recognized unique epitopes. Utilizing the mAbs' lack of reactivity with bovine (b) IFN-γ, epitopes were identified using 7 h/bIFN-γ chimeras where the helical regions (A-F) or the C terminus were substituted with bIFN-γ residues. Chimeras had a N-terminal peptide tag enabling the analysis of mAb recognition of chimeras in ELISA. The 2 mAb clusters mapped to region A and E, respectively; the epitopes of several mAbs also involved additional regions. MAbs in cluster A neutralized, to various degrees, IFN-γ-mediated activation of human cells, in line with the involvement of region A in the IFN-γ receptor interaction. MAbs mapping to region E displayed a stronger neutralizing capacity although this region has not been directly implicated in the receptor interaction. The results corroborate earlier studies and provide a detailed picture of the link between the epitope specificity and neutralizing capacity of mAbs. They further demonstrate the general use of peptide-tagged chimeric proteins as a powerful and straightforward method for efficient mapping of conformational epitopes. PMID:27336613

  14. Epitope Mapping of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies to Human Interferon-γ Using Human-Bovine Interferon-γ Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Bartek; Rudström, Karin; Ehrnfelt, Cecilia; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to identify conformational epitopes, recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) made against human (h) interferon (IFN)-γ. Based on the mAbs' (n = 12) ability to simultaneously bind hIFN-γ in ELISA, 2 epitope clusters with 5 mAbs in each were defined; 2 mAbs recognized unique epitopes. Utilizing the mAbs' lack of reactivity with bovine (b) IFN-γ, epitopes were identified using 7 h/bIFN-γ chimeras where the helical regions (A-F) or the C terminus were substituted with bIFN-γ residues. Chimeras had a N-terminal peptide tag enabling the analysis of mAb recognition of chimeras in ELISA. The 2 mAb clusters mapped to region A and E, respectively; the epitopes of several mAbs also involved additional regions. MAbs in cluster A neutralized, to various degrees, IFN-γ-mediated activation of human cells, in line with the involvement of region A in the IFN-γ receptor interaction. MAbs mapping to region E displayed a stronger neutralizing capacity although this region has not been directly implicated in the receptor interaction. The results corroborate earlier studies and provide a detailed picture of the link between the epitope specificity and neutralizing capacity of mAbs. They further demonstrate the general use of peptide-tagged chimeric proteins as a powerful and straightforward method for efficient mapping of conformational epitopes. PMID:27336613

  15. Epitope Predictions Indicate the Presence of Two Distinct Types of Epitope-Antibody-Reactivities Determined by Epitope Profiling of Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Luštrek, Mitja; Lorenz, Peter; Kreutzer, Michael; Qian, Zilliang; Steinbeck, Felix; Wu, Di; Born, Nadine; Ziems, Bjoern; Hecker, Michael; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Cao, Zhiwei; Glocker, Michael O.; Li, Yixue; Fuellen, Georg; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Epitope-antibody-reactivities (EAR) of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) determined for 75,534 peptides by microarray analysis demonstrate that roughly 9% of peptides derived from 870 different human protein sequences react with antibodies present in IVIG. Computational prediction of linear B cell epitopes was conducted using machine learning with an ensemble of classifiers in combination with position weight matrix (PWM) analysis. Machine learning slightly outperformed PWM with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.884 vs. 0.849. Two different types of epitope-antibody recognition-modes (Type I EAR and Type II EAR) were found. Peptides of Type I EAR are high in tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine, and low in asparagine, glutamine and glutamic acid residues, whereas for peptides of Type II EAR it is the other way around. Representative crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) of Type I EAR are PDB 1TZI and PDB 2DD8, while PDB 2FD6 and 2J4W are typical for Type II EAR. Type I EAR peptides share predicted propensities for being presented by MHC class I and class II complexes. The latter interaction possibly favors T cell-dependent antibody responses including IgG class switching. Peptides of Type II EAR are predicted not to be preferentially presented by MHC complexes, thus implying the involvement of T cell-independent IgG class switch mechanisms. The high extent of IgG immunoglobulin reactivity with human peptides implies that circulating IgG molecules are prone to bind to human protein/peptide structures under non-pathological, non-inflammatory conditions. A webserver for predicting EAR of peptide sequences is available at www.sysmed-immun.eu/EAR. PMID:24244326

  16. T cell epitope redundancy: cross-conservation of the TCR face between pathogens and self and its implications for vaccines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Moise, Leonard; Beseme, Sarah; Tassone, Ryan; Liu, Rui; Kibria, Farzana; Terry, Frances; Martin, William; De Groot, Anne S

    2016-05-01

    T cells are extensively trained on 'self' in the thymus and then move to the periphery, where they seek out and destroy infections and regulate immune response to self-antigens. T cell receptors (TCRs) on T cells' surface recognize T cell epitopes, short linear strings of amino acids presented by antigen-presenting cells. Some of these epitopes activate T effectors, while others activate regulatory T cells. It was recently discovered that T cell epitopes that are highly conserved on their TCR face with human genome sequences are often associated with T cells that regulate immune response. These TCR-cross-conserved or 'redundant epitopes' are more common in proteins found in pathogens that have co-evolved with humans than in other non-commensal pathogens. Epitope redundancy might be the link between pathogens and autoimmune disease. This article reviews recently published data and addresses epitope redundancy, the "elephant in the room" for vaccine developers and T cell immunologists. PMID:26588466

  17. Identification and localization of minimal MHC-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes within the Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 protein

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) is a leading malaria vaccine candidate antigen that is expressed by sporozoite, liver and blood stage parasites. Since CD8+ T cell responses have been implicated in protection against pre-erythrocytic stage malaria, this study was designed to identify MHC class I-restricted epitopes within AMA1. Methods A recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing P. falciparum AMA1 was highly immunogenic when administered to healthy, malaria-naive adult volunteers as determined by IFN-γ ELISpot responses to peptide pools containing overlapping 15-mer peptides spanning full-length AMA1. Computerized algorithms (NetMHC software) were used to predict minimal MHC-restricted 8-10-mer epitope sequences within AMA1 15-mer peptides active in ELISpot. A subset of epitopes was synthesized and tested for induction of CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses by ELISpot depletion and ICS assays. A 3-dimensional model combining Domains I + II of P. falciparum AMA1 and Domain III of P. vivax AMA1 was used to map these epitopes. Results Fourteen 8-10-mer epitopes were predicted to bind to HLA supertypes A01 (3 epitopes), A02 (4 epitopes), B08 (2 epitopes) and B44 (5 epitopes). Nine of the 14 predicted epitopes were recognized in ELISpot or ELISpot and ICS assays by one or more volunteers. Depletion of T cell subsets confirmed that these epitopes were CD8+ T cell-dependent. A mixture of the 14 minimal epitopes was capable of recalling CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses from PBMC of immunized volunteers. Thirteen of the 14 predicted epitopes were polymorphic and the majority localized to the more conserved front surface of the AMA1 model structure. Conclusions This study predicted 14 and confirmed nine MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes on AMA1 recognized in the context of seven HLA alleles. These HLA alleles belong to four HLA supertypes that have a phenotypic frequency between 23% - 100% in different human populations. PMID

  18. The epitopes that cause cross-reactions between peanuts and tree nuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many peanut allergic individuals also have allergies to tree nuts. Our previous work has shown that there are epitopes with different amino acid sequences, but similar physical and chemical properties are recognized by the same IgE molecule. Anti-Ara h 2 monoclonal antibodies were produced. They we...

  19. T helper cell recognition of muscle acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis. Epitopes on the gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, A A; Protti, M P; Dalton, M W; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1993-01-01

    We tested the response of CD4+ cells and/or total lymphocytes from the blood of 22 myasthenic patients and 10 healthy controls to overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, to screen the sequence of the gamma and delta subunits of human muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The gamma subunit is part of the AChR expressed in embryonic muscle and is substituted in the AChRs of most adult muscles by an epsilon subunit. The delta subunit is present in both embryonic and adult AChRs. Adult extrinsic ocular muscles, which are preferentially and sometimes uniquely affected by myasthenic symptoms, and thymus, which has a still obscure but important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, express the embryonic gamma subunit. Anti-AChR CD4+ responses were more easily detected after CD8+ depletion. All responders recognized epitopes on both the gamma and delta subunits and had severe symptoms. In four patients the CD4+ cell response was tested twice, when the symptoms were severe and during a period of remission. Consistently, the response was only detectable, or larger, when the patients were severely affected. Images PMID:7688757

  20. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  1. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  2. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  3. Multiplex localization of sequential peptide epitopes by use of a planar microbead chip.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Carsten; Rödiger, Stefan; Gruner, Melanie; Moncsek, Anja; Stohwasser, Ralf; Hanack, Katja; Schierack, Peter; Schröder, Christian

    2016-02-18

    Epitope mapping is crucial for the characterization of protein-specific antibodies. Commonly, small overlapping peptides are chemically synthesized and immobilized to determine the specific peptide sequence. In this study, we report the use of a fast and inexpensive planar microbead chip for epitope mapping. We developed a generic strategy for expressing recombinant peptide libraries instead of using expensive synthetic peptide libraries. A biotin moiety was introduced in vivo at a defined peptide position using biotin ligase. Peptides in crude Escherichia coli lysate were coupled onto streptavidin-coated microbeads by incubation, thereby avoiding tedious purification procedures. For read-out we used a multiplex planar microbead chip with size- and fluorescence-encoded microbead populations. For epitope mapping, up to 18 populations of peptide-loaded microbeads (at least 20 microbeads per peptide) displaying the primary sequence of a protein were analyzed simultaneously. If an epitope was recognized by an antibody, a secondary fluorescence-labeled antibody generated a signal that was quantified, and the mean value of all microbeads in the population was calculated. We mapped the epitopes for rabbit anti-PA28γ (proteasome activator 28γ) polyclonal serum, for a murine monoclonal antibody against PA28γ, and for a murine monoclonal antibody against the hamster polyoma virus major capsid protein VP1 as models. In each case, the identification of one distinct peptide sequence out of up to 18 sequences was possible. Using this approach, an epitope can be mapped multiparametrically within three weeks. PMID:26826697

  4. Identification of HLA-A*11:01-restricted Mycobacterium tuberculosis CD8(+) T cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su-Dong; Su, Jin; Zhang, Shi-Meng; Dong, Hai-Ping; Wang, Hui; Luo, Wei; Wen, Qian; He, Jian-Chun; Yang, Xiao-Fan; Ma, Li

    2016-09-01

    New vaccines are needed to combat Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infections. The currently employed Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is becoming ineffective, due in part to the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) strains and the reduced immune capacity in cases of HIV coinfection. CD8(+) T cells play an important role in the protective immunity against MTB infections, and the identification of immunogenic CD8(+) T cell epitopes specific for MTB is essential for the design of peptide-based vaccines. To identify CD8(+) T cell epitopes of MTB proteins, we screened a set of 94 MTB antigens for HLA class I A*11:01-binding motifs. HLA-A*11:01 is one of the most prevalent HLA molecules in Southeast Asians, and definition of T cell epitopes it can restrict would provide significant coverage for the Asian population. Peptides that bound with high affinity to purified HLA molecules were subsequently evaluated in functional assays to detect interferon-γ release and CD8(+) T cell proliferation in active pulmonary TB patients. We identified six novel epitopes, each derived from a unique MTB antigen, which were recognized by CD8(+) T cells from active pulmonary TB patients. In addition, a significant level of epitope-specific T cells could be detected ex vivo in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from active TB patients by an HLA-A*11:01 dextramer carrying the peptide Rv3130c194-204 (from the MTB triacylglycerol synthase Tgs1), which was the most frequently recognized epitope in our peptide library. In conclusion, this study identified six dominant CD8(+) T cell epitopes that may be considered potential targets for subunit vaccines or diagnostic strategies against TB. PMID:27072810

  5. Variable epitope library carrying heavily mutated survivin-derived CTL epitope variants as a new class of efficient vaccine immunogen tested in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    NoeDominguez-Romero, Allan; Zamora-Alvarado, Rubén; Servín-Blanco, Rodolfo; Pérez-Hernández, Erendira G; Castrillon-Rivera, Laura E; Munguia, Maria Elena; Acero, Gonzalo; Govezensky, Tzipe; Gevorkian, Goar; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The antigenic variability of tumor cells leading to dynamic changes in cancer epitope landscape along with escape from immune surveillance by down-regulating tumor antigen expression/presentation and immune tolerance are major obstacles for the design of effective vaccines. We have developed a novel concept for immunogen construction based on introduction of massive mutations within the epitopes targeting antigenically variable pathogens and diseases. Previously, we showed that these immunogens carrying large combinatorial libraries of mutated epitope variants, termed as variable epitope libraries (VELs), induce potent, broad and long lasting CD8+IFN-γ+ T-cell response as well as HIV-neutralizing antibodies. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested immunogenic properties and anti-tumor effects of the VELs bearing survivin-derived CTL epitope (GWEPDDNPI) variants in an aggressive metastatic mouse 4T1 breast tumor model. The constructed VELs had complexities of 10,500 and 8,000 individual members, generated as combinatorial M13 phage display and synthetic peptide libraries, respectively, with structural composition GWXPXDXPI, where X is any of 20 natural amino acids. Statistically significant tumor growth inhibition was observed in BALB/c mice immunized with the VELs in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Vaccinated mice developed epitope-specific spleen cell and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T-cell responses that recognize more than 50% of the panel of 87 mutated epitope variants, as demonstrated in T-cell proliferation assays and FACS analysis. These data indicate the feasibility of the application of this new class of immunogens based on VEL concept as an alternative approach for the development of molecular vaccines against cancer. PMID:25483665

  6. Variable epitope library carrying heavily mutated survivin-derived CTL epitope variants as a new class of efficient vaccine immunogen tested in a mouse model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    NoeDominguez-Romero, Allan; Zamora-Alvarado, Rubén; Servín-Blanco, Rodolfo; Pérez-Hernández, Erendira G; Castrillon-Rivera, Laura E; Munguia, Maria Elena; Acero, Gonzalo; Govezensky, Tzipe; Gevorkian, Goar; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The antigenic variability of tumor cells leading to dynamic changes in cancer epitope landscape along with escape from immune surveillance by down-regulating tumor antigen expression/presentation and immune tolerance are major obstacles for the design of effective vaccines. We have developed a novel concept for immunogen construction based on introduction of massive mutations within the epitopes targeting antigenically variable pathogens and diseases. Previously, we showed that these immunogens carrying large combinatorial libraries of mutated epitope variants, termed as variable epitope libraries (VELs), induce potent, broad and long lasting CD8+IFN-γ+ T-cell response as well as HIV-neutralizing antibodies. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested immunogenic properties and anti-tumor effects of the VELs bearing survivin-derived CTL epitope (GWEPDDNPI) variants in an aggressive metastatic mouse 4T1 breast tumor model. The constructed VELs had complexities of 10,500 and 8,000 individual members, generated as combinatorial M13 phage display and synthetic peptide libraries, respectively, with structural composition GWXPXDXPI, where X is any of 20 natural amino acids. Statistically significant tumor growth inhibition was observed in BALB/c mice immunized with the VELs in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Vaccinated mice developed epitope-specific spleen cell and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T-cell responses that recognize more than 50% of the panel of 87 mutated epitope variants, as demonstrated in T-cell proliferation assays and FACS analysis. These data indicate the feasibility of the application of this new class of immunogens based on VEL concept as an alternative approach for the development of molecular vaccines against cancer. PMID:25483665

  7. Towards in silico prediction of immunogenic epitopes.

    PubMed

    Flower, Darren R

    2003-12-01

    As torrents of new data now emerge from microbial genomics, bioinformatic prediction of immunogenic epitopes remains challenging but vital. In silico methods often produce paradoxically inconsistent results: good prediction rates on certain test sets but not others. The inherent complexity of immune presentation and recognition processes complicates epitope prediction. Two encouraging developments - data driven artificial intelligence sequence-based methods for epitope prediction and molecular modeling methods based on three-dimensional protein structures - offer hope for the future. PMID:14644141

  8. Epitope mapping and identification of amino acids critical for mouse IgG-binding to linear epitopes on Gly m Bd 28K.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jun; Yan, Huili

    2016-10-01

    Gly m Bd 28K is one of the major allergens in soybeans, but there is limited information on its IgG-binding epitopes. Thirty-four overlapping peptides that covered the entire sequence of Gly m Bd 28K were synthesized, and 3 monoclonal antibodies against Gly m Bd 28K were utilized to identify the IgG-binding regions of Gly m Bd 28K. Three dominant peptides corresponding to (28)GDKKSPKSLFLMSNS(42)(G28-S42), (56)LKSHGGRIFYRHMHI(70)(L56-I70), and (154)ETFQSFYIGGGANSH(168)(E154-H168) were recognized. L56-I70 is the most important epitope, and a competitive ELISA indicated that it could inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibody to Gly m Bd 28K protein. Alanine scanning of L56-I70 documented that F64, Y65, and R66 were the critical amino acids of this epitope. Two bioinformatics tools, ABCpred and BepiPred, were used to predict the epitopes of Gly m Bd 28K, and the predictions were compared with the epitopes that we had located by monoclonal antibodies. PMID:27033966

  9. Generation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against a Cyclic Variant of Hepatitis C Virus E2 Epitope 412-422

    PubMed Central

    Sandomenico, Annamaria; Leonardi, Antonio; Berisio, Rita; Sanguigno, Luca; Focà, Giuseppina; Focà, Annalia; Ruggiero, Alessia; Doti, Nunzianna; Muscariello, Livio; Barone, Daniela; Farina, Claudio; Owsianka, Ania; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 envelope glycoprotein is crucial for virus entry into hepatocytes. A conserved region of E2 encompassing amino acids 412 to 423 (epitope I) and containing Trp420, a residue critical for virus entry, is recognized by several broadly neutralizing antibodies. Peptides embodying this epitope I sequence adopt a β-hairpin conformation when bound to neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) AP33 and HCV1. We therefore generated new mouse MAbs that were able to bind to a cyclic peptide containing E2 residues 412 to 422 (C-epitope I) but not to the linear counterpart. These MAbs bound to purified E2 with affinities of about 50 nM, but they were unable to neutralize virus infection. Structural analysis of the complex between C-epitope I and one of our MAbs (C2) showed that the Trp420 side chain is largely buried in the combining site and that the Asn417 side chain, which is glycosylated in E2 and solvent exposed in other complexes, is slightly buried upon C2 binding. Also, the orientation of the cyclic peptide in the antibody-combining site is rotated by 180° compared to the orientations of the other complexes. All these structural features, however, do not explain the lack of neutralization activity. This is instead ascribed to the high degree of selectivity of the new MAbs for the cyclic epitope and to their inability to interact with the epitope in more flexible and extended conformations, which recent data suggest play a role in the mechanisms of neutralization escape. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a major health care burden, affecting almost 3% of the global population. The conserved epitope comprising residues 412 to 423 of the viral E2 glycoprotein is a valid vaccine candidate because antibodies recognizing this region exhibit potent neutralizing activity. This epitope adopts a β-hairpin conformation when bound to neutralizing MAbs. We explored the potential of cyclic peptides mimicking this structure to elicit

  10. Multiplicity of virus-encoded helper T-cell epitopes expressed on FBL-3 tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Iwashiro, M; Kondo, T; Shimizu, T; Yamagishi, H; Takahashi, K; Matsubayashi, Y; Masuda, T; Otaka, A; Fujii, N; Ishimoto, A

    1993-01-01

    To identify retroviral antigenic determinants recognized by CD4+ T helper cells during tumor rejection, we established four noncytolytic, helper-type, CD4+ T-cell clones by limiting dilution cultures of mixed lymphocyte-tumor cultures from mice immune to a Friend virus-induced tumor, FBL-3. Among these, three T helper cell clones were isolated from C57BL/6 mice and the fourth was isolated from a (BALB/c x C57BL/6)F1 mouse. All these clones proliferated in response to the immunizing FBL-3 tumor cells in a major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted manner. Each clone expressed a distinct T-cell receptor with a characteristic combination of alpha and beta chains. The localization of helper T-cell determinants on viral proteins was analyzed with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV) gag or env genes or shorter fragments of the env gene. Epitopes recognized by these T-cell clones were mapped to at least two distinct portions in the env region of the F-MuLV genome. These epitopes were identified more precisely with synthetic peptides derived from the F-MuLV envelope protein sequence. One of these epitopes was common to Friend and Moloney MuLVs and was located in the N-terminal region of the gp70 glycoprotein at amino acids 122 to 141. The second epitope, which was recognized in the context of hybrid I-Eb/d major histocompatibility complex class II molecule, was located close to the C-terminal end of gp70 at amino acids 462 to 479. In addition, a possible third epitope was located in the N-terminal half of the gp70 sequence and differed from the first epitope in that it was not cross-reactive with the Moloney MuLV envelope protein. PMID:7687300

  11. Recognizing Computational Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2006-08-01

    There are prestigious international awards that recognize the role of theory and experiment in science and mathematics, but there are no awards of a similar stature that explicitly recognize the role of computational science in a scientific field. In 1945, John von Neumann noted that "many branches of both pure and applied mathematics are in great need of computing instruments to break the present stalemate created by the failure of the purely analytical approach to nonlinear problems." In the past few decades, great strides in mathematics and in the applied sciences can be linked to computational science.

  12. Studies of epitope restriction on myeloperoxidase (MPO), an important antigen in systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    SHORT, A K; LOCKWOOD, C M

    1997-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are important components of the inflammatory response in patients with systemic vasculitis. Their role in the pathogenesis of these conditions remains incompletely defined. Several antigens have been identified, and MPO is one of the most important. To gain more understanding of the immune mechanisms involved, we were keen to see if the antibody response to MPO was restricted, or whether there was a general loss of tolerance to the whole surface of the molecule. To study the epitopes we employed both ELISA and biosensor technology, and were able to demonstrate restriction both in the number and localization of the epitopes being recognized. PMID:9367412

  13. Discrimination and Variable Impact of ANCA Binding to Different Surface Epitopes on Proteinase 3, the Wegener’s Autoantigen

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francisco; Hummel, Amber M.; Jenne, Dieter E.; Specks, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3)-specific antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are highly specific for the autoimmune small vessel vasculitis, Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG). PR3-ANCA have proven diagnostic value but their pathogenic potential and utility as a biomarker for disease activity remain unclear. PR3-ANCA recognize conformational epitopes, and epitope-specific PR3-ANCA subsets with variable impact on biological functions of PR3 have been postulated. The aims of this study were to identify specific PR3 surface epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) and to determine whether the findings can be used to measure the functional impact of epitope-specific PR3-ANCA and their potential relationship to disease activity. We used a novel flow cytometry assay based on TALON-beads coated with recombinant human (H) and murine (M) PR3 and 10 custom-designed chimeric human/mouse rPR3-variants (Hm1–5/Mh1–5) identifying 5 separate non-conserved PR3 surface epitopes. Anti-PR3 moAbs recognize 4 major surface epitopes, and we identified the specific surface location of 3 of these with the chimeric rPR3-variants. The ability of PR3-ANCA to inhibit the enzymatic activity of PR3 was measured indirectly using a capture-ELISA system based on the different epitopes recognized by capturing moAbs. Epitope-specific PR3-ANCA capture-ELISA results obtained from patient plasma (n=27) correlated with the inhibition of enzymatic activity of PR3 by paired IgG preparations (r=0.7, P<0.01). The capture-ELISA results also seem to reflect disease activity. In conclusion, insights about epitopes recognized by anti-PR3 moAbs can be applied to separate PR3-ANCA subsets with predictable functional qualities. The ability of PR3-ANCA to inhibit the enzymatic activity of PR3, a property linked to disease activity, can now be gauged using a simple epitope-based capture-ELISA system. PMID:20810247

  14. Epitope topography controls bioactivity in supramolecular nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Shantanu; Tantakitti, Faifan; Matson, John B.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating bioactivity into artificial scaffolds using peptide epitopes present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a well-known approach. A common strategy has involved epitopes that provide cells with attachment points and external cues through interaction with integrin receptors. Although a variety of bioactive sequences have been identified so far, less is known about their optimal display in a scaffold. We report here on the use of self-assembled peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofiber matrices to investigate the impact of spatial presentation of the fibronectin derived epitope RGDS on cell response. Using one, three, or five glycine residues, RGDS epitopes were systematically spaced out from the surface of the rigid nanofibers. We found that cell morphology was strongly affected by the separation of the epitope from the nanofiber surface, with the longest distance yielding the most cell-spreading, bundling of actin filaments, and a round-to-polygonal transformation of cell shape. Cell response to this type of epitope display was also accompanied with activated integrin-mediated signaling and formation of stronger adhesions between cells and substrate. Interestingly, unlike length, changing the molecular flexibility of the linker had minimal influence on cell behavior on the substrate for reasons that remain poorly understood. The use in this study of high persistence length nanofibers rather than common flexible polymers allows us to conclude that epitope topography at the nanoscale structure of a scaffold influences its bioactive properties independent of epitope density and mechanical properties. PMID:25745558

  15. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Directed against Defined Linear Epitopes on Domain 4 of Anthrax Protective Antigen▿

    PubMed Central

    Kelly-Cirino, Cassandra D.; Mantis, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the receptor-binding subunit common to lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET), which are responsible for the high mortality rates associated with inhalational Bacillus anthracis infection. Although recombinant PA (rPA) is likely to be an important constituent of any future anthrax vaccine, evaluation of the efficacies of the various candidate rPA vaccines is currently difficult, because the specific B-cell epitopes involved in toxin neutralization have not been completely defined. In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of two murine monoclonal immunoglobulin G1 antibodies (MAbs), 1-F1 and 2-B12, which recognize distinct linear neutralizing epitopes on domain 4 of PA. 1-F1 recognized a 12-mer peptide corresponding to residues 692 to 703; this epitope maps to a region of domain 4 known to interact with the anthrax toxin receptor CMG-2 and within a conformation-dependent epitope recognized by the well-characterized neutralizing MAb 14B7. As expected, 1-F1 blocked PA's ability to associate with CMG-2 in an in vitro solid-phase binding assay, and it protected murine macrophage cells from intoxication with LT. 2-B12 recognized a 12-mer peptide corresponding to residues 716 to 727, an epitope located immediately adjacent to the core 14B7 binding site and a stretch of amino acids not previously identified as a target of neutralizing antibodies. 2-B12 was as effective as 1-F1 in neutralizing LT in vitro, although it only partially inhibited PA binding to its receptor. Mice passively administered 1-F1 or 2-B12 were partially protected against a lethal challenge with LT. These results advance our fundamental understanding of the mechanisms by which antibodies neutralize anthrax toxin and may have future application in the evaluation of candidate rPA vaccines. PMID:19703971

  16. Conformational B-cell epitopes prediction from sequences using cost-sensitive ensemble classifiers and spatial clustering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Xiaowei; Sun, Pingping; Gao, Bo; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    B-cell epitopes are regions of the antigen surface which can be recognized by certain antibodies and elicit the immune response. Identification of epitopes for a given antigen chain finds vital applications in vaccine and drug research. Experimental prediction of B-cell epitopes is time-consuming and resource intensive, which may benefit from the computational approaches to identify B-cell epitopes. In this paper, a novel cost-sensitive ensemble algorithm is proposed for predicting the antigenic determinant residues and then a spatial clustering algorithm is adopted to identify the potential epitopes. Firstly, we explore various discriminative features from primary sequences. Secondly, cost-sensitive ensemble scheme is introduced to deal with imbalanced learning problem. Thirdly, we adopt spatial algorithm to tell which residues may potentially form the epitopes. Based on the strategies mentioned above, a new predictor, called CBEP (conformational B-cell epitopes prediction), is proposed in this study. CBEP achieves good prediction performance with the mean AUC scores (AUCs) of 0.721 and 0.703 on two benchmark datasets (bound and unbound) using the leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV). When compared with previous prediction tools, CBEP produces higher sensitivity and comparable specificity values. A web server named CBEP which implements the proposed method is available for academic use. PMID:25045691

  17. Conformational B-Cell Epitopes Prediction from Sequences Using Cost-Sensitive Ensemble Classifiers and Spatial Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Xiaowei; Sun, Pingping; Gao, Bo; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    B-cell epitopes are regions of the antigen surface which can be recognized by certain antibodies and elicit the immune response. Identification of epitopes for a given antigen chain finds vital applications in vaccine and drug research. Experimental prediction of B-cell epitopes is time-consuming and resource intensive, which may benefit from the computational approaches to identify B-cell epitopes. In this paper, a novel cost-sensitive ensemble algorithm is proposed for predicting the antigenic determinant residues and then a spatial clustering algorithm is adopted to identify the potential epitopes. Firstly, we explore various discriminative features from primary sequences. Secondly, cost-sensitive ensemble scheme is introduced to deal with imbalanced learning problem. Thirdly, we adopt spatial algorithm to tell which residues may potentially form the epitopes. Based on the strategies mentioned above, a new predictor, called CBEP (conformational B-cell epitopes prediction), is proposed in this study. CBEP achieves good prediction performance with the mean AUC scores (AUCs) of 0.721 and 0.703 on two benchmark datasets (bound and unbound) using the leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV). When compared with previous prediction tools, CBEP produces higher sensitivity and comparable specificity values. A web server named CBEP which implements the proposed method is available for academic use. PMID:25045691

  18. Antisera preparation and epitope mapping of a recombinant protein comprising three peptide fragments of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Tang, Haiping; Xu, Wanxiang; Chen, Aijun; Shi, Qixian; Sun, Zhida; Wang, Liyan; Ni, Ya

    2015-10-01

    Antibodies targeting a single epitope of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been reported to influence the validity of immunological analyses; however, autoimmune mechanisms associated with CFTR epitopes are not well understood. In this study, antiserum raised against a multi-epitope recombinant protein composed of three peptide fragments of CFTR (r-CFTR-3P) was prepared and B cell epitope mapping of the protein was carried out using biosynthetic peptides. The r-CFTR-3P gene was cloned into the pSY621 expression plasmid and the protein was expressed in the BL21 strain of Escherichia coli. The rabbit r-CFTR-3P antiserum recognized the native CFTR antigen extracted from human sperm and the GST188 fusion peptides CFTR(25-36), CFTR(103-117), and CFTR(1387-1480) spanning different regions of CFTR. Four novel r-CFTR-3P B cell epitopes were identified: (29)RQRLEL(34), (104)RIIASY(109), (111)PDN(113), and (1447)VKLF(1450) of CFTR. Other proteins from various species shared sequence homology with the identified epitopes based on NCBI BLAST alignment. This study provides new tools for detecting CFTR protein and insight into the characteristics of minimal B cell epitopes of CFTR and associated immunological mechanisms. PMID:26087025

  19. Identification of a novel B-cell epitope specific for avian leukosis virus subgroup J gp85 protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Haibo; Wang, Qi; Sun, Jiashan; Gao, Yanni; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2015-04-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an avian oncogenic retrovirus that has caused severe economic losses in China. Gp85 protein is the main envelope protein and the most variable structural protein of ALV-J. It is also involved in virus neutralization. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, 4A3, was produced against the ALV-J gp85 protein. Immunofluorescence assays showed that 4A3 could react with different strains of ALV-J, including the British prototype isolate HPRS103, the American strains, an early Chinese broiler isolate, and layer isolates. A linear epitope on the gp85 protein was identified using a series of partially overlapping fragments spanning the gp85-encoding gene and subjecting them to western blot analysis. The results indicated that (134)AEAELRDFI(142) was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb 4A3. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that chicken anti-ALV-J sera and mouse anti-ALV-J gp85 sera could also recognize the minimal linear epitope. Alignment analysis of amino acid sequences indicated that the epitope was highly conserved among 34 ALV-J strains. Furthermore, the epitope was not conserved among subgroup A and B of avian leukosis virus (ALV). Taken together, the mAb and the identified epitope may provide valuable tools for the development of new diagnostic methods for ALV-J. PMID:25655260

  20. HLA Preferences for Conserved Epitopes: A Potential Mechanism for Hepatitis C Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiangyu; Hoof, Ilka; van Baarle, Debbie; Keşmir, Can; Textor, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections affect more than 170 million people worldwide. Most of these individuals are chronically infected, but some clear the infection rapidly. Host factors seem to play a key role in HCV clearance, among them are the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules. Certain HLA molecules, e.g., B*27 and B*57, are associated with viral clearance. To identify potential mechanisms for these associations, we assess epitope distribution differences between HLA molecules using experimentally verified and in silico predicted HCV epitopes. Specifically, we show that the NS5B protein harbors the largest fraction of conserved regions among all HCV proteins. Such conserved regions could be good targets for cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses. We find that the protective HLA-B*27 molecule preferentially presents cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) epitopes from NS5B and, in general, presents the most strongly conserved epitopes among the 23 HLA molecules analyzed. In contrast, HLA molecules known to be associated with HCV persistence do not have similar preferences and appear to target the variable P7 protein. Overall, our analysis suggests that by targeting highly constrained – and thereby conserved – regions of HCV, the protective HLA molecule HLA-B*27 reduces the ability of HCV to escape the cytotoxic T-cell response of the host. For visualizing the distribution of both experimentally verified and predicted epitopes across the HCV genome, we created the HCV epitope browser, which is available at theory.bio.uu.nl/ucqi/hcv. PMID:26579127

  1. Recognition and sensing of low-epitope targets via ternary complexes with oligonucleotides and synthetic receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kyung-Ae; Barbu, Mihaela; Halim, Marlin; Pallavi, Payal; Kim, Benjamin; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M.; Pecic, Stevan; Taylor, Steven; Worgall, Tilla S.; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2014-11-01

    Oligonucleotide-based receptors or aptamers can interact with small molecules, but the ability to achieve high-affinity and specificity of these interactions depends strongly on functional groups or epitopes displayed by the binding targets. Some classes of targets are particularly challenging: for example, monosaccharides have scarce functionalities and no aptamers have been reported to recognize, let alone distinguish from each other, glucose and other hexoses. Here we report aptamers that differentiate low-epitope targets such as glucose, fructose or galactose by forming ternary complexes with high-epitope organic receptors for monosaccharides. In a follow-up example, we expand this method to isolate high-affinity oligonucleotides against aromatic amino acids complexed in situ with a nonspecific organometallic receptor. The method is general and enables broad clinical use of aptamers for the detection of small molecules in mix-and-measure assays, as demonstrated by monitoring postprandial waves of phenylalanine in human subjects.

  2. Unravelling viral camouflage: approaches to the study and characterization of conformational epitopes.

    PubMed

    Augustin, T; Cehlar, O; Skrabana, R; Majerova, P; Hanes, J

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies are broadly used in clinical and basic research. Many of monoclonal antibodies are successfully adopted for therapeutic and diagnostic targeting of viral pathogens. Efficacy of antiviral neutralizing or protective antibodies depends on their ability to recognize epitopes interfering with viral infection. However, viruses are able to incessantly change their antigenic determinants to escape surveillance of humoral immune system and therefore the successful antiviral therapies require continuous development. Characterization of interactions of antibodies with prevalently conformational viral epitopes is important for understanding antibody mode of action and can help to identify conserved regions that may be exploited in designing new vaccines and virus neutralizing antibodies. In this article, we are reviewing techniques in use for characterization of conformational epitopes of monoclonal antibodies with focus on viruses. PMID:26104327

  3. Disulfide-bonded discontinuous epitopes on the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (New Jersey serotype).

    PubMed

    Grigera, P R; Keil, W; Wagner, R R

    1992-06-01

    Intrachain disulfide bonds between paired cysteines in the glycoprotein (G) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) are required for the recognition of discontinuous epitopes by specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (W. Keil and R. R. Wagner, Virology 170:392-407, 1989). Cleavage by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease of the 517-amino-acid VSV-New Jersey G protein, limited to the glutamic acid at residue 110, resulted in a protein (designated GV8) with greatly retarded migration by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) under nonreducing conditions. By Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, protein GV8 was found to lose discontinuous epitope IV, which maps within the first 193 NH2-terminal amino acids. These data, coupled with those obtained by PAGE migration of a vector-expressed, truncated protein (G1-193) under reducing and nonreducing conditions, lead us to postulate the existence of a major loop structure within the first 193 NH2-terminal amino acids of the G protein, possibly anchored by a disulfide bond between cysteine 108 and cysteine 169, encompassing epitope IV. Site-directed mutants in which 10 of the 12 cysteines were individually converted to serines in vaccinia virus-based vectors expressing these single-site mutant G proteins were also constructed, each of which was then tested by immunoprecipitation for its capacity to recognize epitope-specific MAbs. These results showed that mutations in NH2-terminal cysteines 130, 174, and, to a lesser extent, 193 all resulted in the loss of neutralization epitope VIII. A mutation at NH2-terminal cysteine 130 also resulted in the loss of neutralization epitope VII, as did a mutation at cysteine 108 to a lesser extent. Both epitopes VII and VIII disappeared when mutations were made in COOH-distal cysteine 235, 240, or 273, the general map locations of epitopes VII and VIII. These studies also reveal that distal, as well as proximal, cysteine residues markedly influence the disulfide-bond secondary structure, which

  4. Information filtering via preferential diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  5. Information filtering via preferential diffusion.

    PubMed

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects. PMID:21797453

  6. Isolation and Epitope Mapping of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Single-Domain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kendrick B.; Zabetakis, Dan; Legler, Patricia; Goldman, Ellen R.; Anderson, George P.

    2014-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs), derived from the heavy chain only antibodies found in camelids such as llamas have the potential to provide rugged detection reagents with high affinities, and the ability to refold after denaturation. We have isolated and characterized sdAbs specific to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) which bind to two distinct epitopes and are able to function in a sandwich immunoassay for toxin detection. Characterization of these sdAbs revealed that each exhibited nanomolar binding affinities or better. Melting temperatures for the sdAbs ranged from approximately 60 °C to over 70 °C, with each demonstrating at least partial refolding after denaturation and several were able to completely refold. A first set of sdAbs was isolated by panning the library using adsorbed antigen, all of which recognized the same epitope on SEB. Epitope mapping suggested that these sdAbs bind to a particular fragment of SEB (VKSIDQFLYFDLIYSI) containing position L45 (underlined), which is involved in binding to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Differences in the binding affinities of the sdAbs to SEB and a less-toxic vaccine immunogen, SEBv (L45R/Y89A/Y94A) were also consistent with binding to this epitope. A sandwich panning strategy was utilized to isolate sdAbs which bind a second epitope. This epitope differed from the initial one obtained or from that recognized by previously isolated anti-SEB sdAb A3. Using SEB-toxin spiked milk we demonstrated that these newly isolated sdAbs could be utilized in sandwich-assays with each other, A3, and with various monoclonal antibodies. PMID:24949641

  7. Depigmented Allergoids Reveal New Epitopes with Capacity to Induce IgG Blocking Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    López-Matas, M. Angeles; Gallego, Mayte; Iraola, Víctor; Robinson, Douglas; Carnés, Jerónimo

    2013-01-01

    Background. The synthesis of allergen-specific blocking IgGs that interact with IgE after allergen immunotherapy (SIT) has been related to clinical efficacy. The objectives were to investigate the epitope specificity of IgG-antibodies induced by depigmented-polymerized (Dpg-Pol) allergoids and unmodified allergen extracts, and examine IgE-blocking activity of induced IgG-antibodies. Methods. Rabbits were immunized with native and Dpg-Pol extracts of birch pollen, and serum samples were obtained. Recognition of linear IgG-epitopes of Bet v 1 and Bet v 2 and the capacity of these IgG-antibodies to block binding of human-IgE was determined. Results. Serum from rabbits immunized with native extracts recognised 11 linear epitopes from Bet v 1, while that from Dpg-Pol-immunized animals recognised 8. For Bet v 2, 8 epitopes were recognized by IgG from native immunized animals, and 9 from Dpg-Pol immunized one. Dpg-Pol and native immunized serum did not always recognise the same epitopes, but specific-IgG from both could block human-IgE binding sites for native extract. Conclusions. Depigmented-polymerized birch extract stimulates the synthesis of specific IgG-antibodies which recognize common but also novel epitopes compared with native extracts. IgG-antibodies induced by Dpg-Pol effectively inhibit human-IgE binding to allergens which may be part of the mechanism of action of SIT. PMID:24222901

  8. Schistosoma mansoni shares a protective carbohydrate epitope with keyhole limpet hemocyanin

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The glycanic epitope of the 38,000 Mr Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula major immunogen defined by the IPLSm1 protective mAb was identified in the hemocyanin of the marine mollusc Megathura crenulata, better known as KLH. This antigenic community was exploited to investigate further the biological properties of this epitope. KLH was shown to strongly inhibit the binding of IPLSm1 mAb to its 38,000 Mr target antigen. Immunization of naive LOU rats with KLH elicited the production of anti- S. mansoni antibodies capable of immunoprecipitating the 38,000 Mr schistosomulum antigen. Antibodies to KLH mediated a marked eosinophil- dependent cytotoxicity and passively transferred immunity towards S. mansoni infection. Finally, rats immunized with KLH were significantly protected against a challenge with S. mansoni cercariae. The deglycosylation of KLH completely abolishes its immunological and functional KLH properties, indicating the participation of an oligosaccharidic epitope of the native KLH that is also recognized by the sera of S. mansoni-infected patients. These observations provide new opportunities of access to the well-defined structure of a glycanic epitope potentially available for the immunoprophylaxis and seroepidemiology of schistosomiasis, and a new approach to the isotypic response towards a well-chemically defined epitope. PMID:2434601

  9. NEP: web server for epitope prediction based on antibody neutralization of viral strains with diverse sequences.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Liou, David; Kwong, Peter D; Georgiev, Ivelin S

    2014-07-01

    Delineation of the antigenic site, or epitope, recognized by an antibody can provide clues about functional vulnerabilities and resistance mechanisms, and can therefore guide antibody optimization and epitope-based vaccine design. Previously, we developed an algorithm for antibody-epitope prediction based on antibody neutralization of viral strains with diverse sequences and validated the algorithm on a set of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies. Here we describe the implementation of this algorithm, NEP (Neutralization-based Epitope Prediction), as a web-based server. The users must supply as input: (i) an alignment of antigen sequences of diverse viral strains; (ii) neutralization data for the antibody of interest against the same set of antigen sequences; and (iii) (optional) a structure of the unbound antigen, for enhanced prediction accuracy. The prediction results can be downloaded or viewed interactively on the antigen structure (if supplied) from the web browser using a JSmol applet. Since neutralization experiments are typically performed as one of the first steps in the characterization of an antibody to determine its breadth and potency, the NEP server can be used to predict antibody-epitope information at no additional experimental costs. NEP can be accessed on the internet at http://exon.niaid.nih.gov/nep. PMID:24782517

  10. Blister-inducing antibodies target multiple epitopes on collagen VII in mice

    PubMed Central

    Csorba, Kinga; Chiriac, Mircea Teodor; Florea, Florina; Ghinia, Miruna Georgiana; Licarete, Emilia; Rados, Andreea; Sas, Alexandra; Vuta, Vlad; Sitaru, Cassian

    2014-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease of mucous membranes and the skin caused by autoantibodies against collagen VII. In silico and wet laboratory epitope mapping studies revealed numerous distinct epitopes recognized by EBA patients' autoantibodies within the non-collagenous (NC)1 and NC2 domains of collagen VII. However, the distribution of pathogenic epitopes on collagen VII has not yet been described. In this study, we therefore performed an in vivo functional epitope mapping of pathogenic autoantibodies in experimental EBA. Animals (n = 10/group) immunized against fragments of the NC1 and NC2 domains of collagen VII or injected with antibodies generated against the same fragments developed to different extent experimental EBA. Our results demonstrate that antibodies targeting multiple, distinct epitopes distributed over the entire NC1, but not NC2 domain of collagen VII induce blistering skin disease in vivo. Our present findings have crucial implications for the development of antigen-specific B- and T cell-targeted therapies in EBA. PMID:25091020

  11. Blister-inducing antibodies target multiple epitopes on collagen VII in mice.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Kinga; Chiriac, Mircea Teodor; Florea, Florina; Ghinia, Miruna Georgiana; Licarete, Emilia; Rados, Andreea; Sas, Alexandra; Vuta, Vlad; Sitaru, Cassian

    2014-09-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease of mucous membranes and the skin caused by autoantibodies against collagen VII. In silico and wet laboratory epitope mapping studies revealed numerous distinct epitopes recognized by EBA patients' autoantibodies within the non-collagenous (NC)1 and NC2 domains of collagen VII. However, the distribution of pathogenic epitopes on collagen VII has not yet been described. In this study, we therefore performed an in vivo functional epitope mapping of pathogenic autoantibodies in experimental EBA. Animals (n = 10/group) immunized against fragments of the NC1 and NC2 domains of collagen VII or injected with antibodies generated against the same fragments developed to different extent experimental EBA. Our results demonstrate that antibodies targeting multiple, distinct epitopes distributed over the entire NC1, but not NC2 domain of collagen VII induce blistering skin disease in vivo. Our present findings have crucial implications for the development of antigen-specific B- and T cell-targeted therapies in EBA. PMID:25091020

  12. Combinatorial tetramer staining and mass cytometry analysis facilitate T-cell epitope mapping and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Evan W; Sigal, Natalia; Nair, Nitya; Kidd, Brian A; Greenberg, Harry B; Davis, Mark M

    2013-01-01

    It is currently not possible to predict which epitopes will be recognized by T cells in different individuals. This is a barrier to the thorough analysis and understanding of T-cell responses after vaccination or infection. Here, by combining mass cytometry with combinatorial peptide–MHC tetramer staining, we have developed a method allowing the rapid and simultaneous identification and characterization of T cells specific for many epitopes. We use this to screen up to 109 different peptide–MHC tetramers in a single human blood sample, while still retaining at least 23 labels to analyze other markers of T-cell phenotype and function. Among 77 candidate rotavirus epitopes, we identified six T-cell epitopes restricted to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 in the blood of healthy individuals. T cells specific for epitopes in the rotavirus VP3 protein displayed a distinct phenotype and were present at high frequencies in intestinal epithelium. This approach should be useful for the comprehensive analysis of T-cell responses to infectious diseases or vaccines. PMID:23748502

  13. Oxidation-specific epitopes are dominant targets of innate natural antibodies in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Chou, Meng-Yun; Fogelstrand, Linda; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Hansen, Lotte F; Woelkers, Douglas; Shaw, Peter X; Choi, Jeomil; Perkmann, Thomas; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Miller, Yury I; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Corr, Maripat; Witztum, Joseph L; Binder, Christoph J

    2009-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of oxidized lipoproteins and apoptotic cells. Adaptive immune responses to various oxidation-specific epitopes play an important role in atherogenesis. However, accumulating evidence suggests that these epitopes are also recognized by innate receptors, such as scavenger receptors on macrophages, and plasma proteins, such as C-reactive protein (CRP). Here, we provide multiple lines of evidence that oxidation-specific epitopes constitute a dominant, previously unrecognized target of natural Abs (NAbs) in both mice and humans. Using reconstituted mice expressing solely IgM NAbs, we have shown that approximately 30% of all NAbs bound to model oxidation-specific epitopes, as well as to atherosclerotic lesions and apoptotic cells. Because oxidative processes are ubiquitous, we hypothesized that these epitopes exert selective pressure to expand NAbs, which in turn play an important role in mediating homeostatic functions consequent to inflammation and cell death, as demonstrated by their ability to facilitate apoptotic cell clearance. These findings provide novel insights into the functions of NAbs in mediating host homeostasis and into their roles in health and diseases, such as chronic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis. PMID:19363291

  14. Production, Characterization, and Epitope Mapping of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Different Subtypes of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV)

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Desheng; Liu, Jiasen; Jiang, Qian; Yu, Zuo; Hu, Xiaoliang; Guo, Dongchun; Huang, Qianqian; Jiao, Meihui; Qu, Liandong

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, a new rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) variant, designated RHDV2, was identified for the first time in Italy. Studies have shown that RHDV2 differs from RHDV1 (traditional RHDV) in terms of its antigenic profile and genetic characteristics. The VP60 protein of RHDV is a structural protein that plays important roles in viral replication, assembly, and immunogenicity. In this study, we immunized BALB/c mice with recombinant VP60 proteins from different RHDV subtypes. After three rounds of subcloning, type-specific positive hybridoma clones of RHDV1 and RHDV2 were further identified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting, and an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Finally, three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (1D6, 1H2, and 3F2) that only recognize RHDV1, and four MAbs (1G2, 2C1, 3B7, and 5D6) that only recognize RHDV2 were identified. The epitopes recognized by these MAbs were mapped by Western blotting. Sequence analysis showed that the epitope sequences recognized by 1D6, 1H2, and 3F2 are highly conserved (98%) among RHDV1 strains, whereas the epitope sequences recognized by 1G2, 2C1, 3B7, and 5D6 are 100% conserved among RHDV2 strains. The high conservation of the epitope sequence showed that the screened MAbs were type-specific, and that they could distinguish different RHDV subtypes. PMID:26878800

  15. On recognizing ignorance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    How an expert system reasons about its own ability to deal with a particular problem is studied. Ideally, an expert system ought to rapidly recognize that a particular problem is beyond its abilities and defer to another, perhaps human, expert. This capability is extremely important in domains where expert systems may control life critical processes such as air traffic control, medicine, strategic defense, and manned space exploration. The methods used by knowledge engineers to infuse an expert system with knowledge of its own limitations is surveyed. A computability theory is employed to analyze the general problem of meta-knowledge and to give insight into the efficacy of specific solutions.

  16. Preventing and Recognizing Embezzlement.

    PubMed

    Phairas, Debra

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that approximately one in six physicians will be the victim of embezzlement at least once during his or her lifetime. This may be due to the trusting nature of physicians, a lack of business training about separating duties in transactions involving money, or employees' feeling overworked, underpaid, or underappreciated. The best protection against embezzlement is prevention. This article informs the reader of the steps to take to prevent stealing in the medical office, how to recognize if it is occurring, and how to obtain restitution or prosecution. PMID:27039633

  17. Defining a protective epitope on factor H binding protein, a key meningococcal virulence factor and vaccine antigen.

    PubMed

    Malito, Enrico; Faleri, Agnese; Lo Surdo, Paola; Veggi, Daniele; Maruggi, Giulietta; Grassi, Eva; Cartocci, Elena; Bertoldi, Isabella; Genovese, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Romagnoli, Giacomo; Borgogni, Erica; Brier, Sébastien; Lo Passo, Carla; Domina, Maria; Castellino, Flora; Felici, Franco; van der Veen, Stijn; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M; Tang, Christoph M; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Savino, Silvana; Norais, Nathalie; Rappuoli, Rino; Bottomley, Matthew J; Masignani, Vega

    2013-02-26

    Mapping of epitopes recognized by functional monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is essential for understanding the nature of immune responses and designing improved vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics. In recent years, identification of B-cell epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies has facilitated the design of peptide-based vaccines against highly variable pathogens like HIV, respiratory syncytial virus, and Helicobacter pylori; however, none of these products has yet progressed into clinical stages. Linear epitopes identified by conventional mapping techniques only partially reflect the immunogenic properties of the epitope in its natural conformation, thus limiting the success of this approach. To investigate antigen-antibody interactions and assess the potential of the most common epitope mapping techniques, we generated a series of mAbs against factor H binding protein (fHbp), a key virulence factor and vaccine antigen of Neisseria meningitidis. The interaction of fHbp with the bactericidal mAb 12C1 was studied by various epitope mapping methods. Although a 12-residue epitope in the C terminus of fHbp was identified by both Peptide Scanning and Phage Display Library screening, other approaches, such as hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (MS) and X-ray crystallography, showed that mAb 12C1 occupies an area of ∼1,000 Å(2) on fHbp, including >20 fHbp residues distributed on both N- and C-terminal domains. Collectively, these data show that linear epitope mapping techniques provide useful but incomplete descriptions of B-cell epitopes, indicating that increased efforts to fully characterize antigen-antibody interfaces are required to understand and design effective immunogens. PMID:23396847

  18. Recognizing musical text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Alastair T.; Brown, B. M.; Thorne, M. P.

    1993-08-01

    This paper reports on some recent developments in a software product that recognizes printed music notation. There are a number of computer systems available which assist in the task of printing music; however the full potential of these systems cannot be realized until the musical text has been entered into the computer. It is this problem that we address in this paper. The software we describe, which uses computationally inexpensive methods, is designed to analyze a music score, previously read by a flat bed scanner, and to extract the musical information that it contains. The paper discusses the methods used to recognize the musical text: these involve sampling the image at strategic points and using this information to estimate the musical symbol. It then discusses some hard problems that have been encountered during the course of the research; for example the recognition of chords and note clusters. It also reports on the progress that has been made in solving these problems and concludes with a discussion of work that needs to be undertaken over the next five years in order to transform this research prototype into a commercial product.

  19. Characterization of HLA-DR-restricted T-cell epitopes derived from human proteinase 3.

    PubMed

    Piesche, Matthias; Hildebrandt, York; Chapuy, Björn; Wulf, Gerald G; Trümper, Lorenz; Schroers, Roland

    2009-07-23

    Human proteinase 3 (PRTN3) is a leukemia-associated antigen specifically recognized by CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). PRTN3 also has been shown to elicit both antibody responses and T-cell proliferation in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis. In order to improve current vaccines that aim to stimulate CTL without inducing harmful autoimmune disease, it is necessary to study the role of PRTN3-specific CD4+ T-helper (TH) and CD4+ T-regulatory (Treg) cells. Since both TH and Treg cells recognize antigens in the context of HLA-class-II-molecules, identification of HLA-class-II-associated peptide-epitopes from self-antigens such as PRTN3 is required. Here, we analyzed T-cell responses against proteinase 3 using synthetic peptides predicted to serve as HLA-DR-restricted epitopes. We first screened a panel of ten epitope peptide candidates selected with the TEPITOPE program and found that nine out of ten peptides induced PRTN3 peptide-specific proliferation of T-cells with precursor frequencies of 0-1.1 x 10(-6). For one peptide-epitope, PRTN3(235), T-cell-clones were demonstrated to be capable of recognizing naturally processed protein antigen in a HLA-DR-restricted fashion. PRTN3(235)-specific T-cells could be stimulated from the blood of healthy individuals with multiple HLA-DR-genotypes. In summary, the identified PRTN3(235)-epitope can be used to study the role of CD4+ TH- and Treg-cells in immune responses against PRTN3 in leukemia patients and patients with Wegener's disease. PMID:19446593

  20. Do Karstic Unsaturated Zones Have the Fastest Preferential Flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, J. R.; Perkins, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    There is strong evidence that unsaturated-zone travel times for preferential flow, unlike those for diffuse flow, mostly fall within a relatively small range, even for a wide variety of media and conditions [Nimmo, 2007, Water Resources Research]. We have calculated travel times for preferential flow observations published in the last seven years, finding a range of travel velocities with a greater maximum than was previously recognized. The instances of faster transport, however, are predominantly for karst or other materials in which water flow may strongly influence the creation and development of preferential flow paths. These findings motivate a hypothesis: in media where the matrix is soluble, erodible, or otherwise vulnerable to enlargement by flowing water, this flow acts to reduce flow impediments within a macropore network. This might be thought of as a sculpting process in which water carves its conduit into a smoother, larger, less constrictive shape, as discussed in connection with soil pipes [Jones, 2010, Hydrological Processes]. Known developmental processes of karst and epikarst are consistent with this hypothesis. Its acceptance would open doors to expanded use of optimality and thermodynamic principles to understand and predict preferential flow. It also could lead to new modes of hydraulic characterization of subsurface media with regard to unsaturated flow, which are much needed as the difficulty of measuring hydraulic properties of the unsaturated zone is a major barrier to the advance of hydrologic science. In practical terms, a new guideline may be justified: in unsaturated karst or other materials in which flowing water may enhance flowpaths, preferential transport rates in general may be several times faster than through media without such pore-developmental processes.

  1. A continuous peptide epitope reacting with pandemic influenza AH1N1 predicted by bioinformatic approaches.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Vazquez, Jonathan P; Correa-Basurto, José; García-Machorro, Jazmin; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Moreau, Violaine; Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge L; Reyes-López, Cesar A; Rojas-López, Marlon; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom

    2015-09-01

    Computational identification of potential epitopes with an immunogenic capacity challenges immunological research. Several methods show considerable success, and together with experimental studies, the efficiency of the algorithms to identify potential peptides with biological activity has improved. Herein, an epitope was designed by combining bioinformatics, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations. The hemagglutinin protein of the H1N1 influenza pandemic strain served as a template, owing to the interest of obtaining a scheme of immunization. Afterward, we performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using the epitope to analyze if any antibodies in human sera before and after the influenza outbreak in 2009 recognize this peptide. Also, a plaque reduction neutralization test induced by virus-neutralizing antibodies and the IgG determination showed the biological activity of this computationally designed peptide. The results of the ELISAs demonstrated that the serum of both prepandemic and pandemic recognized the epitope. Moreover, the plaque reduction neutralization test evidenced the capacity of the designed peptide to neutralize influenza virus in Madin-Darby canine cells. PMID:25788327

  2. Thioreductase-Containing Epitopes Inhibit the Development of Type 1 Diabetes in the NOD Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Malek Abrahimians, Elin; Vander Elst, Luc; Carlier, Vincent A.; Saint-Remy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Autoreactive CD4+ T cells recognizing islet-derived antigens play a primary role in type 1 diabetes. Specific suppression of such cells therefore represents a strategic target for the cure of the disease. We have developed a methodology by which CD4+ T cells acquire apoptosis-inducing properties on antigen-presenting cells after cognate recognition of natural sequence epitopes. We describe here that inclusion of a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase (thioreductase) motif within the flanking residues of a single MHC class II-restricted GAD65 epitope induces GAD65-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells (cCD4+ T). The latter, obtained either in vitro or by active immunization, acquire an effector memory phenotype and lyse APCs by a Fas–FasL interaction. Furthermore, cCD4+ T cells eliminate by apoptosis activated bystander CD4+ T cells recognizing alternative epitopes processed by the same APC. Active immunization with a GAD65 class II-restricted thioreductase-containing T cell epitope protects mice from diabetes and abrogates insulitis. Passive transfer of in vitro-elicited cCD4+ T cells establishes that such cells are efficient in suppressing autoimmunity. These findings provide strong evidence for a new vaccination strategy to prevent type 1 diabetes. PMID:26973647

  3. Epitope specificity of human immunodeficiency virus-1 antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] responses.

    PubMed

    Pollara, Justin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M Anthony; Pazgier, Marzena; Haynes, Barton F; Ferrari, Guido

    2013-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] has been suggested to play an important role in control of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 [HIV-1] viral load and protection from infection. ADCC antibody responses have been mapped to multiple linear and conformational epitopes within the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Many epitopes targeted by antibodies that mediate ADCC overlap with those recognized by antibodies capable of virus neutralization. In addition, recent studies conducted with human monoclonal antibodies derived from HIV-1 infected individuals and HIV-1 vaccine-candidate vaccinees have identified a number of antibodies that lack the ability to capture primary HIV-1 isolates or mediate neutralizing activity, but are able to bind to the surface of infected CD4+ T cells and mediate ADCC. Of note, the conformational changes in the gp120 that may not exclusively relate to binding of the CD4 molecule are important in exposing epitopes recognized by ADCC responses. Here we discuss the HIV-1 envelope epitopes targeted by ADCC antibodies in the context of the potential protective capacities of ADCC. PMID:24191939

  4. Detailed analyses of antibodies recognizing mitochondrial antigens suggest similar or identical mechanism for production of natural antibodies and natural autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Czömpöly, Tamás; Olasz, Katalin; Nyárády, Zoltán; Simon, Diána; Bovári, Judit; Németh, Péter

    2008-06-01

    Because of their endosymbiotic evolutionary origin, proteins compartmentalized into mitochondria represent an interesting transition from prokaryotic foreign to essential self molecules. We investigated the presence of naturally occurring antibodies (nAbs) recognizing mitochondrial inner membrane enzymes. Epitope mapping analysis of a mitochondrial inner membrane enzyme, citrate synthase (CS) by synthetic overlapping peptides and phage display libraries using sera from healthy individuals and from patients having systemic autoimmune disease revealed CS recognizing nAbs with IgM isotype. We analyzed cross-reactive epitopes on human CS, bacterial CS, and various standard autoantigens. We have found that the fine epitope pattern on CS is different under physiological and pathological conditions. Moreover sera affinity purified on CS cross reacts with nucleosome antigen, which cross-reactivity could be mapped to a short epitope on human CS. These data indicate that in theory, nAbs "specific" for a given self antigen could fulfill the function of participating in innate defense mechanisms and at the same time recognize a target antigen in a systemic autoimmune disease. Thus, at the level of recognized epitopes there is a possible link between the innate like part and the adaptive-autoimmune arm of the humoral immune system. PMID:18558363

  5. 15 CFR 700.14 - Preferential scheduling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Industrial Priorities § 700.14 Preferential scheduling. (a)...

  6. Recognizing the Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark Scott

    2016-01-01

    Solar system planetary science has traditionally focused on understanding in depth individual planets. While there have been some efforts at synergy, most studies have focused on understanding the details of individual planets. Now that we are in the era of exoplanet science, with thousands of known planets and hundreds that have been characterized to varying degrees, the systematics of planetary science are becoming apparent. This also means that, for the first time, what had previously been seen as individual quirks of solar system planets are instead being recognized as part of the normal range of planetary behavior. In my talk I will consider a number of such characteristics and explain how we are now starting to understand their true context. In particular I will discuss the atmospheric composition, clouds, hazes, and winds of giant planets, trace gasses in the atmosphere of Venus, and the presence and absence of atmospheres on various terrestrial worlds.

  7. Recognizing People in Motion.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Galit; O'Toole, Alice J

    2016-05-01

    Natural movements of the face and body, as well as voice, provide converging cues to a person's identity. To date, person recognition has been studied primarily with static images of faces. Face recognition, however, is part of a larger system, whose preeminent goal is to efficiently recognize dynamic familiar people in unconstrained environments. We present a comprehensive framework for understanding person recognition as it happens in the real world. In this framework, dynamic information plays the central role in binding multi-modal information from the face, body, and the voice to achieve robust and highly accurate recognition. The superior temporal sulcus (STS) integrates multisensory, dynamic information from the whole person for recognition, thereby complementing its role in social cognition. PMID:27016844

  8. Recognizing outstanding achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiss, Fred

    One function of any professional society is to provide an objective, informed means for recognizing outstanding achievements in its field. In AGU's Ocean Sciences section we have a variety of means for carrying out this duty. They include recognition of outstanding student presentations at our meetings, dedication of special sessions, nomination of individuals to be fellows of the Union, invitations to present Sverdrup lectures, and recommendations for Macelwane Medals, the Ocean Sciences Award, and the Ewing Medal.Since the decision to bestow these awards requires initiative and judgement by members of our section in addition to a deserving individual, it seems appropriate to review the selection process for each and to urge you to identify those deserving of recognition.

  9. T Cell Epitope Clustering in the Highly Immunogenic BZLF1 Antigen of Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rist, Melissa J.; Neller, Michelle A.; Burrows, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polymorphism in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci ensures that the CD8+ T cell response to viruses is directed against a diverse range of antigenic epitopes, thereby minimizing the impact of virus escape mutation across the population. The BZLF1 antigen of Epstein-Barr virus is an immunodominant target for CD8+ T cells, but the response has been characterized only in the context of a limited number of HLA molecules due to incomplete epitope mapping. We have now greatly expanded the number of defined CD8+ T cell epitopes from BZLF1, allowing the response to be evaluated in a much larger proportion of the population. Some regions of the antigen fail to be recognized by CD8+ T cells, while others include clusters of overlapping epitopes presented by different HLA molecules. These highly immunogenic regions of BZLF1 include polymorphic sequences, such that up to four overlapping epitopes are impacted by a single amino acid variation common in different regions of the world. This focusing of the immune response to limited regions of the viral protein could be due to sequence similarity to human proteins creating “immune blind spots” through self-tolerance. This study significantly enhances the understanding of the immune response to BZLF1, and the precisely mapped T cell epitopes may be directly exploited in vaccine development and adoptive immunotherapy. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an important human pathogen, associated with several malignancies, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. T lymphocytes are critical for virus control, and clinical trials aimed at manipulating this arm of the immune system have demonstrated efficacy in treating these EBV-associated diseases. These trials have utilized information on the precise location of viral epitopes for T cell recognition, for either measuring or enhancing responses. In this study, we have characterized the T cell response to the highly immunogenic BZLF1 antigen of EBV by

  10. Automatic Generation of Validated Specific Epitope Sets

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco Pro, Sebastian; Sidney, John; Paul, Sinu; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia; Weiskopf, Daniela; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement of B and T cell responses is a valuable tool to study autoimmunity, allergies, immunity to pathogens, and host-pathogen interactions and assist in the design and evaluation of T cell vaccines and immunotherapies. In this context, it is desirable to elucidate a method to select validated reference sets of epitopes to allow detection of T and B cells. However, the ever-growing information contained in the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) and the differences in quality and subjects studied between epitope assays make this task complicated. In this study, we develop a novel method to automatically select reference epitope sets according to a categorization system employed by the IEDB. From the sets generated, three epitope sets (EBV, mycobacteria and dengue) were experimentally validated by detection of T cell reactivity ex vivo from human donors. Furthermore, a web application that will potentially be implemented in the IEDB was created to allow users the capacity to generate customized epitope sets. PMID:26568965

  11. How legumes recognize rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    Via, Virginia Dalla; Zanetti, María Eugenia; Blanco, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legume plants have developed the capacity to establish symbiotic interactions with soil bacteria (known as rhizobia) that can convert N2 to molecular forms that are incorporated into the plant metabolism. The first step of this relationship is the recognition of bacteria by the plant, which allows to distinguish potentially harmful species from symbiotic partners. The main molecular determinant of this symbiotic interaction is the Nod Factor, a diffusible lipochitooligosaccharide molecule produced by rhizobia and perceived by LysM receptor kinases; however, other important molecules involved in the specific recognition have emerged over the years. Secreted exopolysaccharides and the lipopolysaccharides present in the bacterial cell wall have been proposed to act as signaling molecules, triggering the expression of specific genes related to the symbiotic process. In this review we will briefly discuss how transcriptomic analysis are helping to understand how multiple signaling pathways, triggered by the perception of different molecules produced by rhizobia, control the genetic programs of root nodule organogenesis and bacterial infection. This knowledge can help to understand how legumes have evolved to recognize and establish complex ecological relationships with particular species and strains of rhizobia, adjusting gene expression in response to identity determinants of bacteria. PMID:26636731

  12. HIV-1 gp140 epitope recognition is influenced by immunoglobulin DH gene segment sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuge; Kapoor, Pratibha; Parks, Robert; Silva-Sanchez, Aaron; Alam, S Munir; Verkoczy, Laurent; Liao, Hua-Xin; Zhuang, Yingxin; Burrows, Peter; Levinson, Michael; Elgavish, Ada; Cui, Xiangqin; Haynes, Barton F; Schroeder, Harry

    2016-02-01

    Complementarity Determining Region 3 of the immunoglobulin (Ig) H chain (CDR-H3) lies at the center of the antigen-binding site where it often plays a decisive role in antigen recognition and binding. Amino acids encoded by the diversity (DH) gene segment are the main component of CDR-H3. Each DH has the potential to rearrange into one of six DH reading frames (RFs), each of which exhibits a characteristic amino acid hydrophobicity signature that has been conserved among jawed vertebrates by natural selection. A preference for use of RF1 promotes the incorporation of tyrosine into CDR-H3 while suppressing the inclusion of hydrophobic or charged amino acids. To test the hypothesis that these evolutionary constraints on DH sequence influence epitope recognition, we used mice with a single DH that has been altered to preferentially use RF2 or inverted RF1. B cells in these mice produce a CDR-H3 repertoire that is enriched for valine or arginine in place of tyrosine. We serially immunized this panel of mice with gp140 from HIV-1 JR-FL isolate and then used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or peptide microarray to assess antibody binding to key or overlapping HIV-1 envelope epitopes. By ELISA, serum reactivity to key epitopes varied by DH sequence. By microarray, sera with Ig CDR-H3s enriched for arginine bound to linear peptides with a greater range of hydrophobicity but had a lower intensity of binding than sera containing Ig CDR-H3s enriched for tyrosine or valine. We conclude that patterns of epitope recognition and binding can be heavily influenced by DH germ line sequence. This may help explain why antibodies in HIV-infected patients must undergo extensive somatic mutation in order to bind to specific viral epitopes and achieve neutralization. PMID:26687685

  13. Efficient loading of HLA-DR with a T helper epitope by genetic exchange of CLIP

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Jeroen; Schoenberger, Stephen P.; Verreck, Frank; Amons, Reinout; Offringa, Rienk; Koning, Frits

    1997-01-01

    The HLA class II-associated invariant chain (Ii)-derived peptide (CLIP) occupies the peptide binding groove during assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum, travels with HLA class II to endosomal compartments, and is subsequently released to allow binding of antigenic peptides. We investigated whether the exchange of CLIP with a known T helper epitope at the DNA level would lead to efficient loading of this helper epitope onto HLA class II. For this purpose, a versatile Ii-encoding expression vector was created in which CLIP can be replaced with a helper epitope of choice. Upon supertransfection of HLA-DR1-transfected 293 cells with an Ii vector encoding a known T helper epitope (HA307–319), predominantly length variants of this epitope were detected in association with the HLA-DR1 molecules of these cells. Moreover, this transfectant was efficiently recognized by a peptide-specific T helper clone (HA1.7). The results suggest that this type of Ii vector can be used to create potent class II+ cellular vaccines in which defined T cell epitopes are continuously synthesized. PMID:9207120

  14. Identification of a Novel Conserved B Cell Epitope in the N Protein of Equine Arteritis Virus (Bucyrus Strain).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Guo, Xinggang; Li, Lianwei

    2015-09-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein is the most conserved structural protein in equine arteritis virus (EAV). This study aimed to identify the minimal conserved B cell epitope on the EAV N protein. The purified N protein was used to immunize mice for preparing monoclonal antibody (mAb). The reactivity of mAb was evaluated by Western blot and immunofluorescence assay. Moreover, 11 overlapping peptides (named MBP-N1 to MBP-N11) were designed to localize the linear antigenic epitope within the N protein. The peptides were identified by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot. The minimal conserved B cell epitope on the EAV N protein was identified. The homology analysis was also performed. An EAV N-reactive mAb was selected and designated as 1C11. Indirect ELISA results showed that overlapping domain between MBP-N10 and MBP-N11 was recognized by the mAb 1C11. Furthermore, the indirect ELISA and Western blot showed that (101)QRKVAP(106) was the minimal linear epitope of the EAV N protein. The homology analysis showed that the identified epitope was conserved among all EAV strains analyzed in this work, with the exception of the ARVAC. One EAV N-specific mAb (1C11) was developed, and a minimal linear peptide epitope ((101)QRKVAP(106)) within the N protein was identified. PMID:26331346

  15. Antibody Recognition of a Highly Conserved Influenza Virus Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Ekiert, Damian C.; Bhabha, Gira; Elsliger, Marc-André; Friesen, Robert H.E.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Throsby, Mark; Goudsmit, Jaap; Wilson, Ian A.; Scripps; Crucell

    2009-05-21

    Influenza virus presents an important and persistent threat to public health worldwide, and current vaccines provide immunity to viral isolates similar to the vaccine strain. High-affinity antibodies against a conserved epitope could provide immunity to the diverse influenza subtypes and protection against future pandemic viruses. Cocrystal structures were determined at 2.2 and 2.7 angstrom resolutions for broadly neutralizing human antibody CR6261 Fab in complexes with the major surface antigen (hemagglutinin, HA) from viruses responsible for the 1918 H1N1 influenza pandemic and a recent lethal case of H5N1 avian influenza. In contrast to other structurally characterized influenza antibodies, CR6261 recognizes a highly conserved helical region in the membrane-proximal stem of HA1 and HA2. The antibody neutralizes the virus by blocking conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion. The CR6261 epitope identified here should accelerate the design and implementation of improved vaccines that can elicit CR6261-like antibodies, as well as antibody-based therapies for the treatment of influenza.

  16. Combination of In Silico Methods in the Search for Potential CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Epitopes in the Proteome of Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    e Silva, Rafael de Freitas; Ferreira, Luiz Felipe Gomes Rebello; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; de Brito, Maria Edileuza Felinto; de Oliveira, Beatriz Coutinho; da Silva, Ailton Alvaro; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo Pompílio; Rezende, Antônio Mauro; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are neglected tropical diseases widespread throughout the globe, which are caused by protozoans from the genus Leishmania and are transmitted by infected phlebotomine flies. The development of a safe and effective vaccine against these diseases has been seen as the best alternative to control and reduce the number of cases. To support vaccine development, this work has applied an in silico approach to search for high potential peptide epitopes able to bind to different major histocompatibility complex Class I and Class II (MHC I and MHC II) molecules from different human populations. First, the predicted proteome of Leishmania braziliensis was compared and analyzed by modern linear programs to find epitopes with the capacity to trigger an immune response. This approach resulted in thousands of epitopes derived from 8,000 proteins conserved among different Leishmania species. Epitopes from proteins similar to those found in host species were excluded, and epitopes from proteins conserved between different Leishmania species and belonging to surface proteins were preferentially selected. The resulting epitopes were then clustered, to avoid redundancies, resulting in a total of 230 individual epitopes for MHC I and 2,319 for MHC II. These were used for molecular modeling and docking with MHC structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular docking then ranked epitopes based on their predicted binding affinity to both MHC I and II. Peptides corresponding to the top 10 ranked epitopes were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their capacity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from post-treated cutaneous leishmaniasis patients, with PBMC from healthy donors used as control. From the 10 peptides tested, 50% showed to be immunogenic and capable to stimulate the proliferation of lymphocytes from recovered individuals. PMID:27621732

  17. Combination of In Silico Methods in the Search for Potential CD4(+) and CD8(+) T Cell Epitopes in the Proteome of Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    E Silva, Rafael de Freitas; Ferreira, Luiz Felipe Gomes Rebello; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; de Brito, Maria Edileuza Felinto; de Oliveira, Beatriz Coutinho; da Silva, Ailton Alvaro; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo Pompílio; Rezende, Antônio Mauro; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are neglected tropical diseases widespread throughout the globe, which are caused by protozoans from the genus Leishmania and are transmitted by infected phlebotomine flies. The development of a safe and effective vaccine against these diseases has been seen as the best alternative to control and reduce the number of cases. To support vaccine development, this work has applied an in silico approach to search for high potential peptide epitopes able to bind to different major histocompatibility complex Class I and Class II (MHC I and MHC II) molecules from different human populations. First, the predicted proteome of Leishmania braziliensis was compared and analyzed by modern linear programs to find epitopes with the capacity to trigger an immune response. This approach resulted in thousands of epitopes derived from 8,000 proteins conserved among different Leishmania species. Epitopes from proteins similar to those found in host species were excluded, and epitopes from proteins conserved between different Leishmania species and belonging to surface proteins were preferentially selected. The resulting epitopes were then clustered, to avoid redundancies, resulting in a total of 230 individual epitopes for MHC I and 2,319 for MHC II. These were used for molecular modeling and docking with MHC structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular docking then ranked epitopes based on their predicted binding affinity to both MHC I and II. Peptides corresponding to the top 10 ranked epitopes were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their capacity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from post-treated cutaneous leishmaniasis patients, with PBMC from healthy donors used as control. From the 10 peptides tested, 50% showed to be immunogenic and capable to stimulate the proliferation of lymphocytes from recovered individuals. PMID:27621732

  18. The molecular relationship between antigenic domains and epitopes on hCG.

    PubMed

    Berger, Peter; Lapthorn, Adrian J

    2016-08-01

    Antigenic domains are defined to contain a limited number of neighboring epitopes recognized by antibodies (Abs) but their molecular relationship remains rather elusive. We thoroughly analyzed the antigenic surface of the important pregnancy and tumor marker human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a cystine knot (ck) growth factor, and set antigenic domains and epitopes in molecular relationships to each other. Antigenic domains on hCG, its free hCGα and hCGβ subunits are dependent on appropriate inherent molecular features such as molecular accessibility and protrusion indices that determine bulging structures accessible to Abs. The banana-shaped intact hCG comprises ∼7500Å(2) of antigenic surface with minimally five antigenic domains that encompass a continuum of overlapping non-linear composite epitopes, not taking into account the C-terminal peptide extension of hCGβ (hCGβCTP). Epitopes within an antigenic domain are defined by specific Abs, that bury nearly 1000Å(2) of surface accessible area on the antigen and recognize a few up to 15 amino acid (aa) residues, whereby between 2 and 5 of these provide the essential binding energy. Variability in Ab binding modes to the contact aa residues are responsible for the variation in affinity and intra- and inter-species specificity, e.g. cross-reactions with luteinizing hormone (LH). Each genetically distinct fragment antigen binding (Fab) defines its own epitope. Consequently, recognition of the same epitope by different Abs is only possible in cases of genetically identical sequences of its binding sites. Due to combinatorial V(D)J gene segment variability of heavy and light chains, Abs defining numerous epitopes within an antigenic domain can be generated by different individuals and species. Far more than hundred Abs against the immuno-dominant antigenic domains of either subunit at both ends of the hCG-molecule, the tips of peptide loops one and three (Ł1+3) protruding from the central ck, encompassing h

  19. Identification of a novel canine distemper virus B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Yuening; Zhang, Miao; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Wang, Jianke; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-02-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a member of the genus Morbillivirus within the family Paramyxoviridae and has caused severe economic losses in China. Nucleocapsid protein (N) is the major structural viral protein and can be used to diagnose CDV and other morbilliviruses. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, 1N8, was produced against the CDV N protein (amino acids 277-471). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. The results indicated that (350)LNFGRSYFDPA(360) was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb 1N8. ELISA assays revealed that mouse anti-CDV sera could also recognize the minimal linear epitope. Alignment analysis of the amino acid sequences indicated that the epitope was highly conserved among CDV strains. Furthermore, the epitope was conserved among other morbilliviruses, which was confirmed with PRRV using western blotting. Taken together, the results of this study may have potential applications in the development of suitable diagnostic techniques for CDV or other morbilliviruses. PMID:26514066

  20. Identification of T- and B-cell epitopes of the E7 protein of human papillomavirus type 16.

    PubMed Central

    Comerford, S A; McCance, D J; Dougan, G; Tite, J P

    1991-01-01

    There is strong evidence implicating human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) in the genesis of human genital cancer. Viral DNA has been identified in invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix and in cell lines derived from cervical carcinomas. These sequences are actively transcribed, and translation products corresponding to the early (E)-region genes have been identified. The most abundant viral protein is the E7 protein, which has been shown to possess transforming activity for both established and primary cells. In addition, it has been shown to bind to a cellular tumor suppressor, the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb-105). In view of these properties, we have undertaken the immunological analysis of this protein and have identified four T-cell epitopes and three B-cell epitopes by using a series of overlapping peptides spanning the entire HPV16 E7 sequence. Two of the B-cell epitopes were recognized by antisera from mice with three different murine (H-2) haplotypes (k, d, and s) immunized with two different E7 fusion proteins and from Fischer rats seeded with baby rat kidney cells transformed by HPV16 E7 and ras. A third B-cell epitope was recognized by antisera from CBA mice seeded with HPV16 E7-expressing L cells. Two regions of the protein contain common B- and T-cell epitopes, one of which appears to be particularly immunodominant. Images PMID:1714516

  1. Identification and characterization of B-cell epitopes of IpaC, an invasion-associated protein of Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Phalipon, A; Arondel, J; Nato, F; Rouyre, S; Mazie, J C; Sansonetti, P J

    1992-05-01

    Invasion plasmid antigen C (IpaC) is a 43-kDa plasmid-encoded protein associated with the ability of shigellae to invade epithelial cells. This protein is consistently strongly recognized by sera from convalescent patients and monkeys experimentally infected with shigellae. The strong immunogenicity of IpaC in the course of natural infection makes it a good candidate as a potentially protective antigen. To map the B-cell epitopes of this protein, the gene encoding IpaC was cloned and expressed at a high level in Escherichia coli. The partially purified recombinant protein was used to raise rabbit polyclonal antisera and murine monoclonal antibodies. A lambda gt11 ipaC gene library was screened with the antisera and antibodies. Recombinant DNA clones producing specific antigenic determinants were isolated, and the sequence of their DNA inserts was determined. The amino acid sequence of each determinant was deduced from the minimal overlap of DNA inserts of multiple antibody-positive DNA clones. Two distinct epitopes, located between amino acid residues 25 and 33 and 90 and 97, were identified. Two additional B-cell epitopes which were located between residues 297 and 349, near the carboxy-terminal end of the protein, were characterized. Each of these epitopes was also recognized by sera from convalescent humans and monkeys. Therefore, it seems likely that these epitopes are relevant to the humoral response against IpaC during natural infection. PMID:1373401

  2. Analysis of the immune response of a new malaria vaccine based on the modification of cryptic epitopes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Wang, Jun; Huang, Yuxiao; Liang, Jiao; Liu, Xuewu; Wu, Dudu; Jiang, He; Zhao, Ya; Li, Yinghui

    2016-05-01

    Malaria is a severe, life-threatening infectious disease that endangers human health. However, there are no vaccines or immune strategy of vaccines succeeding in both erythrocytic and pre-erythrocytic stage. During the liver stage of the Plasmodium life cycle, sporozoites invade the host liver cells. The sporozoites, then, induce a cellular immune response via the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on their surfaces. The cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) then recognize the corresponding antigen-MHC complex on the surfaces of these infected liver cells and kill them. However, dominant epitopes with high MHC affinity are prone to mutation due to immune selection pressure. CTLs evoked by the original dominant epitopes cannot recognize the mutated epitopes, leading to immune evasion. In this study, we have modified the cryptic epitopes of different antigens in the sporozoite and liver stages of Plasmodium falciparum to increase their immunogenicity without changing T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-peptide binding specificity. In addition, we have also added an important erythrocytic phase protective antigen, named apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1), to this process with the goal of constructing a complex multi-stage, multi-epitope recombinant DNA vaccine against P. falciparum. The vaccine was tested in HHD-2 mice. The method involved multiple stages of the P. falciparum life cycle as well as elucidation both humoral and cellular immunity. The conclusion drawn from the study was that the vaccine might provide an important theoretical and practical basis for generating effective preventative or therapeutic vaccine against P. falciparum. PMID:26833322

  3. The POM Monoclonals: A Comprehensive Set of Antibodies to Non-Overlapping Prion Protein Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Polymenidou, Magdalini; Moos, Rita; Scott, Mike; Sigurdson, Christina; Shi, Yong-zhong; Yajima, Bill; Hafner-Bratkovič, Iva; Jerala, Roman; Hornemann, Simone; Wuthrich, Kurt; Bellon, Anne; Vey, Martin; Garen, Graciela; James, Michael N. G.; Kav, Nat; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2008-01-01

    PrPSc, a misfolded and aggregated form of the cellular prion protein PrPC, is the only defined constituent of the transmissible agent causing prion diseases. Expression of PrPC in the host organism is necessary for prion replication and for prion neurotoxicity. Understanding prion diseases necessitates detailed structural insights into PrPC and PrPSc. Towards this goal, we have developed a comprehensive collection of monoclonal antibodies denoted POM1 to POM19 and directed against many different epitopes of mouse PrPC. Three epitopes are located within the N-terminal octarepeat region, one is situated within the central unstructured region, and four epitopes are discontinuous within the globular C-proximal domain of PrPC. Some of these antibodies recognize epitopes that are resilient to protease digestion in PrPSc. Other antibodies immunoprecipitate PrPC, but not PrPSc. A third group was found to immunoprecipitate both PrP isoforms. Some of the latter antibodies could be blocked with epitope-mimicking peptides, and incubation with an excess of these peptides allowed for immunochromatography of PrPC and PrPSc. Amino-proximal antibodies were found to react with repetitive PrPC epitopes, thereby vastly increasing their avidity. We have also created functional single-chain miniantibodies from selected POMs, which retained the binding characteristics despite their low molecular mass. The POM collection, thus, represents a unique set of reagents allowing for studies with a variety of techniques, including western blotting, ELISA, immunoprecipitation, conformation-dependent immunoassays, and plasmon surface plasmon resonance-based assays. PMID:19060956

  4. Physical detection of influenza A epitopes identifies a stealth subset on human lung epithelium evading natural CD8 immunity

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Derin B.; Reinhold, Bruce B.; Zhang, Guang Lan; Ivanov, Alexander R.; Karger, Barry L.; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines eliciting immunity against influenza A viruses (IAVs) are currently antibody-based with hemagglutinin-directed antibody titer the only universally accepted immune correlate of protection. To investigate the disconnection between observed CD8 T-cell responses and immunity to IAV, we used a Poisson liquid chromatography data-independent acquisition MS method to physically detect PR8/34 (H1N1), X31 (H3N2), and Victoria/75 (H3N2) epitopes bound to HLA-A*02:01 on human epithelial cells following in vitro infection. Among 32 PR8 peptides (8–10mers) with predicted IC50 < 60 nM, 9 were present, whereas 23 were absent. At 18 h postinfection, epitope copies per cell varied from a low of 0.5 for M13–11 to a high of >500 for M158–66 with PA, HA, PB1, PB2, and NA epitopes also detected. However, aside from M158–66, natural CD8 memory responses against conserved presented epitopes were either absent or only weakly observed by blood Elispot. Moreover, the functional avidities of the immunodominant M158–66/HLA-A*02:01-specific T cells were so poor as to be unable to effectively recognize infected human epithelium. Analysis of T-cell responses to primary PR8 infection in HLA-A*02:01 transgenic B6 mice underscores the poor avidity of T cells recognizing M158–66. By maintaining high levels of surface expression of this epitope on epithelial and dendritic cells, the virus exploits the combination of immunodominance and functional inadequacy to evade HLA-A*02:01-restricted T-cell immunity. A rational approach to CD8 vaccines must characterize processing and presentation of pathogen-derived epitopes as well as resultant immune responses. Correspondingly, vaccines may be directed against “stealth” epitopes, overriding viral chicanery. PMID:25646416

  5. Epitope mapping for monoclonal antibodies recognizing tuber necrotic isolates of Potato virus Y

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato virus Y (PVY) is an important viral pathogen of potato responsible for reducing tuber yield and quality across the globe. The PVYN and PVYNTN strains, the latter of which induces potato tuber necrotic ringspot disease (PTNRD), are regulated for international potato trade, and have been routin...

  6. Glycocalyx on Rabbit Intestinal M Cells Displays Carbohydrate Epitopes from Muc2

    PubMed Central

    Lelouard, Hugues; Reggio, Hubert; Roy, Christian; Sahuquet, Alain; Mangeat, Paul; Montcourrier, Philippe

    2001-01-01

    It is essential to investigate the apical surface properties of both M cells and dome enterocytes to understand the mechanisms involved in the binding of pathogens to M cells. In rabbit appendix tissue, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) highlight differences between M cells (MAb 58) and dome enterocytes (MAb 214). Such antibodies ultimately recognized intestinal mucin-related epitopes. To further characterize these differences, the labeling patterns obtained with these MAbs were compared to those obtained with other antibodies to intestinal mucins on dissected domes from all gut-associated lymphoid tissues. A glycoprotein recognized by MAb 58 was purified on a CsCl isopycnic density gradient and microsequenced, and its mRNA expression was localized by in situ hybridization. It was identified as the rabbit homologue of human Muc2, i.e., the major mucin secreted in intestine tissue. Two other Muc2 carbohydrate epitopes were also expressed on M cells, although Muc2 mRNA was not detected. All results indicated that M cells express, on their apical membrane, glycoconjugates bearing at least three glycosidic epitopes from Muc2. MAb 214 and MAb 6G2, which recognized a partially characterized mucin expressed on dome enterocytes, were negative markers for M cells in rabbit gut-associated lymphoid tissues. We propose that the presence, on the surface of M cells, of carbohydrates also expressed on Muc2, together with the absence of an enterocyte-associated mucin, could favor pathogen attachment and accessibility to the M-cell luminal membrane. PMID:11160003

  7. Glycocalyx on rabbit intestinal M cells displays carbohydrate epitopes from Muc2.

    PubMed

    Lelouard, H; Reggio, H; Roy, C; Sahuquet, A; Mangeat, P; Montcourrier, P

    2001-02-01

    It is essential to investigate the apical surface properties of both M cells and dome enterocytes to understand the mechanisms involved in the binding of pathogens to M cells. In rabbit appendix tissue, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) highlight differences between M cells (MAb 58) and dome enterocytes (MAb 214). Such antibodies ultimately recognized intestinal mucin-related epitopes. To further characterize these differences, the labeling patterns obtained with these MAbs were compared to those obtained with other antibodies to intestinal mucins on dissected domes from all gut-associated lymphoid tissues. A glycoprotein recognized by MAb 58 was purified on a CsCl isopycnic density gradient and microsequenced, and its mRNA expression was localized by in situ hybridization. It was identified as the rabbit homologue of human Muc2, i.e., the major mucin secreted in intestine tissue. Two other Muc2 carbohydrate epitopes were also expressed on M cells, although Muc2 mRNA was not detected. All results indicated that M cells express, on their apical membrane, glycoconjugates bearing at least three glycosidic epitopes from Muc2. MAb 214 and MAb 6G2, which recognized a partially characterized mucin expressed on dome enterocytes, were negative markers for M cells in rabbit gut-associated lymphoid tissues. We propose that the presence, on the surface of M cells, of carbohydrates also expressed on Muc2, together with the absence of an enterocyte-associated mucin, could favor pathogen attachment and accessibility to the M-cell luminal membrane. PMID:11160003

  8. Mapping of multiple HLA class II-restricted T-cell epitopes of the mycobacterial 70-kilodalton heat shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Oftung, F; Geluk, A; Lundin, K E; Meloen, R H; Thole, J E; Mustafa, A S; Ottenhoff, T H

    1994-01-01

    By combining a DNA subclone and synthetic-peptide approach, we mapped epitopes of the immunogenic mycobacterial 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) recognized by human CD4+ T-cell clones and lines. In addition, we identified the respective HLA-DR molecules used in antigen presentation. The donor groups used were healthy persons immunized with killed Mycobacterium leprae and tuberculoid leprosy patients. The results show that the N-terminal part of the HSP70 molecule contains three different T-cell epitopes, of which two were presented by DR7 (amino acids [aa] 66 to 82 and 210 to 226) and one was presented by DR3 (aa 262 to 274). The C-terminal part contains one epitope (aa 413 to 424) presented by HLA-DR2. The C-terminal epitope shows extensive homology to the corresponding region of the human HSP70 sequence. All of the T-cell epitopes identified were presented by only one particular HLA-DR molecule. We also found that HLA-DR5 and DRw53 can present HSP70 to T cells, demonstrating the presence of additional epitopes not yet defined at the peptide level. On the basis of the donors used in this study, recognition of HSP70 at the epitope level seems to be ruled by the restriction elements expressed by the donor rather than by any difference in reactivity between healthy individuals and patients. In conclusion, mycobacterial HSP70 is relevant to subunit vaccine design since it contains a variety of T-cell epitopes presented in the context of multiple HLA-DR molecules. PMID:7525484

  9. Characterization of specific antigenic epitopes and the nuclear export signal of the Porcine circovirus 2 ORF3 protein.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jinyan; Wang, Lun; Jin, Yulan; Lin, Cui; Wang, Huijuan; Zhou, Niu; Xing, Gang; Liao, Min; Zhou, Jiyong

    2016-02-29

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is the etiological agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. PCV2 ORF3 protein is a nonstructural protein known to induce apoptosis, but little is known about the biological function of ORF3 protein. Therefore, we undertook this study to map ORF3 protein epitopes recognized by a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and to characterize putative nuclear localization (NLS) and nuclear export (NES) sequences in ORF3. The linear epitopes targeted by two previously published mAbs 3B1 and 1H3 and a novel mouse mAb 3C3 were defined using overlapping pools of peptides. Here, we find that ORF3 in PCV2 infected cells contains a conformational epitope targeted by the antibody 3C3, which is distinct from linear epitopes recognized by the antibodies 3B1 and 1H3 in recombinant ORF3 protein. These results suggest that the linear epitope recognized by 3B1 and 1H3 is masked in PCV2 infected cells, and that the conformational epitope is unique to PCV2 infection. Furthermore, we find that ORF3 protein expressed in cytoplasm in early stages of PCV2 infection and then accumulated in nucleus over time. Moreover, we localize a NES at the N-terminus (residues 1-35aa) of ORF3 which plays critical role in nuclear export activity. These findings provide a novel insight that deepens our understanding of the biological function of PCV2 ORF3. PMID:26854343

  10. Fine mapping of canine parvovirus B cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    López de Turiso, J A; Cortés, E; Ranz, A; García, J; Sanz, A; Vela, C; Casal, J I

    1991-10-01

    In this report we describe the topological mapping of neutralizing domains of canine parvovirus (CPV). We obtained 11 CPV-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), six of which are neutralizing. The reactivities were as determined by ELISA and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. VP2, the most abundant protein of the CPV capsid, seemed to contain all the neutralization sites. Also, an almost full-length genomic clone of CPV was constructed in the bacterial plasmid pUC18 to enable expression of CPV proteins. All the neutralizing MAbs recognized recombinant VP2 when it was expressed as a free protein in Escherichia coli but not when expressed as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase. When two large fragments containing about 85% and 67% of the C terminus of VP2 were expressed, no neutralization sites were detected. When fusion proteins containing the N terminus were expressed, two linear determinants were mapped, one between residues 1 to 10 of VP2, and the other between amino acids 11 and 23. The peptide 11 GQPAVRNERATGS 23, recognized by MAb 3C9, was synthesized chemically and checked for immunogenicity, not being able to induce neutralizing activity. Although the antibody response in rabbits to all the fusion proteins was uniformly high, the anti-CPV response was very variable. Protein from pCPVEx11, which contains a T cell epitope (peptide PKIFINLAKKKKAG) present in the VP1-specific region as well as the B cell epitopes, seemed to be the most effective in inducing virus neutralization. PMID:1919526

  11. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against listeriolysin: mapping of epitopes involved in pore formation.

    PubMed Central

    Darji, A; Niebuhr, K; Hense, M; Wehland, J; Chakraborty, T; Weiss, S

    1996-01-01

    Six different mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and a specific rabbit polygonal antibody were raised against listeriolysin. Four of the MAbs also recognized seeligeriolysin, and five cross-reacted with ivanolysin. The hemolytic activity could be neutralized by the polygonal antibody as well as by five of the MAbs. None of the neutralizing antibodies interfered with the binding of listeriolysin to the cellular membrane. The epitopes recognized by the MAbs were localized by using overlapping synthetic peptides between positions 59 and 279, a region hitherto not implicated in mediating hemolytic activity. PMID:8675351

  12. Pathogenic Natural Antibodies Recognizing Annexin IV Are Required to Develop Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury1

    PubMed Central

    Kulik, Liudmila; Fleming, Sherry D.; Moratz, Chantal; Reuter, Jason W.; Novikov, Aleksey; Chen, Kuan; Andrews, Kathy A.; Markaryan, Adam; Quigg, Richard J.; Silverman, Gregg J.; Tsokos, George C.; Holers, V. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR)3 injury is initiated when natural IgM antibodies recognize neo-epitopes that are revealed on ischemic cells. The target molecules and mechanisms whereby these neo-epitopes become accessible to recognition are not well understood. Proposing that isolated intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) may carry IR-related neo-epitopes, we used in vitro IEC binding assays to screen hybridomas created from B cells of unmanipulated wild type C57BL/6 mice. We identified a novel IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb B4) that reacted with the surface of IEC by flow cytometric analysis and was alone capable of causing complement activation, neutrophil recruitment and intestinal injury in otherwise IR-resistant Rag1−/− mice. Monoclonal Ab B4 was found to specifically recognize mouse annexin IV. Pre-injection of recombinant annexin IV blocked IR injury in wild type C57BL/6 mice, demonstrating the requirement for recognition of this protein in order to develop IR injury in the context of a complex natural antibody repertoire. Humans were also found to exhibit IgM natural antibodies that recognize annexin IV. These data in toto identify annexin IV as a key ischemia-related target antigen that is recognized by natural Abs in a pathologic process required in vivo to develop intestinal IR injury. PMID:19380783

  13. Localization and Characterization of Flavivirus Envelope Glycoprotein Cross-Reactive Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Crill, Wayne D.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.

    2004-01-01

    The flavivirus E glycoprotein, the primary antigen that induces protective immunity, is essential for membrane fusion and mediates binding to cellular receptors. Human flavivirus infections stimulate virus species-specific as well as flavivirus cross-reactive immune responses. Flavivirus cross-reactive antibodies in human sera create a serious problem for serodiagnosis, especially for secondary flavivirus infections, due to the difficulty of differentiating primary from secondary cross-reactive serum antibodies. The presence of subneutralizing levels of flavivirus cross-reactive serum antibodies may result in a dramatic increase in the severity of secondary flavivirus infections via antibody-dependent enhancement. An understanding of flavivirus E-glycoprotein cross-reactive epitopes is therefore critical for improving public health responses to these serious diseases. We identified six E-glycoprotein residues that are incorporated into three distinct flavivirus cross-reactive epitopes. Two of these epitopes which are recognized by distinct monoclonal antibodies contain overlapping continuous residues located within the highly conserved fusion peptide. The third epitope consists of discontinuous residues that are structurally related to the strictly conserved tryptophan at dengue virus serotype 2 E-glycoprotein position 231. PMID:15564505

  14. Dissociation between Epitope Hierarchy and Immunoprevalence in CD8 Responses to Vaccinia Virus Western Reserve1

    PubMed Central

    Oseroff, Carla; Peters, Bjoern; Pasquetto, Valerie; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Sidney, John; Panchanathan, Vijay; Tscharke, David C.; Maillere, Bernard; Grey, Howard; Sette, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Understanding immunity to vaccinia virus (VACV) is important for the development of safer vaccines for smallpox- and poxvirus-vectored recombinant vaccines. VACV is also emerging as an outstanding model for studying CD8+ T cell immunodominance because of the large number of CD8+ T cell epitopes known for this virus in both mice and humans. In this study, we characterize the CD8+ T cell response in vaccinated BALB/c mice by a genome-wide mapping approach. Responses to each of 54 newly identified H-2d-restricted T cell epitopes could be detected after i.p. and dermal vaccination routes. Analysis of these new epitopes in the context of those already known for VACV in mice and humans revealed two important findings. First, CD8+ T cell epitopes are not randomly distributed across the VACV proteome, with some proteins being poorly or nonimmunogenic, while others are immunoprevalent, being frequently recognized across diverse MHC haplotypes. Second, some proteins constituted the major targets of the immune response by a specific haplotype as they recruited the majority of the specific CD8+ T cells but these proteins did not correspond to the immunoprevalent Ags. Thus, we found a dissociation between immunoprevalence and immunodominance, implying that different sets of rules govern these two phenomena. Together, these findings have clear implications for the design of CD8+ T cell subunit vaccines and in particular raise the exciting prospect of being able to choose subunits without reference to MHC restriction. PMID:18490718

  15. Identification of a promiscuous HLA DR-restricted T-cell epitope derived from the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin.

    PubMed

    Piesche, Matthias; Hildebrandt, York; Zettl, Florian; Chapuy, Björn; Schmitz, Marc; Wulf, Gerald; Trümper, Lorenz; Schroers, Roland

    2007-07-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin is a promising tumor-associated antigen specifically recognized by CD8+ cytotoxic effector T-lymphocytes (CTL). To improve current vaccines that aim to induce survivin-specific CTL, it is necessary to study the role of CD4+ T-helper (TH) and CD4+ T-regulatory (Treg) cells. Because both TH and Treg cells recognize antigens in the context of HLA-class II molecules, identification of HLA class II-associated peptide epitopes from survivin is required. Here, we analyzed T-cell responses against survivin using synthetic peptides predicted to serve as HLA-DR-restricted epitopes. Six peptides were shown to induce CD4+ T-cell responses, restricted by HLA-DR molecules. For one peptide epitope, SVN10, T-cell clones were demonstrated to be capable of recognizing naturally processed antigen. SVN10-specific T cells could be stimulated from the blood of healthy individuals and cancer patients with multiple HLA-DR genotypes. Thus the identified SVN10 epitope can be used to study the role of CD4+ TH and Treg cells in immune responses and possibly be included in a multivalent peptide vaccine against survivin. PMID:17584578

  16. Epitope mapping of B-cell determinants on the 15-kilodalton lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum (Tpp15) with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Baughn, R E; Demecs, M; Taber, L H; Musher, D M

    1996-01-01

    The antigenicity of the 15-kDa lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum (Tpp15 or TpN15) was comprehensively evaluated in epitope-scanning studies with overlapping deca- and octapeptides and polygonal rabbit and human infant immunoglobulins (Igs) and antisera. This approach enabled us to identify potentially important regions and to determine the optimal dilutions of Igs or antisera for use in further studies. IgM and IgG from both species were capable of recognizing multiple, continuous epitopes. A total of 13 peptides, principally clustered in the central regions of the protein, were recognized by all syphilitic sera and Ig fractions. On the basis of window analyses, frequency profiles, and alanine substitution studies, five heptapeptides were selected for mimetic studies. Two of these five immunodominant, continuous epitopes initially appeared to be species specific; however, antisera elicited against mimetics of all five epitopes were polyspecific, recognizing similar motifs on several other treponemal proteins, including those of avirulent organisms. The only mimetic which yielded positive reactions with infant IgM and syphilitic sera in the absence of cross-reactions with rabbit antisera to avirulent treponemes was the variant of the VMYASSG motif. These findings are relevant to the development of simple, inexpensive assays for the serodiagnosis of active syphilis. PMID:8698467

  17. Proteasomes generate spliced epitopes by two different mechanisms and as efficiently as non-spliced epitopes.

    PubMed

    Ebstein, F; Textoris-Taube, K; Keller, C; Golnik, R; Vigneron, N; Van den Eynde, B J; Schuler-Thurner, B; Schadendorf, D; Lorenz, F K M; Uckert, W; Urban, S; Lehmann, A; Albrecht-Koepke, N; Janek, K; Henklein, P; Niewienda, A; Kloetzel, P M; Mishto, M

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome-catalyzed peptide splicing represents an additional catalytic activity of proteasomes contributing to the pool of MHC-class I-presented epitopes. We here biochemically and functionally characterized a new melanoma gp100 derived spliced epitope. We demonstrate that the gp100(mel)47-52/40-42 antigenic peptide is generated in vitro and in cellulo by a not yet described proteasomal condensation reaction. gp100(mel)47-52/40-42 generation is enhanced in the presence of the β5i/LMP7 proteasome-subunit and elicits a peptide-specific CD8(+) T cell response. Importantly, we demonstrate that different gp100(mel)-derived spliced epitopes are generated and presented to CD8(+) T cells with efficacies comparable to non-spliced canonical tumor epitopes and that gp100(mel)-derived spliced epitopes trigger activation of CD8(+) T cells found in peripheral blood of half of the melanoma patients tested. Our data suggest that both transpeptidation and condensation reactions contribute to the frequent generation of spliced epitopes also in vivo and that their immune relevance may be comparable to non-spliced epitopes. PMID:27049119

  18. Proteasomes generate spliced epitopes by two different mechanisms and as efficiently as non-spliced epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ebstein, F.; Textoris-Taube, K.; Keller, C.; Golnik, R.; Vigneron, N.; Van den Eynde, B. J.; Schuler-Thurner, B.; Schadendorf, D.; Lorenz, F. K. M.; Uckert, W.; Urban, S.; Lehmann, A.; Albrecht-Koepke, N.; Janek, K.; Henklein, P.; Niewienda, A.; Kloetzel, P. M.; Mishto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome-catalyzed peptide splicing represents an additional catalytic activity of proteasomes contributing to the pool of MHC-class I-presented epitopes. We here biochemically and functionally characterized a new melanoma gp100 derived spliced epitope. We demonstrate that the gp100mel47–52/40–42 antigenic peptide is generated in vitro and in cellulo by a not yet described proteasomal condensation reaction. gp100mel47–52/40–42 generation is enhanced in the presence of the β5i/LMP7 proteasome-subunit and elicits a peptide-specific CD8+ T cell response. Importantly, we demonstrate that different gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes are generated and presented to CD8+ T cells with efficacies comparable to non-spliced canonical tumor epitopes and that gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes trigger activation of CD8+ T cells found in peripheral blood of half of the melanoma patients tested. Our data suggest that both transpeptidation and condensation reactions contribute to the frequent generation of spliced epitopes also in vivo and that their immune relevance may be comparable to non-spliced epitopes. PMID:27049119

  19. Identification and characterization of immunodominant linear epitopes on the antigenic region of a serine protease in newborn Trichinella larvae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Vallée, I; Lacour, S A; Boireau, P; Cheng, S P; Liu, M Y

    2016-03-01

    An immunodominant serine protease of Trichinella spiralis named NBL1 showed encouraging potential in early diagnosis of trichinellosis in pigs and elicited protective immune responses during infection of animals. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the specific epitopes on NBL protein recognized by the antibody responses of different susceptible hosts need to be defined. The present study described comprehensive mapping of immunodominant linear epitopes in the antigenic region (NBL-C, the C-terminal part of the protein) using various serum samples obtained from three kinds of hosts - pig, wild boar and mice. We identified six peptides which were commonly recognized by sera from pigs experimentally infected with Trichinella and pigs immunized with rNBL1-C; five and four peptides were recognized by sera from wild boars and mice infected with Trichinella, respectively. Three peptides (NBL1-6, -7 and -9) were commonly recognized by antisera in all three hosts, which share the sequence PSSGSRPTYP. We also found that one peptide (NBL1-12) was only recognized by antibodies from pigs immunized with rNBL1-C. The identification of specific epitopes targeted by the host antibody response is important both for understanding the natural response to infection and for the development of subunit vaccines and diagnostic tools for trichinellosis. PMID:25989815

  20. Generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes against immunorecessive epitopes after multiple immunizations with adenovirus vectors is dependent on haplotype.

    PubMed

    Sparer, T E; Wynn, S G; Clark, D J; Kaplan, J M; Cardoza, L M; Wadsworth, S C; Smith, A E; Gooding, L R

    1997-03-01

    Currently, adenovirus (Ad) is being considered as a vector for the treatment of cystic fibrosis as well as other diseases. However, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to Ad could limit the effectiveness of such approaches. Since the CTL response to virus infection is often focused on one or a few immunodominant epitopes, one approach to circumvent this response is to create vectors that lack these immunodominant epitopes. The effectiveness of this approach was tested by immunizing mice with human group C adenoviruses. Three mouse strains (C57BL/10SnJ [H-2b], C3HeB/FeJ [H-2k], and BALB/cByJ [H-2d]) were immunized with wild-type Ad or Ad vectors lacking the immunodominant antigen(s), and the CTL responses were measured. In C57BL/10 (B10) mice, a single inoculation intraperitoneally (i.p.) led to the recognition of an immunodominant antigen in E1A. When B10 mice were inoculated multiple times either i.p. or intranasally with wild-type Ad or an Ad vector lacking most of the E1 region, subdominant epitopes outside this region were recognized. In contrast, C3H mice inoculated with wild-type Ad recognized an epitope mapping within E1B. When inoculated twice with Ad vectors lacking both E1A and E1B, no immunorecessive epitopes were recognized. The immune response to Ad in BALB/c mice was more complex. CTLs from BALB/c mice inoculated i.p. with wild-type Ad recognized E1B in the context of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I Dd allele and a region outside E1 associated with the Kd allele. When BALB/c mice were inoculated with E1-deleted Ad vectors, only the immunodominant Kd-restricted epitope was recognized, and Dd-restricted CTLs did not develop. This report indicates that the emergence of CTLs against immunorecessive epitopes following multiple administrations of Ad vectors lacking immunodominant antigens is dependent on haplotype and could present an obstacle to gene therapy in an MHC-diverse human population. PMID:9032363

  1. The Relationship between B-cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint. PMID:26715528

  2. The epitope analysis of an antibody specifically against Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa by phage library study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shiliang; Lin, Zhen; Liu, Xinfeng; Zheng, Wen; Lu, Gang; Tu, Zhiguang; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Jian; Yu, Xiaolin

    2015-10-01

    To prevent epidemic and pandemic cholera disease, an indispensible approach is to develop cholera vaccines based on comprehensive epitope information of this pathogen. This study aimed to utilize our previously raised monoclonal antibody IXiao3G6, which can recognize an epitope in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sites of Ogawa, to identify mimetic peptides, which may represent Ogawa LPS's epitope information. A phage display library screening using IXiao3G6 antibody resulted in identification of a mimic peptide (MP) with high avidity. A recombinant protein, containing one cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) and two MP repeats (CTB-(MP)2), was subsequently constructed and investigated for its immunological characteristics. The findings collectively demonstrated that the MP presenting phages and CTB-(MP)2 recombinant protein were both capable of inhibiting the interaction between IXiao3G6 and Ogawa/Ogawa LPS specifically in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:26172085

  3. Establishment of Schistosoma japonicum calpain-specific mouse T cell hybridomas and identification of a T cell epitope that stimulates IFNgamma production.

    PubMed

    Osada, Yoshio; Kumagai, Takashi; Hato, Mariko; Suzuki, Takashi; El-Malky, Mohamed; Asahi, Hiroko; Kanazawa, Tamotsu; Ohta, Nobuo

    2005-04-15

    Calpain is a calcium-dependent cystein protease, and the homologues of schistosome are known as one of vaccine candidate molecules against schistosomiasis. Here, we established two IL-2 producing T cell hybridoma cell lines specific for Schistosoma japonicum calpain, to identify T cell epitope(s) on the molecule. Overlapping 15mer oligopeptides of calpain were synthesized and tested for their stimulatory abilities to the hybridomas. As a result, epitopes recognized by the two hybridoma lines were the same: EQLKIYAQRC. Spleen cells from calpain multiple antigenic peptide (MAP)-immunized BALB/c mice produced IFNgamma upon stimulation with MAP or soluble worm antigen preparation (SWAP). The identification of the T cell epitope to stimulate Th1 response will contribute to the proper design of synthetic vaccines, evaluation of their protective potentials and elucidation of protective mechanisms in murine experimental schistosomiasis. PMID:15780729

  4. Lipophosphoglycan and secreted acid phosphatase of Leishmania tropica share species-specific epitopes.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, C L; Perez, L; Schnur, L F

    1990-06-01

    Several species-specific monoclonal antibodies (T11, T13-T15) which only react with Leishmania tropica, recognize phosphorlated carbohydrate epitopes on lipophosphoglycan and the structurally related molecule, phosphoglycan, which is shed by promastigotes into spent culture medium. During immunoaffinity isolation of [32P]orthophosphate-labeled phosphoglycan on monoclonal antibody T15 conjugated to Sepharose 4B, a high-Mr component (approx. 200,000) was co-purified. The latter material is metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine and [3H]glucosamine. This glycoprotein was separated from phosphoglycan by chromatography on lentil lectin resin. The glycoprotein exhibited a L-tatrate-sensitive acid phosphatase activity, typical of secreted acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) from Leishmania. Monospecific antibodies to Leishmania donovani-secreted acid phosphatase selectively precipitated the L. tropica enzyme from immunoaffinity purified mixtures of the two antigens, and monoclonal antibodies to lipophosphoglycan precipitate the pure enzyme. Species-specific monoclonal antibodies to L. major lipophosphoglycan also recognized both L. tropica antigens. Treatment of the acid phosphatase with periodate or phosphodiesterase I abolished binding by the monoclonal antibodies to the pure enzyme. These results demonstrate that the two major secreted glycoconjugates of Leishmania tropica, the lipophosphoglycan and the acid phosphatase, share species-specific phosphorylated carbohydrate epitope(s). PMID:1697935

  5. A Chimeric Pneumovirus Fusion Protein Carrying Neutralizing Epitopes of Both MPV and RSV

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaolin; Pickens, Jennifer; Mousa, Jarrod J.; Leser, George P.; Lamb, Robert A.; Crowe, James E.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) are paramyxoviruses that are responsible for substantial human health burden, particularly in children and the elderly. The fusion (F) glycoproteins are major targets of the neutralizing antibody response and studies have mapped dominant antigenic sites in F. Here we grafted a major neutralizing site of RSV F, recognized by the prophylactic monoclonal antibody palivizumab, onto HMPV F, generating a chimeric protein displaying epitopes of both viruses. We demonstrate that the resulting chimeric protein (RPM-1) is recognized by both anti-RSV and anti-HMPV F neutralizing antibodies indicating that it can be used to map the epitope specificity of antibodies raised against both viruses. Mice immunized with the RPM-1 chimeric antigen generate robust neutralizing antibody responses to MPV but weak or no cross-reactive recognition of RSV F, suggesting that grafting of the single palivizumab epitope stimulates a comparatively limited antibody response. The RPM-1 protein provides a new tool for characterizing the immune responses resulting from RSV and HMPV infections and provides insights into the requirements for developing a chimeric subunit vaccine that could induce robust and balanced immunity to both virus infections. PMID:27224013

  6. Myelin basic protein-specific T lymphocyte repertoire in multiple sclerosis. Complexity of the response and dominance of nested epitopes due to recruitment of multiple T cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    Meinl, E; Weber, F; Drexler, K; Morelle, C; Ott, M; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G; Goebels, N; Ertl, B; Jechart, G; Giegerich, G

    1993-01-01

    The human T cell response to the myelin basic protein (MBP) has been studied with respect to T cell receptor (TCR) usage, HLA class II restriction elements, and epitope specificity using a total of 215 long-term MBP-specific T cell lines (TCL) isolated from the peripheral blood of 13 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 10 healthy donors. In most donors, the anti-MBP response was exceedingly heterogeneous. Using a panel of overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the entire length of human MBP, at least 26 epitopes recognized by human TCL could be distinguished. The MBP domain most commonly recognized was sequence 80-105 (31% of MS TCL, and 24% of control TCL). Sequence 29-48 was recognized more frequently by control-derived TCL (24%) than by TCL from MS patients (5%). The MBP epitopes were recognized in the context of DRB1 *0101, DRB5*0101, DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301, DRB1*0401, DRB1*1402, and DRB3*0102, as demonstrated using a panel of DR gene-transfected L cells. The TCR gene usage was also heterogeneous. V beta 5.2, a peptide of which is currently being used in a clinical trial for treatment of MS patients, was expressed by only one of our TCL. However, within this complex pattern of MBP-specific T cell responses, a minority of MS patients were found to exhibit a more restricted response with respect to their TCL epitope specificity. In these patients 75-87% of the TCL responded to a single, patient-specific cluster of immunodominant T cell epitopes located within a small (20-amino acid) domain of MBP. These nested clusters of immunodominant epitopes were noted within the amino acids 80-105, 108-131, and 131-153. The T cell response to the immunodominant epitopes was not monoclonal, but heterogeneous, with respect to fine specificity, TCR usage, and even HLA restriction. In one patient (H.K.), this restricted epitope profile remained stable for > 2 yr. The TCR beta chain sequences of TCL specific for the immunodominant region of HK are consistent with an

  7. Superior Control of HIV-1 Replication by CD8+ T Cells Targeting Conserved Epitopes: Implications for HIV Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Pratima; Hawkins, Natalie; Dinges, Warren L.; Liu, Yi; Gabriel, Erin E.; Swan, David A.; Stevens, Claire E.; Maenza, Janine; Collier, Ann C.; Mullins, James I.; Hertz, Tomer; Yu, Xuesong; Horton, Helen

    2013-01-01

    A successful HIV vaccine will likely induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, however, the enormous diversity of HIV has hampered the development of a vaccine that effectively elicits both arms of the adaptive immune response. To tackle the problem of viral diversity, T cell-based vaccine approaches have focused on two main strategies (i) increasing the breadth of vaccine-induced responses or (ii) increasing vaccine-induced responses targeting only conserved regions of the virus. The relative extent to which set-point viremia is impacted by epitope-conservation of CD8+ T cell responses elicited during early HIV-infection is unknown but has important implications for vaccine design. To address this question, we comprehensively mapped HIV-1 CD8+ T cell epitope-specificities in 23 ART-naïve individuals during early infection and computed their conservation score (CS) by three different methods (prevalence, entropy and conseq) on clade-B and group-M sequence alignments. The majority of CD8+ T cell responses were directed against variable epitopes (p<0.01). Interestingly, increasing breadth of CD8+ T cell responses specifically recognizing conserved epitopes was associated with lower set-point viremia (r = - 0.65, p = 0.009). Moreover, subjects possessing CD8+ T cells recognizing at least one conserved epitope had 1.4 log10 lower set-point viremia compared to those recognizing only variable epitopes (p = 0.021). The association between viral control and the breadth of conserved CD8+ T cell responses may be influenced by the method of CS definition and sequences used to determine conservation levels. Strikingly, targeting variable versus conserved epitopes was independent of HLA type (p = 0.215). The associations with viral control were independent of functional avidity of CD8+ T cell responses elicited during early infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the next-generation of T-cell based HIV-1 vaccines should focus on strategies that

  8. Superior control of HIV-1 replication by CD8+ T cells targeting conserved epitopes: implications for HIV vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Kunwar, Pratima; Hawkins, Natalie; Dinges, Warren L; Liu, Yi; Gabriel, Erin E; Swan, David A; Stevens, Claire E; Maenza, Janine; Collier, Ann C; Mullins, James I; Hertz, Tomer; Yu, Xuesong; Horton, Helen

    2013-01-01

    A successful HIV vaccine will likely induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, however, the enormous diversity of HIV has hampered the development of a vaccine that effectively elicits both arms of the adaptive immune response. To tackle the problem of viral diversity, T cell-based vaccine approaches have focused on two main strategies (i) increasing the breadth of vaccine-induced responses or (ii) increasing vaccine-induced responses targeting only conserved regions of the virus. The relative extent to which set-point viremia is impacted by epitope-conservation of CD8(+) T cell responses elicited during early HIV-infection is unknown but has important implications for vaccine design. To address this question, we comprehensively mapped HIV-1 CD8(+) T cell epitope-specificities in 23 ART-naïve individuals during early infection and computed their conservation score (CS) by three different methods (prevalence, entropy and conseq) on clade-B and group-M sequence alignments. The majority of CD8(+) T cell responses were directed against variable epitopes (p<0.01). Interestingly, increasing breadth of CD8(+) T cell responses specifically recognizing conserved epitopes was associated with lower set-point viremia (r = - 0.65, p = 0.009). Moreover, subjects possessing CD8(+) T cells recognizing at least one conserved epitope had 1.4 log10 lower set-point viremia compared to those recognizing only variable epitopes (p = 0.021). The association between viral control and the breadth of conserved CD8(+) T cell responses may be influenced by the method of CS definition and sequences used to determine conservation levels. Strikingly, targeting variable versus conserved epitopes was independent of HLA type (p = 0.215). The associations with viral control were independent of functional avidity of CD8(+) T cell responses elicited during early infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the next-generation of T-cell based HIV-1 vaccines should focus on

  9. Identification of autoantigens recognized by the 2F5 and 4E10 broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Holl, T. Matt; Liu, Yang; Li, Yi; Lu, Xiaozhi; Nicely, Nathan I.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Alam, S. Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Cain, Derek W.; Spicer, Leonard; VandeBerg, John L.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2013-01-01

    Many human monoclonal antibodies that neutralize multiple clades of HIV-1 are polyreactive and bind avidly to mammalian autoantigens. Indeed, the generation of neutralizing antibodies to the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of HIV-1 gp41 in man may be proscribed by immune tolerance because mice expressing the VH and VL regions of 2F5 have a block in B cell development that is characteristic of central tolerance. This developmental blockade implies the presence of tolerizing autoantigens that are mimicked by the membrane-proximal external region of HIV-1 gp41. We identify human kynureninase (KYNU) and splicing factor 3b subunit 3 (SF3B3) as the primary conserved, vertebrate self-antigens recognized by the 2F5 and 4E10 antibodies, respectively. 2F5 binds the H4 domain of KYNU which contains the complete 2F5 linear epitope (ELDKWA). 4E10 recognizes an epitope of SF3B3 that is strongly dependent on hydrophobic interactions. Opossums carry a rare KYNU H4 domain that abolishes 2F5 binding, but they retain the SF3B3 4E10 epitope. Immunization of opossums with HIV-1 gp140 induced extraordinary titers of serum antibody to the 2F5 ELDKWA epitope but little or nothing to the 4E10 determinant. Identification of structural motifs shared by vertebrates and HIV-1 provides direct evidence that immunological tolerance can impair humoral responses to HIV-1. PMID:23359068

  10. Identification of a highly conserved and surface exposed B-cell epitope on the nucleoprotein of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Gui, Xun; Ge, Pinghui; Wang, Xuliang; Yang, Kunyu; Yu, Hai; Zhao, Qinjian; Chen, Yixin; Xia, Ningshao

    2014-06-01

    Influenza virus still poses a major threat to human health worldwide. The nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza A virus plays an essential role in the viral replication and transcription and hence becomes a promising therapeutic target. NP forms a complicated conformation under native conditions and might denature when performing immunoassays such as western blot in the study of NP function. Therefore, it is useful to make an NP specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognizes linear epitope instead of conformational epitope. In this study, a recombinant NP (rNP) of influenza A virus was over-expressed and used to generate a panel of anti-NP mAbs. These anti-NP mAbs were grouped into three classes based on their reactivity in Western blots. Only Class I mAb can react with linear rNP fragments. One of Class I mAb, 4D2, was characterized further by epitope mapping with a series of overlapping synthetic peptides, indicating that the 4D2 epitope is a surface exposed, linear epitope between amino acid residues 243 and 251. This epitope is highly conserved among different influenza A viruses with an identity of 98.4% (17,922/18,210). Western blot, co-immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry experiments all indicated 4D2 is highly specific to NP of influenza A virus. The results demonstrated that 4D2 can be used as a research tool for functional study of NP in the replication cycle of influenza A virus. Further work is needed to understand the function and importance of this epitope. PMID:24136709